National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fuel sup ply

  1. With the increasing needs to incorporate more complex mixed-signal controller for switched mode power sup-plies, Smart Power ICs designers need to examine various considerations for the implementation of integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeMara, Ronald F.

    power sup- plies, Smart Power ICs designers need to examine various considerations for the implementation of integrated DC-DC converters, including switched-mode power supply topology, digital versus integrated switch-mode power supplies (SMPS) and integrated class-D audio power amplifiers. After obtaining

  2. Physical characteristics of LWRs and SCLWRs loaded by ({sup 233}U-Th-{sup 238}U) oxide fuel with small additions of {sup 231}Pa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulikov, E.G.; Shmelev, A.N.; Apse, V.A. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute - State University, Kashirskoe shosse, 31, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kulikov, G.G. [International Science and Technology Center, Krasnoproletarskaya ul., 32-34, P.0. Box 20, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    The paper investigates the possibility and attractiveness of using (U-Th) fuel in light-water reactors (LWRs) and in light-water reactors with super-critical coolant parameters (SCLWRs). It is proposed to dilute {sup 233}U with {sup 238}U to enhance the proliferation resistance of this fissionable isotope. If is noteworthy that she idea was put forward for the first time by she well known American physicist and participant of the Manhattan Project Dr. T. Taylor. Various fuel compositions are analyzed and compared on fuel breeding, achievable values of fuel burn-up and cross-sections of parasitic neutron absorption. It is also demonstrated that small {sup 231}Pa additions (several percent) into the fuel allows: to increase fuel burn-up, to achieve more negative temperature reactivity coefficient of coolant and to enhance nonproliferation of the fuel. (authors)

  3. 22 IEEE power & energy magazine march/april 2011 THE SECURITY OF ENERGY SUP-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    22 IEEE power & energy magazine march/april 2011 T THE SECURITY OF ENERGY SUP- ply has become in energy security and natu- ral disasters have been conducted around the world. Research cen- ters have on a continuous energy supply, but our complete style of living collapses when energy fails. Surges in fuel prices

  4. Abundance of {sup 14}C in biomass fractions of wastes and solid recovered fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellner, Johann Rechberger, Helmut

    2009-05-15

    In recent years thermal utilization of mixed wastes and solid recovered fuels has become of increasing importance in European waste management. Since wastes or solid recovered fuels are generally composed of fossil and biogenic materials, only part of the CO{sub 2} emissions is accounted for in greenhouse gas inventories or emission trading schemes. A promising approach for determining this fraction is the so-called radiocarbon method. It is based on different ratios of the carbon isotopes {sup 14}C and {sup 12}C in fossil and biogenic fuels. Fossil fuels have zero radiocarbon, whereas biogenic materials are enriched in {sup 14}C and reflect the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} abundance of the ambient atmosphere. Due to nuclear weapons tests in the past century, the radiocarbon content in the atmosphere has not been constant, which has resulted in a varying {sup 14}C content of biogenic matter, depending on the period of growth. In the present paper {sup 14}C contents of different biogenic waste fractions (e.g., kitchen waste, paper, wood), as well as mixtures of different wastes (household, bulky waste, and commercial waste), and solid recovered fuels are determined. The calculated {sup 14}C content of the materials investigated ranges between 98 and 135 pMC.

  5. Estimation of average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors by using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endo, T.; Sato, S.; Yamamoto, A.

    2012-07-01

    Average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors is estimated, using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method for measured radioactivities of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs in contaminated soils within the range of 100 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants. As a result, the measured {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio from the contaminated soil is 0.996{+-}0.07 as of March 11, 2011. Based on the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method, the estimated burnup of damaged fuels is approximately 17.2{+-}1.5 [GWd/tHM]. It is noted that the numerical results of various calculation codes (SRAC2006/PIJ, SCALE6.0/TRITON, and MVP-BURN) are almost the same evaluation values of {sup 134}Cs/ {sup 137}Cs ratio with same evaluated nuclear data library (ENDF-B/VII.0). The void fraction effect in depletion calculation has a major impact on {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio compared with the differences between JENDL-4.0 and ENDF-B/VII.0. (authors)

  6. Modeling of Selected Ceramic Processing Parameters Employed in the Fabrication of <sup>238sup>PuO2 Fuel Pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockman, R. A. [Univ. of Dayton, OH (United States); Kramer, Daniel P. [Univ. of Dayton, OH (United States); Barklay, Chadwick D. [Univ. of Dayton, OH (United States); Cairns-Gallimore, Dirk [U.S. Department of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States); Brown, J. L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Huling, J. C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); van Pelt, C. E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Recent deep space missions utilize the thermal output of the radioisotope plutonium-238 as the fuel in the thermal to electrical power system. Since the application of plutonium in its elemental state has several disadvantages, the fuel employed in these deep space power systems is typically in the oxide form such as plutonium-238 dioxide (<sup>238sup>PuO2). As an oxide, the processing of the plutonium dioxide into fuel pellets is performed via ''classical'' ceramic processing unit operations such as sieving of the powder, pressing, sintering, etc. Modeling of these unit operations can be beneficial in the understanding and control of processing parameters with the goal of further enhancing the desired characteristics of the <sup>238sup>PuO2 fuel pellets. A finite element model has been used to help identify the time-temperature-stress profile within a pellet during a furnace operation taking into account that <sup>238sup>PuO2 itself has a significant thermal output. Results of the modeling efforts will be discussed.

  7. IMHEX{sup {reg_sign}} fuel cells progress toward commercialization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scroppo, J.A.; Laurens, R.M.; Petraglia, V.J.

    1995-12-31

    The overall goal of M-C Power is the development and subsequent commercialization of Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) stacks. More specifically, MCFC`s Manifolded Heat Exchange (IMHEX{sup {reg_sign}}) plate design created by the Institute of Technology. In order to achieve the aforementioned goal, M-C Power assembled a formidable team of industry leaders. This group, refered to as the (IHMEX{sup {reg_sign}}) Team, has developed a strategy to move decisively through the stages of Technology Development and Product Design and Improvement through commercialization. This paper is to review the status of the overall commercialization program and activities. It will also provide an overview of the market entry product. Furthermore, we will evaluate the opportunities and benefits this product brings to a competitive power industry.

  8. Radioactive Waste Management at the New Conversion Facility of 'TVEL'{sup R} Fuel Company - 13474

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Indyk, S.I.; Volodenko, A.V. [JSC 'TVEL', Russia, Moscow, 49 Kashirskoye Shosse, 115409 (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'TVEL', Russia, Moscow, 49 Kashirskoye Shosse, 115409 (Russian Federation); Tvilenev, K.A.; Tinin, V.V.; Fateeva, E.V. [JSC 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises', Russia, Seversk, 1 Kurchatov Street, 636000 (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises', Russia, Seversk, 1 Kurchatov Street, 636000 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    The project on the new conversion facility construction is being implemented by Joint Stock Company (JSC) 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises' (SGChE) within TVEL{sup R} Fuel Company. The objective is to construct the up-to-date facility ensuring the industrial and environmental safety with the reduced impact on the community and environment in compliance with the Russian new regulatory framework on radioactive waste (RW) management. The history of the SGChE development, as well as the concepts and approaches to RW management implemented by now are shown. The SGChE future image is outlined, together with its objectives and concept on RW management in compliance with the new act 'On radioactive waste management' adopted in Russia in 2011. Possible areas of cooperation with international companies are discussed in the field of RW management with the purpose of deploying the best Russian and world practices on RW management at the new conversion facility. (authors)

  9. AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant safety overview for spent fuel cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorgemans, J.; Mulhollem, L.; Glavin, J.; Pfister, A.; Conway, L.; Schulz, T.; Oriani, L.; Cummins, E.; Winters, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The AP1000{sup R} plant is an 1100-MWe class pressurized water reactor with passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications that enhance construction, operation, maintenance, safety and costs. The AP1000 design uses passive features to mitigate design basis accidents. The passive safety systems are designed to function without safety-grade support systems such as AC power, component cooling water, service water or HVAC. Furthermore, these passive features 'fail safe' during a non-LOCA event such that DC power and instrumentation are not required. The AP1000 also has simple, active, defense-in-depth systems to support normal plant operations. These active systems provide the first level of defense against more probable events and they provide investment protection, reduce the demands on the passive features and support the probabilistic risk assessment. The AP1000 passive safety approach allows the plant to achieve and maintain safe shutdown in case of an accident for 72 hours without operator action, meeting the expectations provided in the U.S. Utility Requirement Document and the European Utility Requirements for passive plants. Limited operator actions are required to maintain safe conditions in the spent fuel pool via passive means. In line with the AP1000 approach to safety described above, the AP1000 plant design features multiple, diverse lines of defense to ensure spent fuel cooling can be maintained for design-basis events and beyond design-basis accidents. During normal and abnormal conditions, defense-in-depth and other systems provide highly reliable spent fuel pool cooling. They rely on off-site AC power or the on-site standby diesel generators. For unlikely design basis events with an extended loss of AC power (i.e., station blackout) or loss of heat sink or both, spent fuel cooling can still be provided indefinitely: - Passive systems, requiring minimal or no operator actions, are sufficient for at least 72 hours under all possible pool heat load conditions. - After 3 days, several different means are provided to continue spent fuel cooling using installed plant equipment as well as off-site equipment with built-in connections. Even for beyond design basis accidents with postulated pool damage and multiple failures in the passive safety-related systems and in the defense-in-depth active systems, the AP1000 multiple spent fuel pool spray and fill systems provide additional lines of defense to prevent spent fuel damage. (authors)

  10. Preliminary results of calculations for heavy-water nuclear-power-plant reactors employing {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 232}Th as a fuel and meeting requirements of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ioffe, B. L.; Kochurov, B. P. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-15

    A physical design is developed for a gas-cooled heavy-water nuclear reactor intended for a project of a nuclear power plant. As a fuel, the reactor would employ thorium with a small admixture of enriched uranium that contains not more than 20% of {sup 235}U. It operates in the open-cycle mode involving {sup 233}U production from thorium and its subsequent burnup. The reactor meets the conditions of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons: the content of fissionable isotopes in uranium at all stages of the process, including the final one, is below the threshold for constructing an atomic bomb, the amount of product plutonium being extremely small.

  11. Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanch, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    2006) Trends in Oil Sup-ply and Demand, the Potential forthe U.S. As world demand increases, oil reserves may become

  12. L3:RTM.SUP.P9.01 Resonance Self-shielding Method for Fuel Annular

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse Bergkamp Graduate student Subtask 4Photo4>EC.P9.05SUP.P9.01 Resonance

  13. Delamination at Thick Ply Drops in Carbon and Glass Fiber Laminates Under Fatigue Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    literature, for the wind turbine blade application the effects of thicker plies and lower cost processing resin system, containing various ply drop geometries, and using thicker plies typical of wind turbine used for glass fibers in wind turbine blades. Introduction The primary structural elements in most wind

  14. A 48-month extended fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erighin, M. A. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, 109 Ramsey Place, Lynchburg, VA 24502 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small, rail-shippable pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and an electric power output of 150 MW, which is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height, but otherwise standard, PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array on a 21.5 cm inter-assembly pitch. The B and W mPower core design and cycle management plan, which were performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, follow the pattern of a typical nuclear reactor fuel cycle design and analysis performed by most nuclear fuel management organizations, such as fuel vendors and utilities. However, B and W is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for four years of continuous power operations without refueling and without the hurdles of chemical shim. (authors)

  15. Ultrasonic ply-by-ply detection of matrix cracks in laminated composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganpatye, Atul Shridatta

    2005-02-17

    In the design of cryogenic fuel tanks for the next generation Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLVs), the permeability of liquid hydrogen (LH2) across the thickness of the tank is a critical issue. The rate of permeation of LH2 is largely dependent...

  16. Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Hayley

    2013-01-01

    energy sup- plies and developing relations with numerous fossil fuel exporting coun- tries, including Venezuela, Nigeria,

  17. An extended conventional fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarangella, M. J. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, 109 Ramsey Place, Lynchburg, VA 24502 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and a thermal output of about 500 MW; it is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array. The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for a four-year cycle based on its presumed attractiveness to potential customers. This option is a once-through fuel cycle in which the entire core is discharged and replaced after four years. In addition, a conventional fuel utilization strategy, employing a periodic partial reload and shuffle, was developed as an alternative to the four-year once-through fuel cycle. This study, which was performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, is a typical multi-cycle projection analysis of the type performed by most fuel management organizations such as fuel vendors and utilities. In the industry, the results of such projections are used by the financial arms of these organizations to assist in making long-term decisions. In the case of the B and W mPower reactor, this analysis demonstrates flexibility for customers who consider the once-through fuel cycle unacceptable from a fuel utilization standpoint. As expected, when compared to the once-through concept, reloads of the B and W mPower reactor will achieve higher batch average discharge exposure, will have adequate shut-down margin, and will have a relatively flat hot excess reactivity trend at the expense of slightly increased peaking. (authors)

  18. Request for Alternative Activity for PLI Credit Last Name First Name M.I.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    Request for Alternative Activity for PLI Credit Full Name: Last Name First Name M.I. Email Address information for Coordinator of Program: Requesting Alternate Activity credit for which PLI Track (Choose one): Verification Information Email Address: College of Engineering Student Information Alternate Activity

  19. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)K-> and B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)?-> decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T. [Helsinki Inst. of Physics; Gonzalez, Alvarez B. [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S. [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D. [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A. [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A. [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Appel, J. A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A. [Purdue; Arisawa, T. [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

    2011-08-01

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)K-> and B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)?-> decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb<sup>-1sup> of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)K-> suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10<sup>-3sup>, R<sup>+>(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10<sup>-3sup>, R<sup>->(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10<sup>-3sup> as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B<sup>-> ? D(? K<sup>+?-)?-> decay are also reported.

  20. Uncertainty analysis on reactivity and discharged inventory for a pressurized water reactor fuel assembly due to {sup 235,238}U nuclear data uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Da Cruz, D. F.; Rochman, D.; Koning, A. J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG, Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    This paper discusses the uncertainty analysis on reactivity and inventory for a typical PWR fuel element as a result of uncertainties in {sup 235,238}U nuclear data. A typical Westinghouse 3-loop fuel assembly fuelled with UO{sub 2} fuel with 4.8% enrichment has been selected. The Total Monte-Carlo method has been applied using the deterministic transport code DRAGON. This code allows the generation of the few-groups nuclear data libraries by directly using data contained in the nuclear data evaluation files. The nuclear data used in this study is from the JEFF3.1 evaluation, and the nuclear data files for {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U (randomized for the generation of the various DRAGON libraries) are taken from the nuclear data library TENDL. The total uncertainty (obtained by randomizing all {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U nuclear data in the ENDF files) on the reactor parameters has been split into different components (different nuclear reaction channels). Results show that the TMC method in combination with a deterministic transport code constitutes a powerful tool for performing uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of reactor physics parameters. (authors)

  1. Role of delamination and interlaminar fatigue in the failure of laminates with ply dropoffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shim, Dong Jin, 1972-

    2002-01-01

    Analytical and experimental investigations were conducted on laminates with ply dropoffs to better understand the interlaminar stress field and delamination/damage characteristics in such laminates, as well as the relationship ...

  2. Residual thermal stresses in an unsymmetrical cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Brian Douglas

    1980-01-01

    RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in parrial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Approved as to style and content by: r. Y. N itsman (Chair of Committee) Dr...

  3. Hygrothermal effects in an anti-symmetric cross-ply graphite/epoxy material 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Steven Paul

    1984-01-01

    HYGROTHERMAL EFFECTS IN AN ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY MATERIAL A Thesis STEVEN PAUL JACKSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SC...'IENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering HYGROTHERMAL ~S IN AN ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis STEVE? PAUL JACKSON Approved as to style and content by: (Y. eitsman, Charrman) (W. L. Bradley, M (W. E. Haisler...

  4. Failure Criterion for Two-Ply Plain-Weave CFRP Laminates H.M.Y.C. Mallikarachchi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    -ply plain-weave lami- nates of carbon-fiber reinforced plastic. The criterion is formulated in terms of six-strain-energy composite deployable booms with tape-spring hinges made from a two-ply laminate of plain weave carbon fiber in the distribution and arrangement of the fibers that are responsible for stress concen- trations. These effects

  5. Mod`ele Elements Finis d'un Pli Vocal Artificiel avec Couplage Hydro-elastique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mod`ele El´ements Finis d'un Pli Vocal Artificiel avec Couplage Hydro-´elastique N. Hermanta , F formulation variationnelle du couplage hydro-élastique. Un premier calcul hyper-élastique simule le gonflement dans l'analyse modale des vibrations de petite amplitude du système hydro-élastique, permettant ainsi

  6. PLI: A New Framework to Protect Digital Content for P2P Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Guofei

    . In this paper, we first propose a novel Public License Infrastructure (PLI) that uses cryptographic threshold secret sharing schemes to provide decentralized public license services for the Digital Rights Management management for users of Peer-to-Peer (P2P) networks. This DRM system is especially useful for small content

  7. Auto Defect Classification (ADC) Value for Patterned Wafer Inspection Systems in PLY Within a High Volume Wafer Manufacturing Fabrication Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durniak, John

    2010-05-14

    The purpose of this investigation is to demonstrate value for Auto Defect Classification (ADC) for patterned wafer inspection systems within a high volume manufacturing fabrication in the Process Limited Yield (PLY) defect area. Process excursions...

  8. Moisture and temperature effects on curvature of anti-symmetric cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Randall Stephen

    1980-01-01

    MOISTURE AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CURVATURE OF ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by RANDALL STEPHEN LOTT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering MOISTURE AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CURVATURE OF ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by RANDALL STEPHEN LOTT Approved as to style and content...

  9. fuel

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4%2A en Cheaper catalyst may lower fuel costs for hydrogen-powered cars http:www.nnsa.energy.govblogcheaper-catalyst-may-lower-fuel-costs-hydrogen-powered-cars

  10. Search for b?u transitions in B<supsup>?[K<sup>??±??]DK±> decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu.?G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu.?I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K.?Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Buenger, C.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Santoro, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.

    2011-07-06

    We present a study of the decays B<sup>±?DK±> with D mesons reconstructed in the K????? or K????? final states, where D indicates a D? or a D¯¯¯0 meson. Using a sample of 474×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e?e? collider at SLAC, we measure the ratios R<supsup>?((?(B<supsup>?[K<sup>?sup>?<supsup>??]DK<supsup>))/((?(B<sup>±?[K±????]DK±>)). We obtain R?=(5<sup>?12sup>?10(stat)<sup>?2sup>?4(syst))×10?³ and R?=(12<sup>?12sup>?10(stat)<sup>?3sup>?5(syst))×10?³, from which we extract the upper limits at 90% probability: R?<23×10?³ and R?<29×10?³. Using these measurements, we obtain an upper limit for the ratio rB of the magnitudes of the b?u and b?c amplitudes rB<0.13 at 90% probability.

  11. fuel

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3446 YEAR/%2Afissile4/%2A en

  12. Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-10-01

    Two subjects are covered in this section. They are: (1) Health effects of possible contamination at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant to be studied; and (2) DOE agrees on test of MOX fuel in Canada.

  13. Observation of the Baryonic Flavor-Changing Neutral Current Decay ?b<sup>0sup> ? ?µ<sup>+µ->

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-08

    The authors report the first observation of the baryonic flavor-changing neutral current decay ?b<sup>0sup> ? ?µ<sup>+µ-> with 24 signal events and a statistical significance of 5.8 Gaussian standard deviations. This measurement uses a pp? collisions data sample corresponding to 6.8 fb<sup>-1sup> at ?s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. The total and differential branching ratios for ?b<sup>0sup> ? ?µ<sup>+µ-> are measured. They find ?(?b<sup>0sup> ? ?µ<sup>+µ->) = [1.73 ± 0.42(stat) ± 0.55(syst)] x 10<sup>-6sup>. They also report the first measurement of the differential branching ratio of Bs<sup>0sup>??µ+µ-> using 49 signal events. In addition, they report branching ratios for B<sup>+sup>?K+µ+µ->, B<sup>0sup>?K>0sup>µ+µ-> and ?? K*(892)µ<sup>+µ-> decays.

  14. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc<sup>±> ? J/??<sup>±>and B<sup>±> ? J/? K<sup>±> and B(Bc<sup>±>? J/? ?<supsup>?<supsup>?-/+)/B(Bc±> ? J/? ?<sup>±>) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia)

    2015-01-01

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc<sup>±>) B(Bc<sup>±> ? J/??<sup>±))/(?(B±>) B(B<sup>±> ? J/?K<sup>±>) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c<sup>±> and B<sup>±>mesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| < 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb<sup>-1sup>. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 ± 0.05 (stat) ± 0.03(syst) ± 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/??<sup>±?±?-/+> decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed to measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ?<supsup>?<supsup>?-/+)/B(Bc±> is measured to be 2.55 ± 0.80(stat) ± 0.33(syst) <sup>+0.04sup>-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.

  15. Labelled biomolecules with sup 1 sup 5 sup 3 Sm, sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re, and sup 9 sup 0 Y for targeted radiotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mushtaq, A; Perverz, S

    1998-01-01

    A somatostatin analogue Lanreotide was labelled with sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re, sup 9 sup 9 Tc sup m and sup 1 sup 3 sup 1 I. Labelling was accomplished by reduction of cysteine bridge, which provided sulfhydryl groups for chelation with sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re/ sup 9 sup 9 Tc sup m. Stannous chloride was used as reducing agent, while tartrate acted as transchelating agent. The lower redox potential of ReO sub 4 sup - than TcO sub 4 sup - required the addition of excess SnCl sub 2 and medium-chelating agent for stabilizing the excess of SnCl sub 2 in solution. ITLC and HPLC techniques employed for monitoring the labelling yield revealed >95% labelling efficiency. Radioiodination of lanreotide was carried out by Chloramine-T and iodogen methods. The radiolabelling yield varied between 40-80%. Chloramine-T method was found more suitable than Iodogen method, because approx 25% of the initial iodine activity was adsorbed on Iodogen coating. Avidin-biotin system is widely used in medical research, especially in pretargete...

  16. Production of ?<sup>0sup>, ??<sup>0sup>, ?<sup>±>, and ?<sup>±> hyperons in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.

    2012-07-01

    We report a set of measurements of inclusive invariant pT differential cross sections of ?<sup>0sup>, ??<sup>0sup>, ?<sup>±>, and ?<sup>±> hyperons reconstructed in the central region with pseudorapidity |?|<1 and pT up to 10 GeV/c. Events are collected with a minimum-bias trigger in pp? collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Tevatron Collider. As pT increases, the slopes of the differential cross sections of the three particles are similar, which could indicate a universality of the particle production in pT. The invariant differential cross sections are also presented for different charged-particle multiplicity intervals.

  17. What this work demonstrates is that it is possible to sup-ply power to devices fabricated on silicon that are moved

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    be produced on silicon. One can envision moving light-emit- ting diodes or semiconductor lasers, for example, VCH, Weinheim 1995. [10] Handbook of Conducting Polymers, 2nd ed. (Eds: T. A. Skotheim, R. L, 72, 2900. [17] A. Moliton, in Handbook of Conducting Polymers, 2nd ed. (Eds: T. A. Skotheim, R. L

  18. Search for the decay modes B<sup>±?h±>?l

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Benitez, J. F.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.

    2012-07-16

    We present a search for the lepton flavor violating decay modes B<sup>±?h±>?l (h=K, ?; l=e, ?) using the BABAR data sample, which corresponds to 472×10? BB¯¯¯ pairs. The search uses events where one B meson is fully reconstructed in one of several hadronic final states. Using the momenta of the reconstructed B, h, and l candidates, we are able to fully determine the ? four-momentum. The resulting ? candidate mass is our main discriminant against combinatorial background. We see no evidence for B<sup>±?h±>?l decays and set a 90% confidence level upper limit on each branching fraction at the level of a few times 10??.

  19. U.sup.+4 generation in HTER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Gay, Eddie C. (Park Forest, IL); Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Homer Glen, IL)

    2006-03-14

    A improved device and process for recycling spent nuclear fuels, in particular uranium metal, that facilitates the refinement and recovery of uranium metal from spent metallic nuclear fuels. The electrorefiner device comprises two anodes in predetermined spatial relation to a cathode. The anodese have separate current and voltage controls. A much higher voltage than normal for the electrorefining process is applied to the second anode, thereby facilitating oxidization of uranium (III), U.sup.+, to uranium (IV), U.sup.+4. The current path from the second anode to the cathode is physically shorter than the similar current path from the second anode to the spent nuclear fuel contained in a first anode shaped as a basket. The resulting U.sup.+4 oxidizes and solubilizes rough uranium deposited on the surface of the cathode. A softer uranium metal surface is left on the cathode and is more readily removed by a scraper.

  20. {sup 85}Kr induced global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakharov, V.I.

    1996-12-31

    It`s well known that the trace atmospheric constituent as {sup 85}Kr is at present about 10{sup 6} cm{sup {minus}3} and increasing considerably (twice every 8--10 years) as a result of nuclear fuel utilization. This paper presents the model of influence of {sup 85}Kr accumulation in the earth atmosphere on climate perturbation and global warming. The process of increasing the concentrations in the troposphere due to the anthropogenic emission of {sup 85}Kr and its radioactive decay is analyzed, based on master kinetic equations. Results indicate that anthropogenic emissions contributing to the total equilibrium concentration of tropospheric ions due to {sup 85}Kr is about equal to the natural level of tropospheric ions. The influence of atmospheric electricity on the transformation between water vapor and clouds which result in an increase in the concentration of ions in troposphere is investigated. The paper shows that the process of anthropogenic accumulation of {sup 85}Kr in the troposphere at present rate up to 2005--2010 increases the mean of the dew-point temperature several degrees on the global scale. Relevant change of height for the lower level of clouds has been obtained. Positive feedback between the process of warming of the lower atmosphere and the concentration of tropospheric ions has been considered.

  1. Measurement of time-dependent CP violation in B <sup>0sup> ? ?'K <sup>0 sup>decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Šantelj, L.; Yusa, Y.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Bahinipati, S.

    2014-10-29

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP violation parameters in B<sup>0sup> ? ?'K<sup>0sup> decays. The measurement is based on the full data sample containing 772×10<sup>6sup> BB-bar pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance using the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e<sup>+e-> collider. The measured values of the mixing-induced and direct CP violation parameters are: sin 2?1<sup>eff> = +0.68 ± 0.07 ± 0.03, A?'K<sup>0sup> = +0.03 ± 0.05 ± 0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The values obtained are the most accurate to date. Furthermore, these results are consistent with our previous measurements and with the world-average value of sin 2?1 measured in B<sup>0sup> ? J/?K<sup>0sup> decays.

  2. Cryogenic Thermal Expansion of Y-12 Graphite Fuel Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eash, D. T.

    2013-07-08

    Thermal expansion measurements betwccn 20°K and 300°K were made on segments of three uranium-loaded Y-12 uncoated graphite fuel elements. The thermal expansion of these fuel elements over this temperature range is represented by the equation: {Delta}L/L = -39.42 x 10{sup -5} + 1.10 x 10{sup -7} T + 6.47 x 10{sup -9} T{sup 2} - 8.30 x 10{sup -12} T{sup 3}.

  3. Spectroscopy and applications of the 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} electronic state of {sup 39}K{sup 85}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Jayita Rahmlow, David; Carollo, Ryan; Bellos, Michael; Eyler, Edward E.; Gould, Phillip L.; Stwalley, William C.

    2013-11-07

    We report new results on the spectroscopy of the 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} electronic state of {sup 39}K{sup 85}Rb. The observations are based on resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of ultracold KRb molecules starting in vibrational levels v?? = 18–23 of the a?{sup 3}?{sup +} state and ionized via the intermediate 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} state. The a-state ultracold molecules are formed by photoassociation of ultracold {sup 39}K and {sup 85}Rb atoms to the 3(0{sup +}) state of KRb followed by spontaneous emission. We discuss the potential applications of this state to future experiments, as a pathway for populating the lowest vibrational levels of the a state as well as the X state.

  4. Elastic scattering of {sup 6}He and {sup 7}Be on a {sup 9}Be target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pires, K. C. C.; Lichtenthaeler, R. [Depto de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05389-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mukha, I.; Moro, A. M. [Depto de FAMN, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Gomez-Camacho, J. [Depto de FAMN, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-04-26

    The elastic scattering data for the {sup 6}He+{sup 9}Be and {sup 7}Be+{sup 9}Be reactions, measured at E{sub lab} = 16.2 MeV and E{sub lab} = 23.7 MeV respectively, are presented and analyzed using the optical model and coupled-channels formalisms.

  5. Lifetime measurements in {sup 63}Co and {sup 65}Co

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dijon, A.; Clement, E.; France, G. de; Van Isacker, P.; Rejmund, M.; Schmitt, C.; Goergen, A.; Obertelli, A.; Korten, W.; Dewald, A.; Hackstein, M.; Pissulla, Th.; Rother, W.; Zell, K. O.; Gadea, A.; Gaudefroy, L.; Mengoni, D.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.

    2011-06-15

    Lifetimes of the 9/2{sub 1}{sup -} and 3/2{sub 1}{sup -} states in {sup 63}Co and the 9/2{sub 1}{sup -} state in {sup 65}Co were measured using the recoil distance Doppler shift and the differential decay curve methods. The nuclei were populated by multinucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics. {gamma} rays were measured with the EXOGAM Ge array and the recoiling fragments were fully identified using the large-acceptance VAMOS spectrometer. The E2 transition probabilities from the 3/2{sub 1}{sup -} and 9/2{sub 1}{sup -} states to the 7/2{sup -} ground state could be extracted in {sup 63}Co as well as an upper limit for the 9/2{sub 1}{sup -}{yields}7/2{sub 1}{sup -} B(E2) value in {sup 65}Co. The experimental results were compared to large-scale shell-model calculations in the pf and pfg{sub 9/2} model spaces, allowing us to draw conclusions on the single-particle or collective nature of the various states.

  6. <sup>137sup> Ba Double Gamma Decay Measurement with GAMMASPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchán, E.; Moran, K.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; McCutchan, E. A.; Greene, J. P.; Zhu, S.; Lauritsen, T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Shearman, R.

    2015-05-28

    The study of the electromagnetic moments (EM), and decay probability, provides detailed information about nuclear wave functions. The well-know properties of EM interactions are good for extracting information about the motion of nucleons. Higher order EM processes always occur, but are usually too weak to be measured. In the case of a 0<sup>+> ? 0<sup>+> transitions, where a single gamma transition is forbidden, the simultaneous emission of two ?-rays has been studied. An interesting opportunity to further investigate 2-photon emission phenomena is by using a standard <sup>137sup>Cs source populating, via ?-decay, the J<sup>?> = 11/2<sup>-> isomeric state at 662 keV in <sup>137sup>Ba. In this case, two photon process can have contributions from quadrupole-quadrupole or dipole-octupole multipolarities in direct competition with the high multipolarity M4 decay. Since the yield of the double gamma decay is around six orders of magnitude less than the first order transition, very good statistics are needed in order to observe the phenomena and great care must be taken to suppress the first-order decay. The Gammasphere array is ideal since its configuration allows a good coverage of the angular distribution and the Compton events can be suppressed. Nevertheless the process to understand and eliminate the Compton background is a challenge. Geant4 simulations were carried out to help understand and correct for those factors.

  7. Stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of p-process isotopes. II. {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marganiec, J.; Dillmann, I.; Pardo, C. Domingo; Kaeppeler, F.; Walter, S.

    2010-09-15

    The neutron-capture cross sections of {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg have been measured by means of the activation technique. The samples were irradiated in a quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV, which was produced at the Karlsruhe 3.7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator via the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. Systematic uncertainties were investigated in repeated activations with different samples and by variation of the experimental parameters, that is, irradiation times, neutron fluxes, and {gamma}-ray counting conditions. The measured data were converted into Maxwellian-averaged cross sections at kT=30 keV, yielding 1214{+-}61, 624{+-}54, 590{+-}43, 511{+-}46, and 201{+-}11 mb for {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg, respectively. The present results either represent first experimental data ({sup 168}Yb, {sup 184}Os, and {sup 196}Hg) or could be determined with significantly reduced uncertainties ({sup 180}W and {sup 190}Pt). These measurements are part of a systematic study of stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of the stable p isotopes.

  8. Structures of {sup 201}Po and {sup 205}Rn from EC/{beta}{sup +}-decay studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, A. Y.; Podolyak, Zs.; Walker, P. M.; Farrelly, G.; Gelletly, W. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Algora, A. [IFIC, CSIC - Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 (Spain); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen, H-4001 (Hungary); Rubio, B.; Agramunt, J.; Estevez, E. [IFIC, CSIC - Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 (Spain); Fraile, L. M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Facultad CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Al-Dahan, N. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Kerbala, Kerbala (Iraq); Alkhomashi, N. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); KACST, P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Briz, J. A.; Maira, A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Herlert, A. [ISOLDE, PH Department, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Koester, U. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Singla, S. [Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110 016 (India)

    2010-02-15

    Several low-lying excited states in {sub 86}{sup 205}Rn{sub 119} and {sub 84}{sup 201}Po{sub 117} were identified for the first time following EC/{beta}{sup +} decay of {sup 205}Fr and {sup 201}At, respectively, using {gamma}-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy at the CERN isotope separator on-line (ISOLDE) facility. The EC/{beta}{sup +} branch from {sup 205}Fr was measured to be 1.5(2)%. The excited states of the daughter nuclei are understood in terms of the odd nucleon coupling to the neighboring even-even core. The neutron single-particle energies of the p{sub 3/2} orbital relative to the f{sub 5/2} ground state in {sup 205}Rn, and the f{sub 5/2} orbital relative to the p{sub 3/2} ground state in {sup 201}Po, were determined to be 31.4(2) and 5.7(3) keV, respectively. We tentatively identify a (13/2){sup +} isomeric level at 657.1(5) keV in {sup 205}Rn. The systematic behavior of the (13/2){sup +} and (3/2){sup -} levels is also discussed.

  9. Neutron capture of /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te, /sup 124/Te, /sup 125/Te, and /sup 126/Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macklin, R.L.; Winters, R.R.

    1989-07-01

    Isotopically enriched samples of the tellurium isotopes from mass 122 to mass 126 were used to measure neutron capture in the energy range 2.6 keV to 600 keV at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator pulsed neutron source. Starting at 2.6 keV, over 200 Breit-Wigner resonances for each isotope were used to describe the capture data. Least-squares adjustment gave parameters and their uncertainties for a total of 1659 resonances. Capture cross sections averaged over Maxwellian neutron distributions with temperatures ranging from kT = 5 keV to kT = 100 keV were derived for comparison with stellar nucleosynthesis calculations. For the three isotopes shielded from the astrophysical r-process, /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te and /sup 124/Te at kT = 30 keV the respective values were (280 /plus minus/ 10) mb, (819 /plus minus/ 30) mb and (154 /plus minus/ 6) mb. The corresponding products of cross section and solar system abundance are nearly equal in close agreement with s-process nucleosynthesis calculations. 26 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  10. Organic fuel cells and fuel cell conducting sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); Ha, Su (Champaign, IL); Adams, Brian (Savoy, IL)

    2007-10-16

    A passive direct organic fuel cell includes an organic fuel solution and is operative to produce at least 15 mW/cm.sup.2 when operating at room temperature. In additional aspects of the invention, fuel cells can include a gas remover configured to promote circulation of an organic fuel solution when gas passes through the solution, a modified carbon cloth, one or more sealants, and a replaceable fuel cartridge.

  11. Transfer mechanism in /sup 16/O+/sup 24/Mg and /sup 20/Ne+/sup 24/Mg elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NING Ping-Zhi; GAO Cheng-Qun; HE Guo-Zhu

    1985-10-01

    The mechanism of transferring a cluster of nucleons between two colliding nuclei is considered to explain the backward angle oscillatory rise in the differential cross section of the elastic scattering between certain nuclei, such as /sup 16/O+/sup 24/Mg or /sup 20/Ne+/sup 24/Mg. The nuclear molecular orbit approximation theory is applied. For one-step transfer, if the parameter involved is assumed to be adjustable, the numerical calculations can be made to fit the experimental results naturally.

  12. Corrosion Tests of LWR Fuels - Nuclide Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.A. Finn; Y. Tsai; J.C. Cunnane

    2001-12-14

    Two BWR fuels [64 and 71 (MWd)/kgU], one of which contained 2% Gd, and two PWR fuels [30 and 45 (MWd)/kgU], are tested by dripping groundwater on the fuels under oxidizing and hydrologically unsaturated conditions for times ranging from 2.4 to 8.2 yr at 90 C. The {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 97}Mo, and {sup 90}Sr releases are presented to show the effects of long reaction times and of gadolinium on nuclide release. This investigation showed that the five nuclides at long reaction times have similar fractional release rates and that the presence of 2% Gd reduced the {sup 99}Tc cumulative release fraction by about an order of magnitude over that of a fuel with a similar burnup.

  13. Direct determination of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 147}Pm in Chernobyl hot particles collected in Kiev using beta absorption method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papp, Z.; Bolyos, A.; Dezso, Z.; Daroczy, S. [Kossuth Univ., Debrecen (Hungary)

    1997-12-01

    59 hot particles were collected in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1987. All but one were prepared from a moss carpet of 360 cm{sup 2} area. Radionuclide composition of the hot particles was investigated by gamma-spectrometry and beta absorption method. Pure beta emitters {sup 90}Sr and {sup 147}Pm were determined in 25 hot particles measuring the beta absorption curves of the hot particles with an end-window Geiger-Mueller counter and decomposing the curves in order to obtain the contributions of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 147}Pm to the total beta counting rate. All but one of the hot particles were found to be the debris of the fuel. The activity ratio {sup 90}Sr:{sup 144}Ce was 0.078 which is half of the theoretical result. Although {sup 147}Pm is considered to be a refractory nuclide, it seems that significant part of {sup 147}Pm went to the homogeneous fraction of the general fallout. The surface density of hot particles (of higher than about 50 Bq activity) was about 1,600 m{sup -2} and that of the activities of the nuclides {sup 90}Sr, {sup 106}Ru, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce and {sup 147}Pm as components of hot particles was 12.2, 54.3, 5.9, 9.7, 234 and 18.3 kBq m{sup -2} (activity values counted for 26 April 1986), respectively, in downtown Kiev city in 1987.

  14. Neutron decays of {sup 13}Be* to the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state of {sup 12}Be

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortune, H. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Sherr, R. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We suggest that an appreciable portion of the 1/2{sup -} peak in a recent {sup 13}Be*{yields}{sup 12}Be + n experiment is actually due to 5/2{sup +} decays to the excited 0{sup +} state.

  15. Comparative efficacy of <sup>177sup>Lu and <sup>90sup>Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bäck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.; Afrin, Farhat

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (<sup>90sup>Y) and lutetium-177 (<sup>177sup>Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas <sup>90sup>Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with <sup>177sup>Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either <sup>90sup>Y or <sup>177sup>Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an <sup>90sup>Y- or <sup>177sup>Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for <sup>90sup>Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for <sup>177sup>Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with <sup>90sup>Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with <sup>177sup>Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq <sup>90sup>Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of <sup>177sup>Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with <sup>90sup>Y-PRIT and 0% cured with <sup>177sup>Lu-PRIT. Toxicities were comparable with both isotopes. Conclusion <sup>90sup>Y was therapeutically superior to <sup>177sup>Lu for streptavidin-biotin PRIT approaches in these human lymphoma xenograft models.

  16. Search for B{sub c}{sup {plus_minus}} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup {plus_minus}} and the B rare decays B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +} mu{sup {minus}} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, T. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); CDF Collaboration

    1996-09-01

    We present a search for the {ital B}{sup +}{sub {ital c}}{yields}{ital J}/{Psi}{pi}{sup {+-}}. We measure the limit of {delta}({ital B}{sup {+-}}{sub {ital c}}){center_dot}{ital BR(B{sub c}{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{Psi}{pi}{sup {+-}})/{delta}(B{sup +-}{sub u}){center_dot}BR(B{sup {+-}}{sub u}{yields}J/{Psi}{Kappa}{sup {+-}}}) as a function of the {ital B{sup {+-}}{sub c}} lifetime, using {approx} 110 {ital pb}{sup -1} of data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We present also a search for the rare decays {ital B}{sup 0}{sub {ital d}}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {ital B}{sup 0}{sub {ital s}}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, setting an upper limit on their respective branching ratios.

  17. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  18. Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selby, H.D.; Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C.

    2010-12-15

    We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for {sup 99}Mo, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 140}Ba, {sup 141,143}Ce, and {sup 147}Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the {sup 147}Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by {approx}5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except for {sup 99}Mo where the present results are about 4%-relative higher for neutrons incident on {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U. Additionally, our results illustrate the importance of representing the incident energy dependence of fission product yields over the fast neutron energy range for high-accuracy work, for example the {sup 147}Nd from neutron reactions on plutonium. An upgrade to the ENDF library, for ENDF/B-VII.1, based on these and other data, is described in a companion paper to this work.

  19. Collectivity in {sup 41}S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z. M.; Chapman, R.; Liang, X.; Burns, M.; Hodsdon, A.; Keyes, K.; Kumar, V.; Papenberg, A.; Smith, J. F.; Spohr, K. M.; Haas, F.; Curien, D.; Azaiez, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Verney, D.; Behera, B. R.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.

    2011-06-15

    Yrast states in the neutron-rich {sup 41}S nucleus have been studied using binary grazing reactions produced by the interaction of a 215-MeV beam of {sup 36}S ions with a thin {sup 208}Pb target. The magnetic spectrometer, PRISMA, and the {gamma}-ray array, CLARA, were used in the measurements. {gamma}-ray transitions of energy 449 and 638 keV were observed. Results from published intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation measurements in combination with those from the present work have led to the construction of a new {sup 41}S level scheme. Proposed J{sup {pi}} values are based on experimental observation and on model-dependent arguments. The level scheme and published electromagnetic transition probabilities are discussed within the context of state-of-art shell-model calculations using the SDPF-U effective interaction. In contrast with the excellent agreement observed in earlier published work, here there are significant discrepancies between experiment and the results of shell-model calculations.

  20. Measurement of the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg excitation function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folden III, C. M.; Dragojevic, I.; Garcia, M. A.; Gates, J. M.; Nelson, S. L.; Hoffman, D. C.; Nitsche, H.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K. E.; Eichler, R.

    2009-02-15

    The excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg reaction has been measured using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. The maximum cross section of 320{sub -100}{sup +110} pb is observed at a center-of-target laboratory-frame energy of 253.0 MeV. In total, 25 decay chains originating from {sup 259}Sg were observed and the measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. In addition, a partial excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,2n){sup 258}Sg reaction was obtained, and an improved {sup 258}Sg half-life of 2.6{sub -0.4}{sup +0.6} ms was calculated by combining all available experimental data.

  1. Branching Ratio of the Electromagnetic Decay of the ?<sup>+>(1385)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, D; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Bookwalter, C; Boiarinov, S; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Graham, L; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Khandaker, M; Khertarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, A; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I.J. D; Mao, Y; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Pappalardo, L; Paremuzyan, R; Anefalos Pereira, S; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, E S; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, C E; Tkachenko, S; Vernarsky, B; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhao, B

    2012-03-23

    The CLAS detector was used to obtain the first ever measurement of the electromagnetic decay of the ?*<sup>+>(1385) from the reaction ?p ? K<sup>0sup> ?*<sup>+>(1385). A real photon beam with a maximum energy of 3.8 GeV was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target, resulting in the photoproduction of the kaon and ?* hyperon. Kinematic fitting was used to separate the reaction channel from the background processes. The fitting algorithm exploited a new method to kinematically fit neutrons in the CLAS detector, leading to the partial width measurement of 250.0 ± 56.9(stat)-41.2<sup>+34.3sup>(sys) keV. A U-spin symmetry test using the SU(3) flavor-multiplet representation yields predictions for the ?*<sup>+>(1385) ? ?<sup>+>? and ?*<sup>0sup>(1385) ? ?? partial widths that agree with the experimental measurements.

  2. Excited states in {sup 115}Pd populated in the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 115}Rh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurpeta, J.; Plochocki, A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Urban, W. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue J. Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Rissanen, J.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilae, H.; Saastamoinen, A.; Weber, C.; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40351, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Elomaa, V.-V. [Turku PET Centre, Accelerator Laboratory, Abo Akademi University, FIN-20500 Turku (Finland); Rahaman, S. [Physics Division, P-23, Mail Stop H803, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sonoda, T. [Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Szerypo, J. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Excited states in {sup 115}Pd, populated following the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 115}Rh have been studied by means of {gamma} spectroscopy after the Penning-trap station at the IGISOL facility, University of Jyvaeskylae. The 1/2{sup +} spin and parity assignment of the ground state of {sup 115}Pd, confirmed in this work, may indicate a transition to an oblate shape in Pd isotopes at high neutron number.

  3. Studies of the /sup 32/S + /sup 182/W reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, B.B.; Keller, J.G.; Worsham, A.; Glagola, B.G.; Henderson, D.; Kaufman, S.; Sanders, S.J.; Siemssen, R.; Videbaek, F.; Wilkins, B.D.

    1986-01-01

    Fission-like products from the reaction /sup 32/S + /sup 182/W were measured over the entire angular range from theta = 10-170/sup 0/ and for bombarding energies of E/sub lab/ = 166, 177, 222, and 260 MeV using an array of eight Si detectors. From the measured energy and flight time the product mass was determined event-by-event by performing the appropriate corrections for the plasma delay and pulse height defect associated with Si detectors. The mass, angular, and total kinetic energy distributions of fission-like fragments are obtained by assuming two-body kinematics. The angular distributions indicate that a fraction of the observed cross section is associated with quasi-fission reactions as observed previously in several other reactions involving /sup 32/S projectiles. Furthermore, we observe an angular dependence of the fragment mass distributions, a feature which is strictly incompatible with compound nucleus decay. Both of these observations indicate that a fraction of fission-like products originate from quasi-fission, a process in which a large degree of mass transfer occurs between the two interaction nuclei in a short time scale. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Analysis of T = 1 {sup 10}B States Analogue to {sup 10}Be Cluster States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uroic, M.; Miljanic, D.; Blagus, S.; Bogovac, M.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Majer, M.; Milin, M.; Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A.; Acosta, L.

    2009-08-26

    Current status of the search for T = 1 cluster states in {sup 10}Be, {sup 10}B and {sup 10}C is presented. The best known of the three, {sup 10}Be, has an established rotational band (6.18, 7.54 and 10.15 MeV) with unusually large moment of inertia. Search of their isobaric analogue in {sup 10}B is presented, with emphasis on {sup 3}He+{sup 11}B reaction.

  5. Identification of {gamma} rays from {sup 172}Au and {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au, {sup 168}Ir, and {sup 164}Re

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadinia, B.; Cederwall, B.; Andgren, K.; Baeck, T.; Johnson, A.; Khaplanov, A.; Wyss, R.; Page, R. D.; Grahn, T.; Paul, E. S.; Sandzelius, M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, J.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.

    2009-12-15

    The very neutron deficient odd-odd nucleus {sup 172}Au was studied in reactions of 342 and 348 MeV {sup 78}Kr beams with an isotopically enriched {sup 96}Ru target. The {alpha} decays previously reported for {sup 172}Au were confirmed and the decay chain extended down to {sup 152}Tm through the discovery of a new {alpha}-decaying state in {sup 164}Re[E{sub {alpha}}=5623(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=864{sub -110}{sup +150} ms; b{sub {alpha}}=3(1)%]. Fine structure in these {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au and {sup 168}Ir were identified. A new {alpha}-decaying state was also observed and assigned as the ground state in {sup 172}Au[E{sub {alpha}}=6762(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=22{sub -5}{sup +6} ms]. This decay chain was also correlated down to {sup 152}Tm through previously reported {alpha} decays. Prompt {gamma} rays from excited states in {sup 172}Au have been identified using the recoil-decay tagging technique. The partial level scheme constructed for {sup 172}Au indicates that it has an irregular structure. Possible configurations of the {alpha}-decaying states in {sup 172}Au are discussed in terms of the systematics of nuclei in this region and total Routhian surface calculations.

  6. Isomers in Neutron-Rich A ?? 190 NNuclides from <sup>208sup>Pb Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caamano, M. [University of Surrey, UK; Walker, P. M. [University of Surrey, UK; Regan, P. H. [University of Surrey, UK; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Podolyak, Zs. [University of Surrey, UK; Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Hellstrom, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mayet, P. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mineva, M. N. [Lund University, Sweden; Aprahamian, A. [University of Notre Dame, IN; Benlliure, J. [University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Bruce, A. M. [University of Brighton, UK; Butler, P. A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, UK; Cortina Gil, D. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Cullen, D. M. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, UK; Doring, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Enqvist, T. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Fox, C. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, UK; Garces Narro, J. [University of Surrey, UK; Geissel, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Gelletly, W. [University of Surrey, UK; Giovinazzo, J. [CEN Bordeaux-Gradignan/CNRS, France; Gorska, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Grawe, H. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Grzywacz, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kleinbohl, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Korten, W. [CEA, Saclay, France; Lewitowicz, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL); Lucas, R. [CEA, Saclay, France; Mach, H. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; O'Leary, C. D. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, UK; De Oliveira, F. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL); Pearson, C. J. [University of Surrey, UK; Rejmund, F. [IPN, Cedex, France; Rejmund, M. [IPN, Cedex, France; Sawicka, M. [University of Warsaw; Schaffner, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schlegel, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schmidt, K. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schmidt, K.-H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Stevenson, P. D. [University of Surrey, UK; Theisen, Ch. [CEA, Saclay, France; Vives, F. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Warner, D. D. [Daresbury Laboratory, UK; Wheldon, C. [University of Surrey, UK; Wollersheim, H. J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Wooding, S. [University of Surrey, UK; Xu, F. [University of Surrey, UK; Yordanov, O. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany

    2005-01-01

    Relativistic projectile fragmentation of {sup 208}Pb has been used to produce isomers in neutron-rich, A {approx} 190 nuclides. A forward-focusing spectrometer provided ion-by-ion mass and charge identification. The detection of gamma-rays emitted by stopped ions has led to the assignment of isomers in {sup 188}Ta, {sup 190}W, {sup 192}Re, {sup 193}Re, {sup 195}Os, {sup 197}Ir, {sup 198}Ir, {sup 200}Pt, {sup 201}Pt, {sup 202}Pt and {sup 203}Au, with half-lives ranging from approximately 10 ns to 1 ms. Tentative isomer information has been found also for {sup 174}Er, {sup 175}Er, {sup 185}Hf, {sup 191}Re, {sup 194}Re and {sup 199}Ir. In most cases, time-correlated, singles gamma-ray events provided the first spectroscopic data on excited states for each nuclide. In {sup 200}Pt and {sup 201}Pt, the assignments are supported by gamma-gamma coincidences. Isomeric ratios provide additional information, such as half-life and transition energy constraints in particular cases. The level structures of the platinum isotopes are discussed, and comparisons are made with isomer systematics.

  7. SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding Performance during 4-Point Tubular Bend Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IJ van Rooyen; WR Lloyd; TL Trowbridge; SR Novascone; KM Wendt; SM Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE) established the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to develop technologies and other solutions to improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development Pathway in the LWRS program encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. Recent investigations of potential options for “accident tolerant” nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. One of the proposed SiC-based fuel cladding designs being investigated incorporates a SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) as a structural material supplementing an internal Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) liner tube, referred to as the hybrid clad design. Characterization of the advanced cladding designs will include a number of out-of-pile (nonnuclear) tests, followed by in-pile irradiation testing of the most promising designs. One of the out-of-pile characterization tests provides measurement of the mechanical properties of the cladding tube using four point bend testing. Although the material properties of the different subsystems (materials) will be determined separately, in this paper we present results of 4-point bending tests performed on fully assembled hybrid cladding tube mock-ups, an assembled Zr-4 cladding tube mock-up as a standard and initial testing results on bare SiC-CMC sleeves to assist in defining design parameters. The hybrid mock-up samples incorporated SiC-CMC sleeves fabricated with 7 polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles. To provide comparative information; both 1- and 2-ply braided SiC-CMC sleeves were used in this development study. Preliminary stress simulations were performed using the BISON nuclear fuel performance code to show the stress distribution differences for varying lengths between loading points and clad configurations. The 2-ply sleeve samples show a higher bend momentum compared to those of the 1-ply sleeve samples. This is applicable to both the hybrid mock-up and bare SiC-CMC sleeve samples. Comparatively both the 1- and 2-ply hybrid mock-up samples showed a higher bend stiffness and strength compared with the standard Zr-4 mock-up sample. The characterization of the hybrid mock-up samples showed signs of distress and preliminary signs of fraying at the protective Zr-4 sleeve areas for the 1-ply SiC-CMC sleeve. In addition, the microstructure of the SiC matrix near the cracks at the region of highest compressive bending strain shows significant cracking and flaking. The 2-ply SiC-CMC sleeve samples showed a more bonded, cohesive SiC matrix structure. This cracking and fraying causes concern for increased fretting during the actual use of the design. Tomography was proven as a successful tool to identify open porosity during pre-test characterization. Although there is currently insufficient data to make conclusive statements regarding the overall merit of the hybrid cladding design, preliminary characterization of this novel design has been demonstrated.

  8. Study of {sup 11}Be structure via the p({sup 11}Be, {sup 10}Be)d reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortier, S.; Winfield, J. S.; Pita, S.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Gales, S.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Laurent, H.; Lhenry, I.; Maison, J. M.; Suomijarvi, T.; Catford, W. N.; Curtis, N.; Jones, K. L.; Shawcross, M.; Orr, N. A.; Chapman, R.; Smith, M.; Spohr, K.; Chappell, S. P. G.; Clarke, N. M.

    1998-12-21

    The reaction {sup 11}Be(p,d){sup 10}Be has been studied for the first time, using a secondary {sup 11}Be beam of 35.3 MeV/nucleon. Angular distributions up to about 15{sub cm}{sup o} were measured by detecting {sup 10}Be in a spectrometer and coincident deuterons in a position sensitive silicon detector array. Preliminary analysis provides evidence for a large core excitation component in the structure of {sup 11}Be{sub GS}.

  9. Nuclear structure ''southeast'' of {sup 208}Pb: Isomeric states in {sup 208}Hg and {sup 209}Tl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Dahan, N. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Kerbala, Kerbala (Iraq); Podolyak, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Alkhomashi, N.; Deo, A. Y.; Farrelly, G.; Steer, S. J.; Cullen, I. J.; Gelletly, W.; Swan, T.; Thomas, J. S.; Walker, P. M. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Gerl, J.; Pietri, S. B.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Boutachkov, P.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Farinon, F. [GSI, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)] (and others)

    2009-12-15

    The nuclear structure of neutron-rich N>126 nuclei has been investigated following their production via relativistic projectile fragmentation of a E/A=1 GeV {sup 238}U beam. Metastable states in the N=128 isotones {sup 208}Hg and {sup 209}Tl have been identified. Delayed {gamma}-ray transitions are interpreted as arising from the decay of I{sup {pi}}=(8{sup +}) and (17/2{sup +}) isomers, respectively. The data allow for the so far most comprehensive verification of the shell-model approach in the region determined by magic numbers Z<82 and N>126.

  10. Determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients for <sup>14sup>C + n <--> <sup>15sup>C, the <sup>14sup>C(n, gamma)<sup>15sup>C reaction rate, and evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCleskey, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.; Banu, A.; Eremenko, V.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Lui, Y. W.; McCleskey, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Spiridon, A.; Carstoiu, F.; Burjan, V.; Hons, Z.; Thompson, I. J.

    2014-04-17

    The <sup>14sup>C + n <--> <sup>15sup>C system has been used as a test case in the evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors that uses the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). The method proved to be unsuccessful for this case. As part of this experimental program, the ANCs for the <sup>15sup>C ground state and first excited state were determined using a heavy-ion neutron transfer reaction as well as the inverse kinematics (d,p) reaction, measured at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute. The ANCs were used to evaluate the astrophysical direct neutron capture rate on <sup>14sup>C, which was then compared with the most recent direct measurement and found to be in good agreement. A study of the <sup>15sup>C SF via its mirror nucleus <sup>15sup>F and a new insight into deuteron stripping theory are also presented.

  11. JLab Measurement of the <sup>4sup>He Charge Form Factor at Large Momentum Transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camsonne, Alexandre; Katramatou, A. T.; Olson, M.; Sparveris, Nikolaos; Acha, Armando; Allada, Kalyan; Anderson, Bryon; Arrington, John; Baldwin, Alan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Decowski, Piotr; Dutta, Chiranjib; Folts, Edward; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilman, Ronald; Gomez, Javier; Hahn, Brian; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jian; Iodice, Mauro; Kelleher, Aidan; Khrosinkova, Elena; Kievsky, A.; Kuchina, Elena; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; Lee, Byungwuek; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Lott, Gordon; Lu, H.; Marcucci, Laura; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Meekins, David; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Norum, Blaine; Petratos, Gerassimos; Puckett, Andrew; Qian, Xin; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segal, John; Hashemi, Mitra; Shahinyan, Albert; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Subedi, Ramesh; Suleiman, Riad; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Viviani, Michele; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zhang, W. -M.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2014-04-01

    The charge form factor of <sup>4sup>He has been extracted in the range 29 fm<sup>-2sup> <= Q<sup>2sup> <= 77 fm<sup>-2sup> from elastic electron scattering, detecting <sup>4sup>He nuclei and electrons in coincidence with the High Resolution Spectrometers of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab. The results are in qualitative agreement with realistic meson-nucleon theoretical calculations. The data have uncovered a second diffraction minimum, which was predicted in the Q<sup>2sup> range of this experiment, and rule out conclusively long-standing predictions of dimensional scaling of high-energy amplitudes using quark counting.

  12. On the neutrinoless double ?{sup +}/EC decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suhonen, Jouni

    2013-12-30

    The neutrinoless double positron-emission/electron-capture (0??{sup +}/EC) decays are studied for the magnitudes of the involved nuclear matrix elements (NMEs). Decays to the ground state, 0{sub gs}{sup +}, and excited 0{sup +} states are discussed. The participant many-body wave functions are evaluated in the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Effective, G-matrix-derived nuclear forces are used in realistic single-particle model spaces. The channels ?{sup +}?{sup +}, ?{sup +}EC, and the resonant neutrinoless double electron capture (R0?ECEC) are discussed.

  13. Comparison of {sup 241}Am, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 137}Cs concentrations in soil around Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulse, S.E.; Ibrahim, S.A.; Whicker, F.W.; Chapman, P.L.

    1999-03-01

    Gamma spectroscopy measurements were used to estimate concentrations of {sup 241}Am and {sup 137}Cs in soil profiles to depths of 21 cm at on-site and off-site locations around the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and at regional background locations east of the Front Range between Colorado`s borders with New Mexico and Wyoming. Concentrations of these radionuclides were compared with concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu in the same samples. Concentrations of {sup 241}Am in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm decreased in an easterly direction from more than 5.3 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} 5 to 7 km away at a rate that was nearly proportional to the inverse square of distance. Deposits of {sup 137}Cs were ubiquitous, averaging 0.12 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm, but were unevenly distributed around Rocky Flats and the regional background locations. Deviations from the uniform exponential rate at which soil concentrations of {sup 137}Cs typically decreased with depth, {minus}0.25 cm{sup {minus}1} at undisturbed sites, enabled the authors to determine that about 10% of their sampling sites had been disturbed by erosion, tillage, or other factors. The mean rate at which {sup 239,240}Pu decreased with depth was about the same, {minus}0.23 cm{sup {minus}1}, throughout the study area. Soil concentrations of {sup 241}Am decreased with depth at a similar mean rate of {minus}0.22 cm{sup {minus}1} at locations close to the 903 pad where measurements were robust. Ratios between {sup 241}Am or {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 137}Cs proved more useful for delineating the extent and pattern of contamination from Rocky Flats than did activity concentrations in soil.

  14. Excitation functions of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prepolec, L.; Soic, N.; Blagus, S.; Miljanic, D.; Siketic, Z.; Skukan, N.; Uroic, M.; Milin, M.

    2009-08-26

    Differential cross sections of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li nuclear reactions have been measured at forward angles (10 deg. and 20 deg.), using particle identification detector telescopes, over the energy range 2.75-10.00 MeV. Excitation functions have been obtained for low-lying residual-nucleus states. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) at beam energy about 8 MeV, first observed by Wyborny and Carlson in 1971 at 0 deg., has been observed at 10 deg., but is less evident at 20 deg. The cross section obtained for the {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(g.s,0{sup +}) reaction is about ten times smaller. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) reaction could correspond to excited states in {sup 14}C, at excitation energies around 30 MeV.

  15. Probing the nuclides {sup 102}Pd, {sup 106}Cd, and {sup 144}Sm for resonant neutrinoless double-electron capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncharov, M.; Blaum, K.; Eliseev, S.; Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Minaya Ramirez, E.; Droese, C.; Schweikhard, L.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Zuber, K.

    2011-08-15

    The Q values for double-electron capture in {sup 102}Pd, {sup 106}Cd, and {sup 144}Sm have been measured by Penning-trap mass spectrometry. The results exclude at present all three nuclides from the list of suitable candidates for a search for resonant neutrinoless double-electron capture.

  16. Scavenging of Chernobyl [sup 137]Cs and natural [sup 210]Pb in Lake Sempach, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wieland, E. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States)); Santschi, P.H. (Texas A M Univ., Galveston (United States)); Hoehener, P. (Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Schlieren (Switzerland)); Sturm, M. (Swiss Federal Inst. for Water Resources and Water Pollution Control, Duebendorf (Switzerland))

    1993-07-01

    Radioactive fallout from the burning Chernobyl nuclear reactor provided a pulsed release of [sup 137]Cs to Lake Sempach at the beginning of May 1986. The time-dependent removal of [sup 137]Cs from the water column into the sediments has been investigated by analyzing water samples, settling particles, and sediment cores. A flux balance has been established to determine and to quantify the removal processes in the epilimnion and hypolimnion of Lake Sempach. Between May 1986 and March 1988, removal residence times of [sup 137]Cs averaged 150 days in the epilimnion and 280 days in the hypolimnion. [sup 137]Cs accumulated in the hypolimnion during stratification, and its scavenging from the hypolimnion into the sediments was the rate-limiting step of the overall process of removing [sup 137]Cs from the water column. Resuspension of sedimentary [sup 137]Cs occurred during circulation periods in winter. Scavenging trap fluxes of [sup 137]Cs and [sup 210]Pb linearly correlated with increasing particle fluxes up to a maximum of about 2.5 g m[sup [minus]2] d[sup [minus]1]. Higher particle fluxes, likely due to calcite precipitation, did not enhance removal fluxes and scavenging efficiency for these nuclides. The distribution coefficient for the partition of [sup 137]Cs between lake water and settling particles, K[sub d], was determined to 7.0 [+-] 1.0 [times] 10[sup 4] cm[sup 3] g[sup [minus]1] for epilimnetic particles and to 5.3 [+-] 1.1 [times] 10[sup 4] cm[sup 3] g[sup [minus]1] for hypolimnetic particles. The distribution coefficient for [sup 210]Pb was estimated to 1.1 [times] 10[sup 6] cm[sup 3] g[sup [minus]1]. The possibility of postdepositional mobility of Chernobyl and nuclear weapons [sup 137]Cs and natural [sup 210]Pb in sediments was proved. 72 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  17. INVESTIGATION ON THE FLAME EXTINCTION LIMIT OF FUEL BLENDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahsan R. Choudhuri

    2005-02-01

    Lean flame extinction limits of binary fuel mixtures of methane (CH{sub 4}), propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}), and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were measured using a twin-flame counter-flow burner. Experiments were conducted to generate an extinction equivalence ratio vs. global stretch rate plot and an extrapolation method was used to calculate the equivalence ratio corresponding to an experimentally unattainable zero-stretch condition. The foregoing gases were selected because they are the primary constitutes of natural gas, which is the primary focus of the present study. To validate the experimental setup and methodology, the flame extinction limit of pure fuels at zero stretch conditions were also estimated and compared with published values. The lean flame extinction limits of methane (f{sub ext} = 4.6%) and propane (f{sub ext} = 2.25%) flames measured in the present study agreed with the values reported in the literature. It was observed that the flame extinction limit of fuel blends have a polynomial relation with the concentration of component fuels in the mixture. This behavior contradicts with the commonly used linear Le Chatelier's approximation. The experimentally determined polynomial relations between the flame extinction limits of fuel blends (i.e. methane-propane and methane-ethane) and methane concentration are as follows: (1) Methane-Propane--%f{sub ext} = (1.05 x 10{sup -9}) f{sup 5}-(1.3644 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(6.40299 x 10{sup -6}) f{sup 3}-(1.2108459 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2}+(2.87305329 x 10{sup -3}) f+2.2483; (2) Methane-Ethane--%f{sub ext} = (2.1 x 10{sup -9})f{sup 5}-(3.5752 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(2.095425 x 10{sup -5}) f{sup 3}-(5.037353 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2} + 6.08980409 f + 2.8923. Where f{sub ext} is the extinction limits of methane-propane and methane-ethane fuel blends, and f is the concentration (% volume) of methane in the fuel mixture. The relations were obtained by fitting fifth order curve (polynomial regression) to experimentally measured extinction limits at different mixture conditions. To extend the study to a commercial fuel, the flame extinction limit for Birmingham natural gas (a blend of 95% methane, 5% ethane and 5% nitrogen) was experimentally determined and was found to be 3.62% fuel in the air-fuel mixture.

  18. Shape coexistence in {sup 180}Hg studied through the {beta} decay of {sup 180}Tl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elseviers, J.; Bree, N.; Diriken, J.; Huyse, M.; Ivanov, O.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Barzakh, A.; Fedorov, D.; Cocolios, T. E.; Seliverstov, M.; Comas, V. F.; Heredia, J. A.; Fedosseyev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A.; Franchoo, S.; Page, R. D.

    2011-09-15

    The {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of {sup 180}Tl and excited states in the daughter nucleus {sup 180}Hg have been investigated at the CERN On-Line Isotope Mass Separator (ISOLDE) facility. Many new low-lying energy levels were observed in {sup 180}Hg, of which the most significant are the 0{sub 2}{sup +} at 419.6 keV and the 2{sub 2}{sup +} at 601.3 keV. The former is the bandhead of an excited band in {sup 180}Hg assumed originally to be of prolate nature. From the {beta} feeding to the different states in {sup 180}Hg, the ground-state spin of {sup 180}Tl was deduced to be (4{sup -},5{sup -}).

  19. New determination of the {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction rates at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumino, A.; Spartà, R.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Typel, S.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Hons, Z.; Mrazek, J.; Piskor, S.; Lamia, L.

    2014-04-20

    The cross sections of the {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reactions have been measured via the Trojan Horse method applied to the quasi-free {sup 2}H({sup 3}He,p {sup 3}H){sup 1}H and {sup 2}H({sup 3}He,n {sup 3}He){sup 1}H processes at 18 MeV off the proton in {sup 3}He. For the first time, the bare nucleus S(E) factors have been determined from 1.5 MeV, across the relevant region for standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis, down to the thermal energies of deuterium burning in the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase of stellar evolution, as well as of future fusion reactors. Both the energy dependence and the absolute value of the S(E) factors deviate by more than 15% from the available direct data and existing fitting curves, with substantial variations in the electron screening by more than 50%. As a consequence, the reaction rates for astrophysics experience relevant changes, with a maximum increase of up to 20% at the temperatures of the PMS phase. From a recent primordial abundance sensitivity study, it turns out that the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction is quite influential on {sup 7}Li, and the present change in the reaction rate leads to a decrease in its abundance by up to 10%. The present reaction rates have also been included in an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code to analyze their influence on the central deuterium abundance in PMS stars with different masses. The largest variation of about 10%-15% pertains to young stars (?1 Myr) with masses ?1 M {sub ?}.

  20. Measurement and analysis of the muonic x rays of /sup 151/Eu and /sup 153/Eu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Y.; Steffen, R.M.; Shera, E.B.; Reuter, W.; Hoehn, M.V.; Zumbro, J.D.

    1984-05-01

    Monopole and quadrupole charge distributions of /sup 151/Eu and /sup 153/Eu were investigated by muonic atom K and L x-ray measurements. The model-independent Barrett charge radii R/sub k/ and the isotope shift ..delta..R/sub k/ were measured, and the value of ..delta..sup 2/> = 0.606(18) fm/sup 2/ was deduced. This isotope shift is the largest known of all nuclear pairs. The isomer shift of the first excited state of /sup 153/Eu is found to be close to zero, in contrast to the large isomer shifts observed in its neighbors: /sup 152/Sm and /sup 154/Gd. The quadrupole moments of the first excited states were determined as Q/sup 151/((7/2)/sup +/) = 1.28(2) e b and Q/sup 153/((7/2)/sup +/) = 0.44(2) e b. The value for /sup 151/Eu and its ground-state quadrupole moment of Q/sup 151/((5/2)/sup +/) = 0.90(1) e b reported previously are several times larger than the respective single particle units. This fact shows that a fair amount of collectivity is involved in the (5/2)/sup +/ ground state and in the (7/2)/sup +/ first excited state of /sup 151/Eu.

  1. Analysis of states in {sup 13}C populated in {sup 9}Be + {sup 4}He resonant scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.; Curtis, N.; Kokalova, Tz.; Wheldon, C.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Scuderi, V.; Torresi, D.; Grassi, L.; Jelavic Malenica, D.; Koncul, M.; Mijatovic, T.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Szilner, S.; Tokic, V.; Milin, M.

    2011-09-15

    Measurements of {sup 9}Be + {alpha} resonant scattering have been performed using the thick-target approach with a {sup 4}He gas volume and a large-area silicon strip detector. {sup 9}Be beam energies in the range 12 to 21.4 MeV were used to measure the {sup 13}C excitation energy spectrum between 13.2 and 16.2 MeV. An R-matrix analysis has been performed to characterize the spins and widths of {sup 13}C resonances, some of which have been proposed to be associated with a 3{alpha}+n molecular band.

  2. Measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in inclusive electroproduction of ?<sup>-> near the Delta<sup>0sup> resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Androic, D.; Armstrong, D. S.; Bailey, S. L.; Beck, D. H.; Beise, E. J.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bimbot, L.; Birchall, J.; Bosted, P.; Breuer, H.; Capuano, C. L.; Chao, Y. -C.; Coppens, A.; Davis, C. A.; Ellis, C.; Flores, G.; Franklin, G.; Furget, C.; Gaskell, D.; Gericke, T. W.; Grames, J.; Guillard, G.; Hansknecht, J.; Horn, T.; Jones, M. K.; King, P. M.; Korsch, W.; Kox, S.; Lee, L.; Liu, J.; Lung, A.; Mammei, J.; Martin, J. W.; McKeown, R. D.; Micherdzinska, A.; Mihovilovic, M.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Muether, M.; Page, S. A.; Papvassiliou, V.; Pate, S. F.; Phillips, S. K.; Pillot, P.; Pitt, M. L.; Poelker, M.; Quinn, B.; Ramsay, W. D.; Real, J. -S.; Roche, J.; Roos, P.; Schaub, J.; Seva, T.; Simicevic, N.; Smith, G. R.; Spayde, D. T.; Stutzman, M.; Suleiman, R.; Tadevosyan, V.; van Oers, W. T.H.; Versteegen, M.

    2012-03-20

    The parity-violating (PV) asymmetry of inclusive ?<sup>-> production in electron scattering from a liquid deuterium target was measured at backward angles. The measurement was conducted as a part of the G0 experiment, at a beam energy of 360 MeV. The physics process dominating pion production for these kinematics is quasi-free photoproduction off the neutron via the ?<sup>0sup> resonance. In the context of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory (HB?PT), this asymmetry is related to a low energy constant d?<sup>-> that characterizes the parity-violating ?N? coupling. Zhu et al. calculated d?<sup>-> in a model benchmarked by the large asymmetries seen in hyperon weak radiative decays, and predicted potentially large asymmetries for this process, ranging from A?<sup>-> = -5.2 to +5.2 ppm. The measurement performed in this work leads to A?<sup>-> = -0.36 ± 1.06 ± 0.37 ± 0.03 ppm (where sources of statistical, systematic and theoretical uncertainties are included), which would disfavor enchancements considered by Zhu et al. proportional to Vud/Vus. The measurement is part of a program of inelastic scattering measurements that were conducted by the G0 experiment, seeking to determine the N-? axial transition form-factors using PV electron scattering.

  3. The Concentrations of {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th in Soil Sample in Osmaniye (Turkey)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkurt, I.; Guenoglu, K.; Kara, A.; Mavi, B.; Karaboerklue, S.

    2011-12-26

    The {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th concentration is due to the magmatic structure of the earth and it can be varied from place to place. Osmaniye is located in the Eastern side of Mediteranean Region. It holds the climatic characteristics of the same region and arises with Middle Taurus Mountains from west to North and with Amonos Mounations in East and West-east parts and is situated between 35 deg. .52'-36 deg. .42' east longitudes and 36 deg. .57'-37 deg. .45' north latitudes. In this study, the natural radioactivity concentrations {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th in some soil samples collected in Osmaniye have been investigated. The measurements have been performed using 3x3{sup ''} NaI(Tl) detector system.

  4. <sup>137sup> Cs Activities and <sup>135sup> Cs/ <sup>137sup> Cs Isotopic Ratios from Soils at Idaho National Laboratory: A Case Study for Contaminant Source Attribution in the Vicinity of Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.; Clark, Sue B.; Kelley, Morgan; Delmore, James E.

    2015-03-03

    Radiometric and mass spectrometric analyses of Cs contamination in the environment can reveal the location of Cs emission sources, release mechanisms, modes of transport, prediction of future contamination migration, and attribution of contamination to specific generator(s) and/or process(es). The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) represents a complicated case study for demonstrating the current capabilities and limitations to environmental Cs analyses. <sup>137sup>Cs distribution patterns, <sup>135sup>Cs/>137sup>Cs isotope ratios, known Cs chemistry at this site, and historical records enable narrowing the list of possible emission sources and release events to a single source and event, with the SDA identified as the emission source and flood transport of material from within Pit 9 and Trench 48 as the primary release event. These data combined allow refining the possible number of waste generators from dozens to a single generator, with INL on-site research and reactor programs identified as the most likely waste generator. A discussion on the ultimate limitations to the information that <sup>135sup>Cs/>137sup>Cs ratios alone can provide is presented and includes (1) uncertainties in the exact date of the fission event and (2) possibility of mixing between different Cs source terms (including nuclear weapons fallout and a source of interest).

  5. Excitation functions of the <sup>natTa(p,x)>178m2sup>Hf and <sup>natW(p,x)>178m2sup>Hf reactions at energies up to 2600 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Zhivun, V. M.; Chauzova, M. V.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich; Leray, S.; Boudard, A.; David, J. -C.; Mancusi, D.; Cugnon, J.; Yariv, Y.; Nishihara, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kumawat, H.; Stankovskiy, A. Yu.

    2015-04-29

    Due to potential level of energy intensity <sup>178m2sup>Hf is an extremely interesting isomer. One possible way to produce this isomer is irradiation of <sup>nat>Ta or <sup>nat>W samples with high energy protons. Irradiation of <sup>nat>Ta or <sup>nat>W samples performed for other purposes provides an opportunity to study the corresponding reactions. This paper presents the <sup>178m2sup>Hf independent production cross sections for both targets measured by the gamma-ray spectrometry method. The reaction excitation functions have been obtained for the proton energies from 40 up to 2600 MeV. The experimental results were compared with calculations by various versions of the intranuclear cascade model in the well-known codes: ISABEL, Bertini, INCL4.5+ABLA07, PHITS, CASCADE07 and CEM03.02. The isomer ratio for the <sup>nat>Ta(p,x) <sup>178m2sup>Hf reaction is evaluated on the basis of the available data.

  6. Observation of a Broad 1{sup --} Resonant Structure around 1.5 GeV/c{sup 2} in the K{sup +}K{sup -} Mass Spectrum in J/{psi}{yields}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Cui, X. Z.; Deng, Z. Y.; Dong, L. Y.; Du, S. X.; Du, Z. Z.; Fang, J.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; Guo, Y. Q. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)] (and others)

    2006-10-06

    A broad peak is observed at low K{sup +}K{sup -} invariant mass in J/{psi}{yields}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays found in a sample of 5.8x10{sup 7} J/{psi} events collected with the BESII detector. The statistical significance of the broad resonance is much larger than 5{sigma}. A partial wave analysis shows that the J{sup PC} of this structure is 1{sup --}. Its pole position is determined to be [1576{sub -55}{sup +49}(stat){sub -91}{sup +98}(syst)] MeV/c{sup 2}-(i/2)[818{sub -23}{sup +22}(stat){sub -133}{sup +64}(syst)] MeV/c{sup 2}. These parameters are not compatible with any known meson resonances.

  7. /sup 34/S, /sup 36/S, and /sup 18/O isotope effects on /sup 31/P chemical shifts in thiophosphate anhydrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roeske, C.; Paneth, P.; O'Leary, M.H.; Reimschuessel, W.

    1985-03-06

    /sup 34/S, /sup 36/S, and /sup 18/O isotope effects on /sup 31/P chemical shifts were measured for the isomeric thiophosphate anhydrides bis(5,5-dimethyl-2-oxo-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinanyl) sulfide (1) and P-oxo-P'-thionobis(5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinanyl) oxide (2). The doubly bonded S in 2 gave isotopic shifts of 0.0097 and 0.018 ppm upfield of P = /sup 32/S for /sup 34/S and /sup 36/S, respectively. The singly bonded S in 1 gave a smaller isotopic shift, the exact value being obscured by the line widths. /sup 18/O in the nonbridging position in 1 gave an isotopic shift of 0.0455 ppm. /sup 18/O in the bridging position in 2 gave an isotopic shift of 0.019 ppm. These observations confirm the expectation that /sup 36/S effects should be twice as large as the corresponding /sup 34/S effects.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of ASnF{sub 3} (A=Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thao Tran, T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, 136 Fleming Building, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States); Shiv Halasyamani, P., E-mail: psh@uh.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, 136 Fleming Building, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, Kemistintie 1, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2014-02-15

    A family of alkali metal tin(II) fluorides, ASnF{sub 3} (A=Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, or Cs{sup +}), has been synthesized through a low temperature solvothermal technique. A fluorine free solvent, methanol, was used in the synthesis. NaSnF{sub 3}, KSnF{sub 3}, and RbSnF{sub 3} have been reported previously; however for RbSnF{sub 3} the reported space group is incorrect. CsSnF{sub 3} is a new alkali tin(II) fluoride, and exhibits a ‘zero-dimensional’ crystal structure with isolated SnF{sub 3}{sup ?} anions separated by Cs{sup +} cations. In addition to the synthesis, infrared, UV–vis, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis measurements were performed. - Graphical abstract: Ball-and-stick diagrams of CsSnF{sub 3}. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A family of ASnF{sub 3} (A=Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +} or Cs{sup +}) has been synthesized solvothermally at low temperatures. • Fluorine-free solvent, methanol, was used instead of conventional fluorinating agents. • RbSnF{sub 3} described in the correct space group exhibits infinite chains of corner-sharing SnF{sub 4} polyhedra. • New CsSnF{sub 3} exhibits a ‘zero-dimensional’ crystal structure consisting of isolated SnF{sub 3}{sup ?} anionic polyhedra.

  9. Experimental study of the beta-delayed proton precursors /sup 33/Ar and /sup 49/Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU Xiao-ji; GUO Jun-sheng; GUO Ying-xiang; ZHAO Zhi-zheng; LUO Yi-xiao

    1985-01-01

    Beta-delayed proton precursors /sup 33/Ar and /sup 49/Fe have been produced via the (/sup 12/C,3n) reaction in 65-MeV carbon bombardments of /sup 24/Mg and /sup 40/Ca, respectively. The major proton peaks are at 3.28 +- 0.07 MeV for /sup 33/Ar and 1.98 +- 0.04 MeV for /sup 49/Fe. The corresponding cross section for /sup 33/Ar is 0.40 +- 0.08 ..mu..b, and for /sup 49/Fe 0.70 +- 0.14 ..mu..b. The half-life of /sup 33/Ar was determined to be 167 +- 24 ms.

  10. Elastic scattering measurements for {sup 7}Be+{sup 27}Al system at RIBRAS facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morcelle, V.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Morais, M. C.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Gasques, L.; Pires, K. C. C.; Condori, R. P.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Barioni, A.; Shorto, J. M. B.; Zamora, J. C.

    2013-05-06

    Elastic scattering angular distribution measurements of {sup 7}Be+{sup 27}Al system were performed at the laboratory energy of 15.6 MeV. The {sup 7}Be secondary beam was produced by the proton transfer reaction {sup 3}He({sup 6}Li,{sup 7}Be) and impinged on {sup 27}Al and {sup 197}Au targets, using the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, RIBRAS. The elastic angular distribution was obtained within the angular range of 15{sup 0} - 80{sup 0} at the center of mass frame. Optical model calculations have been performed using the Woods- Saxon form factors and the Sao Paulo potential to fit the experimental data. The total reaction cross section was derived.

  11. High spin states in {sup 143}Sm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raut, R.; Ganguly, S.; Kshetri, R.; Banerjee, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Dasmahapatra, B.; Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Sarkar, M. Saha; Goswami, A.; Gangopadhyay, G.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Krishichayan,; Chakraborty, A.; Ghughre, S. S.; Bhattacharjee, T.; Basu, S. K. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India); Department of Physics, University of Calcutta 92, A.P.C Rd. Kolkata-700009 (India); UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research LB-8, Sector III, Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700098 (India); Variable Energy Cyclotron Center 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700064 (India)

    2006-04-15

    The high spin states of {sup 143}Sm have been studied by in-beam {gamma}-spectroscopy following the reaction {sup 130}Te({sup 20}Ne,7n){sup 143}Sm at E{sub lab}=137 MeV, using a Clover detector array. More than 50 new gamma transitions have been placed above the previously known J{sup {pi}}=23/2{sup -}, 30 ms isomer at 2795 keV. The level scheme of {sup 143}Sm has been extended up to 12 MeV and spin-parity assignments have been made to most of the newly proposed level. Theoretical calculation with the relativistic mean field approach using blocked BCS method, has been performed. A sequence of levels connected by M1 transitions have been observed at an excitation energy {approx}8.6 MeV. The sequence appears to be a magnetic rotational band from systematics.

  12. Check for chirality in {sup 102}Rh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Yavahchova, M. S.; Petkov, P.; Angelis, G. de; Bhowmik, R. K.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Madhavan, N.; Kumar, R.; Raju, M. Kumar; Kaur, J.; Mahanto, G.; Singh, A.; Kaur, N.; Garg, R.; Sukla, A.; Marinov, Ts. K.; Brant, S.

    2012-10-20

    Excited states in {sup 102}Rh, populated by the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 94}Zr({sup 11}B,3n){sup 102}Rh at a beam energy of 36 MeV, were studied using the INGA spectrometer at IUAC, New Delhi. The angular correlations and the electromagnetic character of some of the gamma-ray transitions observed were investigated in details. A new chiral candidate sister band was found in the level-scheme of {sup 102}Rh. Lifetimes of exited states in {sup 102}Rh were measured by means of the Doppler-shift attenuation technique. The experimental results do not support the presence of static chirality in {sup 102}Rh.

  13. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  14. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA); Leggett, Robert D. (Richland, WA); Baker, Ronald B. (Richland, WA)

    1989-01-01

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  15. Infrared spectra of ClCN{sup +}, ClNC{sup +}, and BrCN{sup +} trapped in solid neon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacox, Marilyn E.; Thompson, Warren E. [Optical Technology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8441 (United States)

    2007-06-28

    When a mixture of ClCN or BrCN with a large excess of neon is codeposited at 4.3 K with a beam of neon atoms that have been excited in a microwave discharge, the infrared spectrum of the resulting solid includes prominent absorptions of the uncharged isocyanide, ClNC or BrNC, and of the corresponding cation, ClCN{sup +} or BrCN{sup +}. The NC-stretching fundamentals of the isocyanides trapped in solid neon lie close to the positions for their previously reported argon-matrix counterparts. The CN-stretching absorptions of ClCN{sup +} and BrCN{sup +} and the CCl-stretching absorption of ClCN{sup +} appear very close to the gas-phase band centers. Absorptions of two overtones and one combination band of ClCN{sup +} are identified. Reversible photoisomerization of ClCN{sup +} to ClNC{sup +} occurs. The two stretching vibrational fundamentals and several infrared and near infrared absorptions associated with electronic transitions of ClNC{sup +} are observed. Minor infrared peaks are attributed to the vibrational fundamental absorptions of the CX and CX{sup +} species (X=Cl,Br)

  16. Overview of advanced technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, K.B.; Foltyn, E.M.; Heslop, J.M.

    1998-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of potential technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has processed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel into heat sources for space and terrestrial uses for the past several decades. The 88-year half-life of {sup 238}Pu and thermal power of approximately 0.6 watts/gram make this isotope ideal for missions requiring many years of dependable service in inaccessible locations. However, the same characteristic which makes {sup 238}Pu attractive for heat source applications, the high Curie content (17 Ci/gram versus 0.06 Ci/gram for 239{sup Pu}), makes disposal of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste difficult. Specifically, the thermal load limit on drums destined for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), 0.23 gram per drum for combustible waste, is impossible to meet for nearly all {sup 238}Pu-contaminated glovebox waste. Use of advanced waste treatment technologies including Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and aqueous chemical separation will eliminate the combustible matrix from {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste and recover kilogram quantities of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} from the waste stream. A conceptual design of these advanced waste treatment technologies will be presented.

  17. Subthreshold pion production in the reaction /sup 139/La + /sup 139/La. -->. pi. /sup + -/ + X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.

    1988-01-01

    We have measured charged pion production in the reaction /sup 139/La + /sup 139/La ..-->.. ..pi../sup + -/ + X at three beam energies (246, 183 and 138 MeVnucleon) below the nucleon-nucleon threshold. Associated multiplicity for charged participants was obtained using a 110-element scintillator multiplicity array. Data were taken over the angular range of 21/degree/ to 67/degree/ in the laboratory (equivalent to 30/degree/ to 90/degree/ in the center of mass). Dependence of the spectra upon pion charge, energy and angle, beam energy, system mass and associated multiplicity was investigated. Based on the isotropic angular distibutions and the associated multiplicities for pion production, it appears that subthreshold pions in the range of our experiment are produced predominantly from a source at rest in the center of mass and involving a large number of nucleons. The general character of the subthreshold pion spectra is comparable to previous results above threshold. However, the scaling of the subthreshold pion yield with system mass deviates from the dependence observed in light systems, to an extent which cannot be explained by a simple nucleon-nucleon model. We also found charge dependent structure in the pion spectra, which we analysed in the framework of both Coulomb distortion and clustering models. We conclude that while we did not find clear evidence of collective effects in subthreshold pion production, it would be very worthwhile to conduct a systematic investigation of pion production for all charge states and over a range of angles, system masses and beam energies, below threshold. 170 refs., 78 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Synthesis of [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methacrylic acid, [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methyl methacrylate and/or related compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Marc A. (Santa Fe, NM); Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-01-22

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds of the formulae ##STR00001## wherein Q is selected from the group consisting of --S--, --S(.dbd.O)--, and --S(.dbd.O).sub.2--, Z is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group selected from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently selected from the group consisting of a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, an aryl, and an alkoxy group, and X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group, and a fully-deuterated C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group. The present invention is also directed to a process of preparing labeled compounds, e.g., process of preparing [.sup.13C]methacrylic acid by reacting a (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13CH.sub.2)-- aryl sulfone precursor with .sup.13CHI to form a (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13C(.sup.13CH.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfone intermediate, and, reacting the (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13C(.sup.13CH.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfone intermediate with sodium hydroxide, followed by acid to form [.sup.13C]methacrylic acid. The present invention is further directed to a process of preparing [.sup.2H.sub.8]methyl methacrylate by reacting a (HOOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate with CD.sub.3I to form a (.sup.2H.sub.3COOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate, and heating the(.sup.2H.sub.3COOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate at temperatures and for time sufficient to form [.sup.2H.sub.8]methyl methacrylate.

  19. Applications developed for byproduct /sup 85/Kr and tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remini, W.C.; Case, F.N.; Haff, K.W.; Tiegs, S.M.

    1983-01-01

    The radionuclides, krypton-85 and tritium, both of which are gases under ordinary conditions, are used in many applications in industries and by the military forces. Krypton-85 is produced during the fissioning of uranium and is released during the dissolution of spent-fuel elements. It is a chemically inert gas that emits 0.695-MeV beta rays and a small yield of 0.54-MeV gammas over a half life of 10.3 years. Much of the /sup 85/Kr currently produced is released to the atmosphere; however, large-scale reprocessing of fuel will require collection of the gas and storage as a waste product. An alternative to storage is utilization, and since the chemical and radiation characteristics of /sup 85/Kr make this radionuclide a relatively low hazard from the standpoint of contamination and biological significance, a number of uses have been developed. Tritium is produced as a byproduct of the nuclear-weapons program, and it has a half life of 12.33 years. It has a 0.01861-MeV beta emission and no gamma emission. The absence of a gamma-ray energy eliminates the need for external shielding of the devices utilizing tritium, thus making them easily transportable. Many of the applications require only small quantities of /sup 85/Kr or tritium; however, these uses are important to the technology base of the nation. A significant development that has the potential for beneficial utilization of large quantities of /sup 85/Kr and of tritium involves their use in the production of low-level lighting devices. Since these lights are free from external fuel supplies, have a long half life (> 10 years), are maintenance-free, reliable, and easily deployed, both military and civilian airfield-lighting applications are being studied.

  20. Double beta decays of {sup 106}Cd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suhonen, Jouni [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2011-12-16

    The two-neutrino (2{nu}2{beta}) and neutrinoless (0{nu}2{beta}) double beta decays of {sup 106}Cd are studied for the transitions to the ground state 0{sub gs}{sup +} and 0{sup +} and 2{sup +} excited states in {sup 106}Pd by using realistic many-body wave functions calculated in the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation. Effective, G-matrix-derived nuclear forces are used in realistic single-particle model spaces. All the possible channels, {beta}{sup +}{beta}{sup +}, {beta}{sup +}EC, and ECEC, are discussed for both the 2{nu}2{beta} and 0{nu}2{beta} decays. The associated half-lives are computed and particular attention is devoted to the study of the detectability of the resonant neutrinoless double electron capture (R0{nu}ECEC) process in {sup 106}Cd. The calculations of the present article constitute the thus far most complete and up-to-date investigation of the double-beta-decay properties of {sup 106}Cd.

  1. Decay of the 9/2{sup -} isomer in {sup 181}Tl and mass determination of low-lying states in {sup 181}Tl, {sup 177}Au, and {sup 173}Ir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Ackermann, D.; Comas, V. F.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Hessberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Cocolios, T. E.; Elseviers, J.; Huyse, M.; Van Duppen, P. Van; Venhart, M.; Franchoo, S.; Hofmann, S.

    2009-08-15

    A detailed spectroscopic study of the neutron-deficient isotope {sup 181}Tl and the daughter of its {alpha} decay, {sup 177}Au, has been performed in the complete fusion reaction {sup 40}Ca+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 184}Pb* at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI). The mass excess, excitation energy, and decay scheme of the isomeric 1.40(3) ms, 9/2{sup -} intruder state in {sup 181}Tl have been established for the first time. These results solve a long-standing puzzle of the unrealistically large reduced {alpha}-decay width of this isomer. Based on this, the previously unknown masses of the long-lived isomeric states in {sup 177}Au and {sup 173}Ir have been derived. In turn, it now allows the excitation energies of previously identified bands in {sup 177}Au and {sup 173}Ir to be deduced and compared with theoretical predictions. First measurements of {alpha}-decay branching ratios for {sup 181}Tl{sup m} and {sup 177}Au{sup m,g} are also reported.

  2. Neutron Multiplicity Measurements for <sup>19sup>F+>194,196,198sup>Pt Systems to Investigate the Effect of Shell Closure on Nuclear Dissipation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Varinderjit; Behera, B. R.; Kaur, Maninder; Kumar, A.; Sugathan, P.; Golda, K. S.; Jhingan, A.; Chatterjee, M. B.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Siwal, Davinder; Goyal, S.; Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Saxena, A.; Santra, S.; Kailas, S.

    2013-01-01

    Pre- and post-scission neutron multiplicities are measured for the three isotopes of Fr (<sup>217sup>Fr, <sup>215sup>Fr, and <sup>213sup>Fr) in the excitation energy range of 48 91.8 MeV. Out of these three isotopes, 213Fr has shell closure (NC = 126) while the other two are non-closed-shell nuclei. Statistical model calculations using Kramers fission width are performed to investigate shell effects on the dissipation strength which fit the experimental data. It is observed that shell correction to the binding energies of the evaporated particles strongly affects the fitted values of the dissipation strength. However, the best-fit dissipation strength is only weakly influenced by the inclusion of shell correction in fission barrier.

  3. D{sup 0}, D{sup +}, D{sub s}{sup +}, and {lambda}{sub c}{sup +} fragmentation functions from CERN LEP1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kniehl, Bernd A.; Kramer, Gustav

    2005-05-01

    We present new sets of nonperturbative fragmentation functions for D{sup 0}, D{sup +}, and D{sub s}{sup +} mesons as well as for {lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryons, both at leading and next-to-leading order in the MS factorization scheme with five massless quark flavors. They are determined by fitting data of e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation taken by the OPAL Collaboration at CERN LEP1. We take the charm-quark fragmentation function to be of the form proposed by Peterson et al. and thus obtain new values of the {epsilon}{sub c} parameter, which are specific for our choice of factorization scheme.

  4. Measurement and analysis of. cap alpha. particles emitted in reactions of /sup 12/C bombarding /sup 12/C, /sup 27/Al, and /sup nat/Ca

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XIE Yuan-xiang; WU Guo-hua; ZHU Yong-tai; MIAO Rong-zhi; FONG En-pu; YIN Xu; MIAO He-bing; CAI Jing-xiang; SHEN Wen-qing; SUN Shu-ming

    1985-10-01

    The energy spectra and angular distributions of the ..cap alpha.. particles emitted in the reactions of 69.5 MeV /sup 12/C bombarding /sup 12/C, /sup 27/Al, and /sup nat/Ca have been measured and analyzed using the fast-particle exciton model. The contribution from the equilibrium and pre-equilibrium ..cap alpha.. emissions is calculated to be 89%, 81%, and 83% of the total ..cap alpha.. yields for the three reactions, respectively, where the pre-equilibrium ..cap alpha.. emissions are 11%, 14%, and 16%, respectively. A small contribution comes from other reaction mechanisms.

  5. Measurement of the reaction cross section of {sup 18}C and observations of fragments from {sup 17}C and {sup 18}C at 80A MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozawa, A.; Fang, D. Q.; Fukuda, M.; Iwasa, N.; Izumikawa, T.; Jeppesen, H.; Kanungo, R.; Koyama, R.; Ohtsubo, T.; Shinozaki, W.; Takahashi, M.; Ohnishi, T.; Suda, T.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Suzuki, T.; Tanihata, I.; Wu, C.

    2008-11-15

    The one- and two-neutron removal reactions from {sup 17}C and {sup 18}C as well as the reaction cross section of {sup 18}C have been studied using a carbon target at 80A MeV. The longitudinal momentum distributions of {sup 15,16}C fragments from {sup 17}C and {sup 16,17}C fragments from {sup 18}C were measured by a direct time-of-flight method. The width of {sup 15}C fragments from {sup 17}C is fairly smaller than that from other C isotopes. The experimental data are discussed within the framework of the Glauber model.

  6. Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)Forthcoming UpgradesArea: PADD 1 to PADDFuelFuelFuel

  7. Synthetic Fuel

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

    2010-01-08

    Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

  8. Growth and characterization of isotopically enriched [sup 70]Ge and [sup 74]Ge single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, K.

    1992-10-01

    Isotopically enriched [sup 70]Ge and [sup 74]Ge single crystals were successfully gown by a newly developed vertical Bridgman method. The system allows us to reliably grow high purity Ge single crystals of approximately 1 cm[sup 3] volume. To our knowledge, we have grown the first [sup 70]Ge single crystal. The electrically active chemical impurity concentration for both crystals was found to be [approximately]2 [times] cm[sup [minus]3] which is two order of magnitude better that of [sup 74]Ge crystals previously grown by two different groups. Isotopic enrichment of the [sup 70]Ge and the [sup 74]Ge crystals is 96.3% and 96.8%, respectively. The residual chemical impurities present in both crystals were identified as phosphorus, copper, aluminum, and indium. A wide variety of experiments which take advantage of the isotopic purity of our crystals are discussed.

  9. Growth and characterization of isotopically enriched {sup 70}Ge and {sup 74}Ge single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Itoh, K.

    1992-10-01

    Isotopically enriched {sup 70}Ge and {sup 74}Ge single crystals were successfully gown by a newly developed vertical Bridgman method. The system allows us to reliably grow high purity Ge single crystals of approximately 1 cm{sup 3} volume. To our knowledge, we have grown the first {sup 70}Ge single crystal. The electrically active chemical impurity concentration for both crystals was found to be {approximately}2 {times} cm{sup {minus}3} which is two order of magnitude better that of {sup 74}Ge crystals previously grown by two different groups. Isotopic enrichment of the {sup 70}Ge and the {sup 74}Ge crystals is 96.3% and 96.8%, respectively. The residual chemical impurities present in both crystals were identified as phosphorus, copper, aluminum, and indium. A wide variety of experiments which take advantage of the isotopic purity of our crystals are discussed.

  10. Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department is investing in groundbreaking research that will make cars weigh less, drive further and consume less fuel.

  11. Intrinsic state lifetimes in {sup 103}Pd and {sup 106,107}Cd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, S. F.; Thomas, N. J.; Regan, P. H.; Gelletly, W.; Andgren, K.; McCutchan, E. A.; Casten, R. F.; Plettner, C.; Vinson, J.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.; Zamfir, N. V.; Amon, L.; Cakirli, R. B.; Clark, R. M.; Guerdal, G.; Keyes, K. L.; Papenberg, A.; Meyer, D. A.; Erduran, M. N.

    2007-12-15

    The mean-lifetimes, {tau}, of various medium-spin excited states in {sup 103}Pd and {sup 106,107}Cd have been deduced using the Recoil Distance Doppler Shift technique and the Differential Decay Curve Method. In {sup 106}Cd, the mean-lifetimes of the I{sup {pi}}=12{sup +} state at E{sub x}=5418 keV and the I{sup {pi}}=11{sup -} state at E{sub x}=4324 keV have been deduced as 11.4(17)ps and 8.2(7)ps, respectively. The associated {beta}{sub 2} deformation within the axially-symmetric deformed rotor model for these states are 0.14(1) and 0.14(1), respectively. The {beta}{sub 2} deformation of 0.14(1) for the I{sup {pi}}=12{sup +} state in {sup 106}Cd compares with a predicted {beta}{sub 2} value from total Routhian surface (TRS) calculations of 0.17. In addition, the mean-lifetimes of the yrast I{sup {pi}}=(15/2){sup -} states in {sup 103}Pd (at E{sub x}=1262 keV) and {sup 107}Cd (at E{sub x}=1360 keV) have been deduced to be 31.2(44)ps and 31.4(17)ps, respectively, corresponding to {beta}{sub 2} values of 0.16(1) and 0.12(1) assuming axial symmetry. Agreement with TRS calculations are good for {sup 103}Pd but deviate for that predicted for {sup 107}Cd.

  12. Prompt Proton Decay and Deformed Bands in <sup>56sup>Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johansson, E. K.; Rudolph, D.; Andersson, L. L.; Torres, D. A.; Ragnarsson, I.; Andreoiu, C.; Baktash, Cyrus; Carpenter, M. P.; Charity, R. J.; Chiara, C. J.; Ekman, J.; Fahlander, C.; Hoel, C.; Pechenaya, O. L.; Reviol, W.; du Rietz, R.; Sarantites, D. G.; Seweryniak, D.; Sobotka, L. G.; Yu, Chang-Hong; Zhu, S.

    2008-06-01

    High-spin states in the doubly magic N=Z nucleus {sup 56}Ni have been investigated with three fusion-evaporation reaction experiments. New {gamma}-ray transitions are added, and a confirmation of a previously suggested prompt proton decay from a rotational band in {sup 56}Ni into the ground state of {sup 55}Co is presented. The rotational bands in {sup 56}Ni are discussed within the framework of cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations.

  13. Cyclotron production of {sup 61}Cu using natural Zn and enriched {sup 64}Zn targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asad, A. H.; Smith, S. V.; Chan, S.; Jeffery, C. M.; Morandeau, L.; Price, R. I. [RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia, Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, Australia, and Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Can (Australia); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States) and Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, and Chemistry, University of Western Australia, Pe (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia and Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)

    2012-12-19

    Copper-61 ({sup 61}Cu) shares with {sup 64}Cu certain advantages for PET diagnostic imaging, but has a shorter half-life (3.4hr vs. 12.7hr) and a greater probability of positron production per disintegration (61% vs. 17.9%). One important application is for in vivo imaging of hypoxic tissue. In this study {sup 61}Cu was produced using the {sup 64}Zn(p,{alpha}){sup 61}Cu reaction on natural Zn or enriched {sup 64}Zn targets. The enriched {sup 64}Zn (99.82%) was electroplated onto high purity gold or silver foils or onto thin Al discs. A typical target bombardment used 30{mu}A; at 11.7, 14.5 or 17.6MeV over 30-60min. The {sup 61}Cu (radiochemical purity of >95%) was separated using a combination of cation and anion exchange columns. The {sup 64}Zn target material was recovered after each run, for re-use. In a direct comparison with enriched {sup 64}Zn-target results, {sup 61}Cu production using the cheaper {sup nat}Zn target proved to be an effective alternative.

  14. Fuels Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping intoand DavidEnergyVirginiaEnergy|Fuels

  15. {sup 16}O resonances near 4? threshold through {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Faria, P. Neto de; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M.; Napoli, M. di; Ukita, G. M.

    2014-11-11

    Several narrow alpha resonant {sup 16}O states were detected through the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction, in the range of 13.5 to 17.5 MeV of excitation energy. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the São Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion technique. Experimental angular distributions associated with natural parity quasi-bound states around the 4? threshold are presented and compared to DWBA predictions. The upper limit for the resonance widths obtained is near the energy resolution (15 keV)

  16. A validation of the [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He method for determining groundwater recharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, D.K. ); Schiff, S.L. ); Poreda, R.J. ); Clarke, W.B. )

    1993-09-01

    Tritium and He isotopes have been measured at a site where groundwater flow is nearly vertical for a travel time of 100 years and where recharge rates are spatially variable. Because the mid-1960s [sup 3]H peak (arising from aboveground testing of thermonuclear devices) is well-defined, the vertical groundwater velocity is known with unusual accuracy at this site. Utilizing [sup 3]H and its stable daughter [sup 3]He to determine groundwater ages, we compute a recharge rate of 0.16 m/yr, which agrees to within about 5% of the value based on the depth of the [sup 3]H peak (measured both in 1986 and 1991) and two-dimensional modeling in an area of high recharge. Zero [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He age occurs at a depth that is approximately equal to the average depth of the annual low water table, even though the capillary fringe extends to land surface during most of the year at the study site. In an area of low recharge (0.05 m/yr) where the [sup 3]H peak (and hence the vertical velocity) is also well-defined, the [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He results could not be used to compute recharge because samples were not collected sufficiently far above the [sup 3]H peak; however, modeling indicates that the [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He age gradient near the water table is an accurate measure of vertical velocities in the low-recharge area. Because [sup 3]H and [sup 3]He have different diffusion coefficients, and because the amount of mechanical mixing is different in the area of high recharge than in the low-recharge area, we have separated the dispersive effects of mechanical mixing from molecular diffusion. We estimate a longitudinal dispersivity of 0.07 m and effective diffusion coefficients for [sup 3]H ([sup 3]HHO) and [sup 3]He of 2.4 x 10[sup [minus]5] and 1.3 x 10[sup [minus]4] m[sup 2]/day, respectively. 26 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Attempt to confirm superheavy element production in the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 238}U reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregorich, K.E.; Sudowe, R.; Loveland, W.; Sprunger, P.; Peterson, D.; Zielinski, P.M.; Nelson, S.L.; Duellmann, Ch.E.; Folden III, C.M.; Hoffman, D.C.; Wilson, R.E.; Nitsche, H.; Chung, Y.H.; Aleklett, K.; Eichler, R.; Soverna, S.; Omtvedt, J.P.; Pang, G.K.; Schwantes, J.M.

    2005-07-01

    An attempt to confirm production of superheavy elements in the reaction of {sup 48}Ca beams with actinide targets has been performed using the {sup 238}U({sup 48}Ca,3n){sup 283}112 reaction. Two {sup 48}Ca projectile energies were used that spanned the energy range where the largest cross sections have been reported for this reaction. No spontaneous fission events were observed. No {alpha} decay chains consistent with either reported or theoretically predicted element 112 decay properties were observed. The cross-section limits reached are significantly smaller than the recently reported cross sections.

  18. Alternate-fuel reactor studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, K. Jr.; Ehst, D.A.; Gohar, Y.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Turner, L.R.

    1983-02-01

    A number of studies related to improvements and/or greater understanding of alternate-fueled reactors is presented. These studies cover the areas of non-Maxwellian distributions, materials and lifetime analysis, a /sup 3/He-breeding blanket, tritium-rich startup effects, high field magnet support, and reactor operation spanning the range from full D-T operation to operation with no tritium breeding.

  19. Parity nonconservation in {sup 106}Pd and {sup 108}Pd neutron resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, B.E.; Roberson, N.R. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States)] [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States); Bowman, J.D.; Knudson, J.N.; Penttilae, S.I.; Seestrom, S.J.; Yuan, V.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Delheij, P.P. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (CANADA)] [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (CANADA); Haseyama, T.; Masaike, A.; Matsuda, Y. [Physics Department, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-01 (Japan)] [Physics Department, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-01 (Japan); Lowie, L.Y.; Mitchell, G.E.; Stephenson, S.L. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States)] [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States); Postma, H. [Delft University of Technology, Delft, 2629 JB (The Netherlands)] [Delft University of Technology, Delft, 2629 JB (The Netherlands); Sharapov, E.I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russia)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russia)

    1999-11-01

    Parity nonconservation (PNC) has been studied in the neutron {ital p}-wave resonances of {sup 106}Pd and {sup 108}Pd in the energy range of 20 to 2000 eV. Longitudinal asymmetries in {ital p}-wave capture cross sections are measured using longitudinally polarized neutrons incident on {approximately}20-g metal-powder targets at LANSCE. A CsI {gamma}-ray detector array measures capture cross section asymmetries as a function of neutron energy which is determined by the neutron time-of-flight method. A total of 21 {ital p}-wave resonances in {sup 106}Pd and 21 {ital p}-wave resonances in {sup 108}Pd were studied. One statistically significant PNC effect was observed in {sup 106}Pd, and no effects were observed in {sup 108}Pd. For {sup 106}Pd a weak spreading width of {Gamma}{sub w}=34{sub {minus}28}{sup +47}{times}10{sup {minus}7} eV was obtained. For {sup 108}Pd an upper limit on the weak spreading width of {Gamma}{sub w}{lt}12{times}10{sup {minus}7} eV was determined at the 68{percent} confidence level. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. THE {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li ISOTOPE RATIO NEAR THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT IC 443

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, C. J.; Ritchey, A. M.; Federman, S. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Lambert, D. L., E-mail: corbin.taylor@rockets.utoledo.edu, E-mail: steven.federman@utoledo.edu, E-mail: aritchey@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu [W. J. McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-05-01

    We present an analysis of {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li isotope ratios along four sight lines that probe diffuse molecular gas near the supernova remnant IC 443. Recent gamma-ray observations have revealed the presence of shock-accelerated cosmic rays interacting with the molecular cloud surrounding the remnant. Our results indicate that the {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li ratio is lower in regions more strongly affected by these interactions, a sign of recent Li production by cosmic rays. We find that {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li Almost-Equal-To 7 toward HD 254755, which is located just outside the visible edge of IC 443, while {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li Almost-Equal-To 3 along the line of sight to HD 43582, which probes the interior region of the supernova remnant. No evidence of {sup 7}Li synthesis by neutrino-induced spallation is found in material presumably contaminated by the ejecta of a core-collapse supernova. The lack of a neutrino signature in the {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li ratios near IC 443 is consistent with recent models of Galactic chemical evolution, which suggest that the {nu}-process plays only a minor role in Li production.

  1. The ({sup 18}O, {sup 16}O) reaction as a probe for nuclear spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Bondì, M.; Nicolosi, D.; Tropea, S.; Agodi, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Cunsolo, A.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; De Napoli, M.; Linares, R.

    2014-11-11

    The response of nuclei to the ({sup 18}O, {sup 16}O) two-neutron transfer reaction at 84 MeV incident energy has been systematically studied at the Catania INFN-LNS laboratory. The experiments were performed using several solid targets from light ({sup 9}Be, {sup 11}B, {sup 12,13}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 28}Si) to heavy ones ({sup 58,64}Ni, {sup 120}Sn, {sup 208}Pb). The {sup 16}O ejectiles were detected at forward angles by the MAGNEX magnetic spectrometer. Exploiting the large momentum acceptance (?10%, +14%) and solid angle (50 msr) of the spectrometer, energy spectra were obtained with a relevant yield up to about 20 MeV excitation energy. The application of the powerful trajectory reconstruction technique did allow to get energy spectra with energy resolution of about 150 keV and angular distributions with angular resolution better than 0.3°. A common feature observed with light nuclei is the appearance of unknown resonant structures at high excitation energy. The strong population of these latter together with the measured width can reveal the excitation of a collective mode connected with the transfer of a pair.

  2. Use of .sup.3 He.sup.30 + ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Belle Mead, NJ); Hwang, David Q. (Lawrencevill, NJ); Hovey, Jane (Plainsboro, NJ)

    1986-04-22

    Neutron activation due to high levels of neutron production in a first heated deuterium-tritium plasma is substantially reduced by using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating of energetic .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions in a second deuterium-.sup.3 He.sup.++ plasma which exhibit an energy distribution and density similar to that of alpha particles in fusion reactor experiments to simulate fusion alpha particle heating in the first plasma. The majority of the fast .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions and their slowing down spectrum can be studied using either a modulated hydrogen beam source for producing excited states of He.sup.+ in combination with spectrometers or double charge exchange with a high energy neutral lithium beam and charged particle detectors at the plasma edge. The maintenance problems thus associated with neutron activation are substantially reduced permitting energetic alpha particle behavior to be studied in near term large fusion experiments.

  3. Transportation Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout / Transforming Y-12Capacity-Forum

  4. Renewable Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners *ReindustrializationEnergyWind Energy Wind Energy Renewable

  5. fuel cells

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 3446 YEAR/%2Afissile4/%2A en

  6. Department of Li/sup /minus// and H/sup /minus// ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walther, S.R.

    1988-12-01

    Sources of Li/sup /minus// and H/sup /minus// ions are needed for diagnostic neutral beam and for current drive in fusion plasmas. Previous efforts to generate Li/sup /minus// beams have focused on electron capture in a gas or production on a low work function surface in a plasma. Volume production of Li/sup /minus// by dissociative attachment of optically pumped lithium molecules has also been studied. This thesis presents the first experimental results for volume production of a Li/sup /minus// ion beam from a plasma discharge. A theoretical model for volume production of Li/sup /minus// ions and separate model for Li/sub 2/ production in the lithium discharge are developed to explain the experimental results. The model is in good agreement with the experiment and shows favorable parameter scalings for further improvement of the Li/sup /minus// ion source. A /sup 6/Li/degree/ diagnostic neutral beam based on this ion source is proposed for measurement of magnetic pitch angle in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Previous efforts in developing H/sup /minus// ion sources have concentrated on volume production in a plasma discharge. Experiments to improve the H/sup /minus// current density from a magnetically filtered multicusp ion source by seeding the discharge with cesium or barium have been conducted. A substantial (> factor of five) increase in H/sup /minus// output is achieved for both cesium and barium addition. Further experiments with barium have shown that the increase is due to H/sup /minus// production on the anode walls. The experiments with cesium are consistent with this formation mechanism. These results show that this new type of 'converterless' surface production H/sup /minus// source provides greatly improved performance when compared to a volume H/sup /minus// source. 92 refs., 47 figs.

  7. Air concentrations of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu and potential radiation doses to persons living near Pu-contaminated areas in Palomares, Spain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iranzo, E.; Salvador, S.; Iranzo, C.E.

    1987-04-01

    On 17 January 1966, an accident during a refueling operation resulted in the destruction of an air force KC-135 tanker and a B-52 bomber carrying four thermonuclear weapons. Two weapons, whose parachutes opened, were found intact. The others experienced non-nuclear explosion with some burning and release of the fissile fuel at impact. Joint efforts by the United States and Spain resulted in remedial action and a long-term program to monitor the effectiveness of the cleanup. Air concentrations of /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu have been continuously monitored since the accident. The average annual air concentration for each location was used to estimate committed dose equivalents for individuals living and working around the air sampling stations. The average annual /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu air concentrations during the 15-y period corresponding to 1966-1980 and the potential committed dose equivalents for various tissues due to the inhalation of the /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu average annual air concentration during this period are shown and discussed in the report.

  8. Isoscalar giant resonances in {sup 48}Ca

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lui, Y.-W.; Youngblood, D. H.; Shlomo, S.; Chen, X.; Tokimoto, Y.; Krishichayan,; Anders, M.; Button, J. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    The giant resonance region from 9.5 MeV < E{sub x} < 40 MeV in {sup 48}Ca has been studied with inelastic scattering of 240-MeV {alpha} particles at small angles, including 0 deg. 95{sub -15}{sup +11}% of E0 energy-weighted sum rule (EWSR), 83{sub -16}{sup +10}% of E2 EWSR, and 137 {+-} 20% of E1 EWSR were located below E{sub x}=40 MeV. A comparison of the experimental data with calculated results for the isoscalar giant monopole resonance, obtained within the mean-field-based random-phase approximation, is also given.

  9. First Observations of Nonhydrodynamic Mix at the Fuel-Shell Interface in Shock-Driven Inertial Confinement Implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Amendt, P.; Delettrez, J.; Bellei, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Betti, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Landen, O.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Wilks, S.; Greenwood, A.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-04-01

    A strong nonhydrodynamic mechanism generating atomic fuel-shell mix has been observed in strongly shocked inertial confinement fusion implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells filled with <sup>3sup>He gas. These implosions were found to produce D<sup>3sup>He-proton shock yields comparable to implosions of identical shells filled with a hydroequivalent 50:50 D<sup>3sup>He gas mixture. Standard hydrodynamic mixing cannot explain this observation, as hydrodynamic modeling including mix predicts a yield an order of magnitude lower than was observed. Instead, these results can be attributed to ion diffusive mix at the fuel-shell interface.

  10. Comparison studies of head-end reprocessing using three LWR fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goode, J.H.; Stacy, R.G.; Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1980-06-01

    The removal of {sup 3}H by voloxidation and the dissolution behavior of two PWR and one BWR fuels were compared in hot-cell studies. The experiments showed that >99% of the {sup 3}H contained in the irradiated UO{sub 2} was volatilized by oxidation in air at 753{sup 0}K (480{sup 0}C). The oxidation did not affect the dissolution of the uranium and plutonium in 7 M HNO{sub 3} (0.02 to 0.03% insoluble plutonium) but did create a fission-product residue that was two to three times more insoluble. From 40 to 69% of the ternary fission-product {sup 3}H was found in the Zircaloy cladding of the fuel rods. Voloxidation had little effect on the {sup 3}H held in the Zircaloy cladding; oxidation for 6 h at 753{sup 0}K released only 0.05% of the {sup 3}H.

  11. pi. sup minus p r arrow. pi. sup 0. pi. sup 0 n near threshold and chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowe, J.; Bassalleck, B.; Burkhardt, H.; Fickinger, W.J.; Hall, J.R.; Hasinoff, M.D.; Horvath, D.; Koch, G.; Larson, K.D.; Miller, J.P.; Noble, A.; Roberts, B.L.; Robinson, D.K.; Sakitt, M.; Sevior, M.E.; Tanner, N.W.; Waltham, C.E.; Warner, T.M.; Wolfe, D.M. (University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B152TT, United Kingdom Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts (USA) University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada) Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York (USA) Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio (USA) Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest (Hungary) University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico (USA) University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG72RD, United Kingdom Oxford University, Oxford, OX13RH, United Kingdom TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada)

    1991-09-01

    Total cross sections, angular, and mass distributions for the reaction {pi}{sup {minus}}{ital p}{r arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{ital n} have been measured for {ital p}{sub {pi}}{sup {minus}}(lab)=7--140 MeV/{ital c} above threshold. The threshold amplitude was used to determine a value for the chiral-symmetry-breaking parameter, {xi}, of {minus}0.98{plus minus}0.52. The {pi}{pi} scattering lengths {ital a}{sub {ital I}} for isospin {ital I}=0 and 2 are derived from this result, together with a current-algebra sum rule. The results are {ital a}{sub 0}=(0.207{plus minus}0.028){ital m}{sub {pi}}{sup {minus}1} and {ital a}{sub 2}=({minus}0.022{plus minus}0.011){ital m}{sub {pi}}{sup {minus}1}. These values are consistent with chiral symmetry broken by the Weinberg {pi}{pi} interaction and the effects of the {ital f}{sub 0}(975) scalar meson.

  12. Fuel injector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambeth, Malcolm David Dick (Bromley, GB)

    2001-02-27

    A fuel injector comprises first and second housing parts, the first housing part being located within a bore or recess formed in the second housing part, the housing parts defining therebetween an inlet chamber, a delivery chamber axially spaced from the inlet chamber, and a filtration flow path interconnecting the inlet and delivery chambers to remove particulate contaminants from the flow of fuel therebetween.

  13. The {sup 14}C-Cluster and Molecular bands in the Oxygen Isotopes {sup 18,20}O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oertzen, W. von [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, Freie Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Dorsch, T.; Bohlen, H. G. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-08-26

    We have studied states in {sup 18}O and {sup 20}O with the ({sup 7}Li,p) reaction on {sup 12}C and {sup 14}C targets at E{sub lab}({sup 7}Li) = 44 MeV, using the high resolution Q3D magnetic spectrometer at the Maier-Leibnitz-Laboratory in Munich. The systematics of the excitation energies and cross sections were used to construct rotational bands with high moments of inertia. The bands observed are discussed in terms of underlying ({sup 14}C x {sup 4}He)-cluster structure for {sup 18}O, and for {sup 20}O the cluster structures are ({sup 14}C x {sup 6}He) and ({sup 14}C x 2n x alpha). The intrinsically reflection asymmetric shapes give rise to molecular bands, which appear as parity inversion doublets.

  14. Fuel rail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haigh, M.; Herbert, J.D.; O'Leary, J.J.

    1988-09-20

    This patent describes a fuel rail for a V-configuration automotive type internal combustion engine having a throttle body superimposed over an intake manifold. The throttle body has an air plenum above an induction channel aligned with a throttle bore passage in the manifold for flow or air to the engine cylinders. The rail includes a spacer body mounted sealingly between the throttle body and the manifold of the engine and having air induction passages therethrough to connect the throttle body channels and the manifold, the spacer body having at least on longitudinal bore defining a fuel passage extending through the spacer body, and a fuel injector receiving cups projecting from and communicating with the fuel passage. The spacer body consists of a number of separated spacer members, and rail member means through which the fuel passage runs joining the spacer members together.

  15. Method for selective recovery of PET-usable quantities of [.sup.18 F] fluoride and [.sup.13 N] nitrate/nitrite from a single irradiation of low-enriched [.sup.18 O] water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Shea, Colleen (Wading River, NY)

    1995-06-13

    A process for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- for radiotracer synthesis is disclosed. The process includes producing [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- simultaneously by exposing a low-enriched (20%-30%) [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target to proton irradiation, sequentially isolating the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target, and reducing the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- to [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3. The [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- products are then conveyed to a laboratory for radiotracer applications. The process employs an anion exchange resin for isolation of the isotopes from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O, and sequential elution of [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [ .sup.18 F]F.sup.- fractions. Also the apparatus is disclosed for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from a single irradiation of a single low-enriched [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target.

  16. The {sup 18}O(d,p){sup 19}O reaction and the ANC method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burjan, V.; Hons, Z.; Kroha, V.; Mrázek, J.; Pisko?, Š. [Nuclear Physics Institute of Czech Academy of Sciences, 250 68 ?ež (Czech Republic); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Pizzone, G. R.; Puglia, S. M. R.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Spartà, R.; Spitaleri, C. [Università di Catania and INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Gulino, M.; Tumino, A. [Università degli Studi di Enna KORE, Enna, Italy and Università di Catania and INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)

    2014-05-09

    The neutron capture rate {sup 18}O(n,?){sup 19}O is important for analysis of nucleosynthesis in inhomogeneous Big Bang models and also for models of processes in massive red giant stars and AGB stars. Angular distributions of the {sup 18}O(d,p){sup 19}O reaction were measured at a deuteron energy of 16.3 MeV in NPI in ?ež, Czech Republic, with the aim to determine Asymptotic Normalization Coefficients which can then be used for indirect determination of the direct contribution to the {sup 18}O(n,?){sup 19}O process. In the experiment, the gas target with {sup 18}O isotope of high purity 99.9 % was used thus eliminating any contaminating reactions. Reaction products were measured by the set of 8 ?E-E telescopes consisting of thin and thick silicon surface-barrier detectors. Angular distributions of proton transfers corresponding to 6 levels of {sup 19}O up to the 4.1093 MeV excitation energy were determined. The analysis of angular distributions in the angular range from 6 to 64 degree including also the angular distribution of elastically scattered deuterons was carried out by means of ECIS and DWUCK codes. From the determined ANCs the direct contribution to the radiative capture {sup 18}O(n,?){sup 19}O was deduced and compared with existing direct measurements.

  17. Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspac...

  18. High spin states in {sup 139}Pm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhal, A.; Sinha, R. K.; Chaturvedi, L.; Agarwal, P.; Kumar, S.; Jain, A. K.; Kumar, R.; Govil, I. M.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Chakraborty, A.; Krishichayan; Ray, S.; Ghugre, S. S.; Sinha, A. K.; Kumar, R.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Pancholi, S. C.; Gupta, J. B. [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005 (India); Department of Physics, IIT Roorkee, Roorkee-247 667 (India); Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160 014 (India); UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Centre, Kolkata-700 098 (India); Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi-110 067 (India); Ramjas College, Delhi University, Delhi-110 007 (India)

    2009-07-15

    The odd mass nucleus {sup 139}Pm has been studied to high spins through the {sup 116}Cd({sup 27}Al,4n){sup 139}Pm reaction at an incident beam energy of 120 MeV. The de-exciting {gamma}-rays were detected using an array of 12 Compton suppressed Ge detectors. A total of 46 new levels have been proposed in the present work as a result of the observation of 60 new {gamma}-rays. Four new bands including a {delta}J=1 sequence have been identified and all the earlier reported bands, other than the yrast band, have been extended to higher spins and excitation energy. The spin assignments for most of the newly reported levels have been made using the observed coincidence angular anisotropy. Tilted axis cranking calculations support the interpretation of two of the observed magnetic dipole sequences as examples of magnetic rotational bands.

  19. Photodisintegration of the isotope {sup 116}Cd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belyshev, S. S.; Ishkhanov, B. S. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)] [Moscow State University (Russian Federation); Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A.; Khankin, V. V.; Shvedunov, N. V., E-mail: gg.swedn@gmail.com [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    The results obtained by measuring the yields of photodisintegration of the isotope {sup 116}Cd irradiated with bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum had an endpoint energy of 55 MeV are presented and compared with the results of theoretical calculations.

  20. Measurement of K<sup>0sup>S and K<sup>*0sup> in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.

    2014-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K<sup>0sup>S and K<sup>*0sup> meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K<sup>0sup>S and K<sup>*0sup> mesons are reconstructed via their K<sup>0sup>S and ?<sup>0sup>(???)?>0sup> (???) and K<sup>*0sup> ? K <sup>±#25;sup>?±> decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K<sup>0sup>S and K<sup>*0sup> mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K<sup>0sup>S and K<sup>*0sup> mesons is almost constant as a function of transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 2–5 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K<sup>0sup>S, K<sup>*0sup>) similarly to the #30;? meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (?<sup>0sup>) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ?2. (auth)

  1. Half Life of {sup 127}Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, Wagner F.; Genezini, Frederico A.; Zamboni, Cibele B.; Zahn, Guilherme S. [Centro do Reator de Pesquisas (CRPq)-Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP). Av. Linneu Prestes, 2242-Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo, SP, 05507-000 (Brazil)

    2009-06-03

    In this work, the half life of the beta-unstable nucleus {sup 127}Te was studied using neutron-irradiated samples of {sup 126}Te. The gamma activity of each of the irradiated samples was followed for 3-5 consecutive half lives. The results were analysed in two different ways, and the resulting half-life was 9.295(5)h, which is compatible with the tabulated value of 9.35(7)h, with much lower uncertainty.

  2. Quantum Coherence between Two Atoms beyond Q=10{sup 15}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, C. W.; Hume, D. B.; Thorpe, M. J.; Wineland, D. J.; Rosenband, T. [Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)

    2011-04-22

    We place two atoms in quantum superposition states and observe coherent phase evolution for 3.4x10{sup 15} cycles. Correlation signals from the two atoms yield information about their relative phase even after the probe radiation has decohered. This technique allowed a frequency comparison of two {sup 27}Al{sup +} ions with fractional uncertainty 3.7{sub -0.8}{sup +1.0}x10{sup -16}/{radical}({tau}/s). Two measures of the Q factor are reported: The Q factor derived from quantum coherence is 3.4{sub -1.1}{sup +2.4}x10{sup 16}, and the spectroscopic Q factor for a Ramsey time of 3 s is 6.7x10{sup 15}. We demonstrate a method to detect the individual quantum states of two Al{sup +} ions in a Mg{sup +}-Al{sup +}-Al{sup +} linear ion chain without spatially resolving the ions.

  3. CRITICAL REVIEW OF N, N{sup +}, N{sup +} {sub 2}, N{sup ++}, And N{sup ++} {sub 2} MAIN PRODUCTION PROCESSES AND REACTIONS OF RELEVANCE TO TITAN'S ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutuit, Odile; Thissen, Roland; Vuitton, Veronique; Canosa, Andre; Picard, Sebastien Le; Loison, Jean-Christophe; Ascenzi, Daniela; Tosi, Paolo; Franceschi, Pietro; Price, Stephen D.; Lavvas, Panayotis

    2013-02-15

    This paper is a detailed critical review of the production processes and reactions of N, N{sup +}, N{sup +} {sub 2}, N{sup ++}, and N{sup ++} {sub 2} of relevance to Titan's atmosphere. The review includes neutral, ion-molecule, and recombination reactions. The review covers all possible active nitrogen species under Titan's atmospheric conditions, specifically N{sub 2} (A {sup 3}{Sigma}{sup +} {sub u}), N ({sup 4} S), N ({sup 2} D), N ({sup 2} P), N{sup +} {sub 2}, N{sup +} ({sup 3} P), N{sup +} ({sup 1} D), N{sup ++} {sub 2}, and N{sup ++} species, and includes a critical survey of the reactions of N, N{sup +}, N{sup +} {sub 2}, N{sup ++}, and N{sup ++} {sub 2} with N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6}, C{sub 3}H{sub 8} and the deuterated hydrocarbon analogs, as well as the recombination reactions of N{sup +} {sub 2}, N{sup +}, N{sup ++} {sub 2}, and N{sup ++}. Production processes, lifetimes, and quenching by collisions with N{sub 2} of all reactant species are reviewed. The N ({sup 4} S) state is reactive with radicals and its reactions with CH{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 3}, and C{sub 2}H{sub 5} are reviewed. Metastable states N{sub 2} (A {sup 3}{Sigma}{sup +} {sub u}), N ({sup 2} D), and N ({sup 2} P) are either reactive or quenched by collisions with the target molecules reviewed. The reactions of N{sup +} ({sup 1} D) have similar rate constants as N{sup +} ({sup 3} P), but the product branching ratios differ significantly. Temperature effects and the role of the kinetic energy content of reactants are investigated. In all cases, experimental uncertainties of laboratory data are reported or estimated. Recommended values with uncertainties, or estimated values when no data are available, are given for rate constants and product branching ratios at 300 K and at the atmospheric temperature range of Titan (150-200 K for neutral reactions and 150 K for ion reactions).

  4. Isospin symmetry and proton decay: Identification of the 10{sup +} isomer in {sup 54}Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolph, D.; Hellstroem, M.; Andersson, L.-L.; Fahlander, C.; Johansson, E. K. [Department of Physics, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Hoischen, R. [Department of Physics, Lund University, S-22100 Lund (Sweden); Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Pietri, S.; Podolyak, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Steer, S. J. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Garnsworthy, A. B. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8124 (United States); Becker, F.; Gerl, J.; Gorska, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Schaffner, H.; Wollersheim, H. J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Bednarczyk, P.; GrePbosz, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics (IFJ PAN), PL-31342 Krakow (Poland)] (and others)

    2008-08-15

    The {gamma} decays from an isomeric 10{sup +} state at 6457 keV in the nucleus {sub 28}{sup 54}Ni{sub 26} have been identified using the GSI fragment separator in conjunction with the RISING Ge-detector array. The state is interpreted as the isobaric analog of the 6527-keV 10{sup +} isomer in {sub 26}{sup 54}Fe{sub 28}. The results are discussed in terms of isospin-dependent shell-model calculations. Clear evidence is presented for a discrete l=5 proton decay branch into the first excited 9/2{sup -} state of the daughter {sup 53}Co. This decay is the first of its kind observed following projectile fragmentation reactions.

  5. Two-neutron stripping in ({sup 18}O, {sup 16}O) and (t,p) reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavallaro, M.; Agodi, A.; Carbone, D.; Cunsolo, A.; Bondì, M.; Cappuzzello, F.; Nicolosi, D.; Tropea, S.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; De Napoli, M.; Garcia, V. N.

    2014-11-11

    The {sup 12}C({sup 18}O,{sup 16}O){sup 14}C reactions has been investigated at 84 MeV incident energy. The charged ejectiles produced in the reaction have been momentum analyzed and identified by the MAGNEX magnetic spectrometer. Q-value spectra have been extracted with an energy resolution of 160 keV (Full Width at Half Maximum) and several known bound and resonant states of {sup 14}C have been identified up to 15 MeV. In particular, excited states with dominant 2p - 4h configuration are the most populated. The absolute values of the cross sections have been extracted showing a striking similarity with those measured for the same transitions by (t,p) reactions. This indicates that the effect of the {sup 16}O core is negligible in the reaction mechanism.

  6. Evidence for an Excess of B??D<sup>(*)>????? Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.

    2012-09-06

    Based on the full BABAR data sample, we report improved measurements of the ratios R(D<sup>(*)sup>)=B(B??D<sup>(*)sup>???¯?)/B(B??D<sup>(*)>ll), where l is either e or ?. These ratios are sensitive to new physics contributions in the form of a charged Higgs boson. We measure R(D)=0.440±0.058±0.042 and R(D*)=0.332±0.024±0.018, which exceed the standard model expectations by 2.0? and 2.7?, respectively. Taken together, our results disagree with these expectations at the 3.4? level. This excess cannot be explained by a charged Higgs boson in the type II two-Higgs-doublet model.

  7. Photoluminescence properties of rare earths (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}) activated NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} wolframite host lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asiri Naidu, S.; Boudin, S. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Materiaux, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS, 6 Bd Marechal Juin, F-14050 Caen (France); Varadaraju, U.V. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Raveau, B., E-mail: bernard.raveau@ensicaen.fr [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Materiaux, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS, 6 Bd Marechal Juin, F-14050 Caen (France)

    2012-01-15

    The photoluminescence (PL) studies on NaIn{sub 1-x}RE{sub x}W{sub 2}O{sub 8}, with RE=Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} phases have shown that the relative contribution of the host lattice and of the intra-f-f emission of the activators to the PL varies with the nature of the rare earth cation. In the case of Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} activators, with yellow and blue emission, respectively, the energy transfer from host to the activator plays a major role. In contrast for Eu{sup 3+}, with intense red emission, the host absorption is less pronounced and the intra-f-f transitions of the Eu{sup 3+} ions play a major role, whereas for Tb{sup 3+} intra-f-f transitions are only observed, giving rise to green emission. - Graphical abstract: NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} double tungstate doped with Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}and Tm{sup 3+} shows characteristic emission of intense red for Eu{sup 3+}, yellow for Dy{sup 3+}, green for Tb{sup 3+} and blue for Tm{sup 3+}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic emissions of rare earths (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}) are observed NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} wolframite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy transfer from host to the activators (Eu{sup 3+} Dy{sup 3+} Tm{sup 3+} is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL properties of rare earth ions depend on minor structural variations in the host lattice.

  8. Synthesis of isotopically labeled R- or S-[.sup.13C, .sup.2H] glycerols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Alvarez, Marc A.

    2008-01-22

    The present invention is directed to asymmetric chiral labeled glycerols including at least one chiral atom, from one to two .sup.13C atoms and from zero to four deuterium atoms bonded directly to a carbon atom, e.g., (2S) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol and (2R) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol, and to the use of such chiral glycerols in the preparation of labeled amino acids.

  9. Fuel economizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwierzelewski, V.F.

    1984-06-26

    A fuel economizer device for use with an internal combustion engine fitted with a carburetor is disclosed. The fuel economizer includes a plate member which is mounted between the carburetor and the intake portion of the intake manifold. The plate member further has at least one aperture formed therein. One tube is inserted through the at least one aperture in the plate member. The one tube extends longitudinally in the passage of the intake manifold from the intake portion toward the exit portion thereof. The one tube concentrates the mixture of fuel and air from the carburetor and conveys the mixture of fuel and air to a point adjacent but spaced away from the inlet port of the internal combustion engine.

  10. Effect of Tb{sup 3+} concentration on the optical and vibrational properties of YBO{sub 3} tri-doped with Eu{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+}, and Tb{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohal, S.; Hassanzadeh, E.; Huang, J. Y. [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University and Nano Tech Center, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Nazari, M.; Holtz, M., E-mail: mark.holtz@txstate.edu [Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States); Zhang, X.; Chaudhuri, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Kuryatkov, V. V. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Hope-Weeks, L. J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2014-05-14

    Structural and optical studies are reported of yttrium orthoborate YBO{sub 3} when tri-doped with Eu{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+}, and Tb{sup 3+}, focusing on the role of terbium concentration. Incorporation of Tb{sup 3+} affects emission properties for photoluminescence (PL) excited by near ultraviolet light. For constant cerium and europium concentrations, increasing the Tb{sup 3+} results in diminished PL from the Ce{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} color centers. Simultaneously, the PL excitation bands related to both Ce{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} increase in intensity for red emission from the Eu{sup 3+}. Results are consistent with a Ce{sup 3+}???(Tb{sup 3+}){sub n}???Eu{sup 3+} energy transfer scheme, where (Tb{sup 3+}){sub n} denotes a chain incorporating n terbium ions. A high red to orange PL intensity ratio is obtained, ranging from 1.34 to 2.09. Raman vibrational bands show a systematic change, with Tb{sup 3+} concentration, in the B{sub 3}O{sub 9} ring terminal oxygen bending mode coordinated with the yttrium site where dopant ions substitute. The structural changes are interpreted as variations in the local neighborhood of these sites in the YBO{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+},Eu{sup 3+} crystal structure.

  11. Low-energy D{sup +} and H{sup +} ion irradiation effects on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kue Park, Jun; Won Lee, Kyu; Hee Han, Jun; Jung Kweon, Jin; Kim, Dowan; Eui Lee, Cheol [Department of Physics and Institute for Nano Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Institute for Nano Science, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sun-Taek; Kim, Gon-Ho [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, S. J.; Kim, H. S. [Department of Applied Physics, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Applied Physics, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-07

    We have investigated the low-energy (100 eV) D{sup +} and H{sup +} ion irradiation effects on the structural and chemical properties of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). Structural disorder due to the ion irradiation was identified by the Raman spectroscopy, the D{sup +} irradiation giving rise to greater structural disorder than the H{sup +} irradiation. Only sp{sup 2} bonding was identified in the X-ray photoemission spectroscopy of the D{sup +}-irradiated HOPG, indicating no change in the surface chemical structure. The H{sup +} irradiation, on the other hand, gave rise to sp{sup 3} bonding and ???{sup *} transition, the sp{sup 3} bonding increasing with increasing irradiation dose. It is thus shown that the chemical properties of the HOPG surface may be sensitively modified by the low-energy H{sup +} ion irradiation, but not by the low-energy D{sup +} ion irradiation.

  12. {beta} decay spectroscopy of {sup 192}Pt and the nature of 0{sup +} excitations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Casten, R. F.; Werner, V.; Winkler, R.; Cakirli, R. B.; Gurdal, G.; Liang, X.; Williams, E.; Physics; Yale Univ.; Istanbul Univ.; Clark Univ.; Univ.of Paisley

    2008-07-01

    Excited states in {sup 192}Pt were populated in {beta}{sup +}/{epsilon} decay and studied through off-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. New coincidence data give no support for several reported low-energy, low-spin states proposed in {beta} decay and lead to a substantially revised level scheme. The structure of {sup 192}Pt is discussed in terms of both single-space IBA-1 calculations and two-space IBA calculations with configuration mixing. Both models together suggest that it is the perhaps the 04{sup +} state that corresponds to an intruder excitation, resulting from the excitation of a pair of protons across the Z=82 closed shell.

  13. Fuel Cells and Renewable Gaseous Fuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cell Technologies Office | 1 7142015 Fuel Cells and Renewable Gaseous Fuels Bioenergy 2015: Renewable Gaseous Fuels Breakout Session Sarah Studer, PhD ORISE Fellow Fuel Cell...

  14. Fuel cell membranes and crossover prevention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); York, Cynthia A. (Newington, CT); Waszczuk, Piotr (White Bear Lake, MN); Wieckowski, Andrzej (Champaign, IL)

    2009-08-04

    A membrane electrode assembly for use with a direct organic fuel cell containing a formic acid fuel includes a solid polymer electrolyte having first and second surfaces, an anode on the first surface and a cathode on the second surface and electrically linked to the anode. The solid polymer electrolyte has a thickness t:.gtoreq..times..times..times..times. ##EQU00001## where C.sub.f is the formic acid fuel concentration over the anode, D.sub.f is the effective diffusivity of the fuel in the solid polymer electrolyte, K.sub.f is the equilibrium constant for partition coefficient for the fuel into the solid polymer electrolyte membrane, I is Faraday's constant n.sub.f is the number of electrons released when 1 molecule of the fuel is oxidized, and j.sub.f.sup.c is an empirically determined crossover rate of fuel above which the fuel cell does not operate.

  15. Relative brightness of the O{sup +}({sup 2} D-{sup 2} P) doublets in low-energy aurorae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whiter, D. K. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Erik Palménin Aukio 1, FI-00560 Helsinki (Finland); Lanchester, B. S.; Gustavsson, B.; Jallo, N. I. B.; Jokiaho, O.; Dahlgren, H. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Ivchenko, N., E-mail: daniel.whiter@fmi.fi [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Teknikringen 31, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-12-10

    The ratio of the emission line doublets from O{sup +} at 732.0 nm (I {sub 732}) and 733.0 nm (I {sub 733}) has been measured in auroral conditions of low-energy electron precipitation from Svalbard (78.°20 north, 15.°83 east). Accurate determination of R = I {sub 732}/I {sub 733} provides a powerful method for separating the density of the O{sup +} {sup 2} P{sub 1} {sub /2,3} {sub /2}{sup o} levels in modeling of the emissions from the doublets. A total of 383 spectra were included from the winter of 2003-2004. The value obtained is R = I {sub 732}/I {sub 733} = 1.38 ± 0.02, which is higher than theoretical values for thermal equilibrium in fully ionized plasma, but is lower than reported measurements by other authors in similar auroral conditions. The continuity equations for the densities of the two levels are solved for different conditions, in order to estimate the possible variations of R. The results suggest that the production of ions in the two levels from O ({sup 3} P {sub 1}) and O ({sup 3} P {sub 2}) does not follow the statistical weights, unlike astrophysical calculations for plasmas in nebulae. The physics of auroral impact ionization may account for this difference, and therefore for the raised value of R. In addition, the auroral solution of the densities of the ions, and thus of the value of R, is sensitive to the temperature of the neutral atmosphere. Although the present work is a statistical study, it shows that it is necessary to determine whether there are significant variations in the ratio resulting from non-equilibrium conditions, from auroral energy deposition, large electric fields, and changes in temperature and composition.

  16. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 240-MeV {sup 6}Li ions from {sup 40}Ca and {sup 48}Ca and tests of a systematic optical potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishichayan,; Chen, X.; Lui, Y.-W.; Button, J.; Youngblood, D. H. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2010-04-15

    Elastic and inelastic scattering of 240-MeV {sup 6}Li particles from {sup 40}Ca and {sup 48}Ca were measured with the multipole-dipole-multipole spectrometer from 4 deg. <=theta{sub c.m.}<=40 deg. Optical potential parameters were obtained by fitting the elastic-scattering data with the double-folding model using the density-dependent M3Y NN effective interaction and B(E2) and B(E3) values obtained for low-lying 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} states agreed with the adopted values. The results are compared with those obtained using potentials derived from the systematics of potentials previously obtained for {sup 24}Mg, {sup 28}Si, {sup 58}Ni, and {sup 90}Zr. Cross sections for excitation of giant resonances were also calculated with the potentials obtained.

  17. Charmed meson physics accessible to an L = 10/sup 33/ cm/sup /minus/2/ sec/sup /minus/1/ e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collider operating near charm threshold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schindler, R.H.

    1989-06-01

    In this report, the potential for dedicated charmed D/sup 0/, D/sup +/ and D/sub s/ meson physics in a high-luminosity e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collider operated near charm threshold is explored. The construction of such a high-luminosity collider or Tau-Charm Factory in conjunction with a new detector whose design draws heavily on the extensive operational experience of previous detectors at SPEAR, could achieve three orders-of-magnitude improvement in sensitivity in most areas of charmed meson studies. 27 refs., 10 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Near- and sub-barrier fusion of {sup 6}He+{sup 40}Ar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinnefeld, J.D.; Kolata, J.J.; Belbot, M.; Lamkin, K.; Zahar, M.; Santi, P.; Kugi, J.

    1993-10-01

    A measurement of the fusion cross section for {sup 6}He + {sup 40}Ar near and below the Coulomb barrier has been performed using a {sup 6}He beam from the UND/Um radioactive beam facility. The {sup 6}He nucleus is thought to have a neutron skin surrounding a {sup 6}He core. If this is the case, then Coulomb polarization of the core relative to the halo might result in neutron flow along a neck, and therefore to a large enhancement of the sub-barrier fusion cross section. {sup 6}He nuclei, of incident energy 10.05 {+-} 0.44 MeV, were directed into a segmented ionization counter (MUSIC) filled with P10 at 40 torr. The {sup 40}Ar in the detector gas served also as the target nuclei. {sup 6}He energies in the 50-cm active length of the detector varied from 7.75 MeV down to 3.05 MeV. Calculations indicate that fusion events should be distinguishable from most non-fusion events on the basis of energy deposition patterns in the ten MUSIC detector segments. For some large-angle scattering events a more elaborate analysis involving detailed Monte Carlo simulation of the various reactions is necessary.

  19. The {sup 30}P(p, ?){sup 31}S reaction in classical novae: progress and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wrede, C., E-mail: wrede@nscl.msu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    The unknown thermonuclear rate of the {sup 30}P(p, ?){sup 31}S reaction at classical-nova temperatures currently prohibits the accurate modeling of nova nucleosynthesis in the A ? 30 region. This is hindering the calibration of nova thermometers based on observed O/S, S/Al, O/P, and P/Al abundance ratios in nova ejecta, the calibration of a meter to probe mixing at the core-envelope interface in novae based on the observed Si/H abundance ratio, and the identification of candidate pre-solar nova grains found in primitive meteorites based on laboratory measurements of their {sup 30}Si/{sup 28}Si isotopic ratios. Each of these diagnostics could address key questions in our understanding of classical novae if the {sup 30}P(p, ?){sup 31}S rate were known. We review progress on the determination of the {sup 30}P(p, ?){sup 31}S rate leading to a critical assessment of current interpretations of published data and prospects for future work.

  20. Hematological responses after inhaling {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}: An extrapolation from beagle dogs to humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, B.R.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Welsh, C.A.; Angerstein, D.A.

    1994-11-01

    The alpha emitter plutonium-238 ({sup 238}Pu), which is produced in uranium-fueled, light-water reactors, is used as a thermoelectric power source for space applications. Inhalation of a mixed oxide form of Pu is the most likely mode of exposure of workers and the general public. Occupational exposures to {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} have occurred in association with the fabrication of radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Organs and tissue at risk for deterministic and stochastic effects of {sup 238}Pu-alpha irradiation include the lung, liver, skeleton, and lymphatic tissue. Little has been reported about the effects of inhaled {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} on peripheral blood cell counts in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate hematological responses after a single inhalation exposure of Beagle dogs to alpha-emitting {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} particles and to extrapolate results to humans.

  1. Adaptive architectures for peak power management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kontorinis, Vasileios

    2013-01-01

    the energy stored in UPSs (Uninterruptible Power Supply). Bystored in data center Uninterruptible Power Sup- plies (UPS)

  2. GeoMelt{sup R} ICV{sup TM} Treatment of Sellafield Pond Solids Waste - 13414

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witwer, Keith; Woosley, Steve; Campbell, Brett [Kurion, Inc., GeoMelt Division, 3015 Horn Rapids Road, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Kurion, Inc., GeoMelt Division, 3015 Horn Rapids Road, Richland, Washington (United States); Wong, Martin; Hill, Joanne [AMEC Inc., Birchwood Park, 601 Faraday Street, Birchwood, Warrington, WA3 6GN (United Kingdom)] [AMEC Inc., Birchwood Park, 601 Faraday Street, Birchwood, Warrington, WA3 6GN (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Kurion, Inc., in partnership with AMEC Ltd., is demonstrating its GeoMelt{sup R} In-Container Vitrification (ICV){sup TM} Technology to Sellafield Ltd. (SL). SL is evaluating the proposition of directly converting a container (skip/box/drum) of raw solid ILW into an immobilized waste form using thermal treatment, such that the resulting product is suitable for interim storage at Sellafield and subsequent disposal at a future Geological Disposal Facility. Potential SL feed streams include sludges, ion-exchange media, sand, plutonium contaminated material, concrete, uranium, fuel cladding, soils, metals, and decommissioning wastes. The solid wastes have significant proportions of metallic constituents in the form of containers, plant equipment, structural material and swarf arising from the nuclear operations at Sellafield. GeoMelt's proprietary ICV process was selected for demonstration, with the focus being high and reactive metal wastes arising from solid ILW material. A composite surrogate recipe was used to demonstrate the technology towards treating waste forms of diverse types and shapes, as well as those considered difficult to process; all the while requiring few (if any) pre-treatment activities. Key strategic objectives, along with their success criterion, were established by SL for this testing, namely: 1. Passivate and stabilize the raw waste simulant, as demonstrated by the entire quantity of material being vitrified, 2. Immobilize the radiological and chemo-toxic species, as demonstrated via indicative mass balance using elemental analyses from an array of samples, 3. Production of an inert and durable product as evidenced by transformation of reactive metals to their inert oxide forms and satisfactory leachability results using PCT testing. Two tests were performed using the GeoMelt Demonstration Unit located at AMEC's Birchwood Park Facilities in the UK. Post-melt examination of the first test indicated some of the waste simulant had not fully processed, due to insufficient processing time and melt temperature. A second test, incorporating operational experience from the first test, was performed and resulted in all of the 138 kg of feed material being treated. The waste simulant portion, at 41 kg, constituted 30 wt% of the total feed mass, with over 90% of this being made up of various reactive and non-reactive metals. The 95 liters of staged material was volume reduced to 41 liters, providing a 57% overall feed to product volume reduction in a fully passivated two-phase glass/metal product. The GeoMelt equipment operated as designed, vitrifying the entire batch of waste simulant. Post-melt analytical testing verified that 91-99+% of the radiological tracer metals were uniformly distributed within the glass/cast refractory/metal product, and the remaining fraction was captured in the offgas filtration systems. PCT testing of the glass and inner refractory liner showed leachability results that outperform the DOE regulatory limit of 2 g/m{sup 2} for the radiological species of interest (Sr, Ru, Cs, Eu, Re), and by more than an order of magnitude better for standard reference analytes (B, Na, Si). (authors)

  3. Spectroscopy of {sup 52,53}Sc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhattacharyya, S.; Rejmund, M.; Navin, A.; Gelin, M.; Mittig, W.; Mukherjee, G.; Rejmund, F.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Poves, A.; Theisen, Ch.

    2009-01-15

    Excited states of neutron-rich odd-A and odd-odd Sc isotopes, populated in deep inelastic multinucleon transfer reactions, induced by a {sup 238}U beam on a thin {sup 48}Ca target, have been identified. A strong feeding of both yrast and nonyrast states in such a reaction is illustrated using a combination of a large efficiency spectrometer and a {gamma} detector array. The structure of the populated states is interpreted in terms of the role of the valence proton and neutrons and compared to shell model calculations in the full pf shell.

  4. Properties of excited states in {sup 77}Ge.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kay, B. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Schiffer, J. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Zhu, S.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; McCutchan, E. A.; Seweryniak, D.; Stefanescu, I.; Univ. of Maryland; Horia-Hulubei National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering

    2009-07-01

    The nucleus {sup 77}Ge was studied through the {sup 76}Ge({sup 13}C,{sup 12}C){sup 77}Ge reaction at a sub-Coulomb energy. The angular distributions of rays depopulating excited states in {sup 77}Ge were measured in order to constrain spin and parity assignments. Some of these assignments are of use in connection with neutrinoless double beta decay, where the population of states near the Fermi surface of {sup 76}Ge was recently explored using transfer reactions.

  5. 1-/sup 11/C-D-glucose and related compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiue, C.Y.; Wolf, A.P.

    1982-01-26

    The novel compounds 1-/sup 11/C-D-glucose, 1-/sup 11/C-D-mannose, 1-/sup 11/C-D-galactose, 2-/sup 11/C-D-glucose, 2-/sup 11/C-D-mannose and 2-/sup 11/C-D-galactose which can be used in nuclear medicine to monitor the metabolism of glucose and galactose can be rapidly prepared by reaction of the appropriate aldose substrate with an alkali metal /sup 11/C-labeled cyanide followed by reduction with a Raney alloy in formic acid.

  6. {alpha} decay of {sup 180,181}Pb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Ackermann, D.; Comas, V. F.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Hessberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Cocolios, T. E.; Elseviers, J.; Huyse, M.; Duppen, P. Van; Venhart, M.; Franchoo, S.; Hofmann, S.

    2009-11-15

    A detailed {alpha}-decay study of the neutron-deficient isotope {sup 181}Pb has been performed in the complete fusion reaction {sup 40}Ca+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 184}Pb* at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI, Darmstadt). In comparison with the literature, more precise data have been deduced for the I{sup {pi}}=(9/2{sup -}) ground state in this nucleus, which is presumably based on the neutron {nu}h{sub 9/2} spherical orbital. Improved {alpha}-decay data were also measured for {sup 180}Pb.

  7. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ?s<sup>J/??> using the flavor-tagged decay Bs<sup>0sup>?J/ ?? in 8 fb?¹ of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2012-02-22

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ?s<sup>J/??>, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ??s, from the flavor-tagged decay B<sup>0sup>s?J/??. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb?¹ accumulated with the D0 detector using pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ??s=0.163<sup>+0.065sup>?0.064 ps?¹ and ?s<sup>J/??>=?0.55<sup>+0.38sup>?0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  8. A compilation of information on the {sup 31}P(p,{alpha}){sup 28}Si reaction and properties of excited levels in the compound nucleus {sup 32}S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.E.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Technology Development Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Technology Development Div.

    1997-11-01

    This report documents a survey of the literature, and provides a compilation of data contained therein, for the {sup 31}P(p,{alpha}){sup 28}Si reaction. Attention is paid here to resonance states in the compound-nuclear system {sup 32}S formed by {sup 31}P + p, with emphasis on the alpha-particle decay channels, {sup 28}Si + {alpha} which populate specific levels in {sup 28}Si. The energy region near the proton separation energy for {sup 32}S is especially important in this context for applications in nuclear astrophysics. Properties of the excited states in {sup 28}Si are also considered. Summaries of all the located references are provided and numerical data contained in them are compiled in EXFOR format where applicable.

  9. Crystal structure of chloryl tetrafluoroborate ClO/sub 2//sup +/BF/sub 4//sup -/ at -120/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antipin, M.Yu.; Ellern, A.M.; Sukhoverkhov, V.F.; Struchkov, Yu.T.; Buslaev, Yu.A.

    1987-10-01

    The authors have synthesized and examined chloryl tetrafluoroborate, which is formed by the reaction of boron trifluoride with chlorine trifluoride in the presence of traces of water. A single crystal suitable for use was obtained by zone melting at -20/sup 0/C, zone traverse rate 0.6 mm/h. The crystals are monoclinic, and at -120/sup 0/C: a = 5.427(3), b = 8.517(5), c = 9.446(5) A, ..beta.. = 97.97(4)/sup 0/, V = 432.4(3) A/sup 3/, Z = 4, space group Cc. The data indicate that the ClF/sub 2//sup +/BF/sub 4//sup -/ is hydrolyzed by water adsorbed on the capillary, which results in ClO/sub 2//sup +/BF/sub 4//sup -/; it has been shown that this compound is formed under analogous conditions in the reaction of ClF/sub 3/ and BF/sub 3/.

  10. Prompt Gamma Rays in {sup 77}Ge after Neutron Capture on {sup 76}Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meierhofer, Georg; Grabmayr, Peter; Jochum, Josef [Physikalisches Institut, Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Canella, Lea [Institut fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Jolie, Jan; Kudejova, Petra; Warr, Nigel [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne (Germany)

    2009-01-28

    The observation of neutrinoless double beta decay would be proof of the Majorana nature of the neutrino. Half-lives for these decays are very long (for {sup 76}Ge:>10{sup 25} y), so background reduction and rejection is the major task for double beta experiments. The GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment at the Gran Sasso Laboratory of the INFN (LNGS) searches for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. The isotope {sup 76}Ge is an ideal candidate because it can be used as source and detector at the same time. A large remaining contribution to the background arises from the prompt gamma cascade after neutron capture by {sup 76}Ge followed by {beta}{sup -}-decay of {sup 77}Ge. Since the prompt gamma decay scheme is poorly known, measurements with isotopically enriched Germanium samples were carried out at the PGAA facility at the research reactor FRM II (Munich). With the known prompt gamma spectrum it will be possible to improve the overall veto efficiency of the GERDA experiment.

  11. FIRST INTERSTELLAR HCO{sup +} MASER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakobian, Nicholas S.; Crutcher, Richard M., E-mail: nhakobi2@illinois.edu, E-mail: crutcher@illinois.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W. Green St. Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    A previously unseen maser in the J = 1-0 transition of HCO{sup +} has been detected by the Combined Array for Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). A subarcsecond map was produced of the 2 arcmin{sup 2} region around DR21(OH), which has had previous detections of OH and methanol masers. This new object has remained undetected until now due to its extremely compact size. The object has a brightness temperature of >2500 K and an FWHM linewidth of 0.497 km s{sup -1}, both of which suggest non-thermal line emission consistent with an unsaturated maser. This object coincides in position and velocity with the methanol maser named DR21(OH)-1 by Plambeck and Menten. No compact HCO{sup +} emission was present in the CARMA data toward the other methanol masers described in that Letter. These new results support the theory introduced in Plambeck and Menten that these masers likely arise from strong outflows interacting with low mass, high density pockets of molecular gas. This is further supported by recent observations of a CO outflow by Zapata et al. that traces the outflow edges and confirms that the maser position lies along the edge of the outflow where interaction with molecular tracers can occur.

  12. mRNA Transcript Abundance during Plant Growth and the Influence of Li<sup>+> Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duff, M. C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Kuhne, W. W. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Halverson, N. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Chang, C. -S. [Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, Augusta, GA (United States). Integrated Genomics Core; Kitamura, E. [Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, Augusta, GA (United States). Integrated Genomics Core; Hawthorn, L. [Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, Augusta, GA (United States). Integrated Genomics Core; Milliken, C. E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Caldwell, E. F. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Stieve-Caldwell, E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Martinez, N. E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences; Stafford, C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Univ. of South Carolina Medical School, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li<sup>+> concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li<sup>+> focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li<sup>+> exposure in Arabidopsis with Li<sup>+> uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li<sup>+>-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li<sup>+> resembled prior studies due to its influence on: inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li<sup>+> exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li<sup>+> exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li<sup>+>-sensitive genes and a gene-based “response plan” for acute and chronic Li<sup>+> exposure are delineated.

  13. Decay Heat Calculations for PWR and BWR Assemblies Fueled with Uranium and Plutonium Mixed Oxide Fuel using SCALE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ade, Brian J; Gauld, Ian C

    2011-10-01

    In currently operating commercial nuclear power plants (NPP), there are two main types of nuclear fuel, low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, and mixed-oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX) fuel. The LEU fuel is made of pure uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2} or UOX) and has been the fuel of choice in commercial light water reactors (LWRs) for a number of years. Naturally occurring uranium contains a mixture of different uranium isotopes, primarily, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U. {sup 235}U is a fissile isotope, and will readily undergo a fission reaction upon interaction with a thermal neutron. {sup 235}U has an isotopic concentration of 0.71% in naturally occurring uranium. For most reactors to maintain a fission chain reaction, the natural isotopic concentration of {sup 235}U must be increased (enriched) to a level greater than 0.71%. Modern nuclear reactor fuel assemblies contain a number of fuel pins potentially having different {sup 235}U enrichments varying from {approx}2.0% to {approx}5% enriched in {sup 235}U. Currently in the United States (US), all commercial nuclear power plants use UO{sub 2} fuel. In the rest of the world, UO{sub 2} fuel is still commonly used, but MOX fuel is also used in a number of reactors. MOX fuel contains a mixture of both UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}. Because the plutonium provides the fissile content of the fuel, the uranium used in MOX is either natural or depleted uranium. PuO{sub 2} is added to effectively replace the fissile content of {sup 235}U so that the level of fissile content is sufficiently high to maintain the chain reaction in an LWR. Both reactor-grade and weapons-grade plutonium contains a number of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes, with the fraction of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes being dependent on the source of the plutonium. While only RG plutonium is currently used in MOX, there is the possibility that WG plutonium from dismantled weapons will be used to make MOX for use in US reactors. Reactor-grade plutonium in MOX fuel is generally obtained from reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuel, whereas weapons-grade plutonium is obtained from decommissioned nuclear weapons material and thus has a different plutonium (and other actinides) concentration. Using MOX fuel instead of UOX fuel has potential impacts on the neutronic performance of the nuclear fuel and the design of the nuclear fuel must take these differences into account. Each of the plutonium sources (RG and WG) has different implications on the neutronic behavior of the fuel because each contains a different blend of plutonium nuclides. The amount of heat and the number of neutrons produced from fission of plutonium nuclides is different from fission of {sup 235}U. These differences in UOX and MOX do not end at discharge of the fuel from the reactor core - the short- and long-term storage of MOX fuel may have different requirements than UOX fuel because of the different discharged fuel decay heat characteristics. The research documented in this report compares MOX and UOX fuel during storage and disposal of the fuel by comparing decay heat rates for typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with and without weapons-grade (WG) and reactor-grade (RG) MOX fuel.

  14. Role of the frequency of blood CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} CCR6{sup +} T cells in autoimmunity in patients with Sjoegren's syndrome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xue-yi; Wu, Zhen-biao; Ding, Jin; Zheng, Zhao-hui [Department of Clinical Immunology, State key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xi-jing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Clinical Immunology, State key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xi-jing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Shaanxi Province (China); Li, Xiao-yan [Department of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shaanxi Provincial People's Hospital, Xi'an, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shaanxi Provincial People's Hospital, Xi'an, Shaanxi Province (China); Chen, Li-na [Department of Clinical Immunology, State key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xi-jing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Clinical Immunology, State key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xi-jing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Shaanxi Province (China); Zhu, Ping, E-mail: zhuping@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Clinical Immunology, State key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xi-jing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Shaanxi Province (China)] [Department of Clinical Immunology, State key Discipline of Cell Biology, Xi-jing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Shaanxi Province (China)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The frequency of CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} CCR6{sup +} T cells increased in pSS patients and positively correlated with autoantibodies in the blood. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} CCR6{sup +} T cells in blood invariably coexpressed PD-1, ICOS, CD40L, Bcl-6 and secreted IL-21 after stimulated by PHA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} CCR6{sup +} Tfh cells in blood may be suitable biomarkers for the evaluation of the active immune stage of pSS patients. -- Abstract: The blood CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} T cells, known as 'circulating' Tfh, have been shown to efficiently induce naieve B cells to produce immunoglobulin. They play an important role in certain autoimmune diseases. In the present study, we show for the first time that the frequency of CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} T cells is increased in pSS patients and positively correlated with autoantibodies in the blood. The concentration of Th17-like subsets (CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} CCR6{sup +}) in pSS patients was found to be significantly higher than in healthy controls. Functional assays showed that activated Th17-like subtypes in the blood display the key features of Tfh cells, including invariably coexpressed PD-1, ICOS, CD40L and IL-21. Th17 subsets were found to highly express Bcl-6 protein and Th1 and Th2 were not. Bcl-6 is believed to be a master transforming factor for Tfh cell differentiation and facilitate B cell proliferation and somatic hypermutation within the germinal center. These data indicate that Th17 subsets of CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} T cells in the blood may participate in the antibody-related immune responses and that high frequency of CD4{sup +} CXCR5{sup +} CCR6{sup +} Tfh cells in blood may be suitable biomarkers for the evaluation of the active immune stage of pSS patients. It might provide insights into the pathogenesis and perhaps help researchers identify novel therapeutic targets for pSS.

  15. Vertical Profiles Of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th And {sup 40}K Activities In Rocks From The Irati Formation Of The Parana Sedimentary Basin, Southern Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Ademar de O.; Bastos, Rodrigo O.; Appoloni, Carlos R. [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada-Departamento de Fisica-CCE Universidade Estadual de Londrina-Campus Universitario Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid s/n, Cx. Postal 6001 86051-990 Londrina (Puerto Rico)

    2008-08-07

    Naturally occurring radioisotopes are present in different concentrations in sedimentary rocks, reflecting the origin of the sediments, the depositional environment, and more recent events such as weathering and erosion. Using a high-resolution {gamma}-ray spectrometry methodology, sedimentary rocks were measured to assess the concentration activities of the natural radioisotopes. The surveyed rocks are from the Irati formation in the Parana sedimentary basin, which are exposed by an abandoned, open-pit limestone mine, in the city of Sapopema, southern Brazil. The exposed vertical profile is 5 m, and its stratigraphy is represented by an alternation of limestone and bituminous shale (layers being a few decimeters thick), and some millimeter rhythm layers with limestone and bituminous shale laminas. Eleven samples were collected along this profile, each of them dried in the open air during 48 hours, sieved through 4 mm mesh and sealed in cylindrical recipients. Measurements were accomplished using a 66% relative efficiency HPGE detector connected to a standard gamma ray spectrometry electronic chain. The detector efficiency in the range of 60 to 1800 keV was carried out with the certified IAEA-385 sediment sample. The Lower Limit of Detection (LLD) to the system is 2.40 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 1.84 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th and 4.20 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K. Activity concentrations were determined for {sup 226}Ra (from 16.22 to 151.55 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1}), {sup 232}Th (from 2.93 to 56.12 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1}) and {sup 40}K (from 38.45 to 644.63 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1}). The layers enriched with organic matter presented the higher values of activity. The measured concentrations of the natural radioisotopes were lower for limestone samples (average values and respective deviations were 22.81{+-}0.22 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 4.21{+-}0.07 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, and 50.11{+-}0.82 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K). Higher concentrations were measured for the bituminous shale samples (average values and respective deviations were 108.10{+-}12.17 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 43.69{+-}0.30 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, and 465.82{+-}3.99 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K). The concentrations were intermediate for the rhythmite samples (average values and respective deviations were 50.69{+-}1.09 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 7.63{+-}0.21 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, and 85.96{+-}2.47 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K). As the analyzed rocks are raw materials for the ceramic, cement and soil correction compound industries, the results of this work furnish data to estimate the contribution of these products to the general public's radiation exposure.

  16. Studies on the double-{beta} decay nucleus {sup 64}Zn using the (d,{sup 2}He) reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grewe, E.-W.; Baeumer, C.; Dohmann, H.; Frekers, D.; Hollstein, S.; Rakers, S.; Thies, J. H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster (Germany); Harakeh, M. N.; Berg, A. M. van den; Woertche, H. J. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, NL-9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Johansson, H.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Petermann, I.; Sieja, K.; Simon, H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Langanke, K. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Nowacki, F. [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, Universite Louis Pasteur, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); Popescu, L. [Vakgroep Subatomaire en Stralingsfysica, Universiteit Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Savran, D. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, NL-9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Zilges, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    The (d,{sup 2}He) charge-exchange reaction on the double-{beta} decay ({beta}{beta}) nucleus {sup 64}Zn has been studied at an incident energy of 183 MeV. The two protons in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} state (indicated as {sup 2}He) were both momentum analyzed and detected simultaneously by the BBS magnetic spectrometer and its position-sensitive detector. {sup 2}He spectra with a resolution of about 115 keV (FWHM) have been obtained allowing identification of many levels in the residual nucleus {sup 64}Cu with high precision. {sup 64}Zn is one of the rare cases undergoing a {beta}{beta} decay in {beta}{sup +} direction. In the experiment presented here, Gamow-Teller (GT{sup +}) transition strengths have been extracted. Together with the GT{sup -} transition strengths from {sup 64}Ni({sup 3}He,t) data to the same intermediate nucleus {sup 64}Cu, the nuclear matrix elements of the {beta}{beta} decay of {sup 64}Zn have been evaluated. Finally, the GT{sup {+-}} distributions are compared with shell-model calculations and a critical assessment is given of the various residual interactions presently employed for the pf shell.

  17. Method for the production of .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo-containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Ralph G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Christian, Jerry D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, S. Blaine (Idaho Falls, ID); Petti, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Terry, William K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Yoon, Woo Y. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01

    An improved method for producing .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo compounds. .sup.100 Mo metal or .sup.100 MoO.sub.3 is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 with an optimum depth of 0.5-5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 which contains vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3, vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.3, and vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.2. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O.sub.2(g)) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 and vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 into a condensed .sup.99m Tc-containing reaction product which is collected.

  18. Method for the production of {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo-containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, R.G.; Christian, J.D.; Grover, S.B.; Petti, D.A.; Terry, W.K.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1998-09-01

    An improved method is described for producing {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo compounds. {sup 100}Mo metal or {sup 100}MoO{sub 3} is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} with an optimum depth of 0.5--5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} which contains vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}, vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 3}, and vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 2}. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O{sub 2(g)}) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} and vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} into a condensed {sup 99m}Tc-containing reaction product which is collected. 1 fig.

  19. /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihalczo, J.T.; King, W.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1985-01-01

    The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method has been tested in a wide variety of experiments that have indicated the broad range of applicability of the method. The neutron multiplication factor k/sub eff/ has been satisfactorily detemined for a variety of materials including uranium metal, light water reactor fuel pins, fissile solutions, fuel plates in water, and interacting cylinders. For a uranyl nitrate solution tank which is typical of a fuel processing or reprocessing plant, the k/sub eff/ values were satisfactorily determined for values between 0.92 and 0.5 using a simple point kinetics interpretation of the experimental data. The short measurement times, in several cases as low as 1 min, have shown that the development of this method can lead to a practical subcriticality monitor for many in-plant applications. The further development of the method will require experiments oriented toward particular applications including dynamic experiments and the development of theoretical methods to predict the experimental observables.

  20. ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"per Building (gallons)","per Square Foot...

  1. ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities, 1999" ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"per Building (gallons)","per Square Foot (gallons)","per Worker...

  2. Fission Product Yields of {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu in Fields of Thermal Neutrons, Fission Neutrons and 14.7-MeV Neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurec, J.; Adam, A.; Bruyne, T. de [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre DAM-Ile de France (CEA DAM DIF), 91297 Arpajon (France); Bauge, E., E-mail: eric.bauge@cea.f [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre DAM-Ile de France (CEA DAM DIF), 91297 Arpajon (France); Granier, T.; Aupiais, J.; Bersillon, O.; Le Petit, G. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre DAM-Ile de France (CEA DAM DIF), 91297 Arpajon (France); Authier, N.; Casoli, P. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2010-12-15

    The yields of more than fifteen fission products have been carefully measured using radiochemical techniques, for {sup 235}U(n,f), {sup 239}Pu(n,f) in a thermal spectrum, for {sup 233}U(n,f), {sup 235}U(n,f), and {sup 239}Pu(n,f) reactions in a fission neutron spectrum, and for {sup 233}U(n,f), {sup 235}U(n,f), {sup 238}U(n,f), and {sup 239}Pu(n,f) for 14.7 MeV monoenergetic neutrons. Irradiations were performed at the EL3 reactor, at the Caliban and Prospero critical assemblies, and at the Lancelot electrostatic accelerator in CEA-Valduc. Fissions were counted in thin deposits using fission ionization chambers. The number of fission products of each species were measured by gamma spectrometry of co-located thick deposits.

  3. PEM fuel cell durability studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ofstad, Axel B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Xu, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization for stationary and transportation power applications. For transportation applications, the durability target for fuel cell power systems is a 5,000 hour lifespan and able to function over a range of vehicle operating conditions (-40{sup o} to +40{sup o}C). However, durability is difficult to quantify and improve because of the quantity and duration of testing required, and also because the fuel cell stack contains many components, for which the degradation mechanisms, component interactions and effects of operating conditions are not fully understood. These requirements have led to the development of accelerated testing protocols for PEM fuel cells. The need for accelerated testing methodology is exemplified by the times required for standard testing to reach their required targets: automotive 5,000 hrs = {approx} 7 months; stationary systems 40,000 hrs = {approx} 4.6 years. As new materials continue to be developed, the need for relevant accelerated testing increases. In this investigation, we examine the durability of various cell components, examine the effect of transportation operating conditions (potential cycling, variable RH, shut-down/start-up, freeze/thaw) and evaluate durability by accelerated durability protocols. PEM fuel cell durability testing is performed on single cells, with tests being conducted with steady-state conditions and with dynamic conditions using power cycling to simulate a vehicle drive cycle. Component and single-cell characterization during and after testing was conducted to identify changes in material properties and related failure mechanisms. Accelerated-testing experiments were applied to further examine material degradation.

  4. Elastic {alpha} scattering on {sup 112}Sn and {sup 124}Sn at astrophysically relevant energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galaviz, D.; Mohr, P.; Zilges, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Schlossgartenstrasse 9, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Fueloep, Zs.; Gyuerky, Gy.; Mate, Z.; Somorjai, E. [ATOMKI, P.O. Box 51, H-4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Rauscher, T. [Departement fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2005-06-01

    The cross sections for the elastic scattering reactions {sup 112,124}Sn({alpha},{alpha}){sup 112,124}Sn at energies above and below the Coulomb barrier are presented and compared to predictions for global {alpha}-nucleus potentials. The high precision of the new data allows a study of the global {alpha}-nucleus potentials at both the proton- and neutron-rich sides of an isotopic chain. In addition, local {alpha}-nucleus potentials have been extracted for both nuclei and used to reproduce elastic scattering data at higher energies. Predictions from the capture cross section of the reaction {sup 112}Sn({alpha},{gamma}){sup 116}Te at astrophysically relevant energies are presented and compared to experimental data.

  5. {beta} decay spectroscopy of {sup 192}Pt and the nature of 0{sup +} excitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCutchan, E. A.; Casten, R. F.; Werner, V.; Winkler, R.; Williams, E.; Cakirli, R. B.; Guerdal, G.; Liang, X.

    2008-07-15

    Excited states in {sup 192}Pt were populated in {beta}{sup +}/{epsilon} decay and studied through off-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. New coincidence data give no support for several reported low-energy, low-spin states proposed in {beta} decay and lead to a substantially revised level scheme. The structure of {sup 192}Pt is discussed in terms of both single-space IBA-1 calculations and two-space IBA calculations with configuration mixing. Both models together suggest that it is the perhaps the 0{sub 4}{sup +} state that corresponds to an intruder excitation, resulting from the excitation of a pair of protons across the Z=82 closed shell.

  6. Observation of the Decay K{sup +} yields P{sup +} v...

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diwan, M.V.

    1999-05-21

    We have observed 1 event consistent with the signature expected of the rare decay of a positive kaon to a positive pion and a neutrino anti-neutrino pair. In the examined momentum region of 211 to 230 MeV/c in the center of mass of the kaon we estimated the backgrounds to be about 0.08 ± 0.03 events. From this observation we estimate the branching ratio to be 4.2<SUP>+9.7SUP>-3.5 x 10<SUP>-10SUP>. In this presentation I will explain the experiment, and the analysis techniques. I will also discuss the expected improvements in the near future from the analysis of new data sets.

  7. Exploring the {sup 22}Ne(p,?){sup 23}Na reaction at LUNA and at HZDR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavanna, Francesca [Dipartimento di fisica, Università di Genova, and INFN Sezione di Genova, Genova (Italy); Collaboration: LUNA Collaboration

    2014-05-09

    The {sup 22}Ne(p,?){sup 23}Na reaction is involved in the hydrogen burning NeNa cycle. This determines the nucleosynthesis of the Ne and Na isotopes in the Red Giant Branch and Asymptotic Giant Branch phases of stellar evolution. In the energy range relevant for astrophysics (20 keV < E < 600 keV), the {sup 22}Ne(p,?){sup 23}Na reaction rate is highly uncertain because of the contribution of a large number of resonances never measured directly. A related study is under preparation at the Laboratory for Underground Nuclear Astrophysics (LUNA), in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, and it will cover the energy range 100 keV < E < 400 keV. Meanwhile, a measurement at higher energies (i.e. 436 keV) has been carried out at the Tandetron accelerator of the HZDR (Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf) in Germany. Some preliminary results will be presented.

  8. Selected Topics in Hadron production in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemingway, Richard J.

    1997-04-20

    This note provides a current and complete tabulation of all multiplicities in hadronic Z{sup 0} decay and makes a comparison with the predictions of the OPAL tune of JETSET version 74 and HERWIG version 59.

  9. Search for the decay modes D??e?e?, D??????, and D??e<sup>±>??

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Mullin, E.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Cheaib, R.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.

    2012-08-01

    We present searches for the rare decay modes D??e?e?, D0?????, and D??e<sup>±??> in continuum e?e??cc¯ events recorded by the BABAR detector in a data sample that corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb?¹. These decays are highly Glashow–Iliopoulos–Maiani suppressed but may be enhanced in several extensions of the standard model. Our observed event yields are consistent with the expected backgrounds. An excess is seen in the D?????? channel, although the observed yield is consistent with an upward background fluctuation at the 5% level. Using the Feldman–Cousins method, we set the following 90% confidence level intervals on the branching fractions: B(D??e?e?)<1.7×10??, B(D??????) within [0.6,8.1]×10??, and B(D??e±??)<3.3×10??.

  10. Microheterogeneous Thoria-Urania Fuels for Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shwageraus, Eugene; Zhao Xianfeng; Driscoll, Michael J.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kazimi, Mujid S.; Herring, J. Stephen

    2004-07-15

    A thorium-based fuel cycle for light water reactors will reduce the plutonium generation rate and enhance the proliferation resistance of the spent fuel. However, priming the thorium cycle with {sup 235}U is necessary, and the {sup 235}U fraction in the uranium must be limited to below 20% to minimize proliferation concerns. Thus, a once-through thorium-uranium dioxide (ThO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2}) fuel cycle of no less than 25% uranium becomes necessary for normal pressurized water reactor (PWR) operating cycle lengths. Spatial separation of the uranium and thorium parts of the fuel can improve the achievable burnup of the thorium-uranium fuel designs through more effective breeding of {sup 233}U from the {sup 232}Th. Focus is on microheterogeneous fuel designs for PWRs, where the spatial separation of the uranium and thorium is on the order of a few millimetres to a few centimetres, including duplex pellet, axially microheterogeneous fuel, and a checkerboard of uranium and thorium pins. A special effort was made to understand the underlying reactor physics mechanisms responsible for enhancing the achievable burnup at spatial separation of the two fuels. The neutron spectral shift was identified as the primary reason for the enhancement of burnup capabilities. Mutual resonance shielding of uranium and thorium is also a factor; however, it is small in magnitude. It is shown that the microheterogeneous fuel can achieve higher burnups, by up to 15%, than the reference all-uranium fuel. However, denaturing of the {sup 233}U in the thorium portion of the fuel with small amounts of uranium significantly impairs this enhancement. The denaturing is also necessary to meet conventional PWR thermal limits by improving the power share of the thorium region at the beginning of fuel irradiation. Meeting thermal-hydraulic design requirements by some of the microheterogeneous fuels while still meeting or exceeding the burnup of the all-uranium case is shown to be potentially feasible. However, the large power imbalance between the uranium and thorium regions creates several design challenges, such as higher fission gas release and cladding temperature gradients. A reduction of plutonium generation by a factor of 3 in comparison with all-uranium PWR fuel using the same initial {sup 235}U content was estimated. In contrast to homogeneously mixed U-Th fuel, microheterogeneous fuel has a potential for economic performance comparable to the all-UO{sub 2} fuel provided that the microheterogeneous fuel incremental manufacturing costs are negligibly small.

  11. Elastic and inelastic scattering to low-lying states of {sup 58}Ni and {sup 90}Zr using 240-MeV {sup 6}Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishichayan; Chen, X.; Lui, Y.-W.; Tokimoto, Y.; Button, J.; Youngblood, D. H. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Elastic and inelastic scattering of 240-MeV {sup 6}Li particles from {sup 58}Ni and {sup 90}Zr were measured with the multipole-dipole-multipole spectrometer from 4 deg. <={theta}{sub c.m.}<=43 deg. The elastic scattering data were fitted with the double-folding model using the density-dependent M3Y NN effective interaction and with a phenomenological Woods-Saxon potential. B(E2) and B(E3) values obtained for low-lying 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} states with the double-folding calculations agreed with the adopted values.

  12. ?? correlation function in Au + Au collisions at ?<sup>s>NN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamczyk, L. [AGH Univ. of Science and Technology, Cracow (Poland)

    2015-01-01

    We present ?? correlation measurements in heavy-ion collisions for Au+Au collisions at ?<sup>s>NN = 200 GeV using the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC). The Lednický-Lyuboshitz analytical model has been used to fit the data to obtain a source size, a scattering length and an effective range. Implications of the measurement of the ?? correlation function and interaction parameters for di-hyperon searches are discussed.

  13. Searches for dark photons at e{sup +}e{sup ?} colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossi, Fabio [Laboratori Nazionali dell'INFN Frascati (Italy)

    2013-11-07

    Searches for new, light, neutral vector particles are being pursued by several different experiments in the world, using e{sup +}e{sup ?} collsion data at center-of-mass energies ranging between ?1 and ?10 GeV. In this paper I will review the most recent results from KLOE, BESIII, BaBar and Belle and briefly discuss open issues and future perspectives in the field.

  14. Safety analysis of B and W Standard PWR using thorium-based fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uotinen, V.O.; Carroll, W.P.; Jones, H.M.; Toops, E.C.

    1980-06-01

    A study was performed to assess the safety and licenseability of the Babcock and Wilcox standard 205-fuel assembly PWR when it is fueled with three types of thoria-based fuels denatured (/sup 233/U//sup 238/U-Th)O/sub 2/, denatured (/sup 235//U/sup 238/U-Th)O/sub 2/, and (Th-Pu)O/sub 2/. Selected transients were analyzed using typical PWR safety analysis calculational methods. The results support the conclusion that it is feasible from a safety standpoint to utilize either of the denatured urania-thoria fuels in the standard B and W plant. In addition, it appears that the use of thoria-plutonia fuels would probably also be feasible. These tentative conclusions depend on a data that is more limited than that available for UO/sub 2/ fuels.

  15. Method for selective recovery of PET-usable quantities of [{sup 18}F] fluoride and [{sup 13}N] nitrate/nitrite from a single irradiation of low-enriched [{sup 18}O] water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Schlyer, D.J.; Shea, C.

    1995-06-13

    A process for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} for radiotracer synthesis is disclosed. The process includes producing [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} simultaneously by exposing a low-enriched (20%-30%) [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target to proton irradiation, sequentially isolating the [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} from the [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target, and reducing the [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3}. The [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} products are then conveyed to a laboratory for radiotracer applications. The process employs an anion exchange resin for isolation of the isotopes from the [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O, and sequential elution of [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} fractions. Also the apparatus is disclosed for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} from a single irradiation of a single low-enriched [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target. 2 figs.

  16. Level structures in {sup 147}Pm from {sup 147}Nd decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sainath, M.; Venkataramaniah, K. [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prashanthinilayam 515134 (India)] [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prashanthinilayam 515134 (India); Sood, P.C. [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India)] [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India); [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prashanthinilayam 515134 (India)

    1997-11-01

    The {gamma} and conversion electron spectra following the {beta} decay of {sup 147}Nd are measured using the HPGe detector and the miniorange electron spectrometer. The {sup 147}Pm level scheme comprising of 11 levels up to 686 keV excitation, interconnected by 29 transitions, is presented. The 649 keV (11) /(2) {sup {minus}} level, with six interconnecting (including two E3) transitions, is observed for the first time in decay studies. K-shell conversion coefficients for four transitions and L-shell conversion coefficients for five transitions are being reported for the first time. The I{sup {pi}}= (7) /(2) {sup +} spin-parity assignment for the 680 keV level is confirmed. Specific structure features of the {sup 147}Pm level scheme, depicting the unique coexistence of spherical shell model configurations, particle-phonon coupled multiplets, evolution of octupole collectivity, and well-developed rotational bands, are discussed; certain open questions about the spectroscopy and interpretation of the 633 and the 641 keV levels are highlighted. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Nuclear fuel particles and method of making nuclear fuel compacts therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVelasco, Rubin I. (Encinitas, CA); Adams, Charles C. (San Diego, CA)

    1991-01-01

    Methods for making nuclear fuel compacts exhibiting low heavy metal contamination and fewer defective coatings following compact fabrication from a mixture of hardenable binder, such as petroleum pitch, and nuclear fuel particles having multiple layer fission-product-retentive coatings, with the dense outermost layer of the fission-product-retentive coating being surrounded by a protective overcoating, e.g., pyrocarbon having a density between about 1 and 1.3 g/cm.sup.3. Such particles can be pre-compacted in molds under relatively high pressures and then combined with a fluid binder which is ultimately carbonized to produce carbonaceous nuclear fuel compacts having relatively high fuel loadings.

  18. Formulation for Tin-.sup.117m /diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY)

    1999-01-01

    The invention provides improved formulations of .sup.117m Sn (Sn.sup.4+) DTPA which allow higher doses of .sup.117m Sn (Sn.sup.4+) to be administered than were previously possible. Methods for making pharmaceutical compositions comprising .sup.117m Sn (Sn.sup.4+) DTPA in which the amount of unchelated DTPA is minimized are disclosed along with methods of using the improved formlulations, both for palliation of bone pain associated with cancer and for treatment of osseous tumors.

  19. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  20. Dynamically polarized target for the g<sup>p>2 and G<sup>p>E experiments at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, J.; Maxwell, J.; Badman, T.; Brock, J.; Carlin, C.; Crabb, D. G.; Day, D.; Keith, C. D.; Kvaltine, N.; Meekins, D. G.; Mulholland, J.; Shields, J.; Slifer, K.

    2013-12-16

    We describe a dynamically polarized target that has been utilized for two electron scattering experiments in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. The primary components of the target are a new, high cooling power <sup>4sup> He evaporation refrigerator, and a re-purposed, superconducting split-coil magnet. It has been used to polarize protons in irradiated NH3 at a temperature of 1 K and at fields of 2.5 and 5.0 Tesla. The performance of the target material in the electron beam under these conditions will be discussed. The maximum polarizations of 28% and 95% were obtained at those fields, respectively. To satisfy the requirements of both experiments, the magnet had to be routinely rotated between angles of 0, 6, and 90 degrees with respect to the incident electron beam. This was accomplished using a new rotating vacuum seal which permits rotations to be performed in only a few minutes.

  1. Probing Nilsson states in {sup 233}U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotthaus, T.; Reiter, P.; Hess, H.; Kalkuehler, M.; Wendt, A.; Wiens, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Hertenberger, R.; Morgan, T.; Thirolf, P. G.; Wirth, H.-F. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Faestermann, T. [Physik Department E12, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    The reaction {sup 234}U(d-vector, t){sup 233}U was measured at the Munich Q3D magnetic spectrometer with a polarized deuteron beam. The beam energy was 22 MeV, and a vector polarization of the deuterons of 80% was achieved. Angular distributions of the reaction cross section and analyzing power at seven angles between 5 deg. and 35 deg. were analyzed. Spin and parity assignments for 33 states were determined by comparison with results from distorted wave Born approximation (DWBA) calculations. Based on these assignments and energy systematics, the observed states were sorted into rotational bands. The Nilsson configurations of the bands are identified by examining the population strengths within each band. Two rotational bands with Nilsson configurations 1/2[501] and 3/2[501] could be identified for the first time.

  2. Method of producing .sup.67 Cu

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Jr., Harold A. (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, John W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Thomas, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bentley, Glenn E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A method of producing carrier-free .sup.67 Cu by proton spallation combined with subsequent chemical separation and purification is disclosed. A target consisting essentially of pressed zinc oxide is irradiated with a high energy, high current proton beam to produce a variety of spallogenic nuclides, including .sup.67 Cu and other copper isotopes. The irradiated target is dissolved in a concentrated acid solution to which a palladium salt is added. In accordance with the preferred method, the spallogenic copper is twice coprecipitated with palladium, once with metallic zinc as the precipitating agent and once with hydrogen sulfide as the precipitating agent. The palladium/copper precipitate is then dissolved in an acid solution and the copper is separated from the palladium by liquid chromatography on an anion exchange resin.

  3. Theoretical analyses of (n,xn) reactions on sup 235 U, sup 238 U, sup 237 Np, and sup 239 Pu for ENDF/B-VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.G.; Arthur, E.D.

    1991-01-01

    Theoretical analyses were performed of neutron-induced reactions on {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu between 0.01 and 20 MeV in order to calculate neutron emission cross sections and spectra for ENDF/B-VI evaluations. Coupled-channel optical model potentials were obtained for each target nucleus by fitting total, elastic, and inelastic scattering cross section data, as well as low-energy average resonance data. The resulting deformed optical model potentials were used to calculate direct (n,n{prime}) cross sections and transmission coefficients for use in Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory analyses. A fission model with multiple barrier representation, width fluctuation corrections, and preequilibrium corrections were included in the analyses. Direct cross sections for higher-lying vibrational states were calculated using DWBA theory, normalized using B(E{ell}) values determined from (d,d{prime}) and Coulomb excitation data, where available, and from systematics otherwise. Initial fission barrier parameters and transition state density enhancements appropriate to the compound systems involved were obtained from previous analyses, especially fits to charged-particle fission probability data. The parameters for the fission model were adjusted for each target system to obtain optimum agreement with direct (n,f) cross section measurements, taking account of the various multichance fission channels, that is, the different compound systems involved. The results from these analyses were used to calculate most of the neutron (n,n), (n,n{prime}), and (n,xn) cross section data in the ENDF/B/VI evaluations for the above nuclei, and all of the energy-angle correlated spectra. The deformed optical model and fission model parameterizations are described. Comparisons are given between the results of these analyses and the previous ENDF/B-V evaluations as well as with the available experimental data. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  4. ROVIBRATIONAL LINE LISTS FOR NINE ISOTOPOLOGUES OF THE CO MOLECULE IN THE X {sup 1}?{sup +} GROUND ELECTRONIC STATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Gang; Gordon, Iouli E.; Rothman, Laurence S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Atomic and Molecular Physics Division, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Tan, Yan; Hu, Shui-Ming [Hefei National Laboratory for Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, 230026 Hefei (China); Kassi, Samir; Campargue, Alain [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Physique, CNRS UMR 5588, Université Joseph Fourier de Grenoble, B.P. 87, F-38402 Saint-Martin-d'Hères Cedex (France); Medvedev, Emile S., E-mail: igordon@cfa.harvard.edu [The Institute of Problems of Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Science, Prospect Akademika Semenova 1, 142432 Chernogolovka (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-01

    Extensive rovibrational line lists were computed for nine isotopologues of the CO molecule, namely, {sup 12}C{sup 16}O, {sup 12}C{sup 17}O, {sup 12}C{sup 18}O, {sup 13}C{sup 16}O, {sup 13}C{sup 17}O, {sup 13}C{sup 18}O, {sup 14}C{sup 16}O, {sup 14}C{sup 17}O, and {sup 14}C{sup 18}O in the ground electronic state with v ? 41, ?v ? 11, and J ? 150. The line intensity and position calculations were carried out using a newly determined piece-wise dipole moment function (DMF) in conjunction with the wavefunctions calculated from an experimentally determined potential energy function from Coxon and Hajigeorgiou. A direct-fit method that simultaneously fits all the reliable experimental rovibrational matrix elements has been used to construct the dipole moment function near equilibrium internuclear distance. In order to extend the amount and quality of input experimental parameters, new Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy experiments were carried out to enable measurements of the lines in the 4-0 band with low uncertainty as well as the first measurements of lines in the 6-0 band. A new high-level ab initio DMF, derived from a finite field approach has been calculated to cover internuclear distances far from equilibrium. Accurate partition sums have been derived for temperatures up to 9000 K. In addition to air- and self-induced broadening and shift parameters, those induced by CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} are now provided for planetary applications. A complete set of broadening and shift parameters was calculated based on sophisticated extrapolation of high-quality measured data. The line lists, which follow HITRAN formalism, are provided as supplementary material.

  5. Micro Fuel Cells Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micro Fuel Cells TM Direct Methanol Fuel Cells for Portable Power A Fuel Cell System Developer-17, 2002 Phoenix, Arizona #12;Micro Fuel Cells Direct Methanol Fuel Cells for Portable Power Outline (1 Energy Content (Wh) Volume(cm^3) Li-Ion Battery DMFC #12;Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Technology

  6. Fireside Corrosion in Oxy-fuel Combustion of Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, Gordon R [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Tylczak, Joseph [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Meier, Gerald H [University of Pittsburgh; Lutz, Bradley [University of Pittsburgh; Jung, Keeyoung [Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, Korea; Mu, Nan; Yanar, Nazik M [University of Pittsburgh; Pettit, Frederick S [University of Pittsburgh; Zhu, Jingxi [Carnegie Mellon University; Wise, Adam [Carnegie Mellon University; Laughlin, David E. [Carnegie Mellon University; Sridhar, Seetharaman [Carnegie Mellon University

    2013-11-25

    Oxy-fuel combustion is burning a fuel in oxygen rather than air for ease of capture of CO2 from for reuse or sequestration. Corrosion issues associated with the environment change (replacement of much of the N2 with CO2 and higher sulfur levels) from air- to oxy-firing were examined. Alloys studied included model Fe–Cr alloys and commercial ferritic steels, austenitic steels, and nickel base superalloys. The corrosion behavior is described in terms of corrosion rates, scale morphologies, and scale/ash interactions for the different environmental conditions. Evidence was found for a hreshold for severe attack between 10<sup>-4sup> and 10<sup>-3sup> atm of SO3 at 700ºC.

  7. Double Higgs boson production via WW fusion in TeV e sup + e sup minus collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barger, V.; Han, T. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-04-10

    The production of two standard model Higgs bosons via the WW fusion process e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {r arrow} {bar v}{sub e}v{sub e}HH would test the predicted HHH, HWW and HHWW couplings. At TeV energies this fusion cross section dominates over that from e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {r arrow} ZHH and would give significant event rates for M{sub H}{approx lt} 1/2 M{sub z} at high luminosity e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders. The authors evaluate the rates and present the dynamical distributions.

  8. Complete and Incomplete Fusion of {sup 6}He and {sup 6}Li Projectiles with Medium Mass Targets at Energy {approx}10 AMeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupko, S. A.; Daniel, A. V.; Fomichev, A. S.; Golovkov, M. S.; Gorshkov, V. A.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Popeko, G. S.; Sidorchuk, S. I.; Ter-Akopian, G. M.; Slepnev, R. S.; Chudoba, V.; Standylo, L.; Chepigin, V. I.; Katrasev, D. E.; Malyshev, O. N.; Svirikhin, A. I.; Yeremin, A. V. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear reactions JINR, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Wolski, R. [Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear reactions JINR, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics PAS, Cracow (Poland); Briancon, Ch.; Hauschild, K. [CSNSM, IN2P3-CNRS, UMR8609, F-91405 Orsay (France)] (and others)

    2009-03-04

    Complete fusion (CF) and incomplete fusion (ICF) reactions were studied with the beams of loosely bound {sup 6}He and {sup 6}Li bombarding {sup 166}Er and {sup 165}Ho targets. Experiments were carried out to test an approach exploiting the measured intensities of {gamma} rays emitted at the transitions between the yrast-band levels of reaction products formed after the termination of neutron evaporation. Partial waves feeding the CF [{sup 165}Ho({sup 6}Li,5n){sup 166}Yb, {sup 166}Er({sup 6}He,6n){sup 166}Yb] and ICF [{sup 165}Ho({sup 6}Li,{alpha}3n){sup 164}Er, and {sup 166}Er({sup 6}He,{alpha}4n){sup 164}Er] reaction channels were revealed from the obtained {gamma}-ray data.

  9. Status of verification and validation of AREVA's ARCADIA{sup R} code system for PWR applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porsch, D. [AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); P.O.Box 1109, 91001 Erlangen (Germany); Leberig, M.; Kuch, S. [AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); Magat, P. [AREVA, AREVA NP SAS, Paris (France); Segard, K. [AREVA, AREVA NP Inc., Lynchburg (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In March 2010 the submittal of Topical Reports for ARCADIA{sup R} and COBRA-FLX, the thermal-hydraulic module of ARCADIA{sup R}, to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concluded a major step in the development of AREVA's new code system for core design and safety analyses. This submittal was dedicated to the application of the code system to uranium fuel in pressurized water reactors. The submitted information comprised results for plants operated in the US (France)) and Germany and provided uncertainties for in-core measuring systems with traveling in-core detectors and for the aero-ball system of the EPR. A reduction of the uncertainties in the prediction of F{sub AH} and F{sub Q} of > 1 % (absolute) was derived compared to the current code systems. This paper extents the verification and validation base for uranium based fuel and demonstrates the basic capabilities of ARCADIA{sup R} of describing MOX. The achieved status of verification and validation is described in detail. All applications followed the same standard without any specific calibration. The paper gives also insight in the new capability of 3D full core steady-state and transient pin-by-pin/sub-channel-by-sub-channel calculations and the opportunities offered by this feature. The gain of margins with increasing detail of the representation is outlined. Currently, the strategies for worldwide implementation of ARCADIA{sup R} are developed. (authors)

  10. Method of locating a leaking fuel element in a fast breeder power reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honekamp, John R. (Downers Grove, IL); Fryer, Richard M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1978-01-01

    Leaking fuel elements in a fast reactor are identified by measuring the ratio of .sup.134 Xe to .sup.133 Xe in the reactor cover gas following detection of a fuel element leak, this ratio being indicative of the power and burnup of the failed fuel element. This procedure can be used to identify leaking fuel elements in a power breeder reactor while continuing operation of the reactor since the ratio measured is that of the gases stored in the plenum of the failed fuel element. Thus, use of a cleanup system for the cover gas makes it possible to identify sequentially a multiplicity of leaking fuel elements without shutting the reactor down.

  11. Z{sup '} search--present and future limits at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonfor DirectSciTechConnectXOP:(Journal Article) | SciTech

  12. Synthesis of rutherfordium isotopes in the {sup 238}U({sup 26}Mg, xn){sup 264-x}Rf reaction and study of their decay properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gates, J. M.; Garcia, M. A.; Dragojevic, I.; Folden, C. M. III; Nelson, S. L.; Nitsche, H.; Gregorich, K. E.; Stavsetra, L.; Sudowe, R.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Dvorak, J.; Tuerler, A.; Eichler, R.; Loveland, W.; Pang, G. K.

    2008-03-15

    Isotopes of rutherfordium ({sup 258-261}Rf) were produced in irradiations of {sup 238}U targets with {sup 26}Mg beams. Excitation functions were measured for the 4n,5n, and 6n exit channels. Production of {sup 261}Rf in the 3n exit channel with a cross section of 28{sub -26}{sup +92} pb was observed. {alpha}-decay of {sup 258}Rf was observed for the first time with an {alpha}-particle energy of 9.05 {+-} 0.03 MeV and an {alpha}/total-decay branching ratio of 0.31 {+-} 0.11. In {sup 259}Rf, the electron capture/total-decay branching ratio was measured to be 0.15{+-}0.04. The measured half-lives for {sup 258}Rf, {sup 259}Rf, and {sup 260}Rf were 14.7{sub -1.0}{sup +1.2} ms, 2.5{sub -0.3}{sup +0.4} s, and 22.2{sub -2.4}{sup +3.0} ms, respectively, in agreement with literature data. The systematics of the {alpha}-decay Q-values and of the partial spontaneous fission half-lives were evaluated for even-even nuclides in the region of the N=152,Z=100 deformed shell. The influence of the N=152 shell on the {alpha}-decay Q-values for rutherfordium was observed to be similar to that of the lighter elements (96{<=}Z{<=}102). However, the N=152 shell does not stabilize the rutherfordium isotopes against spontaneous fission, as it does in the lighter elements (96{<=}Z{<=}102)

  13. Low-lying isomeric state in {sup 80}Ga from the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 80}Zn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LicA, R.; Marginean, N.; Ghita, D.G.; and others

    2012-10-20

    A new level scheme was constructed for {sup 80}Ga which is significantly different from the one previously reported. The excitation energy of a new low-lying state recently reported in [2] was identified at 22.4 keV. Properties of the level scheme suggest that the ground state has spin J = 6 and the first excited state has spin J = 3. The spin assignments are in agreement with laser spectroscopy values previously measured. Our work provides the first evidence for the J = 6 being the ground state.

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas a Vehicle Fuel

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digglaws-incentivesFuelsPublicationsPlug-InBenefits

  16. Ion Fokker-Planck simulation of D-{sup 3}He gas target implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larroche, O. [CEA DIF, Bruyeres le Chatel, 91297 Arpajon Cedex (France)

    2012-12-15

    Recently performed inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments involving D-{sup 3}He gas-filled microballoons have shown discrepancies between expected and measured nuclear fusion yields as the relative abundances of D and {sup 3}He are varied. The latter have been tentatively attributed to a sedimentation, or stratification phenomenon occurring in the target core. This work investigates the possibility of ion species sedimentation in a detailed way through multi-species ion-kinetic Vlasov-Fokker-Planck simulations of the implosion process. A noticeable amount of sedimentation is found to build up during the main shock propagation to the target center, but then disappears as the implosion proceeds. As a result, only the yield of the first burst of neutrons, associated with shock convergence, is appreciably modified, leaving the main neutron production phase during fuel compression and stagnation unaffected. The sedimentation of fuel ion species found, thus, cannot explain the experimental discrepancies.

  17. Structural and optical study of ? –BIMEVOX; ME: Ba{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Sakshi Singh, K.

    2015-05-15

    Bismuth oxide based compounds, such as Bi{sub 4}V{sub 2}O{sub 11-?} (BIVOX), exhibit Aurivillus type of interleaving arrangement of (Bi{sub 2}O{sub 2}){sup 2+} and (VO{sub 3}?{sub 0.5}){sup 2-} (?: oxygen vacancies). Bi{sub 4}V{sub 2}O{sub 11-?,} is known to have three kinds of temperature dependent interconvertible polymorphs ? (monoclinic), ? (orthorhombic) and ? (tetragonal). Out of all the three phases, the ? – phase is highly disordered and hence, is the most conductive one which can be stabilized by proper lower valence cation (ME) doping at V site. Bi{sub 4}V{sub 1.90}ME{sub 0.20}O{sub 11-?} (ME: Ba{sup 2+} and Sr{sup 2+}) were prepared via splat quenching technique. The required compositions were melted at 1250 °C in an electric furnace. The as quenched samples were sintered at 800 °C for 12 hours (h). The formed phases were analyzed using X-ray diffraction on quenched and sintered samples, the peak at 32{sup °} is found to be singlet in all the samples which confirms the presence of ?-phase. Hence, the stabilization of ?-phase with tetragonal structure was found to have taken place with doping and quenching. These samples are also studied by FT-IR and UV/vis spectroscopy to investigate the effect of dopants on structure and band gaps respectively.

  18. Description of {sup 4}He tetramer bound and scattering states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazauskas, Rimantas; Carbonell, Jaume [Groupe de Physique Theorique, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, 53, Avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2006-06-15

    Faddeev-Yakubovski equations are solved numerically for {sup 4}He tetramer and trimer states using realistic helium-helium interaction models. We describe the properties of ground and excited states, and we discuss with a special emphasis the {sup 4}He-{sup 4}He{sub 3} low energy scattering.

  19. /sup 238/PuO/sub 2//Mo-50 wt% Re compatibility at 800 and 1000/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaeffer, D.R.; Teaney, P.E.

    1980-07-18

    The compatibility of Mo-50 wt % Re with /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ was investigated after heat treatments of up to 720 days at 800/sup 0/C and 180 days at 1000/sup 0/C. At 800/sup 0/C, a 1-..mu..m thick, continuous layer of molybdenum oxide resulted. At 1000/sup 0/C, the oxide reaction product contained some plutonium and did not appear continuous. At 1000/sup 0/C, a layer of intermetallic formed at the Mo-Re edge, beneath the oxide layer, creating a barrier between the Mo-50 wt % Re and the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/. The intermetallic layer was promoted by the iron impurity in the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/.

  20. Elastic scattering and total reaction cross section for the {sup 6}He+{sup 58}Ni system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morcelle, V.; Lichtenthäler, R.; Lépine-Szily, A.; Guimarães, V.; Gasques, L.; Scarduelli, V.; Condori, R. Pampa; Leistenschneider, E.; Mendes Jr, D. R.; Faria, P. N. de; Pires, K. C. C.; Barioni, A.; Morais, M. C.; Shorto, J. M. B.; Zamora, J. C.

    2014-11-11

    Elastic scattering measurements of {sup 6}He + {sup 58}Ni system have been performed at the laboratory energy of 21.7 MeV. The {sup 6}He secondary beam was produced by a transfer reaction {sup 9}Be ({sup 7}Li, {sup 6}He) and impinged on {sup 58}Ni and {sup 197}Au targets, using the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, RIBRAS, installed in the Pelletron Laboratory of the Institute of Physics of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. The elastic angular distribution was obtained in the angular range from 15° to 80° in the center of mass frame. Optical model calculations have been performed using a hybrid potential to fit the experimental data. The total reaction cross section was derived.

  1. Hydration of DNA by tritiated water and isotope distribution: a study by /sup 1/H, /sup 2/H, and /sup 3/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur-De Vre, R.; Grimee-Declerck, R.; Lejeune, P.; Bertinchamps, A.J.

    1982-06-01

    The hydration layer of DNA (0.75%) in tritiated water represents 3.5% of solvent /sup 3/HHO. The combined effects of temperature (-6 to -40/sup 0/C) and H/sub 2/O//sup 2/H/sub 2/O solvent composition on the spin-lattice relaxation times of water protons and deuterons suggest selective distribution of isotopes in the hydration layer. The ''hydration isotope'' effect and the localization of tritiated water molecules in the hydration layer of DNA have important implications in describing the radiobiological effects of tritiated water because the initial molecular damage caused by /sup 3/HHO (internal radiation source) localizes close to /sup 3/H due to the short range and low energy of /sup 3/H ..beta.. rays.

  2. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY)

    1985-01-01

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  3. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coughlin, P.K.; Rabo, J.A.

    1985-12-03

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C[sub 5][sup +] hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising a SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  4. Enhanced conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY)

    1986-01-01

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  5. Alternative Fuel Implementation Toolkit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? Alternative Fuels, the Smart Choice: Alternative fuels ­ biodiesel, electricity, ethanol (E85), natural gas

  6. Research on the elastic scattering of 5--7 MeV/A /sup 14/N by /sup 59/Co and /sup 51/V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Wen-qing; Zhu Yong-tai; Zhang Yu-hu; Zhan Wen-long; Qiao Wei-min; Zhang Zhen; Wu En-chiu; Yen Shu-zhi; Fan Guo-ying; Miao He-bin

    1986-04-01

    The energy spectra and angular distributions produced by 5--7 MeV/A /sup 14/N ions on /sup 59/Co and /sup 51/V are measured by using a semiconductor detector. The atomic numbers and quantities of the contaminating heavy elements are determined. The angular distributions of the elastic scattering are fitted by using a general Fresnel model. The possibility of extracting the quasielastic cross section from the fitting procedure is discussed.

  7. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimble, Ralph E. (Finleyville, PA)

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

  8. Electromagnetic dissociation of relativistic {sup 28}Si by nucleon emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnadara, U.J.

    1992-12-01

    A detailed study of the electromagnetic dissociation of {sup 28}Si by nucleon emission at E{sub lab}/A = 14.6 (GeV/nucleon was carried out with {sup 28}Si beams interacting on {sup 208}Pb). {sup 120}Sn. {sup 64}C targets. The measurements apparatus consists of detectors in the target area which measure the energy and charged multiplicity, and a forward spectrometer which measures the position, momentum and energy of the reaction fragments. The exclusive electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for decay channels having multiple nucleons in the final state have been measured which enables the selection of events produced in pure electromagnetic interactions. The measured cross sections agree well with previous measurements obtained for the removal of a few nucleons as well as with measurements on total charge removal cross sections from other experiments. The dependence of the integrated cross sections on the target charge Z{sub T} and the target mass AT confirms that for higher Z targets the excitation is largely electromagnetic. Direct measurements of the excitation energy for the electromagnetic dissociation of {sup 28}Si {yields} p+{sup 27}Al and {sup 28}Si {yields} n+{sup 27}Si have been obtained through a calculation of the invariant mass in kinematically, reconstructed events. The excitation energy spectrum for all targets peak near the isovector giant dipole resonance in {sup 28}Si. These distributions are well reproduced by combining the photon spectrum calculated using the Weizsaecker-Williams approximation with the experimental data on the photonuclear {sup 28}Si({sub {gamma},p}){sup 27}Al and {sup 28}Si({sub {gamma},n}){sup 27}Si. The possibilities of observing double giant dipole resonance excitations in {sup 28}Si have been investigated with cross section measurements as well as with excitation energy reconstruction.

  9. Electromagnetic dissociation of relativistic [sup 28]Si by nucleon emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnadara, U.J.

    1992-12-01

    A detailed study of the electromagnetic dissociation of [sup 28]Si by nucleon emission at E[sub lab]/A = 14.6 (GeV/nucleon was carried out with [sup 28]Si beams interacting on [sup 208]Pb). [sup 120]Sn. [sup 64]C targets. The measurements apparatus consists of detectors in the target area which measure the energy and charged multiplicity, and a forward spectrometer which measures the position, momentum and energy of the reaction fragments. The exclusive electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for decay channels having multiple nucleons in the final state have been measured which enables the selection of events produced in pure electromagnetic interactions. The measured cross sections agree well with previous measurements obtained for the removal of a few nucleons as well as with measurements on total charge removal cross sections from other experiments. The dependence of the integrated cross sections on the target charge Z[sub T] and the target mass AT confirms that for higher Z targets the excitation is largely electromagnetic. Direct measurements of the excitation energy for the electromagnetic dissociation of [sup 28]Si [yields] p+[sup 27]Al and [sup 28]Si [yields] n+[sup 27]Si have been obtained through a calculation of the invariant mass in kinematically, reconstructed events. The excitation energy spectrum for all targets peak near the isovector giant dipole resonance in [sup 28]Si. These distributions are well reproduced by combining the photon spectrum calculated using the Weizsaecker-Williams approximation with the experimental data on the photonuclear [sup 28]Si([sub [gamma],p])[sup 27]Al and [sup 28]Si([sub [gamma],n])[sup 27]Si. The possibilities of observing double giant dipole resonance excitations in [sup 28]Si have been investigated with cross section measurements as well as with excitation energy reconstruction.

  10. Spent fuel dry storage technology development: thermal evaluation of sealed storage cask containing spent fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitten, P.F.; Wright, J.B.

    1980-08-01

    A PWR spent fuel assembly was encapsulated inside the E-MAD Hot Bay and placed in a instrumented above surface storage cell during December 1978 for thermal testing. Instrumentation provided to measure canister, liner and concrete temperatures consisted of thermocouples which were inserted into tubes on the outside of the canister and liner and in three radial positions in the concrete. Temperatures from the SSC test assembly have been recorded throughout the past 16 months. Canister and liner temperatures have reached their peak values of 200{sup 0}F and 140{sup 0}F, respectively. Computer predictions of the transient and steady-state temperatures show good agreement with the test data.

  11. Superfluid {sup 4}He Quantum Interference Grating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Yuki; Joshi, Aditya; Packard, Richard

    2008-08-22

    We report the first observation of quantum interference from a grating structure consisting of four weak link junctions in superfluid {sup 4}He. We find that an interference grating can be implemented successfully in a superfluid matter wave interferometer to enhance its sensitivity while trading away some of its dynamic range. We also show that this type of device can be used to measure absolute quantum mechanical phase differences. The results demonstrate the robust nature of superfluid phase coherence arising from quantum mechanics on a macroscopic scale.

  12. [Purification of {sup 67}Cu]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1994-09-01

    This report documents progress made in several areas of research and describes results which have not yet been published. These areas include: Purification of {sup 67}Cu; Macrocyclic chelates for targeted therapy; Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules; Analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response; Human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals; studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies.

  13. Process of [sup 196]Hg enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Mellor, C.E.

    1993-04-27

    A simple rate equation model shows that by increasing the length of the photochemical reactor and/or by increasing the photon intensity in said reactor, the feedstock utilization of [sup 196]Hg will be increased. Two preferred embodiments of the present invention are described, namely (1) long reactors using long photochemical lamps and vapor filters; and (2) quartz reactors with external UV reflecting films. These embodiments have each been constructed and operated, demonstrating the enhanced utilization process dictated by the mathematical model (also provided).

  14. Process of .sup.196 Hg enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Mellor, Charles E. (Salem, MA)

    1993-01-01

    A simple rate equation model shows that by increasing the length of the photochemical reactor and/or by increasing the photon intensity in said reactor, the feedstock utilization of .sup.196 Hg will be increased. Two preferred embodiments of the present invention are described, namely (1) long reactors using long photochemical lamps and vapor filters; and (2) quartz reactors with external UV reflecting films. These embodiments have each been constructed and operated, demonstrating the enhanced utilization process dictated by the mathematical model (also provided).

  15. Actinide production in /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregorich, K.E.

    1985-08-01

    The production cross sections for the actinide products from /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf at energies 1.02, 1.09, and 1.16 times the Coulomb barrier were determined. Fractions of the individual actinide elements were chemically separated from recoil catcher foils. The production cross sections of the actinide products were determined by measuring the radiations emitted from the nuclides within the chemical fractions. The chemical separation techniques used in this work are described in detail, and a description of the data analysis procedure is included. The actinide production cross section distributions from these /sup 136/Xe + /sup 249/Cf bombardments are compared with the production cross section distributions from other heavy ion bombardments of actinide targets, with emphasis on the comparison with the /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction. A technique for modeling the final actinide cross section distributions has been developed and is presented. In this model, the initial (before deexcitation) cross section distribution with respect to the separation energy of a dinuclear complex and with respect to the Z of the target-like fragment is given by an empirical procedure. It is then assumed that the N/Z equilibration in the dinuclear complex occurs by the transfer of neutrons between the two participants in the dinuclear complex. The neutrons and the excitation energy are statistically distributed between the two fragments using a simple Fermi gas level density formalism. The resulting target-like fragment initial cross section distribution with respect to Z, N, and excitation energy is then allowed to deexcite by emission of neutrons in competition with fission. The result is a final cross section distribution with respect to Z and N for the actinide products. 68 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Spectral properties of the Dirichlet operator ?{sub i=1}{sup d}(??{sub i}{sup 2}){sup s} on domains in d-dimensional Euclidean space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatzinikitas, Agapitos N.

    2013-10-15

    In this article, we investigate the distribution of eigenvalues of the Dirichlet pseudo-differential operator ?{sub i=1}{sup d}(??{sub i}{sup 2}){sup s},?s?(0,1] on an open and bounded subdomain ??R{sup d} and predict bounds on the sum of the first N eigenvalues, the counting function, the Riesz means, and the trace of the heat kernel. Moreover, utilizing the connection of coherent states to the semi-classical approach of quantum mechanics, we determine the sum for moments of eigenvalues of the associated Schrödinger operator.

  17. Assessment of SFR fuel pin performance codes under advanced fuel for minor actinide transmutation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouineau, V.; Lainet, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pelletier, M.

    2013-07-01

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is, therefore, an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and residual power packages as well as the repository area. In the SUPERFACT Experiment four different oxide fuels containing high and low concentrations of {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am, representing the homogeneous and heterogeneous in-pile recycling concepts, were irradiated in the PHENIX reactor. The behavior of advanced fuel materials with minor actinide needs to be fully characterized, understood and modeled in order to optimize the design of this kind of fuel elements and to evaluate its performances. This paper assesses the current predictability of fuel performance codes TRANSURANUS and GERMINAL V2 on the basis of post irradiation examinations of the SUPERFACT experiment for pins with low minor actinide content. Their predictions have been compared to measured data in terms of geometrical changes of fuel and cladding, fission gases behavior and actinide and fission product distributions. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results, although improvements are also pointed out for further studies, especially if larger content of minor actinide will be taken into account in the codes. (authors)

  18. Measurements of the {sup 6}He+p resonant scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Condori, R. Pampa; Lichtenthäler, R.; Lépine-Szily, A.; Gasques, L. R.; Morais, M. C.; Scarduelli, V. B.; Leistenschneider, E.; Alcántara-Núñez, J. A.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes Jr, D. R.; Pires, K. C. C.; Shorto, J. M. B.

    2014-11-11

    Measurements of the p({sup 6}He,p) elastic scattering excitation function have been performed in the RIBRAS system using a {sup 6}He secondary beam and a CH{sub 2} polyethylene thick target. The motivation is to observe states of the compound nucleus {sup 7}Li in the excitation energy range of E{sub exc}{sup 7Li}?=?10.8-11.8MeV, where the isobaric analog state of {sup 7}He ground state lies. Excitation functions have been obtained at three laboratory angles ?{sub lab} = 0°, 20°, and 25° which correspond to ?{sub c.m} = 180°, 140°, and 130°.

  19. Observation of excited states in /sup 128/Ba

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Zhi-zheng; Guo Ying-xiang; Pan Zong-you; Xiao Jian-min; Lei Xiang-guo; Liu Hong-ye; Sun Xi-jun

    1987-01-01

    Excited states in /sup 128/Ba have been investigated via the /sup 120/Sn (/sup 12/C, 4n..gamma..) /sup 128/Ba reaction by means of in-beam gamma spectroscopy. A 12/sup +/ state other than the previously reported one is observed according to the properties of the 935.0 keV ..gamma..-ray. It does not belong to the ground-state band. Two new interband transitions, 224.8 keV and 632.7 keV, are observed and assigned to sidefeeding between the negative-parity band and ground-state band.

  20. Fusion of [sup 32]S+[sup 154]Sm at sub-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomes, P.R.S.; Charret, I.C.; Wanis, R.; Sigaud, G.M. (Departamento de Fisica da Universidade Federal Fluminense, Outeiro S. Joao Batista, Niteroi, 24020 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)); Vanin, V.R.; Liguori Neto, R. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 20510, Sao Paulo, 01498 Sao Paulo (Brazil)); Abriola, D.; Capurro, O.A.; DiGregorio, D.E.; di Tada, M.; Duchene, G.; Elgue, M.; Etchegoyen, A.; Fernandez Niello, J.O.; Ferrero, A.M.J.; Gil, S.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Pacheco, A.J.; Testoni, J.E. (Laboratorio TANDAR, Departamento de Fisica, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    1994-01-01

    Fusion-evaporation cross sections for the [sup 32]S+[sup 154]Sm system at bombarding energies near the Coulomb barrier have been measured by off-line observation of the [ital K] x rays emitted in the radioactive decay of the residual nuclei. The total fusion cross sections were obtained by adding the contributions from evaporation and fission processes. The fusion excitation function for this system is compared with coupled-channel calculations that include the deformation of the target and vibrational states of both target and projectile.

  1. Fusion of {sup 48}Ca+{sup 48}Ca Far Below the Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarlassara, F.; Montagnoli, G.; Mason, P.; Stefanini, A. M.; Silvestri, R.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Guiot, B.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Szilner, S.

    2009-08-26

    In recent years, a puzzling pattern has been observed in fusion cross sections well below the Coulomb barrier, characterized as a departure from the exponential-like behavior predicted by standard coupled-channels models, known as fusion hindrance. We report on recent fusion measurements performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in particular the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 48}Ca reaction down to the level of 0.6 {mu}b. Unlike most recent results in this field, we do not observe the typical divergent behavior of the logarithmic derivative; but rather a sort of saturation, albeit at a larger value than predicted with a standard nucleus-nucleus potential.

  2. {sup 12}C+{sup 16}O: Properties of sub-barrier resonance {gamma}-decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goasduff, A.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Jenkins, D. G.; Fallis, J.; Ruiz, C.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Amandruz, P.-A.; Davis, C.; Hager, U.; Ottewell, D.; Ruprecht, G.

    2012-10-20

    In a recent experiment performed at Triumf using the Dragon 0 Degree-Sign spectrometer and its associated BGO array, the complete {gamma}-decay of the radiative capture channel below the Coulomb barrier has been measured for the first time. This measurement has been performed at two energies E{sub c.m.}= 6.6 and 7.2 MeV. A selective contribution of the entrance spins 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} has been evidenced which is consistent with existing results above the barrier.

  3. B{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}/{rho}{sup -}{rho}{sup 0} to next-to-next-to-leading order in QCD factorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Guido; Pilipp, Volker

    2009-09-01

    The approximate tree decays B{sup -}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}/{rho}{sup -}{rho}{sup 0} may serve as benchmark channels for testing the various theoretical descriptions of the strong interaction dynamics in hadronic B meson decays. The ratios of hadronic and differential semileptonic B{yields}{pi}l{nu}/{rho}l{nu} decay rates at maximum recoil provide particularly clean probes of the QCD dynamics. We confront the recent next-to-next-to-leading order calculation in the QCD factorization framework with experimental data and find support for the factorization assumption. A detailed analysis of all tree-dominated B{yields}{pi}{pi}/{pi}{rho}/{rho}{rho} decay modes seems to favor somewhat enhanced color-suppressed amplitudes, which may be accommodated in QCD factorization by a small value of the first inverse moment of the B meson light-cone distribution amplitude, {lambda}{sub B}{approx_equal}250 MeV. Precise measurements of the semileptonic B{yields}{rho}l{nu} spectrum could help to clarify this point.

  4. Irradiation Test of Advanced PWR Fuel in Fuel Test Loop at HANARO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yong Sik; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Song, Kun Woo; Park, Su Ki; Seo, Chul Gyo

    2007-07-01

    A new fuel test loop has been constructed in the research reactor HANARO at KAERI. The main objective of the FTL (Fuel Test Loop) is an irradiation test of a newly developed LWR fuel under PWR or Candu simulated conditions. The first test rod will be loaded within 2007 and its irradiation test will be continued until a rod average their of 62 MWd/kgU. A total of five test rods can be loaded into the IPS (In-Pile Section) and fuel centerline temperature, rod internal pressure and fuel stack elongation can be measured by an on-line real time system. A newly developed advanced PWR fuel which consists of a HANA{sup TM} alloy cladding and a large grain UO{sub 2} pellet was selected as the first test fuel in the FTL. The fuel cladding, the HANA{sup TM} alloy, is an Nb containing Zirconium alloy that has shown better corrosion and creep resistance properties than the current Zircaloy-4 cladding. A total of six types of HANA{sup TM} alloy were developed and two or three of these candidate alloys will be used as test rod cladding, which have shown a superior performance to the others. A large-grain UO{sub 2} pellet has a 14{approx}16 micron 2D diameter grain size for a reduction of a fission gas release at a high burnup. In this paper, characteristics of the FTL and IPS are introduced and the expected operation and irradiation conditions are summarized for the test periods. Also the preliminary fuel performance analysis results, such as the cladding oxide thickness, fission gas release and rod internal pressure, are evaluated from the test rod safety analysis aspects. (authors)

  5. Fuel cell using a hydrogen generation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dentinger, Paul M. (Sunol, CA); Crowell, Jeffrey A. W. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2010-10-19

    A system is described for storing and generating hydrogen and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  6. Evaporation-based Ge/.sup.68 Ga Separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirzadeh, Saed (Albuquerque, NM); Whipple, Richard E. (Los Alamos, NM); Grant, Patrick M. (Los Alamos, NM); O'Brien, Jr., Harold A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    Micro concentrations of .sup.68 Ga in secular equilibrium with .sup.68 Ge in strong aqueous HCl solution may readily be separated in ionic form from the .sup.68 Ge for biomedical use by evaporating the solution to dryness and then leaching the .sup.68 Ga from the container walls with dilute aqueous solutions of HCl or NaCl. The chloro-germanide produced during the evaporation may be quantitatively recovered to be used again as a source of .sup.68 Ga. If the solution is distilled to remove any oxidizing agents which may be present as impurities, the separation factor may easily exceed 10.sup.5. The separation is easily completed and the .sup.68 Ga made available in ionic form in 30 minutes or less.

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg Find More places to

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg Find More places toEthanol PrintableEthanol

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg Find More places toEthanolVehicles Printable

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas a VehicleNaturalDimethyl

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas aEthanol Benefits and

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas a Vehicle FuelFueling Stations to

  13. Spectral investigations of Sm{sup 3+}-doped oxyfluorosilicate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramachari, D. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Rama Moorthy, L., E-mail: lrmphysics@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Department of Physics, Chadalawada Ramanamma Engineering College, Renigunta Road, Tirupati 517506 (India); Jayasankar, C.K. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India)

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: The figure shows the emission spectra of Sm{sup 3+} doped KNSZL glass for different concentrations. Among the four emission transitions {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} ? {sup 6}H{sub 5/2}, {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} ? {sup 6}H{sub 7/2}, {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} ? {sup 6}H{sub 9/2} and {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} ? {sup 6}H{sub 11/2}, the {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} ? {sup 6}H{sub 7/2} transition of KNSZLSm10 glass is more intense compared with all the transitions. The insert figure shows, the color coordinates (0.59, 0.41) of KNSZLSm10 glass is located on the perimeter of the chromaticity diagram at 592 nm which appears to be closest to the orange color. From these results the KNSZLSm10 glass could be useful for optical amplifiers, waveguides, telecommunications and orange LEDs. - Highlights: • From the DTA, the undoped KNSZL glass more precisely in fiberdrawing. • The XRD pattern confirmed the KNbO{sub 3} nanocrystallites of undoped KNSZL glass. • FTIR and Raman data of KNSZLSm10 glass revealed structural properties. • Judd–Ofelt analysis and decay measurements were carried out. • The optical gain parameter of the investigated glass is 18.13 × 10{sup ?25} cm{sup 2} s. - Abstract: Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped oxyfluorosilicate glasses were prepared by melt-quenching method. The differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction were carried out to investigate the glass transition temperature and structure of precursor glass. Infrared spectroscopy, Raman, optical absorption, photoluminescence and decay measurements were carried out for Sm{sup 3+}-doped oxyfluorosilicate glasses. From the absorption spectrum, the Judd–Ofelt intensity parameters have been evaluated to predict the radiative properties for the emission levels of Sm{sup 3+} ions. The lifetimes of {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} level are found to decrease from 1.17 to 0.93 ms due to the energy transfer, when the concentration of Sm{sup 3+} ions increases from 0.1 to 2.0 mol%. The optical gain parameter (18.13 × 10{sup ?25} cm{sup 2} s) of the investigated glass is found to be higher than the other Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped glass systems.

  14. Neutronics study of LEU fuel options for the HFR-Petten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    The standard HEU fuel cycle characteristics are compared with those of several different LEU fuel cycles in the new vessel configuration. The primary design goals were to provide similar reactivity performance and neutron flux profiles with a minimal increase in /sup 235/U loading. The fuel cycle advantages of Cd burnable absorbers over /sup 10/B are presented. The LEU fuel cycle requirements were calculated also for an extended 32-day cycle and for a reload batch size reduction from six to five standard elements for the standard 26-day cycle. The effects of typical in-core experiments upon neutron flux profiles and fuel loading requirements are also presented.

  15. Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strain, R.V.; Sanecki, J.E.; Osborne, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel is being studied by heating fuel rod segments in flowing steam and an inert carrier gas to simulate accident conditions. Fuels with a range of irradiation histories are being subjected to several steam flow rates over a wide range of temperatures. Fission product release during each test is measured by gamma spectroscopy and by detailed examination of the collection apparatus after the test has been completed. These release results are complemented by a detailed posttest examination of samples of the fuel rod segment. Results of release measurements and fuel rod characterizations for tests at 1400 through 2000/sup 0/C are presented in this paper.

  16. Optical Ramsey spectroscopy of a single trapped {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letchumanan, V. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2BW (United Kingdom); Gill, P.; Sinclair, A.G. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Riis, E. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2004-09-01

    Coherent optical spectroscopy has been performed on the narrow 5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} quadrupole transition in a single Doppler-cooled and trapped {sup 88}Sr{sup +} ion. High-contrast optical Ramsey spectra have been observed with fringe visibilities up to {approx}90%. The visibility decreased as the free precession period was increased, and was limited by the interrogation laser's coherence. The effect of varying the relative phase of the second Ramsey pulse was investigated. By measuring the difference in excitation probability on reversing a 90 deg. relative phase shift between the two Ramsey pulses, we have demonstrated Ramsey's anti-symmetric line shape in the optical domain. A significant advantage of this line shape is the zero crossing at line center and the independence of this center frequency on drifts in signal amplitude. This optical Ramsey line shape is suitable for stabilizing a local oscillator to an atomic reference transition in an optical frequency standard. All observed optical Ramsey signals are well described by a model using the optical Bloch equations.

  17. Radiative recombination data for tungsten ions: II. W{sup 47+}–W{sup 71+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trzhaskovskaya, M.B., E-mail: Trzhask@MT5605.spb.edu [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Nikulin, V.K. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-15

    New radiative recombination and photoionization cross sections, radiative recombination rate coefficients, and radiated power loss rate coefficients are presented for 23 tungsten impurity ions in plasmas. We consider ions from W{sup 47+} to W{sup 71+} that are of importance to fusion studies for ITER and for experiments using electron beam ion traps. The calculations are fully relativistic and all significant multipoles of the radiative field are taken into account. The Dirac–Fock method is used to compute the electron wavefunctions. Radiative recombination rates and radiated power loss rates are found using the relativistic Maxwell–Jüttner distribution of the continuum electron velocity. The total radiative recombination cross sections are given in the electron energy range from 1 eV to ?80keV. Partial cross sections for ground and excited states are approximated by an analytical expression involving five fit parameters. Radiative recombination rates and radiated power loss rates are calculated in the temperature range from 10{sup 4}K to 10{sup 9}K. The total radiative recombination rates are approximated by another analytical expression with four fit parameters.

  18. Measurement of K/sup +/ conductance in gastric vesicles from secreting stomach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabon, E.; Gunther, R.D.

    1986-05-01

    Specific inhibitors were used to identify two components of /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake in vesicles obtained from secreting rabbit stomachs. Rb/sup +/ transport was measured in vesicles as trace /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake following removal of external K/sup +/ from vesicles equilibrated in potassium gluconate. /sup 86/Rb)2= uptake mediated by the gastric H/sup +/K/sup +/-ATPase was identified by sensitivity to vanadate, ATP and pyridyl (1,2a) imidazole (SCH28080). In contrast, /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ influx through a K/sup +/ conductance mechanism was inhibited by the protonophore (TCS) induced collapse of the K/sup +/ diffusion potential. K/sup +/ conductance sensitivity to quinine and the K/sup +/ channel blocker bis-Guanidinium (bis G-8) were demonstrated by inhibition of a K/sup +/ induced chase of intravesicular /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ previously loaded by /sup 86/Rb/sup +//K/sup +/ exchange in the presence of 2 ..mu..M SCH28080. The K/sup +/ conductance is Ba/sup 2 +/ and apamine insensitive and exhibits a monovalent cation specificity of Rb > Kapprox. = Cs >> Na, Li. KCl dependent H/sup +/ transport exhibited complete sensitivity to the H/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase inhibitors SCH28080 and vanadate. The measurements of Rb/sup +/ pathways distinctive for the H/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase and a K/sup +/ conductance support previous suggestions of a functional linkage between the H/sup +/, K/sup +/-ATPase and a K/sup +/ conductance in vesicles, obtained from stimulated stomach. The experimental discrimination between the two Rb/sup +/ pathways suggests that a separate mechanism is utilized for each transport pathway.

  19. Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turgut Gur

    2010-04-30

    This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2}) that simulates the composition of the coal syngas. At 800 C, the stack achieved a power density of 1176 W, which represents the largest power level demonstrated for CO in the literature. Although the FB-DCFC performance results obtained in this project were definitely encouraging and promising for practical applications, DCFC approaches pose significant technical challenges that are specific to the particular DCFC scheme employed. Long term impact of coal contaminants, particularly sulfur, on the stability of cell components and cell performance is a critically important issue. Effective current collection in large area cells is another challenge. Lack of kinetic information on the Boudouard reactivity of wide ranging solid fuels, including various coals and biomass, necessitates empirical determination of such reaction parameters that will slow down development efforts. Scale up issues will also pose challenges during development of practical FB-DCFC prototypes for testing and validation. To overcome some of the more fundamental problems, initiation of federal support for DCFC is critically important for advancing and developing this exciting and promising technology for third generation electricity generation from coal, biomass and other solid fuels including waste.

  20. State-to-state dynamics of the H{sup *}(n) + HD ? D{sup *}(n{sup ?}) + H{sub 2} reactive scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Shengrui; Su, Shu; Dai, Dongxu; Yuan, Kaijun, E-mail: kjyuan@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: xmyang@dicp.ac.cn; Yang, Xueming, E-mail: kjyuan@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: xmyang@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 457 Zhongshan Road, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2014-01-21

    The state-to-state dynamics of the H{sup *}(n) + HD ? D{sup *}(n{sup ?}) + H{sub 2} reactive scattering at the collision energy of 0.5 eV have been carried out for the first time by using H-atom Rydberg tagging time-of-flight technique. Experimental results show that the angular distribution of the total H{sub 2} products presents clearly forward-backward asymmetric, which considerably differs from that of the corresponding H{sup +} + HD ? D{sup +} + H{sub 2} reaction predicted by previously theoretical calculations. Such disagreement between these two processes suggests that the Fermi independent-collider model is also not valid in describing the dynamics of isotopic variants of the H{sup *} + H{sub 2} reaction. The rotational state distribution of the H{sub 2} products demonstrates a saw-toothed distribution with odd-j{sup ?} > even-j{sup ?}. This interesting observation is strongly influenced by nuclear spin statistics.

  1. Performance analysis of a thorium-fueled reactor with a seed-blanket assembly configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Kyung TAek; Cho, Nam Zin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Due to the superior nuclear properties of {sup 233}U, thorium-based reactors are receiving increasing attention. Because of the relatively high neutron yield of {sup 233}U in the thermal range, the thorium-{sup 233}U fuel system has a higher conversion ratio in thermal reactors than {sup 238}U-based fuel systems. Moreover, the thorium-{sup 233}U system is advantageous in that it produces significantly fewer toxic nuclides of plutonium, americium, and neptunium isotopes. Thorium-based cycles do have some problems, such as slow {sup 233}U buildup and the need of additional neutron source initially. In addition, the existence of hard gamma emitters makes it very difficult to reprocess discharged fuel, which is at the same time a positive factor for nonproliferation. Recently, Radkowsky proposed a new type of thorium-fueled reactor, consisting of seed-blanket fuel assemblies, that could be compatible with the existing light water reactor (LWR) technology and could overcome the problems of the thorium fuel cycle. In this paper, the results of a preliminary study on this seed-blanket thorium-based fuel assembly are reported and compared with a standard LWR assembly (ABB/CE type).

  2. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Reforming for Molten Carbonate Fuel Cells," Berichte derVan Dijkum, "The Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Programme in thealkaline, molten carbonate, and solid oxide. (Fuel cells

  3. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    regenerative braking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissionsconditions, the expected savings in fuel costs are notis whether the fuel cost savings over the lifetime of the

  4. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per...

  5. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  6. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per Square Foot"...

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (DNR) has defined. Eligible alternative fuels include natural gas, propane, hydrogen, coal-derived liquid fuels, fuels other than alcohol derived from biological materials, and...

  8. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01

    would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

  9. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per...

  10. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  11. High-resolution study of 0{sup +} and 2{sup +} excitations in {sup 168}Er with the (p,t) reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucurescu, D. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG-6, R-76900 Bucharest (Romania); Graw, G.; Hertenberger, R. [Sektion Physik, Ludwig Maximilians Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Wirth, H.-F.; Faestermann, T.; Kruecken, R.; Mahgoub, M. [Physik Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lo Iudice, N. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli 'Federico II' and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Monte S Angelo, Via Cintia I-80126 Naples (Italy); Sushkov, A.V.; Shirikova, N.Yu. [Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Sun, Y. [Department of Physics and Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Physics, Xuzhou Normal University, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221009 (China); Jolie, J.; Brentano, P. von; Braun, N.; Heinze, S.; Moeller, O.; Muecher, D.; Scholl, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, D-50937 Cologne (Germany); Casten, R.F.; Meyer, D.A. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8124 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Excited states in the deformed nucleus {sup 168}Er have been studied with high-energy resolution, in the (p,t) reaction, with the Munich Q3D spectrograph. A number of 25 excited 0{sup +} states (four tentative) and 63 2{sup +} states have been assigned up to 4.0 MeV excitation energy. This unusually rich characterization of the 0{sup +} and 2{sup +} states in a deformed nucleus, close to a complete level scheme, offers a unique opportunity to check, in detail, models of nuclear structure that incorporate many excitation modes. A comparison of the experimental data is made with two such models: the quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM), and the projected shell model (PSM). The PSM wave functions appear to contain fewer correlations than those of the QPM and than required by the data.

  12. ELECTRON-CAPTURE SUPERNOVAE AS SOURCES OF {sup 60}Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanajo, Shinya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Janka, Hans-Thomas; Mueller, Bernhard, E-mail: shinya.wanajo@nao.ac.jp [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    We investigate the nucleosynthesis of the radionuclide {sup 60}Fe in electron-capture supernovae (ECSNe). The nucleosynthetic results are based on a self-consistent, two-dimensional simulation of an ECSN as well as models in which the densities are systematically increased by some factors (low-entropy models). {sup 60}Fe is found to be appreciably made in neutron-rich ejecta during the nuclear quasi-equilibrium phase with greater amounts being produced in the lower-entropy models. Our results, combining them with the yields of core-collapse supernovae in the literature, suggest that ECSNe account for at least 4%-30% of live {sup 60}Fe in the Milky Way. ECSNe co-produce neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 48}Ca, {sup 50}Ti, {sup 54}Cr, some light trans-iron elements, and possibly weak r-process elements including some radionuclides such as {sup 93}Zr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 107}Pd, whose association with {sup 60}Fe might have been imprinted in primitive meteorites or in the deep ocean crust on the Earth.

  13. Engineered fuel: Renewable fuel of the future?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomczyk, L.

    1997-01-01

    The power generation and municipal solid waste management industries share an interest in the use of process engineered fuel (PEF) comprised mainly of paper and plastics as a supplement to conventional fuels. PEF is often burned in existing boilers, making PEF an alternative to traditional refuse derived fuels (RDF). This paper describes PEF facilities and makes a comparison of PEF and RDF fuels.

  14. OptFuels: Fuel Treatment Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OptFuels: Fuel Treatment Optimization Scientists a Rocky Mountain Research Station Missoula, MT, scientists at the University of Montana, are developing a tool to help forest managers prioritize forest fuel reduction treatments. Although several computer models analyz stand-level effects of fuel treatments

  15. Carbon-14 in waste packages for spent fuel in a tuff repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Smith, C.F.; Culham, H.W.; Smith, H.D.

    1986-10-14

    Carbon-14 is produced naturally by cosmic ray neutrons in the upper atmosphere. It is also produced in nuclear reactors, in amounts much smaller than the global inventory. About one-third of this is released directly to the atmosphere, and the other two-thirds remains in the spent fuel. Both the Environmental Protection Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have established limits on release of the {sup 14}C in spent fuel. This is of particular concern for the proposed repository in tuff, because of the unsaturated conditions and the consequent possibility of gaseous transport of {sup 14}C as CO{sub 2}. Existing measurements and calculations of the {sup 14}C inventory in spent fuel are reviewed. The physical distribution and chemical forms of the {sup 14}C are discussed. Available data on the release of {sup 14}C from spent fuel in aqueous solutions and in gaseous environments of air, nitrogen, and helium are reviewed. Projected {sup 14}C behavior in a tuff repository is described. It is concluded that {sup 14}C release measurements from spent fuel into moist air at temperatures both above and below the in situ boiling point of water as well as detailed transport calculations for the tuff geological environment will be needed to determine whether the 10CFR60 and 40CFR191 requirements can be met. 56 refs., 1 tab.

  16. California Fuel Cell Partnership: Alternative Fuels Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels| Department ofBusinessCEA90:2:09California EnergyFuel Cell

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas aEthanol Benefits andFueling Stations

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas aEthanolAFDCHydrogen PrintableFueling

  19. Tips: Buying and Driving Fuel Efficient and Alternative Fuel...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Fuel Vehicles & Fuels Tips: Buying and Driving Fuel Efficient and Alternative Fuel Vehicles Tips: Buying and Driving Fuel Efficient and Alternative Fuel Vehicles...

  20. A novel technique for measurement of thermal rate constants and temperature dependences of dissociative recombination: CO{sub 2}{sup +}, CF{sub 3}{sup +}, N{sub 2}O{sup +}, C{sub 7}H{sub 8}{sup +}, C{sub 7}H{sub 7}{sup +}, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}{sup +}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}{sup +}, C{sub 5}H{sub 6}{sup +}, C{sub 4}H{sub 4}{sup +}, and C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, Joseph A.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Melko, Joshua J.; Ard, Shaun G.; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2013-04-21

    A novel technique using a flowing afterglow-Langmuir probe apparatus for measurement of temperature dependences of rate constants for dissociative recombination (DR) is presented. Low ({approx}10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) concentrations of a neutral precursor are added to a noble gas/electron afterglow plasma thermalized at 300-500 K. Charge exchange yields one or many cation species, each of which may undergo DR. Relative ion concentrations are monitored at a fixed reaction time while the initial plasma density is varied between 10{sup 9} and 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. Modeling of the decrease in concentration of each cation relative to the non-recombining noble gas cation yields the rate constant for DR. The technique is applied to several species (O{sub 2}{sup +}, CO{sub 2}{sup +}, CF{sub 3}{sup +}, N{sub 2}O{sup +}) with previously determined 300 K values, showing excellent agreement. The measurements of those species are extended to 500 K, with good agreement to literature values where they exist. Measurements are also made for a range of C{sub n}H{sub m}{sup +} (C{sub 7}H{sub 7}{sup +}, C{sub 7}H{sub 8}{sup +}, C{sub 5}H{sub 6}{sup +}, C{sub 4}H{sub 4}{sup +}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 6}{sup +}) derived from benzene and toluene neutral precursors. C{sub n}H{sub m}{sup +} DR rate constants vary from 8-12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 300 K with temperature dependences of approximately T{sup -0.7}. Where prior measurements exist these results are in agreement, with the exception of C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} where the present results disagree with a previously reported flat temperature dependence.

  1. (Fuel Cells)(Fuel Cells) William Grove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yang-Yuan

    Fuel Cell #12; H2 O2 Power CH4 H2 Toyota H2 H2 #12; H2 ~253 #12; 2. 3. : 1. #12; #12;Fuel Cell #12; (Fuel Cells)(Fuel Cells) 1839 William Grove A H2O2 H2O2 2H; Fuel Cell #12;!! PEMFC DMFC SOFC (60~200) (60~100) (600~1000) #12; Proton

  2. THE RGB AND AGB STAR NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN LIGHT OF THE RECENT {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N AND {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N REACTION-RATE DETERMINATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmerini, S.; Sergi, M. L.; La Cognata, M.; Pizzone, R. G.; Spitaleri, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy)] [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Lamia, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy)

    2013-02-20

    In recent years, the Trojan Horse Method (THM) has been used to investigate the low-energy cross sections of proton-induced reactions on A = 17 and A = 18 oxygen isotopes, overcoming extrapolation procedures and enhancement effects due to electron screening. In particular, the strengths of the 20 keV and 65 keV resonances in the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N and {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N reactions, respectively, have been extracted, as well as the contribution of the tail of the broad 656 keV resonance in the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N reaction inside the Gamow window. The strength of the 65 keV resonance in the {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N reaction, measured by means of the THM, has been used to renormalize the corresponding resonance strength in the {sup 17}O + p radiative capture channel. As a result, more accurate reaction rates for the {sup 18}O(p, {alpha}){sup 15}N, {sup 17}O(p, {alpha}){sup 14}N, and {sup 17}O(p, {gamma}){sup 18}F processes have been deduced, devoid of systematic errors due to extrapolation or the electron screening effect. Such rates have been introduced into state-of-the-art red giant branch and asymptotic giant branch (AGB) models for proton-capture nucleosynthesis coupled with extra-mixing episodes. The predicted abundances have been compared with isotopic compositions provided by geochemical analysis of presolar grains. As a result, an improved agreement is found between the models and the isotopic mix of oxide grains of AGB origins, whose composition is the signature of low-temperature proton-capture nucleosynthesis. The low {sup 14}N/{sup 15}N found in SiC grains cannot be explained by the revised nuclear reaction rates and remains a serious problem that has not been satisfactorily addressed.

  3. Measurement of the cross sections for the production of the isotopes {sup 74}As, {sup 68}Ge, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 60}Co from natural and enriched germanium irradiated with 100-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabanov, I. R.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Gurentsov, V. I.; Zhuykov, B. L.; Kianovsky, S. V.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kohanuk, V. M.; Yanovich, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15

    The cross sections for the production of the radioactive isotopes {sup 74}As, {sup 68}Ge, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 60}Co in metallic germanium irradiated with 100-MeV protons were measured, the experiments being performed both with germanium of natural isotopic composition and germanium enriched in the isotope {sup 76}Ge. The targets were irradiated with a proton beam at the facility for the production of radionuclides at the accelerator of the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR, Moscow). The data obtained will further be used to calculate the background of radioactive isotopes formed by nuclear cascades of cosmic-ray muons in new-generation experiments devoted to searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 76}Ge at underground laboratories.

  4. Short-lived isomers in {sup 94}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsekhanovich, I.; Dare, J. A.; Smith, A. G.; Varley, B. J.; Simpson, G. S.; Urban, W.; Soldner, T.; Jolie, J.; Linnemann, A.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, J. F.; Scherillo, A.; Rzaca-Urban, T.; Zlomaniec, A.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B. J. P.; Roux, B.

    2008-07-15

    The medium-spin structure of the neutron-rich, odd-odd nucleus {sup 94}Rb was studied by means of {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Excited levels were populated in the neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U and in the spontaneous fission of {sup 252}Cf and {sup 248}Cm. Two isomeric states were found at 1485.2 and 2074.8 keV with half-lives of 18 and 107 ns, respectively. The probable structures of the two isomers involve the fully aligned, proton-neutron configurations [{pi}(g{sub 9/2}) x {nu}(g{sub 7/2})]{sub 8{sup +}} and [{pi}(g{sub 9/2}) x {nu}(h{sub 11/2})]{sub 10{sup -}}, respectively. These new data give information on the single-particle energies in the region.

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropaneAlternative FuelNaturalFueling

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropaneAlternative FuelNaturalFuelingVehicle

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropaneAlternative FuelNaturalFuelingVehicleLoans

  8. Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReportOfficeAcqguide18pt0Department ofHigh2 DOEFactory-Built

  9. Uniform AMoO{sub 4}:Ln (A=Sr{sup 2+}, Ba{sup 2+}; Ln=Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) submicron particles: Solvothermal synthesis and luminescent properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Piaoping [College of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Li Chunxia [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Wang Wenxin [College of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Quan Zewei [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); Gai Shili [College of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Lin Jun, E-mail: jlin@ciac.jl.c [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China)

    2009-09-15

    Rare-earth ions (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) doped AMoO{sub 4} (A=Sr, Ba) particles with uniform morphologies were successfully prepared through a facile solvothermal process using ethylene glycol (EG) as protecting agent. X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), photoluminescence (PL) spectra and the kinetic decays were performed to characterize these samples. The XRD results reveal that all the doped samples are of high purity and crystallinity and assigned to the tetragonal scheelite-type structure of the AMoO{sub 4} phase. It has been shown that the as-synthesized SrMoO{sub 4}:Ln and BaMoO{sub 4}:Ln samples show respective uniform peanut-like and oval morphologies with narrow size distribution. The possible growth process of the AMoO{sub 4}:Ln has been investigated in detail. The EG/H{sub 2}O volume ratio, reaction temperature and time have obvious effect on the morphologies and sizes of the as-synthesized products. Upon excitation by ultraviolet radiation, the AMoO{sub 4}:Eu{sup 3+} phosphors show the characteristic {sup 5}D{sub 0}-{sup 7}F{sub 1-4} emission lines of Eu{sup 3+}, while the AMoO{sub 4}:Tb{sup 3+} phosphors exhibit the characteristic {sup 5}D{sub 4}-{sup 7}F{sub 3-6} emission lines of Tb{sup 3+}. These phosphors exhibit potential applications in the fields of fluorescent lamps and light emitting diodes (LEDs). - Graphical abstract: Uniform rare-earth ions (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) doped AMoO{sub 4} (A=Sr, Ba) submicron phosphors with tetragonal scheelite-type structure have been prepared through a facile solvothermal process using EG as reaction media. Display Omitted

  10. /sup 10/Be profiles in lunar surface rock 68815

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishiizumi, K.; Imamura, M.; Kohl, C.P.; Nagai, H.; Kobayashi, K.; Yoshida, K.; Yamashita, H.; Reedy, R.C.; Honda, M.; Arnold, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Cosmic ray produced /sup 10/Be (t/sub 1/2/ = 1.6 x 10/sup 6/ years) activities have been measured in fourteen carefully ground samples of lunar surface rock 68815. The /sup 10/Be profiles from 0 to 4 mm are nearly flat for all three surface angles measured and show a very slight increase with depth from the surface to a depth of 1.5 cm. These depth profiles are in contrast to the SCR (solar cosmic ray) produced /sup 26/Al and /sup 53/Mn profiles measured from these same samples. There is no sign of SCR produced /sup 10/Be in this rock. The discrepancy between the data and the Reedy-Arnold theoretical calculation (about 2 dpm /sup 10/Be/kg at the surface) can be explained in two ways: (1) the low energy proton induced cross sections for /sup 10/Be production from oxygen are really lower than those used in the calculations or, (2) compared to the reported fits for /sup 26/Al and /sup 53/Mn, the solar proton spectral shape is actually softer (exponential rigidity parameter Ro less than 100 MV), the omnidirectional flux above 10 MeV is higher (more than 70 protons/cm/sup 2/ s), and the erosion rate is higher (greater than 1.3 mm/My). /sup 10/Be, as a high energy product, is a very useful nuclide for helping to obtain the SCR spectral shape in the past. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Study of {sup 24}Mg resonances relevant for carbon burning nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toki?, V.; Soi?, N.; Blagus, S.; Fazini?, S.; Jelavi?-Malenica, D.; Miljani?, D.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Szilner, S.; Uroi?, M.; Milin, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Lattuada, M.; Scuderi, V.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Freer, M.; Ziman, V.; and others

    2014-05-09

    We have studied decays of resonances in {sup 24}Mg at excitation energies above the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C decay threshold, using {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,?){sup 24}Mg* reaction. This experiment has been performed at INFNLNS, using Tandem accelerator beam of 16O at E = 94 MeV. Some preliminary results are presented.

  12. {gamma}-ray production by proton and {alpha}-particle induced reactions on {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 24}Mg, and Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belhout, A.; Kiener, J.; Coc, A.; Duprat, J.; Engrand, C.; Fitoussi, C.; Gounelle, M.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Sereville, N. de; Tatischeff, V.; Thibaud, J.-P.; Chabot, M.; Hammache, F.; Benhabiles-Mezhoud, H.

    2007-09-15

    {gamma}-ray production cross sections for proton and {alpha}-particle interactions with {sup 12}C, {sup 16}O, {sup 24}Mg, and Fe have been measured in the energy range 5-25 MeV with proton beams and 5-40 MeV with {alpha}-particle beams. Isotopically pure foils of {sup 24}Mg and foils of natural isotopical composition of C, MgO, and Fe have been used. {gamma}-ray angular distributions were obtained with five high-purity Ge detectors with bismuth germanate Compton shields placed at angles of 45 deg. to 157.5 deg. Cross sections for more than 50 different {gamma}-ray transitions were extracted, and for many of them no data have been published before. Comparison of present data with data available in the literature shows mostly good to excellent agreement. In addition to the production cross sections, high-statistics, low-background line shapes of the 4.438 MeV {sup 12}C {gamma} ray from inelastic scattering off {sup 12}C and spallation of {sup 16}O were obtained. Comparison with nuclear reaction calculations shows that these data place interesting constraints on nuclear reaction models.

  13. Note: Recombination of H{sup +} and OH{sup -} ions along water wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Song Hi; Rasaiah, Jayendran C.

    2013-07-21

    Transport and recombination of hydrogen and hydroxide ions along a hydrogen-bonded water wire are studied by molecular dynamics simulation using a dissociating model for water. The results are compared with a recent CP-MD study of neutralization in bulk water [A. Hassanali, M. K. Prakrash, H. Eshet, and M. Parrinello, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 108, 20410 (2011)]. The translocation of H{sup +} and OH{sup -} along the wire is faster than in the bulk water, followed by compression of the water wire when two water molecules separate the transported ions. Neutralization occurs with the concerted transfer of three protons as in the bulk water, followed by energy dissipation along the water chain.

  14. Mirror symmetry at high spin in {sup 51}Fe and {sup 51}Mn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentley, M. A.; Williams, S. J.; Joss, D. T.; O'Leary, C. D.; Bruce, A. M.; Cameron, J. A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Fallon, P.; Frankland, L.; Gelletly, W. (and others)

    2000-11-01

    Gamma decays from excited states in the T{sub z}=-1/2 nucleus {sup 51}Fe have been observed for the first time. The differences in excitation energies as compared with those of the mirror partner, {sup 51}Mn, have been interpreted in terms of Coulomb effects and the resulting Coulomb energy differences (CED) can be understood intuitively in terms of particle-alignment effects. A new CED effect has been observed, in which different CED trends have been measured for each signature of the rotational structures that characterize these mid-f{sub 7/2} shell nuclei. Large-scale fp-shell model calculations have been used to compute the trends of the CED as a function of spin. The result of comparing these calculations with the data demonstrates an ability to reproduce the fine details of the Coulomb effects with a precision far greater than has been previously achieved.

  15. Nuclear Structure Relevant to Neutrinoless Double {beta} Decay: {sup 76}Ge and {sup 76}Se

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiffer, J. P.; Gros, S.; Jiang, C. L.; Rehm, K. E. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Freeman, S. J.; Fitzpatrick, C. R.; Kay, B. P. [University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Clark, J. A.; Deibel, C.; Heinz, A.; Parikh, A.; Parker, P. D.; Werner, V.; Wrede, C. [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Hirata, D. [GANIL (IN2P3/CNRS -DSM/CEA), B.P. 55027 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Villari, A. C. C. [GANIL (IN2P3/CNRS -DSM/CEA), B.P. 55027 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

    2008-03-21

    The possibility of observing neutrinoless double {beta} decay offers the opportunity of determining the effective neutrino mass if the nuclear matrix element were known. Theoretical calculations are uncertain, and measurements of the occupations of valence orbits by nucleons active in the decay can be important. The occupation of valence neutron orbits in the ground states of {sup 76}Ge (a candidate for such decay) and {sup 76}Se (the daughter nucleus) were determined by precisely measuring cross sections for both neutron-adding and removing transfer reactions. Our results indicate that the Fermi surface is much more diffuse than in theoretical calculations. We find that the populations of at least three orbits change significantly between these two ground states while in the calculations, the changes are confined primarily to one orbit.

  16. Nucleation and growth of /sup 3/He-B in /sup 3/He-A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W.; Buchanan, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The /sup 3/He A ..-->.. B transition is remarkable for a number of reasons. Because of the small bulk free energy difference between the two phases, the probability of homogeneous thermal nucleation of the B phase is vanishingly small. Thus the experimental fact that the B phase nucleates readily from the A phase is not understood. The A ..-->.. B transition is also remarkable in that when it occurs after cooling from above the critical temperature, it occurs in an extreme state of supercooling known as hypercooling. In this situation, the velocity of propagation of the A-B phase interface is controlled by microscopic phenomena rather than by thermal diffusion. We briefly review our recent work on both these topics, including the velocity of propagation of the A-B interface through hypercooled /sup 3/He-A, a search for cosmic-ray-induced B-phase nucleation, and preliminary observations of B-phase nucleation locations and temperatures. 15 refs.

  17. Charge-changing particle-hole excitation of {sup 16}N and {sup 16}F nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taqi Al-Bayati, Ali H.; Darwesh, Sarah S. [Physics Department, College of Science, Kirkuk University, Kirkuk (Iraq)

    2013-12-16

    The nuclear structure of {sup 16}N (closed shell + ? ? ?) and {sup 16}F (closed shell + ? ? ?) nuclei is studied using particle-hole proton-neutron Tamm-Dancoff Approximation pn TDA and particle-hole proton-neutron Random Phase Approximation pn RPA. The particle-hole Hamiltonian of PSD model space is to be diagonalized in the presence of the PSDMWKPN interaction: for P-space the Cohen-Kurath interaction, for SD-space the Wildenthal Interaction, for the coupling matrix elements between P- and SD-spaces the Millener-Kurath interaction is used, spurious components were eliminated with CM contribution. The results containing energy level schemes and electromagnetic transition strength are compared with the available experimental data.

  18. Sub-barrier fusion of {sup 32}S+{sup 48}Ca

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montagnoli, G.; Stefanini, A. M.; Jiang, C. L.; Corradi, L.; Courtin, S.; and others

    2012-10-20

    The fusion excitation function of {sup 32}S+{sup 48}Ca has been measured in a wide energy range, from above the Coulomb barrier down to cross sections in the sub-{mu}b region. The excitation function has a smooth behavior below the barrier with a rather flat slope, and no maximum of astrophysical factor S vs. energy has been observed. However, other interesting features of the dynamics of this system can be noted. In particular, the fusion barrier distribution has an unusual shape with two peaks of similar height, lower and higher than the Akyuez-Winther barrier. Preliminary coupledchannels calculations and a comparison with nearby systems yield information on the possible influence of nucleon transfer channels with positive Q-value.

  19. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ?s<sup>J/??> in Bs<sup>0sup>?J/?? decays with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.

    2012-04-01

    We present a measurement of the CP-violating parameter ?s<sup>J/??> using approximately 6500 B<sup>0sup>s?J/?? decays reconstructed with the CDF II detector in a sample of pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV corresponding to 5.2 fb?¹ integrated luminosity produced by the Tevatron collider at Fermilab. We find the CP-violating phase to be within the range ?s<sup>J/??>? [0.02,0.52]?[1.08,1.55] at 68% confidence level where the coverage property of the quoted interval is guaranteed using a frequentist statistical analysis. This result is in agreement with the standard model expectation at the level of about one Gaussian standard deviation. We consider the inclusion of a potential S-wave contribution to the B<sup>0sup>s?J/?K?K? final state which is found to be negligible over the mass interval 1.009s<sup>J/??>, we find the B<sup>0sup>s decay width difference to be ??s=0.075±0.035(stat)±0.006(syst) ps?¹. We also present the most precise measurements of the B<sup>0sup>s mean lifetime ?(B<sup>0sup>s)=1.529±0.025(stat)±0.012(syst) ps, the polarization fractions |A0(0)|²=0.524±0.013(stat)±0.015(syst) and |A II (0)|²=0.231±0.014(stat)±0.015(syst), as well as the strong phase ??=2.95±0.64(stat)±0.07(syst) rad. In addition, we report an alternative Bayesian analysis that gives results consistent with the frequentist approach.

  20. No-carrier-added [1.sup.11 c]putrescine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPherson, Daniel W. (Baltimore, MD); Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY)

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a new radiolabeled imaging agent, no-carrier-added [1-.sup.11 C]putrescine, and to the use of this very pure material as a radiotracer with positron emission tomography for imaging brain tumors. The invention further relates to the synthesis of no-carrier-added [1-.sup.11 C]putrescine based on the Michael addition of potassium .sup.11 C-labeled cyanide to acrylonitrile followed by reduction of the .sup.11 C-labeled dinitrile. The new method is rapid and efficient and provides radiotracer with a specific activity greater than 1.4 curies per millimol and in a purity greater than 95%.

  1. Double-{beta} decay Q value of {sup 150}Nd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolhinen, V. S.; Eronen, T.; Gorelov, D.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Suhonen, J.; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, P. O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2010-08-15

    The double-{beta} decay Q value of {sup 150}Nd was determined by using the JYFLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer. The measured mass difference between {sup 150}Nd and {sup 150}Sm is 3371.38(20) keV. This new value deviates by 3.7 keV from the previously adopted value of 3367.7(22) keV and is a factor of 10 more precise. Accurate knowledge of this Q value is important because {sup 150}Nd is a primary candidate to be used in the search for neutrinoless double-{beta} decay modes in several experiments.

  2. 850/sup 0/C VHTR plant technical description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This report describes the conceptual design of an 842-MW(t) process heat very high temperature reactor (VHTR) plant having a core outlet temperature of 850/sup 0/C (1562/sup 0/F). The reactor is a variation of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) power plant concept. The report includes a description of the nuclear heat source (NHS) and of the balance of reactor plant (BORP) requirements. The design of the associated chemical process plant is not covered in this report. The reactor design is similar to a previously reported VHTR design having a 950/sup 0/C (1742/sup 0/F) core outlet temperature.

  3. Products of the Benzene + O(<sup>3sup>P) Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Meloni, Giovanni; Trevitt, Adam J.; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Krylov, Anna I.; Sirjean, Baptiste; Dames, Enoch; Wang, Hai

    2010-03-11

    The gas-phase reaction of benzene with O(<sup>3sup>P) is of considerable interest for modeling of aromatic oxidation, and also because there exist fundamental questions concerning the prominence of intersystem crossing in the reaction. While its overall rate constant has been studied extensively, there are still significant uncertainties in the product distribution. The reaction proceeds mainly through the addition of the O atom to benzene, forming an initial triplet diradical adduct, which can either dissociate to form the phenoxy radical and H atom or undergo intersystem crossing onto a singlet surface, followed by a multiplicity of internal isomerizations, leading to several possible reaction products. In this work, we examined the product branching ratios of the reaction between benzene and O(<sup>3sup>P) over the temperature range 300-1000 K and pressure range 1-10 Torr. The reactions were initiated by pulsed-laser photolysis of NO2 in the presence of benzene and helium buffer in a slow-flow reactor, and reaction products were identified by using the multiplexed chemical kinetics photoionization mass spectrometer operating at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Phenol and phenoxy radical were detected and quantified. Cyclopentadiene and cyclopentadienyl radical were directly identified for the first time. Finally, ab initio calculations and master equation/RRKM modeling were used to reproduce the experimental branching ratios, yielding pressure-dependent rate expressions for the reaction channels, including phenoxy + H, phenol, cyclopentadiene + CO, which are proposed for kinetic modeling of benzene oxidation.

  4. Measurement of Polarization and Search for CP Violation in Bs<sup>0sup>??? Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.

    2011-12-01

    We present the first measurement of polarization and CP-violating asymmetries in a Bs<sup>0sup> decay into two light vector mesons, Bs<sup>0sup>???, and an improved determination of its branching ratio using 295 decays reconstructed in a data sample corresponding to 2.9 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The fraction of longitudinal polarization is determined to be fL=0.348±0.041(stat)±0.021(syst), and the branching ratio B(Bs<sup>0sup>???)=[2.32±0.18(stat)±0.82(syst)]×10??. Asymmetries of decay angle distributions sensitive to CP violation are measured to be Au=-0.007±0.064(stat)±0.018(syst) and Av=-0.120±0.064(stat)±0.016(syst).

  5. Neutron resonance spectroscopy of {sup 106}Pd and {sup 108}Pd from 20 to 2000 eV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, B.E.; Roberson, N.R. [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States)] [Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States); Bowman, J.D.; Knudson, J.N.; Penttilae, S.I.; Seestrom, S.J.; Yuan, V.W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Delheij, P.P. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (CANADA)] [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (CANADA); Haseyama, T.; Masaike, A.; Matsuda, Y. [Physics Department, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-01 (Japan)] [Physics Department, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-01 (Japan); Lowie, L.Y.; Mitchell, G.E.; Stephenson, S.L. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States)] [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 and Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708-0308 (United States); Postma, H. [University of Technology, Delft, 2600 GA (The Netherlands)] [University of Technology, Delft, 2600 GA (The Netherlands); Sharapov, E.I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russia)] [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russia)

    1998-08-01

    Parity nonconserving asymmetries have been measured in p-wave resonances of {sup 106}Pd and {sup 108}Pd. The data analysis requires knowledge of the neutron resonance parameters. Transmission and capture {gamma}-ray yields were measured for E{sub n}=20{endash}2000 eV with the time-of-flight method at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). A total of 28 resonances in {sup 106}Pd and 32 resonances in {sup 108}Pd were studied. The resonance parameters for {sup 106}Pd are new for all except one resonance. In {sup 108}Pd six new resonances were observed and the precision improved for many of the resonance parameters. A Bayesian analysis was used to assign orbital angular momentum for the resonances studied. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Fusion Cross Section in the {sup 4,6}He+{sup 64}Zn Collisions Around the Coulomb Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisichella, M.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Marchetta, C.; Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Scuderi, V.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Milin, M.; Skukan, N.; Zadro, M.

    2011-10-28

    New fusion data for the {sup 4}He+{sup 64}Zn system at sub-barrier energies are measured to cover the same energy region of previous measurements for {sup 6}He+{sup 64}Zn. Aim of the experiment was to compare the fusion excitation functions for the two system to investigate on the effects of the {sup 6}He neutron-halo structure on the fusion reaction mechanism at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The fusion cross section was measured by using an activation technique. Comparing the two systems, we observe an enhancement of the fusion cross section in the reaction induced by {sup 6}He, at and below the Coulomb barrier.

  7. Half-life determination for {sup 108}Ag and {sup 110}Ag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahn, Guilherme S.; Genezini, Frederico A.

    2014-11-11

    In this work, the half-life of the short-lived silver radionuclides {sup 108}Ag and {sup 110}Ag were measured by following the activity of samples after they were irradiated in the IEA-R1 reactor. The results were then fitted using a non-paralizable dead time correction to the regular exponential decay and the individual half-life values obtained were then analyzed using both the Normalized Residuals and the Rajeval techniques, in order to reach the most exact and precise final values. To check the validity of dead-time correction, a second correction method was also employed by means of counting a long-lived {sup 60}Co radioactive source together with the samples as a livetime chronometer. The final half-live values obtained using both dead-time correction methods were in good agreement, showing that the correction was properly assessed. The results obtained are partially compatible with the literature values, but with a lower uncertainty, and allow a discussion on the last ENSDF compilations' values.

  8. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio G{sub En}/G{sub Mn} via the {sup 2}H(e{yields},e{sup '}n{yields}){sup 1}H reaction to Q{sup 2}=1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaster, B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Semenov, A.Yu.; Semenova, I.A. [Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna RU-141980 (Russian Federation); Aghalaryan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Stepanyan, S.; Tadevosyan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan 375036 (Armenia); Crouse, E.; Finn, J.M.; Perdrisat, C.; Roche, J. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); MacLachlan, G.; Opper, A.K. [Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Tajima, S.; Churchwell, S.; Howell, C.R. [Duke University and TUNL, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Tireman, W. [Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States); Northern Michigan University, Marquette, Michigan 49855 (United States); Ahmidouch, A. [North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 (United States); Anderson, B. D. [Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States)] (and others)

    2006-02-15

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G{sub En}/G{sub Mn}, deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic {sup 2}H(e{yields},e{sup '}n{yields}){sup 1}H reaction, at three Q{sup 2} values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The data at Q{sup 2}=1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2} are the first direct experimental measurements of G{sub En} employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q{sup 2}>1 (GeV/c){sup 2} region and stand as the most precise determinations of G{sub En} for all values of Q{sup 2}.

  9. REVISED BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS WITH LONG-LIVED, NEGATIVELY CHARGED MASSIVE PARTICLES: UPDATED RECOMBINATION RATES, PRIMORDIAL {sup 9}Be NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND IMPACT OF NEW {sup 6}Li LIMITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Cheoun, Myung-Ki [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kino, Yasushi [Department of Chemistry, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Mathews, Grant J., E-mail: motohiko@kau.ac.kr, E-mail: kyungsik@kau.ac.kr, E-mail: cheoun@ssu.ac.kr, E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: y.k@m.tohoku.ac.jp, E-mail: gmathews@nd.edu [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X {sup –}, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X {sup –} particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the {sup 6,} {sup 7}Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, {sup 7}Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X {sup –} particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 4}He with X {sup –}. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X {sup –} mass, m{sub X} ? 100 GeV, the d-wave ? 2P transition is most important for {sup 7}Li and {sup 7,} {sup 9}Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the {sup 7}Be recombination for m{sub X} = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for {sup 9}Be production: the recombination of {sup 7}Li and X {sup –} followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of {sup 7}Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of {sup 7}Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X {sup –} are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial {sup 6}Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the {sup 7}Li problem and the primordial {sup 9}Be abundances are revised.

  10. Production of ultradense deuterium: A compact future fusion fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badiei, Shahriar; Andersson, Patrik U.; Holmlid, Leif [Department of Chemistry, Atmospheric Science, University of Gothenburg, SE-412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2010-03-22

    Ultradense deuterium as a nuclear fuel in laser-ignited inertial confinement fusion appears to have many advantages. The density of ultradense deuterium D(-1) is as high as 140 kg cm{sup -3} or 10{sup 29} cm{sup -3}. This means that D(-1) will be very useful as a target fuel, circumventing the complex and unstable laser compression stage. We show that the material is stable apart from the oscillation between two forms, and can exist for days in the laboratory environment. We also demonstrate that an amount of D(-1) corresponding to tens of kilojoules is produced in each experiment. This may be sufficient for break-even.

  11. Nuclear matrix elements for 0??{sup ?}?{sup ?} decays: Comparative analysis of the QRPA, shell model and IBM predictions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Civitarese, Osvaldo; Suhonen, Jouni

    2013-12-30

    In this work we report on general properties of the nuclear matrix elements involved in the neutrinoless double ?{sup ?} decays (0??{sup ?}?{sup ?} decays) of several nuclei. A summary of the values of the NMEs calculated along the years by the Jyväskylä-La Plata collaboration is presented. These NMEs, calculated in the framework of the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), are compared with those of the other available calculations, like the Shell Model (ISM) and the interacting boson model (IBA-2)

  12. Fuel processor for fuel cell power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Springer, Thomas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Huff, James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

  13. Fusion cross sections for the {sup 9}Be+{sup 124}Sn reaction at energies near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkar, V. V.; Palit, R.; Sharma, Sushil K.; Naidu, B. S.; Santra, S.; Mahata, K.; Ramachandran, K.; Joshi, P. K.; Rath, P. K.; Trivedi, T.; Raghav, A.

    2010-11-15

    The complete and incomplete fusion cross sections for {sup 9}Be+{sup 124}Sn reaction have been deduced using the online {gamma}-ray measurement technique. Complete fusion at energies above the Coulomb barrier was found to be suppressed by {approx}28% compared to the coupled-channels calculations and is in agreement with the systematics of L. R. Gasques et al. [Phys. Rev. C 79, 034605 (2009)]. Study of the projectile dependence for fusion on a {sup 124}Sn target shows that, for {sup 9}Be nuclei, the enhancement at below-barrier energies is substantial compared to that of tightly bound nuclei.

  14. Discovery of the Shape Coexisting 0{sup +} State in {sup 32}Mg by a Two Neutron Transfer Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wimmer, K.; Kroell, T.; Kruecken, R.; Bildstein, V.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Bastin, B.; Bree, N.; Diriken, J.; Van Duppen, P.; Huyse, M.; Patronis, N.; Vermaelen, P.; Voulot, D.; Van de Walle, J.; Wenander, F.; Fraile, L. M.; Chapman, R.; Hadinia, B.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, J. F.

    2010-12-17

    The ''island of inversion'' nucleus {sup 32}Mg has been studied by a (t, p) two neutron transfer reaction in inverse kinematics at REX-ISOLDE. The shape coexistent excited 0{sup +} state in {sup 32}Mg has been identified by the characteristic angular distribution of the protons of the {Delta}L=0 transfer. The excitation energy of 1058 keV is much lower than predicted by any theoretical model. The low {gamma}-ray intensity observed for the decay of this 0{sup +} state indicates a lifetime of more than 10 ns. Deduced spectroscopic amplitudes are compared with occupation numbers from shell-model calculations.

  15. High {sup 222}Rn levels, enhanced plateout, increased diffusion coefficient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, B.E.

    1994-12-31

    In a previous study of plateout and resuspension effects for {sup 222}Rn progeny, an unexpected suppression of the airborne {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po levels, which is total unrelated and not predicted by theory or other works, was observed when high {sup 222}Rn concentrations were utilized in a 0.283-m{sup 3} test chamber. Two separate time-dependent methods were used and are reported here to measure this airborne progeny suppression effect to attempt to possibly determine the magnitude and cause of the effect and possible consequences on prior and current ongoing radon research by others. The earlier buildup method was used to observe the buildup phase of {sup 222} Rn and its daughters from a constant emanation source, a constant air change rate (ACH), and initially zero concentrations Rn and progeny. The data were compared with theory using Leonard`s solutions to the Bateman equations to determine the magnitude of the suppression. The second method, referred to as the {open_quotes}down{close_quotes} method, was to measure the decrease in {sup 222}Rn and progeny concentrations from an initially injected high {sup 222}Rn activity concentration in the test chamber, the decrease resulting from a constant ACH of {approximately}0.1 h{sup -1} imposed by the gradual removal of air from the chamber at a constant rate of {approximately}0.5 l/min. No {sup 222}Rn emanation source was present during the second method after the initial injection so that the level of the {sup 222}Rn underwent a monotonic decrease in concentration.

  16. p27{sup Kip1} inhibits tissue factor expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breitenstein, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.breitenstein@usz.ch [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland) [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZHIP), University of Zurich (Switzerland); Akhmedov, Alexander; Camici, Giovanni G.; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Tanner, Felix C. [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland) [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZHIP), University of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •p27{sup Kip1}regulates the expression of tissue factor at the transcriptional level. •This inhibitory effect of p27{sup Kip1} is independently of its cell regulatory action. •The current study provides new insights into a pleiotrophic function of p27{sup Kip1}. -- Abstract: Background: The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) p27{sup Kip1} regulates cell proliferation and thus inhibits atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling. Expression of tissue factor (TF), the key initator of the coagulation cascade, is associated with atherosclerosis. Yet, it has not been studied whether p27{sup Kip1} influences the expression of TF. Methods and results: p27{sup Kip1} overexpression in human aortic endothelial cells was achieved by adenoviral transfection. Cells were rendered quiescent for 24 h in 0.5% fetal-calf serum. After stimulation with TNF-? (5 ng/ml), TF protein expression and activity was significantly reduced (n = 4; P < 0.001) in cells transfected with p27{sup Kip1}. In line with this, p27{sup Kip1} overexpression reduced cytokine-induced TF mRNA expression (n = 4; P < 0.01) and TF promotor activity (n = 4; P < 0.05). In contrast, activation of the MAP kinases p38, ERK and JNK was not affected by p27{sup Kip1} overexpression. Conclusion: This in vitro study suggests that p27{sup Kip1} inhibits TF expression at the transcriptional level. These data indicate an interaction between p27{sup Kip1} and TF in important pathological alterations such as atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  17. Efimov physics in {sup 6}Li atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas

    2010-01-15

    A new narrow three-atom loss resonance associated with an Efimov trimer crossing the three-atom threshold has recently been discovered in a many-body system of ultracold {sup 6}Li atoms in the three lowest hyperfine spin states at a magnetic field near 895 G. O'Hara and coworkers have used measurements of the three-body recombination rate in this region to determine the complex three-body parameter associated with Efimov physics. Using this parameter as the input, we calculate the universal predictions for the spectrum of Efimov states and for the three-body recombination rate in the universal region above 600 G where all three scattering lengths are large. We predict an atom-dimer loss resonance at 672+-2 G associated with an Efimov trimer disappearing through an atom-dimer threshold. We also predict an interference minimum in the three-body recombination rate at 759+-1 G where the three-spin mixture may be sufficiently stable to allow experimental study of the many-body system.

  18. Fuel Cycle Subcommittee

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

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  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

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    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

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  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement Vouchers TheIncentiveAlternative Fuel and

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeVehicle Replacement Vouchers TheIncentiveAlternative Fuel

  13. Branching ratios from B{sub s} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew S. Martin

    2004-05-28

    CDF Run II relative branching ratio measurements for 65 pb{sup -1} of data in the channels B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {-+}}, {Lambda} {sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} are presented. Further, an observation of B{sub s} {yields} K{sup {+-}} K{sup {-+}} and a measurement of A{sub CP} are presented.

  14. Analysis of the JINR p(660 MeV) + [sup 129]I, [sup 23]Np, and [sup 231]Am measurements with eleven different models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashnik, S. G. (Stepan G.); Pronskikh, V. S.; Adam, J.; Balabekyan, A.; Barashenkov, V.; Filinova, V. P.; Solnyshkin, A. A.; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V. M.; Brandt, R.; Odoj, R.; Sierk, A. J. (Arnold J.); Prael, R. E. (Richard E.); Gudima, K. K. (Konstantin K.); Baznat, M. I. (Mircha Ivanovich)

    2004-01-01

    Isotopically enriched {sup 129}I (85% {sup 129}I and 15% {sup 127}I), {sup 237}Np, and {sup 241}Am targets were irradiated with a beam of 660-MeV protons at the JINR DLNP Phasotron and cross sections of formation of 207 residual products (74 from {sup 129}I, 53 from {sup 237}Np, and 80 from {sup 241}Am) were determined using the {gamma}-spectrometry method. Here, they analyze all these data using eleven different models, realized in eight codes: LAHET (Bertini, ISABEL, INCL+ABLA, and INCL+RAL options), CASCADE, CEM95, CEM2k, LAQGSM+GEM2, CEM2k+GEM2, LAQGSM+GEMINI, and CEM2k+GEMINI, in order to validate the tested models against the experimental data and to understand better the mechanisms for production of residual nuclei. The agreement of different models with the data varies quite a bit. They find that most of the codes are fairly reliable in predicting cross sections for nuclides not too far away in mass from the targets, but differ greatly in the deep spallation, fission, and fragmentation regions. None of the codes tested here except GEMINI allow fission of nuclei as light as iodine, therefore the best agreement with the {sup 129}I data, especially in the A = 40-90 region, is shown by the codes CEM2k and LAQGSM when they are merged with GEMINI. At the same time, GEMINI is not yet very reliable for an accurate description of actinides and the {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am data are reproduced better by LAHET (Bertini, ISABEL, or INCL+RAL/ABLA options), and by CEM2k and LAQGSM merged with GEM2 and not so well when using GEMINI. They conclude that none of the codes tested here are able to reproduce well all these data and all of them need to be further improved; development of a better universal evaporation/fission model should be of a high priority.

  15. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  16. Measurement of the Forward-Backward Asymmetry in the B?K<sup>(*)>????Decay and First Observation of the Bs<sup>0sup>?????? Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.

    2011-04-01

    We reconstruct the rare decays B??K?????, B??K*(892)?????, and Bs<sup>0sup>??(1020)???? in a data sample corresponding to 4.4 fb?¹ collected in pp¯ collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron Collider. Using 121±16 B??K????? and 101±12 B??K*????? decays we report the branching ratios. In addition, we report the differential branching ratio and the muon forward-backward asymmetry in the B? and B? decay modes, and the K*? longitudinal polarization fraction in the B? decay mode with respect to the squared dimuon mass. These are consistent with the predictions, and most recent determinations from other experiments and of comparable accuracy. We also report the first observation of the Bs<sup>0sup>?????? decay and measure its branching ratio BR(Bs<sup>0sup>??????)=[1.44±0.33±0.46]×10?? using 27±6 signal events. This is currently the most rare Bs<sup>0sup> decay observed.

  17. High-spin structure of {sup 102}Ru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohler, D.; Timar, J.; Molnar, J.; Dombradi, Zs.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Zolnai, L. [Institute of Nuclear Research, H-4001 Debrecen, Pf. 51 (Hungary); Rainovski, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY, Stony Brook, New York, 11794-3800 (United States); Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Joshi, P.; Wadsworth, R.; Jenkins, D.G.; Raddon, P.M.; Simons, A.J.; Wilkinson, A.R. [Department of Physics, University of York, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Starosta, K. [NSCL, Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY, Stony Brook, New York, 11794-3800 (United States); Fossan, D.B.; Koike, T.; Vaman, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, SUNY, Stony Brook, New York, 11794-3800 (United States); Algora, A. [Institute of Nuclear Research, H-4001 Debrecen, Pf. 51 (Hungary); Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Bednarczyk, P. [IReS, 23 rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France); GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Curien, D. [IReS, 23 rue du Loess, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)] [and others

    2005-06-01

    High-spin states in the nucleus {sup 102}Ru have been investigated via the {sup 96}Zr({sup 13}C,{alpha}3n) reaction at beam energies of 51 and 58 MeV, using the euroball IV {gamma}-ray spectrometer and the diamant charged particle array. Several new high-spin bands have been established. The ground-state band has been extended up to E{sub x}{approx}12 MeV with I{sup {pi}}=(26{sup +}); the previously published negative-parity bands have been extended up to E{sub x}{approx}11 and {approx} 9 MeV with I{sup {pi}}=(23{sup -}) and (20{sup -}), respectively. The deduced high-spin structure has been compared with Woods-Saxon total Routhian surface calculations and, on the basis of the measured Routhians, aligned angular momenta, and B(M1)/B(E2) ratios, {nu}h{sub 11/2}(g{sub 7/2},d{sub 5/2}) configurations are suggested for the negative-parity structures.

  18. {sup 12}C formation: A classical quest in new light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tengblad, O.; Alcorta, M.; Borge, M. J. G.; Madurga, M.; Perea, A.; Cubero, M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Riisager, K.; Kirsebom, O.; Hyldegaard, S.; Jonson, B.; Nyman, G.; Nilsson, T.; Diget, D. G.; Fulton, B.

    2011-10-28

    In this work we have studied the break-up of {sup 12}C following the reactions {sup 10}B({sup 3}He,p{alpha}{alpha}{alpha}) and {sup 11}B({sup 3}He,d{alpha}{alpha}{alpha}). The study was performed at the 5 MV tandem in Madrid. The break-up gives us information on excited states in {sup 12}C from the famous Hoyle state up to an energy of almost 18 MeV. Using a highly segmented experimental set-up the simultaneous detection of the three alpha particles in coincidence with a proton or deuteron respectively made possible a full kinematic reconstruction of the break-up. On the basis of the energies of the 3 {alpha} particles and their angular correlations it has been possible to determine the spin and parity of states for cases in which the assignment has been doubtful. Some of these levels will also de-excite via electromagnetic emission. The comparison between the energy of proton that populate a state of {sup 12}C and the sum of the energies of the 3{alpha} emitted from the same state makes possible to determine the presence of electromagnetic disintegration ({gamma}) to lower states within {sup 12}C followed by the 3{alpha} break-up.

  19. Fuel dissipater for pressurized fuel cell generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Basel, Richard A.; King, John E.

    2003-11-04

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a pressurized fuel cell generator (10) when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated during transient operation, such as a shutdown; where, two electrically resistive elements (two of 28, 53, 54, 55) at least one of which is connected in parallel, in association with contactors (26, 57, 58, 59), a multi-point settable sensor relay (23) and a circuit breaker (24), are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals (21, 22) at two or more contact points, in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel inventory in the generator.

  20. Reaction dynamics of OH{sup +}({sup 3}{sigma}{sup -})+C{sub 2}H{sub 2} studied with crossed beams and density functional theory calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Li; Martin, Courtney; Farrar, James M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2006-10-07

    The reactions between OH{sup +}({sup 3}{sigma}{sup -}) and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} have been studied using crossed ion and molecular beams and density functional theory calculations. Both charge transfer and proton transfer channels are observed. Products formed by carbon-carbon bond cleavage analogous to those formed in the isoelectronic O({sup 3}P)+C{sub 2}H{sub 2} reaction, e.g., {sup 3}CH{sub 2}+HCO{sup +}, are not observed. The center of mass flux distributions of both product ions at three different energies are highly asymmetric, with maxima close to the velocity and direction of the precursor acetylene beam, characteristic of direct reactions. The internal energy distributions of the charge transfer products are independent of collision energy and are peaked at the reaction exothermicity, inconsistent with either the existence of favorable Franck-Condon factors or energy resonance. In proton transfer, almost the entire reaction exothermicity is transformed into product internal excitation, consistent with mixed energy release in which the proton is transferred with both the breaking and forming bonds extended. Most of the incremental translational energy in the two higher-energy experiments appears in product translational energy, providing an example of induced repulsive energy release.

  1. Fuel Cells Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015ExecutiveFluorescentDanKathy LoftusFuel CellFuel Fuel CellsCells Fuel

  2. Kinetic energy deficit in the symmetric fission of /sup 259/Md. [Light particle emission in /sup 256/Fm fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Lougheed, R.W.; Baisden, P.A.; Dougan, R.J.; Mustafa, M.G.

    1980-10-01

    The fragment energies of about 725 coincidence events have now been observed in the spontaneous fission (SF) decay of 105-min /sup 259/Md since its discovery in 1977. The fission of /sup 259/Md is characterized by a symmetric mass distribution, similar to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, but with a broad total kinetic energy (anti TKE) distribution which peaks at about 195 MeV, in contrast to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, for which the anti TKE is about 240 MeV. This kinetic energy deficit, approx. 40 MeV, has been postulated to be due to the emission of hydrogen-like particles by /sup 259/Md at the scission point in a large fraction of the fissions, leaving the residual fissioning nucleus with 100 protons. The residual nucleus would then be able to divide into two ultrastable tin-like fission fragments, but with less kinetic energy than that observed in the SF of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, because of binding-energy losses and a reduction in the Coulomb repulsion of the major fragments. To test this hypothesis, counter-telescope experiments aimed at detecting and identifying these light particles were performed. In 439 SF events 3 + 3 protons of the appropriate energy were observed, too few to account for the kinetic energy deficit in the fission of /sup 259/Md. There seems to be no explanation for this problem within the framework of current fission theory. These results are discussed along with preliminary measurements of light-particle emission in the SF of /sup 256/Fm. 5 figures.

  3. Structure, solvation, and dynamics of Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and Ba{sup 2+} complexes with 3-hydroxyflavone and perchlorate anion in acetonitrile medium: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agieienko, Vira N.; Kolesnik, Yaroslav V.; Kalugin, Oleg N.

    2014-05-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations of complexes of Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and Ba{sup 2+} with 3-hydroxyflavone (flavonol, 3HF) and ClO {sub 4}{sup ?} in acetonitrile were performed. The united atoms force field model was proposed for the 3HF molecule using the results of DFT quantum chemical calculations. 3HF was interpreted as a rigid molecule with two internal degrees of freedom, i.e., rotation of the phenyl ring and of the OH group with respect to the chromone moiety. The interatomic radial distribution functions showed that interaction of the cations with flavonol occurs via the carbonyl group of 3HF and it is accompanied with substitution of one of the acetonitrile molecules in the cations’ first solvation shells. Formation of the cation–3HF complexes does not have significant impact on the rotation of the phenyl ring with respect to the chromone moiety. However, the orientation of the flavonol's OH-group is more sensitive to the interaction with doubly charged cations. When complex with Mg{sup 2+} is formed, the OH-group turns out of the plane of the chromone moiety that leads to rupture of intramolecular H-bond in the ligand molecule. Complexation of Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and BaClO {sub 4}{sup +} with 3HF produces two structures with different OH-positions, as in the free flavonol with the intramolecular H-bond and as in the complex with Mg{sup 2+} with disrupted H-bonding. It was shown that additional stabilization of the [MgClO{sub 4}(3HF)]{sup +} and [BaClO{sub 4}(3HF)]{sup +} complexes is determined by strong affinity of perchlorate anion to interact with flavonol via intracomplex hydrogen bond between an oxygen atom of the anion and the hydrogen atom of the 3-hydroxyl group. Noticeable difference in the values of the self-diffusion coefficients for Kt{sup 2+} from one side and ClO {sub 4}{sup ?}, 3HF, and AN in the cations’ coordination shell from another side implies quite weak interaction between cation, anion, and ligands in the investigated complexes.

  4. Spectroscopy of {sup 90}Nb at high spin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, A.; Krishichayan,; Ghugre, S.S.; Goswami, R.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pattabiraman, N.S.; Ray, S.; Sinha, A.K.; Sarkar, S.; Rao, P.V. Madhusudhana; Garg, U.; Basu, S.K.; Chaterjee, M.B.; Sarkar, M. Saha; Chaturvedi, L.; Dhal, A.; Sinha, R.K.; Govil, I.M.; Bhowmik, R.K.; Jhingan, A. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Center, Sector III/LB-8, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700098 (India); Department of Physics, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan 713104 (India); Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Variable Energy Cyclotron Center, Sector-I/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Sector-I/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India); Nuclear Science Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110067 (India)] [and others

    2005-11-01

    Excited states of {sup 90}Nb were investigated via prompt and delayed {gamma} decays and the recoil-isomer tagging technique. The level scheme of {sup 90}Nb has been extended up to J=19({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) and E{sub x}=8.4 MeV. Half-lives of the 11{sup -} and 17/2{sup -} isomeric levels in {sup 90,91}Nb were measured to be 0.47{+-}0.01 and 3.3{+-}0.4 {mu}s, respectively. The results are compared with the predictions of large-basis shell model calculations. The effects of truncation of the valence model space on the calculated results are discussed.

  5. Spectroscopy of neutron-rich {sup 37}P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodsdon, A.; Chapman, R.; Liang, X.; Ollier, J.; Burns, M.; Keyes, K. L.; O'Donnell, D.; Papenberg, A.; Smith, J. F.; Spohr, K.-M.; Wang, Z.; Haas, F.; Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.; Salsac, M.-D.; Curien, D.; Beghini, S.; Farnea, E.

    2007-03-15

    The excited states of the neutron-rich nucleus {sub 15}{sup 37}P{sub 22} have been populated in grazing reactions, using a beam of {sup 36}S ions (at 215 MeV) delivered onto a thin {sup 208}Pb target. Emitted {gamma} rays from excited projectile-like nuclei were detected using the CLARA array of 25 escape-suppressed Ge clover detectors in coincidence with reaction products detected and identified with the PRISMA magnetic spectrometer. A level scheme is presented for {sup 37}P together with proposed spin assignments. The level structure of {sup 37}P is discussed within the context of shell-model calculations by using an improved sdpf effective interaction.

  6. High-spin rotational structures in {sup 76}Kr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valiente-Dobon, J.J.; Svensson, C.E.; Finlay, P.; Grinyer, G.F.; Hyland, B.; Phillips, A.A.; Schumaker, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); O'Leary, C.D.; Jenkins, D.; Johnston-Theasby, F.; Joshi, P.; Kelsall, N.S.; Wadsworth, R. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Ragnarsson, I. [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Andreoiu, C. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Appelbe, D.E. [CLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Austin, R.A.E.; Cameron, J.A.; Waddington, J.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Ball, G.C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada)] [and others

    2005-03-01

    High-spin states in {sup 36}{sub 76}Kr{sub 40} have been populated in the {sup 40}Ca({sup 40}Ca,4p){sup 76}Kr fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 165 MeV and studied using the Gammasphere and Microball multidetector arrays. The ground-state band and two signature-split negative parity bands of {sup 76}Kr have been extended to {approx}30({Dirac_h}/2{pi}). Lifetime measurements using the Doppler-shift attenuation method show that the transition quadrupole moment of these three bands decrease as they approach their maximum-spin states. Two signatures of a new rotational structure with remarkably rigid rotational behavior have been identified. The high-spin properties of these rotational bands are analyzed within the framework of configuration-dependent cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations.

  7. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact Sheet Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact Sheet Fact sheet produced by the Fuel Cell...

  8. Exclusive heavy quarkonium +{gamma} production from e{sup +}e{sup -}

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article) | SciTech(Journal(Patent)pressure| SciTech Connect

  9. TRENDS IN {sup 44}Ti AND {sup 56}Ni FROM CORE-COLLAPSE SUPERNOVAE (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaled X-Ray Head (JournalSciTechAUTHORS(Conference)

  10. Testing Higgs models via the H{sup {+-}}W{sup {-+}}Z vertex by a recoil

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)Feedback SystemGimbaledM-PACE Observations (Journal Article) |

  11. High resolution neutron imaging of water in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Optimal water management in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells is critical to improving the performance and durability of fuel cell systems especially during transient, start-up and shut-down operations. For example, while a high water content is desirable for improved membrane and catalyst ionomer conductivity, high water content can also block gas access to the triple-phase boundary resulting in lowered performance due to catalyst and gas diffusion layer (GDL) flooding. Visualizing liquid water by neutron imaging has been used over the past decade to study the water distribution inside operating fuel cells. In this paper, the results from our imaging at NIST using their recently installed higher resolution ({approx} 25 mm) Microchannel Plate (MCP) detector with a pixel pitch of 14.7 mm are presented. This detector is capable of quantitatively imaging the water inside the MEA (Membrane Electrode Assembly)/GDL (Gas Diffusion Layer) of working fuel cells and can provide the water profiles within these various components in addition to the channel water. Specially designed fuel cells (active area = 2.25 cm{sup 2}) have been used in order to take advantage of the full detector resolution. The cell design is illustrated in a figure where one of the current collector/end plates is shown. The serpentine pattern was machined into a block of aluminum and plated with nickel and then gold to form the flow field. The measurements were performed using beam no. 1 and aperture no. 2 with a fluence rate of 1.9 x 10{sup 6} neutrons cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1}. The cells were assembled with Gore{sup TM} Primea{sup R} MEAs and SGL Sigracet {sup R} 24 series GDLs (PRIMEA, GORE-SELECT and GORE are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc). All the cells were tested at 80 {sup o}C with 1.2 stoichiometry H{sub 2} and 2.0 stoichiometry air flows.

  12. Migration of Nuclear Shell Gaps Studied in the d({sup 24}Ne,p{gamma}){sup 25}Ne Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catford, W. N.; Timis, C. N.; Baldwin, T. D.; Gelletly, W.; Pain, S. D.; Lemmon, R. C.; Pucknell, V. P. E.; Warner, D. D.; Labiche, M.; Orr, N. A.; Achouri, N. L.; Chapman, R.; Amzal, N.; Burns, M.; Liang, X.; Spohr, K.; Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.

    2010-05-14

    The transfer of neutrons onto {sup 24}Ne has been measured using a reaccelerated radioactive beam of {sup 24}Ne to study the (d,p) reaction in inverse kinematics. The unusual raising of the first 3/2{sup +} level in {sup 25}Ne and its significance in terms of the migration of the neutron magic number from N=20 to N=16 is put on a firm footing by confirmation of this state's identity. The raised 3/2{sup +} level is observed simultaneously with the intruder negative parity 7/2{sup -} and 3/2{sup -} levels, providing evidence for the reduction in the N=20 gap. The coincident gamma-ray decays allowed the assignment of spins as well as the transferred orbital angular momentum. The excitation energy of the 3/2{sup +} state shows that the established USD shell model breaks down well within the sd model space and requires a revised treatment of the proton-neutron monopole interaction.

  13. Observation of the Decay B??Ds<sup>(*)+>K?l????l

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Tanabe, T.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Randle-Conde, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, T. M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Volk, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Perez, A.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Anderson, J.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Salvati, E.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Sciolla, G.; Zhao, M.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Prendki, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.

    2011-07-22

    We report the observation of the decay B??Ds<sup>(*)+>K?l??¯l based on 342fb?¹ of data collected at the ?(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e?e? storage rings at SLAC. A simultaneous fit to three D+s decay chains is performed to extract the signal yield from measurements of the squared missing mass in the B meson decay. We observe the decay B??Ds<sup>(*)+>K?l??¯l with a significance greater than 5 standard deviations (including systematic uncertainties) and measure its branching fraction to be B(B??Ds<sup>(*)+>K?l??¯l)=[6.13<sup>+1.04sup>-1.03(stat)±0.43(syst)±0.51(B(Ds))]×10??, where the last error reflects the limited knowledge of the Ds branching fractions.

  14. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Experience with the German Hydrogen Fuel Project," HydrogenHydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles UCD-ITS-RR-92-14 September bycost than both. Solar-hydrogen fuel- cell vehicles would be

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuels Road Tax Alternative fuels including, but not limited to, natural gas or propane sold by a licensed alternative fuel dealer and used in on-road vehicles is subject to a...

  16. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    S O N I A YE H Low Carbon Fuel Standards The most direct andalternative transportation fuels is to spur innovation withstandard for upstream fuel producers. hen it comes to energy

  17. Differential Die-Away Instrument: Report on Fuel Assembly Mock-up Measurements with Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Henzl, Vladimir; Rael, Carlos D.; Desimone, David J.

    2014-09-18

    Fresh fuel experiments for the differential die-away (DDA) project were performed using a DT neutron generator, a 15x15 PWR fuel assembly, and nine <sup>3sup>He detectors in a water tank inside of a shielded cell at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Eight different fuel enrichments were created using low enriched (LEU) and depleted uranium (DU) dioxide fuel rods. A list-mode data acquisition system recorded the time-dependent signal and analysis of the DDA signal die-away time was performed. The die-away time depended on the amount of fissile material in the fuel assembly and the position of the detector. These experiments were performed in support of the spent nuclear fuel Next Generation Safeguards Initiative DDA project. Lessons learned from the fresh fuel DDA instrument experiments and simulations will provide useful information to the spent fuel project.

  18. Optical properties of Eu{sup 2+}/Eu{sup 3+} mixed valence, silicon nitride based materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kate, Otmar M. ten, E-mail: o.m.tenkate@tudelft.nl [Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Vranken, Thomas [Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kolk, Erik van der [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Jansen, Antonius P.J.; Hintzen, Hubertus T. [Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology, Den Dolech 2, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-05-01

    Eu{sub 2}SiN{sub 3}, a mixed valence europium nitridosilicate, has been prepared via solid-state reaction synthesis and its oxidation behavior and optical properties have been determined. Furthermore, the stability of several isostructural compounds of the type M{sup 2+}L{sup 3+}SiN{sub 3} has been predicted by using the density functional theory calculations, and verified by the actual synthesis of CaLaSiN{sub 3}, CaEuSiN{sub 3} and EuLaSiN{sub 3}. The band gap of CaLaSiN{sub 3} was found around 3.2 eV giving the material its yellow color. Eu{sub 2}SiN{sub 3} on the other hand is black due to a combination of the 4f–5d absorption band of Eu{sup 2+} and the charge transfer band of Eu{sup 3+}. Thermogravimetric analysis and Raman spectroscopic study of Eu{sub 2}SiN{sub 3} revealed that oxidation of this compound in dry air takes place via a nitrogen retention complex. - Graphical abstract: Energy level scheme of Eu{sub 2}SiN{sub 3} showing the occupied N{sup 3?} 2p band (blue rectangle), unoccupied Eu{sup 2+} 5d band (white rectangle), occupied Eu{sup 2+} 4f ground states (filled red circles) and unoccupied Eu{sup 2+} ground states (open red circles). - Highlights: • Density functional theory calculations on the stability of M{sup 2+}L{sup 3+}SiN{sub 3} compounds. • Solid-state reaction synthesis of Eu{sub 2}SiN{sub 3}, CaLaSiN{sub 3}, EuLaSiN{sub 3} and CaEuSiN{sub 3}. • Determination of the Eu{sup 2+} 4f–5d and Eu{sup 3+} CT transitions in M{sup 2+}L{sup 3+}SiN{sub 3} compounds. • Oxidation of Eu{sub 2}SiN{sub 3} in dry air takes place via a nitrogen retention complex.

  19. Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

    2012-01-01

    comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuelcomparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel121, 2011. C. Fischer. Renewable Portfolio Standards: When

  20. Identification and decay of the 0.48 ms 13/2{sup +} isomer in {sup 181}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Saro, S.; Ackermann, D.; Comas, V. F.; Heinz, S.; Heredia, J. A.; Hessberger, F. P.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kojouharov, I.; Kindler, B.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Cocolios, T. E.; Elseviers, J.; Huyse, M.; Duppen, P. Van; Venhart, M.; Franchoo, S.; Hofmann, S.

    2009-10-15

    A new isomer with a half-life of 0.48(2) ms was identified in the nuclide {sup 181}Hg, which was produced in the complete fusion reaction {sup 40}Ca+{sup 144}Sm{yields}{sup 184}Pb* at the velocity filter SHIP (GSI, Darmstadt). The isomeric state was tentatively assigned a spin-parity of 13/2{sup +}. We propose that this isomer de-excites by a yet unobserved low-energy, strongly converted {gamma}-ray transition, followed by a newly identified cascade composed of a 90.3 keV M1 and a 71.4 keV E2 {gamma}-ray transition.

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg Find More places to share EERE: Alternative

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg Find More places to share EERE: AlternativeLocal

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg Find More places to share EERE:

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg Find More placesNaturalStateVehicleTools Printable

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg Find More placesNaturalStateVehicleTools

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg Find More

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA Clean Ports USA is an

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA Clean Ports USA is

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA Clean Ports USA

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA Clean Ports USAVoluntary Airport Low

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA Clean Ports USAVoluntary Airport

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA Clean Ports USAVoluntary

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA Clean Ports USAVoluntaryAftermarket

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA Clean Ports

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA Clean PortsRenewable

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA Clean PortsRenewableIncome

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA Clean

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA CleanAdvanced Technology Vehicle

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA CleanAdvanced Technology

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA CleanAdvanced

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA CleanAdvancedAlternative

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA CleanAdvancedAlternativePayments

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USA

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USAEthanol Infrastructure Grants and

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USAEthanol Infrastructure Grants

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USAEthanol Infrastructure GrantsAmerican

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USAEthanol Infrastructure

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USAEthanol InfrastructureImprovement and

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USAEthanol InfrastructureImprovement

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USAEthanol

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USAEthanolState Printable Version Share

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USAEthanolState Printable Version

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USAEthanolState Printable

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPorts USAEthanolState PrintableState

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManual del

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManual delBiodiesel Tax

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManual delBiodiesel

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManual delBiodieselIdle

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManual

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManualLiquefied Natural Gas (LNG)

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManualLiquefied Natural Gas

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManualLiquefied Natural

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManualLiquefied NaturalLiquefied

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManualLiquefied

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManualLiquefiedVehicle and Equipment

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManualLiquefiedVehicle and

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManualLiquefiedVehicle

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls onManualLiquefiedVehicleAlternative

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane Rolls

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippi joined Arkansas, Colorado,

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippi joined Arkansas, Colorado,Ohio

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippi joined Arkansas,

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippi joined Arkansas,Low-Speed

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippi joined

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippi joinedPlug-In Electric

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippi joinedPlug-In

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippi joinedPlug-InAlternative

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippi

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippiNatural Gas Measurement

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippiNatural Gas MeasurementPublic

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippiNatural Gas

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippiNatural GasNatural Gas

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippiNatural GasNatural

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippiNatural

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippiNaturalAlternative

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane RollsMississippiNaturalAlternativeAdvanced

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropane

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School Bus Grants The Indiana Office of

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School Bus Grants The Indiana Office

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School Bus Grants The Indiana

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School Bus Grants The IndianaFreight

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School Bus Grants The

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School Bus Grants TheDiesel Emissions

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School Bus Grants TheDiesel

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School Bus Grants

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School Bus GrantsTechnician Training The

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School Bus GrantsTechnician Training

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School Bus GrantsTechnician

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School Bus GrantsTechnicianNeighborhood

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School Bus

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School BusNeighborhood Electric Vehicle

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School BusNeighborhood Electric

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School BusNeighborhood ElectricNatural

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School BusNeighborhood

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School BusNeighborhoodNatural Gas and

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School BusNeighborhoodNatural Gas

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School BusNeighborhoodNatural

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School BusNeighborhoodNaturalEmissions

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane School

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanol and Methanol Tax Ethyl

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanol and Methanol Tax

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanol and Methanol

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanol and MethanolAlternative

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanol and

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanol andEthanol Blend

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanol andEthanol

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanol andEthanolBiofuel

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanol

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanolMid-level Ethanol Blend

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanolMid-level Ethanol

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanolMid-level

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanolMid-levelBiodiesel and

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane SchoolEthanolMid-levelBiodiesel

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropane

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onPropanePropaneAlternative

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe HeatClean

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe HeatCleanNatural Gas

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageBlender PumpVehiclesThe HeatCleanNatural