National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fuel sup ply

  1. Abundance of {sup 14}C in biomass fractions of wastes and solid recovered fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellner, Johann Rechberger, Helmut

    2009-05-15

    In recent years thermal utilization of mixed wastes and solid recovered fuels has become of increasing importance in European waste management. Since wastes or solid recovered fuels are generally composed of fossil and biogenic materials, only part of the CO{sub 2} emissions is accounted for in greenhouse gas inventories or emission trading schemes. A promising approach for determining this fraction is the so-called radiocarbon method. It is based on different ratios of the carbon isotopes {sup 14}C and {sup 12}C in fossil and biogenic fuels. Fossil fuels have zero radiocarbon, whereas biogenic materials are enriched in {sup 14}C and reflect the {sup 14}CO{sub 2} abundance of the ambient atmosphere. Due to nuclear weapons tests in the past century, the radiocarbon content in the atmosphere has not been constant, which has resulted in a varying {sup 14}C content of biogenic matter, depending on the period of growth. In the present paper {sup 14}C contents of different biogenic waste fractions (e.g., kitchen waste, paper, wood), as well as mixtures of different wastes (household, bulky waste, and commercial waste), and solid recovered fuels are determined. The calculated {sup 14}C content of the materials investigated ranges between 98 and 135 pMC.

  2. High conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly for current generation of PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldova, D.; Fridman, E.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a preliminary design of a high conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly applicable for current generation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWRs). The considered fuel assembly has a typical 17 x 17 PWR lattice. However in order to increase the conversion of Th{sup 232} to U{sup 233}, the assembly was subdivided into the two regions called seed and blanket. The central seed region has a higher than blanket U{sup 233} content and acts as a neutron source for the peripheral blanket region. The latest acts as a U{sup 233} breeder. While the seed fuel pins have a standard dimensions the blanket fuel radius was increased in order to reduce the moderation and to facilitate the resonance neutron absorption in blanket Th{sup 232}. The U{sup 233} content in the seed and blanket regions was optimized to achieve maximal initial to discharged fissile inventory ratio (FIR) taking into account the target fuel cycle length of 12 months with 3-batch reloading scheme. In this study the neutronic calculations were performed on the fuel assembly level using Helios deterministic lattice transport code. The fuel cycle length and the core k{sub eff} were estimated by applying the Non Linear Reactivity Model. The applicability of the HELIOS code for the analysis of the Th-based high conversion designs was confirmed with the help of continuous-energy Monte-Carlo code SERPENT. The results of optimization studies show that for the heterogeneous seed and blanket (SB) fuel assembly the FIR of about 0.95 can be achieved. (authors)

  3. Breeding of {sup 233}U in the thorium–uranium fuel cycle in VVER reactors using heavy water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshalkin, V. E. Povyshev, V. M.

    2015-12-15

    A method is proposed for achieving optimal neutron kinetics and efficient isotope transmutation in the {sup 233}U–{sup 232}Th oxide fuel of water-moderated reactors with variable water composition (D{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O) that ensures breeding of the {sup 233}U and {sup 235}U isotopes. The method is comparatively simple to implement.

  4. Estimation of average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors by using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endo, T.; Sato, S.; Yamamoto, A.

    2012-07-01

    Average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors is estimated, using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method for measured radioactivities of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs in contaminated soils within the range of 100 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants. As a result, the measured {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio from the contaminated soil is 0.996{+-}0.07 as of March 11, 2011. Based on the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method, the estimated burnup of damaged fuels is approximately 17.2{+-}1.5 [GWd/tHM]. It is noted that the numerical results of various calculation codes (SRAC2006/PIJ, SCALE6.0/TRITON, and MVP-BURN) are almost the same evaluation values of {sup 134}Cs/ {sup 137}Cs ratio with same evaluated nuclear data library (ENDF-B/VII.0). The void fraction effect in depletion calculation has a major impact on {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio compared with the differences between JENDL-4.0 and ENDF-B/VII.0. (authors)

  5. Experimental study of the dissolution of spent fuel at 85{sup 0} in natural ground water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N.; Shaw, H.F.

    1987-12-31

    Semi-static dissolution tests using pressurized water reactor spent fuel rod segments and NNWSI reference J-13 well water in sealed stainless steel vessels at 85{sup 0}C are being conducted in support of the Waste Package Task of the NNWSI Project. Test specimens include: bare fuel plus the empty cladding hulls, fuel rod segments with artificially induced cladding defects and water-tight end caps, and undefected fuel rod segments with water-tight end caps. The test conditions approximate those expected in the proposed NNWSI Project repository when the waste package has cooled sufficiently to allow water to enter a breached container and contact the fuel rods, some of which may exhibit various degrees of cladding failure. Periodic solution samples (unfiltered and filtered) were analyzed for most radionuclides for which cumulative release limits are listed by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Results from the first six-month cycle of the 85{sup 0}C tests are presented and are compared with results from the first cycle of a previous test series run at 25{sup 0}C in fused silica test vessels. 5 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  6. Modeling of selected ceramic processing parameters employed in the fabrication of <sup>238sup>PuO2 fuel pellets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockman, R. A.; Kramer, D. P.; Barklay, C. D.; Cairns-Gallimore, D.; Brown, J. L.; Huling, J. C.; Van Pelt, C. E.

    2011-10-01

    Recent deep space missions utilize the thermal output of the radioisotope plutonium-238 as the fuel in the thermal to electrical power system. Since the application of plutonium in its elemental state has several disadvantages, the fuel employed in these deep space power systems is typically in the oxide form such as plutonium-238 dioxide (<sup>238sup>PuO2). As an oxide, the processing of the plutonium dioxide into fuel pellets is performed via ''classical'' ceramic processing unit operations such as sieving of the powder, pressing, sintering, etc. Modeling of these unit operations can be beneficial in the understanding and control of processing parameters with the goal of further enhancing the desired characteristics of the <sup>238sup>PuO2 fuel pellets. A finite element model has been used to help identify the time-temperature-stress profile within a pellet during a furnace operation taking into account that <sup>238sup>PuO2 itself has a significant thermal output. The results of the modeling efforts will be discussed.

  7. Surveillance of PLUS7{sup TM} fuel for PWR nuclear power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jang, Y. K.; Kim, J. I.; Shin, J. C.; Chung, J. G.; Chung, S. K.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, T. H.; Yoon, Y. B.; Kim, T. W.

    2012-07-01

    The surveillance program on the advanced nuclear fuel of PLUS{sup TM} developed for Optimized Power Reactors of 1000 MWe (OPR1000s) and Advanced Power Reactors of 1400 MWe (APR1400s) in Korea was completed in the early of 2011. This fuel had been jointly developed through the extensive out-of-pile tests with Westinghouse for three years since 1999. The irradiation tests for the in-reactor verification using four lead test assemblies (LTAs) had been started in Ulchin unit 3 in 2002. During the overhaul period after each irradiation test, the eight (8) burnup-dependent parameters were measured without disassembling using the precise measurement systems in pool-side. After three cycle irradiations, one test assembly was disassembled and the rod-wise inspection on twenty rods was performed. During this stage, five (5) parameters were measured and evaluated. Among these twenty rods, ten rods including skeleton were sent to hot-cell test facility for further detailed examination and are currently being examined. After in-reactor verifications during two cycles, this fuel was commercially supplied to eight (8) OPR1000s sequentially. Currently all eight (8) OPR1000s were replaced with this fuel. In addition, this fuel is going to be supplied to four (4) APR1400s being constructed in Braka, UAE as well as four(4) OPR1000s and four(4) APR1400s being constructed in Korea. In the meanwhile, the surveillance program for the commercially supplied fuel has been launched to confirm growth, creep, corrosion and deformation, etc. obtained during LTA irradiation. Four (4) limiting fuel assemblies, that is, two (2) assemblies to be discharged after 2 cycle irradiations and the other two (2) after 3 cycle irradiations were selected for this surveillance program. Irradiation data of commercially supplied fuels are compared and confirmed to LTA irradiation performance behaviors on this paper. Among the eight (8) burnup-dependent parameters, the interesting ones were irradiation

  8. IMHEX{sup {reg_sign}} fuel cells progress toward commercialization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scroppo, J.A.; Laurens, R.M.; Petraglia, V.J.

    1995-12-31

    The overall goal of M-C Power is the development and subsequent commercialization of Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) stacks. More specifically, MCFC`s Manifolded Heat Exchange (IMHEX{sup {reg_sign}}) plate design created by the Institute of Technology. In order to achieve the aforementioned goal, M-C Power assembled a formidable team of industry leaders. This group, refered to as the (IHMEX{sup {reg_sign}}) Team, has developed a strategy to move decisively through the stages of Technology Development and Product Design and Improvement through commercialization. This paper is to review the status of the overall commercialization program and activities. It will also provide an overview of the market entry product. Furthermore, we will evaluate the opportunities and benefits this product brings to a competitive power industry.

  9. AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant safety overview for spent fuel cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorgemans, J.; Mulhollem, L.; Glavin, J.; Pfister, A.; Conway, L.; Schulz, T.; Oriani, L.; Cummins, E.; Winters, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The AP1000{sup R} plant is an 1100-MWe class pressurized water reactor with passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications that enhance construction, operation, maintenance, safety and costs. The AP1000 design uses passive features to mitigate design basis accidents. The passive safety systems are designed to function without safety-grade support systems such as AC power, component cooling water, service water or HVAC. Furthermore, these passive features 'fail safe' during a non-LOCA event such that DC power and instrumentation are not required. The AP1000 also has simple, active, defense-in-depth systems to support normal plant operations. These active systems provide the first level of defense against more probable events and they provide investment protection, reduce the demands on the passive features and support the probabilistic risk assessment. The AP1000 passive safety approach allows the plant to achieve and maintain safe shutdown in case of an accident for 72 hours without operator action, meeting the expectations provided in the U.S. Utility Requirement Document and the European Utility Requirements for passive plants. Limited operator actions are required to maintain safe conditions in the spent fuel pool via passive means. In line with the AP1000 approach to safety described above, the AP1000 plant design features multiple, diverse lines of defense to ensure spent fuel cooling can be maintained for design-basis events and beyond design-basis accidents. During normal and abnormal conditions, defense-in-depth and other systems provide highly reliable spent fuel pool cooling. They rely on off-site AC power or the on-site standby diesel generators. For unlikely design basis events with an extended loss of AC power (i.e., station blackout) or loss of heat sink or both, spent fuel cooling can still be provided indefinitely: - Passive systems, requiring minimal or no operator actions, are sufficient for at least 72 hours under all possible pool

  10. Radioactive Waste Management at the New Conversion Facility of 'TVEL'{sup R} Fuel Company - 13474

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Indyk, S.I.; Volodenko, A.V.; Tvilenev, K.A.; Tinin, V.V.; Fateeva, E.V.

    2013-07-01

    The project on the new conversion facility construction is being implemented by Joint Stock Company (JSC) 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises' (SGChE) within TVEL{sup R} Fuel Company. The objective is to construct the up-to-date facility ensuring the industrial and environmental safety with the reduced impact on the community and environment in compliance with the Russian new regulatory framework on radioactive waste (RW) management. The history of the SGChE development, as well as the concepts and approaches to RW management implemented by now are shown. The SGChE future image is outlined, together with its objectives and concept on RW management in compliance with the new act 'On radioactive waste management' adopted in Russia in 2011. Possible areas of cooperation with international companies are discussed in the field of RW management with the purpose of deploying the best Russian and world practices on RW management at the new conversion facility. (authors)

  11. Preliminary results of calculations for heavy-water nuclear-power-plant reactors employing {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 232}Th as a fuel and meeting requirements of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ioffe, B. L.; Kochurov, B. P.

    2012-02-15

    A physical design is developed for a gas-cooled heavy-water nuclear reactor intended for a project of a nuclear power plant. As a fuel, the reactor would employ thorium with a small admixture of enriched uranium that contains not more than 20% of {sup 235}U. It operates in the open-cycle mode involving {sup 233}U production from thorium and its subsequent burnup. The reactor meets the conditions of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons: the content of fissionable isotopes in uranium at all stages of the process, including the final one, is below the threshold for constructing an atomic bomb, the amount of product plutonium being extremely small.

  12. A 48-month extended fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erighin, M. A.

    2012-07-01

    The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small, rail-shippable pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and an electric power output of 150 MW, which is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height, but otherwise standard, PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array on a 21.5 cm inter-assembly pitch. The B and W mPower core design and cycle management plan, which were performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, follow the pattern of a typical nuclear reactor fuel cycle design and analysis performed by most nuclear fuel management organizations, such as fuel vendors and utilities. However, B and W is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for four years of continuous power operations without refueling and without the hurdles of chemical shim. (authors)

  13. L3:RTM.SUP.P9.01 Resonance Self-shielding Method for Fuel Annular

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SUP.P9.01 Resonance Self-shielding Method for Fuel Annular Subdivisions Using Quasi- 1D Slowing-down Solution Yuxuan Liu and William Martin University of Michigan Mark Williams and Kang-Seog Kim Oak Ridge National Laboratory July 31, 2014 CASL-U-2014-0123-000-a CASL-U-2014-0123-000-a 1 Resonance Self-shielding Method for Fuel Annular Subdivisions Using Quasi-1D Slowing-down Solution Yuxuan Liu and William Martin Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan

  14. High-silicon {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, M.A.H.

    1997-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment- impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and Earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously.

  15. An extended conventional fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarangella, M. J.

    2012-07-01

    The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and a thermal output of about 500 MW; it is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array. The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for a four-year cycle based on its presumed attractiveness to potential customers. This option is a once-through fuel cycle in which the entire core is discharged and replaced after four years. In addition, a conventional fuel utilization strategy, employing a periodic partial reload and shuffle, was developed as an alternative to the four-year once-through fuel cycle. This study, which was performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, is a typical multi-cycle projection analysis of the type performed by most fuel management organizations such as fuel vendors and utilities. In the industry, the results of such projections are used by the financial arms of these organizations to assist in making long-term decisions. In the case of the B and W mPower reactor, this analysis demonstrates flexibility for customers who consider the once-through fuel cycle unacceptable from a fuel utilization standpoint. As expected, when compared to the once-through concept, reloads of the B and W mPower reactor will achieve higher batch average discharge exposure, will have adequate shut-down margin, and will have a relatively flat hot excess reactivity trend at the expense of slightly increased peaking. (authors)

  16. Surveillance of PLUS7{sup TM} fuel for PWR nuclear power plant...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1999. The irradiation tests for the in-reactor verification using four lead test ... After in-reactor verifications during two cycles, this fuel was commercially supplied to ...

  17. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240} PU core : a cylindrical assemby with mixed (PU, U)-oxide fuel and a central high {sup 240} PU zone.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lell, R. M.; Schaefer, R. W.; McKnight, R. D.; Tsiboulia, A.; Rozhikhin, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering

    2007-10-01

    Over a period of 30 years more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. The term 'benchmark' in a ZPR program connotes a particularly simple loading aimed at gaining basic reactor physics insight, as opposed to studying a reactor design. In fact, the ZPR-6/7 Benchmark Assembly (Reference 1) had a very simple core unit cell assembled from plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U3O8, and plutonium. The ZPR-6/7 core cell-average composition is typical of the interior region of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) of the era. It was one part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program,a which provided integral experiments characterizing the important features of demonstration

  18. Modeling fatigue crack growth in cross ply titanium matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakuckas, J.G. Jr.; Johnson, W.S.

    1993-05-01

    In this study, the fatigue crack growth behavior of fiber bridging matrix cracks in cross-ply SCS-6/Ti-15-3 and SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates containing center holes was investigated. Experimental observations revealed that matrix cracking was far more extensive and wide spread in the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates compared to that in the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates. In addition, the fatigue life of the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates was significantly longer than that of the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates. The matrix cracking observed in both material systems was analyzed using a fiber bridging (FB) model which was formulated using the boundary correction factors and weight functions for center hole specimen configurations. A frictional shear stress is assumed in the FB model and was used as a curve fitting parameter to model matrix crack growth data. The higher frictional shear stresses calculated in the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates resulted in lower stress intensity factors in the matrix and higher axial stresses in the fibers compared to those in the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates at the same applied stress levels.

  19. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240}Pu core experiments : a fast reactor core with mixed (Pu,U)-oxide fuel and a centeral high{sup 240}Pu zone.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lell, R. M.; Morman, J. A.; Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-23

    ZPR-6 Assembly 7 (ZPR-6/7) encompasses a series of experiments performed at the ZPR-6 facility at Argonne National Laboratory in 1970 and 1971 as part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program (Reference 1). Assembly 7 simulated a large sodium-cooled LMFBR with mixed oxide fuel, depleted uranium radial and axial blankets, and a core H/D near unity. ZPR-6/7 was designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, so configurations in the Assembly 7 program were as simple as possible in terms of geometry and composition. ZPR-6/7 had a very uniform core assembled from small plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and Pu-U-Mo alloy loaded into stainless steel drawers. The steel drawers were placed in square stainless steel tubes in the two halves of a split table machine. ZPR-6/7 had a simple, symmetric core unit cell whose neutronic characteristics were dominated by plutonium and {sup 238}U. The core was surrounded by thick radial and axial regions of depleted uranium to simulate radial and axial blankets and to isolate the core from the surrounding room. The ZPR-6/7 program encompassed 139 separate core loadings which include the initial approach to critical and all subsequent core loading changes required to perform specific experiments and measurements. In this context a loading refers to a particular configuration of fueled drawers, radial blanket drawers and experimental equipment (if present) in the matrix of steel tubes. Two principal core configurations were established. The uniform core (Loadings 1-84) had a relatively uniform core composition. The high {sup 240}Pu core (Loadings 85-139) was a variant on the uniform core. The plutonium in the Pu-U-Mo fuel plates in the uniform core contains 11% {sup 240}Pu. In the high {sup 240}Pu core, all Pu-U-Mo plates in the inner core region (central 61 matrix locations per half of the split table machine) were replaced by Pu-U-Mo plates containing 27% {sup 240}Pu in the plutonium

  20. Tungsten-rhenium composite tube fabricated by CVD for application in 1800/sup 0/C high thermal efficiency fuel processing furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svedberg, R.C.; Bowen, W.W.; Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    1980-04-01

    Chemical Vapor Deposit (CVD) rhenium was selected as the muffle material for an 1800/sup 0/C high thermal efficiency fuel processing furnace. The muffle is exposed to high vacuum on the heater/insulation/instrumentation side and to a flowing argon-8 V/0 hydrogen gas mixture at one atmosphere pressure on the load volume side. During operation, the muffle cycles from room temperature to 1800/sup 0/C and back to room temperature once every 24 hours. Operational life is dependent on resistance to thermal fatigue during the high temperature exposure. For a prototypical furnace, the muffle is approximately 13 cm I.D. and 40 cm in length. A small (about one-half size) rhenium closed end tube overcoated with tungsten was used to evaluate the concept. The fabrication and testing of the composite tungsten-rhenium tube and prototypic rhenium muffle is described.

  1. fuel

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4%2A en Cheaper catalyst may lower fuel costs for hydrogen-powered cars http:www.nnsa.energy.govblogcheaper-catalyst-may-lower-fuel-costs-hydrogen-powered-cars

  2. fuel

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4%2A en Cheaper catalyst may lower fuel costs for hydrogen-powered cars http:nnsa.energy.govblogcheaper-catalyst-may-lower-fuel-costs-hydrogen-powered-cars

  3. Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing ... Heavy Duty Fuels DISI Combustion HCCISCCI Fundamentals Spray Combustion Modeling ...

  4. Behavior of a centrally notched cross-ply and unidirectional ceramic matrix composite in tension-compression fatigue. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weidenaar, W.A.

    1992-12-01

    Centrally notched (hole), cross-ply, ((0/90) sub 2) sub s, and unidirectional, (0) sub 8 laminates of Silicon Carbide fiber-reinforced Aluminosilicate glass, SiC/1723, were fatigue tested under tension-compression loading with a load ratio of -1. Damage accumulated continuously for both lay-ups, leading to eventual failure and a reduced fatigue life. Critical damage in the cross-ply consisted of longitudinal cracks in the 90 deg plies growing and combining with transverse cracks to effectively eliminate the 90 deg plies' load carrying capability and allowing the specimen to buckle. Critical damage in the unidirectional lay-up consisted of longitudinal cracks which initiated at the shear stress concentration points on the hole periphery. Reversed cyclic loading caused continued crack growth at maximum stresses below the tension-tension fatigue limit. The cross-ply lay-up appeared insensitive to the hole, while critical damage in the unidirectional lay-up was dependent on the shear stress concentrations at the hole.... Ceramic matrix composite, Tension-compression fatigue, Notched specimen.

  5. Multiple Pathways for Benzyl Alcohol Oxidation by Ru<sup>V=O>3+ sup>and Ru<sup>IV=O>2+sup>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, Amit; Hull, Jonathan F.; Norris, Michael R.; Chen, Zuofeng; Ess, Daniel H.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2011-01-20

    Significant rate enhancements are found for benzyl alcohol oxidation by the Ru<sup>V=O>3+ sup> form of the water oxidation catalyst [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH2)]<sup>2+ sup> [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine] compared to Ru<sup>IV=O>2+sup> and for the Ru<sup>IV=O>2+sup> form with added bases due to a new pathway, concerted hydride proton transfer (HPT).

  6. Multiple Pathways for Benzyl Alcohol Oxidation by Ru<sup>V=O>3+sup> and Ru<sup>IV=O>2+sup>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, Amit; Hull, Jonathan F.; Norris, Michael R.; Chen, Zuofeng; Ess, Daniel H.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.

    2011-01-20

    Significant rate enhancements are found for benzyl alcohol oxidation by the Ru<sup>V=O>3+sup> form of the water oxidation catalyst [Ru(Mebimpy)(bpy)(OH2)]<sup>2+sup> [Mebimpy = 2,6-bis(1-methylbenzimidazol-2-yl)pyridine; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine] compared to Ru<sup>IV=O>2+sup> and for the Ru<sup>IV=O>2+sup> form with added bases due to a new pathway involving concerted hydride proton transfer (HPT).

  7. Behavior of a quasi-isotropic ply metal matrix composite under thermo-mechanical and isothermal fatigue loading. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, K.A.

    1992-12-01

    This study investigated the behavior of the SCS6/Ti-15-3 metal matrix composite with a quasi-isotropic layup when tested under static and fatigue conditions. Specimens were subjected to in-phase and out-of-phase thermo-mechanical and isothermal fatigue loading. In-phase and isothermal loading produced a fiber dominated failure while the out-of-phase loading produced a matrix dominated failure. Also, fiber domination in all three profiles was present at higher maximum applied loads and al three profiles demonstrated matrix domination at lower maximum applied loads. Thus, failure is both profile dependent and load equipment. Additional analyses, using laminated plate theory, Halpin-Tsai equations, METCAN, and the Linear Life Fraction Model (LLFM), showed: the as-received specimens contained plies where a portion of the fibers are debonded from the matrix; during fatigue cycling, the 90 deg. plies and a percentage of the 45 deg. plies failed immediately with greater damage becoming evident with additional cycles; and, the LLFM suggests that there may be a non-linear combination of fiber and matrix domination for in-phase and isothermal cycling.

  8. Study of charmonium resonances in the γγ -> K<sup>0sup>SK±> π<sup>∓>i- and γγ -> K<sup>+> K<sup>-π+π-π>0sup> processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biassoni, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    This thesis reports the analysis of the e<sup>+e-> → e<sup>+e->K{sub S}<sup>0sup>K±π±> and e<sup>+e-> → e<sup>+sup>e<sup>-sup>K<sup>+sup>K<sup>-π+π-π>0sup> processes using the final dataset of the BABAR experiment located at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. From previous measurements, the KS<sup>0sup>K±π±> final state is known to show a clear signal from the βc(2S) particle. This c$\\bar{c}$ state escaped detection for almost twenty years and its properties are still not well established on the experimental ground, while accurate predictions exist on the theoretical side. The e<sup>+e->→ e<sup>+sup>e<sup>-sup>K<sup>+sup>K<sup>-π+π-{pi}>0sup> process is first studied in this thesis. An accurate determination of the βc(2S) properties is obtained in the KS<sup>0sup>K±π±> decay mode. We also report the first observation of {eta}c(2S) and other charmonium states to the K<sup>+sup>K<sup>-π+π-π>0sup> final state. The results of this thesis have been published in Physical Review D, and will be useful to test theoretical models describing the charmonium system. The thesis is organized in four chapters. The first one gives a brief introduction of the theoretical models used to describe the charmonium system. The second one discuss the current status of conventional and exotic charmonium spectroscopy, reporting recent experimental results and their interpretation. The third Chapter is devoted to describe the BABAR experiment. The analysis technique and results are described in Chapter 4. Finally, conclusions from this analysis are drawn.

  9. Thermal stability of ferritic alloys for fossil-fuel processing systems. Final technical report, September 1, 1978-August 31, 1981. [at 475/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polonis, D.H.; Spear, W.S.

    1981-12-31

    This research program has investigated the thermal stability of several ferritic stainless steels containing 15 to 18 weight percent chromium over the temperature range 400/sup 0/C to 550/sup 0/C where the 475/sup 0/C embrittlement reaction is of concern. A major part of the experimental work was concerned with the effect of ternary additions of up to 6 weight percent; aluminum on the kinetics and the magnitude of the embrittlement reaction. The work also included a binary Fe-18Cr alloy, a ternary Fe-18Cr-2Mo, and two commercial alloys, Armco type 430 and type 18SR. Resistometric studies of the kinetics of microstructural instability indicated that aluminum additions promote the tendency of chromium atoms to cluster at temperatures in the vicinity of 475/sup 0/C. The magnitude of embrittling reaction is intensified by the aluminum additions which are expected to restrict dislocation cross slip and increase the coherency strains associated with the alpha prime precipitates. Activation energy determinations for the decomposition reaction indicate that the rate controlling process is most likely determined by the diffusion of chromium, and the tendency of aluminum to enhance the clustering of chromium atoms is similar to the effect reported for molybdenum additions by previous workers.

  10. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shackleford, M.H.

    1958-12-16

    A fuel element possessing good stability and heat conducting properties is described. The fuel element comprises an outer tube formed of material selected from the group consisting of stainhess steel, V, Ti. Mo. or Zr, a fuel tube concentrically fitting within the outer tube and containing an oxide of an isotope selected from the group consisting of U/sup 235/, U/sup 233/, and Pu/sup 239/, and a hollow, porous core concentrically fitting within the fuel tube and formed of an oxide of an element selected from the group consisting of Mg, Be, and Zr.

  11. Observation of the Baryonic Flavor-Changing Neutral Current Decay ?b<sup>0sup> ? ?<sup>+->

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-11-08

    The authors report the first observation of the baryonic flavor-changing neutral current decay ?b<sup>0sup> ? ?<sup>+-> with 24 signal events and a statistical significance of 5.8 Gaussian standard deviations. This measurement uses a pp? collisions data sample corresponding to 6.8 fb<sup>-1sup> at ?s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. The total and differential branching ratios for ?b<sup>0sup> ? ?<sup>+-> are measured. They find ?(?b<sup>0sup> ? ?<sup>+->) = [1.73 0.42(stat) 0.55(syst)] x 10<sup>-6sup>. They also report the first measurement of the differential branching ratio of Bs<sup>0sup>??+-> using 49 signal events. In addition, they report branching ratios for B<sup>+sup>?K++->, B<sup>0sup>?K>0sup>+-> and ?? K*(892)<sup>+-> decays.

  12. Concept of a demonstrational hybrid reactor—a tokamak with molten-salt blanket for {sup 233}U fuel production: 1. Concept of a stationary Tokamak as a neutron source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azizov, E. A.; Gladush, G. G. Dokuka, V. N.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.

    2015-12-15

    On the basis of current understanding of physical processes in tokamaks and taking into account engineering constraints, it is shown that a low-cost facility of a moderate size can be designed within the adopted concept. This facility makes it possible to achieve the power density of neutron flux which is of interest, in particular, for solving the problem of {sup 233}U fuel production from thorium. By using a molten-salt blanket, the important task of ensuring the safe operation of such a reactor in the case of possible coolant loss is accomplished. Moreover, in a hybrid reactor with the blanket based on liquid salts, the problem of periodic refueling that is difficult to perform in solid blankets can be solved.

  13. Detector for measuring the ?<sup>+> ? e<sup>+>v branching fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A. A.; Aoki, M.; Blecher, M.; Bruch, D. vom; Bryman, D.; Comfort, J.; Cuen-Rochin, S.; Doria, L.; Gumplinger, P.; Hussein, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ito, N.; Ito, S.; Kettell, S. H.; Kurchaninov, L.; Littenberg, L.; Malbrunot, C.; Mischke, R. E.; Muroi, A.; Numao, T.; Sheffer, G.; Sher, A.; Sullivan, T.; Tauchi, K.; Vavilov, D.; Yamada, K.; Yoshida, M.

    2015-04-13

    The PIENU experiment at TRIUMF is aimed at a measurement of the branching ratio R<sup>e/u> = ?((?<sup>+> ? e<sup>+>ve) + (?<sup>+> ? e<sup>+ve?))/?((?+> ? ?<sup>+>v?) + (?<sup>+> ? ?<sup>+>v??)) with precision < 0.1%. Incident pions, delivered at the rate of 60 kHz with momentum 75 MeV/c, were degraded and stopped in a plastic scintillator target. Pions and their decay product positrons were detected with plastic scintillators and tracked with multiwire proportional chambers and silicon strip detectors. The energies of the positrons were measured in a spectrometer consisting of a large NaI(T?) crystal surrounded by an array of pure CsI crystals. This paper provides a description of the PIENU experimental apparatus and its performance in pursuit of R<sup>e/u>

  14. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc<sup>> ? J/??<sup>>and B<sup>> ? J/? K<sup>> and B(Bc<sup>>? J/? ?<sup>sup>?<sup>sup>?-/+)/B(Bc> ? J/? ?<sup>>) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-01-13

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc<sup>>) B(Bc<sup>> ? J/??<sup>))/(?(B>) B(B<sup>> ? J/?K<sup>>) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c<sup>> and B<sup>>mesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| < 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb<sup>-1sup>. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 0.05 (stat) 0.03(syst) 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/??<sup>??-/+> decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed to measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ?<sup>sup>?<sup>sup>?-/+)/B(Bc> is measured to be 2.55 0.80(stat) 0.33(syst) <sup>+0.04sup>-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.

  15. Measurements of delayed neutron decay constants and fission yields from {sup 235}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleh, H.H.; Parish, T.A.; Raman, S.; Shinohara, Nobuo

    1997-01-01

    Isotopes of the higher actinide elements are produced as a result of successive radiative capture reactions in the uranium fuel of nuclear reactors. Typically, these transuranic isotopes decay through long chains, have long half-lives, and dominate the long-term toxicity of spent reactor fuel. One of the options for high level waste management is to remove the higher actinide elements from spent fuel by chemical processing, to load them into new special fuel elements, and to transmute them by neutron-induced fission into shorter-lived fission fragments. Reactors designed to achieve high actinide fission (transmutation) rates are called actinide burners. In such reactors, the actinide wastes would constitute much of the fissionable fuel. Due to the high transuranic isotope loadings in the fuel of actinide burners, the neutronic properties of the higher actinide isotopes will have a significant effect on the criticality and safety characteristics of such reactors. While there is an extensive operational database for reactors fueled with uranium and plutonium, operating experience with fuel containing large amounts of actinide wastes is quite limited. Two important neutronic properties of actinide burner cores are their reactivity and their delayed neutron fraction. Both of these properties will be strongly influenced by the neutronic characteristics of the actinide waste isotopes. Here, delayed neutron yields and decay constants for {sup 235}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am were measured at the Texas A and M University TRIGA reactor using a fast pneumatic transfer system. The detection system consisted of an array of BF{sub 3} proportional counters embedded in a polyethylene cylinder. The measured values of the total delayed neutron yield per 100 fissions from thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am were determined to be 1.59 {+-} 0.04, 1.29 {+-} 0.04, 0.49 {+-} 0.02, and 0.84 {+-} 0.04, respectively.

  16. Six language extensions to enhance the portability of mathematical software written in PL/I: background and justification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dritz, K.W.

    1982-05-01

    This report proposes six extensions to ANS PL/I, which is being revised by the American National Standards Committee X3J1. The new features include environmental enquiry functions, generalization of restricted expressings (compile-time expressions), liberalization of the contexts of restricted expressions, a named-literal declaration type, explicit precision specification for constants, and a pragmatic statement for expressing conditions that an implementation must satisfy for acceptable compilation. Used together, these features will give numerical analysts access to properties of an implementation's floating-point arithmetic in exactly the ways required to ease the burden of tailoring a program's precision specifications to new environments. In many cases it will be possible to write PL/I programs that are completely self-adapting to their host environment. Effective definition of the environmental enquiry functions will require the incorporation of an explicitly parameterized model of floating-point arithmetic. If such a model is integrated into the Standard, numerical analysts will be able to state and prove theorems about their programs' error bounds by appealing directly to the Standard.

  17. Determination of the half-life of the ground state of {sup 229}Th by using {sup 232}U and {sup 233}U decay series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kikunaga, H.; Suzuki, T.; Nomura, M.; Mitsugashira, T.; Shinohara, A.

    2011-07-15

    The half-life of the ground state of {sup 229}Th ({sup 229}Th{sup g}) has become an important factor in nuclear technology, for example, in the geological disposal of nuclear spent fuel. However, the values reported in two previous studies are not in agreement. This study reevaluates the half-life of {sup 229}Th{sup g} by using a simple and reliable method. The {sup 232}U/{sup 233}U activity ratio of a {sup 232,233}U sample was measured by high-resolution {alpha}-particle spectrometry. Next, the {sup 228}Th/{sup 229}Th{sup g} activity ratio of the Th sample, which was grown from the {sup 232,233}U sample, was also measured. The half-life of {sup 229}Th{sup g} was calculated from these activity ratios, the growth time, and the half-lives of {sup 232}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 228}Th. From the results of these five measurements, the half-life of {sup 229}Th{sup g} is determined to be 7932 {+-} 55 yr at a confidence level of 2{sigma}.

  18. Fabrication of thorium bearing carbide fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gutierrez, R.L.; Herbst, R.J.; Johnson, K.W.R.

    Thorium-uranium carbide and thorium-plutonium carbide fuel pellets have been fabricated by the carbothermic reduction process. Temperatures of 1750/sup 0/C and 2000/sup 0/C were used during the reduction cycle. Sintering temperatures of 1800/sup 0/C and 2000/sup 0/C were used to prepare fuel pellet densities of 87% and > 94% of theoretical, respectively. The process allows the fabrication of kilogram quantities of fuel with good reproductibility of chemical and phase composition.

  19. Data Testing Revised <sup>235sup>U, <sup>239sup>Pu and <sup>63,65sup>Cu Files with ICSBEP Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahler, III, Albert C.; Leal, Luiz C.

    2014-03-13

    We review recent critical benchmark calculations with revised <sup>235sup>U, <sup>239sup>Pu and <sup>63,65sup>Cu evaluated data files.

  20. Organic fuel cells and fuel cell conducting sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I.; Ha, Su; Adams, Brian

    2007-10-16

    A passive direct organic fuel cell includes an organic fuel solution and is operative to produce at least 15 mW/cm.sup.2 when operating at room temperature. In additional aspects of the invention, fuel cells can include a gas remover configured to promote circulation of an organic fuel solution when gas passes through the solution, a modified carbon cloth, one or more sealants, and a replaceable fuel cartridge.

  1. U.sup.+4 generation in HTER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, William E.; Gay, Eddie C.; Tomczuk, Zygmunt

    2006-03-14

    A improved device and process for recycling spent nuclear fuels, in particular uranium metal, that facilitates the refinement and recovery of uranium metal from spent metallic nuclear fuels. The electrorefiner device comprises two anodes in predetermined spatial relation to a cathode. The anodese have separate current and voltage controls. A much higher voltage than normal for the electrorefining process is applied to the second anode, thereby facilitating oxidization of uranium (III), U.sup.+, to uranium (IV), U.sup.+4. The current path from the second anode to the cathode is physically shorter than the similar current path from the second anode to the spent nuclear fuel contained in a first anode shaped as a basket. The resulting U.sup.+4 oxidizes and solubilizes rough uranium deposited on the surface of the cathode. A softer uranium metal surface is left on the cathode and is more readily removed by a scraper.

  2. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  3. Search for long-lived particles in e<sup>+e-> collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.

    2015-04-29

    In this study, we present a search for a neutral, long-lived particle L that is produced in e<sup>+e–> collisions and decays at a significant distance from the e<sup>+e–> interaction point into various flavor combinations of two oppositely charged tracks. The analysis uses an e<sup>+e–> data sample with a luminosity of 489.1 fb<sup>–1sup> collected by the BABAR detector at the Υ(4S), Υ(3S), and Υ(2S) resonances and just below the Υ(4S). Fitting the two-track mass distribution in search of a signal peak, we do not observe a significant signal, and set 90% confidence level upper limits on the product of the L production cross section, branching fraction, and reconstruction efficiency for six possible two-body L decay modes as a function of the L mass. The efficiency is given for each final state as a function of the mass, lifetime, and transverse momentum of the candidate, allowing application of the upper limits to any production model. In addition, upper limits are provided on the branching fraction B(B → XsL), where Xs is a strange hadronic system.

  4. {sup 85}Kr induced global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakharov, V.I.

    1996-12-31

    It`s well known that the trace atmospheric constituent as {sup 85}Kr is at present about 10{sup 6} cm{sup {minus}3} and increasing considerably (twice every 8--10 years) as a result of nuclear fuel utilization. This paper presents the model of influence of {sup 85}Kr accumulation in the earth atmosphere on climate perturbation and global warming. The process of increasing the concentrations in the troposphere due to the anthropogenic emission of {sup 85}Kr and its radioactive decay is analyzed, based on master kinetic equations. Results indicate that anthropogenic emissions contributing to the total equilibrium concentration of tropospheric ions due to {sup 85}Kr is about equal to the natural level of tropospheric ions. The influence of atmospheric electricity on the transformation between water vapor and clouds which result in an increase in the concentration of ions in troposphere is investigated. The paper shows that the process of anthropogenic accumulation of {sup 85}Kr in the troposphere at present rate up to 2005--2010 increases the mean of the dew-point temperature several degrees on the global scale. Relevant change of height for the lower level of clouds has been obtained. Positive feedback between the process of warming of the lower atmosphere and the concentration of tropospheric ions has been considered.

  5. Corrosion Tests of LWR Fuels - Nuclide Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.A. Finn; Y. Tsai; J.C. Cunnane

    2001-12-14

    Two BWR fuels [64 and 71 (MWd)/kgU], one of which contained 2% Gd, and two PWR fuels [30 and 45 (MWd)/kgU], are tested by dripping groundwater on the fuels under oxidizing and hydrologically unsaturated conditions for times ranging from 2.4 to 8.2 yr at 90 C. The {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 97}Mo, and {sup 90}Sr releases are presented to show the effects of long reaction times and of gadolinium on nuclide release. This investigation showed that the five nuclides at long reaction times have similar fractional release rates and that the presence of 2% Gd reduced the {sup 99}Tc cumulative release fraction by about an order of magnitude over that of a fuel with a similar burnup.

  6. Astrophysical S factors of radiative {sup 3}He{sup 4}He, {sup 3}H{sup 4}He, and {sup 2}H{sup 4}He capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2010-09-15

    The possibility of describing the astrophysical S factors for radiative {sup 3}He{sup 4}He capture at energies of up to 15 keV and radiative {sup 3}H{sup 4}He and {sup 2}H{sup 4}He capture at energies of up 5 keV is considered on the basis of the potential cluster model involving forbidden states.

  7. Search for b→u transitions in B<supsup>→[K<sup>∓sup>π<supsup>π⁰]DK±> decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Nicolaci, M.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Ebert, M.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Paramesvaran, S.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Neri, N.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Buenger, C.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Benitez, J. F.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Ofte, I.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Santoro, V.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Lindsay, C.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2011-07-06

    We present a study of the decays B<sup>±→DK±> with D mesons reconstructed in the K⁺π⁻π⁰ or K⁻π⁺π⁰ final states, where D indicates a D⁰ or a D¯¯¯0 meson. Using a sample of 474×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e⁺e⁻ collider at SLAC, we measure the ratios R<supsup>≡((Γ(B<supsup>→[K<sup>∓sup>π<supsup>π⁰]DK<supsup>))/((Γ(B<supsup>→[K<supsup>π<sup>∓π⁰]DK±>)). We obtain R⁺=(5<sup>⁺12sup>⁻10(stat)<sup>⁺2sup>⁻4(syst))×10⁻³ and R⁻=(12<sup>⁺12sup>⁻10(stat)<sup>⁺3sup>⁻5(syst))×10⁻³, from which we extract the upper limits at 90% probability: R⁺<23×10⁻³ and R⁻<29×10⁻³. Using these measurements, we obtain an upper limit for the ratio rB of the magnitudes of the b→u and b→c amplitudes rB<0.13 at 90% probability.

  8. Fuel Options

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Production Market Transformation Fuel Cells Predictive Simulation of Engines ... Twitter Google + Vimeo Newsletter Signup SlideShare Fuel Options HomeCapabilitiesFuel ...

  9. Observation of. lambda. -hypernuclei in the reaction /sup 12/C(. pi. /sup +/,K/sup +/)/sub. lambda. //sup 12/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milner, E.C.

    1985-12-01

    The observation of ..lambda..-hypernuclear levels in /sub ..lambda..//sup 12/C by associated production through the (..pi../sup +/,K/sup +/) reaction is reported. Spectrometers used in the measurements are discussed. The /sub ..lambda..//sup 12/C excitation energy spectra were recorded at laboratory scattering angles of 5.6/sup 0/, 10.3/sup 0/, and 15.2/sup 0/. The spectra show two major peaks - one attributed to the ground state, and one about 11 MeV higher in excitation. The peak near 11 MeV excitation energy is believed to be almost entirely composed of a multiplet of three J/sup ..pi../ = 2/sup +/ states. Relativistic DWBA calculations imply support for the expectation that higher spin states are preferentially populated in the (..pi../sup +/,K/sup +/) reaction, compared to the (K/sup -/,..pi../sup -/) reaction in which lower spin states are excited. 29 refs., 40 figs.

  10. Fatigue behavior of a cross-ply ceramic matrix composite subjected to tension-tension cycling with hold time. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, S.A.

    1994-12-01

    This study was carried out to investigate the elevated temperature behavior of the SiC-MAS5 cross- ply (O/9O)4S ceramic matrix composite manufactured by Corning Inc. to fatigue with loading waveforms that combine the characteristics of stress rupture and high cycle fatigue. The test results were compiled in the form of S-N (cycles to failure), S-T (exposure time versus cycles to failure), S-S (energy exposure versus cycles to failure), normalized modulus degradation, strain progression, and hysteresis loop progression. From the mechanical behavior demonstrated by these curves, relationships between the effect of the environment and loading waveform were developed. In addition, a post-mortem SEM analysis of the fracture surface was conducted and the results compared to the mechanical behavior.

  11. Transfer couplings and hindrance far below the barrier for <sup>40sup> Ca + <sup>96sup> Zr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanini, A. M.; Montagnoli, G.; Esbensen, H.; Corradi, L.; Courtin, S.; Fioretto, E.; Goasduff, A.; Grebosz, J.; Haas, F.; Mazzocco, M.; Michelagnoli, C.; Mijatović, T.; Montanari, D.; Pasqualato, G.; Parascandolo, C.; Scarlassara, F.; Strano, E.; Szilner, S.; Toniolo, N.; Torresi, D.

    2015-01-29

    The sub-barrier fusion excitation function of <sup>40sup>Ca + <sup>96sup>Zr has been measured down to cross sections ≃2.4µb, i.e. two orders of magnitude smaller than obtained in the previous experiment, where the sub-barrier fusion of this system was found to be greatly enhanced with respect to <sup>40sup>Ca + <sup>90sup>Zr, and the need of coupling to transfer channels was suggested. The purpose of this work was to investigate the behavior of <sup>40sup>Ca + <sup>96sup>Zr fusion far below the barrier. The smooth trend of the excitation function has been found to continue, and the logarithmic slope increases very slowly. No indication of hindrance shows up, and a comparison with <sup>48sup>Ca + <sup>96sup>Zr is very useful in this respect. A new CC analysis of the complete excitation function has been performed, including explicitly one- and two-nucleon Q >0 transfer channels. Such transfer couplings bring significant cross section enhancements, even at the level of a few µb. Locating the hindrance threshold, if any, in <sup>40sup>Ca + <sup>96sup>Zr would require challenging measurements of cross sections in the sub-µb range.

  12. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  13. Cryogenic Thermal Expansion of Y-12 Graphite Fuel Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eash, D. T.

    2013-07-08

    Thermal expansion measurements betwccn 20°K and 300°K were made on segments of three uranium-loaded Y-12 uncoated graphite fuel elements. The thermal expansion of these fuel elements over this temperature range is represented by the equation: {Delta}L/L = -39.42 x 10{sup -5} + 1.10 x 10{sup -7} T + 6.47 x 10{sup -9} T{sup 2} - 8.30 x 10{sup -12} T{sup 3}.

  14. Spatially-Resolved Analyses of Aerodynamic Fallout from a Uranium-Fueled Nuclear Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, L. A.; Knight, K. B.; Matzel, J. E.; Prussin, S. G.; Zimmer, M. M.; Kinman, W S; Ryerson, F. J.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2015-07-28

    The fiive silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. Several samples display compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing between major elements and natural U (<sup>238sup>U/>235sup>U = 0.00725) and enriched U. Samples exhibit extreme spatial heterogeneity in U isotopic composition with 0.02 < <sup>235sup>U/>238sup>U < 11.84 among all five spherules and 0.02 < <sup>235sup>U/>238sup>U < 7.41 within a single spherule. Moreover, in two spherules, the <sup>235sup>U/>238sup>U ratio is correlated with changes in major element composition, suggesting the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are nearly homogenous with respect to major element and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due to experiencing higher temperatures or residing longer in the fireball. Linear correlations between <sup>234sup>U/>238sup>U, <sup>235sup>U/>238sup>U, and <sup>236sup>U/>238sup>U ratios are consistent with a two-component mixing model, which is used to illustrate the extent of mixing between natural and enriched U end members.

  15. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Opportunity fuels - fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels - are discussed in outline form. The type and source of fuels, types of fuels, combustability, methods of combustion, refinery wastes, petroleum coke, garbage fuels, wood wastes, tires, and economics are discussed.

  16. Measurement of time-dependent CP violation in B <sup>0sup> ? ?'K <sup>0 sup>decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    antelj, L.; Yusa, Y.; Abdesselam, A.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Al Said, S.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Ayad, R.; Bahinipati, S.

    2014-10-29

    We present a measurement of the time-dependent CP violation parameters in B<sup>0sup> ? ?'K<sup>0sup> decays. The measurement is based on the full data sample containing 77210<sup>6sup> BB-bar pairs collected at the ?(4S) resonance using the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e<sup>+e-> collider. The measured values of the mixing-induced and direct CP violation parameters are: sin 2?1<sup>eff> = +0.68 0.07 0.03, A?'K<sup>0sup> = +0.03 0.05 0.04, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The values obtained are the most accurate to date. Furthermore, these results are consistent with our previous measurements and with the world-average value of sin 2?1 measured in B<sup>0sup> ? J/?K<sup>0sup> decays.

  17. Extended life aluminide fuel for university research reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, L.G.; Brown, K.R.; Beeston, J.M.; McGinty, D.M.

    1983-01-01

    A test program is being conducted to determine if the fuel loading and burnup limits for fuel elements in university research reactors can be safely increased beyond the limits presently allowed by reactor licensing restrictions. For the tests, 30 fuel plates were constructed to a maximum fuel loading which could be produced on a commercial basis and to contain a maximum boron content as used in the Advanced Test Reactor to reduce initial reactor reactivity. A UAl/sub 2/ fuel matrix was used to gain higher uranium content. The test program planned for the fuel plates to be irradiated to a 3.3 x 10/sup 21/ fissions/cm/sup 3/ average burnup (45% of U-235 for the 50 vol% fuel plate cores). This would be twice the burnup presently allowed in the university reactors. Irradiation performance of the heavy loaded fuel plates has been good at burnups exceeding 2.3 x 10/sup 21/ fissions/cm/sup 3/, with one fuel plate reaching a peak burnup of about 3 x 10/sup 21/ fissions/cm/sup 3/. Three fuel plates failed, however, during the irradiation, and are undergoing destructive analysis. Corrosion pitting occurred in cladding of both UAl/sub 2/ and UAl/sub 3/ fuel plates. Some plates appear to be more resistant to corrosion pitting than others. Localized swelling in high fuel loaded plates also is being investigated as a possible failure mode.

  18. Extended life aluminide fuel for university research reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, L.G.; Brown, K.R.; Beeston, J.M.; McGinty, D.M.

    1983-12-01

    A test program is being conducted to determine if the fuel loading and burnup limits for fuel elements in university research reactors can be safely increased beyond the limits presently allowed by reactor licensing restrictions. For the tests, 30 fuel plates were constructed to a maximum fuel loading which could be produced on a commercial basis and to contain a maximum boron content as used in the INEL Advanced Test Reactor to reduce initial reactor reactivity. A UAl/sub 2/ fuel matrix was used to gain higher uranium content. The test program planned for the fuel plates to be irradiated to a 3.3 x 10/sup 21/ fissions/cm/sup 3/ average burnup (45% of U-235 for the 50 vol% fuel plate cores), twice the burnup presently allowed in the university reactors. Irradiation performance of the heavy loaded fuel plates has been good at burnups exceeding 2.3 x 10/sup 21/ fissions/cm/sup 3/, with one fuel plate reaching a peak burnup of about 3 x 10/sup 21/ fissions/cm/sup 3/. Three fuel plates failed, however, during the irradiation, and are undergoing destructive analysis. Corrosion pitting occurred in cladding of both UAl/sub 2/ and UAl/sub 3/ fuel plates. Some plates appear to be more resistant to corrosion pitting than others. Localized swelling in high fuel loaded plates also is being investigated as a possible failure mode.

  19. I{sup G}J{sup PC}=1{sup -}1{sup -+} tetraquark states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Huaxing; Hosaka, Atsushi; Zhu Shilin

    2008-09-01

    We study the tetraquark states with I{sup G}J{sup PC}=1{sup -}1{sup -+} in the QCD sum rule. After exhausting all possible flavor structures, we analyze both the Shifman-Vainshtein-Zakharov (SVZ) and finite energy sum rules. Both approaches lead to a mass around 1.6 GeV for the state with the quark contents qqqq, and around 2.0 GeV for the state with the quark contents qsqs. The flavor structure (3 x 6)+(6 x 3) is preferred. Our analysis strongly indicates that both {pi}{sub 1}(1600) and {pi}{sub 1}(2015) are also compatible with the exotic tetraquark interpretation, which are sometimes labeled as candidates of the 1{sup -+} hybrid mesons. Moreover one of their dominant decay modes is a pair of axial-vector and pseudoscalar mesons such as b{sub 1}(1235){pi}, which is sometimes considered as the characteristic decay mode of the hybrid mesons.

  20. Spectroscopy and applications of the 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} electronic state of {sup 39}K{sup 85}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Jayita Rahmlow, David; Carollo, Ryan; Bellos, Michael; Eyler, Edward E.; Gould, Phillip L.; Stwalley, William C.

    2013-11-07

    We report new results on the spectroscopy of the 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} electronic state of {sup 39}K{sup 85}Rb. The observations are based on resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of ultracold KRb molecules starting in vibrational levels v?? = 1823 of the a?{sup 3}?{sup +} state and ionized via the intermediate 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} state. The a-state ultracold molecules are formed by photoassociation of ultracold {sup 39}K and {sup 85}Rb atoms to the 3(0{sup +}) state of KRb followed by spontaneous emission. We discuss the potential applications of this state to future experiments, as a pathway for populating the lowest vibrational levels of the a state as well as the X state.

  1. 2{sup +} excitation of the {sup 12}C Hoyle state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freer, M.; Fujita, H.; Carter, J.; Usman, I.; Buthelezi, Z.; Foertsch, S. V.; Neveling, R.; Perez, S. M.; Smit, F. D.; Fearick, R. W.; Papka, P.; Swartz, J. A.

    2009-10-15

    A high-energy-resolution magnetic spectrometer has been used to measure the {sup 12}C excitation energy spectrum to search for the 2{sup +} excitation of the 7.65 MeV, 0{sup +} Hoyle state. By measuring in the diffractive minimum of the angular distribution for the broad 0{sup +} background, evidence is found for a possible 2{sup +} state at 9.6(1) MeV with a width of 600(100) keV. The implications for the {sup 8}Be+{sup 4}He reaction rate in stellar environments are discussed.

  2. Mn<sup>4+sup> emission in pyrochlore oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Mao-Hua

    2015-01-01

    For the existing Mn<sup>4+sup> activated red phosphors have relatively low emission energies (or long emission wavelengths) and are therefore inefficient for general lighting. Density functional calculations are performed to study Mn<sup>4+sup> emission in rare-earth hafnate, zirconate, and stannate pyrochlore oxides (RE2Hf2O7, RE2Zr2O7, and RE2Sn2O7). We show how the different sizes of the RE<sup>3+sup> cation in these pyrochlores affect the local structure of the distorted MnO6 octahedron, the Mn–O hybridization, and the Mn<sup>4+sup> emission energy. The Mn<sup>4+sup> emission energies of many pyrochlores are found to be higher than those currently known for Mn<sup>4+sup> doped oxides and should be closer to that of Y2O3:Eu<sup>3+sup> (the current commercial red phosphor for fluorescent lighting). The O–Mn–O bond angle distortion in a MnO6 octahedron is shown to play an important role in weakening Mn–O hybridization and consequently increasing the Mn<sup>4+sup> emission energy. Our result shows that searching for materials that allow significant O–Mn–O bond angle distortion in a MnO6 octahedron is an effective approach to find new Mn<sup>4+sup> activated red phosphors with potential to replace the relatively expensive Y2O3:Eu<sup>3+sup> phosphor.

  3. Transmutation of [sup 90]Sr by inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takashita, Hirofumi; Konashi, Kenji )

    1993-11-01

    Transmutation of [sup 90]Sr by inertial confinement fusion is discussed. A pellet composed of deuterium-tritium fuel surrounded by [sup 90]Sr is compressed by a laser or a particle beam. It is shown that a high transmutation rate and a small transmutation energy are obtained because of the highly compressed [sup 90]Sr, which has a large probability of a transmutation reaction. The number of cycles, including recovering and refabrication of the target, is also discussed. 16 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Two-body D sub s sup + decays to. eta. pi. sup + ,. eta. prime. pi. sup + ,. eta. rho. sup + ,. eta. prime. rho. sup + , and. phi. rho. sup +

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daoudi, M.; Ford, W.T.; Johnson, D.R.; Lingel, K.; Lohner, M.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lewis, J.D.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Nandi, S.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; O'Grady, C.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Pisharody, M.; Riley, D.; Sapper, M.; Selen, M.; Worden, H.; Worris, M.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Yelton, J.; Henderson, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Yamamoto, H.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoell

    1992-06-01

    We have made measurements of several {ital D}{sub {ital s}} branching ratios, relative to the {phi}{pi}{sup +} mode. We have observed two previously unseen two-body hadronic decays of the {ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup +}, namely {eta}{rho}{sup +} and {eta}{prime}{rho}{sup +}, and measured relative branching ratios of 2.86{plus minus}0.38{sub {minus}0.38}{sup +0.36} and 3.44{plus minus}0.62{sub {minus}0.46}{sup +0.44}, respectively. We have determined the relative branching ratio for the decay into {phi}{rho}{sup +} to be 1.86{plus minus}0.26{sub {minus}0.40}{sup +0.29}. In addition, we have measured relative branching ratios for the {eta}{pi}{sup +} and {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup +} states, for which there had previously been conflicting measurements; our results are 0.54{plus minus}0.09{plus minus}0.06 and 1.20{plus minus}0.15{plus minus}0.11, respectively. Combining these new measurements with previous results and using (3.7{plus minus}1.2)% for the value of {ital scrB}({ital D}{sub {ital s}}{r arrow}{phi}{pi}{sup +}), we can account for {approx}(79{plus minus}26)% of all {ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup +} decays. In addition we have also measured relative branching ratios or set upper limits on {ital D}{sup +} decays to all of the above-mentioned final states.

  5. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  6. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA); Leggett, Robert D. (Richland, WA); Baker, Ronald B. (Richland, WA)

    1989-01-01

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  7. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Leggett, Robert D.; Baker, Ronald B.

    1989-10-03

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  8. Production of Λ<sup>0sup>, Λ̄<sup>0sup>, Ξ<sup>±>, and Ω<sup>±> hyperons in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell’Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wen, A.; Wester, W. C.; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-07-13

    We report a set of measurements of inclusive invariant pT differential cross sections of Λ<sup>0sup>, Λ̄<sup>0sup>, Ξ<sup>±>, and Ω<sup>±> hyperons reconstructed in the central region with pseudorapidity |η|<1 and pT up to 10 GeV/c. Events are collected with a minimum-bias trigger in pp̄ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Tevatron Collider. As pT increases, the slopes of the differential cross sections of the three particles are similar, which could indicate a universality of the particle production in pT. The invariant differential cross sections are also presented for different charged-particle multiplicity intervals.

  9. Hadron production in e<sup>+e-> annihilation at BABAR, and implication for the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Frank C.

    2015-04-29

    The BABAR collaboration has an extensive program of studying hadronic cross sections in low-energy e<sup>+e-> collisions, accessible via initial-state radiation. Our measurements allow significant improvements in the precision of the predicted value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. These improvements are necessary for illuminating the current 3.6 sigma difference between the predicted and the experimental values. We have published results on a number of processes with two to six hadrons in the final state. We report here the results of recent studies with final states that constitute the main contribution to the hadronic cross section in the energy region between 1 and 3 GeV, as e<sup>+e-> → K<sup>+K->, π<sup>+π->, and e<sup>+e-> → 4 hadrons

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Vehicles Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel

  11. FUEL ELEMENTS FOR THERMAL-FISSION NUCLEAR REACTORS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flint, O.

    1961-01-10

    Fuel elements for thermal-fission nuclear reactors are described. The fuel element is comprised of a core of alumina, a film of a metal of the class consisting of copper, silver, and nickel on the outer face of the core, and a coating of an oxide of a metal isotope of the class consisting of Un/sup 235/, U/ sup 233/, and Pu/sup 239/ on the metal f ilm.

  12. Investigating the Hydrolysis Reactions of a Chemical Warfare Agent Surrogate. A Systematic Study using <sup>1sup>H, <sup>13sup>C, <sup>17sup>O, <sup>19sup>F, <sup>31sup>P, and <sup>35sup>Cl NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, Todd M.; Wilson, Brendan W.

    2015-07-24

    During the summer of 2015, I participated in the DHS HS-STEM fellowship at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL, NM) under the supervision of Dr. Todd M. Alam in his Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy research group. While with the group, my main project involved pursing various hydrolysis reactions with Diethyl Chlorophosphate (DECP), a surrogate for the agent Sarin (GB). Specifically, I performed different hydrolysis reactions, monitored and tracked the different phosphorous containing species using phosphorous (<sup>31sup>P) NMR spectroscopy. With the data collected, I performed kinetics studies mapping the rates of DECP hydrolysis. I also used the NMR of different nuclei such as <sup>1sup>H, <sup>13sup>C, <sup>17sup>O, and <sup>35sup>Cl to help understand the complexity of the reactions that take place. Finally, my last task at SNL was to work with Insensitive Nuclei Enhanced by Polarization Transfer (INEPT) NMR Spectroscopy optimizing conditions for <sup>19sup>F- <sup>31sup>P filtering NMR experiments.

  13. INVESTIGATION ON THE FLAME EXTINCTION LIMIT OF FUEL BLENDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahsan R. Choudhuri

    2005-02-01

    Lean flame extinction limits of binary fuel mixtures of methane (CH{sub 4}), propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}), and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were measured using a twin-flame counter-flow burner. Experiments were conducted to generate an extinction equivalence ratio vs. global stretch rate plot and an extrapolation method was used to calculate the equivalence ratio corresponding to an experimentally unattainable zero-stretch condition. The foregoing gases were selected because they are the primary constitutes of natural gas, which is the primary focus of the present study. To validate the experimental setup and methodology, the flame extinction limit of pure fuels at zero stretch conditions were also estimated and compared with published values. The lean flame extinction limits of methane (f{sub ext} = 4.6%) and propane (f{sub ext} = 2.25%) flames measured in the present study agreed with the values reported in the literature. It was observed that the flame extinction limit of fuel blends have a polynomial relation with the concentration of component fuels in the mixture. This behavior contradicts with the commonly used linear Le Chatelier's approximation. The experimentally determined polynomial relations between the flame extinction limits of fuel blends (i.e. methane-propane and methane-ethane) and methane concentration are as follows: (1) Methane-Propane--%f{sub ext} = (1.05 x 10{sup -9}) f{sup 5}-(1.3644 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(6.40299 x 10{sup -6}) f{sup 3}-(1.2108459 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2}+(2.87305329 x 10{sup -3}) f+2.2483; (2) Methane-Ethane--%f{sub ext} = (2.1 x 10{sup -9})f{sup 5}-(3.5752 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(2.095425 x 10{sup -5}) f{sup 3}-(5.037353 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2} + 6.08980409 f + 2.8923. Where f{sub ext} is the extinction limits of methane-propane and methane-ethane fuel blends, and f is the concentration (% volume) of methane in the fuel mixture. The relations were obtained by fitting fifth order curve (polynomial regression) to experimentally

  14. <sup>137sup> Ba Double Gamma Decay Measurement with GAMMASPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchn, E.; Moran, K.; Lister, C. J.; Chowdhury, P.; McCutchan, E. A.; Greene, J. P.; Zhu, S.; Lauritsen, T.; Carpenter, M. P.; Shearman, R.

    2015-05-28

    The study of the electromagnetic moments (EM), and decay probability, provides detailed information about nuclear wave functions. The well-know properties of EM interactions are good for extracting information about the motion of nucleons. Higher order EM processes always occur, but are usually too weak to be measured. In the case of a 0<sup>+> ? 0<sup>+> transitions, where a single gamma transition is forbidden, the simultaneous emission of two ?-rays has been studied. An interesting opportunity to further investigate 2-photon emission phenomena is by using a standard <sup>137sup>Cs source populating, via ?-decay, the J<sup>?> = 11/2<sup>-> isomeric state at 662 keV in <sup>137sup>Ba. In this case, two photon process can have contributions from quadrupole-quadrupole or dipole-octupole multipolarities in direct competition with the high multipolarity M4 decay. Since the yield of the double gamma decay is around six orders of magnitude less than the first order transition, very good statistics are needed in order to observe the phenomena and great care must be taken to suppress the first-order decay. The Gammasphere array is ideal since its configuration allows a good coverage of the angular distribution and the Compton events can be suppressed. Nevertheless the process to understand and eliminate the Compton background is a challenge. Geant4 simulations were carried out to help understand and correct for those factors.

  15. Cluster Structure of {sup 12}C and {sup 11}Be

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freer, M.; Haigh, P. J.; Ashwood, N. I.; Bloxham, T.; Curtis, N.; McEwan, P.; Fujita, H.; Carter, J.; Usman, I.; Buthelezi, Z.; Foertsch, S. V.; Neveling, R.; Perez, S. M.; Smit, F. D.; Fearick, R. W.; Papka, P.; Swartz, J. A.; Bohlen, H. G.; Dorsch, T.; Kokalova, Tz.

    2009-08-26

    The structure of {sup 12}C is discussed, in particular the spectrum of states above the alpha-decay threshold. A search for the 2{sup +} excitation of the Hoyle-state is reported. The structural link between halo-like states and molecular states is explored in the case of {sup 11}Be.

  16. Lifetime measurements in {sup 63}Co and {sup 65}Co

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dijon, A.; Clement, E.; France, G. de; Van Isacker, P.; Rejmund, M.; Schmitt, C.; Goergen, A.; Obertelli, A.; Korten, W.; Dewald, A.; Hackstein, M.; Pissulla, Th.; Rother, W.; Zell, K. O.; Gadea, A.; Gaudefroy, L.; Mengoni, D.; Recchia, F.; Sahin, E.

    2011-06-15

    Lifetimes of the 9/2{sub 1}{sup -} and 3/2{sub 1}{sup -} states in {sup 63}Co and the 9/2{sub 1}{sup -} state in {sup 65}Co were measured using the recoil distance Doppler shift and the differential decay curve methods. The nuclei were populated by multinucleon transfer reactions in inverse kinematics. {gamma} rays were measured with the EXOGAM Ge array and the recoiling fragments were fully identified using the large-acceptance VAMOS spectrometer. The E2 transition probabilities from the 3/2{sub 1}{sup -} and 9/2{sub 1}{sup -} states to the 7/2{sup -} ground state could be extracted in {sup 63}Co as well as an upper limit for the 9/2{sub 1}{sup -}{yields}7/2{sub 1}{sup -} B(E2) value in {sup 65}Co. The experimental results were compared to large-scale shell-model calculations in the pf and pfg{sub 9/2} model spaces, allowing us to draw conclusions on the single-particle or collective nature of the various states.

  17. Stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of p-process isotopes. II. {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marganiec, J.; Dillmann, I.; Pardo, C. Domingo; Kaeppeler, F.; Walter, S.

    2010-09-15

    The neutron-capture cross sections of {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg have been measured by means of the activation technique. The samples were irradiated in a quasistellar neutron spectrum of kT=25 keV, which was produced at the Karlsruhe 3.7-MV Van de Graaff accelerator via the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction. Systematic uncertainties were investigated in repeated activations with different samples and by variation of the experimental parameters, that is, irradiation times, neutron fluxes, and {gamma}-ray counting conditions. The measured data were converted into Maxwellian-averaged cross sections at kT=30 keV, yielding 1214{+-}61, 624{+-}54, 590{+-}43, 511{+-}46, and 201{+-}11 mb for {sup 168}Yb, {sup 180}W, {sup 184}Os, {sup 190}Pt, and {sup 196}Hg, respectively. The present results either represent first experimental data ({sup 168}Yb, {sup 184}Os, and {sup 196}Hg) or could be determined with significantly reduced uncertainties ({sup 180}W and {sup 190}Pt). These measurements are part of a systematic study of stellar (n,{gamma}) cross sections of the stable p isotopes.

  18. SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding Performance during 4-Point Tubular Bend Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IJ van Rooyen; WR Lloyd; TL Trowbridge; SR Novascone; KM Wendt; SM Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE) established the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to develop technologies and other solutions to improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development Pathway in the LWRS program encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. Recent investigations of potential options for “accident tolerant” nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. One of the proposed SiC-based fuel cladding designs being investigated incorporates a SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) as a structural material supplementing an internal Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) liner tube, referred to as the hybrid clad design. Characterization of the advanced cladding designs will include a number of out-of-pile (nonnuclear) tests, followed by in-pile irradiation testing of the most promising designs. One of the out-of-pile characterization tests provides measurement of the mechanical properties of the cladding tube using four point bend testing. Although the material properties of the different subsystems (materials) will be determined separately, in this paper we present results of 4-point bending tests performed on fully assembled hybrid cladding tube mock-ups, an assembled Zr-4 cladding tube mock-up as a standard and initial testing results on bare SiC-CMC sleeves to assist in defining design parameters. The hybrid mock-up samples incorporated SiC-CMC sleeves fabricated with 7 polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles. To provide comparative information; both 1- and 2-ply braided SiC-CMC sleeves were used in this development study. Preliminary stress simulations were performed using the BISON nuclear fuel performance code to show the stress distribution differences for varying lengths between loading points

  19. Search for the decay modes B<sup>±→h±>τl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Khan, A.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Yushkov, A. N.; Bondioli, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Stoker, D. P.; Atmacan, H.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Vitug, G. M.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; West, C. A.; Eisner, A. M.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Martinez, A. J.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Rakitin, A. Y.; Andreassen, R.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Toki, W. H.; Spaan, B.; Kobel, M. J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Playfer, S.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Munerato, M.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Contri, R.; Guido, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Bhuyan, B.; Prasad, V.; Lee, C. L.; Morii, M.; Edwards, A. J.; Adametz, A.; Marks, J.; Uwer, U.; Lacker, H. M.; Lueck, T.; Dauncey, P. D.; Behera, P. K.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rubin, A. E.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Derkach, D.; Grosdidier, G.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Malaescu, B.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Stocchi, A.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Chavez, C. A.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Gradl, W.; Hafner, A.; Prencipe, E.; Alwyn, K. E.; Bailey, D.; Barlow, R. J.; Jackson, G.; Lafferty, G. D.; Behn, E.; Cenci, R.; Hamilton, B.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Sciolla, G.; Lindemann, D.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Schram, M.; Biassoni, P.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stracka, S.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D. J.; Nguyen, X.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Monorchio, D.; Onorato, G.; Sciacca, C.; Martinelli, M.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; LoSecco, J. M.; Wang, W. F.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Feltresi, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Sitt, S.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Pacetti, S.; Rossi, A.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Anulli, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Li Gioi, L.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Grünberg, O.; Hartmann, T.; Leddig, T.; Schröder, H.; Voss, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Olaiya, E. O.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Aston, D.; Bard, D. J.; Bartoldus, R.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Fulsom, B. G.; Gabareen, A. M.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Lewis, P.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va’vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Benitez, J. F.; Burchat, P. R.; Miyashita, T. S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Lund, P.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Wray, B. C.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Ahmed, H.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Choi, H. H. F.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.

    2012-07-16

    We present a search for the lepton flavor violating decay modes B<sup>±→h±>τl (h=K, π; l=e, μ) using the BABAR data sample, which corresponds to 472×10⁶ BB¯¯¯ pairs. The search uses events where one B meson is fully reconstructed in one of several hadronic final states. Using the momenta of the reconstructed B, h, and l candidates, we are able to fully determine the τ four-momentum. The resulting τ candidate mass is our main discriminant against combinatorial background. We see no evidence for B<sup>±→h±>τl decays and set a 90% confidence level upper limit on each branching fraction at the level of a few times 10⁻⁵.

  20. D sub s sup + decays to. eta. rho. sup + ,. eta. prime. rho. sup + , and. phi. rho. sup +

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Yelton, J.; Henderson, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Yamamoto, H.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Gan, K.K.; Jensen, T.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Lambrecht, M.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Wang, P.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.N.; Dominick, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Shibata, E.I.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kroha, H.; Roberts, S.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.; Artuso, M.; Goldberg, M.; Haupt, T.; Horwitz, N.; Kennett, R.; Moneti, G.C.; Rozen, Y.; Rubin, P.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Thusalidas, M.; Yao, W.; Zhu, G.; Bar

    1992-03-02

    We have observed the previously unseen {eta}{rho}{sup +} and {eta}{prime}{rho}{sup +} decay model of the {ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup +}, and measured branching ratios relative to the {phi}{pi}{sup +} mode of 2.86{plus minus}0.38{sub {minus}0.38}{sup +0.36} and 3.44{plus minus}0.62{sub {minus}0.46}{sup +0.44}, respectively. In addition, the relative branching ratio for the decay into {phi}{rho}{sup +} is measured as 1.86{plus minus}0.26{sub {minus}0.40}{sup +0.29}. Combining these new measurements with previous results and those in the preceding Letter, we account for {approx}(79{plus minus}26)% of {ital D}{sub {ital s}} decays.

  1. SIMS Analyses of Aerodynamic Fallout from a Uranium-Fueled Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, L. A.; Knight, K. B.; Matzel, J. E.; Prussin, S. G.; Ryerson, F. J.; Kinman, W. S.; Zimmer, M. M.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2014-09-09

    Five silicate fallout glass spherules produced in a uranium-fueled, near-surface nuclear test were characterized by secondary ion mass spectrometry, electron probe microanalysis, autoradiography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x ray spectroscopy. Several samples display distinctive compositional heterogeneity suggestive of incomplete mixing, and exhibit heterogeneity in U isotopes with 0.02 <<sup> 235sup>U/> 238sup>U < 11.8 among all five samples and 0.02 < <sup> 235sup>U/> 238sup>U < 7.81 within a single sample. In two samples, the <sup> 235sup>U/> 238sup>U ratio is correlated with major element composition, consistent with the agglomeration of chemically and isotopically distinct molten precursors. Two samples are quasi-homogeneous with respect to composition and uranium isotopic composition, suggesting extensive mixing possibly due longer residence time in the fireball. Correlated variations between <sup> 234sup>U, <sup> 235sup>U, <sup> 236sup>U and <sup> 238sup>U abundances point to mixing of end-members corresponding to uranium derived from the device and natural U (<sup> 238sup>U/> 235sup>U = 0.00725) found in soil.

  2. Structures of {sup 201}Po and {sup 205}Rn from EC/{beta}{sup +}-decay studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deo, A. Y.; Podolyak, Zs.; Walker, P. M.; Farrelly, G.; Gelletly, W.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Agramunt, J.; Estevez, E.; Fraile, L. M.; Al-Dahan, N.; Alkhomashi, N.; Briz, J. A.; Maira, A.; Herlert, A.; Koester, U.; Singla, S.

    2010-02-15

    Several low-lying excited states in {sub 86}{sup 205}Rn{sub 119} and {sub 84}{sup 201}Po{sub 117} were identified for the first time following EC/{beta}{sup +} decay of {sup 205}Fr and {sup 201}At, respectively, using {gamma}-ray and conversion electron spectroscopy at the CERN isotope separator on-line (ISOLDE) facility. The EC/{beta}{sup +} branch from {sup 205}Fr was measured to be 1.5(2)%. The excited states of the daughter nuclei are understood in terms of the odd nucleon coupling to the neighboring even-even core. The neutron single-particle energies of the p{sub 3/2} orbital relative to the f{sub 5/2} ground state in {sup 205}Rn, and the f{sub 5/2} orbital relative to the p{sub 3/2} ground state in {sup 201}Po, were determined to be 31.4(2) and 5.7(3) keV, respectively. We tentatively identify a (13/2){sup +} isomeric level at 657.1(5) keV in {sup 205}Rn. The systematic behavior of the (13/2){sup +} and (3/2){sup -} levels is also discussed.

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Emerging Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Electricity Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on

  10. Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Fuel Oil",,,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspac...

  11. Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Reformer Development Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells Subir Roychoudhury Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI), North Haven, CT Shipboard Fuel Cell Workshop March 29, 2011 ...

  12. Transportation Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuels DOE would invest $52 million to fund a major fleet transformation at Idaho National Laboratory, along with the installation of nine fuel management systems, purchase of additional flex fuel cars and one E85 ethanol fueling station. Transportation projects, such as the acquisition of highly efficient and alternative-fuel vehicles, are not authorized by ESPC legislation. DOE has twice proportion of medium vehicles and three times as many heavy vehicles as compared to the Federal agency

  13. Extended life aluminide fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, L.G.; Beeston, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    As the price of fuel fabrication, shipment of both new and spent fuel, and fuel reprocessing continue to rise at a rapid rate, researchers look for alternate methods to keep reactor fuel costs within their limited funding. Extended fuel element lifetimes, without jeopardizing reactor safety, can reduce fuel costs by up to a factor of two. The Extended Life Aluminide (ELAF) program was started at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as a joint project of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), the University of Missouri, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology research reactors. Fuel plates of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) type construction were fabricated at Atomics International and irradiated in the ATR at the INEL. Four fuel matrix compositions were tested (i.e., 50 vol% UAl/sub x/ cores for reference, and 40, 45 and 50 vol% UAl/sub 2/ cores). The 50 vol% UAl/sub 2/ cores contained up to 3 grams U-235 per cm/sup 3/ of core. Three plates of each composition were irradiated to peak burnup levels of 3 x 10/sup 21/ fission/cm/sup 3/ of core. The only observed damage was due to external corrosion at similar rates experienced by UAl/sub x/ fuel elements in test reactors.

  14. Neutron capture of /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te, /sup 124/Te, /sup 125/Te, and /sup 126/Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macklin, R.L.; Winters, R.R.

    1989-07-01

    Isotopically enriched samples of the tellurium isotopes from mass 122 to mass 126 were used to measure neutron capture in the energy range 2.6 keV to 600 keV at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator pulsed neutron source. Starting at 2.6 keV, over 200 Breit-Wigner resonances for each isotope were used to describe the capture data. Least-squares adjustment gave parameters and their uncertainties for a total of 1659 resonances. Capture cross sections averaged over Maxwellian neutron distributions with temperatures ranging from kT = 5 keV to kT = 100 keV were derived for comparison with stellar nucleosynthesis calculations. For the three isotopes shielded from the astrophysical r-process, /sup 122/Te, /sup 123/Te and /sup 124/Te at kT = 30 keV the respective values were (280 /plus minus/ 10) mb, (819 /plus minus/ 30) mb and (154 /plus minus/ 6) mb. The corresponding products of cross section and solar system abundance are nearly equal in close agreement with s-process nucleosynthesis calculations. 26 refs., 8 figs., 10 tabs.

  15. Fuel cell membranes and crossover prevention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I.; York, Cynthia A.; Waszczuk, Piotr; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2009-08-04

    A membrane electrode assembly for use with a direct organic fuel cell containing a formic acid fuel includes a solid polymer electrolyte having first and second surfaces, an anode on the first surface and a cathode on the second surface and electrically linked to the anode. The solid polymer electrolyte has a thickness t:.gtoreq..times..times..times..times. ##EQU00001## where C.sub.f is the formic acid fuel concentration over the anode, D.sub.f is the effective diffusivity of the fuel in the solid polymer electrolyte, K.sub.f is the equilibrium constant for partition coefficient for the fuel into the solid polymer electrolyte membrane, I is Faraday's constant n.sub.f is the number of electrons released when 1 molecule of the fuel is oxidized, and j.sub.f.sup.c is an empirically determined crossover rate of fuel above which the fuel cell does not operate.

  16. Exploring the influence of transfer channels on fusion reactions: The case of <sup>40sup> Ca + <sup>58,64sup> Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourgin, D.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Goasduff, A.; Stefanini, A. M.; Montagnoli, G.; Montanari, D.; Corradi, L.; Huiming, J.; Scarlassara, F.; Fioretto, E.; Simenel, C.; Rowley, N.; Jiang, C. L.; Szilner, S.; Mijatović, T.

    2015-01-29

    Fusion cross sections have been measured in the <sup>40sup>Ca + <sup>58sup>Ni and <sup>40sup>Ca + <sup>64sup>Ni systems at beam energies ranging from Elab = 104.75 MeV to 153.5 MeV using the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro electrostatic deflector. Distributions of barriers have been extracted from the experimental data. Preliminary coupled channel calculations were performed and hints of effects of neutron transfers on the fusion below the barrier in the <sup>40sup>Ca + <sup>64sup>Ni are discussed.

  17. Full one-loop electroweak corrections to h{sup 0}(H{sup 0},A{sup 0})H{sup {+-}}W{sup {+-}} associated productions at e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Jing; Ma Wengan; Zhang Renyu; Guo Lei; Jiang Yi; Han Liang

    2007-03-01

    We study the complete one-loop electroweak (EW) corrections to the processes of single charged Higgs boson production associated with a neutral Higgs boson (h{sup 0},H{sup 0},A{sup 0}) and a gauge boson W{sup {+-}} in the framework of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). Numerical results at the SPS1a{sup '} benchmark point as proposed in the SPA project, are presented for demonstration. We find that for the process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}h{sup 0}H{sup {+-}}W{sup {+-}} the EW relative correction can be either positive or negative and in the range of -15%{approx}20% in our chosen parameter space. While for the processes e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}H{sup 0}(A{sup 0})H{sup {+-}}W{sup {+-}} the corrections generally reduce the Born cross sections and the EW relative corrections are typically of order -10%{approx}-20%.

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Digg

  19. .sup.82 Sr-.sup.82 Rb Radioisotope generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grant, Patrick M.; Erdal, Bruce R.; O'Brien, Harold A.

    1976-01-01

    An improved .sup.82 Sr-.sup.82 Rb radioisotope generator system, based upon the complexing ion exchange resin Chelex-100, has been developed. Columns of this material can be easily and rapidly milked, and the Rb-Sr separation factor for a fresh generator was found to be > 10.sup.7. Approximately 80 percent of the .sup.82 Rb present was delivered in a 15-ml volume of aqueous 0.2 M NH.sub.4 Cl solution. After more than 6 liters of eluant had been put through the generator, the Rb-Sr separation factor was still observed to be > 10.sup.5, and no unusual strontium breakthrough behavior was seen in the system over nearly three .sup.82 Sr half lives.

  20. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The paper consists of viewgraphs from a conference presentation. A comparison is made of opportunity fuels, defined as fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels. Types of fuels for which some limited technical data is provided include petroleum coke, garbage, wood waste, and tires. Power plant economics and pollution concerns are listed for each fuel, and compared to coal and natural gas power plant costs. A detailed cost breakdown for different plant types is provided for use in base fuel pricing.

  1. METHOD OF PRODUCING U$sup 23$$sup 3$

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1960-08-30

    A method for producing U/sup 233/ is outlined in which a body of thorium carbonate is heated to at least 200 deg C until it attains a constant weight and compressing the body into a pellet having a density of at least 2.6 g/cm/sup 3/. The pellet is enclosed in a sealed container and placed in the blanket of a thermal nuclear reactor having a neutron flux in which the majority of neutrons have an energy of below I Mev. The pellet is removed from the flux before the ratio of U/sup 233/ to Th/sup 232/ is about 1: 100.

  2. Elastic scattering of /sup 16/O by /sup 28/Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shkolnik, V.; Dehnhard, D.; Franey, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Differential cross sections were measured in small angular steps at forward angles for the elastic scattering of /sup 16/O from /sup 28/Si, /sup 29/Si, and /sup 30/Si at E/sub lab/ = 60 MeV and from /sup 28/Si at six other incident energies between 45 and 63 MeV. The angular position of a peak in the diffraction pattern at theta/sub c.m./approx. =75/sup 0/ was measured as a function of the incident energy between 55 and 63 MeV in 0.5 MeV steps. Close fits to these angular distributions and those of other authors at energies between 41 and 81 MeV, some spanning the whole angular range up to 180/sup 0/, and the excitation functions at 90/sup 0/ and 180/sup 0/, were obtained in an optical model analysis. A consistent description of the data was found by the use of a surface-transparent and parity-dependent potential with a real part able to generate a pocket in the total potential. The real and imaginary strengths depend quite strongly and smoothly on the incident energy. This potential shows a transition from surface transparency to strong absorption as E/sub lab/ approaches 81 MeV. The ambiguities in the strengths of the potential are discussed. The broad dispersive potential resonances which are present in several partial waves at every energy are also discussed and their relative importance is examined.

  3. First observation of CP violation in B¯<sup>0sup> → D<sup>(*)>CP h<sup>0sup> decays by a combined time-dependent analysis of BaBar And Belle Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdesselam, A.

    2015-09-16

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of B¯<sup>0sup> → D<sup>(*)CPh>0sup> decays, where the light neutral hadron h<sup>0sup> is a π<sup>0sup>, η, or ω meson, and the neutral D meson is reconstructed in the CP eigenstates K<sup>+K–>, K<sup>0sup>Sπ>0sup>, or K<sup>0sup>Sω. The measurement is performed combining the final data samples collected at the Υ(4S) resonance by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy B factories PEP-II at SLAC and KEKB at KEK, respectively. The data samples contain (471±3)×10<sup>6sup> BB¯ pairs recorded by the BABAR detector and (772±11)×10<sup>6sup> BB¯ pairs recorded by the Belle detector. We measure the CP asymmetry parameters –ηfS=+0.66±0.10(stat)±0.06(syst) and C=–0.02±0.07(stat)±0.03(syst). These results correspond to the first observation of CP violation in B¯<sup>0sup> → D<sup>(*)CPh>0sup> decays. As a result, the hypothesis of no mixing-induced CP violation is excluded in these decays at the level of 5.4 standard deviations.

  4. Combustion and fuel characterization of coal-water fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chow, O.K.; Gralton, G.W.; Lachowicz, Y.V.; Laflesh, R.C.; Levasseur, A.A.; Liljedahl, G.N.

    1989-02-01

    This five-year research project was established to provide sufficient data on coal-water fuel (CWF) chemical, physical, and combustion properties to assess the potential for commercial firing in furnaces designed for gas or oil firing. Extensive laboratory testing was performed at bench-scale, pilot-scale (4 {times} 10{sup 6}Btu/hr) and commercial-scale (25 {times} 10{sup 6} to 50 {times} 10{sup 6}Btu/hr) on a cross-section of CWFs. Fuel performance characteristics were assessed with respect to coal properties, level of coal beneficiation, and slurry formulation. The performance of four generic burner designs was also assessed. Boiler performance design models were applied to analyze the impacts associated with conversion of seven different generic unit designs to CWF firing. Equipment modifications, operating limitations, and retrofit costs were determined for each design when utilizing several CWFs. Unit performance analyses showed significantly better load capacity for utility and industrial boilers as the CWF feed coal ash content is reduced to 5% or 2.6%. In general, utility units had more attractive capacity limits and retrofit costs than the industrial boilers and process heaters studied. Economic analyses indicated that conversion to CWF firing generally becomes feasible when differential fuel costs are above $1.00/10{sup 6}Btu. 60 figs., 24 tabs.

  5. Synthetic Fuel

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

    2010-01-08

    Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

  6. Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department is investing in groundbreaking research that will make cars weigh less, drive further and consume less fuel.

  7. Transfer mechanism in /sup 16/O+/sup 24/Mg and /sup 20/Ne+/sup 24/Mg elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NING Ping-Zhi; GAO Cheng-Qun; HE Guo-Zhu

    1985-10-01

    The mechanism of transferring a cluster of nucleons between two colliding nuclei is considered to explain the backward angle oscillatory rise in the differential cross section of the elastic scattering between certain nuclei, such as /sup 16/O+/sup 24/Mg or /sup 20/Ne+/sup 24/Mg. The nuclear molecular orbit approximation theory is applied. For one-step transfer, if the parameter involved is assumed to be adjustable, the numerical calculations can be made to fit the experimental results naturally.

  8. Mutual neutralization of atomic rare-gas cations (Ne{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, Kr{sup +}, Xe{sup +}) with atomic halide anions (Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, I{sup −})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuman, Nicholas S.; Miller, Thomas M.; Viggiano, Albert A.; Johnsen, Rainer

    2014-01-28

    We report thermal rate coefficients for 12 reactions of rare gas cations (Ne{sup +}, Ar{sup +}, Kr{sup +}, Xe{sup +}) with halide anions (Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, I{sup −}), comprising both mutual neutralization (MN) and transfer ionization. No rate coefficients have been previously reported for these reactions; however, the development of the Variable Electron and Neutral Density Attachment Mass Spectrometry technique makes it possible to measure the difference of the rate coefficients for pairs of parallel reactions in a Flowing Afterglow-Langmuir Probe apparatus. Measurements of 18 such combinations of competing reaction pairs yield an over-determined data set from which a consistent set of rate coefficients of the 12 MN reactions can be deduced. Unlike rate coefficients of MN reactions involving at least one polyatomic ion, which vary by at most a factor of ∼3, those of the atom-atom reactions vary by at least a factor 60 depending on the species. It is found that the rate coefficients involving light rare-gas ions are larger than those for the heavier rare-gas ions, but the opposite trend is observed in the progression from Cl{sup −} to I{sup −}. The largest rate coefficient is 6.5 × 10{sup −8} cm{sup 3} s{sup −1} for Ne{sup +} with I{sup −}. Rate coefficients for Ar{sup +}, Kr{sup +}, and Xe{sup +} reacting with Br{sub 2}{sup −} are also reported.

  9. Coherent π<sup>0sup> photoproduction at intermediate energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J. H.; Moniz, Ernest J.

    1983-02-01

    Coherent π<sup>0sup> photoproduction from nuclei is calculated in the Δ-hole framework. Important background production terms are included, and a comparison with data is presented. Sensitivity to various aspects of the dynamics, such as recoil and the Δ spreading potential, are examined.

  10. Measurement of the Helicity Difference in γ<sup>→sup>p<sup>→sup>→pπ+π-> with the CLAS Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Sungkyun

    2010-08-05

    The study of the properties of baryon resonances can provide us with hints to help us understand the structure of non-perturbative QCD and the effect of a particular resonance on polarization observables. The investigation of double-pion photoproduction data is needed to discover higher-lying states and their properties at and above W [approximate] 1.8 GeV. Therefore, the analysis of the helicity difference in gp γp→pπ<sup>+π>- sup> will help us in our understanding of QCD.The CLAS g9a (FROST) experiment, as part of the N* spectroscopy program at Jefferson Laboratory, has accumulated photoproduction data using linearly and circularly polarized photons incident on a longitudinally-polarized butanol target in the photon energy range 0.3 to 2.4 GeV. The FROST experiment provides an important step toward a “complete” experiment for the reaction gammaN-->KY.In this contribution, the method to calculate the helicity difference for the reaction γp→pπ<sup>+π>- sup>will be described and preliminary results will be discussed.

  11. Photoproduction of the D{sup *+ -}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, Paul Ralph

    1980-01-01

    Using the broad band beam at FNAL, the photoproduction of the D{sup *+} (and D{sup *-}) meson was observed, where D{sup *+} -> D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} and D{sup 0} -> K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} (143 +- 20 events) or D{sup 0} -> K{sub s}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} (35 +- 11 events). The observation exploited the small D{sup *+} - D{sup 0} mass difference to reduce the combinatoric background by 3 orders of magnitude. A variety of analysis techniques are presented to demonstrate that the D{sup *+} is created by a diffractive pair production mechanism, with a cross section given by {sigma}({gamma} + N -> D{sup 0}) = 160 +- 70 nb/nucleon. Finally the data is discussed in terms of a QCD production mechanism, photon gluon fusion, and certain parameters are fixed in the theory by using the D* P{sub t} distribution.

  12. D sub s sup + decays to. eta. pi. sup + and. eta. prime. pi. sup +

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, J.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser, B.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lewis, J.D.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Nandi, S.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; O'Grady, C.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Pisharody, M.; Riley, D.; Sapper, M.; Selen, M.; Worden, H.; Worris, M.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Rodriguez, J.; Yelton, J.; Henderson, S.; Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Yamamoto, H.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Gan, K.K.; Jensen, T.; Kagan, H.; Kas

    1992-03-02

    Using the CLEO II detector, we have accurately measured {ital D}{sub {ital s}} decay branching ratios relative to the {phi}{pi}{sup +} mode for the {eta}{pi}{sup +} and {eta}{prime}{pi}{sup +} states, for which there are conflicting claims; our results are 0.54{plus minus}0.09{plus minus}0.06 and 1.20{plus minus}0.15{plus minus}0.11, respectively.

  13. Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selby, H.D.; Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C.

    2010-12-15

    We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for {sup 99}Mo, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 140}Ba, {sup 141,143}Ce, and {sup 147}Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the {sup 147}Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by {approx}5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried

  14. Measurements of production cross sections of <sup>10sup>Be and <sup>26sup>Al by 120 GeV and 392 MeV proton bombardment of <sup>89sup>Y, <sup>159sup>Tb, and <sup>nat>Cu targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekimoto, S.; Okumura, S.; Yashima, H.; Matsushi, Y.; Matsuzaki, H.; Matsumura, H.; Toyoda, A.; Oishi, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kasugai, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Nakashima, H.; Boehnlein, D.; Coleman, R.; Lauten, G.; Leveling, A.; Mokhov, N.; Ramberg, E.; Soha, A.; Vaziri, K.; Ninomiya, K.; Omoto, T.; Shima, T.; Takahashi, N.; Shinohara, A.; Caffee, M. W.; Welten, K. C.; Nishiizumi, K.; Shibata, S.; Ohtsuki, T.

    2015-08-12

    The production cross sections of <sup>10sup>Be and <sup>26sup>Al were measured by accelerator mass spectrometry using <sup>89sup>Y, <sup>159sup>Tb, and natCu targets bombarded by protons with energies Ep of 120 GeV and 392 MeV. The production cross sections obtained for <sup>10sup>Be and <sup>26sup>Al were compared with those previously reported using Ep = 50 MeV–24 GeV and various targets. It was found that the production cross sections of <sup>10sup>Be monotonically increased with increasing target mass number when the proton energy was greater than a few GeV. On the other hand, it was also found that the production cross sections of <sup>10sup>Be decreased as the target mass number increased from that of carbon to those near the mass numbers of nickel and zinc when the proton energy was below approximately 1 GeV. They also increased as the target mass number increased from near those of nickel and zinc to that of bismuth, in the same proton energy range. Similar results were observed in the production cross sections of <sup>26sup>Al, though the absolute values were quite different between <sup>10sup>Be and <sup>26sup>Al. As a result, the difference between these production cross sections may depend on the impact parameter (nuclear radius) and/or the target nucleus stiffness.

  15. Barrier Distribution of Quasi-elastic Backward Scattering of {sup 48}Ti, {sup 54}Cr, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 64}Ni, {sup 70}Zn and {sup 86}Kr on {sup 208}Pb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitsuoka, S.; Ikezoe, H.; Nishio, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Jeong, S. C.

    2009-03-04

    In order to study the nucleus-nucleus interaction in Pb-based cold fusion, we have measured excitation functions for quasi-elastic scattering of {sup 48}Ti, {sup 54}Cr, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 64}Ni, {sup 70}Zn and {sup 86}Kr projectiles on {sup 208}Pb target at backward angles. The barrier distributions were derived from the first derivative of measured quasi-elastic scattering cross sections relative to the Rutherford scattering cross section. The centroids of the barrier distributions show a deviation from several predicted barrier heights toward the low energy side. The shape of the barrier distributions is well reproduced by the results of a coupled-channel calculation taking account of the coupling effects of two phonon excitations of the quadrupole vibration for the projectiles and of the octupole vibration for the {sup 208}Pb target.

  16. NMR shielding and spin–rotation constants of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demissie, Taye B.

    2015-12-31

    This presentation demonstrates the relativistic effects on the spin-rotation constants, absolute nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) shielding constants and shielding spans of {sup 175}LuX (X = {sup 19}F, {sup 35}Cl, {sup 79}Br, {sup 127}I) molecules. The results are obtained from calculations performed using density functional theory (non-relativistic and four-component relativistic) and coupled-cluster calculations. The spin-rotation constants are compared with available experimental values. In most of the molecules studied, relativistic effects make an order of magnitude difference on the NMR absolute shielding constants.

  17. R-matrix description of particle energy spectra produced by low-energy <sup>3sup>H + <sup>3sup>H reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brune, C. R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Sayre, D. B.; Bacher, A. D.; Hale, G. M.; Paris, M. W.

    2015-07-20

    An R-matrix model for three-body final states is presented and applied to a recent measurement of the neutron energy spectrum from the <sup>3sup>H + <sup>3sup>H→ 2n + α reaction. The calculation includes the n alpha and n n interactions in the final state, angular momentum conservation, antisymmetrization, and the interference between different channels. A good fit to the measured spectrum is obtained, where clear evidence for the <sup>5sup>He ground state is observed. The model is also used to predict the alpha-particle spectrum from <sup>3sup>H + <sup>3sup>H as well as particle spectra from <sup>3sup>He + <sup>3sup>He. The R-matrix approach presented here is very general, and can be adapted to a wide variety of problems with three-body final states.

  18. An Empirical Method for Determining <sup>234sup>U Percentage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miko, David K.

    2015-11-02

    When isotopic information for uranium is provided, the concentration of <sup>234sup>U is frequently neglected. Often the isotopic content is given as a percentage of <sup>235sup>U with the assumption that the remainder consists of <sup>238sup>U. In certain applications, such as heat output, the concentration of <sup>234sup>U can be a significant contributing factor. For situations where only the <sup>235sup>U and <sup>238sup>U values are given, a simple way to calculate the <sup>234sup>U component would be beneficial. The approach taken here is empirical. A series of uranium standards with varying enrichments were analyzed. The <sup>234sup>U and <sup>235sup>U data were fit using a second order polynomial.

  19. <sup>135sup>Cs/>137sup>Cs isotopic composition of environmental samples across Europe: Environmental transport and source term emission applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.

    2015-11-02

    <sup>135sup>Cs/>137sup>Cs isotopic analyses represent an important tool for studying the fate and transport of radiocesium in the environment; in this work the <sup>135sup>Cs/>137sup>Cs isotopic composition in environmental samples taken from across Europe is reported. Surface soil and vegetation samples from western Russia, Ukraine, Austria, and Hungary show consistent aged thermal fission product <sup>135sup>Cs/>137sup>Cs isotope ratios of 0.58 ± 0.01 (age corrected to 1/1/15), with the exception of one sample of soil-moss from Hungary which shows an elevated <sup>135sup>Cs/>137sup>Cs ratio of 1.78 ± 0.12. With the exception of the outlier sample from Hungary, surface soil/vegetation data are in quantitative agreement with values previously reported for soils within the Chernobyl exclusion zone, suggesting that radiocesium at these locations is primarily composed of homogenous airborne deposition from Chernobyl. Seawater samples taken from the Irish Sea show <sup>135sup>Cs/>137sup>Cs isotope ratios of 1.22 ± 0.11 (age corrected to 1/1/15), suggesting aged thermal fission product Cs discharged from Sellafield. Furthermore, the differences in <sup>135sup>Cs/>137sup>Cs isotope ratios between Sellafield, Chernobyl, and global nuclear weapons testing fallout indicate that <sup>135sup>Cs/>137sup>Cs isotope ratios can be utilized to discriminate between and track radiocesium transport from different nuclear production source terms, including major emission sources in Europe.

  20. Decay Heat Calculations for PWR and BWR Assemblies Fueled with Uranium and Plutonium Mixed Oxide Fuel using SCALE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ade, Brian J; Gauld, Ian C

    2011-10-01

    In currently operating commercial nuclear power plants (NPP), there are two main types of nuclear fuel, low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, and mixed-oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX) fuel. The LEU fuel is made of pure uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2} or UOX) and has been the fuel of choice in commercial light water reactors (LWRs) for a number of years. Naturally occurring uranium contains a mixture of different uranium isotopes, primarily, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U. {sup 235}U is a fissile isotope, and will readily undergo a fission reaction upon interaction with a thermal neutron. {sup 235}U has an isotopic concentration of 0.71% in naturally occurring uranium. For most reactors to maintain a fission chain reaction, the natural isotopic concentration of {sup 235}U must be increased (enriched) to a level greater than 0.71%. Modern nuclear reactor fuel assemblies contain a number of fuel pins potentially having different {sup 235}U enrichments varying from {approx}2.0% to {approx}5% enriched in {sup 235}U. Currently in the United States (US), all commercial nuclear power plants use UO{sub 2} fuel. In the rest of the world, UO{sub 2} fuel is still commonly used, but MOX fuel is also used in a number of reactors. MOX fuel contains a mixture of both UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}. Because the plutonium provides the fissile content of the fuel, the uranium used in MOX is either natural or depleted uranium. PuO{sub 2} is added to effectively replace the fissile content of {sup 235}U so that the level of fissile content is sufficiently high to maintain the chain reaction in an LWR. Both reactor-grade and weapons-grade plutonium contains a number of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes, with the fraction of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes being dependent on the source of the plutonium. While only RG plutonium is currently used in MOX, there is the possibility that WG plutonium from dismantled weapons will be used to make MOX for use in US reactors. Reactor-grade plutonium

  1. Unusual decay modes of D sup 0 and D sup + mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Haas, P.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Jensen, T.; Johnson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.N.; Dominick, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Ng, C.R.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Battle, M.; Kroha, H.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Li, W.C.; Nemati, B.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Goldberg, M.; Haupt, T.; Horwitz, N.; Jain, V.; Kennett, R.; Mestayer, M.D.; Moneti, G.C.; Rozen, Y.; Rubin, P.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Thusalidas, M.; Yao, W.; Zhu, G.; Barnes, A.V.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Letson, T.; Alexander, J.; Artuso, M.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Geiser,

    1991-12-01

    CLEO has measured decay modes of the {ital D}{sup 0} and {ital D}{sup +} into final states consisting of {ital K}{sup {plus minus}}'s, {pi}{sup {plus minus}}'s, {ital K}{sup 0}'s and {ital {bar K}}{sup 0}'s, using data taken with the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. We report new results on the decays of {ital D}{sup 0}'s into 4{pi}{sup {plus minus}},{ital K}{sup {minus}}{ital K+}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +},{ital {bar K}}{sup 0}{ital K+}{ital K{minus}},{ital {bar K}}{sup 0} {ital K+}{pi}{sup {minus}},{ital K}{sup 0}{ital K{minus}}{pi}{sup +},3{ital K}{sub {ital S}}{sup 0} and {ital {bar K}}{sup 0}{phi} together with some of their resonant substructure. We also present the first observation of the decay {ital D}{sup +}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}}{sup 0}{ital {bar K}0}{ital K+} and give limits on the doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the {ital D}{sup 0} into {ital K}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} and {ital K}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}.

  2. Method of locating a leaking fuel element in a fast breeder power reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honekamp, John R.; Fryer, Richard M.

    1978-01-01

    Leaking fuel elements in a fast reactor are identified by measuring the ratio of .sup.134 Xe to .sup.133 Xe in the reactor cover gas following detection of a fuel element leak, this ratio being indicative of the power and burnup of the failed fuel element. This procedure can be used to identify leaking fuel elements in a power breeder reactor while continuing operation of the reactor since the ratio measured is that of the gases stored in the plenum of the failed fuel element. Thus, use of a cleanup system for the cover gas makes it possible to identify sequentially a multiplicity of leaking fuel elements without shutting the reactor down.

  3. Fuels Technologies

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Displacement of petroleum n Approach n Example Project Accomplishments n Research Directions Fuels Technologies R&D Budget by Activities Major Activities FY 2007 ...

  4. Comparative efficacy of <sup>177sup>Lu and <sup>90sup>Y for Anti-CD20 Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Murine Lymphoma Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, Sofia H. L.; Frayo, Shani L.; Miller, Brian W.; Orozco, Johnnie J.; Booth, Garrett C.; Hylarides, Mark D.; Lin, Yukang; Green, Damian J.; Gopal, Ajay K.; Pagel, John M.; Bck, Tom A.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Press, Oliver W.; Afrin, Farhat

    2015-03-18

    Purpose Pretargeted radioimmunotherapy (PRIT) is a multi-step method of selectively delivering high doses of radiotherapy to tumor cells while minimizing exposure to surrounding tissues. Yttrium-90 (<sup>90sup>Y) and lutetium-177 (<sup>177sup>Lu) are two of the most promising beta-particle emitting radionuclides used for radioimmunotherapy, which despite having similar chemistries differ distinctly in terms of radiophysical features. These differences may have important consequences for the absorbed dose to tumors and normal organs. Whereas <sup>90sup>Y has been successfully applied in a number of preclinical and clinical radioimmunotherapy settings, there have been few published pretargeting studies with <sup>177sup>Lu. We therefore compared the therapeutic potential of targeting either <sup>90sup>Y or <sup>177sup>Lu to human B-cell lymphoma xenografts in mice. Methods Parallel experiments evaluating the biodistribution, imaging, dosimetry, therapeutic efficacy, and toxicity were performed in female athymic nude mice bearing either Ramos (Burkitt lymphoma) or Granta (mantle cell lymphoma) xenografts, utilizing an anti-CD20 antibodystreptavidin conjugate (1F5-SA) and an <sup>90sup>Y- or <sup>177sup>Lu-labeled 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-biotin second step reagent. Results The two radionuclides displayed comparable biodistributions in tumors and normal organs; however, the absorbed radiation dose delivered to tumor was more than twice as high for <sup>90sup>Y (1.3 Gy/MBq) as for <sup>177sup>Lu (0.6 Gy/MBq). More importantly, therapy with <sup>90sup>Y-DOTAbiotin was dramatically more effective than with <sup>177sup>Lu-DOTA-biotin, with 100% of Ramos xenograft-bearing mice cured with 37 MBq <sup>90sup>Y, whereas 0% were cured using identical amounts of <sup>177sup>Lu-DOTA-biotin. Similar results were observed in mice bearing Granta xenografts, with 80% of the mice cured with <sup>90sup>Y-PRIT and 0

  5. Synthesis and characterization of lanthanum phosphate nanoparticles as carriers for <sup>223sup>Ra and <sup>225sup>Ra for targeted alpha therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rojas, J. V.; Woodward, J. D.; Chen, N.; Rondinone, A. J.; Castano, C. H.; Mirzadeh, S.

    2015-03-19

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) has the potential for killing specific tumor cells with minimum collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissue. Radionuclides such as <sup>223sup>Ra, <sup>225sup>Ra, and <sup>225sup>Ac are of special interest for radiotherapeutic applications as they emit multiple -particles during their decay. Utilizing appropriate carriers capable of retaining both the parent radioisotope as well as daughter products is important for the effective delivery of the radioisotope to the tumor site while mitigating global in vivo radiotoxicity. Methods. In this work, core and core+2 shells (NPs with 2 additional layers of cold LaPO4 deposited on the core surfaces) LaPO4 nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized containing either <sup>223sup>Ra or <sup>225sup>Ra/>225sup>Ac and the retention of the parents and daughters within the NPs in vitro was investigated. Results. The NPs crystallized in rhabdophane phase with mean diameters of 3.4 and 6.3 nm for core and core+2 shells, respectively. The core LaPO 4 NPs retained up to 88% of <sup>223sup>Ra over 35 days. However, in the core+2 shell NPs, the retention of <sup>223sup>Ra and its daughter, <sup>211sup>Pb, was improved to > 99.9% over 27 days. Additionally, the retention of <sup>225sup>Ra/>225sup>Ac parents was > 99.98% and ~80% for the <sup>221sup>Fr and<sup> 213sup>Bi daughters over 35 days for the core+2 shell NPs. Conclusions. These results suggest that LaPO4 NPs are potentially effective carriers of radium isotopes.

  6. Fuel Model | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuels Model This model informs analyses of the availability of transportation fuel in the event the fuel supply chain is disrupted. The portion of the fuel supply system...

  7. Modeling of polymer electrolyte fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, R.; Ahluwalia, R.; Geyer, H.K.; Krumpelt, M.

    1993-09-01

    Propulsion systems based on the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) are being developed. This paper reports an analysis undertaken to design improved PEFC systems. A reference system design with some variants were set up for a methanol-fueled PEFC propulsion system. Efficiency improves from 38.4 to 44.1% as cell current density goes from 0.75 to 0.45 A/cm{sup 2}, while fuel cell efficiency increases from 52.6 to 60.0%; to get a net power output of 80 kWe, the active fuel cell area must increase from 18.8 to 27.3 m{sup 2}. Three parametric studies were conducted on the off-design performance of the reference system.

  8. Microheterogeneous Thoria-Urania Fuels for Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shwageraus, Eugene; Zhao Xianfeng; Driscoll, Michael J.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kazimi, Mujid S.; Herring, J. Stephen

    2004-07-15

    A thorium-based fuel cycle for light water reactors will reduce the plutonium generation rate and enhance the proliferation resistance of the spent fuel. However, priming the thorium cycle with {sup 235}U is necessary, and the {sup 235}U fraction in the uranium must be limited to below 20% to minimize proliferation concerns. Thus, a once-through thorium-uranium dioxide (ThO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2}) fuel cycle of no less than 25% uranium becomes necessary for normal pressurized water reactor (PWR) operating cycle lengths. Spatial separation of the uranium and thorium parts of the fuel can improve the achievable burnup of the thorium-uranium fuel designs through more effective breeding of {sup 233}U from the {sup 232}Th. Focus is on microheterogeneous fuel designs for PWRs, where the spatial separation of the uranium and thorium is on the order of a few millimetres to a few centimetres, including duplex pellet, axially microheterogeneous fuel, and a checkerboard of uranium and thorium pins. A special effort was made to understand the underlying reactor physics mechanisms responsible for enhancing the achievable burnup at spatial separation of the two fuels. The neutron spectral shift was identified as the primary reason for the enhancement of burnup capabilities. Mutual resonance shielding of uranium and thorium is also a factor; however, it is small in magnitude. It is shown that the microheterogeneous fuel can achieve higher burnups, by up to 15%, than the reference all-uranium fuel. However, denaturing of the {sup 233}U in the thorium portion of the fuel with small amounts of uranium significantly impairs this enhancement. The denaturing is also necessary to meet conventional PWR thermal limits by improving the power share of the thorium region at the beginning of fuel irradiation. Meeting thermal-hydraulic design requirements by some of the microheterogeneous fuels while still meeting or exceeding the burnup of the all-uranium case is shown to be potentially feasible

  9. Self-humidified proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Operation of larger cells and fuel cell stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhar, H.P.; Lee, J.H.; Lewinski, K.A.

    1996-12-31

    The PEM fuel cell is promising as the power source for use in mobile and stationary applications primarily because of its high power density, all solid components, and simplicity of operation. For wide acceptability of this power source, its cost has to be competitive with the presently available energy sources. The fuel cell requires continuous humidification during operation as a power source. The humidification unit however, increases fuel cell volume, weight, and therefore decreases its overall power density. Great advantages in terms of further fuel cell simplification can be achieved if the humidification process can be eliminated or minimized. In addition, cost reductions are associated with the case of manufacturing and operation. At BCS Technology we have developed a technology of self-humidified operation of PEM fuel cells based on the mass balance of the reactants and products and the ability of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) to retain water necessary for humidification under the cell operating conditions. The reactants enter the fuel cell chambers without carrying any form of water, whether in liquid or vapor form. Basic principles of self-humidified operation of fuel cells as practiced by BCS Technology, Inc. have been presented previously in literature. Here, we report the operation of larger self-humidified single cells and fuel cell stacks. Fuel cells of areas Up to 100 cm{sup 2} have been operated. We also show the self-humidified operation of fuel cell stacks of 50 and 100 cm{sup 2} electrode areas.

  10. Alternate-fuel reactor studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, K. Jr.; Ehst, D.A.; Gohar, Y.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Turner, L.R.

    1983-02-01

    A number of studies related to improvements and/or greater understanding of alternate-fueled reactors is presented. These studies cover the areas of non-Maxwellian distributions, materials and lifetime analysis, a /sup 3/He-breeding blanket, tritium-rich startup effects, high field magnet support, and reactor operation spanning the range from full D-T operation to operation with no tritium breeding.

  11. Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells Presented at the DOE-DOD Shipboard APU Workshop on March 29, 2011. apu2011_6_roychoudhury.pdf (4.83 MB) More Documents & Publications System Design - Lessons Learned, Generic Concepts, Characteristics & Impacts Fuel Cells For Transportation - 1999 Annual Progress Report Energy Conversion Team Fuel Cell Systems Annual Progress Report

  12. ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"per Building (gallons)","per Square Foot...

  13. ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities, 1999" ,"Fuel Oil Consumption",,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures" ,"per Building (gallons)","per Square Foot (gallons)","per Worker...

  14. (Evaluations of neutron reactions with sup 52 Cr, sup 56 Fe, sup 58 Ni)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, C.Y.

    1990-12-21

    The traveler organized and chaired the meeting of the NEANDC/NEACRP Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation Subgroup-I: Intercomparison of USA, European, and Japanese Evaluations for {sup 52}Cr, {sup 56}Fe, and {sup 58}Ni, held on December 3, 1990, at the NEA Data Bank in Saclay, France. The traveler held discussions with Subgroup-II members to keep track of the activities of this group in which the traveler is a member. Highlights and/or recommendations of these meetings, as well as observations of the EAF, EFF, and JEF meetings, are included in this report.

  15. Fuel injector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambeth, Malcolm David Dick

    2001-02-27

    A fuel injector comprises first and second housing parts, the first housing part being located within a bore or recess formed in the second housing part, the housing parts defining therebetween an inlet chamber, a delivery chamber axially spaced from the inlet chamber, and a filtration flow path interconnecting the inlet and delivery chambers to remove particulate contaminants from the flow of fuel therebetween.

  16. Proton form factor ratio, μpGE<sup>P/GMP> from double spin asymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habarakada Liyanage, Anusha Pushpakumari

    2013-08-01

    The form factors are fundamental properties of the nucleon representing the effect of its structure on its response to electromagnetic probes such as electrons. They are functions of the four-momentum transfer squared Q<sup>2sup> between the electron and the proton. This thesis reports the results of a new measurement of the ratio of the electric and magnetic form factors of the proton up to Q<sup>2sup> = 5.66 (GeV/c)<sup>2sup> using the double spin asymmetry with a polarized beam and target. Experiment E07-003 (SANE, Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment) was carried out in Hall C at Jefferson Lab in 2009 to study the proton spin structure functions with a dynamically polarized ammonia target and longitudinally polarized electron beam. By detecting elastically scattered protons in the High-Momentum Spectrometer (HMS) in coincidence with the electrons in the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), elastic measurements were carried out in parallel. The elastic double spin asymmetry allows one to extract the proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio G<sup>psup>E/G<sup>p>M at high-momentum transfer, Q<sup>2sup>= 5.66 (GeV/c)<sup>2sup>. In addition to the coincidence data, inclusively scattered electrons from the polarized ammonia target were detected by HMS, which allows to measure the beam-target asymmetry in the elastic region with the target spin nearly perpendicular to the momentum transfer, and to extract G<sup>psup>E/G<sup>p>M at low Q<sup>2sup>= 2.06 (GeV/c)<sup>2sup>. This alternative measurement of G<sup>psup>E/G<sup>p>M has verified and confirmed the dramatic discrepancy at high Q<sup>2sup> between the Rosenbluth and the recoil-polarization-transfer iv method with a different measurement technique and systematic uncertainties uncorrelated to those of the recoil-polarization measurements. The measurement of the form factor ratio at Q<sup>2sup> = 2

  17. Nuclear fuel particles and method of making nuclear fuel compacts therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVelasco, Rubin I.; Adams, Charles C.

    1991-01-01

    Methods for making nuclear fuel compacts exhibiting low heavy metal contamination and fewer defective coatings following compact fabrication from a mixture of hardenable binder, such as petroleum pitch, and nuclear fuel particles having multiple layer fission-product-retentive coatings, with the dense outermost layer of the fission-product-retentive coating being surrounded by a protective overcoating, e.g., pyrocarbon having a density between about 1 and 1.3 g/cm.sup.3. Such particles can be pre-compacted in molds under relatively high pressures and then combined with a fluid binder which is ultimately carbonized to produce carbonaceous nuclear fuel compacts having relatively high fuel loadings.

  18. LINE LISTS FOR THE A {sup 2}Π-X {sup 2}Σ{sup +} (RED) AND B {sup 2}Σ{sup +}-X {sup 2}Σ{sup +} (VIOLET) SYSTEMS OF CN, {sup 13}C{sup 14}N, AND {sup 12}C{sup 15}N, AND APPLICATION TO ASTRONOMICAL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sneden, Christopher; Lucatello, Sara; Ram, Ram S.; Brooke, James S. A.; Bernath, Peter E-mail: sara.lucatello@oapd.inaf.it E-mail: jsabrooke@gmail.com

    2014-10-01

    New red and violet system line lists for the CN isotopologues {sup 13}C{sup 14}N and {sup 12}C{sup 15}N have been generated. These new transition data are combined with those previously derived for {sup 12}C{sup 14}N, and applied to the determination of CNO abundances in the solar photosphere and in four red giant stars: Arcturus, the bright, very low-metallicity star HD 122563, and the carbon-enhanced metal-poor stars HD 196944 and HD 201626. When both red and violet system lines are detectable in a star, their derived N abundances are in good agreement. The mean N abundances determined in this work are also generally in accord with published values.

  19. Method of removing Pu(IV) polymer from nuclear fuel reclaiming liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallent, Othar K.; Mailen, James C.; Bell, Jimmy T.; Arwood, Phillip C.

    1982-01-01

    A Pu(IV) polymer not extractable from a nuclear fuel reclaiming solution by conventional processes is electrolytically converted to Pu.sup.3+ and PuO.sub.2.sup.2+ ions which are subsequently converted to Pu.sup.4+ ions extractable by the conventional processes.

  20. First Observations of Nonhydrodynamic Mix at the Fuel-Shell Interface in Shock-Driven Inertial Confinement Implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Li, C. K.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Amendt, P.; Delettrez, J.; Bellei, C.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Betti, R.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Landen, O.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Wilks, S.; Greenwood, A.; Nikroo, A.

    2014-04-01

    A strong nonhydrodynamic mechanism generating atomic fuel-shell mix has been observed in strongly shocked inertial confinement fusion implosions of thin deuterated-plastic shells filled with <sup>3sup>He gas. These implosions were found to produce D<sup>3sup>He-proton shock yields comparable to implosions of identical shells filled with a hydroequivalent 50:50 D<sup>3sup>He gas mixture. Standard hydrodynamic mixing cannot explain this observation, as hydrodynamic modeling including mix predicts a yield an order of magnitude lower than was observed. Instead, these results can be attributed to ion diffusive mix at the fuel-shell interface.

  1. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  2. Fuel Cells and Renewable Gaseous Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3-C: Renewable Gaseous FuelsFuel Cells and Renewable Gaseous FuelsSarah Studer, ORISE Fellow—Fuel Cell Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy

  3. <sup>3sup>He Alternatives Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, Robert Dennis

    2015-11-01

    Most of the <sup>3sup>He consumed by neutron-based safeguards assay systems is used in neutron coincidence and neutron multiplicity counting systems. Detection methods for the limited number of total neutron counting applications are not considered in this report, but it is believed that the boron-lined tubes [1, 2] already developed for portal monitoring applications will serve as a suitable replacement for those measurements. In this report, we discuss the potential replacement technologies that are most suitable for use in safeguards applications.

  4. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  5. Collectivity in {sup 41}S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z. M.; Chapman, R.; Liang, X.; Burns, M.; Hodsdon, A.; Keyes, K.; Kumar, V.; Papenberg, A.; Smith, J. F.; Spohr, K. M.; Haas, F.; Curien, D.; Azaiez, F.; Ibrahim, F.; Verney, D.; Behera, B. R.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Gadea, A.; Latina, A.

    2011-06-15

    Yrast states in the neutron-rich {sup 41}S nucleus have been studied using binary grazing reactions produced by the interaction of a 215-MeV beam of {sup 36}S ions with a thin {sup 208}Pb target. The magnetic spectrometer, PRISMA, and the {gamma}-ray array, CLARA, were used in the measurements. {gamma}-ray transitions of energy 449 and 638 keV were observed. Results from published intermediate-energy Coulomb excitation measurements in combination with those from the present work have led to the construction of a new {sup 41}S level scheme. Proposed J{sup {pi}} values are based on experimental observation and on model-dependent arguments. The level scheme and published electromagnetic transition probabilities are discussed within the context of state-of-art shell-model calculations using the SDPF-U effective interaction. In contrast with the excellent agreement observed in earlier published work, here there are significant discrepancies between experiment and the results of shell-model calculations.

  6. Measurements of the decays {tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{ital h}{sup +}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{ital h}{sup +}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Lohner, M.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.J.; Ehrlich, R.; Elia, R.; Gaidarev, P.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Henderson, S.; Jones, C.D.; Jones, S.L.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lee, T.; Liu, Y.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Lingel, K.; Prescott, C.; Rodriguez, J.; Yang, S.; Yelton, J.; Brandenburg, G.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Edwards, K.W.; McLean, K.W.; Ogg, M.; Bellerive, A.; Britton, D.I.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; Janicek, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Spaan, B.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Momayezi, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; O`Neill, J.J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Wappler, F.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.M.; Fu, X.; Nemati, B.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Wood, M.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; Hinson, J.W.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Gibbons, L.; Johnson, S.D.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Coan, T.E.; Dominick, J.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Lambrecht, M.; Sanghera, S.; Shelkov, V.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Wei, G.; Artuso, M.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; (CLEO Colla..

    1995-11-20

    We use a data sample of 2.8{times}10{sup 6} produced {tau}-pair events, obtained with the CLEO II detector, to measure {ital B}{bold (}{tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{ital h}{sup +}{ital h}{sup {minus}}({pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}}{bold )}, where {ital h} refers to either a charged {pi} or {ital K}. These branching fractions are measured with samples of lepton-tagged and 3 vs 3 events. We find {ital B}({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{ital h}{sup +}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}})=0.0951{plus_minus}0.0007 m*0.0020 and {ital B}({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{ital h}{sup +}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}})=0.0423{plus_minus} .0006{plus_minus}0.0022. We also measure {ital B}({tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{omega}{ital h}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}})=0.0195{plus_minus}0.0007{plus_minus}0.0011 {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  7. Observation of [ital D][sup 0][r arrow][ital K][sup +][pi][sup [minus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cinabro, D.; Henderson, S.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Gollin, G.; Ong, B.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Ball, S.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Nemati, B.; O'Neill, J.J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Zoeller, M.M.; Crawford, G.; Daubenmier, C.M.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Skovpen, Y.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Snow, J.; Wang, P.L.; Wood, M.; Brown, D.N.; Fast, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Payne, D.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Battle, M.; Ernst, J.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.H.; Dominick,

    1994-03-07

    Using the CLEO II data sample, with an integrated luminosity of 1.8 fb[sup [minus]1] at and near the [Upsilon](4[ital S]) resonance, we have observed a signal for [ital D][sup 0][r arrow][ital K][sup +][pi][sup [minus

  8. Measurement of the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg excitation function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Folden III, C. M.; Dragojevic, I.; Garcia, M. A.; Gates, J. M.; Nelson, S. L.; Hoffman, D. C.; Nitsche, H.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Sudowe, R.; Gregorich, K. E.; Eichler, R.

    2009-02-15

    The excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,n){sup 259}Sg reaction has been measured using the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 88-Inch Cyclotron. The maximum cross section of 320{sub -100}{sup +110} pb is observed at a center-of-target laboratory-frame energy of 253.0 MeV. In total, 25 decay chains originating from {sup 259}Sg were observed and the measured decay properties are in good agreement with previous reports. In addition, a partial excitation function for the {sup 208}Pb({sup 52}Cr,2n){sup 258}Sg reaction was obtained, and an improved {sup 258}Sg half-life of 2.6{sub -0.4}{sup +0.6} ms was calculated by combining all available experimental data.

  9. Fuel economizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwierzelewski, V.F.

    1984-06-26

    A fuel economizer device for use with an internal combustion engine fitted with a carburetor is disclosed. The fuel economizer includes a plate member which is mounted between the carburetor and the intake portion of the intake manifold. The plate member further has at least one aperture formed therein. One tube is inserted through the at least one aperture in the plate member. The one tube extends longitudinally in the passage of the intake manifold from the intake portion toward the exit portion thereof. The one tube concentrates the mixture of fuel and air from the carburetor and conveys the mixture of fuel and air to a point adjacent but spaced away from the inlet port of the internal combustion engine.

  10. Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and robust solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. Specific objectives include achieving an efficiency of greater than 60 percent, meeting a stack cost target of 175 per kW, and ...

  11. Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strain, R.V.; Sanecki, J.E.; Osborne, M.F.

    1984-01-01

    Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel is being studied by heating fuel rod segments in flowing steam and an inert carrier gas to simulate accident conditions. Fuels with a range of irradiation histories are being subjected to several steam flow rates over a wide range of temperatures. Fission product release during each test is measured by gamma spectroscopy and by detailed examination of the collection apparatus after the test has been completed. These release results are complemented by a detailed posttest examination of samples of the fuel rod segment. Results of release measurements and fuel rod characterizations for tests at 1400 through 2000/sup 0/C are presented in this paper.

  12. Studies of the /sup 32/S + /sup 182/W reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, B.B.; Keller, J.G.; Worsham, A.; Glagola, B.G.; Henderson, D.; Kaufman, S.; Sanders, S.J.; Siemssen, R.; Videbaek, F.; Wilkins, B.D.

    1986-01-01

    Fission-like products from the reaction /sup 32/S + /sup 182/W were measured over the entire angular range from theta = 10-170/sup 0/ and for bombarding energies of E/sub lab/ = 166, 177, 222, and 260 MeV using an array of eight Si detectors. From the measured energy and flight time the product mass was determined event-by-event by performing the appropriate corrections for the plasma delay and pulse height defect associated with Si detectors. The mass, angular, and total kinetic energy distributions of fission-like fragments are obtained by assuming two-body kinematics. The angular distributions indicate that a fraction of the observed cross section is associated with quasi-fission reactions as observed previously in several other reactions involving /sup 32/S projectiles. Furthermore, we observe an angular dependence of the fragment mass distributions, a feature which is strictly incompatible with compound nucleus decay. Both of these observations indicate that a fraction of fission-like products originate from quasi-fission, a process in which a large degree of mass transfer occurs between the two interaction nuclei in a short time scale. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Method for determination of .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O and .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H ratios and .sup.3 H (tritium) concentrations of xylem waters and subsurface waters using time series sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Brian; Menchaca, Leticia

    1999-01-01

    A method for determination of .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O and .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H ratios and .sup.3 H concentrations of xylem and subsurface waters using time series sampling, insulating sampling chambers, and combined .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O, .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H and .sup.3 H concentration data on transpired water. The method involves collecting water samples transpired from living plants and correcting the measured isotopic compositions of oxygen (.sup.18 O/.sup.16 O) and hydrogen (.sup.2 H/.sup.1 H and/or .sup.3 H concentrations) to account for evaporative isotopic fractionation in the leafy material of the plant.

  14. Excited states in {sup 115}Pd populated in the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 115}Rh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurpeta, J.; Plochocki, A. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Urban, W. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue J. Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Rissanen, J.; Eronen, T.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Karvonen, P.; Moore, I. D.; Penttilae, H.; Saastamoinen, A.; Weber, C.; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FIN-40351, Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Elomaa, V.-V. [Turku PET Centre, Accelerator Laboratory, Abo Akademi University, FIN-20500 Turku (Finland); Rahaman, S. [Physics Division, P-23, Mail Stop H803, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sonoda, T. [Nishina Center for Accelerator Based Science, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Szerypo, J. [Fakultaet fuer Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Am Coulombwall 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    Excited states in {sup 115}Pd, populated following the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 115}Rh have been studied by means of {gamma} spectroscopy after the Penning-trap station at the IGISOL facility, University of Jyvaeskylae. The 1/2{sup +} spin and parity assignment of the ground state of {sup 115}Pd, confirmed in this work, may indicate a transition to an oblate shape in Pd isotopes at high neutron number.

  15. Study of D sup 0 decays into final states with a. pi. sup 0 or. eta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.M.; Procario, M.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Zhu, Y.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Davis, R.; Haas, P.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Schrenk, S.; Crawford, G.; Fulton, R.; Jensen, T.; Johnson, D.R.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Malchow, R.; Morrow, F.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Bortoletto, D.; Brown, D.; Dominick, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Ng, C.R.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Battle, M.; Kroha, H.; Sparks, K.; Thorndike, E.H.; Wang, C.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Li, W.C.; Romero, V.; Sun, C.R.; Wang, P.; Zoeller, M.M.; Goldberg, M.; Haupt, T.; Horwitz, N.; Jain, V.; Mestayer, M.D.; Moneti, G.C.; Rozen, Y.; Rubin, P.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stone, S.; Thusalidas, M.; Yao, W.; Zhu, G.; Barnes, A.V.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Letson, T.; Alexander, J.; Artuso, M.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Besson, D.; Browder, T.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Drell,

    1991-05-01

    We have made measurements of decay modes of neutral {ital D} mesons into exclusive final states containing photons using data collected with the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring. We report observation of {ital D}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} (charge conjugates are implicit), and present new measurements of the branching ratios for {ital D}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, {ital D}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {minus}}, {ital D}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, {ital {bar K}}{sup *0}{eta}, and {ital D}{sup 0}{r arrow}{ital {bar K}}{sup 0}{omega}. Where possible, results are compared with theoretical predictions for two-body {ital D}{sup 0} decays.

  16. Analysis of <sup>125sup>Xe electron–photon coincidence decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klingberg, Franziska J.; Biegalski, Steven R.; Prinke, Amanda; Haas, Derek A.; Lowrey, Justin D.

    2015-10-26

    In this study, as part of the verification component of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), environmental gas samples originating from nuclear fission are analyzed for the presence of <sup>131sup>mXe, <sup>133sup>mXe, <sup>133sup>Xe, and <sup>135sup>Xe. In this work, the non-traditional radioxenon isotope <sup>125sup>Xe was investigated. The isotope was produced as an isotopically pure sample via neutron activation of <sup>124sup>Xe at the University of Texas at Austin Nuclear Engineering Teaching Lab’s TRIGA MARK II Reactor. The sample was then measured using a HPGe detector as well as an ARSA-style β–γ coincidence detector. Potential sources and sensitivities for production of <sup>125sup>Xe are also considered for relevance to the CTBT verification mission.

  17. Comparison studies of head-end reprocessing using three LWR fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goode, J.H.; Stacy, R.G.; Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1980-06-01

    The removal of {sup 3}H by voloxidation and the dissolution behavior of two PWR and one BWR fuels were compared in hot-cell studies. The experiments showed that >99% of the {sup 3}H contained in the irradiated UO{sub 2} was volatilized by oxidation in air at 753{sup 0}K (480{sup 0}C). The oxidation did not affect the dissolution of the uranium and plutonium in 7 M HNO{sub 3} (0.02 to 0.03% insoluble plutonium) but did create a fission-product residue that was two to three times more insoluble. From 40 to 69% of the ternary fission-product {sup 3}H was found in the Zircaloy cladding of the fuel rods. Voloxidation had little effect on the {sup 3}H held in the Zircaloy cladding; oxidation for 6 h at 753{sup 0}K released only 0.05% of the {sup 3}H.

  18. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coughlin, P.K.; Rabo, J.A.

    1985-12-03

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C[sub 5][sup +] hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising a SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  19. Enhanced conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Peter K.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1986-01-01

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  20. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Peter K.; Rabo, Jule A.

    1985-01-01

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  1. Four different shale oils processed into jet fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-03-01

    Crude shale oils produced by (a) Geokinetics, (b) Occidental, (c) Paraho, and (d) Tosco II processes have each been catalytically hydroprocessed to produce jet fuel fractions. The shale oil hydroprocessing was performed at low, medium and high hydroprocessing severities. Hydroprocessing severity was changed mainly by varying the temperature. Full boiling range (121-300/sup 0/C) jet fuel was produced from the hydroprocessed product of the raw oil distillates boiling below 343/sup 0/C. This paper describes the shale oil properties and hydroprocessing, gives the results of sulfur removal and hydrogenated shale oil distillation, and lists the physical and chemical properties of the jet fuels. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  2. Analysis of T = 1 {sup 10}B States Analogue to {sup 10}Be Cluster States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uroic, M.; Miljanic, D.; Blagus, S.; Bogovac, M.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Majer, M.; Milin, M.; Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A.; Acosta, L.

    2009-08-26

    Current status of the search for T = 1 cluster states in {sup 10}Be, {sup 10}B and {sup 10}C is presented. The best known of the three, {sup 10}Be, has an established rotational band (6.18, 7.54 and 10.15 MeV) with unusually large moment of inertia. Search of their isobaric analogue in {sup 10}B is presented, with emphasis on {sup 3}He+{sup 11}B reaction.

  3. Determination of B ( D sub s sup + r arrow. phi. pi. sup + ) via observation of D sub s sup + r arrow. phi. l sup +. nu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, J.; Artuso, M.; Bebek, C.; Berkelman, K.; Browder, T.; Cassel, D.G.; Cheu, E.; Coffman, D.M.; Crawford, G.; DeWire, J.W.; Drell, P.S.; Ehrlich, R.; Galik, R.S.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Halling, A.M.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lewis, J.D.; Ludwig, G.S.; Mistry, N.B.; Mueller, J.; Nandi, S.; Nordberg, E.; O'Grady, C.; Peterson, D.; Pisharody, M.; Riley, D.; Sapper, M.; Selen, M.; Silverman, A.; Stone, S.; Worden, H.; Worris, M.; Sadoff, A.J.; Avery, P.; Besson, D.; Garren, L.; Yelton, J.; Bowcock, T.; Kinoshita, K.; Pipkin, F.M.; Procario, M.; Wilson, R.; Wolinski, J.; Xiao, D.; Zhu, Y.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Coppage, D.; Haas, P.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, N.; Lam, H.; Ro, S.; Kubota, Y.; Nelson, J.K.; Perticone, D.; Poling, R.; Fulton, R.; Jensen, T.; Johnson, D.R.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morrow, F.; Whitmore, J.; Wilson, P.; Bortoletto, D.; Chen, W.; Dominick, J.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miller, D.H.; Ng, C.R.; Schaffner, S.F.; Shibata,

    1990-09-24

    Using the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR), we have determined the ratio {Gamma}({ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup +}{r arrow}{phi}{ital l}{sup +}{nu})/{Gamma}({ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup +} {r arrow}{phi}{pi}{sup +})=0.49{plus minus}0.10{sub {minus}0.14}{sup +0.10}. We use this measurement to derive {ital B}({ital D}{sub {ital s}}{sup +}{r arrow}{phi}{pi}{sup +}).

  4. NEW ACCURATE MEASUREMENT OF {sup 36}ArH{sup +} AND {sup 38}ArH{sup +} RO-VIBRATIONAL TRANSITIONS BY HIGH RESOLUTION IR ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cueto, M.; Herrero, V. J.; Tanarro, I.; Doménech, J. L.; Cernicharo, J.; Barlow, M. J.; Swinyard, B. M.

    2014-03-01

    The protonated argon ion, {sup 36}ArH{sup +}, was recently identified in the Crab Nebula from Herschel spectra. Given the atmospheric opacity at the frequency of its J = 1-0 and J = 2-1 rotational transitions (617.5 and 1234.6 GHz, respectively), and the current lack of appropriate space observatories after the recent end of the Herschel mission, future studies on this molecule will rely on mid-infrared observations. We report on accurate wavenumber measurements of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +} rotation-vibration transitions in the v = 1-0 band in the range 4.1-3.7 μm (2450-2715 cm{sup –1}). The wavenumbers of the R(0) transitions of the v = 1-0 band are 2612.50135 ± 0.00033 and 2610.70177 ± 0.00042 cm{sup –1} (±3σ) for {sup 36}ArH{sup +} and {sup 38}ArH{sup +}, respectively. The calculated opacity for a gas thermalized at a temperature of 100 K and with a linewidth of 1 km s{sup –1} of the R(0) line is 1.6 × 10{sup –15} × N({sup 36}ArH{sup +}). For column densities of {sup 36}ArH{sup +} larger than 1 × 10{sup 13} cm{sup –2}, significant absorption by the R(0) line can be expected against bright mid-IR sources.

  5. Overview of advanced technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, K.B.; Foltyn, E.M.; Heslop, J.M.

    1998-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of potential technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has processed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel into heat sources for space and terrestrial uses for the past several decades. The 88-year half-life of {sup 238}Pu and thermal power of approximately 0.6 watts/gram make this isotope ideal for missions requiring many years of dependable service in inaccessible locations. However, the same characteristic which makes {sup 238}Pu attractive for heat source applications, the high Curie content (17 Ci/gram versus 0.06 Ci/gram for 239{sup Pu}), makes disposal of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste difficult. Specifically, the thermal load limit on drums destined for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), 0.23 gram per drum for combustible waste, is impossible to meet for nearly all {sup 238}Pu-contaminated glovebox waste. Use of advanced waste treatment technologies including Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and aqueous chemical separation will eliminate the combustible matrix from {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste and recover kilogram quantities of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} from the waste stream. A conceptual design of these advanced waste treatment technologies will be presented.

  6. Identification of {gamma} rays from {sup 172}Au and {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au, {sup 168}Ir, and {sup 164}Re

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadinia, B.; Cederwall, B.; Andgren, K.; Baeck, T.; Johnson, A.; Khaplanov, A.; Wyss, R.; Page, R. D.; Grahn, T.; Paul, E. S.; Sandzelius, M.; Scholey, C.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P. M.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, J.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.

    2009-12-15

    The very neutron deficient odd-odd nucleus {sup 172}Au was studied in reactions of 342 and 348 MeV {sup 78}Kr beams with an isotopically enriched {sup 96}Ru target. The {alpha} decays previously reported for {sup 172}Au were confirmed and the decay chain extended down to {sup 152}Tm through the discovery of a new {alpha}-decaying state in {sup 164}Re[E{sub {alpha}}=5623(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=864{sub -110}{sup +150} ms; b{sub {alpha}}=3(1)%]. Fine structure in these {alpha} decays of {sup 172}Au and {sup 168}Ir were identified. A new {alpha}-decaying state was also observed and assigned as the ground state in {sup 172}Au[E{sub {alpha}}=6762(10) keV; t{sub 1/2}=22{sub -5}{sup +6} ms]. This decay chain was also correlated down to {sup 152}Tm through previously reported {alpha} decays. Prompt {gamma} rays from excited states in {sup 172}Au have been identified using the recoil-decay tagging technique. The partial level scheme constructed for {sup 172}Au indicates that it has an irregular structure. Possible configurations of the {alpha}-decaying states in {sup 172}Au are discussed in terms of the systematics of nuclei in this region and total Routhian surface calculations.

  7. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact Sheet Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact Sheet Fact sheet produced by the Fuel Cell ...

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... Fuel Properties Search Fuel Properties Comparison Create a custom chart

  9. Nuclear structure ''southeast'' of {sup 208}Pb: Isomeric states in {sup 208}Hg and {sup 209}Tl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Dahan, N.; Podolyak, Zs.; Regan, P. H.; Alkhomashi, N.; Deo, A. Y.; Farrelly, G.; Steer, S. J.; Cullen, I. J.; Gelletly, W.; Swan, T.; Thomas, J. S.; Walker, P. M.; Gorska, M.; Grawe, H.; Gerl, J.; Pietri, S. B.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Boutachkov, P.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Farinon, F.

    2009-12-15

    The nuclear structure of neutron-rich N>126 nuclei has been investigated following their production via relativistic projectile fragmentation of a E/A=1 GeV {sup 238}U beam. Metastable states in the N=128 isotones {sup 208}Hg and {sup 209}Tl have been identified. Delayed {gamma}-ray transitions are interpreted as arising from the decay of I{sup {pi}}=(8{sup +}) and (17/2{sup +}) isomers, respectively. The data allow for the so far most comprehensive verification of the shell-model approach in the region determined by magic numbers Z<82 and N>126.

  10. Study of {sup 11}Be structure via the p({sup 11}Be, {sup 10}Be)d reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortier, S.; Winfield, J. S.; Pita, S.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Gales, S.; Langevin-Joliot, H.; Laurent, H.; Lhenry, I.; Maison, J. M.; Suomijarvi, T.; Catford, W. N.; Curtis, N.; Jones, K. L.; Shawcross, M.; Orr, N. A.; Chapman, R.; Smith, M.; Spohr, K.; Chappell, S. P. G.; Clarke, N. M.

    1998-12-21

    The reaction {sup 11}Be(p,d){sup 10}Be has been studied for the first time, using a secondary {sup 11}Be beam of 35.3 MeV/nucleon. Angular distributions up to about 15{sub cm}{sup o} were measured by detecting {sup 10}Be in a spectrometer and coincident deuterons in a position sensitive silicon detector array. Preliminary analysis provides evidence for a large core excitation component in the structure of {sup 11}Be{sub GS}.

  11. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimble, Ralph E.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

  12. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimble, R.E.

    1988-03-08

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling

  14. PEM fuel cell durability studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borup, Rodney L; Davey, John R; Ofstad, Axel B; Xu, Hui

    2008-01-01

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization for stationary and transportation power applications. For transportation applications, the durability target for fuel cell power systems is a 5,000 hour lifespan and able to function over a range of vehicle operating conditions (-40{sup o} to +40{sup o}C). However, durability is difficult to quantify and improve because of the quantity and duration of testing required, and also because the fuel cell stack contains many components, for which the degradation mechanisms, component interactions and effects of operating conditions are not fully understood. These requirements have led to the development of accelerated testing protocols for PEM fuel cells. The need for accelerated testing methodology is exemplified by the times required for standard testing to reach their required targets: automotive 5,000 hrs = {approx} 7 months; stationary systems 40,000 hrs = {approx} 4.6 years. As new materials continue to be developed, the need for relevant accelerated testing increases. In this investigation, we examine the durability of various cell components, examine the effect of transportation operating conditions (potential cycling, variable RH, shut-down/start-up, freeze/thaw) and evaluate durability by accelerated durability protocols. PEM fuel cell durability testing is performed on single cells, with tests being conducted with steady-state conditions and with dynamic conditions using power cycling to simulate a vehicle drive cycle. Component and single-cell characterization during and after testing was conducted to identify changes in material properties and related failure mechanisms. Accelerated-testing experiments were applied to further examine material degradation.

  15. Nondestructive examination of 51 fuel and reflector elements from Fort St. Vrain Core Segment 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.M.; Saurwein, J.J.

    1980-12-01

    Fifty-one fuel and reflector elements irradiated in core segment 1 of the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) were inspected dimensionally and visually in the Hot Service Facility at Fort St. Vrain in July 1979. Time- and volume-averaged graphite temperatures for the examined fuel elements ranged from approx. 400/sup 0/ to 750/sup 0/C. Fast neutron fluences varied from approx. 0.3 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ to 1.0 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/. Nearly all of the examined elements shrank in both axial and radial dimensions. The measured data were compared with strain and bow predictions obtained from SURVEY/STRESS, a computer code that employs viscoelastic beam theory to calculate stresses and deformations in HTGR fuel elements.

  16. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per...

  17. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  18. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per...

  19. ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Fuel Oil Consumption (gallons) and Energy Intensities by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons)",,,,,"Fuel Oil Energy Intensity...

  20. ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Fuel Oil Expenditures by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Fuel Oil Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Fuel Oil Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per Gallon",,,,"per Square Foot"...

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Clean Transportation Fuel Standards The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) administers the Oregon Clean Fuels Program (Program), which requires fuel producers and ...

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Vehicle and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans The Utah Clean Fuels and Vehicle Technology Grant and Loan Program, funded through the Clean Fuels and Vehicle Technology Fund, ...

  3. Extracting meson-baryon contributions to the electroexcitation of the N (1675)<sup>->5sup>/2 nucleon resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the determination of the electrocouplings for the transition from the proton to the N (1675)<sup>->5sup>/2 resonance state using recent differential cross section data on ep → eπ<sup>+>n by the CLAS collaboration at 1.8 ≤ Q² < 4.5GeV². The data have been analyzed using two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and fixed-t dispersion relations. The extracted γ*p → N (1675)<sup>->5sup>/2 helicity amplitudes show considerable coupling through the A<sup>P>1/2 amplitude, that is significantly larger than predicted three-quark contribution to this amplitude. The amplitude A<sup>P>3/2 is much smaller. Both results are consistent with the predicted sizes of the meson-baryon contributions at Q² ≥ 1.8 GeV² from the dynamical coupled-channel model.

  4. Developing <sup>226sup>Ra and <sup>227sup>Ac age-dating techniques for nuclear forensics to gain insight from concordant and non-concordant radiochronometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayzar, Theresa M.; Williams, Ross W.

    2015-09-26

    The model age or ‘date of purification’ of a nuclear material is an important nuclear forensic signature. In this study, chemical separation and MC-ICP-MS measurement techniques were developed for <sup>226 sup>Ra and <sup>227sup>Ac: grand-daughter nuclides in the <sup>238sup>U and <sup>235sup>U decay chains respectively. The <sup>230sup>Th->234sup>U, <sup>226sup>Ra->238sup>U, <sup>231sup>Pa->235sup>U, and <sup>227sup>Ac->235sup>U radiochronometers were used to calculate model ages for CRM-U100 standard reference material and two highly-enriched pieces of uranium metal from the International Technical Working Group Round Robin 3 Exercise. In conclusion, the results demonstrate the accuracy of the <sup>226sup>Ra->238sup>U and <sup>227sup>Ac->235sup>U chronometers and provide information about nuclide migration during uranium processing.

  5. An efficient and practical synthesis of [2-<sup>11sup>C]indole via superfast nucleophilic [<sup>11sup>C]cyanation and RANEY® Nickel catalyzed reductive cyclization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    So Jeong Lee; Fowler, Joanna S.; Alexoff, David; Schueller, Michael; Kim, Dohyun; Nauth, Alexander; Weber, Carina; Kim, Sung Won; Hooker, Jacob M.; Ma, Ling; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-09-21

    We developed a rapid method for the synthesis of carbon-11 radiolabeled indole using a sub-nanomolar quantity of no-carrier-added [<sup>11sup>C]cyanide as radio-precursor. Based upon a reported synthesis of 2-(2-nitrophenyl)acetonitrile (2), a highly reactive substrate 2-nitrobenzyl bromide (1) was evaluated for nucleophilic [<sup>11sup>C]cyanation. Additionally, related reaction conditions were explored with the goal of obtaining of highly reactive 2-(2-nitrophenyl)-[1-<sup>11sup>C]acetonitrile ([<sup>11sup>C]-2) while inhibiting its rapid conversion to 2,3-bis(2-nitrophenyl)-[1-<sup>11sup>C]propanenitrile ([<sup>11sup>C]-3). Next, a Raney Nickel catalyzed reductive cyclization method was utilized for synthesizing the desired [2-<sup>11sup>C]indole with hydrazinium monoformate as the active reducing agent. Extensive and iterative screening of basicity, temperature and stoichiometry was required to overcome the large stoichiometry bias that favored 2-nitrobenzylbromide (1) over [<sup>11sup>C]cyanide, which both caused further alkylation of the desired nitrile and poisoned the Raney Nickel catalyst. The result is an efficient two-step, streamlined method to reliably synthesize [2-<sup>11sup>C]indole with an entire radiochemical yield of 21 ± 2.2% (n = 5, ranging from 18 – 24%). The radiochemical purity of the final product was > 98% and specific activity was 176 ± 24.8 GBq/μmol (n = 5, ranging from 141 – 204 GBq/μmol). The total radiosynthesis time including product purification by semi-preparative HPLC was 50 – 55 min from end of cyclotron bombardment.

  6. NEUTRON REACTOR HAVING A Xe$sup 135$ SHIELD

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stanton, H.E.

    1957-10-29

    Shielding for reactors of the type in which the fuel is a chain reacting liquid composition comprised essentially of a slurry of fissionable and fertile material suspended in a liquid moderator is discussed. The neutron reflector comprises a tank containing heavy water surrounding the reactor, a shield tank surrounding the reflector, a gamma ray shield surrounding said shield tank, and a means for conveying gaseous fission products, particularly Xe/sup 135/, from the reactor chamber to the shield tank, thereby serving as a neutron shield by capturing the thermalized neutrons that leak outwardly from the shield tank.

  7. Study of the K{sub stop}{sup -}A{yields}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}A' reaction at DA{Phi}NE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnello, M.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Fabbri, F. L.; Gianotti, P.; Lucherini, V.; Bhang, H. C.; Bonomi, G.; Moia, F.; Zenoni, A.; Botta, E.; Bressani, T.; Bufalino, S.; Busso, L.; Calvo, D.; De Mori, F.; Feliciello, A.; Filippi, A.; Marcello, S.; Wheadon, R.

    2010-12-28

    This work describes an experimental study of the K{sub stop}{sup -}A{yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{Sigma}{sup {+-}}A' reaction performed with the FINUDA spectrometer at the DA{Phi}NE {phi}-factory. The reaction is studied via the detection of {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}n events on {sup 6,7}Li, {sup 9}Be, {sup 13}C and {sup 16}O.

  8. Irradiation Test of Advanced PWR Fuel in Fuel Test Loop at HANARO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yong Sik; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Song, Kun Woo; Park, Su Ki; Seo, Chul Gyo

    2007-07-01

    A new fuel test loop has been constructed in the research reactor HANARO at KAERI. The main objective of the FTL (Fuel Test Loop) is an irradiation test of a newly developed LWR fuel under PWR or Candu simulated conditions. The first test rod will be loaded within 2007 and its irradiation test will be continued until a rod average their of 62 MWd/kgU. A total of five test rods can be loaded into the IPS (In-Pile Section) and fuel centerline temperature, rod internal pressure and fuel stack elongation can be measured by an on-line real time system. A newly developed advanced PWR fuel which consists of a HANA{sup TM} alloy cladding and a large grain UO{sub 2} pellet was selected as the first test fuel in the FTL. The fuel cladding, the HANA{sup TM} alloy, is an Nb containing Zirconium alloy that has shown better corrosion and creep resistance properties than the current Zircaloy-4 cladding. A total of six types of HANA{sup TM} alloy were developed and two or three of these candidate alloys will be used as test rod cladding, which have shown a superior performance to the others. A large-grain UO{sub 2} pellet has a 14{approx}16 micron 2D diameter grain size for a reduction of a fission gas release at a high burnup. In this paper, characteristics of the FTL and IPS are introduced and the expected operation and irradiation conditions are summarized for the test periods. Also the preliminary fuel performance analysis results, such as the cladding oxide thickness, fission gas release and rod internal pressure, are evaluated from the test rod safety analysis aspects. (authors)

  9. Dipole transition strengths in {sup 26}Mg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.; Rusev, G.; Erhard, M.; Junghans, A. R.; Kosev, K.; Schilling, K. D.; Fujita, Y.; De Frenne, D.; Grosse, E.

    2009-03-15

    Excited states with J{sup {pi}}=1{sup +} and 1{sup -} in {sup 26}Mg were studied in a photon-scattering experiment using bremsstrahlung produced by an electron beam of 13.0 MeV kinetic energy provided by the superconducting electron linear accelerator ELBE. We determined the transition strengths from the 1{sup +} and 1{sup -} states to the ground state as well as to low-lying excited states. In addition, we observed a J=1 state at 11.154 MeV, above the neutron-separation energy of 11.093 MeV, and determined its partial {gamma} decay width for the first time.

  10. On the neutrinoless double ?{sup +}/EC decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suhonen, Jouni

    2013-12-30

    The neutrinoless double positron-emission/electron-capture (0??{sup +}/EC) decays are studied for the magnitudes of the involved nuclear matrix elements (NMEs). Decays to the ground state, 0{sub gs}{sup +}, and excited 0{sup +} states are discussed. The participant many-body wave functions are evaluated in the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Effective, G-matrix-derived nuclear forces are used in realistic single-particle model spaces. The channels ?{sup +}?{sup +}, ?{sup +}EC, and the resonant neutrinoless double electron capture (R0?ECEC) are discussed.

  11. Determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients for <sup>14sup>C + n <--> <sup>15sup>C, the <sup>14sup>C(n, gamma)<sup>15sup>C reaction rate, and evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCleskey, M.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Trache, L.; Tribble, R. E.; Banu, A.; Eremenko, V.; Goldberg, V. Z.; Lui, Y. W.; McCleskey, E.; Roeder, B. T.; Spiridon, A.; Carstoiu, F.; Burjan, V.; Hons, Z.; Thompson, I. J.

    2014-04-17

    The <sup>14sup>C + n <--> <sup>15sup>C system has been used as a test case in the evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors that uses the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). The method proved to be unsuccessful for this case. As part of this experimental program, the ANCs for the <sup>15sup>C ground state and first excited state were determined using a heavy-ion neutron transfer reaction as well as the inverse kinematics (d,p) reaction, measured at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute. The ANCs were used to evaluate the astrophysical direct neutron capture rate on <sup>14sup>C, which was then compared with the most recent direct measurement and found to be in good agreement. A study of the <sup>15sup>C SF via its mirror nucleus <sup>15sup>F and a new insight into deuteron stripping theory are also presented.

  12. Polarization Transfer in {sup 4}He(e-vector,e{sup '}p-vector){sup 3}H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paolone, Michael

    2007-10-26

    Polarization transfer in quasi-elastic nucleon knockout is sensitive to the properties of the nucleon in the nuclear medium, including possible modification of the nucleon form factor and/or spinor. In our recently completed experiment E03-104 at Jefferson Lab we measured the proton recoil polarization in the {sup 4}He(e-vector,e{sup '}p-vector){sup 3}H reaction at a Q{sup 2} of 0.8 (GeV/c){sup 2} and 1.3 (GeV/c){sup 2} with unprecedented precision. These data complement earlier data between 0.4 and 2.6 (GeV/c){sup 2} from both Mainz and Jefferson Lab, in which the measured ratio of polarization-transfer coefficients differs from a fully relativistic DWIA calculation. Preliminary results hint at a possible unexpected Q{sup 2} dependence in the polarization transfer coefficient ratio. Final analysis will help constrain FSI models.

  13. Fuel Cells & Alternative Fuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cells & Alternative Fuels Fuel Cells & Alternative Fuels Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and ...

  14. Forty-five Years of e{sup +}e{sup -} Annihilation Physics: 1956 to 2001

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Richter, B.

    1984-08-01

    The history of e{sup +}e{sup -} physics in the 1950's and 1960's is reviewed, followed by some highlights of the spectacular discoveries in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation made during the 1970's. The consolidation of knowledge during the last few years is summarized. Some predictions are made for the field of e{sup +}e{sup -} physics for the next decade and beyond. (LEW)

  15. Comparison of {sup 241}Am, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 137}Cs concentrations in soil around Rocky Flats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulse, S.E.; Ibrahim, S.A.; Whicker, F.W.; Chapman, P.L.

    1999-03-01

    Gamma spectroscopy measurements were used to estimate concentrations of {sup 241}Am and {sup 137}Cs in soil profiles to depths of 21 cm at on-site and off-site locations around the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site and at regional background locations east of the Front Range between Colorado`s borders with New Mexico and Wyoming. Concentrations of these radionuclides were compared with concentrations of {sup 239,240}Pu in the same samples. Concentrations of {sup 241}Am in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm decreased in an easterly direction from more than 5.3 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} 5 to 7 km away at a rate that was nearly proportional to the inverse square of distance. Deposits of {sup 137}Cs were ubiquitous, averaging 0.12 kBq kg{sup {minus}1} in soil from depths of 0 to 3 cm, but were unevenly distributed around Rocky Flats and the regional background locations. Deviations from the uniform exponential rate at which soil concentrations of {sup 137}Cs typically decreased with depth, {minus}0.25 cm{sup {minus}1} at undisturbed sites, enabled the authors to determine that about 10% of their sampling sites had been disturbed by erosion, tillage, or other factors. The mean rate at which {sup 239,240}Pu decreased with depth was about the same, {minus}0.23 cm{sup {minus}1}, throughout the study area. Soil concentrations of {sup 241}Am decreased with depth at a similar mean rate of {minus}0.22 cm{sup {minus}1} at locations close to the 903 pad where measurements were robust. Ratios between {sup 241}Am or {sup 239,240}Pu and {sup 137}Cs proved more useful for delineating the extent and pattern of contamination from Rocky Flats than did activity concentrations in soil.

  16. Study of short-range correlation in nuclei via measurement of the <sup>4sup>He(,ee'pp) and <sup>4sup>He(e,e'pn) reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korover, Igor

    2015-04-01

    This thesis reports on a simultaneous measurement of the <sup>4sup>He(e,e'p), <sup>4sup>He(e,e'pp), and <sup>4sup>He(e,e'pn) reactions at Q<sup>2sup> = 2 (GeV/c)<sup>2sup> and xB > 1 for an (e,e'p) missing momentum range of 400 to 830 MeV/c.

  17. Characterization of Nuclear Fuel using Multivariate Statistical Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robel, M; Robel, M; Robel, M; Kristo, M J; Kristo, M J

    2007-11-27

    Various combinations of reactor type and fuel composition have been characterized using principle components analysis (PCA) of the concentrations of 9 U and Pu isotopes in the 10 fuel as a function of burnup. The use of PCA allows the reduction of the 9-dimensional data (isotopic concentrations) into a 3-dimensional approximation, giving a visual representation of the changes in nuclear fuel composition with burnup. Real-world variation in the concentrations of {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U in the fresh (unirradiated) fuel was accounted for. The effects of reprocessing were also simulated. The results suggest that, 15 even after reprocessing, Pu isotopes can be used to determine both the type of reactor and the initial fuel composition with good discrimination. Finally, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PSLDA) was investigated as a substitute for PCA. Our results suggest that PLSDA is a better tool for this application where separation between known classes is most important.

  18. Field measurements to support IAEA procedures development for fuel assembly and fuel rod active length verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belew, W.L.; Cooley, J.N.; Whitaker, J.M.

    1992-07-17

    The activities performed in verification of reactor fuel rods and assemblies by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards inspectors include measurements of the length of the enriched uranium sections in fuel assemblies and fuel rods. These measurements are normally made with the IAEA hand-held gamma monitor (HM-4) on fuel elements containing only enriched uranium. Many fuel rods currently in use contain natural uranium end sections and several different [sup 235]U enrichment zones. To support development of standard procedures for IAEA nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements, a field measurement campaign was carried out to evaluate the FM-4 measurements and to investigate the feasibility of extending the HM-4 measurements to fuel rods and assemblies containing both natural and enriched uranium sections. The results show that the enriched fuel length can be measured to within [plus minus] 1 to 2 cm in the presence of natural uranium sections and to within [plus minus] 0.5 = when only enriched uranium is present. Based on the results from these measurements, a standard procedure, Measurement of Active Fuel Length in Fuel Assemblies and Fuel Rods Using the HM-4,'' has been drafted for review by the IAEA.

  19. Field measurements to support IAEA procedures development for fuel assembly and fuel rod active length verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belew, W.L.; Cooley, J.N.; Whitaker, J.M.

    1992-07-17

    The activities performed in verification of reactor fuel rods and assemblies by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards inspectors include measurements of the length of the enriched uranium sections in fuel assemblies and fuel rods. These measurements are normally made with the IAEA hand-held gamma monitor (HM-4) on fuel elements containing only enriched uranium. Many fuel rods currently in use contain natural uranium end sections and several different {sup 235}U enrichment zones. To support development of standard procedures for IAEA nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements, a field measurement campaign was carried out to evaluate the FM-4 measurements and to investigate the feasibility of extending the HM-4 measurements to fuel rods and assemblies containing both natural and enriched uranium sections. The results show that the enriched fuel length can be measured to within {plus_minus} 1 to 2 cm in the presence of natural uranium sections and to within {plus_minus} 0.5 = when only enriched uranium is present. Based on the results from these measurements, a standard procedure, ``Measurement of Active Fuel Length in Fuel Assemblies and Fuel Rods Using the HM-4,`` has been drafted for review by the IAEA.

  20. Excitation functions of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prepolec, L.; Soic, N.; Blagus, S.; Miljanic, D.; Siketic, Z.; Skukan, N.; Uroic, M.; Milin, M.

    2009-08-26

    Differential cross sections of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li nuclear reactions have been measured at forward angles (10 deg. and 20 deg.), using particle identification detector telescopes, over the energy range 2.75-10.00 MeV. Excitation functions have been obtained for low-lying residual-nucleus states. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) at beam energy about 8 MeV, first observed by Wyborny and Carlson in 1971 at 0 deg., has been observed at 10 deg., but is less evident at 20 deg. The cross section obtained for the {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(g.s,0{sup +}) reaction is about ten times smaller. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) reaction could correspond to excited states in {sup 14}C, at excitation energies around 30 MeV.

  1. Evidence for the synthesis of {sup 267}110 produced by the {sup 59}Co + {sup 209}Bi reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghiorso, A.; Lee, D.; Somerville, L.P. |

    1994-09-01

    An experiment to synthesize element 110 by the {sup 59}Co+{sup 209}Bi reaction has bee performed at the SuperHILAC at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. One event with many of the expected characteristics of a successful of {sup 267}110 was observed. This event corresponds to a production cross section of about one picobarn.

  2. Probing the nuclides {sup 102}Pd, {sup 106}Cd, and {sup 144}Sm for resonant neutrinoless double-electron capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goncharov, M.; Blaum, K.; Eliseev, S.; Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Minaya Ramirez, E.; Droese, C.; Schweikhard, L.; Novikov, Yu. N.; Zuber, K.

    2011-08-15

    The Q values for double-electron capture in {sup 102}Pd, {sup 106}Cd, and {sup 144}Sm have been measured by Penning-trap mass spectrometry. The results exclude at present all three nuclides from the list of suitable candidates for a search for resonant neutrinoless double-electron capture.

  3. Differential Die-Away Instrument: Report on Fuel Assembly Mock-up Measurements with Neutron Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodsell, Alison Victoria; Swinhoe, Martyn Thomas; Henzl, Vladimir; Rael, Carlos D.; Desimone, David J.

    2014-09-18

    Fresh fuel experiments for the differential die-away (DDA) project were performed using a DT neutron generator, a 15x15 PWR fuel assembly, and nine <sup>3sup>He detectors in a water tank inside of a shielded cell at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Eight different fuel enrichments were created using low enriched (LEU) and depleted uranium (DU) dioxide fuel rods. A list-mode data acquisition system recorded the time-dependent signal and analysis of the DDA signal die-away time was performed. The die-away time depended on the amount of fissile material in the fuel assembly and the position of the detector. These experiments were performed in support of the spent nuclear fuel Next Generation Safeguards Initiative DDA project. Lessons learned from the fresh fuel DDA instrument experiments and simulations will provide useful information to the spent fuel project.

  4. California Fuel Cell Partnership: Alternative Fuels Research...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This presentation by Chris White of the California Fuel Cell Partnership provides information about alternative fuels research. cafcpinitiativescall.pdf (133.97 KB) More ...

  5. Fuel Cells and Renewable Gaseous Fuels

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cell Technologies Office | 1 7/14/2015 Fuel Cells and Renewable Gaseous Fuels Bioenergy 2015: Renewable Gaseous Fuels Breakout Session Sarah Studer, PhD ORISE Fellow Fuel Cell Technologies Office Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy June 24, 2015 Washington, DC Fuel Cell Technologies Office | 2 7/14/2015 7/14/2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Integrated approach to widespread commercialization of H 2 and fuel cells Fuel Cell Cost Durability H 2 Cost

  6. PROCESS OF PRODUCING Cm$sup 244$ AND Cm$sup 24$$sup 5$

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manning, W.M.; Studier, M.H.; Diamond, H.; Fields, P.R.

    1958-11-01

    A process is presented for producing Cm and Cm/sup 245/. The first step of the process consists in subjecting Pu/sup 2339/ to a high neutron flux and subsequently dissolving the irradiated material in HCl. The plutonium is then oxidized to at least the tetravalent state and the solution is contacted with an anion exchange resin, causing the plutonium values to be absorbed while the fission products and transplutonium elements remain in the effluent solution. The effluent solution is then contacted with a cation exchange resin causing the transplutonium, values to be absorbed while the fission products remain in solution. The cation exchange resin is then contacted with an aqueous citrate solution and tbe transplutonium elements are thereby differentially eluted in order of decreasing atomic weight, allowing collection of the desired fractions.

  7. Barrier Distributions Derived from Quasielastic Backscattering of {sup 48}Ti, {sup 54}Cr, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 64}Ni, and {sup 70}Zn Projectiles on a {sup 208}Pb Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitsuoka, S.; Ikezoe, H.; Nishio, K.; Tsuruta, K.; Jeong, S. C.; Watanabe, Y.

    2007-11-02

    In order to study the nucleus-nucleus interaction in Pb-based cold fusion, we have measured excitation functions for quasielastic scattering of {sup 48}Ti, {sup 54}Cr, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 64}Ni, and {sup 70}Zn projectiles on a {sup 208}Pb target at backward angles. The barrier distributions were derived from the first derivative of measured quasielastic scattering cross sections relative to the Rutherford scattering cross section. The centroids of the barrier distributions show a deviation from several predicted barrier heights toward the low energy side. The shape of the barrier distributions is well reproduced by the results of a coupled-channel calculation taking account of the coupling effects of two phonon excitations of the quadrupole vibration for the projectiles and of the octupole vibration for the {sup 208}Pb target.

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Renewable Fuel Distributor and Vehicle Manufacturer Liability Protection Renewable fuel refiners, suppliers, terminals, wholesalers, distributors, retailers, and motor vehicle manufacturers and dealers are not liable for property damages related to a customer's purchase of renewable fuel, including blends, if the consumer selected the fuel for use. Motor fuel blended with any amount of renewable fuel will not be considered a defective product provided the fuel compiles with motor fuel quality

  9. Hybrid fusion–fission reactor with a thorium blanket: Its potential in the fuel cycle of nuclear reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shmelev, A. N. Kulikov, G. G. Kurnaev, V. A. Salahutdinov, G. H. Kulikov, E. G. Apse, V. A.

    2015-12-15

    Discussions are currently going on as to whether it is suitable to employ thorium in the nuclear fuel cycle. This work demonstrates that the {sup 231}Pa–{sup 232}U–{sup 233}U–Th composition to be produced in the thorium blanket of a hybrid thermonuclear reactor (HTR) as a fuel for light-water reactors opens up the possibility of achieving high, up to 30% of heavy metals (HM), or even ultrahigh fuel burnup. This is because the above fuel composition is able to stabilize its neutron-multiplying properties in the process of high fuel burnup. In addition, it allows the nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) to be better protected against unauthorized proliferation of fissile materials owing to an unprecedentedly large fraction of {sup 232}U (several percent!) in the uranium bred from the Th blanket, which will substantially hamper the use of fissile materials in a closed NFC for purposes other than power production.

  10. THE {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C REACTION AND THE IMPACT ON NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN MASSIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pignatari, M.; Hirschi, R.; Bennett, M.; Wiescher, M.; Beard, M.; Gallino, R.; Fryer, C.; Rockefeller, G.; Herwig, F.; Timmes, F. X.

    2013-01-01

    Despite much effort in the past decades, the C-burning reaction rate is uncertain by several orders of magnitude, and the relative strength between the different channels {sup 12}C({sup 12}C, {alpha}){sup 20}Ne, {sup 12}C({sup 12}C, p){sup 23}Na, and {sup 12}C({sup 12}C, n){sup 23}Mg is poorly determined. Additionally, in C-burning conditions a high {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C rate may lead to lower central C-burning temperatures and to {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O emerging as a more dominant neutron source than {sup 22}Ne({alpha}, n){sup 25}Mg, increasing significantly the s-process production. This is due to the chain {sup 12}C(p, {gamma}){sup 13}N followed by {sup 13}N({beta} +){sup 13}C, where the photodisintegration reverse channel {sup 13}N({gamma}, p){sup 12}C is strongly decreasing with increasing temperature. Presented here is the impact of the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C reaction uncertainties on the s-process and on explosive p-process nucleosynthesis in massive stars, including also fast rotating massive stars at low metallicity. Using various {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C rates, in particular an upper and lower rate limit of {approx}50,000 higher and {approx}20 lower than the standard rate at 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} K, five 25 M {sub Sun} stellar models are calculated. The enhanced s-process signature due to {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O activation is considered, taking into account the impact of the uncertainty of all three C-burning reaction branches. Consequently, we show that the p-process abundances have an average production factor increased up to about a factor of eight compared with the standard case, efficiently producing the elusive Mo and Ru proton-rich isotopes. We also show that an s-process being driven by {sup 13}C({alpha}, n){sup 16}O is a secondary process, even though the abundance of {sup 13}C does not depend on the initial metal content. Finally, implications for the Sr-peak elements inventory in the solar system and at low metallicity are

  11. 3d-3p transitions in (. mu. /sup -/He/sup 4/)/sup +/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, M.

    1986-01-01

    An experiment to measure the energy of 3d-3p transitions in the (..mu../sup -/He/sup 4/)/sup +/ ion is now in progress. The experiment, which is being performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, will use an infrared CO/sub 2/ laser to stimulate the transitions. These transitions are of interest because their energy is due almost entirely to the polarization of the vacuum. In a pure Coulomb field, states with the same principal quantum number, n, and total angular momentum, J, are degenerate. Vacuum polarization, because of its nonlinear dependence on electric field strength, results in departure from an inverse square Coulomb field, causing a splitting which depends on the orbital angular momentum, removing the degeneracy. The dominance of vacuum polarization in giving rise to these splittings in the muonic ion is in contrast to the situation in electronic atoms where vacuum polarization makes a very minor contribution to the Lamb shift. 4 refs., 4 figs.

  12. New determination of the {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction rates at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumino, A.; Spart, R.; Spitaleri, C.; Pizzone, R. G.; La Cognata, M.; Rapisarda, G. G.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.; Mukhamedzhanov, A. M.; Typel, S.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Burjan, V.; Kroha, V.; Hons, Z.; Mrazek, J.; Piskor, S.; Lamia, L.

    2014-04-20

    The cross sections of the {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reactions have been measured via the Trojan Horse method applied to the quasi-free {sup 2}H({sup 3}He,p {sup 3}H){sup 1}H and {sup 2}H({sup 3}He,n {sup 3}He){sup 1}H processes at 18 MeV off the proton in {sup 3}He. For the first time, the bare nucleus S(E) factors have been determined from 1.5 MeV, across the relevant region for standard Big Bang nucleosynthesis, down to the thermal energies of deuterium burning in the pre-main-sequence (PMS) phase of stellar evolution, as well as of future fusion reactors. Both the energy dependence and the absolute value of the S(E) factors deviate by more than 15% from the available direct data and existing fitting curves, with substantial variations in the electron screening by more than 50%. As a consequence, the reaction rates for astrophysics experience relevant changes, with a maximum increase of up to 20% at the temperatures of the PMS phase. From a recent primordial abundance sensitivity study, it turns out that the {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He reaction is quite influential on {sup 7}Li, and the present change in the reaction rate leads to a decrease in its abundance by up to 10%. The present reaction rates have also been included in an updated version of the FRANEC evolutionary code to analyze their influence on the central deuterium abundance in PMS stars with different masses. The largest variation of about 10%-15% pertains to young stars (?1 Myr) with masses ?1 M {sub ?}.

  13. Round-robin <sup>230sup>Th–>234sup>U age dating of bulk uranium for nuclear forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaffney, Amy M.; Hubert, Amélie; Kinman, William S.; Magara, Masaaki; Okubo, Ayako; Pointurier, Fabien; Schorzman, Kerri C.; Steiner, Robert E.; Williams, Ross W.

    2015-07-30

    In an inter-laboratory measurement comparison study, four laboratories determined <sup>230sup>Th–>234sup>U model ages of uranium certified reference material NBL U050 using isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The model dates determined by the participating laboratories range from 9 March 1956 to 19 October 1957, and are indistinguishable given the associated measurement uncertainties. As a result, these model ages are concordant with to slightly older than the known production age of NBL U050.

  14. Round-robin <sup>230sup>Th>234sup>U age dating of bulk uranium for nuclear forensics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaffney, Amy M.; Hubert, Amlie; Kinman, William S.; Magara, Masaaki; Okubo, Ayako; Pointurier, Fabien; Schorzman, Kerri C.; Steiner, Robert E.; Williams, Ross W.

    2015-07-30

    In an inter-laboratory measurement comparison study, four laboratories determined <sup>230sup>Th>234sup>U model ages of uranium certified reference material NBL U050 using isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The model dates determined by the participating laboratories range from 9 March 1956 to 19 October 1957, and are indistinguishable given the associated measurement uncertainties. As a result, these model ages are concordant with to slightly older than the known production age of NBL U050.

  15. Westinghouse VANTAGE+ fuel assembly to meet future PWR operating requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doshi, P.K.; Chapin, D.L.; Scherpereel, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    Many utilities operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are implementing longer reload cycles. Westinghouse is addressing this trend with fuel products that increase fuel utilization through higher discharge burnups. Higher burnup helps to offset added enriched uranium costs necessary to enable the higher energy output of longer cycles. Current fuel products have burnup capabilities in the area of 40,000 MWd/tonne U or more. There are three main phenomena that must be addressed to achieve even higher burnup levels: accelerated cladding, waterside corrosion, and hydriding; increased fission gas production; and fuel rod growth. Long cycle lengths also require efficient burnable absorbers to control the excess reactivity associated with increased fuel enrichment while maintaining a low residual absorber penalty at the end of cycle. Westinghouse VANTAGE + PWR fuel incorporates features intended to enhance fuel performance at very high burnups, including advances in the three basic elements of the fuel assembly: fuel cladding, fuel rod, and fuel assembly skeleton. ZIRLO {sup TM} cladding, an advanced Zircaloy cladding that contains niobium, offers a significant improvement in corrosion resistance relative to Zircaloy-4. Another important Westinghouse PWR fuel feature that facilitates long cycles is the zirconium diboride integral fuel burnable absorber (ZrB{sub 2}IFBA).

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure

  18. Coincidence measurements of FFTF breeder fuel subassemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eccleston, G W; Foley, J E; Krick, M; Menlove, H O; Goris, P; Ramalho, A

    1984-04-01

    A prototype coincidence counter developed to assay fast breeder reactor fuel was used to measure four fast-flux test facility subassemblies at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory in Richland, Washington. Plutonium contents in the four subassemblies ranged between 7.4 and 9.7 kg with corresponding /sup 240/Pu-effective contents between 0.9 and 1.2 kg. Large count rates were observed from the measurements, and plots of the data showed significant multiplication in the fuel. The measured data were corrected for deadtime and multiplication effects using established formulas. These corrections require accurate knowledge of the plutonium isotopics and /sup 241/Am content in the fuel. Multiplication-corrected coincidence count rates agreed with the expected count rates based on spontaneous fission-neutron emission rates. These measurements indicate that breeder fuel subassemblies with /sup 240/Pu-effective contents up to 1.2 kg can be nondestructively assayed using the shift-register electronics with the prototype counters. Measurements using the standard Los Alamos National Laboratory shift-register coincidence electronics unit can produce an assay value accurate to +-1% in 1000 s. The uncertainty results from counting statistics and deadtime-correction errors. 3 references, 8 figures, 8 tables.

  19. Shape coexistence in {sup 180}Hg studied through the {beta} decay of {sup 180}Tl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elseviers, J.; Bree, N.; Diriken, J.; Huyse, M.; Ivanov, O.; Van den Bergh, P.; Van Duppen, P.; Andreyev, A. N.; Antalic, S.; Barzakh, A.; Fedorov, D.; Cocolios, T. E.; Seliverstov, M.; Comas, V. F.; Heredia, J. A.; Fedosseyev, V. N.; Marsh, B. A.; Franchoo, S.; Page, R. D.

    2011-09-15

    The {beta}{sup +}/EC decay of {sup 180}Tl and excited states in the daughter nucleus {sup 180}Hg have been investigated at the CERN On-Line Isotope Mass Separator (ISOLDE) facility. Many new low-lying energy levels were observed in {sup 180}Hg, of which the most significant are the 0{sub 2}{sup +} at 419.6 keV and the 2{sub 2}{sup +} at 601.3 keV. The former is the bandhead of an excited band in {sup 180}Hg assumed originally to be of prolate nature. From the {beta} feeding to the different states in {sup 180}Hg, the ground-state spin of {sup 180}Tl was deduced to be (4{sup -},5{sup -}).

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Filling CNG Fuel Tanks

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Filling CNG Fuel Tanks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Filling CNG Fuel Tanks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Filling CNG Fuel Tanks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Filling CNG Fuel Tanks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Filling CNG Fuel Tanks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Filling CNG Fuel Tanks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Filling CNG Fuel Tanks on

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Basics on

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Safety

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel Safety to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Safety on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Safety on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Safety on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Safety on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Safety on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Safety on

  3. Status of high-density fuel plates fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.; Thresh, H.R.

    1989-09-01

    Progress has continued on the fabrication of fuel plates with fuel zone loadings approaching 9gU/cm{sup 3}. Using Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIPping) successful diffusion bonds have been made with 110 Al and 6061 Al alloys. These bonds demonstrated the most critical processing step for proof-of-concept hardware. Two types of prototype highly-loaded fuel plates have been fabricated. First, a fuel plate in which 0.030 in. (0.76 mm) uranium compound wires are bonded within an aluminum cladding and second, a dispersion fuel plate with uniform cladding and fuel zone thickness. The successful fabrication of these fuel plates derives from the unique ability of the HIPping process to produce diffusion bonds with minimal deformation. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Analysis of states in {sup 13}C populated in {sup 9}Be + {sup 4}He resonant scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.; Curtis, N.; Kokalova, Tz.; Wheldon, C.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Scuderi, V.; Torresi, D.; Grassi, L.; Jelavic Malenica, D.; Koncul, M.; Mijatovic, T.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Szilner, S.; Tokic, V.; Milin, M.

    2011-09-15

    Measurements of {sup 9}Be + {alpha} resonant scattering have been performed using the thick-target approach with a {sup 4}He gas volume and a large-area silicon strip detector. {sup 9}Be beam energies in the range 12 to 21.4 MeV were used to measure the {sup 13}C excitation energy spectrum between 13.2 and 16.2 MeV. An R-matrix analysis has been performed to characterize the spins and widths of {sup 13}C resonances, some of which have been proposed to be associated with a 3{alpha}+n molecular band.

  5. Measurement and analysis of the muonic x rays of /sup 151/Eu and /sup 153/Eu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Y.; Steffen, R.M.; Shera, E.B.; Reuter, W.; Hoehn, M.V.; Zumbro, J.D.

    1984-05-01

    Monopole and quadrupole charge distributions of /sup 151/Eu and /sup 153/Eu were investigated by muonic atom K and L x-ray measurements. The model-independent Barrett charge radii R/sub k/ and the isotope shift ..delta..R/sub k/ were measured, and the value of ..delta..sup 2/> = 0.606(18) fm/sup 2/ was deduced. This isotope shift is the largest known of all nuclear pairs. The isomer shift of the first excited state of /sup 153/Eu is found to be close to zero, in contrast to the large isomer shifts observed in its neighbors: /sup 152/Sm and /sup 154/Gd. The quadrupole moments of the first excited states were determined as Q/sup 151/((7/2)/sup +/) = 1.28(2) e b and Q/sup 153/((7/2)/sup +/) = 0.44(2) e b. The value for /sup 151/Eu and its ground-state quadrupole moment of Q/sup 151/((5/2)/sup +/) = 0.90(1) e b reported previously are several times larger than the respective single particle units. This fact shows that a fair amount of collectivity is involved in the (5/2)/sup +/ ground state and in the (7/2)/sup +/ first excited state of /sup 151/Eu.

  6. Measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in inclusive electroproduction of ?<sup>-> near the Delta<sup>0sup> resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Androic, D.; Armstrong, D. S.; Bailey, S. L.; Beck, D. H.; Beise, E. J.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bimbot, L.; Birchall, J.; Bosted, P.; Breuer, H.; Capuano, C. L.; Chao, Y. -C.; Coppens, A.; Davis, C. A.; Ellis, C.; Flores, G.; Franklin, G.; Furget, C.; Gaskell, D.; Gericke, T. W.; Grames, J.; Guillard, G.; Hansknecht, J.; Horn, T.; Jones, M. K.; King, P. M.; Korsch, W.; Kox, S.; Lee, L.; Liu, J.; Lung, A.; Mammei, J.; Martin, J. W.; McKeown, R. D.; Micherdzinska, A.; Mihovilovic, M.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Muether, M.; Page, S. A.; Papvassiliou, V.; Pate, S. F.; Phillips, S. K.; Pillot, P.; Pitt, M. L.; Poelker, M.; Quinn, B.; Ramsay, W. D.; Real, J. -S.; Roche, J.; Roos, P.; Schaub, J.; Seva, T.; Simicevic, N.; Smith, G. R.; Spayde, D. T.; Stutzman, M.; Suleiman, R.; Tadevosyan, V.; van Oers, W. T.H.; Versteegen, M.

    2012-03-20

    The parity-violating (PV) asymmetry of inclusive ?<sup>-> production in electron scattering from a liquid deuterium target was measured at backward angles. The measurement was conducted as a part of the G0 experiment, at a beam energy of 360 MeV. The physics process dominating pion production for these kinematics is quasi-free photoproduction off the neutron via the ?<sup>0sup> resonance. In the context of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory (HB?PT), this asymmetry is related to a low energy constant d?<sup>-> that characterizes the parity-violating ?N? coupling. Zhu et al. calculated d?<sup>-> in a model benchmarked by the large asymmetries seen in hyperon weak radiative decays, and predicted potentially large asymmetries for this process, ranging from A?<sup>-> = -5.2 to +5.2 ppm. The measurement performed in this work leads to A?<sup>-> = -0.36 1.06 0.37 0.03 ppm (where sources of statistical, systematic and theoretical uncertainties are included), which would disfavor enchancements considered by Zhu et al. proportional to Vud/Vus. The measurement is part of a program of inelastic scattering measurements that were conducted by the G0 experiment, seeking to determine the N-? axial transition form-factors using PV electron scattering.

  7. Nuclear core and fuel assemblies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert E.

    1981-01-01

    A fast flux nuclear core of a plurality of rodded, open-lattice assemblies having a rod pattern rotated relative to a rod support structure pattern. Elongated fuel rods are oriented on a triangular array and laterally supported by grid structures positioned along the length of the assembly. Initial inter-assembly contact is through strongbacks at the corners of the support pattern and peripheral fuel rods between adjacent assemblies are nested so as to maintain a triangular pitch across a clearance gap between the other portions of adjacent assemblies. The rod pattern is rotated relative to the strongback support pattern by an angle .alpha. equal to sin .sup.-1 (p/2c), where p is the intra-assembly rod pitch and c is the center-to-center spacing among adjacent assemblies.

  8. Assessment of SFR fuel pin performance codes under advanced fuel for minor actinide transmutation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouineau, V.; Lainet, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pelletier, M.

    2013-07-01

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is, therefore, an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and residual power packages as well as the repository area. In the SUPERFACT Experiment four different oxide fuels containing high and low concentrations of {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am, representing the homogeneous and heterogeneous in-pile recycling concepts, were irradiated in the PHENIX reactor. The behavior of advanced fuel materials with minor actinide needs to be fully characterized, understood and modeled in order to optimize the design of this kind of fuel elements and to evaluate its performances. This paper assesses the current predictability of fuel performance codes TRANSURANUS and GERMINAL V2 on the basis of post irradiation examinations of the SUPERFACT experiment for pins with low minor actinide content. Their predictions have been compared to measured data in terms of geometrical changes of fuel and cladding, fission gases behavior and actinide and fission product distributions. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results, although improvements are also pointed out for further studies, especially if larger content of minor actinide will be taken into account in the codes. (authors)

  9. Method of depositing a catalyst on a fuel cell electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dearnaley, Geoffrey; Arps, James H.

    2000-01-01

    Fuel cell electrodes comprising a minimal load of catalyst having maximum catalytic activity and a method of forming such fuel cell electrodes. The method comprises vaporizing a catalyst, preferably platinum, in a vacuum to form a catalyst vapor. A catalytically effective amount of the catalyst vapor is deposited onto a carbon catalyst support on the fuel cell electrode. The electrode preferably is carbon cloth. The method reduces the amount of catalyst needed for a high performance fuel cell electrode to about 0.3 mg/cm.sup.2 or less.

  10. The Concentrations of {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th in Soil Sample in Osmaniye (Turkey)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkurt, I.; Guenoglu, K.; Kara, A.; Mavi, B.; Karaboerklue, S.

    2011-12-26

    The {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th concentration is due to the magmatic structure of the earth and it can be varied from place to place. Osmaniye is located in the Eastern side of Mediteranean Region. It holds the climatic characteristics of the same region and arises with Middle Taurus Mountains from west to North and with Amonos Mounations in East and West-east parts and is situated between 35 deg. .52'-36 deg. .42' east longitudes and 36 deg. .57'-37 deg. .45' north latitudes. In this study, the natural radioactivity concentrations {sup 40}K, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 232}Th in some soil samples collected in Osmaniye have been investigated. The measurements have been performed using 3x3{sup ''} NaI(Tl) detector system.

  11. .sup.18 F-4-Fluoroantipyrine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiue, Chyng-Yann; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1984-03-13

    The novel radioactive compound .sup.18 F-4-fluoroantipyrine having high specific activity which can be used in nuclear medicine in diagnostic applications, prepared by the direct fluorination of antipyrine in acetic acid with radioactive fluorine at room temperature and purifying said radioactive compound by means of gel chromatography with ethyl acetate as eluent is disclosed. The non-radioactive 4-fluoroantipyrine can also be prepared by the direct fluorination of antipyrine in acetic acid with molecular fluorine at room temperature and purified by means of gel chromotography with ethyl acetate eluent.

  12. Synthetic fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    In January 1982, the Department of Energy guaranteed a loan for the construction and startup of the Great Plains project. On August 1, 1985, the partnership defaulted on the $1.54 billion loan, and DOE acquired control of, and then title to, the project. DOE continued to operate the plant, through the ANG Coal Gasification Company, and sell synthetic fuel. The DOE's ownership and divestiture of the plant is discussed.

  13. Static electric dipole polarizabilities of An{sup 5+/6+} and AnO{sub 2}{sup +/2+} (An = U, Np, and Pu) ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parmar, Payal E-mail: kipeters@wsu.edu Peterson, Kirk A. E-mail: kipeters@wsu.edu; Clark, Aurora E. E-mail: kipeters@wsu.edu

    2014-12-21

    The parallel components of static electric dipole polarizabilities have been calculated for the lowest lying spin-orbit states of the penta- and hexavalent oxidation states of the actinides (An) U, Np, and Pu, in both their atomic and molecular diyl ion forms (An{sup 5+/6+} and AnO{sub 2}{sup +/2+}) using the numerical finite-field technique within a four-component relativistic framework. The four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock method formed the reference for MP2 and CCSD(T) calculations, while multireference Fock space coupled-cluster (FSCC), intermediate Hamiltonian Fock space coupled-cluster (IH-FSCC) and Kramers restricted configuration interaction (KRCI) methods were used to incorporate additional electron correlation. It is observed that electron correlation has significant (?5 a.u.{sup 3}) impact upon the parallel component of the polarizabilities of the diyls. To the best of our knowledge, these quantities have not been previously reported and they can serve as reference values in the determination of various electronic and response properties (for example intermolecular forces, optical properties, etc.) relevant to the nuclear fuel cycle and material science applications. The highest quality numbers for the parallel components (?{sub zz}) of the polarizability for the lowest ? levels corresponding to the ground electronic states are (in a.u.{sup 3}) 44.15 and 41.17 for UO{sub 2}{sup +} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, respectively, 45.64 and 41.42 for NpO{sub 2}{sup +} and NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, respectively, and 47.15 for the PuO{sub 2}{sup +} ion.

  14. <sup>137sup> Cs Activities and <sup>135sup> Cs/ <sup>137sup> Cs Isotopic Ratios from Soils at Idaho National Laboratory: A Case Study for Contaminant Source Attribution in the Vicinity of Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Mathew S.; Snyder, Darin C.; Clark, Sue B.; Kelley, Morgan; Delmore, James E.

    2015-03-03

    Radiometric and mass spectrometric analyses of Cs contamination in the environment can reveal the location of Cs emission sources, release mechanisms, modes of transport, prediction of future contamination migration, and attribution of contamination to specific generator(s) and/or process(es). The Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) represents a complicated case study for demonstrating the current capabilities and limitations to environmental Cs analyses. <sup>137sup>Cs distribution patterns, <sup>135sup>Cs/>137sup>Cs isotope ratios, known Cs chemistry at this site, and historical records enable narrowing the list of possible emission sources and release events to a single source and event, with the SDA identified as the emission source and flood transport of material from within Pit 9 and Trench 48 as the primary release event. These data combined allow refining the possible number of waste generators from dozens to a single generator, with INL on-site research and reactor programs identified as the most likely waste generator. A discussion on the ultimate limitations to the information that <sup>135sup>Cs/>137sup>Cs ratios alone can provide is presented and includes (1) uncertainties in the exact date of the fission event and (2) possibility of mixing between different Cs source terms (including nuclear weapons fallout and a source of interest).

  15. Engineered fuel: Renewable fuel of the future?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomczyk, L.

    1997-01-01

    The power generation and municipal solid waste management industries share an interest in the use of process engineered fuel (PEF) comprised mainly of paper and plastics as a supplement to conventional fuels. PEF is often burned in existing boilers, making PEF an alternative to traditional refuse derived fuels (RDF). This paper describes PEF facilities and makes a comparison of PEF and RDF fuels.

  16. Decay Studies of Very Neutron Rich Nuclei near <sup>78sup>Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winger, J. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Korgul, A.; Gross, Carl J; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Batchelder, J. C.; Goodin, C.; Grzywacz, R.; Hamilton, J. H.; Krolas, W.; Liddick, Sean; Mazzocchi, C.; Nelson, C.; Padgett, Stephen; Piechaczek, A.; Rajabali, M. M.; Shapira, Dan; Zganjar, E. F.

    2008-01-01

    The properties of beta-gamma and beta-delayed neutron emission from <sup>76-79sup>Cu and <sup>83-85sup>Ga were measured at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Selected results on the decay properties of copper isotopes are briefly presented and discussed.

  17. Excitation functions of the <sup>natTa(p,x)>178m2sup>Hf and <sup>natW(p,x)>178m2sup>Hf reactions at energies up to 2600 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Zhivun, V. M.; Chauzova, M. V.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich; Leray, S.; Boudard, A.; David, J. -C.; Mancusi, D.; Cugnon, J.; Yariv, Y.; Nishihara, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kumawat, H.; Stankovskiy, A. Yu.

    2015-04-29

    Due to potential level of energy intensity <sup>178m2sup>Hf is an extremely interesting isomer. One possible way to produce this isomer is irradiation of <sup>nat>Ta or <sup>nat>W samples with high energy protons. Irradiation of <sup>nat>Ta or <sup>nat>W samples performed for other purposes provides an opportunity to study the corresponding reactions. This paper presents the <sup>178m2sup>Hf independent production cross sections for both targets measured by the gamma-ray spectrometry method. The reaction excitation functions have been obtained for the proton energies from 40 up to 2600 MeV. The experimental results were compared with calculations by various versions of the intranuclear cascade model in the well-known codes: ISABEL, Bertini, INCL4.5+ABLA07, PHITS, CASCADE07 and CEM03.02. The isomer ratio for the <sup>nat>Ta(p,x) <sup>178m2sup>Hf reaction is evaluated on the basis of the available data.

  18. Characterization of Delayed-Particle Emission Signatures for Pyroprocessing. Part 1: ABTR Fuel Assembly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, Jr., Joe W.

    2015-06-19

    A three-part study is conducted using the MCNP6 Monte Carlo radiation-transport code to calculate delayed-neutron (DN) and delayed-gamma (DG) emission signatures for nondestructive assay (NDA) metal-fuel pyroprocessing. In Part 1, MCNP6 is used to produce irradiation-induced used nuclear fuel (UNF) isotopic inventories for an Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) preconceptual design fuel assembly (FA) model. The initial fuel inventory consists of uranium mixed with light-water-reactor transuranic (TRU) waste and 10 wt% zirconium (U-LWR-SFTRU-10%Zr). To facilitate understanding, parametric evaluation is done using models for 3% and 5% initial <sup>235sup>U a% enrichments, burnups of 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, …, 120 GWd/MTIHM, and 3-, 5-, 10-, 20-, and 30- year cooling times. Detailed delayed-particle radioisotope source terms for the irradiate FA are created using BAMF-DRT and SOURCES3A. Using simulation tallies, DG activity ratios (DGARs) are developed for <sup>134sup>Cs/>137sup>Cs <sup>134sup>Cs/>154sup>Eu, and <sup>154sup>Eu/>137sup>Cs markers as a function of (1) burnup and (2) actinide mass, including elemental uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium. Spectral-integrated DN emission is also tallied. The study reveals a rich assortment of DGAR behavior as a function of DGAR type, enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Similarly, DN emission plots show variation as a function of burnup and of actinide mass. Sensitivity of DGAR and DN signatures to initial <sup>235sup>U enrichment, burnup, and cooling time is evident. Comparisons of the ABTR radiation signatures and radiation signatures previously reported for a generic Westinghouse oxide-fuel assembly indicate that there are pronounced differences in the ABTR and Westinghouse oxide-fuel DN and DG signatures. These differences are largely attributable to the initial TRU inventory in the ABTR fuel. The actinide and nonactinide inventories for the

  19. Hadron production in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation at 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugano, K.

    1987-01-01

    Recent results from HRS on the production of scalar, tensor, and charm mesons and of strange and charm baryons in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation are presented. The production of f/sub 0/(975), f/sub 2/(1270), and K/sub 2/*(1430) is shown briefly. The decays of D*(2010)/sup +/ and D*(2007)/sup 0/ are studied in detail. The production of ..xi../sup -/ and ..sigma..(1385)/sup + -/ is mentioned. Finally, the preliminary analyses of ..lambda../sub c/ and ..sigma../sub c//sup 0,++/ productions are presented.

  20. Check for chirality in {sup 102}Rh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Yavahchova, M. S.; Petkov, P.; Angelis, G. de; Bhowmik, R. K.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Madhavan, N.; Kumar, R.; Raju, M. Kumar; Kaur, J.; Mahanto, G.; Singh, A.; Kaur, N.; Garg, R.; Sukla, A.; Marinov, Ts. K.; Brant, S.

    2012-10-20

    Excited states in {sup 102}Rh, populated by the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 94}Zr({sup 11}B,3n){sup 102}Rh at a beam energy of 36 MeV, were studied using the INGA spectrometer at IUAC, New Delhi. The angular correlations and the electromagnetic character of some of the gamma-ray transitions observed were investigated in details. A new chiral candidate sister band was found in the level-scheme of {sup 102}Rh. Lifetimes of exited states in {sup 102}Rh were measured by means of the Doppler-shift attenuation technique. The experimental results do not support the presence of static chirality in {sup 102}Rh.

  1. Experimental study of the beta-delayed proton precursors /sup 33/Ar and /sup 49/Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU Xiao-ji; GUO Jun-sheng; GUO Ying-xiang; ZHAO Zhi-zheng; LUO Yi-xiao

    1985-01-01

    Beta-delayed proton precursors /sup 33/Ar and /sup 49/Fe have been produced via the (/sup 12/C,3n) reaction in 65-MeV carbon bombardments of /sup 24/Mg and /sup 40/Ca, respectively. The major proton peaks are at 3.28 +- 0.07 MeV for /sup 33/Ar and 1.98 +- 0.04 MeV for /sup 49/Fe. The corresponding cross section for /sup 33/Ar is 0.40 +- 0.08 ..mu..b, and for /sup 49/Fe 0.70 +- 0.14 ..mu..b. The half-life of /sup 33/Ar was determined to be 167 +- 24 ms.

  2. Elastic scattering measurements for {sup 7}Be+{sup 27}Al system at RIBRAS facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morcelle, V.; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Morais, M. C.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Faria, P. N. de; Gasques, L.; Pires, K. C. C.; Condori, R. P.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Lubian, J.; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Barioni, A.; Shorto, J. M. B.; Zamora, J. C.

    2013-05-06

    Elastic scattering angular distribution measurements of {sup 7}Be+{sup 27}Al system were performed at the laboratory energy of 15.6 MeV. The {sup 7}Be secondary beam was produced by the proton transfer reaction {sup 3}He({sup 6}Li,{sup 7}Be) and impinged on {sup 27}Al and {sup 197}Au targets, using the Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility, RIBRAS. The elastic angular distribution was obtained within the angular range of 15{sup 0} - 80{sup 0} at the center of mass frame. Optical model calculations have been performed using the Woods- Saxon form factors and the Sao Paulo potential to fit the experimental data. The total reaction cross section was derived.

  3. Lifetime measurements of yrast states in {sup 162}Yb and {sup 166}Hf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCutchan, E.A.; Casten, R.F.; Ai, H.; Amro, H.; Heinz, A.; Meyer, D.A.; Plettner, C.; Qian, J.; Ressler, J.J.; Werner, V.; Williams, E.; Winkler, R.; Zamfir, N.V.; Babilon, M.; Brenner, D.S.; Guerdal, G.; Hughes, R.O.; Thomas, N.J.

    2006-03-15

    Lifetime measurements of yrast levels in {sup 162}Yb and {sup 166}Hf were performed using the recoil distance Doppler-shift method in coincidence mode. Excited states in {sup 162}Yb and {sup 166}Hf were populated via the reactions {sup 116}Cd({sup 50}Ti, 4n) and {sup 122}Sn({sup 48}Ti, 4n), respectively. The resulting B(E2) values are compared with the X(5) critical point model predictions and interacting boson approximation (IBA) model calculations. The X(5) model provides a reasonable description of the yrast B(E2) values in {sup 166}Hf, whereas the IBA fails to reproduce the transition strengths from the higher spin levels. In {sup 162}Yb, some transitions agree with the X(5) predictions while others are more consistent with the predictions of the IBA or a deformed symmetric rotor.

  4. Threshold ?<sup>0sup> Photoproduction on Transverse Polarised Protons at MAMI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumann, S.

    2015-09-14

    Polarisation-dependent differential cross sections ?T associated with the target asymmetry T have been measured for the reaction ? p<sup>->? p ?<sup>0sup> with transverse target polarisation from ?<sup>0sup> threshold up to photon energies of 190 MeV. Additionally, the data were obtained using a frozen-spin butanol target with the Crystal Ball / TAPS detector set-up and the Glasgow photon tagging system at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. Our results for ?T have been used in combination with our previous measurements of the unpolarised cross section ?<sup>0sup> and the beam asymmetry ? for a model-independent determination of S and P wave multipoles in the ?<sup>0sup> threshold region, which includes for the first time a direct determination of the imaginary part of the E0+ multipole.

  5. Analysis of <sup>161sup>Tb by radiochemical separation and liquid scintillation counting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, J.; Davies, A.; Arrigo, L.; Friese, J.; Seiner, B. N.; Greenwood, L.; Finch, Z.

    2015-12-05

    The determination of <sup>161sup>Tb activity is problematic due to its very low fission yield, short half-life, and the complication of its gamma spectrum. At AWE, radiochemically purified <sup>161sup>Tb solution was measured on a PerkinElmer 1220 Quantulus<sup>TM> Liquid Scintillation Spectrometer. Since there was no <sup>161sup>Tb certified standard solution available commercially, the counting efficiency was determined by the CIEMAT/NIST Efficiency Tracing method. The method was validated during a recent inter-laboratory comparison exercise involving the analysis of a uranium sample irradiated with thermal neutrons. Lastly, the measured <sup>161sup>Tb result was in excellent agreement with the result using gamma spectrometry and the result obtained by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  6. Dosimetric comparison of {sup 90}Y, {sup 32}P, and {sup 186}Re radiocolloids in craniopharyngioma treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Karimi, Elham; Hosseini, S. Hamed

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: In the radionuclide treatment of some forms of brain tumors such as craniopharyngiomas, the selection of the appropriate radionuclide for therapy is a key element in treatment planning. The aim was to study the influence by considering the beta-emitter radionuclide dose rate in an intracranial cyst. Methods: Dosimetry was performed using the MCNP4C radiation transport code. Analytical dosimetry was additionally performed using the Loevinger and the Berger formulas in the MATLAB software. Each result was compared under identical conditions. The advantages and disadvantages of using {sup 90}Y versus {sup 32}P and {sup 186}Re were investigated. Results: The dose rate at the inner surface of the cyst wall was estimated to be 400 mGy/h for a 1 MBq/ml concentration of {sup 90}Y. Under identical conditions of treatment, the corresponding dose rates were 300 mGy/h for {sup 32}P and 160 mGy/h for {sup 186}Re. For a well-defined cyst radius and identical wall thickness, higher dose rates resulted for {sup 90}Y. Conclusions: To achieve the same radiological burden, the required amount of physical activity of injectable solution is lower for {sup 32}P. This is found to be a consequence of both the radionuclide physical half-life and the pattern of energy deposition from the emitted radiation. According to the half-life and dose-rate results, {sup 90}Y would be a good substitute for {sup 32}P.

  7. Fireside Corrosion in Oxy-fuel Combustion of Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, Gordon R; Tylczak, Joseph; Meier, Gerald H; Lutz, Bradley; Jung, Keeyoung; Mu, Nan; Yanar, Nazik M; Pettit, Frederick S; Zhu, Jingxi; Wise, Adam; Laughlin, David E.; Sridhar, Seetharaman

    2013-11-25

    Oxy-fuel combustion is burning a fuel in oxygen rather than air for ease of capture of CO2 from for reuse or sequestration. Corrosion issues associated with the environment change (replacement of much of the N2 with CO2 and higher sulfur levels) from air- to oxy-firing were examined. Alloys studied included model Fe–Cr alloys and commercial ferritic steels, austenitic steels, and nickel base superalloys. The corrosion behavior is described in terms of corrosion rates, scale morphologies, and scale/ash interactions for the different environmental conditions. Evidence was found for a hreshold for severe attack between 10<sup>-4sup> and 10<sup>-3sup> atm of SO3 at 700ºC.

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Strategies to Conserve Fuel

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Stations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data