Sample records for fuel sup ply

  1. 22 IEEE power & energy magazine march/april 2011 THE SECURITY OF ENERGY SUP-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    22 IEEE power & energy magazine march/april 2011 T THE SECURITY OF ENERGY SUP- ply has become in energy security and natu- ral disasters have been conducted around the world. Research cen- ters have on a continuous energy supply, but our complete style of living collapses when energy fails. Surges in fuel prices

  2. High conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly for current generation of PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldova, D.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 510119, Dresden, 01314 (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a preliminary design of a high conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly applicable for current generation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWRs). The considered fuel assembly has a typical 17 x 17 PWR lattice. However in order to increase the conversion of Th{sup 232} to U{sup 233}, the assembly was subdivided into the two regions called seed and blanket. The central seed region has a higher than blanket U{sup 233} content and acts as a neutron source for the peripheral blanket region. The latest acts as a U{sup 233} breeder. While the seed fuel pins have a standard dimensions the blanket fuel radius was increased in order to reduce the moderation and to facilitate the resonance neutron absorption in blanket Th{sup 232}. The U{sup 233} content in the seed and blanket regions was optimized to achieve maximal initial to discharged fissile inventory ratio (FIR) taking into account the target fuel cycle length of 12 months with 3-batch reloading scheme. In this study the neutronic calculations were performed on the fuel assembly level using Helios deterministic lattice transport code. The fuel cycle length and the core k{sub eff} were estimated by applying the Non Linear Reactivity Model. The applicability of the HELIOS code for the analysis of the Th-based high conversion designs was confirmed with the help of continuous-energy Monte-Carlo code SERPENT. The results of optimization studies show that for the heterogeneous seed and blanket (SB) fuel assembly the FIR of about 0.95 can be achieved. (authors)

  3. Estimation of average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors by using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Endo, T.; Sato, S.; Yamamoto, A. [Dept. of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Univ., Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya-shi, 464-8603 (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors is estimated, using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method for measured radioactivities of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs in contaminated soils within the range of 100 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants. As a result, the measured {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio from the contaminated soil is 0.996{+-}0.07 as of March 11, 2011. Based on the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method, the estimated burnup of damaged fuels is approximately 17.2{+-}1.5 [GWd/tHM]. It is noted that the numerical results of various calculation codes (SRAC2006/PIJ, SCALE6.0/TRITON, and MVP-BURN) are almost the same evaluation values of {sup 134}Cs/ {sup 137}Cs ratio with same evaluated nuclear data library (ENDF-B/VII.0). The void fraction effect in depletion calculation has a major impact on {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio compared with the differences between JENDL-4.0 and ENDF-B/VII.0. (authors)

  4. /sup 238/Pu fuel-form processes. Quarterly report, October-December 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the Savannah River /sup 238/Pu Fuel Form Program is summarized. Work during this period concentrated on the extensive cracking of the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel form prior to encapsulation in the iridium containment shell for heat sources. This cracking results in increased recycle cost and decreased production efficiency. To better understand this cracking, Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) has made an extensive review of the development of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel forms from small-scale Multi-hundred Watt (MHW) pellets through the current GPHS full-scale pellet production. Historically, /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ fuel has almost always been uncracked after hot pressing in a graphite die, but has emerged cracked and fragile from the final heat-treatment furnace. The cracking tendency depends on the microstructure of the fuel form and on the hot pressing conditions used to fabricate it. In general, a microstructure of large intershard porosity is more desirable because it allows internal gas to escape more readily and it can absorb more reoxidation strain. Studies of the GPHS microstructure showed that the internal structures of typical GPHS Pellets fabricated at LANL and in the PEF differed significantly. The LANL pellets had severe density gradients and were extensively cracked.

  5. BWR - Spent Fuel Transport and Storage with the TN{sup TM}9/4 and TN{sup TM}24BH Casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wattez, L. [COGEMA LOGISTICS - AREVA Group (France); Marguerat, Y. [BKW FMB Energy Ltd (Switzerland); Hoesli, C. [ZWILAG Zwischenlager Wuerenlingen AG (Switzerland)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Swiss Nuclear Utilities have started in 2001 to store spent fuel in dry metallic dual-purpose casks at ZWILAG, the Swiss interim storage facility. BKW FMB Energy Ltd., the Muehleberg Nuclear Power Plant owner, is involved in this process and has elected to store its BWR spent fuel in a new high capacity dual-purpose cask, the TNeTeM24BH from the COGEMA Logistics/TRANSNUCLEAR TN{sup TM}24 family. The Muehleberg BWR spent fuels are transported by road in a medium size shuttle transport cask and then transferred to a heavy transport/storage cask (dry transfer) in the hot cell of ZWILAG site. For that purpose, COGEMA Logistics designed and supplied: - Two shuttle casks, TN{sup TM}9/4, mainly devoted to transport of spent fuel from Muehleberg NPP to ZWILAG. Licensed according to IAEA 1996, the TN{sup TM}9/4 is a 40 ton transport cask, for 7 BWR high bum-up spent fuel assemblies. - A series of new high capacity dual-purpose casks, TN{sup TM}24BH, holding 69 BWR spent fuels. Two transport campaigns took place in 2003 and 2004. For each campaign, ten TN{sup TM}9/4 round trips are performed, and one TN{sup TM}24BH is loaded. 5 additional TN{sup TM}24BH are being manufactured for BKW, and the next transport campaigns are scheduled from 2006. The TN{sup TM}24BH high capacity dual purpose cask and the TN{sup TM}9/4 transport cask characteristics and capabilities will then be detailed. (authors)

  6. About Ply Gem Headquartered in Cary, North Carolina, Ply Gem is a leading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    . After expanding into wood paneling and vacuum bags, Ply Gem's next big move was to aluminum and vinyl to increase energy efficiency, including its low-energy windows and insulated siding. Community

  7. Feasibility of fissile mass assay of spent nuclear fuel using {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency-analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattingly, J.K.; Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility was evaluated using MCNP-DSP, an analog Monte Carlo transport cod to simulate source-driven measurements. Models of an isolated Westinghouse 17x17 PWR fuel assembly in a 1500-ppM borated water storage pool were used. In the models, the fuel burnup profile was represented using seven axial burnup zones, each with isotopics estimated by the PDQ code. Four different fuel assemblies with average burnups from fresh to 32 GWd/MTU were modeled and analyzed. Analysis of the fuel assemblies was simulated by inducing fission in the fuel using a {sup 252}Cf source adjacent to the assembly and correlating source fissions with the response of a bank of {sup 3}He detectors adjacent to the assembly opposite the source. This analysis was performed at 7 different axial positions on each of the 4 assemblies, and the source-detector cross-spectrum signature was calculated for each of these 28 simulated measurements. The magnitude of the cross-spectrum signature follows a smooth upward trend with increasing fissile material ({sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu) content, and the signature is independent of the concentration of spontaneously fissioning isotopes (e.g., {sup 244}Cm) and ({alpha},n) sources. Furthermore, the cross-spectrum signature is highly sensitive to changes in fissile material content. This feasibility study indicated that the signature would increase {similar_to}100% in response to an increase of only 0.1 g/cm{sup 3} of fissile material.

  8. Ultrasonic ply-by-ply detection of matrix cracks in laminated composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganpatye, Atul Shridatta

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................... 68 Fig. 2.33 (a) Filtered X-ray image, and (b) ultrasonic image, of cracks in the -452 ply-group of the TAMU-1 specimen.................................................... 69 Fig. 2.34 (a) Filtered X-ray image, and (b) ultrasonic image....................................................... 71 Fig. 2.36 (a) Filtered X-ray image, and (b) ultrasonic image, of cracks in the -452 ply-group of the TAMU-4 specimen.................................................... 72 xi Page Fig. 3.1 Ultrasonic images of cracks in the eight...

  9. Preliminary results of calculations for heavy-water nuclear-power-plant reactors employing {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 232}Th as a fuel and meeting requirements of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ioffe, B. L.; Kochurov, B. P. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A physical design is developed for a gas-cooled heavy-water nuclear reactor intended for a project of a nuclear power plant. As a fuel, the reactor would employ thorium with a small admixture of enriched uranium that contains not more than 20% of {sup 235}U. It operates in the open-cycle mode involving {sup 233}U production from thorium and its subsequent burnup. The reactor meets the conditions of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons: the content of fissionable isotopes in uranium at all stages of the process, including the final one, is below the threshold for constructing an atomic bomb, the amount of product plutonium being extremely small.

  10. Use of {sup 59}Ni, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 236}U to monitor the release of radionuclides from objects containing spent nuclear fuel dumped in the Kara Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mount, M.E.; Layton, D.W.; Lynn, N.M.; Hamilton, T.F.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1965 and 1981, five objects - six naval reactor pressure vessels (RPVs) from four former Soviet Union submarines and a special containers from the icebreaker Lenin, each of which contained damaged spent nuclear fuel (SNF) - were dumped in a variety of containments, using a number of sealing methods, at four sites in the Kara Sea. All objects were dumped at sites that varied in depth from 12 to 300 m. This paper examines the use of the long-lived radionuclides {sup 59}Ni, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 236}U encased within these objects to monitor the breakdown of the containments due to corrosion. Included are discussions of the radionuclide inventory and their release rate model, the estimated radionuclide mass in a typical seawater sample, and the potential for radionuclide measurement via Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS).

  11. L3:RTM.SUP.P9.01 Resonance Self-shielding Method for Fuel Annular

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12electron beamJoin2015JustKateKent5 BC#SUP.P9.01 Resonance

  12. Fission product release from highly irradiated LWR fuel heated to 1300 to 1600/sup 0/C in steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenz, R.A.; Collins, J.L.; Malinauskas, A.P. Osborne, M.F.; Towns, R.L.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four tests were performed with high-burnup light water reactor (LWR) fuel to explore the amount and characteristics of fission product release at short heating times (0.4 to 10 min) in steam atmosphere in the temperature range 1300 to 1600/sup 0/C. The test fuel rod segments were cut from full-length fuel rods irradiated at low heat rating to 30,000 MWd/MT in the H.B. Robinson-2 reactor. The releases of cesium and iodine increased tenfold (approx.0.3 to >4%) with temperature from 1350 to 1400/sup 0/C from fuel with defects that simulate ruptured cladding. Krypton release rose from approx.2 to approx.11% of total inventory in this temperature range. This sudden increase in release of krypton, cesium, and iodine is believed to result from prior accumulations of these species at or very near the grain boundaries. At 1600/sup 0/C, the releases of krypton, cesium, and iodine were in the range 17 to 25% of total fuel inventory.

  13. Geometry and mechanics of uniform n-plies: from engineering ropes to biological laments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neukirch, Sébastien

    previous work in the literature. An n-ply is the structure formed when n pretwisted strands coil around one of the issues relevant for plies also arise in tightly wound single helices (1-plies) as studied in, e.g., [29. A common way to form a ply is to take a few

  14. Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanch, Harvey

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2006) Trends in Oil Sup-ply and Demand, the Potential forthe U.S. As world demand increases, oil reserves may become

  15. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240} PU core : a cylindrical assemby with mixed (PU, U)-oxide fuel and a central high {sup 240} PU zone.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lell, R. M.; Schaefer, R. W.; McKnight, R. D.; Tsiboulia, A.; Rozhikhin, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over a period of 30 years more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. The term 'benchmark' in a ZPR program connotes a particularly simple loading aimed at gaining basic reactor physics insight, as opposed to studying a reactor design. In fact, the ZPR-6/7 Benchmark Assembly (Reference 1) had a very simple core unit cell assembled from plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U3O8, and plutonium. The ZPR-6/7 core cell-average composition is typical of the interior region of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) of the era. It was one part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program,a which provided integral experiments characterizing the important features of demonstration-size LMFBRs. As a benchmark, ZPR-6/7 was devoid of many 'real' reactor features, such as simulated control rods and multiple enrichment zones, in its reference form. Those kinds of features were investigated experimentally in variants of the reference ZPR-6/7 or in other critical assemblies in the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program.

  16. Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)K-> and B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)?-> decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T. [Helsinki Inst. of Physics; Gonzalez, Alvarez B. [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S. [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D. [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A. [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A. [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Appel, J. A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A. [Purdue; Arisawa, T. [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)K-> and B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)?-> decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb<sup>-1sup> of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)K-> suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 ± 8.6(stat) ± 2.6(syst)] x 10<sup>-3sup>, R<sup>+>(K) = [42.6 ± 13.7(stat) ± 2.8(syst)] x 10<sup>-3sup>, R<sup>->(K) = [3.8 ± 10.3(stat) ± 2.7(syst)] x 10<sup>-3sup> as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.82±0.44(stat)±0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B<sup>-> ? D(? K<sup>+?-)?-> decay are also reported.

  17. Joint ECE/PLI Seminar Title: Innovation Growth and Renewal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joint ECE/PLI Seminar Title: Innovation ­ Growth and Renewal Speaker: Chris Christopher, ECE, business plan development, operations, and executive coaching. He is currently engaged in a management, desktop computer software, operating systems, languages and graphics. He was born in Greece, where he

  18. Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Hayley

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy sup- plies and developing relations with numerous fossil fuel exporting coun- tries, including Venezuela, Nigeria,

  19. Uncertainty analysis on reactivity and discharged inventory for a pressurized water reactor fuel assembly due to {sup 235,238}U nuclear data uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Da Cruz, D. F.; Rochman, D.; Koning, A. J. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group NRG, Westerduinweg 3, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the uncertainty analysis on reactivity and inventory for a typical PWR fuel element as a result of uncertainties in {sup 235,238}U nuclear data. A typical Westinghouse 3-loop fuel assembly fuelled with UO{sub 2} fuel with 4.8% enrichment has been selected. The Total Monte-Carlo method has been applied using the deterministic transport code DRAGON. This code allows the generation of the few-groups nuclear data libraries by directly using data contained in the nuclear data evaluation files. The nuclear data used in this study is from the JEFF3.1 evaluation, and the nuclear data files for {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U (randomized for the generation of the various DRAGON libraries) are taken from the nuclear data library TENDL. The total uncertainty (obtained by randomizing all {sup 238}U and {sup 235}U nuclear data in the ENDF files) on the reactor parameters has been split into different components (different nuclear reaction channels). Results show that the TMC method in combination with a deterministic transport code constitutes a powerful tool for performing uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of reactor physics parameters. (authors)

  20. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240}Pu core experiments : a fast reactor core with mixed (Pu,U)-oxide fuel and a centeral high{sup 240}Pu zone.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lell, R. M.; Morman, J. A.; Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    ZPR-6 Assembly 7 (ZPR-6/7) encompasses a series of experiments performed at the ZPR-6 facility at Argonne National Laboratory in 1970 and 1971 as part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program (Reference 1). Assembly 7 simulated a large sodium-cooled LMFBR with mixed oxide fuel, depleted uranium radial and axial blankets, and a core H/D near unity. ZPR-6/7 was designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, so configurations in the Assembly 7 program were as simple as possible in terms of geometry and composition. ZPR-6/7 had a very uniform core assembled from small plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and Pu-U-Mo alloy loaded into stainless steel drawers. The steel drawers were placed in square stainless steel tubes in the two halves of a split table machine. ZPR-6/7 had a simple, symmetric core unit cell whose neutronic characteristics were dominated by plutonium and {sup 238}U. The core was surrounded by thick radial and axial regions of depleted uranium to simulate radial and axial blankets and to isolate the core from the surrounding room. The ZPR-6/7 program encompassed 139 separate core loadings which include the initial approach to critical and all subsequent core loading changes required to perform specific experiments and measurements. In this context a loading refers to a particular configuration of fueled drawers, radial blanket drawers and experimental equipment (if present) in the matrix of steel tubes. Two principal core configurations were established. The uniform core (Loadings 1-84) had a relatively uniform core composition. The high {sup 240}Pu core (Loadings 85-139) was a variant on the uniform core. The plutonium in the Pu-U-Mo fuel plates in the uniform core contains 11% {sup 240}Pu. In the high {sup 240}Pu core, all Pu-U-Mo plates in the inner core region (central 61 matrix locations per half of the split table machine) were replaced by Pu-U-Mo plates containing 27% {sup 240}Pu in the plutonium component to construct a central core zone with a composition closer to that in an LMFBR core with high burnup. The high {sup 240}Pu configuration was constructed for two reasons. First, the composition of the high {sup 240}Pu zone more closely matched the composition of LMFBR cores anticipated in design work in 1970. Second, comparison of measurements in the ZPR-6/7 uniform core with corresponding measurements in the high {sup 240}Pu zone provided an assessment of some of the effects of long-term {sup 240}Pu buildup in LMFBR cores. The uniform core version of ZPR-6/7 is evaluated in ZPR-LMFR-EXP-001. This document only addresses measurements in the high {sup 240}Pu core version of ZPR-6/7. Many types of measurements were performed as part of the ZPR-6/7 program. Measurements of criticality, sodium void worth, control rod worth and reaction rate distributions in the high {sup 240}Pu core configuration are evaluated here. For each category of measurements, the uncertainties are evaluated, and benchmark model data are provided.

  1. Rapid prediction of various physical properties for middle distillate fuel utilizing directly coupled liquid chromatography//sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caswell, K.A.; Glass, T.E.; Swann, M.; Dorn, H.C.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A group property approach has been developed to predict 17 physical properties of middle distillate (e.g., jet and diesel) fuels from experimentally derived liquid chromatography//sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance (LC//sup 1/H NMR) data. In the LC//sup 1/H NMR technique, the fuel is separated according to chemical class and the average molecular structure for each chemical class is then calculated. These average molecular structures form a basis set to predict the physical properties of the fuel. The physical properties that can be obtained in this manner are cetane number, cetane index, density, specific gravity, pour point, flash point, viscosity, filterability, heat of combustion, cloud point, volume percent aromatics, residual carbon content, and the initial, 10%, 50%, 90%, and end boiling points. Fourteen of the correlation coefficients for the predictions are better than 0.90 with 11 of the predictions falling either within or approximately equal to the ASTM method reproducibility for the measurement of the fuel property. The present method also provides chemical insight concerning the influence of chemical structural changes on the physical properties of the fuel as well as requiring much less analysis time and sample volume than corresponding ASTM methods.

  2. Residual thermal stresses in an unsymmetrical cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Brian Douglas

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in parrial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Approved as to style and content by: r. Y. N itsman (Chair of Committee) Dr...

  3. Stresses due to environmental conditioning of cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglass, David Alan

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STRESSES DUE TO ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONING OF CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by DAVID ALAN DOUGLASS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering STRESSES DUE TO ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONING OF CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by DAVID ALAN DOUGLASS Approved as to style and content by: Dr. . Weitsman Chasrm n of Comittee g...

  4. Institutionalizing Unsustainability: The Paradox of Global Climate Governance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevenson, Hayley

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy sup- plies and developing relations with numerous fossil fuel exporting coun- tries, including Venezuela, Nigeria, Sudan, Angola, Syria, Egypt,

  5. Hygrothermal effects in an anti-symmetric cross-ply graphite/epoxy material 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Steven Paul

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYGROTHERMAL EFFECTS IN AN ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY MATERIAL A Thesis STEVEN PAUL JACKSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SC...'IENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering HYGROTHERMAL ~S IN AN ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis STEVE? PAUL JACKSON Approved as to style and content by: (Y. eitsman, Charrman) (W. L. Bradley, M (W. E. Haisler...

  6. Mod`ele Elements Finis d'un Pli Vocal Artificiel avec Couplage Hydro-elastique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Mod`ele El´ements Finis d'un Pli Vocal Artificiel avec Couplage Hydro-´elastique N. Hermanta , F formulation variationnelle du couplage hydro-élastique. Un premier calcul hyper-élastique simule le gonflement dans l'analyse modale des vibrations de petite amplitude du système hydro-élastique, permettant ainsi

  7. Delamination at Thick Ply Drops in Carbon and Glass Fiber Laminates Under Fatigue Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    used for glass fibers in wind turbine blades. Introduction The primary structural elements in most wind extent, in wind turbine blade technology. 6,7 Methodologies for predicting delamination under static literature, for the wind turbine blade application the effects of thicker plies and lower cost processing

  8. Delamination and Failure at Ply Drops in Carbon Fiber Laminates Under Static and Fatigue Loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plies typical of wind turbine blades. Strain levels to produce significant delamination at both carbon commonly used for glass fibers. I. Introduction The primary structural elements in most wind turbine blades attention in the general composites literature1-5 and, to a lesser extent, in wind turbine blade technology

  9. Effect of Fiber Orientation and Ply Mix on Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Confined Concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    concrete by testing under uniaxial compression a designed array of plain concrete cylinders wrappedEffect of Fiber Orientation and Ply Mix on Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Confined Concrete Ching Au, A concrete lateral strain while the kink stress was found to upshift with increasing jacket stiffness

  10. THERMO-MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF SINGLE-PLY TRIAXIAL WEAVE CARBON FIBRE REINFORCED PLASTIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soykasap, Omer

    1 THERMO-MECHANICAL BEHAVIOUR OF SINGLE-PLY TRIAXIAL WEAVE CARBON FIBRE REINFORCED PLASTIC Ahmad, Trumpington Street, Cambridge, CB2 1PZ, U.K. ABSTRACT This paper is concerned with the thermo-mechanical be-mechanical models. 1. INTRODUCTION This paper is concerned with the thermo-mechanical be- haviour of composite

  11. Study of e<sup>+e-??+?->J/? and Observation of a Charged Charmoniumlike State at Belle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Z. Q.; Shen, C. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Feindt, M.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Joffe, D.; Julius, T.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santel, D.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seidl, R.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Vahsen, S. E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross section for e<sup>+e???+??>J/? between 3.8 and 5.5 GeV is measured with a 967??fb<sup>?1sup> data sample collected by the Belle detector at or near the ?(nS) (n=1,2,…,5) resonances. The Y(4260) state is observed, and its resonance parameters are determined. In addition, an excess of ?<sup>+??>J/? production around 4 GeV is observed. This feature can be described by a Breit-Wigner parametrization with properties that are consistent with the Y(4008) state that was previously reported by Belle. In a study of Y(4260)??<sup>+??>J/? decays, a structure is observed in the M(?<sup>±>J/?) mass spectrum with 5.2? significance, with mass M=(3894.5±6.6±4.5)??MeV/c<sup>2sup> and width ?=(63±24±26)??MeV/c<sup>2sup>, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. This structure can be interpreted as a new charged charmoniumlike state.

  12. Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two subjects are covered in this section. They are: (1) Health effects of possible contamination at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant to be studied; and (2) DOE agrees on test of MOX fuel in Canada.

  13. Measurement of the ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions of Bc<sup>±> ? J/??<sup>±>and B<sup>±> ? J/? K<sup>±> and B(Bc<sup>±>? J/? ?<supsup>?<supsup>?-/+)/B(Bc±> ? J/? ?<sup>±>) in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ratio of the production cross sections times branching fractions (?(Bc<sup>±>) B(Bc<sup>±> ? J/??<sup>±))/(?(B±>) B(B<sup>±> ? J/?K<sup>±>) is studied in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The kinematic region investigated requires Ba,sub>c<sup>±> and B<sup>±>mesons with transverse momentum p? > 15 GeV and rapidity |y| < 1.6. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 5.1 fb<sup>-1sup>. The ratio is determined to be [0.48 ± 0.05 (stat) ± 0.03(syst) ± 0.05 (?Bc)]% The J/??<sup>±?±?-/+> decay mode is also observed in the same data sample. Using a model-independent method developed to measure the efficiency given the presence of resonant behaviour in the three-pion system, the ratio of the branching fractions J/? ?<supsup>?<supsup>?-/+)/B(Bc±> is measured to be 2.55 ± 0.80(stat) ± 0.33(syst) <sup>+0.04sup>-0.01 (?Bc), consistent with the previous LHCb result.

  14. Moisture and temperature effects on curvature of anti-symmetric cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Randall Stephen

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MOISTURE AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CURVATURE OF ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by RANDALL STEPHEN LOTT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering MOISTURE AND TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON CURVATURE OF ANTI-SYMMETRIC CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by RANDALL STEPHEN LOTT Approved as to style and content...

  15. Measurements of the Angular Distributions in the Decays B ? K<sup>(*)> µ<sup>+µ-> at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez [Oviedo U, Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S. [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D. [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A. [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A. [Frascati; Antos, J. [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Appel, J. A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A. [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T. [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

    2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconstruct the decays B ? K<sup>(*)> µ<sup>+µ-> and measure their angular distributions in pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8 fb<sup>-1sup>. The transverse polarization asymmetry AT<sup>(2)sup> and the time-reversal-odd charge-and-parity asymmetry Aim are measured for the first time, together with the K* longitudinal polarization fraction FL and the µ on forward-backward asymmetry AFB, for the decays B<sup>0sup>?K*>0sup>µ+µ-> and B<sup>0sup>?K*+µ+µ->. Our results are among the most accurate to date and consistent with those from other experiments.

  16. Labelled biomolecules with sup 1 sup 5 sup 3 Sm, sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re, and sup 9 sup 0 Y for targeted radiotherapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mushtaq, A; Perverz, S

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A somatostatin analogue Lanreotide was labelled with sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re, sup 9 sup 9 Tc sup m and sup 1 sup 3 sup 1 I. Labelling was accomplished by reduction of cysteine bridge, which provided sulfhydryl groups for chelation with sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re/ sup 9 sup 9 Tc sup m. Stannous chloride was used as reducing agent, while tartrate acted as transchelating agent. The lower redox potential of ReO sub 4 sup - than TcO sub 4 sup - required the addition of excess SnCl sub 2 and medium-chelating agent for stabilizing the excess of SnCl sub 2 in solution. ITLC and HPLC techniques employed for monitoring the labelling yield revealed >95% labelling efficiency. Radioiodination of lanreotide was carried out by Chloramine-T and iodogen methods. The radiolabelling yield varied between 40-80%. Chloramine-T method was found more suitable than Iodogen method, because approx 25% of the initial iodine activity was adsorbed on Iodogen coating. Avidin-biotin system is widely used in medical research, especially in pretargete...

  17. Determination of the half-life of the ground state of {sup 229}Th by using {sup 232}U and {sup 233}U decay series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kikunaga, H. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, T.; Nomura, M. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Mitsugashira, T. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Shinohara, A. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The half-life of the ground state of {sup 229}Th ({sup 229}Th{sup g}) has become an important factor in nuclear technology, for example, in the geological disposal of nuclear spent fuel. However, the values reported in two previous studies are not in agreement. This study reevaluates the half-life of {sup 229}Th{sup g} by using a simple and reliable method. The {sup 232}U/{sup 233}U activity ratio of a {sup 232,233}U sample was measured by high-resolution {alpha}-particle spectrometry. Next, the {sup 228}Th/{sup 229}Th{sup g} activity ratio of the Th sample, which was grown from the {sup 232,233}U sample, was also measured. The half-life of {sup 229}Th{sup g} was calculated from these activity ratios, the growth time, and the half-lives of {sup 232}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 228}Th. From the results of these five measurements, the half-life of {sup 229}Th{sup g} is determined to be 7932 {+-} 55 yr at a confidence level of 2{sigma}.

  18. On the thermally-induced residual stresses in thick fiber-thermoplastic matrix (PEEK) cross-ply laminated plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, S.; Nairn, J.A.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical method for calculating thermally-induced residual stresses in laminated plates is applied to cross-ply PEEK laminates. The authors considered three cooling procedures: slow cooling (uniform temperature distribution); convective and radiative cooling; and rapid cooling by quenching (constant surface temperature). Some of the calculated stresses are of sufficient magnitude to effect failure properties such as matrix microcracking.

  19. Measurements of delayed neutron decay constants and fission yields from {sup 235}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleh, H.H.; Parish, T.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Raman, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shinohara, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotopes of the higher actinide elements are produced as a result of successive radiative capture reactions in the uranium fuel of nuclear reactors. Typically, these transuranic isotopes decay through long chains, have long half-lives, and dominate the long-term toxicity of spent reactor fuel. One of the options for high level waste management is to remove the higher actinide elements from spent fuel by chemical processing, to load them into new special fuel elements, and to transmute them by neutron-induced fission into shorter-lived fission fragments. Reactors designed to achieve high actinide fission (transmutation) rates are called actinide burners. In such reactors, the actinide wastes would constitute much of the fissionable fuel. Due to the high transuranic isotope loadings in the fuel of actinide burners, the neutronic properties of the higher actinide isotopes will have a significant effect on the criticality and safety characteristics of such reactors. While there is an extensive operational database for reactors fueled with uranium and plutonium, operating experience with fuel containing large amounts of actinide wastes is quite limited. Two important neutronic properties of actinide burner cores are their reactivity and their delayed neutron fraction. Both of these properties will be strongly influenced by the neutronic characteristics of the actinide waste isotopes. Here, delayed neutron yields and decay constants for {sup 235}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am were measured at the Texas A and M University TRIGA reactor using a fast pneumatic transfer system. The detection system consisted of an array of BF{sub 3} proportional counters embedded in a polyethylene cylinder. The measured values of the total delayed neutron yield per 100 fissions from thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am were determined to be 1.59 {+-} 0.04, 1.29 {+-} 0.04, 0.49 {+-} 0.02, and 0.84 {+-} 0.04, respectively.

  20. Search for CP Violation in D<sup>±> Meson Decays to ??<sup>±>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stari?, M.; Aihara, H.; Arinstein, K.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bay, A.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Fast, J. E.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. O.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, N.; Koblitz, S.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Liu, Z. Q.; Louvot, R.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mohanty, G. B.; Nakano, E.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Nozaki, T.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H. K.; Park, K. S.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Röhrken, M.; Ryu, S.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, K.; Sakai, Y.; Sanuki, T.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shebalin, V.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Stani?, S.; Sumihama, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Varner, G.; Vossen, A.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Yuan, C. Z.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for CP violation in Cabibbo-suppressed charged D meson decays by measuring the difference between the CP-violating asymmetries for the Cabibbo-suppressed decays D<sup>±?K?K??±> and the Cabibbo-favored decays D<sup>±s?K?K??±> in the K?K? mass region of the ? resonance. Using 955 fb?¹ of data collected with the Belle detector, we obtain A<sup>D?????>CP=(+0.51±0.28±0.05)%. The measurement improves the sensitivity of previous searches by more than a factor of 5. We find no evidence for direct CP violation.

  1. DILEPTON SIGNATURE IN e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}Hl{sup +}e{sup -}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, R. L.; Shimada, T.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the lepton distribution in the reaction e{sup +} e{sup -} {yields} (Higgs boson) + (dilepton) mediated by a neutral gauge boson. Propagator effects favor a slow dilepton for which the study of the joint angular distribution of l{sup +} and l{sup -} is an attractive experimental possibility. This distribution is found to be a sensitive probe of the ZZH vertex.

  2. Astrophysical S factors of radiative {sup 3}He{sup 4}He, {sup 3}H{sup 4}He, and {sup 2}H{sup 4}He capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B., E-mail: sergey@dubovichenko.r [National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Kazakstan, Fesenkov Astrophysical Institute (Kazakhstan)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of describing the astrophysical S factors for radiative {sup 3}He{sup 4}He capture at energies of up to 15 keV and radiative {sup 3}H{sup 4}He and {sup 2}H{sup 4}He capture at energies of up 5 keV is considered on the basis of the potential cluster model involving forbidden states.

  3. /sup 194/ /sup 196/ /sup 198/Pt(t,. cap alpha. )/sup 193/ /sup 195/ /sup 197/Ir reactions with polarized tritons. [17 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cizewski, J.A.; Flynn, E.R.; Sunier, J.W.; Brown, R.E.; Burke, D.G.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The /sup 194/ /sup 196/ /sup 198/Pt(t vector, ..cap alpha..)/sup 193/ /sup 195/ /sup 197/Ir reactions were measured. Angular distributions of cross sections and analyzing powers for levels up to approx. 2.5 MeV in each residual nuclide were obtained, and comparisons with DWBA predictions allowed spins, parities, and pickup spectroscopic strengths to be determined. The results are being analyzed with the aim of testing the existence of supersymmmetric structures in nature. 2 figures.

  4. 8-group relative delayed neutron yields for epithermal neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piksaikin, V M; Kazakov, L E; Korolev, G G; Roshchenko, V A; Tertychnyj, R G

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An 8-group representation of relative delayed neutron yields was obtained for epithermal neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu. These data were compared with ENDF/B-VI data in terms of the average half- life of the delayed neutron precursors and on the basis of the dependence of reactivity on the asymptotic period.

  5. U.sup.+4 generation in HTER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Gay, Eddie C. (Park Forest, IL); Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Homer Glen, IL)

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A improved device and process for recycling spent nuclear fuels, in particular uranium metal, that facilitates the refinement and recovery of uranium metal from spent metallic nuclear fuels. The electrorefiner device comprises two anodes in predetermined spatial relation to a cathode. The anodese have separate current and voltage controls. A much higher voltage than normal for the electrorefining process is applied to the second anode, thereby facilitating oxidization of uranium (III), U.sup.+, to uranium (IV), U.sup.+4. The current path from the second anode to the cathode is physically shorter than the similar current path from the second anode to the spent nuclear fuel contained in a first anode shaped as a basket. The resulting U.sup.+4 oxidizes and solubilizes rough uranium deposited on the surface of the cathode. A softer uranium metal surface is left on the cathode and is more readily removed by a scraper.

  6. [Sigma][sup [minus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szarska, M.; Wilczynski, H.; Wolter, W.; Wozniak, K. (Institute of Nuclear Physics, ul. Kawiory 26A, 30-055 Krakow (Poland)); Lord, J.J.; Wilkes, R.J. (Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental data on multiplicities and angular distributions of heavy ionizing and shower particles in inelastic interactions of 350 GeV [Sigma][sup [minus

  7. Search for the rare decays B{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +}, B{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K*(892){sup 0}, and B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi} at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van [Division of High Energy Physics, Department of Physics, University of Helsinki and Helsinki Institute of Physics, FIN-00014, Helsinki (Finland); Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Kwang, S.; Levy, S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Wolfe, C.; Yang, U. K. [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] (and others)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for b{yields}s{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} transitions in B meson (B{sup +}, B{sup 0}, or B{sub s}{sup 0}) decays with 924 pb{sup -1} of pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We find excesses with significances of 4.5, 2.9, and 2.4 standard deviations in the B{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +}, B{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K*(892){sup 0}, and B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi} decay modes, respectively. Using B{yields}J/{psi}h (h=K{sup +}, K*(892){sup 0}, {phi}) decays as normalization channels, we report branching fractions for the previously observed B{sup +} and B{sup 0} decays, B(B{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +})=(0.59{+-}0.15{+-}0.04)x10{sup -6}, and B(B{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K*(892){sup 0})=(0.81{+-}0.30{+-}0.10)x10{sup -6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, and the second is systematic. We set an upper limit on the relative branching fraction B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi})/B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{phi})<2.6(2.3)x10{sup -3} at the 95(90)% confidence level, which is the most stringent to date.

  8. Delayed neutron energy spectra of {sup 87}Br, {sup 88}Br, {sup 89}Br, {sup 90}Br, {sup 137}I, {sup 138}I, {sup 139}I, and {sup 186}Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, R.C.; Watts, K.D. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In prior publications, the authors reported measurements of the energy spectra of delayed neutrons for the isotope-separated fission product precursors {sup 93}Rb, {sup 94}Rb, {sup 95}Rb, {sup 96}Rb, {sup 97}Rb, {sup 143}Cs, {sup 144}Cs, and {sup 145}Cs. Such studies of delayed neutron energy spectra have important applications in reactor physics, primarily relating to the fundamental role played by delayed neutrons in the kinetic behavior of nuclear reactors. Measurement of the energy spectra of delayed neutrons for the isotope-separated, fission product precursors {sup 87}Br, {sup 88}Br, {sup 89}Br, {sup 90}Br, {sup 137}I, {sup 138}I, {sup 139}I, and {sup 136}Te are reported for an energy range up to 1,213 keV and with lower cutoff energies of 11.1, 11.1, 29.9, 48.9, 14.2, 23.3, 29.9, and 48.9 keV, respectively. These data were obtained at the TRISTAN Isotope Separation On-Line facility using H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} gas-filled proportional counters. The data for each of the bromine, iodine, and tellurium isotopes show good qualitative agreement with the published {sup 3}He ionization chamber data at energies above {approximately}200 keV. In addition, they provide definitive spectral information down to their respective cut-off energies.

  9. Measurements of delayed-neutron emission from {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleh, H.H.; Parish, T.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Raman, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotopes of transuranic elements are produced by successive radiative capture reactions in the fuel of a nuclear reactor. Typically, these transuranic isotopes decay through long chains, have long half-lives, and dominate the long-term toxicity of the spent reactor fuel. One of the options for waste management is to remove the transuranics from spent fuel by chemical processing, to load them into new special fuel elements, and to transmute them by neutron-induced fission into shorter lived fission fragments. Previous studies have shown the feasibility of actinide transmutation in either light water reactors or liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors. Due to the anticipated high transuranic loadings in the fuel of actinide burner reactors, the neutronic properties of the transuranic isotopes will have a significant effect on the operational and safety characteristics of such reactors. Experiments to determine delayed-neutron group yields and decay constants for {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am have been designed and carried out. The experiments were conducted at Texas A&M University on the TRIGA reactor using a very fast pneumatic transfer system.

  10. Spectroscopy and applications of the 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} electronic state of {sup 39}K{sup 85}Rb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Jayita, E-mail: jayitarm@gmail.com; Rahmlow, David; Carollo, Ryan; Bellos, Michael; Eyler, Edward E.; Gould, Phillip L.; Stwalley, William C. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3046 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3046 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report new results on the spectroscopy of the 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} electronic state of {sup 39}K{sup 85}Rb. The observations are based on resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of ultracold KRb molecules starting in vibrational levels v?? = 18–23 of the a?{sup 3}?{sup +} state and ionized via the intermediate 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} state. The a-state ultracold molecules are formed by photoassociation of ultracold {sup 39}K and {sup 85}Rb atoms to the 3(0{sup +}) state of KRb followed by spontaneous emission. We discuss the potential applications of this state to future experiments, as a pathway for populating the lowest vibrational levels of the a state as well as the X state.

  11. CalCc CONCEPT ApPLIED TO COMPRESSION OF PEAT3 Discussion by G. Mesri,4 Member, ASCE, T. D. Stark,' Associate Member, ASCE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CalCc CONCEPT ApPLIED TO COMPRESSION OF PEAT3 Discussion by G. Mesri,4 Member, ASCE, T. D. Stark of natural materials, including peats. organic silts, highly sensitive clays, shales, as well as granular this statement and credit Mesri and Castro (1987) for reporting a C)Cc range of 0.02-0.10 for peats. Ac tually

  12. Design and manufacturing considerations for ply drops in composite D.S. Cairns*, J.F. Mandell, M.E. Scott, J.Z. Maccagnano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .F. Mandell, M.E. Scott, J.Z. Maccagnano Montana State University, DOE EPSCoR Wind Energy Cluster, Bozeman, MT 59717, USA Received 17 February 1998; accepted 28 May 1998 Abstract Thickness variations are required; Strain energy release rate; B. Fracture; B. Fatigue 1. Introduction Ply drops in composite materials

  13. Relative g-factor measurements in {sup 54}Fe, {sup 56}Fe, and {sup 58}Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    East, M. C.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Chamoli, S. K.; Kibedi, T. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Pinter, J. S.; Crawford, H. L.; Mantica, P. F. [NSCL and Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States); Wilson, A. N. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The g factors of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} states in {sup 54}Fe and {sup 58}Fe have been measured relative to the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state g factor of {sup 56}Fe using the transient-field technique in inverse kinematics. The results are in satisfactory agreement with recent shell model calculations in the fp model space. For {sup 56}Fe and {sup 58}Fe the g factors approach Z/A and are therefore also consistent with collective interpretations of these 2{sup +} states.

  14. 2{sup +} excitation of the {sup 12}C Hoyle state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freer, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Fujita, H.; Carter, J.; Usman, I. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Buthelezi, Z.; Foertsch, S. V.; Neveling, R.; Perez, S. M.; Smit, F. D. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Fearick, R. W. [Physics Department, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Papka, P.; Swartz, J. A. [Physics Department, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-energy-resolution magnetic spectrometer has been used to measure the {sup 12}C excitation energy spectrum to search for the 2{sup +} excitation of the 7.65 MeV, 0{sup +} Hoyle state. By measuring in the diffractive minimum of the angular distribution for the broad 0{sup +} background, evidence is found for a possible 2{sup +} state at 9.6(1) MeV with a width of 600(100) keV. The implications for the {sup 8}Be+{sup 4}He reaction rate in stellar environments are discussed.

  15. Biofuel cells: Electro-enzymatic oxidation of formate using formate dehydrogenase, NAD{sup +}, diaphorase, benzyl viologen, and graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmmore, G.T.R.; Bertschy, H.; Bergens, S.H.; Whitesides, G.M. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have developed an effective electrochemical method to regenerate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) from NADH. Diaphorase (D) was used to oxidize NADH to NAD{sup +} with the concomitant reduction of two equivalents of benzylviologen (BV{sup 2+}) to the mono cation, BV{sup +} to the mono cation, BV{sup +}. The BV{sup +} was then electrochemically oxidized to BV{sup 2+} at a carbon-felt anode: NADH + 2BV{sup 2+} --(D)--> NAD{sup +} + 2BV{sup +} 2BV{sup +}-->(anode)-->2BV{sup 2+}. This system was incorporated into an enzymatic fuel cell that used formate as fuel. Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) was used to oxidize formate to CO{sub 2} with the concomitant 2 e{sup {minus}}, 2H{sup +} reduction of NAD{sup +} to NADH. The NADH was then regenerated using the system described above. The anode of the fuel cell was used to oxidize BV{sup +} to BV{sup 2+}. Blackened Pt gauze as used as the cathode of the fuel cell. The working parameters of the formate/O{sub 2} biofuel cell will be presented including methods to develop this system into the more complex methanol/O{sub 2} biofuel cell.

  16. Elastic scattering of {sup 6}He and {sup 7}Be on a {sup 9}Be target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pires, K. C. C.; Lichtenthaeler, R. [Depto de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05389-970, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mukha, I.; Moro, A. M. [Depto de FAMN, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Gomez-Camacho, J. [Depto de FAMN, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The elastic scattering data for the {sup 6}He+{sup 9}Be and {sup 7}Be+{sup 9}Be reactions, measured at E{sub lab} = 16.2 MeV and E{sub lab} = 23.7 MeV respectively, are presented and analyzed using the optical model and coupled-channels formalisms.

  17. Study of the B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay and measurement of the B{sup -}{yields}X(3872)K{sup -} branching fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Palano, A.; Pompili, A. [Universita di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039 (China); Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. [University of Bergen, Inst. of Physics, N-5007 Bergen (Norway)] [and others

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the decay B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using 117x10{sup 6} BB events collected at the Y(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy storage ring. We measure the branching fractions B (B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(116{+-}7(stat.){+-}9(syst.))x10{sup -5} and B (B{sup -}{yields}X(3872)K{sup -})x B (X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(1.28{+-}0.41)x10{sup -5} and find the mass of the X(3872) to be 3873.4{+-}1.4 MeV/c{sup 2}. We search for the h{sub c} narrow state in the decay B{sup -}{yields}h{sub c}K{sup -}, h{sub c}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and for the decay B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, with D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. We set the 90% C.L. limits B(B{sup -}{yields}h{sub c}K{sup -})xB(h{sub c}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})<3.4x10{sup -6} and B(B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -})<5.2x10{sup -5}.

  18. Study of the K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state in B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup +}{yields}{psi}'K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guler, H. [University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Universite de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Arinstein, K.; Aulchenko, V.; Eidelman, S.; Kuzmin, A.; Poluektov, A.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Aushev, T. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bakich, A. M.; McOnie, S. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Balagura, V.; Liventsev, D.; Mizuk, R.; Pakhlov, P. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Barberio, E.; Julius, T.; Sevior, M. E. [University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Belous, K. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 535x10{sup 6} B-meson pairs collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we measure branching fractions of (7.16{+-}0.10(stat){+-}0.60(syst)x10{sup -4} for B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and (4.31{+-}0.20(stat){+-}0.50(syst))x10{sup -4} for B{sup +}{yields}{psi}'K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. We perform amplitude analyses to determine the resonant structure of the K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state in B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup +}{yields}{psi}'K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and find that the K{sub 1}(1270) is a prominent component of both decay modes. There is significant interference among the different intermediate states, which leads, in particular, to a striking distortion of the {rho} line shape due to the {omega}. Based on the results of the fit to the B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} data, the relative decay fractions of the K{sub 1}(1270) to K{rho}, K{omega}, and K*(892){pi} are consistent with previous measurements, but the decay fraction to K{sub 0}*(1430) is significantly smaller. Finally, by floating the mass and width of the K{sub 1}(1270) in an additional fit of the B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} data, we measure a mass of (1248.1{+-}3.3(stat){+-}1.4(syst)) MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of (119.5{+-}5.2(stat){+-}6.7(syst)) MeV/c{sup 2} for the K{sub 1}(1270).

  19. Delayed neutron yield from fast neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piksaikin, V M; Isaev, S G; Kazakov, L E; Roshchenko, V A; Tertytchnyi, R G

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurements of the total delayed neutron yield from fast neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U were made. The experimental method based on the periodic irradiation of the fissionable sample by neutrons from a suitable nuclear reaction had been employed. The preliminary results on the energy dependence of the total delayed neutron yield from fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U are obtained. According to the comparison of experimental data with our prediction based on correlation properties of delayed neutron characteristics, it is concluded that the value of the total delayed neutron yield near the threshold of (n,f) reaction is not a constant.

  20. Dalitz analysis of B{yields}K{pi}{sup +}{psi}{sup '} decays and the Z(4430){sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizuk, R.; Balagura, V.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Liventsev, D.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Tikhomirov, I.; Uglov, T. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Adachi, I.; Dalseno, J.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Sakai, Y.; Trabelsi, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)] (and others)

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From a Dalitz plot analysis of B{yields}K{pi}{sup +}{psi}{sup '} decays, we find a signal for Z(4430){sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{psi}{sup '} with a mass M=(4443{sub -12-13}{sup +15+19}) MeV/c{sup 2}, width {gamma}=(107{sub -43-56}{sup +86+74}) MeV, product branching fraction B(B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}Z(4430){sup +})xB(Z(4430){sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{psi}{sup '})=(3.2{sub -0.9-1.6}{sup +1.8+5.3})x10{sup -5}, and significance of 6.4{sigma} that agrees with previous Belle measurements based on the same data sample. In addition, we determine the branching fraction B(B{sup 0}{yields}K*(892){sup 0}{psi}{sup '})=(5.52{sub -0.32-0.58}{sup +0.35+0.53})x10{sup -4} and the fraction of K*(892){sup 0} mesons that are longitudinally polarized f{sub L}=(44.8{sub -2.7-5.3}{sup +4.0+4.0})%. These results are obtained from a 605 fb{sup -1} data sample that contains 657x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected near the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  1. Fuel cycle cost study with HEU and LEU fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cycle costs are compared for a range of /sup 235/U loadings with HEU and LEU fuels using the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor as an example. If LEU silicide fuels are successfully demonstrated and licensed, the results indicate that total fuel cycle costs can be about the same or lower than those with the HEU fuels that are currently used in most research reactors.

  2. Organic fuel cells and fuel cell conducting sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); Ha, Su (Champaign, IL); Adams, Brian (Savoy, IL)

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive direct organic fuel cell includes an organic fuel solution and is operative to produce at least 15 mW/cm.sup.2 when operating at room temperature. In additional aspects of the invention, fuel cells can include a gas remover configured to promote circulation of an organic fuel solution when gas passes through the solution, a modified carbon cloth, one or more sealants, and a replaceable fuel cartridge.

  3. Search for B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sup +} and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Q. L.; Zhang, C. C. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Gershon, T.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sumisawa, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)] (and others)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of searches for B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sup +} and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays, using a sample of 388x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected with the Belle detector at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance. No statistically significant signal is found for either of the two decay modes and upper limits for the branching fractions are determined to be B(B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sup +})<8.8x10{sup -5} and B(B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sub S}{sup 0})<2.5x10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level.

  4. Structure of {sup 81}Ga populated from the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 81}Zn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paziy, V.; Mach, H.; Fraile, L. M.; Olaizola, B.; Udias, J. M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Aprahamian, A.; Bucher, B. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame (United States); Bernards, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Koeln, Germany. and Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT-06520 (United States); Briz, J. A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Chiara, C. J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA. and Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Dlouhy, Z. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Rez (Czech Republic); Gheorghe, I.; Ghita, D.; Lica, R.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Stanoiu, M.; Stroe, L. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele (Romania); Hoff, P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Koester, U. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); and others

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the results of the {beta}-decay of {sup 81}Zn. The experiment was performed at the CERN ISOLDE facility in the framework of a systematic ultra-fast timing investigation of neutron-rich nuclei populated in the decay of Zn. The present analysis included {beta}-gated {gamma}-ray singles and {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences from the decay of {sup 81}Zn to {sup 81}Ga and leads to a new and much more extensive level scheme of {sup 81}Ga. A new half-life of {sup 81}Zn is provided.

  5. Direct determination of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 147}Pm in Chernobyl hot particles collected in Kiev using beta absorption method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papp, Z.; Bolyos, A.; Dezso, Z.; Daroczy, S. [Kossuth Univ., Debrecen (Hungary)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    59 hot particles were collected in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1987. All but one were prepared from a moss carpet of 360 cm{sup 2} area. Radionuclide composition of the hot particles was investigated by gamma-spectrometry and beta absorption method. Pure beta emitters {sup 90}Sr and {sup 147}Pm were determined in 25 hot particles measuring the beta absorption curves of the hot particles with an end-window Geiger-Mueller counter and decomposing the curves in order to obtain the contributions of {sup 90}Sr and {sup 147}Pm to the total beta counting rate. All but one of the hot particles were found to be the debris of the fuel. The activity ratio {sup 90}Sr:{sup 144}Ce was 0.078 which is half of the theoretical result. Although {sup 147}Pm is considered to be a refractory nuclide, it seems that significant part of {sup 147}Pm went to the homogeneous fraction of the general fallout. The surface density of hot particles (of higher than about 50 Bq activity) was about 1,600 m{sup -2} and that of the activities of the nuclides {sup 90}Sr, {sup 106}Ru, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 144}Ce and {sup 147}Pm as components of hot particles was 12.2, 54.3, 5.9, 9.7, 234 and 18.3 kBq m{sup -2} (activity values counted for 26 April 1986), respectively, in downtown Kiev city in 1987.

  6. Measurement of the {eta}{sup '}-Meson Mass using J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Wilkinson, G. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Ecklund, K. M. [State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Love, W.; Savinov, V. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Mendez, H. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Hu, D.; Moziak, B.; Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); He, Q. [University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the mass of the {eta}{sup '} meson using {psi}(2S){yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}J/{psi}, J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '} events acquired with the CLEO-c detector operating at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. Using three decay modes, {eta}{sup '}{yields}{rho}{sup 0}{gamma}, {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta} with {eta}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}, and {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta} with {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, we find M{sub {eta}{sup '}}=957.793{+-}0.054{+-}0.036 MeV, in which the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. This result is consistent with but substantially more precise than the current world average.

  7. Regulatory function of cytomegalovirus-specific CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tovar-Salazar, Adriana; Patterson-Bartlett, Julie; Jesser, Renee [University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Weinberg, Adriana, E-mail: Adriana.Weinberg@ucdenver.ed [University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    CMV infection is characterized by high of frequencies of CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T cells. Here we demonstrate that CMV-specific CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} cells are regulatory T cells (T{sub R}). CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} cells sorted from CMV-stimulated PBMC of CMV-seropositive donors inhibited de novo CMV-specific proliferation of autologous PBMC in a dose-dependent fashion. Compared with the entire CMV-stimulated CD4{sup +} T-cell population, higher proportions of CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} expressed FoxP3, TGFbeta, granzyme B, perforin, GITR and PD-1, lower proportions expressed CD127 and PD1-L and similar proportions expressed CD25, CTLA4, Fas-L and GITR-L. CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} expanded in response to IL-2, but not to CMV antigenic restimulation. The anti-proliferative effect of CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} significantly decreased after granzyme B or TGFbeta inhibition. The CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} of HIV-infected and uninfected donors had similar phenotypes and anti-proliferative potency, but HIV-infected individuals had higher proportions of CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R}. The CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} may contribute to the downregulation of CMV-specific and nonspecific immune responses of CMV-infected individuals.

  8. Neutron decays of {sup 13}Be* to the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state of {sup 12}Be

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortune, H. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Sherr, R. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey (United States)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that an appreciable portion of the 1/2{sup -} peak in a recent {sup 13}Be*{yields}{sup 12}Be + n experiment is actually due to 5/2{sup +} decays to the excited 0{sup +} state.

  9. Measurement of the mass difference m(B{sup 0})-m(B{sup +})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules, IN2P3/CNRS et Universite de Savoie, F-74941 Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E. [Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat de Fisica, Departament ECM, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M. [Universita di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L. [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using 230x10{sup 6} BB events recorded with the BABAR detector at the e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings PEP-II, we reconstruct approximately 4100 B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and 9930 B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +} decays with J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and e{sup +}e{sup -}. From the measured B-momentum distributions in the e{sup +}e{sup -} rest frame, we determine the mass difference m(B{sup 0})-m(B{sup +})=(+0.33{+-}0.05{+-}0.03) MeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. Search for B{sub c}{sup {plus_minus}} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup {plus_minus}} and the B rare decays B{sub d}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +} mu{sup {minus}} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup {minus}} at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, T. [Geneva Univ. (Switzerland); CDF Collaboration

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for the {ital B}{sup +}{sub {ital c}}{yields}{ital J}/{Psi}{pi}{sup {+-}}. We measure the limit of {delta}({ital B}{sup {+-}}{sub {ital c}}){center_dot}{ital BR(B{sub c}{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{Psi}{pi}{sup {+-}})/{delta}(B{sup +-}{sub u}){center_dot}BR(B{sup {+-}}{sub u}{yields}J/{Psi}{Kappa}{sup {+-}}}) as a function of the {ital B{sup {+-}}{sub c}} lifetime, using {approx} 110 {ital pb}{sup -1} of data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We present also a search for the rare decays {ital B}{sup 0}{sub {ital d}}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and {ital B}{sup 0}{sub {ital s}}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, setting an upper limit on their respective branching ratios.

  11. Preliminary measurement of prompt D{sup {+-}} and D*{sup {+-}} meson production and D*{sup {+-}} spin alignment in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, K. [Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Abe, K. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); Akagi, T. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Stanford Linear Accelerator Center] [and others; SLD Collaboration

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have measured the production rates as a function of scaled energy x of prompt charmed pseudoscalar D{sup {+-}} and vector D*{sup {+-}} mesons in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays. The prompt signal components were isolated from the background of D mesons from B hadron decays using impact parameters of reconstructed D{sup {+-}} {yields} K{sup {minus_plus}}{pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} and D*-daughter D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +} and D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +} candidates. Using the combined meson production rates the authors have measured the fraction of hadronic Z{sup 0} decays into c{bar c}, R{sub c} = 0.182 {+-} 0.027 (stat.) {+-} 0.012 (syst.) (Preliminary). Comparison of the D*{sup {+-}} and D{sup {+-}} rates gives a direct probe of vector (V) vs. pseudoscalar (P) meson production for charmed quarks, and for x > 0.4 they have measured P{sub V} = V/(V + P) = 0.65 {+-} 0.09(stat.) {+-} 0.03(syst.) {+-} 0.03 (BR) (Preliminary). They have measured the degree of spin alignment of the D*{sup {+-}} mesons along their flight direction and find it to be consistent with zero. They compared the latter two results with QCD- and model-based predictions of charm-quark jet fragmentation.

  12. Branching fraction for the doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed decay D{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dytman, S. A.; Love, W.; Savinov, V. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Aquines, O.; Li, Z.; Lopez, A.; Mehrabyan, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez, J. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Huang, G. S.; Miller, D. H.; Pavlunin, V.; Sanghi, B.; Shipsey, I. P. J.; Xin, B. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Adams, G. S.; Anderson, M.; Cummings, J. P.; Danko, I.; Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] (and others)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the branching fraction for the doubly-Cabibbo-suppressed decay D{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, using 281 pb{sup -1} of data accumulated with the CLEO-c detector on the {psi}(3770) resonance. We find B(D{sup +}{yields}K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0})=(2.28{+-}0.36{+-}0.15{+-}0.08)x10{sup -4}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the last error is due to the uncertainty in the reference mode branching fraction.

  13. Fast-neutron interactions with /sup 182/W, /sup 184/W and /sup 186/W

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guenther, P.T.; Smith, A.B.; Whalen, J.F.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron total cross sections of /sup 182/W, /sup 184/W and /sup 186/W are measured from approx. = 0.3 to 5.0 MeV at intervals of less than or equal to 50 keV to accuracies of 1 to 3%. Differential neutron elastic- and inelastic-scattering cross sections of the same three isotopes are measured at scattering angles in the range 20 to 160/sup 0/ and at incident-neutron energy intervals of approx. = 100 keV from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV. Approximately thirty scattered-neutron groups are observed for each of the isotopes. Prominent of these are excitations attributed to collective rotational and vibrational bands. The experimental results are interpreted in terms of optical-statistical and coupled-channels models with particular attention to the direct excitation of ground-state-rotational and ..beta..- and ..gamma..-vibrational bands. The strengths of the direct interactions and the magnitudes of the collective deformations are inferred from the interpretations and compared with similar values previously reported elsewhere. The experimental results are used to deduce experimentally-based evaluated data sets for /sup 182/W, /sup 184/W and /sup 186/W over the energy range 0.1 - approx. = 5.0 MeV.

  14. Directional correlation of [gamma] transitions in [sup 72]Ge following the decay of [sup 72]Ga

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landulfo, E.; Saxena, R.N.; Zamboni, C.B.; Lapolli, A.L. (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear de Brasil, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directional correlations of coincident gamma transitions in [sup 72]Ge have been measured following the [beta][sup [minus

  15. Observation of a Resonancelike Structure in the {pi}{sup +-}{psi}{sup '} Mass Distribution in Exclusive B{yields}K{pi}{sup +-}{psi}{sup '} Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, S.-K. [Gyeongsang National University, Chinju (Korea, Republic of); Olsen, S. L. [University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Adachi, I.; Brodzicka, J.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)] (and others)

    2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A distinct peak is observed in the {pi}{sup {+-}}{psi}{sup '} invariant mass distribution near 4.43 GeV in B{yields}K{pi}{sup {+-}}{psi}{sup '} decays. A fit using a Breit-Wigner resonance shape yields a peak mass and width of M=4433{+-}4(stat){+-}2(syst) MeV and {gamma}=45{sub -13}{sup +18}(stat){sub -13}{sup +30}(syst) MeV. The product branching fraction is determined to be B(B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup {+-}}Z{sup {+-}}(4430))xB(Z{sup {+-}}(4430){yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{psi}{sup '})=(4.1{+-}1.0(stat){+-}1.4(syst))x10{sup -5}, where Z{sup {+-}}(4430) is used to denote the observed structure. The statistical significance of the observed peak is 6.5{sigma}. These results are obtained from a 605 fb{sup -1} data sample that contains 657x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected near the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

  16. First measurements of J/{psi} decays into {sigma}{sup +}{sigma}{sup -} and {xi}{sup 0}{xi}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Bai, Y.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; He, K. L.; Heng, Y. K.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)] (and others)

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on 58x10{sup 6} J/{psi} events collected with the BESII detector at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider, the baryon pair processes J/{psi}{yields}{sigma}{sup +}{sigma}{sup -} and J/{psi}{yields}{xi}{sup 0}{xi}{sup 0} are observed for the first time. The branching fractions are measured to be B(J/{psi}{yields}{sigma}{sup +}{sigma}{sup -})=(1.50{+-}0.10{+-}0.22)x10{sup -3} and B(J/{psi}{yields}{xi}{sup 0}{xi}{sup 0})=(1.20{+-}0.12{+-}0.21)x10{sup -3}, where the first errors are statistical and the second ones are systematic.

  17. Subbarrier fusion of {sup 9}Li with {sup 70}Zn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loveland, W.; Vinodkumar, A. M.; Naik, R. S.; Sprunger, P. H.; Matteson, B.; Neeway, J. [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Trinczek, M.; Dombsky, M.; Machule, P.; Ottewell, D. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Cross, D. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Gagnon, K.; Mills, W. J. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5A 1S6 (Canada)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross section for the fusion of {sup 9}Li with {sup 70}Zn was measured for seven projectile energies spanning the subbarrier and near-barrier region (E{sub c.m.} ranging from 9.7 to 13.4 MeV) using the ISAC facility at TRIUMF. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of the irradiated target foils along with {beta} counting of the chemically separated Ge and As evaporation residues were used to measure the fusion cross sections. Statistical model calculations were used to correct for the yields of any unobserved nuclei. The observed fusion excitation function shows significant subbarrier fusion enhancement with a large deduced value of the fusion radius, R{sub B}=12.1{+-}1.0 fm. Coupled-channels calculations do not account for the observed subbarrier enhancement. The implications of this finding for understanding the fusion of {sup 11}Li are discussed.

  18. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  19. Improving low temperature properties of synthetic diesel fuels derived from oil shale. Alternative fuels utilization program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frankenfeld, J.W.; Taylor, W.F.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of additives to improve the cold flow properties of shale oil derived fuels boiling in the diesel fuel range was evaluated. Because a commercial shale oil industry did not exist to provide actual samples of finished fuels, a representative range of hydroprocessed shale oil fractions was prepared for use in the additive testing work. Crude oil shale from Occidental Shale Company was fractionated to give three liquids in the diesel fuel boiling range. The initial boiling point in each case was 325/sup 0/F (163/sup 0/C). The final boiling points were 640/sup 0/F (338/sup 0/C), 670/sup 0/F (354/sup 0/C) and 700/sup 0/F (371/sup 0/F). Each fraction was hydrotreated to three different severities (800, 1200 and 1500 psi total pressure) over a Shell 324 nickel molybdate on alumina catalyst at 710 to 750/sup 0/F to afford 9 different model fuels. A variety of commercial and experimental additives were evaluated as cold flow improvers in the model fuels at treat levels of 0.04 to 0.4 wt %. Both the standard pour point test (ASTM D97) and a more severe low temperature flow test (LTFT) were employed. Reductions in pour points of up to 70/sup 0/F and improvements in LTFT temperatures up to 16/sup 0/F were achieved. It is concluded that flow improver additives can play an important role in improving the cold flow properties of future synthetic fuels of the diesel type derived from oil shale.

  20. Method for determination of .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O and .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H ratios and .sup.3 H (tritium) concentrations of xylem waters and subsurface waters using time series sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Brian (1126 Delaware St., Berkeley, CA 94702); Menchaca, Leticia (1126 Delaware St., Berkeley, CA 94702)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determination of .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O and .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H ratios and .sup.3 H concentrations of xylem and subsurface waters using time series sampling, insulating sampling chambers, and combined .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O, .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H and .sup.3 H concentration data on transpired water. The method involves collecting water samples transpired from living plants and correcting the measured isotopic compositions of oxygen (.sup.18 O/.sup.16 O) and hydrogen (.sup.2 H/.sup.1 H and/or .sup.3 H concentrations) to account for evaporative isotopic fractionation in the leafy material of the plant.

  1. Branching Ratio of the Electromagnetic Decay of the ?<sup>+>(1385)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, D; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Bookwalter, C; Boiarinov, S; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D& #x27; Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Graham, L; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Khandaker, M; Khertarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, A; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I.J. D; Mao, Y; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Pappalardo, L; Paremuzyan, R; Anefalos Pereira, S; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, E S; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, C E; Tkachenko, S; Vernarsky, B; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhao, B

    2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The CLAS detector was used to obtain the first ever measurement of the electromagnetic decay of the ?*<sup>+>(1385) from the reaction ?p ? K<sup>0sup> ?*<sup>+>(1385). A real photon beam with a maximum energy of 3.8 GeV was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target, resulting in the photoproduction of the kaon and ?* hyperon. Kinematic fitting was used to separate the reaction channel from the background processes. The fitting algorithm exploited a new method to kinematically fit neutrons in the CLAS detector, leading to the partial width measurement of 250.0 ± 56.9(stat)-41.2<sup>+34.3sup>(sys) keV. A U-spin symmetry test using the SU(3) flavor-multiplet representation yields predictions for the ?*<sup>+>(1385) ? ?<sup>+>? and ?*<sup>0sup>(1385) ? ?? partial widths that agree with the experimental measurements.

  2. Supersymmetry and {sup 198}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernards, Christian; Heinze, Stefan; Jolie, Jan; Fransen, Christoph; Linnemann, Andreas; Radeck, Desiree [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum and electromagnetic transition properties of the supermultiplet members with two proton fermions can be constructed using the dynamical U{sub v}(6/12) x U{sub {pi}}(6/4) extended supersymmetry. In order to investigate predictions of the two proton fermion--four neutron boson supermultiplet member {sup 198}Hg, an experiment with the HORUS cube {gamma}-ray spectrometer at the Cologne TANDEM accelerator was performed using the {sup 196}Pt({alpha},2n){sup 198}Hg reaction. By analyzing {gamma}{gamma} coincidence spectra and {gamma}{gamma} angular correlations, the required experimental data--level and decay energies, level spins and multipole mixing ratios--could be obtained. For the low-energy states, the experimental data show good agreement with theory.

  3. Study of the X(3872) and Y(4260) in B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K{sup 0} and B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K{sup -} decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Grauges, E. [IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A. [Universita di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039 (China); Eigen, G.; Ofte, I. [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen (Norway)] (and others)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of a search for the X(3872) in B{sup 0}{yields}X(3872)K{sub S}{sup 0},X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, improved measurements of B{sup -}{yields}X(3872)K{sup -}, and a study of the J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mass region above the X(3872). We use 232x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy storage rings. The results include the 90% confidence interval 1.34x10{sup -6}sup 0}{yields}X(3872)K{sup 0},X{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})<10.3x10{sup -6} and the branching fraction B(B{sup -}{yields}X(3872)K{sup -},X{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(10.1{+-}2.5{+-}1.0)x10{sup -6}. We observe a (2.7{+-}1.3{+-}0.2)MeV/c{sup 2} mass difference of the X(3872) produced in the two decay modes. Furthermore, we search for the Y(4260) in B decays and set the 95% C.L. upper limit B(B{sup -}{yields}Y(4260)K{sup -},Y(4260){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})<2.9x10{sup -5}.

  4. Analysis of T = 1 {sup 10}B States Analogue to {sup 10}Be Cluster States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uroic, M.; Miljanic, D.; Blagus, S.; Bogovac, M.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, Zagreb (Croatia); Majer, M.; Milin, M. [Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Acosta, L. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, Huelva (Spain)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Current status of the search for T = 1 cluster states in {sup 10}Be, {sup 10}B and {sup 10}C is presented. The best known of the three, {sup 10}Be, has an established rotational band (6.18, 7.54 and 10.15 MeV) with unusually large moment of inertia. Search of their isobaric analogue in {sup 10}B is presented, with emphasis on {sup 3}He+{sup 11}B reaction.

  5. Studies of the /sup 32/S + /sup 182/W reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, B.B.; Keller, J.G.; Worsham, A.; Glagola, B.G.; Henderson, D.; Kaufman, S.; Sanders, S.J.; Siemssen, R.; Videbaek, F.; Wilkins, B.D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fission-like products from the reaction /sup 32/S + /sup 182/W were measured over the entire angular range from theta = 10-170/sup 0/ and for bombarding energies of E/sub lab/ = 166, 177, 222, and 260 MeV using an array of eight Si detectors. From the measured energy and flight time the product mass was determined event-by-event by performing the appropriate corrections for the plasma delay and pulse height defect associated with Si detectors. The mass, angular, and total kinetic energy distributions of fission-like fragments are obtained by assuming two-body kinematics. The angular distributions indicate that a fraction of the observed cross section is associated with quasi-fission reactions as observed previously in several other reactions involving /sup 32/S projectiles. Furthermore, we observe an angular dependence of the fragment mass distributions, a feature which is strictly incompatible with compound nucleus decay. Both of these observations indicate that a fraction of fission-like products originate from quasi-fission, a process in which a large degree of mass transfer occurs between the two interaction nuclei in a short time scale. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Neutrino cross sections on {sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandberg, V.D.; LSND Collaboration

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the charged current reactions {sup 12}C({ital v}{sub e},e{sup -}){sup 12}N and {sup 12}C({ital v}{sub {mu}},{mu}{sup - }){sup 12}N for inclusive transitions to {sup 12}N excited states and exclusive transitions to {sup 12}N , are presented. The data presented represent 3 years of running of the LSND experiments and are from runs in 1993, 1994, and 1995 and total to 14772 Coulombs of protons on target. The {ital v}{sub e} scattering and {ital v}{sub {mu}{sup -}} exclusive scattering results are in good agreement with theoretical expectations, while the {ital v}{sub {mu}{sup -}} inclusive scattering results are smaller than expected from a continuum random phase calculation.

  7. Resonance strengths in the {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marta, Michele; Trompler, Erik; Bemmerer, Daniel; Beyer, Roland; Grosse, Eckart; Hannaske, Roland; Junghans, Arnd R.; Nair, Chithra; Schwengner, Ronald; Wagner, Andreas; Yakorev, Dmitry [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD), Dresden (Germany); Broggini, Carlo; Caciolli, Antonio; Erhard, Martin; Menegazzo, Roberto [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy); Fueloep, Zsolt; Gyuerky, Gyoergy [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Szuecs, Tamas [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD), Dresden (Germany); Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), Debrecen (Hungary); Vezzu, Simone [Coordinamento Interuniversitario Veneto per le Nanotechnologie (CIVEN), Venice (Italy)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction is the slowest reaction of the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen cycle of hydrogen burning in stars. As a consequence, it determines the rate of the cycle. The {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reaction is frequently used in inverse kinematics for hydrogen depth profiling in materials. The {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C reactions have been studied simultaneously, using titanium nitride targets of natural isotopic composition and a proton beam. The strengths of the resonances at E{sub p} = 1058 keV in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O and at E{sub p} = 897 and 430 keV in {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C have been determined with improved precision, relative to the well-known resonance at E{sub p} = 278 keV in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O. The new recommended values are omegagamma=0.353+-0.018, 362+-20, and 21.9+-1.0 eV for their respective strengths. In addition, the branching ratios for the decay of the E{sub p} = 1058 keV resonance in {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O have been redetermined. The data reported here should facilitate future studies of off-resonant capture in the {sup 14}N(p,gamma){sup 15}O reaction that are needed for an improved R-matrix extrapolation of the cross section. In addition, the data on the 430 keV resonance in {sup 15}N(p,alphagamma){sup 12}C may be useful for hydrogen depth profiling.

  8. Isomers in Neutron-Rich A ?? 190 NNuclides from <sup>208sup>Pb Fragmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caamano, M. [University of Surrey, UK; Walker, P. M. [University of Surrey, UK; Regan, P. H. [University of Surrey, UK; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Podolyak, Zs. [University of Surrey, UK; Gerl, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Hellstrom, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mayet, P. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Mineva, M. N. [Lund University, Sweden; Aprahamian, A. [University of Notre Dame, IN; Benlliure, J. [University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain; Bruce, A. M. [University of Brighton, UK; Butler, P. A. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, UK; Cortina Gil, D. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Cullen, D. M. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, UK; Doring, J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Enqvist, T. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Fox, C. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, UK; Garces Narro, J. [University of Surrey, UK; Geissel, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Gelletly, W. [University of Surrey, UK; Giovinazzo, J. [CEN Bordeaux-Gradignan/CNRS, France; Gorska, M. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Grawe, H. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Grzywacz, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kleinbohl, A. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Korten, W. [CEA, Saclay, France; Lewitowicz, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL); Lucas, R. [CEA, Saclay, France; Mach, H. [Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; O'Leary, C. D. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, UK; De Oliveira, F. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL); Pearson, C. J. [University of Surrey, UK; Rejmund, F. [IPN, Cedex, France; Rejmund, M. [IPN, Cedex, France; Sawicka, M. [University of Warsaw; Schaffner, H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schlegel, C. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schmidt, K. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Schmidt, K.-H. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Stevenson, P. D. [University of Surrey, UK; Theisen, Ch. [CEA, Saclay, France; Vives, F. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Warner, D. D. [Daresbury Laboratory, UK; Wheldon, C. [University of Surrey, UK; Wollersheim, H. J. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Wooding, S. [University of Surrey, UK; Xu, F. [University of Surrey, UK; Yordanov, O. [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic projectile fragmentation of {sup 208}Pb has been used to produce isomers in neutron-rich, A {approx} 190 nuclides. A forward-focusing spectrometer provided ion-by-ion mass and charge identification. The detection of gamma-rays emitted by stopped ions has led to the assignment of isomers in {sup 188}Ta, {sup 190}W, {sup 192}Re, {sup 193}Re, {sup 195}Os, {sup 197}Ir, {sup 198}Ir, {sup 200}Pt, {sup 201}Pt, {sup 202}Pt and {sup 203}Au, with half-lives ranging from approximately 10 ns to 1 ms. Tentative isomer information has been found also for {sup 174}Er, {sup 175}Er, {sup 185}Hf, {sup 191}Re, {sup 194}Re and {sup 199}Ir. In most cases, time-correlated, singles gamma-ray events provided the first spectroscopic data on excited states for each nuclide. In {sup 200}Pt and {sup 201}Pt, the assignments are supported by gamma-gamma coincidences. Isomeric ratios provide additional information, such as half-life and transition energy constraints in particular cases. The level structures of the platinum isotopes are discussed, and comparisons are made with isomer systematics.

  9. Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well...

  10. INVESTIGATION ON THE FLAME EXTINCTION LIMIT OF FUEL BLENDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahsan R. Choudhuri

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lean flame extinction limits of binary fuel mixtures of methane (CH{sub 4}), propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}), and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were measured using a twin-flame counter-flow burner. Experiments were conducted to generate an extinction equivalence ratio vs. global stretch rate plot and an extrapolation method was used to calculate the equivalence ratio corresponding to an experimentally unattainable zero-stretch condition. The foregoing gases were selected because they are the primary constitutes of natural gas, which is the primary focus of the present study. To validate the experimental setup and methodology, the flame extinction limit of pure fuels at zero stretch conditions were also estimated and compared with published values. The lean flame extinction limits of methane (f{sub ext} = 4.6%) and propane (f{sub ext} = 2.25%) flames measured in the present study agreed with the values reported in the literature. It was observed that the flame extinction limit of fuel blends have a polynomial relation with the concentration of component fuels in the mixture. This behavior contradicts with the commonly used linear Le Chatelier's approximation. The experimentally determined polynomial relations between the flame extinction limits of fuel blends (i.e. methane-propane and methane-ethane) and methane concentration are as follows: (1) Methane-Propane--%f{sub ext} = (1.05 x 10{sup -9}) f{sup 5}-(1.3644 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(6.40299 x 10{sup -6}) f{sup 3}-(1.2108459 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2}+(2.87305329 x 10{sup -3}) f+2.2483; (2) Methane-Ethane--%f{sub ext} = (2.1 x 10{sup -9})f{sup 5}-(3.5752 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(2.095425 x 10{sup -5}) f{sup 3}-(5.037353 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2} + 6.08980409 f + 2.8923. Where f{sub ext} is the extinction limits of methane-propane and methane-ethane fuel blends, and f is the concentration (% volume) of methane in the fuel mixture. The relations were obtained by fitting fifth order curve (polynomial regression) to experimentally measured extinction limits at different mixture conditions. To extend the study to a commercial fuel, the flame extinction limit for Birmingham natural gas (a blend of 95% methane, 5% ethane and 5% nitrogen) was experimentally determined and was found to be 3.62% fuel in the air-fuel mixture.

  11. Final state interaction effects in B{sup 0} ? J/??{sup 0} decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehraban, Hossein, E-mail: hmehraban@semnan.ac.ir; Asadi, Amin, E-mail: amin_asadi66@yahoo.com [Semnan University, Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this research the exclusive decay of B{sup 0} ? J/??{sup 0} is calculated by QCD factorization (QCDF) method and final-state interaction (FSI). First, the B{sup 0} ? J/??{sup 0} decay is calculated via QCDF method. The result that is found by using the QCDF method is less than the experimental result. So FSI is considered to solve the B{sup 0} ? J/??{sup 0} decay. For this decay, the D{sup +}D{sup ?}* and D{sup 0} D-bar{sup 0*} via the exchange of D{sup ?}, D{sup ?}* and D-bar{sup 0}, D-bar{sup 0*} mesons are chosen for the intermediate states. The above intermediate states are calculated by using the QCDF method. The experimental branching ratio of B{sup 0} ? J/??{sup 0} decay is (1.76 ± 0.16) × 10{sup ?5} and our results calculated by QCDF and FSI are (0.56 ± 0.11) × 10{sup ?5} and (1.3 ± 0.09) × 10{sup ?5}, respectively.

  12. Determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients for <sup>14sup>C + n <--> <sup>15sup>C, the <sup>14sup>C(n, gamma)<sup>15sup>C reaction rate, and evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCleskey, M. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Trache, L. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Tribble, R. E. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Banu, A. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Eremenko, V. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Goldberg, V. Z. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Lui, Y. W. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); McCleskey, E. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Roeder, B. T. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Spiridon, A. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Carstoiu, F. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Burjan, V. [Nuclear Physics Inst., Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Hons, Z. [Nuclear Physics Inst., Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Thompson, I. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The <sup>14sup>C + n <--> <sup>15sup>C system has been used as a test case in the evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors that uses the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). The method proved to be unsuccessful for this case. As part of this experimental program, the ANCs for the <sup>15sup>C ground state and first excited state were determined using a heavy-ion neutron transfer reaction as well as the inverse kinematics (d,p) reaction, measured at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute. The ANCs were used to evaluate the astrophysical direct neutron capture rate on <sup>14sup>C, which was then compared with the most recent direct measurement and found to be in good agreement. A study of the <sup>15sup>C SF via its mirror nucleus <sup>15sup>F and a new insight into deuteron stripping theory are also presented.

  13. JLab Measurement of the <sup>4sup>He Charge Form Factor at Large Momentum Transfers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camsonne, Alexandre; Katramatou, A. T.; Olson, M.; Sparveris, Nikolaos; Acha, Armando; Allada, Kalyan; Anderson, Bryon; Arrington, John; Baldwin, Alan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Decowski, Piotr; Dutta, Chiranjib; Folts, Edward; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilman, Ronald; Gomez, Javier; Hahn, Brian; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jian; Iodice, Mauro; Kelleher, Aidan; Khrosinkova, Elena; Kievsky, A.; Kuchina, Elena; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; Lee, Byungwuek; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Lott, Gordon; Lu, H.; Marcucci, Laura; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Meekins, David; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Norum, Blaine; Petratos, Gerassimos; Puckett, Andrew; Qian, Xin; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segal, John; Hashemi, Mitra; Shahinyan, Albert; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Subedi, Ramesh; Suleiman, Riad; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Viviani, Michele; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zhang, W. -M.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The charge form factor of <sup>4sup>He has been extracted in the range 29 fm<sup>-2sup> <= Q<sup>2sup> <= 77 fm<sup>-2sup> from elastic electron scattering, detecting <sup>4sup>He nuclei and electrons in coincidence with the High Resolution Spectrometers of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab. The results are in qualitative agreement with realistic meson-nucleon theoretical calculations. The data have uncovered a second diffraction minimum, which was predicted in the Q<sup>2sup> range of this experiment, and rule out conclusively long-standing predictions of dimensional scaling of high-energy amplitudes using quark counting.

  14. Role of various mechanisms in the formation of a {sup 12}C nucleus in the reaction {sup 13}C({sup 3}He, {alpha}){sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galanina, L. I., E-mail: galanina@nsrd.sinp.msu.ru; Zelenskaja, N. S. [Moscow State University, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Morzabaev, A. K. [Gumilev National Eurasian University (Kazakhstan)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The contributions of various mechanisms to the production of the final nucleus {sup 12}C in the reaction {sup 13}C({sup 3}He, {alpha}){sup 12}C are estimated. These are neutron stripping and the transfer of the heavy cluster {sup 9}Be in the pole approximation or via a sequential transfer of virtual {sup 8}Be and a neutron. It is shown that the sequential mechanism of heavy-cluster transfer must be taken into account in order to describe correctly experimental data over the whole angular range.

  15. The CEBAF e{sup +} Footprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freyberger, Arne P. [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA. 23606 (United States)

    2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Jefferson Laboratory (JLAB) is capable of accelerating e{sup -} to 6 GeV in energy. Presently CEBAF is being upgraded to a maximum energy of 12 GeV. In addition to e{sup -} scattering, the user community has expressed interest in performing e{sup +} scattering experiments with the upgraded CEBAF accelerator. This paper describes the existing and planned CEBAF accelerator complex, possible e{sup +} production locations and the expected e{sup +} beam qualities. Possibilities for production of e{sup +} at the JLAB free electron laser (FEL) is also briefly described.

  16. Excitation functions of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prepolec, L.; Soic, N.; Blagus, S.; Miljanic, D.; Siketic, Z.; Skukan, N.; Uroic, M. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Milin, M. [Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka c. 32, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential cross sections of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li nuclear reactions have been measured at forward angles (10 deg. and 20 deg.), using particle identification detector telescopes, over the energy range 2.75-10.00 MeV. Excitation functions have been obtained for low-lying residual-nucleus states. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) at beam energy about 8 MeV, first observed by Wyborny and Carlson in 1971 at 0 deg., has been observed at 10 deg., but is less evident at 20 deg. The cross section obtained for the {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(g.s,0{sup +}) reaction is about ten times smaller. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) reaction could correspond to excited states in {sup 14}C, at excitation energies around 30 MeV.

  17. Producing [mu][sup [minus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowles, P.E.; Beer, G.A.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. (Victoria Univ., BC (Canada)); Bailey, J.M. (Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom)); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Huber, T.M. (Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States)); Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Schellenberg, L. (Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique); Kammel,

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    After the feasibility of vacuum isolated [mu][sup -]d production was demonstrated at TRIUMF in 1989, development was begun on a target system that would take advantage of the process to aid in the understanding of the muon catalyzed fusion cycle. Minimal neutron backgrounds, the ability to use silicon detectors, and compatibility with tritium were considered important for a very versatile target system. the advantages which the target gives isolating [mu]CF process will be outlined.

  18. 8-group relative delayed neutron yields for monoenergetic neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piksaikin, V M; Kazakov, L E; Korolev, G G; Roshchenko, V A; Tertychnyj, R G

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy dependence of the relative yield of delayed neutrons in an 8-group model representation was obtained for monoenergetic neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu. A comparison of this data with the available experimental data by other was made in terms of the mean half-life of the delayed neutron precursors.

  19. Scavenging of Chernobyl [sup 137]Cs and natural [sup 210]Pb in Lake Sempach, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wieland, E. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States)); Santschi, P.H. (Texas A M Univ., Galveston (United States)); Hoehener, P. (Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology, Schlieren (Switzerland)); Sturm, M. (Swiss Federal Inst. for Water Resources and Water Pollution Control, Duebendorf (Switzerland))

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive fallout from the burning Chernobyl nuclear reactor provided a pulsed release of [sup 137]Cs to Lake Sempach at the beginning of May 1986. The time-dependent removal of [sup 137]Cs from the water column into the sediments has been investigated by analyzing water samples, settling particles, and sediment cores. A flux balance has been established to determine and to quantify the removal processes in the epilimnion and hypolimnion of Lake Sempach. Between May 1986 and March 1988, removal residence times of [sup 137]Cs averaged 150 days in the epilimnion and 280 days in the hypolimnion. [sup 137]Cs accumulated in the hypolimnion during stratification, and its scavenging from the hypolimnion into the sediments was the rate-limiting step of the overall process of removing [sup 137]Cs from the water column. Resuspension of sedimentary [sup 137]Cs occurred during circulation periods in winter. Scavenging trap fluxes of [sup 137]Cs and [sup 210]Pb linearly correlated with increasing particle fluxes up to a maximum of about 2.5 g m[sup [minus]2] d[sup [minus]1]. Higher particle fluxes, likely due to calcite precipitation, did not enhance removal fluxes and scavenging efficiency for these nuclides. The distribution coefficient for the partition of [sup 137]Cs between lake water and settling particles, K[sub d], was determined to 7.0 [+-] 1.0 [times] 10[sup 4] cm[sup 3] g[sup [minus]1] for epilimnetic particles and to 5.3 [+-] 1.1 [times] 10[sup 4] cm[sup 3] g[sup [minus]1] for hypolimnetic particles. The distribution coefficient for [sup 210]Pb was estimated to 1.1 [times] 10[sup 6] cm[sup 3] g[sup [minus]1]. The possibility of postdepositional mobility of Chernobyl and nuclear weapons [sup 137]Cs and natural [sup 210]Pb in sediments was proved. 72 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Single Spin Asymmetries of Inclusive Hadrons Produced in Electron Scattering from a Transversely Polarized <sup>3sup>He Target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allada, Kalyan; Zhao, Yongxiang; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bradshaw, Peter; Bosted, Peter; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chen, Wei; Chirapatpimol, Khem; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Cornejo, Juan; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De, Cornelis; , Jager; De, Raffaele; , Leo; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Ding, Huaibo; Dolph, Peter; Dutta, Chiranjib; Dutta, Dipangkar; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Frullani, Salvatore; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Guo, Lei; Hamilton, David; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jin; Huang, Min; Ibrahim, Hassan; Iodice, Mauro; Jin, Ge; Jones, Mark; Katich, Joseph; Kelleher, Aidan; Kim, Wooyoung; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; LeRose, John; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Y; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lu, Hai-jiang; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Munoz, Carlos; , Camacho; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Oh, Yongseok; Osipenko, Mikhail; Parno, Diana; Peng, Jen-chieh; Phillips, Sarah; Posik, Matthew; Puckett, Andrew; Qian, Xin; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Ransome, Ronald; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Schulte, Elaine; Shahinyan, Albert; Hashemi, Mitra; , Shabestari; Sirca, Simon; Stepanyan, Stepan; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tang, Liguang; Tobias, William; Urciuoli, Guido; Vilardi, Ignazio; Wang, Kebin; Wang, Y; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Z; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yawei; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zong, Xing

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurement of target single-spin asymmetries (AN) in the inclusive hadron production reaction, e + <sup>3sup>He??h+X, using a transversely polarized <sup>3sup> He target. The experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a 5.9-GeV electron beam. Three types of hadrons (?<sup>±>, K<sup>±> and proton) were detected in the transverse hadron momentum range 0.54 < pT < 0.74 GeV/c. The range of xF for pions was -0.29 < xF< -0.23 and for kaons -0.25 < xF<-0.18. The observed asymmetry strongly depends on the type of hadron. A positive asymmetry is observed for ?<sup>+> and K<sup>+>. A negative asymmetry is observed for ?–. The magnitudes of the asymmetries follow |A<sup>?> <sup>–|<|A?> <sup>+|<|AK> <sup>+>|. The K<sup>–> and proton asymmetries are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties. The ?<sup>+> and ?<sup>–> asymmetries measured for the 3He target and extracted for neutrons are opposite in sign with a small increase observed as a function of pT.

  1. Analysis of states in {sup 13}C populated in {sup 9}Be + {sup 4}He resonant scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.; Curtis, N.; Kokalova, Tz.; Wheldon, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Scuderi, V.; Torresi, D. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44, Catania (Italy); Grassi, L.; Jelavic Malenica, D.; Koncul, M.; Mijatovic, T.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Szilner, S.; Tokic, V. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Milin, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka 32, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of {sup 9}Be + {alpha} resonant scattering have been performed using the thick-target approach with a {sup 4}He gas volume and a large-area silicon strip detector. {sup 9}Be beam energies in the range 12 to 21.4 MeV were used to measure the {sup 13}C excitation energy spectrum between 13.2 and 16.2 MeV. An R-matrix analysis has been performed to characterize the spins and widths of {sup 13}C resonances, some of which have been proposed to be associated with a 3{alpha}+n molecular band.

  2. Measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in inclusive electroproduction of ?<sup>-> near the Delta<sup>0sup> resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Androic, D; Armstrong, D S; Bailey, S L; Beck, D H; Beise, E J; Benesch, J; Benmokhtar, F; Bimbot, L; Birchall, J; Bosted, P; Breuer, H; Capuano, C L; Chao, Y -C; Coppens, A; Davis, C A; Ellis, C; Flores, G; Franklin, G; Furget, C; Gaskell, D; Gericke, T W; Grames, J; Guillard, G; Hansknecht, J; Horn, T; Jones, M K; King, P M; Korsch, W; Kox, S; Lee, L; Liu, J; Lung, A; Mammei, J; Martin, J W; McKeown, R D; Micherdzinska, A; Mihovilovic, M; Mkrtchyan, H; Muether, M; Page, S A; Papvassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Phillips, S K; Pillot, P; Pitt, M L; Poelker, M; Quinn, B; Ramsay, W D; Real, J -S; Roche, J; Roos, P; Schaub, J; Seva, T; Simicevic, N; Smith, G R; Spayde, D T; Stutzman, M; Suleiman, R; Tadevosyan, V; van Oers, W.T. H; Versteegen, M

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The parity-violating (PV) asymmetry of inclusive ?<sup>-> production in electron scattering from a liquid deuterium target was measured at backward angles. The measurement was conducted as a part of the G0 experiment, at a beam energy of 360 MeV. The physics process dominating pion production for these kinematics is quasi-free photoproduction off the neutron via the ?<sup>0sup> resonance. In the context of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory (HB?PT), this asymmetry is related to a low energy constant d?<sup>-> that characterizes the parity-violating ?N? coupling. Zhu et al. calculated d?<sup>-> in a model benchmarked by the large asymmetries seen in hyperon weak radiative decays, and predicted potentially large asymmetries for this process, ranging from A?<sup>-> = -5.2 to +5.2 ppm. The measurement performed in this work leads to A?<sup>-> = -0.36 ± 1.06 ± 0.37 ± 0.03 ppm (where sources of statistical, systematic and theoretical uncertainties are included), which would disfavor enchancements considered by Zhu et al. proportional to Vud/Vus. The measurement is part of a program of inelastic scattering measurements that were conducted by the G0 experiment, seeking to determine the N-? axial transition form-factors using PV electron scattering.

  3. Decay Studies of Very Neutron Rich Nuclei near <sup>78sup>Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winger, J. A. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Ilyushkin, S. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Gross, Carl J [ORNL; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Batchelder, J. C. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Goodin, C. [Vanderbilt University; Grzywacz, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hamilton, J. H. [Vanderbilt University; Krolas, W. [H. Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP), Krakow, Poland; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Mazzocchi, C. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Nelson, C. [Vanderbilt University; Padgett, Stephen [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Piechaczek, A. [Louisiana State University; Rajabali, M. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Shapira, Dan [ORNL; Zganjar, E. F. [Louisiana State University

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of beta-gamma and beta-delayed neutron emission from <sup>76-79sup>Cu and <sup>83-85sup>Ga were measured at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Selected results on the decay properties of copper isotopes are briefly presented and discussed.

  4. Applications developed for byproduct /sup 85/Kr and tritium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remini, W.C.; Case, F.N.; Haff, K.W.; Tiegs, S.M.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radionuclides, krypton-85 and tritium, both of which are gases under ordinary conditions, are used in many applications in industries and by the military forces. Krypton-85 is produced during the fissioning of uranium and is released during the dissolution of spent-fuel elements. It is a chemically inert gas that emits 0.695-MeV beta rays and a small yield of 0.54-MeV gammas over a half life of 10.3 years. Much of the /sup 85/Kr currently produced is released to the atmosphere; however, large-scale reprocessing of fuel will require collection of the gas and storage as a waste product. An alternative to storage is utilization, and since the chemical and radiation characteristics of /sup 85/Kr make this radionuclide a relatively low hazard from the standpoint of contamination and biological significance, a number of uses have been developed. Tritium is produced as a byproduct of the nuclear-weapons program, and it has a half life of 12.33 years. It has a 0.01861-MeV beta emission and no gamma emission. The absence of a gamma-ray energy eliminates the need for external shielding of the devices utilizing tritium, thus making them easily transportable. Many of the applications require only small quantities of /sup 85/Kr or tritium; however, these uses are important to the technology base of the nation. A significant development that has the potential for beneficial utilization of large quantities of /sup 85/Kr and of tritium involves their use in the production of low-level lighting devices. Since these lights are free from external fuel supplies, have a long half life (> 10 years), are maintenance-free, reliable, and easily deployed, both military and civilian airfield-lighting applications are being studied.

  5. Probability of spent fuel transportation accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClure, J. D.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transported volume of spent fuel, incident/accident experience and accident environment probabilities were reviewed in order to provide an estimate of spent fuel accident probabilities. In particular, the accident review assessed the accident experience for large casks of the type that could transport spent (irradiated) nuclear fuel. This review determined that since 1971, the beginning of official US Department of Transportation record keeping for accidents/incidents, there has been one spent fuel transportation accident. This information, coupled with estimated annual shipping volumes for spent fuel, indicated an estimated annual probability of a spent fuel transport accident of 5 x 10/sup -7/ spent fuel accidents per mile. This is consistent with ordinary truck accident rates. A comparison of accident environments and regulatory test environments suggests that the probability of truck accidents exceeding regulatory test for impact is approximately 10/sup -9//mile.

  6. Trapping processes in CaS:Eu{sup 2+},Tm{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Dongdong [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, (China)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, (China); Jia, Weiyi [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico)] [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Evans, D. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Dennis, W. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Liu, Huimin [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico)] [Department of Physics, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Zhu, Jing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, (China)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing, (China); Yen, W. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

    2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    CaS:Eu{sup 2+},Tm{sup 3+} is a persistent red phosphor. Thermoluminescence was measured under different excitation and thermal treatment conditions. The results reveal that the charge defects, created by substituting Tm{sup 3+} for Ca{sup 2+}, serve as hole traps for the afterglow at room temperature. Tm{sup 3+} plays the role of deep electron trapping centers, capturing electrons either through the conduction band or directly from the excited Eu{sup 2+} ions. These two processes, in which two different sites of Tm{sup 3+} are involved, correspond to two traps with different depths. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  7. Lifetime Measurement of the 2{sup +}{sub 1} state in {sup 20}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petri, Marina-Kalliopi; Fallon, Paul; Macchiavelli, Augusto; Paschalis, Stephanos; Starosta, Krzysztof; Baugher, Travis; Bazin, Daniel; Cartegni, Lucia; Clark, Roderick; Crawford, Heather; Cromaz, Mario; Dewald, Alfred; Gade, Alexandra; Grinyer, Geoff; Gros, Sebastian; Hackstein, Matthias; Jeppesen, Hendrick; Lee, I-Yang; McDaniel, Sean; Miller, Doug; Rajabali, Mustafa; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Rother, Wolfram; Voss, Phillip; Walsh, Kathleen Ann; Weisshaar, Dirk; Wiedeking, Mathis; Brown, Boyd Alex

    2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishing how and when large N/Z values require modified or new theoretical tools is a major quest in nuclear physics. Here we report the first measurement of the lifetime of the 2{sup +}{sub 1} state in the near-dripline nucleus {sup 20}C. The deduced value of {tau}{sub #28;2{sup +}{sub 1}} = 9.8 ± 2.8(stat){sup +0.5}{sub ?1.1}(syst) ps gives a reduced transition probability of B(E2;2{sup +}{sub 1}{yields}0{sup +}{sub g.s.}) = 7.5{sup +3.0}{sub ?1.7}(stat){sup +1.0}{sub ?0.4}(syst) e{sup 2}fm{sup 4} in good agreement with a shell model calculation using isospin-dependent effective charges.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of ASnF{sub 3} (A=Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cs{sup +})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thao Tran, T. [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, 136 Fleming Building, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States); Shiv Halasyamani, P., E-mail: psh@uh.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, 136 Fleming Building, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Aalto University, Kemistintie 1, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of alkali metal tin(II) fluorides, ASnF{sub 3} (A=Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, or Cs{sup +}), has been synthesized through a low temperature solvothermal technique. A fluorine free solvent, methanol, was used in the synthesis. NaSnF{sub 3}, KSnF{sub 3}, and RbSnF{sub 3} have been reported previously; however for RbSnF{sub 3} the reported space group is incorrect. CsSnF{sub 3} is a new alkali tin(II) fluoride, and exhibits a ‘zero-dimensional’ crystal structure with isolated SnF{sub 3}{sup ?} anions separated by Cs{sup +} cations. In addition to the synthesis, infrared, UV–vis, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis measurements were performed. - Graphical abstract: Ball-and-stick diagrams of CsSnF{sub 3}. Display Omitted - Highlights: • A family of ASnF{sub 3} (A=Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +} or Cs{sup +}) has been synthesized solvothermally at low temperatures. • Fluorine-free solvent, methanol, was used instead of conventional fluorinating agents. • RbSnF{sub 3} described in the correct space group exhibits infinite chains of corner-sharing SnF{sub 4} polyhedra. • New CsSnF{sub 3} exhibits a ‘zero-dimensional’ crystal structure consisting of isolated SnF{sub 3}{sup ?} anionic polyhedra.

  9. /sup 34/S, /sup 36/S, and /sup 18/O isotope effects on /sup 31/P chemical shifts in thiophosphate anhydrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roeske, C.; Paneth, P.; O'Leary, M.H.; Reimschuessel, W.

    1985-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    /sup 34/S, /sup 36/S, and /sup 18/O isotope effects on /sup 31/P chemical shifts were measured for the isomeric thiophosphate anhydrides bis(5,5-dimethyl-2-oxo-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinanyl) sulfide (1) and P-oxo-P'-thionobis(5,5-dimethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinanyl) oxide (2). The doubly bonded S in 2 gave isotopic shifts of 0.0097 and 0.018 ppm upfield of P = /sup 32/S for /sup 34/S and /sup 36/S, respectively. The singly bonded S in 1 gave a smaller isotopic shift, the exact value being obscured by the line widths. /sup 18/O in the nonbridging position in 1 gave an isotopic shift of 0.0455 ppm. /sup 18/O in the bridging position in 2 gave an isotopic shift of 0.019 ppm. These observations confirm the expectation that /sup 36/S effects should be twice as large as the corresponding /sup 34/S effects.

  10. Check for chirality in {sup 102}Rh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Yavahchova, M. S.; Petkov, P.; Angelis, G. de; Bhowmik, R. K.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Madhavan, N.; Kumar, R.; Raju, M. Kumar; Kaur, J.; Mahanto, G.; Singh, A.; Kaur, N.; Garg, R.; Sukla, A.; Marinov, Ts. K.; Brant, S. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria) and INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Inter-University Accelerator Center, New Delhi (India); Nuclear Physics Department, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam (India); Department of Physics, Punjab University, Chandigarh (India); Inter-University Accelerator Center, New Delhi (India); Department of Physics, Punjab University, Chandigarh (India); Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi University, New Delhi (India); Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagreb University, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Excited states in {sup 102}Rh, populated by the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 94}Zr({sup 11}B,3n){sup 102}Rh at a beam energy of 36 MeV, were studied using the INGA spectrometer at IUAC, New Delhi. The angular correlations and the electromagnetic character of some of the gamma-ray transitions observed were investigated in details. A new chiral candidate sister band was found in the level-scheme of {sup 102}Rh. Lifetimes of exited states in {sup 102}Rh were measured by means of the Doppler-shift attenuation technique. The experimental results do not support the presence of static chirality in {sup 102}Rh.

  11. Infrared spectra of ClCN{sup +}, ClNC{sup +}, and BrCN{sup +} trapped in solid neon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacox, Marilyn E.; Thompson, Warren E. [Optical Technology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8441 (United States)

    2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    When a mixture of ClCN or BrCN with a large excess of neon is codeposited at 4.3 K with a beam of neon atoms that have been excited in a microwave discharge, the infrared spectrum of the resulting solid includes prominent absorptions of the uncharged isocyanide, ClNC or BrNC, and of the corresponding cation, ClCN{sup +} or BrCN{sup +}. The NC-stretching fundamentals of the isocyanides trapped in solid neon lie close to the positions for their previously reported argon-matrix counterparts. The CN-stretching absorptions of ClCN{sup +} and BrCN{sup +} and the CCl-stretching absorption of ClCN{sup +} appear very close to the gas-phase band centers. Absorptions of two overtones and one combination band of ClCN{sup +} are identified. Reversible photoisomerization of ClCN{sup +} to ClNC{sup +} occurs. The two stretching vibrational fundamentals and several infrared and near infrared absorptions associated with electronic transitions of ClNC{sup +} are observed. Minor infrared peaks are attributed to the vibrational fundamental absorptions of the CX and CX{sup +} species (X=Cl,Br)

  12. Dosimetric comparison of {sup 90}Y, {sup 32}P, and {sup 186}Re radiocolloids in craniopharyngioma treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadeghi, Mahdi; Karimi, Elham; Hosseini, S. Hamed [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 31485/498, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faculty of Engineering, Research and Science Campus, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14155/4933, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: In the radionuclide treatment of some forms of brain tumors such as craniopharyngiomas, the selection of the appropriate radionuclide for therapy is a key element in treatment planning. The aim was to study the influence by considering the beta-emitter radionuclide dose rate in an intracranial cyst. Methods: Dosimetry was performed using the MCNP4C radiation transport code. Analytical dosimetry was additionally performed using the Loevinger and the Berger formulas in the MATLAB software. Each result was compared under identical conditions. The advantages and disadvantages of using {sup 90}Y versus {sup 32}P and {sup 186}Re were investigated. Results: The dose rate at the inner surface of the cyst wall was estimated to be 400 mGy/h for a 1 MBq/ml concentration of {sup 90}Y. Under identical conditions of treatment, the corresponding dose rates were 300 mGy/h for {sup 32}P and 160 mGy/h for {sup 186}Re. For a well-defined cyst radius and identical wall thickness, higher dose rates resulted for {sup 90}Y. Conclusions: To achieve the same radiological burden, the required amount of physical activity of injectable solution is lower for {sup 32}P. This is found to be a consequence of both the radionuclide physical half-life and the pattern of energy deposition from the emitted radiation. According to the half-life and dose-rate results, {sup 90}Y would be a good substitute for {sup 32}P.

  13. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA); Leggett, Robert D. (Richland, WA); Baker, Ronald B. (Richland, WA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  14. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  15. Subthreshold pion production in the reaction /sup 139/La + /sup 139/La. -->. pi. /sup + -/ + X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured charged pion production in the reaction /sup 139/La + /sup 139/La ..-->.. ..pi../sup + -/ + X at three beam energies (246, 183 and 138 MeVnucleon) below the nucleon-nucleon threshold. Associated multiplicity for charged participants was obtained using a 110-element scintillator multiplicity array. Data were taken over the angular range of 21/degree/ to 67/degree/ in the laboratory (equivalent to 30/degree/ to 90/degree/ in the center of mass). Dependence of the spectra upon pion charge, energy and angle, beam energy, system mass and associated multiplicity was investigated. Based on the isotropic angular distibutions and the associated multiplicities for pion production, it appears that subthreshold pions in the range of our experiment are produced predominantly from a source at rest in the center of mass and involving a large number of nucleons. The general character of the subthreshold pion spectra is comparable to previous results above threshold. However, the scaling of the subthreshold pion yield with system mass deviates from the dependence observed in light systems, to an extent which cannot be explained by a simple nucleon-nucleon model. We also found charge dependent structure in the pion spectra, which we analysed in the framework of both Coulomb distortion and clustering models. We conclude that while we did not find clear evidence of collective effects in subthreshold pion production, it would be very worthwhile to conduct a systematic investigation of pion production for all charge states and over a range of angles, system masses and beam energies, below threshold. 170 refs., 78 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Shielding aspects of D- sup 3 He fusion power reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Guebaly, L.A. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Fusion Technology Inst.)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the implications of the D-{sup 3}He fuel cycle on shielding design are investigated for tokamak power reactors of the ARIES/Apollo class. The prime function of the shield is to protect the superconducting magnets against radiation. A variety of shield options is examined, and the various shields are optimized for the D-{sup 3}He neutron spectrum. The results demonstrate the relative merits of the various materials as a function of the shield thickness. In the first wall/shield, low-activation structural materials (such as Tenelon, modified HT-9, silicon carbide composites, and carbon-carbon composites) were employed to reduce the radioactive inventory and increase the safety margin in case of accidents. A comparison between the different shield options based on detailed neutronics, environmental/safety, and economic assessments has led to the selection of the reference shield design. The first-wall/shield structure is made of an elementally tailored ferritic steel (MHT-9), and the thermal energy is converted through an organic coolant at 44% efficiency. The safety features of the low-activation steel shield, along with the low neutron production in the D-{sup 3}He fuel cycle, enable the ARIES-III/Apollo design to achieve acceptable environmental and safety characteristics.

  17. Synthesis of [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methacrylic acid, [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methyl methacrylate and/or related compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Marc A. (Santa Fe, NM); Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds of the formulae ##STR00001## wherein Q is selected from the group consisting of --S--, --S(.dbd.O)--, and --S(.dbd.O).sub.2--, Z is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group selected from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently selected from the group consisting of a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, an aryl, and an alkoxy group, and X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group, and a fully-deuterated C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group. The present invention is also directed to a process of preparing labeled compounds, e.g., process of preparing [.sup.13C]methacrylic acid by reacting a (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13CH.sub.2)-- aryl sulfone precursor with .sup.13CHI to form a (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13C(.sup.13CH.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfone intermediate, and, reacting the (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13C(.sup.13CH.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfone intermediate with sodium hydroxide, followed by acid to form [.sup.13C]methacrylic acid. The present invention is further directed to a process of preparing [.sup.2H.sub.8]methyl methacrylate by reacting a (HOOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate with CD.sub.3I to form a (.sup.2H.sub.3COOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate, and heating the(.sup.2H.sub.3COOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate at temperatures and for time sufficient to form [.sup.2H.sub.8]methyl methacrylate.

  18. The {sup 3}He(e,e'p){sup 2}H and {sup 4}He(e,e'p){sup 3}H reactions at high momentum transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, William P. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Schiavilla, Rocco [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Van Orden, J. W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present updated calculations for observables in the processes {sup 3}He(e,e'p){sup 2}H, {sup 4}He(e,e'p){sup 3}H and {sup 4}He(e-vector, e'p-vector){sup 3}H. This update entails the implementation of improved nucleon-nucleon (NN) amplitudes to describe final state interactions (FSI) within a Glauber approximation and includes full spin-isospin dependence in the profile operator. In addition, an optical potential, which has also been updated since previous work, is utilized to treat FSI for the {sup 4}He(e,e'p){sup 3}H and {sup 4}He(e-vector, e'p-vector){sup 3}H reactions. The calculations are compared with experimental data and show good agreement between theory and experiment. Comparisons are made between the various approximations in the Glauber treatment, including model dependence due to the NN scattering amplitudes, rescattering contributions, and spin dependence. We also analyze the validity of the Glauber approximation at the kinematics the data is available, by comparing to the results obtained with the optical potential.

  19. Double beta decays of {sup 106}Cd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suhonen, Jouni [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-neutrino (2{nu}2{beta}) and neutrinoless (0{nu}2{beta}) double beta decays of {sup 106}Cd are studied for the transitions to the ground state 0{sub gs}{sup +} and 0{sup +} and 2{sup +} excited states in {sup 106}Pd by using realistic many-body wave functions calculated in the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation. Effective, G-matrix-derived nuclear forces are used in realistic single-particle model spaces. All the possible channels, {beta}{sup +}{beta}{sup +}, {beta}{sup +}EC, and ECEC, are discussed for both the 2{nu}2{beta} and 0{nu}2{beta} decays. The associated half-lives are computed and particular attention is devoted to the study of the detectability of the resonant neutrinoless double electron capture (R0{nu}ECEC) process in {sup 106}Cd. The calculations of the present article constitute the thus far most complete and up-to-date investigation of the double-beta-decay properties of {sup 106}Cd.

  20. Fusion of {sup 6}Li with {sup 159}Tb at near-barrier energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pradhan, M. K.; Mukherjee, A.; Basu, P.; Goswami, A.; Kshetri, R.; Roy, Subinit; Chowdhury, P. Roy; Sarkar, M. Saha; Palit, R.; Parkar, V. V.; Santra, S.; Ray, M. [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata-700064 (India); Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai-400005 (India); Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Department of Physics, Behala College, Parnasree, Kolkata-700060 (India)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Complete and incomplete fusion cross sections for {sup 6}Li + {sup 159}Tb have been measured at energies around the Coulomb barrier by the {gamma}-ray method. The measurements show that the complete fusion cross sections at above-barrier energies are suppressed by {approx}34% compared to coupled-channel calculations. A comparison of the complete fusion cross sections at above-barrier energies with the existing data for {sup 11,10}B + {sup 159}Tb and {sup 7}Li + {sup 159}Tb shows that the extent of suppression is correlated with the {alpha} separation energies of the projectiles. It has been argued that the Dy isotopes produced in the reaction {sup 6}Li + {sup 159}Tb at below-barrier energies are primarily due to the d transfer to unbound states of {sup 159}Tb, while both transfer and incomplete fusion processes contribute at above-barrier energies.

  1. SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding Performance during 4-Point Tubular Bend Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IJ van Rooyen; WR Lloyd; TL Trowbridge; SR Novascone; KM Wendt; SM Bragg-Sitton

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE) established the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to develop technologies and other solutions to improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development Pathway in the LWRS program encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. Recent investigations of potential options for “accident tolerant” nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. One of the proposed SiC-based fuel cladding designs being investigated incorporates a SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) as a structural material supplementing an internal Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) liner tube, referred to as the hybrid clad design. Characterization of the advanced cladding designs will include a number of out-of-pile (nonnuclear) tests, followed by in-pile irradiation testing of the most promising designs. One of the out-of-pile characterization tests provides measurement of the mechanical properties of the cladding tube using four point bend testing. Although the material properties of the different subsystems (materials) will be determined separately, in this paper we present results of 4-point bending tests performed on fully assembled hybrid cladding tube mock-ups, an assembled Zr-4 cladding tube mock-up as a standard and initial testing results on bare SiC-CMC sleeves to assist in defining design parameters. The hybrid mock-up samples incorporated SiC-CMC sleeves fabricated with 7 polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles. To provide comparative information; both 1- and 2-ply braided SiC-CMC sleeves were used in this development study. Preliminary stress simulations were performed using the BISON nuclear fuel performance code to show the stress distribution differences for varying lengths between loading points and clad configurations. The 2-ply sleeve samples show a higher bend momentum compared to those of the 1-ply sleeve samples. This is applicable to both the hybrid mock-up and bare SiC-CMC sleeve samples. Comparatively both the 1- and 2-ply hybrid mock-up samples showed a higher bend stiffness and strength compared with the standard Zr-4 mock-up sample. The characterization of the hybrid mock-up samples showed signs of distress and preliminary signs of fraying at the protective Zr-4 sleeve areas for the 1-ply SiC-CMC sleeve. In addition, the microstructure of the SiC matrix near the cracks at the region of highest compressive bending strain shows significant cracking and flaking. The 2-ply SiC-CMC sleeve samples showed a more bonded, cohesive SiC matrix structure. This cracking and fraying causes concern for increased fretting during the actual use of the design. Tomography was proven as a successful tool to identify open porosity during pre-test characterization. Although there is currently insufficient data to make conclusive statements regarding the overall merit of the hybrid cladding design, preliminary characterization of this novel design has been demonstrated.

  2. Radiative neutron capture by {sup 2}H, {sup 7}Li, {sup 14}C, and {sup 14}N nuclei at astrophysical energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B., E-mail: dubovichenko@mail.ru [V.G. Fessenkov Astrophysical Institute NCSRT NSA RK (Kazakhstan)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of describing experimental data on the total cross sections for the n{sup 2}H, n{sup 7}Li, n{sup 14}C, and n{sup 14}N radiative-capture processes within the potential cluster model involving forbidden states and their classification according to Young's tableaux is considered. It is shown that this model and the methods used here to construct potentials make it possible to describe correctly the behavior of the experimental cross sections at energies between 5 to 10 meV (5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}-10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV) and 1 to 15MeV.

  3. Delayed neutron alignment in sup 117 I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, E.S.; Waring, M.P.; Clark, R.M.; Forbes, S.A.; Fossan, D.B.; Hughes, J.R.; LaFosse, D.R.; Liang, Y.; Ma, R.; Vaska, P.; Wadsworth, R. (Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom) Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States) Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO1 5DD (United Kingdom) Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rotational alignment of {ital h}{sub 11/2} neutrons is considerably delayed ({Delta}{h bar}{omega}{similar to}0.11 MeV) in the {pi}{ital h}{sub 11/2}(550)1/2{sup {minus}} intruder band in {sup 117}I when compared to bands built on normal-parity states. Comparison with cranked shell-model calculations suggests that this effect may indicate a larger quadrupole deformation for the intruder orbital. A strong neutron-proton interaction between the aligning {ital h}{sub 11/2} neutrons and the {ital h}{sub 11/2} proton intruder may also play a role. In addition, noncollective oblate states at {ital I}{sup {pi}}=39/2{sup {minus}},43/2{sup {minus}}, and 45/2{sup {minus}} compete energetically with rotational states of the intruder band which may also perturb the neutron alignment.

  4. Coincidence studies of He ionized by C{sup 6+}, Au{sup 24+}, and Au{sup 53+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGovern, M.; Walters, H. R. J. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D.; Mohallem, J. R. [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa postal 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T. [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529-0116 (United States)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently developed [Phys. Rev. A 79, 042707 (2009)] impact parameter coupled pseudostate approximation (CP) is applied to calculate triple differential cross sections for single ionization of He by C{sup 6+}, Au{sup 24+}, and Au{sup 53+} projectiles at impact energies of 100 and 2 MeV/amu for C{sup 6+} and 3.6 MeV/amu for Au{sup 24+} and Au{sup 53+}. For C{sup 6+}, satisfactory, but not perfect, agreement is found with experimental measurements in coplanar geometry, but there is substantial disagreement with data taken in a perpendicular plane geometry. The CP calculations firmly contradict a projectile-nucleus interaction model which has been used to support the perpendicular plane measurements. For Au{sup 24+} and Au{sup 53+}, there is a complete lack of accord with the available experiments. However, for Au{sup 24+} the theoretical position appears to be quite firm with clear indications of convergence in the CP approximation and very good agreement between CP and the completely different three-distorted-waves eikonal-initial-state (3DW-EIS) approximation. The situation for Au{sup 53+} is different. At the momentum transfers at which the measurements were made, there are doubts about the convergence of the CP approximation and a factor of 2 difference between the CP and 3DW-EIS predictions. The discord between theory and experiment is even greater with the experiment giving cross sections a factor of 10 larger than the theory. A study of the convergence of the CP approximation shows that it improves rapidly with reducing momentum transfer. As a consequence, lower-order cross sections than the triple are quite well converged and present an opportunity for a more reliable test of the experiment.

  5. Top Quark Production Asymmetries AFB<sup>t> and AFB<sup>l>

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, Edmond L.; Cao, Qing-Hong; Chen, Chuan-Ren; Yu, Jiang-Hao; Zhang, Hao

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large forward-backward asymmetry is seen in both the top quark rapidity distribution AFB<sup>t> and in the rapidity distribution of charged leptons AFB<sup>l> from top quarks produced at the Tevatron. We study the kinematic and dynamic aspects of the relationship of the two observables arising from the spin correlation between the charged lepton and the top quark with different polarization states. We emphasize the value of both measurements, and we conclude that a new physics model which produces more right-handed than left-handed top quarks is favored by the present data.

  6. Possible chiral bands in {sup 194}Tl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masiteng, P. L.; Ramashidzha, T. M.; Maliage, S. M.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Vymers, P. A. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, 7535 Bellville (South Africa); Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Bark, R. A.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); Kau, J.; Komati, F. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of the North West, Private Bag X2046, 2735 Mafikeng (South Africa); Lindsay, R. [University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, 7535 Bellville (South Africa); Matamba, I. [University of Venda for Science and Technology, Thohoyandou (South Africa); Mutshena, P. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of Venda for Science and Technology, Thohoyandou (South Africa); Zhang, Y. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of Cape Town, Private Bag, 7701 Rondebosch (South Africa)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High spin states in {sup 194}Tl, excited through the {sup 181}Ta({sup 18}O,5n) fusion evaporation reaction, were studied using the AFRODITE array at iThemba LABS. Candidate chiral bands built on the {pi}h{sub 9/2} x {nu}i{sub 13/2}{sup 1} configuration were found. Furthermore these bands were observed through a band crossing caused by the excitation of a {nu}i{sub 13/2} pair. Above the band crossing the excitation energies remain close, suggesting that chirality may persist for the four quasiparticle configuration too.

  7. Observation of superdeformation in sup 191 Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, E.F.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Chasman, R.R.; Ahmad, I.; Khoo, T.L.; Wolfs, F.L.H. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (US)); Ye, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (US)); Beard, K.B. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (US)); Garg, U. (University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556); Drigert, M.W. (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, EG G Idaho Inc., Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415); and others

    1989-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The first observation of superdeformation in the mass region {ital A}{congruent}190 is reported. A rotational band of twelve transitions with an average energy spacing of 37 keV, an average moment of inertia {ital scrF}{sup (2)} of 110 {h bar}{sup 2} MeV{sup {minus}1}, and an average quadrupole moment of 18{plus minus}3 {ital e} b has been observed in {sup 191}Hg; this band persists at low rotational frequency. These results are in excellent agreement with a calculation that predicts an ellipsoidal axis ratio of 1.65:1 for the superdeformed shape in this nucleus.

  8. Coulomb dissociation of [sup 11]Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ieki, K.; Sackett, D.; Galonsky, A.; Bertulani, C.A.; Kruse, J.J.; Lynch, W.G.; Morrissey, D.J.; Orr, N.A.; Schulz, H.; Sherrill, B.M.; Sustich, A.; Winger, J.A. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics, Michigan State Unversity, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)); Deak, F.; Horvath, A.; Kiss, A. (Department of Atomic Physics, Eoetvoes University, Puskin utca 5-7 H-1088 Budapest 8 (Hungary)); Seres, Z. (KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest 114 (Hungary)); Kolata, J.J. (Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)); Warner, R.E. (Department of Physics, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio 44074 (United States)); Humphrey, D.L. (Department of Physics, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States))

    1993-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinematically complete measurements for Coulomb dissociation of [sup 11]Li into [sup 9]Li+2[ital n] were made at 28 MeV/nucleon. The [ital n]-[ital n] correlation function suggests a large source size for the two-neutron emission. The electromagnetic excitation spectrum of [sup 11]Li has a peak, as anticipated in low-energy dipole resonance models, but a large post-breakup Coulomb acceleration of the [sup 9]Li fragment is observed, indicating a very short lifetime of the excited state and favoring direct breakup as the dissociation mechanism.

  9. {beta}-delayed neutron decay of {sup 19}N and {sup 20}N

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Anthony, D. W.; Lofy, P. A.; Morrissey, D. J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) and Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the first spectroscopic studies of delayed neutron and {gamma} emission following the {beta} decay of {sup 19}N and {sup 20}N are reported. Nuclides were produced by fragmenting an 80 MeV/nucleon {sup 22}Ne beam in a 546 mg/cm{sup 2} thick Be target and were separated at high velocities with the A1200 fragment separator. The nuclides were implanted in a thin plastic scintillator at the center of an array of neutron scintillators to determine the neutron time-of-flight spectrum. Two hyperpure germanium detectors were used to observe coincident {gamma} events. The {beta}-{gamma},{beta}-n, and {beta}-n-{gamma} coincidence spectra were analyzed to obtain the energies of the states populated in {sup 18}O, {sup 19}O, and {sup 20}O following the {beta} decay. Eight new neutron energies with a total neutron emission probability of 41.8(9)%, six {gamma} transitions among the excited states of {sup 19}O, and four {gamma} transitions among the excited states of {sup 18}O were identified in the {sup 19}N {beta} decay. Seven new neutron energies with a total neutron emission probability of 42.9(14)%, ten {gamma} transitions among the excited states of {sup 20}O, and two {gamma} transitions among the exited states of {sup 19}O were observed from the {sup 20}N {beta} decay. Half-lives of 336(3) and 136(3) ms were determined for the {sup 19}N and {sup 20}N decays, respectively. The branching ratios of both decays were deduced and compared with USD (universal sd-shell) shell model calculations. The {beta} decay schemes for {sup 19}N and {sup 20}N were de0011duc.

  10. [sup 27]Al NMR, GT-IR and ethanol-[sup 18]O TPD characterization of fluorided alumina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeCanio, E.C. (Texaco R D Dept., Beacon, NY (United States) Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States)); Bruno, J.W. (Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States)); Nero, V.P.; Edwards, J.C. (Texaco R D Dept., Beacon, NY (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New environmental legislation in the United States requiring reformulation of gasoline and diesel fuels is making its necessary to develop better, alternative acid catalysts for alkylation and isomerization reactions, and for hydrotreating catalysts for sulfur and nitrogen removal from refinery streams. A series of F/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] samples (wt % F = 0 to 20) has been studied using a combination of solid-state [sup 27]Al NMR, FT-IR, and ethanol-[sup 18]O TPD techniques. Solid-state [sup 27]Al NMR is particularly sensitive to amorphous phases or small crystallites present on the catalyst surface, many of which cannot be detected by XRD. [sup 27]Al NMR shows the presence of three types of AlF[sub 3](H[sub 2]O)[sub n] species (with n varying between 0 and 3) on fluorided alumina. FT-IR studies of ethanol adsorption show that fluoride blocks the sites required for dissociative chemisorption of ethanol. A similar analysis of adsorbed pyridine shows an increase in the number of Broensted acid sites with the addition of up to 10 wt % fluoride. However, increasing the fluoride loading to 20 wt % decreases the number of Broensted acid sites. The TPD of ethanol-[sup 18]O from F/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] samples shows that at low levels fluoride serves to block Lewis acid sites, but at higher levels its predominant role is to increase the Broensted acidity of the alumina surface. The pyridine adsorption and TPD experiments show that fluoride strengthens the remaining Lewis acid sites. 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. {Beta}-delayed neutron decay of {sup 17}C and {sup 18}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheller, K.W.; Goerres, J.; Vouzoukas, S.; Wiescher, M. [Univ. of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN (United States)] [and others

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The {Beta}-delayed neutron decay of {sup 17}C and {sup 18}C has bear measured to investigate neutron-unbound levels in {sup 17}N and {sup 19}N. Levels of interest in {sup 17}N and {sup 18}N are those near the neutron threshold which may play a role in a astrophysical reprocess during an inhomogeneous Big Bang. Radioactive ion beaming of {sup 17}C and {sup 18}C were produced by beam fragmentation at the NSCL MSU. Ions were implanted in a plastic scintillator which served as a start detector for a time-of-flight measurement. Neutrons were detected in the MSU neutron detector array. Several neutron groups have been observed and the results will be discussed.

  12. Method of removing Pu(IV) polymer from nuclear fuel reclaiming liquid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tallent, Othar K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Mailen, James C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bell, Jimmy T. (Kingston, TN); Arwood, Phillip C. (Harriman, TN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Pu(IV) polymer not extractable from a nuclear fuel reclaiming solution by conventional processes is electrolytically converted to Pu.sup.3+ and PuO.sub.2.sup.2+ ions which are subsequently converted to Pu.sup.4+ ions extractable by the conventional processes.

  13. {beta}-delayed neutron decay in {sup 17}B and {sup 19}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raimann, G. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Ozawa, A. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-01 (Japan); Boyd, R.N. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)]|[Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Chloupek, F.R. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Fujimaki, M. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-01 (Japan); Kimura, K. [Nagasaki Institute of Applied Science, Nagasaki, Nagasaki 851-01 (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-01 (Japan); Kolata, J.J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Kubono, S. [Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Tanashi, Tokyo 188 (Japan); Tanihata, I.; Watanabe, Y.; Yoshida, K. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-01 (Japan)

    1995-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The {beta}-delayed neutron decays of {sup 17}B and {sup 19}C were studied using radioactive ion beams. The neutron energies, measured via time-of-flight, give information on states above the neutron decay threshold in {sup 17}C and {sup 19}N, respectively. These low lying states are of possible interest for Big Bang nucleosynthesis. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  14. Scattering of {sup 8}He on {sup 208}Pb at 22 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marquinez-Duran, G.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Martel, I.; Berjillos, R.; Duenas, J. A.; Parkar, V. V. [Depto. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Acosta, L. [Depto. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva, Spain and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Via Santa Sofia 62, 95123, Catania (Italy); Rusek, K. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw (Poland); Alvarez, M. A. G.; Gomez-Camacho, J. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, 41092, Sevilla, Spain and Depto. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Borge, M. J. G.; Cruz, C.; Cubero, M.; Pesudo, V.; Tengblad, O. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Chbihi, A. [GANIL, CEA and IN2P3-CNRS, B.P. 5027, 14076 Caen cedex (France); Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Moro, A. M. [Depto. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Fernandez-Martinez, B.; Labrador, J. A. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, 41092, Sevilla (Spain); and others

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The skin nucleus {sup 8}He is investigated by measuring the angular distribution of the elasticly scattered {sup 8}He and the {sup 6,4}He fragments produced in the collision with a {sup 208}Pb target at 22 MeV, just above the Coulomb barrier. The experiment was carried out at SPIRAL/GANIL in 2010. Here we present preliminary results for the elastic scattering.

  15. Synthetic Fuel

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

  16. Cyclotron production of {sup 61}Cu using natural Zn and enriched {sup 64}Zn targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asad, A. H.; Smith, S. V.; Chan, S.; Jeffery, C. M.; Morandeau, L.; Price, R. I. [RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia, Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, Australia, and Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Can (Australia); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States) and Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, and Chemistry, University of Western Australia, Pe (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia and Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)

    2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Copper-61 ({sup 61}Cu) shares with {sup 64}Cu certain advantages for PET diagnostic imaging, but has a shorter half-life (3.4hr vs. 12.7hr) and a greater probability of positron production per disintegration (61% vs. 17.9%). One important application is for in vivo imaging of hypoxic tissue. In this study {sup 61}Cu was produced using the {sup 64}Zn(p,{alpha}){sup 61}Cu reaction on natural Zn or enriched {sup 64}Zn targets. The enriched {sup 64}Zn (99.82%) was electroplated onto high purity gold or silver foils or onto thin Al discs. A typical target bombardment used 30{mu}A; at 11.7, 14.5 or 17.6MeV over 30-60min. The {sup 61}Cu (radiochemical purity of >95%) was separated using a combination of cation and anion exchange columns. The {sup 64}Zn target material was recovered after each run, for re-use. In a direct comparison with enriched {sup 64}Zn-target results, {sup 61}Cu production using the cheaper {sup nat}Zn target proved to be an effective alternative.

  17. Dynamical deformation effects in subbarrier fusion of {sup 64}Ni+{sup 132}Sn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that dynamical deformation effects play an important role in fusion reactions involving the {sup 64}Ni nucleus, in particular the {sup 64}Ni+{sup 132}Sn system. We calculate fully microscopic interaction potentials and the corresponding subbarrier fusion cross-sections.

  18. Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department is investing in groundbreaking research that will make cars weigh less, drive further and consume less fuel.

  19. Ab initio density functional theory study of non-polar (101{sup ¯}0),?(112{sup ¯}0) and semipolar (202{sup ¯}1) GaN surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mutombo, P.; Romanyuk, O., E-mail: romanyuk@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnická 10, 16200 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The atomic structures of non-polar GaN(101{sup ¯}0),?(112{sup ¯}0) and semipolar GaN(202{sup ¯}1),?(202{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}) surfaces were studied using ab initio calculations within density functional theory. The bulk-like truncated (1?×?1) structure with buckled Ga-N or Ga-Ga dimers was found stable on the non-polar GaN(101{sup ¯}0) surface in agreement with previous works. Ga-N heterodimers were found energetically stable on the GaN(112{sup ¯}0)-(1?×?1) surface. The formation of vacancies and substitution site defects was found unfavorable for non-polar GaN surfaces. Semipolar GaN(202{sup ¯}1)-(1?×?1) surface unit cells consist of non-polar (101{sup ¯}0) and semipolar (101{sup ¯}1) nano-facets. The (101{sup ¯}1) nano-facets consist of two-fold coordinated atoms, which form N-N dimers within a (2?×?1) surface unit cell on a GaN(202{sup ¯}1) surface. Dimers are not formed on the GaN(202{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}) surface. The stability of the surfaces with single (101{sup ¯}0) or (101{sup ¯}1) nano-facets was analyzed. A single non-polar (101{sup ¯}0)-(1?×?1) nano-facet was found stable on the GaN(202{sup ¯}1) surface, but unstable on the GaN(202{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}) surface. A single (101{sup ¯}1) nano-facet was found unstable. Semipolar GaN surfaces with (202{sup ¯}1) and (202{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}) polarity can be stabilized with a Ga overlayer at Ga-rich experimental conditions.

  20. Ion-molecule interactions in crossed-beams. [N/sup +/-H/sub 2/; F/sup +/-H; CO/sub 2//sup +/-D/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S.G.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions of the ions N/sup +/, F/sup +/, and CO/sub 2//sup +/ with H/sub 2/ and/or its isotopes were examined using the crossed-beam technique in the low (< 4 eV) initial relative energy. For the reaction N/sup +/(/sup 3/P) + H/sub 2/ ..-->.. NH/sup +/ + H, complex formation dominates up to 1.9 eV and a substantial interaction occurs between all collision partners up to 3.6 eV. The distribution of N/sup +/ scattered nonreactively from H/sub 2/ also showed a long-lived complex channel below 1.9 eV. The reaction F/sup +/(/sup 3/P) + H/sub 2/ ..-->..FH/sup +/ + H proceeded by a direct reaction mechanism at 0.20 to 1.07 eV. The reaction CO/sub 2//sup +/ + D/sub 2/ ..-->.. DCO/sub 2//sup +/ + D gives asymmetric product distributions at 0.27 eV and above, indicating a direct reaction mechanism. Results indicated that there are probably barriers in the exit channels for DCO/sub 2//sup +/, DCO/sup +/, and D/sub 2/O/sup +/ products. The electronic state distributions of the N/sup +/, F/sup +/, and CO/sub 2//sup +/ beams was investigated using beam attenuation and total luminescence techniques.

  1. Alternate-fuel reactor studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, K. Jr.; Ehst, D.A.; Gohar, Y.; Jung, J.; Mattas, R.F.; Turner, L.R.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of studies related to improvements and/or greater understanding of alternate-fueled reactors is presented. These studies cover the areas of non-Maxwellian distributions, materials and lifetime analysis, a /sup 3/He-breeding blanket, tritium-rich startup effects, high field magnet support, and reactor operation spanning the range from full D-T operation to operation with no tritium breeding.

  2. Structural alterations in SiC as a result of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.M.; McHargue, C.J.; Appleton, B.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion scattering and channeling techniques were used to study production of disorder and randomization of SiC by implantation of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ at doses of up to 3 x 10/sup 16/ /cm/sup 2/ for Cr/sup +/ and 8 x 10/sup 16/ /cm/sup 2/ for N/sup +/. Experiments were designed so that the calculated damage energy profiles would be well matched for the two ion species. The results were compared for the degree of effectiveness of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ in producing disorder. At higher doses, Cr/sup +/ was much more effective than N/sup +/ for a given damage energy using the same calculational method for Cr/sup +/ as for N/sup +/. In correlated studies of swelling, both species had about the same effectiveness in producing swelling.

  3. Transportation Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesisAppliances »Contact-InformationFuels DOE would

  4. Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy ForrestalPrinceton PlasmaEnergyFuel Cell

  5. A validation of the [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He method for determining groundwater recharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, D.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Schiff, S.L. (Univ. of Waterloo, Onatrio (Canada)); Poreda, R.J. (Univ. Rochester, NY (United States)); Clarke, W.B. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tritium and He isotopes have been measured at a site where groundwater flow is nearly vertical for a travel time of 100 years and where recharge rates are spatially variable. Because the mid-1960s [sup 3]H peak (arising from aboveground testing of thermonuclear devices) is well-defined, the vertical groundwater velocity is known with unusual accuracy at this site. Utilizing [sup 3]H and its stable daughter [sup 3]He to determine groundwater ages, we compute a recharge rate of 0.16 m/yr, which agrees to within about 5% of the value based on the depth of the [sup 3]H peak (measured both in 1986 and 1991) and two-dimensional modeling in an area of high recharge. Zero [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He age occurs at a depth that is approximately equal to the average depth of the annual low water table, even though the capillary fringe extends to land surface during most of the year at the study site. In an area of low recharge (0.05 m/yr) where the [sup 3]H peak (and hence the vertical velocity) is also well-defined, the [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He results could not be used to compute recharge because samples were not collected sufficiently far above the [sup 3]H peak; however, modeling indicates that the [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He age gradient near the water table is an accurate measure of vertical velocities in the low-recharge area. Because [sup 3]H and [sup 3]He have different diffusion coefficients, and because the amount of mechanical mixing is different in the area of high recharge than in the low-recharge area, we have separated the dispersive effects of mechanical mixing from molecular diffusion. We estimate a longitudinal dispersivity of 0.07 m and effective diffusion coefficients for [sup 3]H ([sup 3]HHO) and [sup 3]He of 2.4 x 10[sup [minus]5] and 1.3 x 10[sup [minus]4] m[sup 2]/day, respectively. 26 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells Presented at the DOE-DOD Shipboard APU Workshop on...

  7. THE {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li ISOTOPE RATIO NEAR THE SUPERNOVA REMNANT IC 443

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, C. J.; Ritchey, A. M.; Federman, S. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States); Lambert, D. L., E-mail: corbin.taylor@rockets.utoledo.edu, E-mail: steven.federman@utoledo.edu, E-mail: aritchey@astro.washington.edu, E-mail: dll@astro.as.utexas.edu [W. J. McDonald Observatory, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li isotope ratios along four sight lines that probe diffuse molecular gas near the supernova remnant IC 443. Recent gamma-ray observations have revealed the presence of shock-accelerated cosmic rays interacting with the molecular cloud surrounding the remnant. Our results indicate that the {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li ratio is lower in regions more strongly affected by these interactions, a sign of recent Li production by cosmic rays. We find that {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li Almost-Equal-To 7 toward HD 254755, which is located just outside the visible edge of IC 443, while {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li Almost-Equal-To 3 along the line of sight to HD 43582, which probes the interior region of the supernova remnant. No evidence of {sup 7}Li synthesis by neutrino-induced spallation is found in material presumably contaminated by the ejecta of a core-collapse supernova. The lack of a neutrino signature in the {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li ratios near IC 443 is consistent with recent models of Galactic chemical evolution, which suggest that the {nu}-process plays only a minor role in Li production.

  8. Use of .sup.3 He.sup.30 + ICRF minority heating to simulate alpha particle heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Belle Mead, NJ); Hwang, David Q. (Lawrencevill, NJ); Hovey, Jane (Plainsboro, NJ)

    1986-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron activation due to high levels of neutron production in a first heated deuterium-tritium plasma is substantially reduced by using Ion Cyclotron Resonance Frequency (ICRF) heating of energetic .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions in a second deuterium-.sup.3 He.sup.++ plasma which exhibit an energy distribution and density similar to that of alpha particles in fusion reactor experiments to simulate fusion alpha particle heating in the first plasma. The majority of the fast .sup.3 He.sup.++ ions and their slowing down spectrum can be studied using either a modulated hydrogen beam source for producing excited states of He.sup.+ in combination with spectrometers or double charge exchange with a high energy neutral lithium beam and charged particle detectors at the plasma edge. The maintenance problems thus associated with neutron activation are substantially reduced permitting energetic alpha particle behavior to be studied in near term large fusion experiments.

  9. Evidence for beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 31/Mg and /sup 32/Mg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaidins, C S; De Saint-Simon, M; Détraz, C; Epherre-Rey-Campagnolle, Marcelle; Guillemaud, D; Klapisch, Robert; Langevin, M; Naulin, F; Thibault, C; Touchard, F

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigates the time spectrum of beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 30-34/Na and their descendants using beta -neutron coincidence detection. The authors have been able to assign an upper limit of 0,4% to the probability of beta -delayed neutron emission, p/sub n/, from the /sup 30/Na daugher isotope /sup 30/Mg. In fitting the time spectra of beta -delayed neutrons from /sup 31/Na and /sup 32/Na, we find a definitive component from subsequent daughter decay as well. This provides evidence for beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 31/Mg and /sup 32/Mg with P/sub n/ values of the order of 2% for each. (7 refs).

  10. Charmonium decays to {gamma}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}{eta}, and {gamma}{eta}{sup '}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedlar, T. K.; Xavier, J. [Luther College, Decorah, Iowa 52101 (United States); Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Klein, T.; Poling, R.; Zweber, P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tan, B. J. Y.; Tomaradze, A. [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Libby, J.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Thomas, C.; Wilkinson, G. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mendez, H. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico); Ge, J. Y. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] (and others)

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data acquired with the CLEO-c detector at the CESR e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we measure branching fractions for J/{psi}, {psi}(2S), and {psi}(3770) decays to {gamma}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}{eta}, and {gamma}{eta}{sup '}. Defining R{sub n}{identical_to}B[{psi}(nS){yields}{gamma}{eta}]/B[{psi}(nS){yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '}], we obtain R{sub 1}=(21.1{+-}0.9)% and, unexpectedly, an order of magnitude smaller limit, R{sub 2}<1.8% at 90% C.L. We also use J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '} events to determine branching fractions of improved precision for the five most copious {eta}{sup '} decay modes.

  11. e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{mu}+{mu}-} scattering in the noncommutative standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, Abhishodh; Mitra, Anupam; Das, Prasanta Kumar [Birla Institute of Technology and Science-Pilani, KK Birla Goa Campus, NH-17B, Zuarinagar, Goa 403726 (India)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study muon pair production e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{mu}+{mu}-} in the noncommutative (NC) extension of the standard model using the Seiberg-Witten maps of this to the second order of the noncommutative parameter {Theta}{sub {mu}{nu}}. Using O({Theta}{sup 2}) Feynman rules, we find the O({Theta}{sup 4}) cross section (with all other lower order contributions simply cancelled) for the pair production. The momentum dependent O({Theta}{sup 2}) NC interaction significantly modifies the cross section and angular distributions which are different from the commuting standard model. We study the collider signatures of the space-time noncommutativity at the International Linear Collider (ILC) and find that the process e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}{mu}+{mu}-} can probe the NC scale {Lambda} in the range 0.8-1.0 TeV for typical ILC energy ranges.

  12. Proton inelastic scattering on {sup 56}Ni in inverse kinematics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraus, G.; Egelhof, P.; Fischer, C.; Geissel, H.; Himmler, A.; Nickel, F.; Muenzenberg, G.; Schwab, W.; Weiss, A. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Chulkov, L.; Golovkov, M.; Ogloblin, A. [I.V. Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Friese, J.; Gillitzer, A.; Koerner, H.J.; Peter, M. [TU, Munich (Germany); Henning, W.; Schiffer, J.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kratz, J.V. [Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inelastic proton scattering to the first excited 2{sup +} state at 2.701 MeV in doubly magic {sup 56}Ni was studied at 101 MeV/u in inverse kinematics. The radioactive {sup 56}Ni ion beam was obtained from the SIS heavy ion synchrotron at GSI Darmstadt via fragmentation of a {sup 58}Ni beam, and separation by the fragment separator (FRS). A value B(E2, 0{sup +} {yields} 2{sup +}) = 600 {+-} 120 e{sup 2} fm{sup 4} was obtained which corresponds to a deformation parameter {beta} ({sup 56}Ni) = 0.173 {+-} 0.017.

  13. Neutron-induced fission cross section measurements for uranium isotopes {sup 236}U and {sup 234}U at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laptev, A. B.; Tovesson, F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM 87545 (United States); Hill, T. S. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls ID 83415 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A well established program of neutron-induced fission cross section measurement at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is supporting the Fuel Cycle Research program (FC R and D). The incident neutron energy range spans from sub-thermal up to 200 MeV by combining two LANSCE facilities, the Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR). The time-of-flight method is implemented to measure the incident neutron energy. A parallel-plate fission ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector. The event rate ratio between the investigated foil and a standard {sup 235}U foil is converted into a fission cross section ratio. In addition to previously measured data new measurements include {sup 236}U data which is being analyzed, and {sup 234}U data acquired in the 2011-2012 LANSCE run cycle. The new data complete the full suite of Uranium isotopes which were investigated with this experimental approach. Obtained data are presented in comparison with existing evaluations and previous data.

  14. The production of /sup 38/Ar and /sup 39/Ar by 14-MeV neutrons on /sup 39/K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foland, K.A.; Borg, R.J.; Mustafa, M.G.

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have determined the cross sections for the production of /sup 38/Ar and /sup 39/Ar from the (n,n'rho) and (n,rho) reactions by neutrons of -- 14 MeV incident on /sup 39/K. Three potassium-bearing specimens were irradiated with fluences of --10/sup 17/ neutrons, and the argon isotopes were measured by mass spectrometry. Previously reported measurements are in substantial disagreement with our results. Values from the three new measurements are consistent with each other and our computational modeling. Nevertheless, there remains an unexplained increase in the cross sections for both reactions as the neutron energy increases from --14.5 to 14.8 MeV.

  15. Differential die-away technique for determination of the fissile contents in spent fuel assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Tachoon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Nartyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed for the differential die-away (DDA) technique to quantify its capability to measure the fissile contents in spent fuel assemblies of 64 different cases in terms of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. The DDA count rate varies according to the contents of fissile isotopes such as {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, and {sup 241}Pu contained in the spent fuel assembly. The effective {sup 239}Pu concept was introduced to quantify the total fissile mass of spent fuel by weighting the relative signal contributions of {sup 235}U and {sup 241}Pu compared to that of {sup 239}Pu. The Monte Carlo simulation results show that the count rate of the DDA instrument for a spent fuel assembly of 4% initial enrichment, 45 GWD/MTU burnup, and 5 year cooling time is {approx} 9.8 x 10{sup 4} counts per second (c/s) with the 100-Hz repeated interrogation pattern of 0 to 10 {micro}s interrogation, 0.2 ms to 1 ms counting time, and 1 x 10{sup 9} n/s neutron source. The {sup 244}Cm neutron background count rate for this counting time scheme is {approx} 1 x 10{sup 4} c/s, and thus the signal to background ratio is {approx}10.

  16. Method for selective recovery of PET-usable quantities of [.sup.18 F] fluoride and [.sup.13 N] nitrate/nitrite from a single irradiation of low-enriched [.sup.18 O] water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Shea, Colleen (Wading River, NY)

    1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- for radiotracer synthesis is disclosed. The process includes producing [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- simultaneously by exposing a low-enriched (20%-30%) [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target to proton irradiation, sequentially isolating the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target, and reducing the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- to [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3. The [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- products are then conveyed to a laboratory for radiotracer applications. The process employs an anion exchange resin for isolation of the isotopes from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O, and sequential elution of [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [ .sup.18 F]F.sup.- fractions. Also the apparatus is disclosed for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from a single irradiation of a single low-enriched [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target.

  17. Biodiesel Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    publication 442-880 There are broad and increasing interests across the nation in using domestic, renewable bioenergy. Virginia farmers and transportation fleets use considerable amounts of diesel fuel in their operations. Biodiesel is an excellent alternative fuel for the diesel engines. Biodiesel can be produced from crops commonly grown in Virginia, such as soybean and canola, and has almost the same performance as petrodiesel. The purpose of this publication is to introduce the basics of biodiesel fuel and address some myths and answer some questions about biodiesel fuel before farmers and fleet owners use this type of fuel. ASTM standard for biodiesel (ASTM D6751) Biodiesel fuel, hereafter referred to as simply biodiesel,

  18. Fuel cell membranes and crossover prevention

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); York, Cynthia A. (Newington, CT); Waszczuk, Piotr (White Bear Lake, MN); Wieckowski, Andrzej (Champaign, IL)

    2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A membrane electrode assembly for use with a direct organic fuel cell containing a formic acid fuel includes a solid polymer electrolyte having first and second surfaces, an anode on the first surface and a cathode on the second surface and electrically linked to the anode. The solid polymer electrolyte has a thickness t:.gtoreq..times..times..times..times. ##EQU00001## where C.sub.f is the formic acid fuel concentration over the anode, D.sub.f is the effective diffusivity of the fuel in the solid polymer electrolyte, K.sub.f is the equilibrium constant for partition coefficient for the fuel into the solid polymer electrolyte membrane, I is Faraday's constant n.sub.f is the number of electrons released when 1 molecule of the fuel is oxidized, and j.sub.f.sup.c is an empirically determined crossover rate of fuel above which the fuel cell does not operate.

  19. Study of B{yields}X(3872)K, with X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules, IN2P3/CNRS et Universite de Savoie, F-74941 Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E. [Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat de Fisica, Departament ECM, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M. [Universita di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L. [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the decays B{sup +}{yields}X(3872)K{sup +} and B{sup 0}{yields}X(3872)K{sup 0} with X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The data sample used, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy storage ring, corresponds to 455x10{sup 6}BB pairs. Branching fraction measurements of B(B{sup +}{yields}X(3872)K{sup +})xB(X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(8.4{+-}1.5{+-}0.7)x10{sup -6} and B(B{sup 0}{yields}X(3872)K{sup 0})xB(X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(3.5{+-}1.9{+-}0.4)x10{sup -6} are obtained. We set an upper limit on the natural width of the X(3872) of {gamma}<3.3 MeV/c{sup 2} at the 90% confidence level.

  20. Measurement of K<sup>0sup>S and K<sup>*0sup> in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adare, A. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Aidala, C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). et al.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider has performed a systematic study of K<sup>0sup>S and K<sup>*0sup> meson production at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt SNN = 200 GeV. The K<sup>0sup>S and K<sup>*0sup> mesons are reconstructed via their K<sup>0sup>S and ?<sup>0sup>(???)?>0sup> (???) and K<sup>*0sup> ? K <sup>±#25;sup>?±> decay modes, respectively. The measured transverse-momentum spectra are used to determine the nuclear modification factor of K<sup>0sup>S and K<sup>*0sup> mesons in d+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at different centralities. In the d+Au collisions, the nuclear modification factor of K<sup>0sup>S and K<sup>*0sup> mesons is almost constant as a function of transverse momentum and is consistent with unity showing that cold-nuclear-matter effects do not play a significant role in the measured kinematic range. In Cu+Cu collisions, within the uncertainties no nuclear modification is registered in peripheral collisions. In central collisions, both mesons show suppression relative to the expectations from the p+p yield scaled by the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions in the Cu+Cu system. In the pT range 2–5 GeV/c, the strange mesons ( K<sup>0sup>S, K<sup>*0sup>) similarly to the #30;? meson with hidden strangeness, show an intermediate suppression between the more suppressed light quark mesons (?<sup>0sup>) and the nonsuppressed baryons (p, p-bar). At higher transverse momentum, pT > 5 GeV/c, production of all particles is similarly suppressed by a factor of ?2. (auth)

  1. Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Rod Borup MPA-11, Fuel Cell Program Manager Email Andrew Dattelbaum MPA-11 Group Leader Email Melissa Fox...

  2. Energy transfer characteristics of silicate glass doped with Er{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, and Ho{sup 3+} for ?2 ?m emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Xueqiang [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China) [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Guo, Yanyan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); Hu, Lili [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang, Junjie [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310 018 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310 018 (China)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A Er{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} tri-doped silicate glass with good thermal stability is prepared by melt-quenching method. Efficient ?2 ?m emission is observed under 808 nm laser excitation. It is found that the 2.0 ?m emission of Ho{sup 3+} can be enhanced under the excitation at 808 nm by incorporating Er{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}. Based on the measurement of absorption spectra, the Judd–Ofelt intensity parameters, radiation emission probability, and branching ratio are calculated to evaluate the spectroscopic properties simultaneously. The maximum value of emission cross section of Ho{sup 3+} is 3.54 × 10{sup ?21} cm{sup 2} at 2008 nm. Additionally, the phonon assistance and the micro-parameters in the energy transfer process are quantitatively analyzed by using Dexter model. The energy transfer coefficient from Tm{sup 3+} to Ho{sup 3+} can reach as high as 21.44 × 10{sup ?40} cm{sup 6}/s, respectively. The emission property together with good thermal property indicates that Er{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} tri-doped silicate glass is a potential kind of laser glass for efficient 2 ?m laser.

  3. Dipole Bands in {sup 196}Hg

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrie, J. J.; Lawrie, E. A.; Newman, R. T.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Smit, F. D. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Msezane, B. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, University of Zululand, Private Bag X1001, Kwadlangezwa 3886 (South Africa); Benatar, M.; Mabala, G. K.; Mutshena, K. P. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Federke, M.; Mullins, S. M. [Physics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Ncapayi, N. J.; Vymers, P. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Belleville 7535 (South Africa)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    High spin states in {sup 196}Hg have been populated in the {sup 198}Pt({alpha},6n) reaction at 65 MeV and the level scheme has been extended. A new dipole band has been observed and a previously observed dipole has been confirmed. Excitation energies, spins and parities of these bands were determined from DCO ratio and linear polarization measurements. Possible quasiparticle excitations responsible for these structures are discussed.

  4. Laser trapping of {sup 21}Na atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive {sup 21}Na (t{sub l/2} = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped {sup 21}Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of {sup 21}Na {yields} {sup 21}Ne + {Beta}{sup +} + v{sub e}, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, {sup 21}Na atoms were produced by bombarding {sup 24}Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The {sup 21}Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  5. Photoluminescence properties of rare earths (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}) activated NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} wolframite host lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asiri Naidu, S.; Boudin, S. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Materiaux, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS, 6 Bd Marechal Juin, F-14050 Caen (France); Varadaraju, U.V. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Raveau, B., E-mail: bernard.raveau@ensicaen.fr [Laboratoire de Cristallographie et Sciences des Materiaux, ENSICAEN, Universite de Caen, CNRS, 6 Bd Marechal Juin, F-14050 Caen (France)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The photoluminescence (PL) studies on NaIn{sub 1-x}RE{sub x}W{sub 2}O{sub 8}, with RE=Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} phases have shown that the relative contribution of the host lattice and of the intra-f-f emission of the activators to the PL varies with the nature of the rare earth cation. In the case of Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+} activators, with yellow and blue emission, respectively, the energy transfer from host to the activator plays a major role. In contrast for Eu{sup 3+}, with intense red emission, the host absorption is less pronounced and the intra-f-f transitions of the Eu{sup 3+} ions play a major role, whereas for Tb{sup 3+} intra-f-f transitions are only observed, giving rise to green emission. - Graphical abstract: NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} double tungstate doped with Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}and Tm{sup 3+} shows characteristic emission of intense red for Eu{sup 3+}, yellow for Dy{sup 3+}, green for Tb{sup 3+} and blue for Tm{sup 3+}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristic emissions of rare earths (Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}) are observed NaInW{sub 2}O{sub 8} wolframite. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy transfer from host to the activators (Eu{sup 3+} Dy{sup 3+} Tm{sup 3+} is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL properties of rare earth ions depend on minor structural variations in the host lattice.

  6. Fuel injector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambeth, Malcolm David Dick (Bromley, GB)

    2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A fuel injector comprises first and second housing parts, the first housing part being located within a bore or recess formed in the second housing part, the housing parts defining therebetween an inlet chamber, a delivery chamber axially spaced from the inlet chamber, and a filtration flow path interconnecting the inlet and delivery chambers to remove particulate contaminants from the flow of fuel therebetween.

  7. Studies of Charged Particle Emission in the Decay of <sup>45sup>Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, W. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Grigorenko, L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Russia; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, H. [University of Warsaw; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabrowski, Ryszard [Warsaw University; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, Robert [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, Mustafa [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of extremely neutron-deficient isotope <sup>45sup>Fe has been studied by using a new type of gaseous detector in which a technique of optical imaging is used to record tracks of charged particles. The two-proton radioactivity and the beta-decay channels accompanied by proton(s) emission were clearly identified. For the first time, the angular and energy correlations between two protons emitted from the <sup>45sup>Fe ground-state were measured. The obtained distributions were confronted with predictions of a three-body model. Studies of beta-decay channels of <sup>45sup>Fe provided first unambiguous evidence for the beta-delayed three proton emission.

  8. Prompt {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of the {sup 104}Mo and {sup 108}Mo fission fragments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guessous, A.; Schulz, N.; Bentaleb, M.; Lubkiewicz, E. [Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite Louis Pasteur, 67037 Strasbourg (France)] [Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite Louis Pasteur, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Durell, J.L.; Pearson, C.J.; Phillips, W.R.; Shannon, J.A.; Urban, W.; Varley, B.J. [Department of Physics, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Ahmad, I.; Lister, C.J.; Morss, L.R.; Nash, K.L.; Williams, C.W. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Khazrouni, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire Appliquee, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra, Maroc (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire Appliquee, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra, Maroc (France)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The level structures of the neutron-rich {sup 104}Mo and {sup 108}Mo nuclei have been investigated by observing prompt {gamma} rays emitted in the spontaneous fission of {sup 248}Cm with the EUROGAM spectrometer. Levels with spins up to 12{h_bar} have been observed and {gamma} branching obtained. The data can be satisfactorily described when {sup 104,108}Mo are considered as axially symmetric nuclei: in {sup 104}Mo, rotational bands based on the ground state, the one-phonon and the two-phonon {gamma}-vibrational states and a quasiparticle state have been observed, whereas in {sup 108}Mo the information is limited to the yrast band and the one phonon {gamma} band. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Combustion and fuel characterization of coal-water fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lachowicz, Y.V.; LaFlesh, R.C.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This five-year research project was established to provide sufficient data on coal-water fuel (CWF) chemical, physical, and combustion properties to assess the potential for commercial firing in furnaces designed for gas or oil firing. Extensive laboratory testing was performed at bench-scale, pilot-scale (4 {times} 10{sup 6}Btu/hr) and commercial-scale (25 {times} 10{sup 6} to 50 {times} 10{sup 6}Btu/hr) on a cross-section of CWFs. Fuel performance characteristics were assessed with respect to coal properties, level of coal beneficiation, and slurry formulation. The performance of four generic burner designs was also assessed. Boiler performance design models were applied to analyze the impacts associated with conversion of seven different generic unit designs to CWF firing. Equipment modifications, operating limitations, and retrofit costs were determined for each design when utilizing several CWFs. This report summarizes studies conducted under Task 4. The objective was to quantify CWF atomization and combustion properties utilizing industrial/utility scale equipment. Burners were evaluated and combustion performance differences identified for various CWF formulations. 12 refs., 23 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Fuel rail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haigh, M.; Herbert, J.D.; O'Leary, J.J.

    1988-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a fuel rail for a V-configuration automotive type internal combustion engine having a throttle body superimposed over an intake manifold. The throttle body has an air plenum above an induction channel aligned with a throttle bore passage in the manifold for flow or air to the engine cylinders. The rail includes a spacer body mounted sealingly between the throttle body and the manifold of the engine and having air induction passages therethrough to connect the throttle body channels and the manifold, the spacer body having at least on longitudinal bore defining a fuel passage extending through the spacer body, and a fuel injector receiving cups projecting from and communicating with the fuel passage. The spacer body consists of a number of separated spacer members, and rail member means through which the fuel passage runs joining the spacer members together.

  11. Effect of Tb{sup 3+} concentration on the optical and vibrational properties of YBO{sub 3} tri-doped with Eu{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+}, and Tb{sup 3+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohal, S.; Hassanzadeh, E.; Huang, J. Y. [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University and Nano Tech Center, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Nazari, M.; Holtz, M., E-mail: mark.holtz@txstate.edu [Department of Physics, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas 78666 (United States); Zhang, X.; Chaudhuri, J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Kuryatkov, V. V. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Hope-Weeks, L. J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural and optical studies are reported of yttrium orthoborate YBO{sub 3} when tri-doped with Eu{sup 3+}, Ce{sup 3+}, and Tb{sup 3+}, focusing on the role of terbium concentration. Incorporation of Tb{sup 3+} affects emission properties for photoluminescence (PL) excited by near ultraviolet light. For constant cerium and europium concentrations, increasing the Tb{sup 3+} results in diminished PL from the Ce{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} color centers. Simultaneously, the PL excitation bands related to both Ce{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} increase in intensity for red emission from the Eu{sup 3+}. Results are consistent with a Ce{sup 3+}???(Tb{sup 3+}){sub n}???Eu{sup 3+} energy transfer scheme, where (Tb{sup 3+}){sub n} denotes a chain incorporating n terbium ions. A high red to orange PL intensity ratio is obtained, ranging from 1.34 to 2.09. Raman vibrational bands show a systematic change, with Tb{sup 3+} concentration, in the B{sub 3}O{sub 9} ring terminal oxygen bending mode coordinated with the yttrium site where dopant ions substitute. The structural changes are interpreted as variations in the local neighborhood of these sites in the YBO{sub 3}:Ce{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+},Eu{sup 3+} crystal structure.

  12. Elastic scattering and total reaction cross section of {sup 6}He+{sup 120}Sn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faria, P. N. de; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Pires, K. C. C.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Barioni, A.; Morcelle, V.; Morais, M. C.; Camargo, O. Jr.; Alcantara Nunez, J. [Instituto de Fisica-Universidade de Sao Paulo, C. P. 66318, 05389-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Moro, A. M. [Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Arazi, A. [Laboratorio Tandar, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rodriguez-Gallardo, M. [Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Assuncao, M. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Campus Diadema, 09941-510 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The elastic scattering of {sup 6}He on {sup 120}Sn has been measured at four energies above the Coulomb barrier using the {sup 6}He beam produced at the RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil) facility. The elastic angular distributions have been analyzed with the optical model and three- and four-body continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations. The total reaction cross sections have been derived and compared with other systems of similar masses.

  13. Synthesis of isotopically labeled R- or S-[.sup.13C, .sup.2H] glycerols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Alvarez, Marc A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to asymmetric chiral labeled glycerols including at least one chiral atom, from one to two .sup.13C atoms and from zero to four deuterium atoms bonded directly to a carbon atom, e.g., (2S) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol and (2R) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol, and to the use of such chiral glycerols in the preparation of labeled amino acids.

  14. Improved low-energy, electron-spin-polarized {sup 4}He{sup +} ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, D.L.; Lancaster, J.C.; Kontur, F.J.; Popple, R.A.; Dunning, F.B.; Walters, G.K. [Department of Physics and the Rice Quantum Institute, Rice University, Houston, Texas, 77251-1892 (United States)] [Department of Physics and the Rice Quantum Institute, Rice University, Houston, Texas, 77251-1892 (United States)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent improvements to a source of electron-spin-polarized {sup 4}He{sup +} ions based on an optically pumped, rf-excited helium discharge are described that have resulted in ion polarizations P{sub +} of {approximately}0.18 at currents of {approximately}1 nA and in an increase of over an order of magnitude in the quality factor P{sub +}{sup 2}I. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Study of heavy element structure with in-beam. cap alpha. /sup -/,. beta. /sup -/ and. gamma. -ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, R.A.; Decman, D.J.; Henry, E.A.; Hoff, R.W.; Mann, L.G.; Struble, G.L.; Ussery, L.E.

    1984-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe our in-beam superconducting conversion electron spectrometer and its use in a (t,p) proton-conversion electron coincidence mode. Several examples of completed and on-going investigations are presented. These include: E0 strength from the /sup 238/U fission isomer; electromagnetic properties of the J/sup ..pi../ = 6/sup +/ and 8/sup +/ states of /sup 210/Pb; single particle and cluster states of /sup 213/Fr; the J/sup ..pi../ = 21/2/sup +/ isomer in /sup 197/Au and /sup 199/Au; and the cluster states of /sup 199/Au. Results of the study of odd-odd deformed /sup 244/Am are presented. The latter results performed using neutron-capture gamma-ray and conversion electron techniques are compared to recent developments in the modeling of deformed odd-odd nuclei. 23 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Hematological responses after inhaling {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}: An extrapolation from beagle dogs to humans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, B.R.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Welsh, C.A.; Angerstein, D.A.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The alpha emitter plutonium-238 ({sup 238}Pu), which is produced in uranium-fueled, light-water reactors, is used as a thermoelectric power source for space applications. Inhalation of a mixed oxide form of Pu is the most likely mode of exposure of workers and the general public. Occupational exposures to {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} have occurred in association with the fabrication of radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Organs and tissue at risk for deterministic and stochastic effects of {sup 238}Pu-alpha irradiation include the lung, liver, skeleton, and lymphatic tissue. Little has been reported about the effects of inhaled {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} on peripheral blood cell counts in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate hematological responses after a single inhalation exposure of Beagle dogs to alpha-emitting {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} particles and to extrapolate results to humans.

  17. Neutrino-nucleus scattering of {sup 95,97}Mo and {sup 116}Cd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ydrefors, E. [Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), Alba Nova University Center, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden and Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Almosly, W.; Suhonen, J. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate knowledge about the nuclear responses to supernova neutrinos for relevant nuclear targets is important both for neutrino detection and for astrophysical applications. In this paper we discuss the cross sections for the charged-current neutrino-nucleus scatterings off {sup 95,97}Mo and {sup 116}Cd. The microscopic quasiparticle-phonon model is adopted for the odd-even nuclei {sup 95,97}Mo. In the case of {sup 116}Cd we present cross sections both for the Bonn one-boson-exchange potential and self-consistent calculations based on modern Skyrme interactions.

  18. Experimental and theoretical study of the 3d {sup 2}D-level lifetimes of {sup 40}Ca{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreuter, A.; Becher, C.; Lancaster, G.P.T.; Mundt, A.B.; Russo, C.; Haeffner, H.; Roos, C.; Haensel, W.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Blatt, R.; Safronova, M.S. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of the lifetimes of the 3d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} and 3d {sup 2}D{sub 3/2} metastable states of a single laser-cooled {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion in a linear Paul trap. We introduce a measurement technique based on high-efficiency quantum state detection after coherent excitation to the D{sub 5/2} state or incoherent shelving in the D{sub 3/2} state, and subsequent free, unperturbed spontaneous decay. The result for the natural lifetime of the D{sub 5/2} state of 1168(9) ms agrees excellently with the most precise published value. The lifetime of the D{sub 3/2} state is measured with a single ion and yields 1176(11) ms which improves the statistical uncertainty of previous results by a factor of four. We compare these experimental lifetimes to high-precision ab initio all order calculations [D{sub 3/2} state: 1196(11) ms; D{sub 5/2} state: 1165(11) ms] and find a very good agreement. These calculations represent an excellent test of high-precision atomic theory and will serve as a benchmark for the study of parity nonconservation in Ba{sup +} which has similar atomic structure.

  19. D{sup 0}-{anti D}{sup 0} mixing and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the D{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fermilab E791 Collaboration

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results from Fermilab experiment E791 on D{sup 0}-{anti D}{sup 0} mixing and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the D{sup +} meson. In order to search for D{sup 0}-{anti D}{sup 0} mixing, the authors use only D{sup 0} mesons from D{sup *+} decays in which case the charge of the pion from the D{sup *+} decay identifies the charm quantum number of the D{sup 0} at birth. When the D{sup 0} decays, the charge of the kaon identifies the charm quantum number and this way one can tell if mixing has occurred. This kind of search can be carried out by CLEO II as well and their conclusion was that there is some evidence of a wrong sign signal (0.77 {+-} 0.25 {+-} 0.25)% of the right sign signal. However, because of a lack of lifetime information, they cannot distinguish between doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays which are expected at the level of the observed signal and mixing. They use their excellent lifetime sensitivity to obtain separate limits. During the past year, the authors have been working on extracting D{sup +} doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay signals from E791`s data sample. These decays are interesting both because they have never been observed and because definite predictions have been made about their rates, based on models of D mesons and their decay mechanisms. Preliminary analyses of 1/3 of the data have now been completed. Figure 3 shows the Cabibbo-favored signal D{sup +} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and the next figure shows the signal in the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed mode D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup {minus}}.

  20. {sup 238}U-{sup 234}U-{sup 230}Th chronometry of Fe-Mn crusts: Growth processes and recovery of thorium isotopic ratios of seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chabaux, F.; Cohen, A.S.; O`Nions, R.K. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)] [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Hein, J.R. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comparison of ({sup 234}U){sub excess}/({sup 238}U) and ({sup 230}Th)/({sup 232}Th) activity ratios in oceanic Fe-Mn deposits provides a method for assessing the closed-system behaviour of {sup 238}U-{sup 234}U-{sup 230}Th, as well as variations in the initial uranium and thorium isotopic ratios of the precipitated metal oxides. This approach is illustrated using a Fe-Mn crust from Lotab seamount (Marshall Islands, west equatorial Pacific). Here we report uranium and thorium isotopic compositions in five subsamples from the surface of one large 5 cm diameter botyroid of this crust, and from two depth profiles of the outermost rim of the same botyroid. The decrease of ({sup 234}U){sub excess}/({sup 238}U) and ({sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th) activity ratio with depth in the two profiles gives mean growth rates, for the last 150 ka, of 7.8 {+-} 2 mm/Ma and 6.6 {+-} 1 mm/Ma, respectively. All data points (surface and core samples) but one, define a linear correlation in the Ln ({sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th) - Ln [({sup 234}U){sub excess}({sup 238}U)] diagram. This correlation indicates that for all points the U-Th system remained closed after the Fe-Mn layer precipitated, and that the different samples possessed the same initial Uranium and thorium isotope ratios. Furthermore, these results show that the preserved surface of this Fe-Mn crust may not be the present-day growth surface, and that the thorium and uranium isotopic ratios of seawater in west equatorial Pacific have not changed during the past 150 ka. The initial thorium activity ratio is estimated from the correlation obtained between Ln({sup 230}Th/{sup 232}Th) and Ln [({sup 234}U){sub excess}/({sup 238}U)].

  1. Study of ternary and quaternary spontaneous fission of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf with the NESSI detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tishchenko, V G; Hilscher, D; Jahnke, U

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ternary and quaternary spontaneous decay of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf was studied with the NESSI detector, a combination of two 4 pi detectors for charged particles, neutrons and gamma-rays. The applied method of particle identification by measuring the energies and relative time-of-flights of the decay products is shown to be very effective for the study of rare decay modes. The energy and angular distributions of the decay products, the associated neutron multiplicities, the total energy of the prompt gamma-radiation as well as correlations between the various observables were measured for the first time in a single full-scale experiment. The characteristics of ternary fission known from previous investigations are confirmed in the frame of a methodically independent experiment. Preliminary estimates of the quaternary fission yield are presented. An attempt is made to determine the mechanism of quaternary fission.

  2. Nondestructive examination of 51 fuel and reflector elements from Fort St. Vrain Core Segment 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, C.M.; Saurwein, J.J.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifty-one fuel and reflector elements irradiated in core segment 1 of the Fort St. Vrain High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) were inspected dimensionally and visually in the Hot Service Facility at Fort St. Vrain in July 1979. Time- and volume-averaged graphite temperatures for the examined fuel elements ranged from approx. 400/sup 0/ to 750/sup 0/C. Fast neutron fluences varied from approx. 0.3 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ to 1.0 x 10/sup 25/ n/m/sup 2/ (E > 29 fJ)/sub HTGR/. Nearly all of the examined elements shrank in both axial and radial dimensions. The measured data were compared with strain and bow predictions obtained from SURVEY/STRESS, a computer code that employs viscoelastic beam theory to calculate stresses and deformations in HTGR fuel elements.

  3. Decay Heat Calculations for PWR and BWR Assemblies Fueled with Uranium and Plutonium Mixed Oxide Fuel using SCALE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In currently operating commercial nuclear power plants (NPP), there are two main types of nuclear fuel, low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, and mixed-oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX) fuel. The LEU fuel is made of pure uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2} or UOX) and has been the fuel of choice in commercial light water reactors (LWRs) for a number of years. Naturally occurring uranium contains a mixture of different uranium isotopes, primarily, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U. {sup 235}U is a fissile isotope, and will readily undergo a fission reaction upon interaction with a thermal neutron. {sup 235}U has an isotopic concentration of 0.71% in naturally occurring uranium. For most reactors to maintain a fission chain reaction, the natural isotopic concentration of {sup 235}U must be increased (enriched) to a level greater than 0.71%. Modern nuclear reactor fuel assemblies contain a number of fuel pins potentially having different {sup 235}U enrichments varying from {approx}2.0% to {approx}5% enriched in {sup 235}U. Currently in the United States (US), all commercial nuclear power plants use UO{sub 2} fuel. In the rest of the world, UO{sub 2} fuel is still commonly used, but MOX fuel is also used in a number of reactors. MOX fuel contains a mixture of both UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}. Because the plutonium provides the fissile content of the fuel, the uranium used in MOX is either natural or depleted uranium. PuO{sub 2} is added to effectively replace the fissile content of {sup 235}U so that the level of fissile content is sufficiently high to maintain the chain reaction in an LWR. Both reactor-grade and weapons-grade plutonium contains a number of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes, with the fraction of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes being dependent on the source of the plutonium. While only RG plutonium is currently used in MOX, there is the possibility that WG plutonium from dismantled weapons will be used to make MOX for use in US reactors. Reactor-grade plutonium in MOX fuel is generally obtained from reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuel, whereas weapons-grade plutonium is obtained from decommissioned nuclear weapons material and thus has a different plutonium (and other actinides) concentration. Using MOX fuel instead of UOX fuel has potential impacts on the neutronic performance of the nuclear fuel and the design of the nuclear fuel must take these differences into account. Each of the plutonium sources (RG and WG) has different implications on the neutronic behavior of the fuel because each contains a different blend of plutonium nuclides. The amount of heat and the number of neutrons produced from fission of plutonium nuclides is different from fission of {sup 235}U. These differences in UOX and MOX do not end at discharge of the fuel from the reactor core - the short- and long-term storage of MOX fuel may have different requirements than UOX fuel because of the different discharged fuel decay heat characteristics. The research documented in this report compares MOX and UOX fuel during storage and disposal of the fuel by comparing decay heat rates for typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with and without weapons-grade (WG) and reactor-grade (RG) MOX fuel.

  4. The {sup 30}P(p, ?){sup 31}S reaction in classical novae: progress and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wrede, C., E-mail: wrede@nscl.msu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The unknown thermonuclear rate of the {sup 30}P(p, ?){sup 31}S reaction at classical-nova temperatures currently prohibits the accurate modeling of nova nucleosynthesis in the A ? 30 region. This is hindering the calibration of nova thermometers based on observed O/S, S/Al, O/P, and P/Al abundance ratios in nova ejecta, the calibration of a meter to probe mixing at the core-envelope interface in novae based on the observed Si/H abundance ratio, and the identification of candidate pre-solar nova grains found in primitive meteorites based on laboratory measurements of their {sup 30}Si/{sup 28}Si isotopic ratios. Each of these diagnostics could address key questions in our understanding of classical novae if the {sup 30}P(p, ?){sup 31}S rate were known. We review progress on the determination of the {sup 30}P(p, ?){sup 31}S rate leading to a critical assessment of current interpretations of published data and prospects for future work.

  5. Evidence for {Kappa}{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kettell, S.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The first observation of the decay {Kappa}{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}} has been reported. The E787 experiment presented evidence for the {Kappa}{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}} decay, based on the observation of a single clean event from data collected during the 1995 run of the AGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory). The branching ratio indicated by this observation, {Beta}({Kappa}{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{nu}{anti {nu}}) = 4.2{sub {minus}3.5}{sup +9.7} {times} 10{sup {minus}10}, is consistent with the Standard Model expectation although the central experimental value is four times larger. The final E787 data sample, from the 1995--98 runs, should reach a sensitivity of about five times that of the 1995 run alone. A new experiment, E949, has been given scientific approval and should start data collection in 2001. It is expected to achieve a sensitivity of more than an order of magnitude below the prediction of the Standard Model.

  6. E691 Dalitz plot analysis of {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +} decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cremaldi, L.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The resonant decays of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} can give insight into the weak decay mechanism of this charmed baryon. We have performed a Dalitz plot analysis of the final state for a clean sample {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} pK{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +} decays observed in photoproduction experiment E691 at Fermilab. We measure {Gamma}(pK*(892){degrees})/{Gamma} (pK{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}) = .35 {plus_minus} .09 {plus_minus} .07. We also observe an unexpected enhancement at low pK- invariant mass.

  7. Coherent photoproduction of {pi}{sup +} from {sup 3}He with CLAS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Berman, Barry [George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

    2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the differential cross section for the {gamma}{sup 3}He{yields}{pi}{sup +}t reaction. This reaction was studied using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. Real photons produced with the Hall-B bremsstrahlung tagging system in the energy range from 0.5 to 1.55 GeV were incident on a cryogenic liquid {sup 3}He target. The differential cross sections for the {gamma}{sup 3}He{yields}{pi}{sup +}t reaction were measured as a function of photon-beam energy and pion-scattering angle. Theoretical predictions to date cannot explain the large cross sections except at backward angles, showing that additional components must be added to the model.

  8. /sup 234/Th: /sup 238/U disequilibria within the California Current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coale, K.H.; Bruland, K.W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Profiles of dissolved and particulate /sup 234/Th were determined at several stations within the California Current. Modeling of the disequilibria between the /sup 234/Th and /sup 238/U within the surface waters provides for estimates of the residence time of dissolved thorium with respect to particle scavenging, the particle residence time, and the particulate /sup 234/Th flux exiting the surface layer. The model-derived, first-order scavenging rate constant for dissolved thorium is observed to be proportional to the rate of primary production. Particle residence times seem to be governed by the rate of zooplankton grazing and the types of zooplankton present. Model-derived particulate /sup 234/Th fluxes are in good agreement with direct measurements by sediment traps.

  9. Observation of B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}p and searches for B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{sigma}{sup 0}p and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}pp decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Q.L.; Dong, L.Y.; Yuan, Y.; Zang, S.L.; Zhang, C.C. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Gershon, T.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Takasaki, F. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)] [and others

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}p and searches for B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{sigma}{sup 0}p and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}pp decays, using a sample of 275x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected with the Belle detector at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance. We observe a signal of 17.2{+-}4.1 events with a significance of 11.1{sigma} and obtain a branching fraction of B(B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}p)=11.6{+-}2.8(stat){sub -2.3}{sup +1.8}(sys)x10{sup -6}. No signal is found for either of the two decay modes, B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{sigma}{sup 0}p and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}pp, and upper limits for the branching fractions are determined to be B(B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{sigma}{sup 0}p)<1.1x10{sup -5} and B(B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}pp)<8.3x10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level.

  10. Safety analysis of B and W Standard PWR using thorium-based fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uotinen, V.O.; Carroll, W.P.; Jones, H.M.; Toops, E.C.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to assess the safety and licenseability of the Babcock and Wilcox standard 205-fuel assembly PWR when it is fueled with three types of thoria-based fuels denatured (/sup 233/U//sup 238/U-Th)O/sub 2/, denatured (/sup 235//U/sup 238/U-Th)O/sub 2/, and (Th-Pu)O/sub 2/. Selected transients were analyzed using typical PWR safety analysis calculational methods. The results support the conclusion that it is feasible from a safety standpoint to utilize either of the denatured urania-thoria fuels in the standard B and W plant. In addition, it appears that the use of thoria-plutonia fuels would probably also be feasible. These tentative conclusions depend on a data that is more limited than that available for UO/sub 2/ fuels.

  11. Appearance of infused zinc ( sup 70 Zn) and oral zinc ( sup 68 Zn) in breast milk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser-Veillon, P.B.; Patterson, K.Y.; Mangels, A.R.; Wallace, G.F.; Veillon, C. (Univ. of Maryland, College Park (United States) Dept. of Agriculture, Beltsville, MD (United States) Perkin-Elmer Corp., Rockville, MD (United States))

    1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to monitor the appearance of a simultaneous intravenous (IV) dose and oral dose of stable isotopes, {sup 70}Zn and {sup 68}Zn, respectively, in breast milk. Three lactating subjects, 2-3 months postpartum were fed a controlled diet which contained an average of 7.8 mg Zn/day. Subjects collected milk samples at the beginning of each feeding for a 24 hour period on the fifth day of the controlled diet. On day 7 of the controlled diet, a 160 ug IV dose of {sup 70}Zn as zinc chloride in saline was infused into each subject. The subjects also received 2 mg of {sup 68 }Zn as zinc chloride in 50 ml of orange juice. Following the stable isotope doses, subjects collected milk samples at the beginning of each feeding for 48 hours, weighing their infants before and after each feeding. The amount of natural Zn, {sup 70}Zn and {sup 68}Zn tracers in the milk was measured by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. The cumulative {sup 70}Zn excretion into breast milk over 48 hours was approximately 1% of the infused dose and the cumulative {sup 68}Zn excretion was smaller still. Thus, only a small fraction of a physiological IV or oral dose of zinc comes out in the milk. The small fraction of {sup 70}Zn and {sup 68}Zn appearing in the milk suggests that circulating zinc and dietary zinc are not rapidly or directly incorporated into breast milk in appreciable amounts.

  12. Investigation of multiparticle final states in {sup 12}C photoreactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, P.D.; MacGregor, I.J.; Annand, J.R.; Anthony, I.; Cross, G.E.; Hall, S.J.; Kellie, J.D.; McGeorge, J.C.; Miller, G.J.; Owens, R.O. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (Scotland)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (Scotland); Grabmayr, P.; Hehl, T.; Lamparter, T.; Sauer, M.; Schneider, R.; Spaeth, K. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Tuebingen, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany)] [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Tuebingen, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Branford, D.; Davinson, T.; MacKenzie, J.A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (Scotland)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (Scotland); Ahrens, J.; Beck, R. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes-Gutenberg Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)] [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes-Gutenberg Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The {sup 12}C({gamma},pn), {sup 12}C({gamma},pp), {sup 12}C({gamma},ppp), {sup 12}C({gamma},pp{pi}{sup {plus_minus}}), {sup 12}C({gamma},p{pi}{sup {plus_minus}}) reactions have been studied using tagged photons of energy E{sub {gamma}}=250{endash}600 MeV. A model which includes all major absorption mechanisms and final state interactions gives results that agree well with the shapes of missing energy spectra, but for some channels the predicted cross sections are too large. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Properties of excited states in {sup 77}Ge.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kay, B. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Schiffer, J. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Zhu, S.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; McCutchan, E. A.; Seweryniak, D.; Stefanescu, I.; Univ. of Maryland; Horia-Hulubei National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nucleus {sup 77}Ge was studied through the {sup 76}Ge({sup 13}C,{sup 12}C){sup 77}Ge reaction at a sub-Coulomb energy. The angular distributions of rays depopulating excited states in {sup 77}Ge were measured in order to constrain spin and parity assignments. Some of these assignments are of use in connection with neutrinoless double beta decay, where the population of states near the Fermi surface of {sup 76}Ge was recently explored using transfer reactions.

  14. Measurements of {psi}(2S) decays into {phi}{pi}{sup 0}, {phi}{eta}, {phi}{eta}{sup '}, {omega}{eta}, and {omega}{eta}{sup '}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J.Z.; Bian, J.G.; Cai, X.; Chang, J.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chen, H.X.; Chen, J.C.; Chen Jin; Chen, M.L.; Chen, Y.B.; Chu, Y.P.; Cui, X.Z.; Dai, H.L.; Deng, Z.Y.; Dong, L.Y.; Du, S.X.; Du, Z.Z.; Fang, J.; Fu, C.D. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039 (China)] [and others

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decays of the {psi}(2S) into vector plus pseudoscalar meson final states have been studied with 14x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events collected with the BESII detector. Branching fractions of {psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{eta}, {phi}{eta}{sup '}, and {omega}{eta}{sup '}, and upper limits of {psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{pi}{sup 0} and {omega}{eta} are obtained: B({psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{eta})=(3.3{+-}1.1{+-}0.5)x10{sup -5}, B({psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{eta}{sup '})=(3.1{+-}1.4{+-}0.7)x10{sup -5}, and B({psi}(2S){yields}{omega}{eta}{sup '})=(3.2{sub -2.0}{sup +2.4}{+-}0.7)x10{sup -5}; and B({psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{pi}{sup 0})<0.40x10{sup -5}, and B({psi}(2S){yields}{omega}{eta})<3.1x10{sup -5} at the 90% C.L. These results are used to test the perturbative QCD ''12% rule.''.

  15. Depth absorbed dose and LET distributions of therapeutic {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 12}C beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempe, Johanna; Gudowska, Irena; Brahme, Anders [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The depth absorbed dose and LET (linear energy transfer) distribution of different ions of clinical interest such as {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 12}C ions have been investigated using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT. The energies of the projectiles correspond to ranges in water and soft tissue of approximately 260 mm. The depth dose distributions of the primary particles and their secondaries have been calculated and separated with regard to their low and high LET components. A LET value below 10 eV/nm can generally be regarded as low LET and sparsely ionizing like electrons and photons. The high LET region may be assumed to start at 20 eV/nm where on average two double-strand breaks can be formed when crossing the periphery of a nucleosome, even though strictly speaking the LET limits are not sharp and ought to vary with the charge and mass of the ion. At the Bragg peak of a monoenergetic high energy proton beam, less than 3% of the total absorbed dose is comprised of high LET components above 20 eV/nm. The high LET contribution to the total absorbed dose in the Bragg peak is significantly larger with increasing ion charge as a natural result of higher stopping power and lower range straggling. The fact that the range straggling and multiple scattering are reduced by half from hydrogen to helium increases the possibility to accurately deposit only the high LET component in the tumor with negligible dose to organs at risk. Therefore, the lateral penumbra is significantly improved and the higher dose gradients of {sup 7}Li and {sup 12}C ions both longitudinally and laterally will be of major advantage in biological optimized radiation therapy. With increasing charge of the ion, the high LET absorbed dose in the beam entrance and the plateau regions where healthy normal tissues are generally located is also increased. The dose distribution of the high LET components in the {sup 7}Li beam is only located around the Bragg peak, characterized by a Gaussian-type distribution. Furthermore, the secondary particles produced by high energy {sup 7}Li ions in tissuelike media have mainly low LET character both in front of and beyond the Bragg peak.

  16. Multi-quasiparticle isomers in {sup 174}Lu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kondev, F. G.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Dracoulis, G. D.; Lane, G. J.; Kibedi, T. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Byrne, A. P. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, The Faculties, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Chowdhury, P.; Tandel, S. K. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Four-, six-, and eight-quasiparticle isomers with K{sup {pi}}=14{sup -}, (21{sup +}) and (26{sup -}) have been identified in the deformed nucleus {sup 174}Lu, in addition to the previously reported K{sup {pi}}=13{sup +}, four-quasiparticle isomeric state. Analysis of alignments and in-band crossover-to-cascade branching ratios lead to the characterization of the configurations associated with the K{sup {pi}}=14{sup -} and (21{sup +}) isomers. The excitation energies of the observed states are compared with results from multi-quasiparticle calculations that include effects of blocking and residual nucleon-nucleon interactions. Good agreement is found for medium-spin (I=13-14({Dirac_h}/2{pi})) and the highest spin (I>20({Dirac_h}/2{pi})) states observed, but there remain ambiguities in assigning configurations in the I=15-19({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) region.

  17. Measurement of the CP-violating phase ?s<sup>J/??> using the flavor-tagged decay Bs<sup>0sup>?J/ ?? in 8 fb?¹ of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, ?s<sup>J/??>, and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, ??s, from the flavor-tagged decay B<sup>0sup>s?J/??. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb?¹ accumulated with the D0 detector using pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are ??s=0.163<sup>+0.065sup>?0.064 ps?¹ and ?s<sup>J/??>=?0.55<sup>+0.38sup>?0.36. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

  18. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elder, H.K.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radioactive wastes expected to result from decommissioning nuclear fuel cycle facilities are reviewed and classified in accordance with 10 CFR 61. Most of the wastes from the MOX plant (exclusive of the lagoon wastes) will require interim storage (11% Class A 49 m/sup 3/; 89% interim storage, 383 m/sup 3/). The MOX plant lagoon wastes are Class A waste (2930 m/sup 3/). All of the wastes from the U-Fab and UF/sub 6/ plants are designated as Class A waste (U-Fab 1090 m/sup 3/, UF/sub 6/ 1259 m/sup 3/).

  19. Unconventional fuel: Tire derived fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hope, M.W. [Waste Recovery, Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Material recovery of scrap tires for their fuel value has moved from a pioneering concept in the early 1980`s to a proven and continuous use in the United States` pulp and paper, utility, industrial, and cement industry. Pulp and paper`s use of tire derived fuel (TDF) is currently consuming tires at the rate of 35 million passenger tire equivalents (PTEs) per year. Twenty mills are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. The utility industry is currently consuming tires at the rate of 48 million PTEs per year. Thirteen utilities are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. The cement industry is currently consuming tires at the rate of 28 million PTEs per year. Twenty two cement plants are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. Other industrial boilers are currently consuming tires at the rate of 6.5 million PTEs per year. Four industrial boilers are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. In total, 59 facilities are currently burning over 117 million PTEs per year. Although 93% of these facilities were not engineered to burn TDF, it has become clear that TDF has found acceptance as a supplemental fuel when blending with conventional fuels in existing combustion devices designed for normal operating conditions. The issues of TDF as a supplemental fuel and its proper specifications are critical to the successful development of this fuel alternative. This paper will focus primarily on TDF`s use in a boiler type unit.

  20. /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihalczo, J.T.; King, W.T.; Blakeman, E.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The /sup 252/Cf-source-driven neutron noise analysis method has been tested in a wide variety of experiments that have indicated the broad range of applicability of the method. The neutron multiplication factor k/sub eff/ has been satisfactorily detemined for a variety of materials including uranium metal, light water reactor fuel pins, fissile solutions, fuel plates in water, and interacting cylinders. For a uranyl nitrate solution tank which is typical of a fuel processing or reprocessing plant, the k/sub eff/ values were satisfactorily determined for values between 0.92 and 0.5 using a simple point kinetics interpretation of the experimental data. The short measurement times, in several cases as low as 1 min, have shown that the development of this method can lead to a practical subcriticality monitor for many in-plant applications. The further development of the method will require experiments oriented toward particular applications including dynamic experiments and the development of theoretical methods to predict the experimental observables.

  1. Pu-238 fuel form activities, January 1-31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This monthly report for /sup 238/Pu Fuel Form Activities has two main sections: SRP-PuFF facility and SRL Fuel Form Activities. The program status, budget information, and milestone schedules are discussed in each main section. The Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for this program is shown. Only one monthly report per year is processed for EDB.

  2. Self-humidified proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Operation of larger cells and fuel cell stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhar, H.P.; Lee, J.H.; Lewinski, K.A. [BCS Technology, Inc., Bryan, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The PEM fuel cell is promising as the power source for use in mobile and stationary applications primarily because of its high power density, all solid components, and simplicity of operation. For wide acceptability of this power source, its cost has to be competitive with the presently available energy sources. The fuel cell requires continuous humidification during operation as a power source. The humidification unit however, increases fuel cell volume, weight, and therefore decreases its overall power density. Great advantages in terms of further fuel cell simplification can be achieved if the humidification process can be eliminated or minimized. In addition, cost reductions are associated with the case of manufacturing and operation. At BCS Technology we have developed a technology of self-humidified operation of PEM fuel cells based on the mass balance of the reactants and products and the ability of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) to retain water necessary for humidification under the cell operating conditions. The reactants enter the fuel cell chambers without carrying any form of water, whether in liquid or vapor form. Basic principles of self-humidified operation of fuel cells as practiced by BCS Technology, Inc. have been presented previously in literature. Here, we report the operation of larger self-humidified single cells and fuel cell stacks. Fuel cells of areas Up to 100 cm{sup 2} have been operated. We also show the self-humidified operation of fuel cell stacks of 50 and 100 cm{sup 2} electrode areas.

  3. BWR Fuel Assembly BWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    BWR Fuel Assembly BWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly The PWR 17x17 assembly is approximately 160 inches long (13.3 feet), 8 inches across, and weighs 1,500 lbs....

  4. A compilation of information on the {sup 31}P(p,{alpha}){sup 28}Si reaction and properties of excited levels in the compound nucleus {sup 32}S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, R.E.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Technology Development Div.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Technology Development Div.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a survey of the literature, and provides a compilation of data contained therein, for the {sup 31}P(p,{alpha}){sup 28}Si reaction. Attention is paid here to resonance states in the compound-nuclear system {sup 32}S formed by {sup 31}P + p, with emphasis on the alpha-particle decay channels, {sup 28}Si + {alpha} which populate specific levels in {sup 28}Si. The energy region near the proton separation energy for {sup 32}S is especially important in this context for applications in nuclear astrophysics. Properties of the excited states in {sup 28}Si are also considered. Summaries of all the located references are provided and numerical data contained in them are compiled in EXFOR format where applicable.

  5. Nuclear fuel particles and method of making nuclear fuel compacts therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeVelasco, Rubin I. (Encinitas, CA); Adams, Charles C. (San Diego, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for making nuclear fuel compacts exhibiting low heavy metal contamination and fewer defective coatings following compact fabrication from a mixture of hardenable binder, such as petroleum pitch, and nuclear fuel particles having multiple layer fission-product-retentive coatings, with the dense outermost layer of the fission-product-retentive coating being surrounded by a protective overcoating, e.g., pyrocarbon having a density between about 1 and 1.3 g/cm.sup.3. Such particles can be pre-compacted in molds under relatively high pressures and then combined with a fluid binder which is ultimately carbonized to produce carbonaceous nuclear fuel compacts having relatively high fuel loadings.

  6. Search for CP-violating charge asymmetry in B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakai, K.; Kawasaki, T.; Miyata, H.; Watanabe, M. [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Arinstein, K.; Bondar, A.; Eidelman, S.; Kuzmin, A.; Shwartz, B.; Zyukova, O. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Aushev, T. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bakich, A. M.; McOnie, S.; Varvell, K. E. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Balagura, V.; Liventsev, D.; Pakhlova, G.; Solovieva, E.; Uglov, T. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the result of a search for charge asymmetry in B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} decays using 772x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The CP-violating charge asymmetry is measured to be A{sub CP}(B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +})=[-0.76{+-}0.50 (stat){+-}0.22 (syst)]%.

  7. {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525); f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525){yields}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besson, D.; Hogan, D. P. [University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States); Pedlar, T. K. [Luther College, Decorah, Iowa 52101 (United States); Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Hietala, J.; Zweber, P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A.; Xiao, T. [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Brisbane, S.; Martin, L.; Powell, A.; Spradlin, P.; Wilkinson, G. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Mendez, H. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, 00681 (Puerto Rico); Ge, J. Y.; Miller, D. H.; Shipsey, I. P. J. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a study of exclusive radiative decays of the {Upsilon}(1S) resonance into a final state consisting of a photon and two K{sub S}{sup 0} candidates. We find evidence for a signal for {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525); f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525){yields}{gamma}K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sub S}{sup 0}, at a rate B({Upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525))=(4.0{+-}1.3{+-}0.6)x10{sup -5}, consistent with previous observations of {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525); f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525){yields}K{sup +}K{sup -}, and isospin. Combining this branching fraction with existing branching fraction measurements of {Upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525) and J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525), we obtain the ratio of branching fractions: B({Upsilon}(1S){yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525))/B(J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}f{sub 2}{sup '}(1525))=0.09{+-}0.02, approximately consistent with expectations based on soft-collinear effective theory.

  8. Observation of B{sup {+-}}{yields}{psi}(2S){pi}{sup {+-}} and search for direct CP violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhardwaj, V.; Kumar, R.; Singh, J. B. [Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Adachi, I.; Brodzicka, J.; Dalseno, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schuemann, J.; Tanaka, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Uehara, S. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)] (and others)

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first observation of B{sup {+-}}{yields}{psi}(2S){pi}{sup {+-}}, a Cabibbo- and color-suppressed decay. This analysis is based on 657x10{sup 6} BB events collected at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy-asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The measured branching fraction is (2.44{+-}0.22{+-}0.20)x10{sup -5} and the charge asymmetry is A=0.022{+-}0.085{+-}0.016. The ratio of the branching fractions B(B{sup {+-}}{yields}{psi}(2S){pi}{sup {+-}})/B(B{sup {+-}}{yields}{psi}(2S)K{sup {+-}})=(3.99{+-}0.36{+-}0.17)% is also determined.

  9. Pion absorption on {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He with emission of three energetic protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LADS Collaboration

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from a 4{pi} solid angle measurement of the reactions {sup 3}He({pi}{sup +},ppp) and {sup 4}He({pi}{sup +},ppp)n at incident pion energies of T{sub {pi}{sup +}}=70, 118, 162, 239, and 330 MeV are presented. For {sup 3}He the total absorption cross sections and their decomposition into two-proton and three-proton components are evaluated; for {sup 4}He the three-proton absorption cross sections are given. The differential distributions of the three-proton multinucleon absorption mode of both nuclei are analyzed and compared to each other by making use of a complete set of variables. The data are investigated for signatures of initial and final state interactions: it is found that more than half of the three-proton yield cannot be accounted for by cascade mechanisms. The remaining strength shows dependence on the incident pion angular momentum, but also structures that are not explained by simple semiclassical models. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  10. Investigation of the sup 9 sup 3 Nb neutron cross-sections in resonance energy range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriev, Y V; Faikov-Stanchik, H; Ilchev, G; Kim, G N; Kitaev, V Ya; Mezentseva, Z V; Panteleev, T; Sinitsa, V V; Zhuravlev, B V

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of gamma-ray multiplicity spectra and transmission measurements for sup 9 sup 3 Nb in energy range 21.5 eV-100 keV are presented. Gamma spectra from 1 to 7 multiplicity were measured on the 501 m and 121 m flight paths of the IBR-30 using a 16-section scintillation detector with a NaI(Tl) crystals of a total volume of 36 l and a 16-section liquid scintillation detector of a total volume of 80 l for metallic samples of 50, 80 mm in diameter and 1, 1.5 mm thickness with 100% sup 9 sup 3 Nb. Besides, the total and scattering cross-section of sup 9 sup 3 Nb were measured by means batteries of B-10 and He-3 counters on the 124 m, 504 m and 1006 m flight paths of the IBR-30. Spectra of multiplicity distribution were obtained for resolved resonances in the energy region E=30-6000 eV and for energy groups in the energy region E=21.5 eV- 100 keV. They were used for determination of the average multiplicity, resonance parameters and capture cross-section in energy groups and for low-laying resonances of sup...

  11. Oceanic stratified euphotic zone as elucidated by /sup 234/Th:/sup 238/U disequilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coale, K.H.; Bruland, K.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Profiles of dissolved and particulate /sup 234/Th were determined at the VERTEX 2 and 3 stations off Manzanillo, Mexico, and at the VERTEX 4 station about 900 km north of Hawaii. By modeling the disequilibria between /sup 234/Th and /sup 238/U in the dissolved and particulate form, estimates of scavenging rates for Th from the dissolved to particulate phases, particle residence times, and the flux of Th via particle removal can be obtained. /sup 234/Th:/sup 238/U activity ratio profiles indicate that the euphotic zone can be separated into two layers: an upper oligotrophic layer characterized by low new production values, low net scavenging, and long dissolved /sup 234/Th residence times; and a subsurface eutrophic layer with higher new production values, more intense scavenging, and shorter dissolved /sup 234/Th residence times. New production, rather than total primary production may determine net scavenging rates of reactive elements from oceanic surface waters. These results contribute to the emerging descriptions of the layered structure of oligotrophic euphotic zones and support the notion that this may be a general and ubiquitous feature of global stratified oligotrophic regimes.

  12. Cold collisions of PH ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sup -}) with helium in magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Eryin; Yu, Chunhua; Sun, Chunyan; Shao, Xi; Huang, Wuying [Department of Physics, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical investigation of the He-PH ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sup -}) complex is presented. We perform ab initio calculations of the interaction potential energy surface and discuss its error bounds with relevance to cold collisions, and we carry out accurate calculations of bound energy levels of the complex including the molecular fine structure and magnetic-field effect. We find the potential has two shallow minima and supports ten and 13 bound levels in complex with {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He, respectively. Based on the potential the quantum scattering calculations are then implemented for elastic and inelastic cross sections of the magnetically trappable low-field-seeking state of PH ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sup -}) in collision with {sup 3}He atom. The cold-collision properties and the influence of the external magnetic field as well as the effect of the uncertainty of interaction potential on the collisionally induced Zeeman relaxation are explored and discussed in detail. The ratio of elastic to inelastic cross sections is large over a wide range of collision energy, magnetic field, and scaling factor of the potential, so that helium buffer-gas loading and evaporative cooling of PH is a good prospect.

  13. Prompt Gamma Rays in {sup 77}Ge after Neutron Capture on {sup 76}Ge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meierhofer, Georg; Grabmayr, Peter; Jochum, Josef [Physikalisches Institut, Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Canella, Lea [Institut fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Jolie, Jan; Kudejova, Petra; Warr, Nigel [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne (Germany)

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The observation of neutrinoless double beta decay would be proof of the Majorana nature of the neutrino. Half-lives for these decays are very long (for {sup 76}Ge:>10{sup 25} y), so background reduction and rejection is the major task for double beta experiments. The GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment at the Gran Sasso Laboratory of the INFN (LNGS) searches for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. The isotope {sup 76}Ge is an ideal candidate because it can be used as source and detector at the same time. A large remaining contribution to the background arises from the prompt gamma cascade after neutron capture by {sup 76}Ge followed by {beta}{sup -}-decay of {sup 77}Ge. Since the prompt gamma decay scheme is poorly known, measurements with isotopically enriched Germanium samples were carried out at the PGAA facility at the research reactor FRM II (Munich). With the known prompt gamma spectrum it will be possible to improve the overall veto efficiency of the GERDA experiment.

  14. FIRST INTERSTELLAR HCO{sup +} MASER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakobian, Nicholas S.; Crutcher, Richard M., E-mail: nhakobi2@illinois.edu, E-mail: crutcher@illinois.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W. Green St. Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A previously unseen maser in the J = 1-0 transition of HCO{sup +} has been detected by the Combined Array for Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). A subarcsecond map was produced of the 2 arcmin{sup 2} region around DR21(OH), which has had previous detections of OH and methanol masers. This new object has remained undetected until now due to its extremely compact size. The object has a brightness temperature of >2500 K and an FWHM linewidth of 0.497 km s{sup -1}, both of which suggest non-thermal line emission consistent with an unsaturated maser. This object coincides in position and velocity with the methanol maser named DR21(OH)-1 by Plambeck and Menten. No compact HCO{sup +} emission was present in the CARMA data toward the other methanol masers described in that Letter. These new results support the theory introduced in Plambeck and Menten that these masers likely arise from strong outflows interacting with low mass, high density pockets of molecular gas. This is further supported by recent observations of a CO outflow by Zapata et al. that traces the outflow edges and confirms that the maser position lies along the edge of the outflow where interaction with molecular tracers can occur.

  15. An interesting finding in sup 229 Th

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reich, C.W.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Work at INEL has recently established that the first excited states of {sup 229}Th forms a closely spaced doublet with the ground state, the separation being 1 {plus minus} 4 electron volts. A discussion of the data and the reasoning supporting this unprecedented finding is given. Some potential applications are briefly mentioned. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Hexadecapolar excitation in sup 100 Ru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sirota, S.; Duarte, J.L.M.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Borello-Lewin, T. (Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sa Paulo, 01498 Sao Paulo, Brasil (BR))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Attention is drawn to the strong collective {ital L}=4 direct excitation of the state at 2.367 MeV in {sup 100}Ru by inelastic scattering of 16 MeV protons characterized by a deformation parameter {beta}{sub 4}=0.10, one of the highest reported for any region of the mass table.

  17. Dielectronic recombination lines of C{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sochi, Taha, E-mail: taha.sochi@kcl.ac.uk; Storey, Peter J.

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper presents atomic data generated to investigate the recombination lines of C II in the spectra of planetary nebulae. These data include energies of bound and autoionizing states, oscillator strengths and radiative transition probabilities, autoionization probabilities, and recombination coefficients. The R-matrix method of electron scattering theory was used to describe the C{sup 2+} plus electron system.

  18. {sup 6}Li({pi}{sup +}, {ital pp}){sup 4}He{sub g.s.} reaction at 100 and 165 MeV incident pion energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papandreou, Z.; Huber, G.; Lolos, G.; Cormier, J.; Mathie, E.; Naqvi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada); Ottewell, D.; Tacik, R.; Walden, P. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada)] [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Jones, G.; Trelle, R. [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A6 (Canada); Aslanoglou, X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Humphrey, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential and total cross sections for {pi}{sup +} absorption on {sup 6}Li leading to the {ital pp}+{sup 4}He{sub g.s} final state are presented at incident pion energies of 100 and 165 MeV. The narrow width of the {ital pp} angular correlation is observed and reported.

  19. mRNA Transcript Abundance during Plant Growth and the Influence of Li<sup>+> Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duff, M. C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Kuhne, W. W. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Halverson, N. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Chang, C. -S. [Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, Augusta, GA (United States). Integrated Genomics Core; Kitamura, E. [Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, Augusta, GA (United States). Integrated Genomics Core; Hawthorn, L. [Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, Augusta, GA (United States). Integrated Genomics Core; Milliken, C. E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Caldwell, E. F. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Stieve-Caldwell, E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Martinez, N. E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences; Stafford, C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Univ. of South Carolina Medical School, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li<sup>+> concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li<sup>+> focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li<sup>+> exposure in Arabidopsis with Li<sup>+> uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li<sup>+>-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li<sup>+> resembled prior studies due to its influence on: inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li<sup>+> exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li<sup>+> exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li<sup>+>-sensitive genes and a gene-based “response plan” for acute and chronic Li<sup>+> exposure are delineated.

  20. Fossil Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fossil Fuels A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi - Department of Petroleum Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals...

  1. Progress on the design of a high luminosity {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}} collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.B.; Sessler, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Muon Collider Collaboration

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameters are presented for a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. The design is not optimized for performance, neither for cost; however, it does suffice to allow one to make a credible case that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics, that could open up the realm of physics above the 1 TeV scale, allowing, for example, copious production of supersymmetric particles or a detailed study of the strongly-interacting scenario of electroweak symmetry breaking.

  2. Vertical Profiles Of {sup 226}Ra, {sup 232}Th And {sup 40}K Activities In Rocks From The Irati Formation Of The Parana Sedimentary Basin, Southern Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Ademar de O.; Bastos, Rodrigo O.; Appoloni, Carlos R. [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada-Departamento de Fisica-CCE Universidade Estadual de Londrina-Campus Universitario Rodovia Celso Garcia Cid s/n, Cx. Postal 6001 86051-990 Londrina (Puerto Rico)

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Naturally occurring radioisotopes are present in different concentrations in sedimentary rocks, reflecting the origin of the sediments, the depositional environment, and more recent events such as weathering and erosion. Using a high-resolution {gamma}-ray spectrometry methodology, sedimentary rocks were measured to assess the concentration activities of the natural radioisotopes. The surveyed rocks are from the Irati formation in the Parana sedimentary basin, which are exposed by an abandoned, open-pit limestone mine, in the city of Sapopema, southern Brazil. The exposed vertical profile is 5 m, and its stratigraphy is represented by an alternation of limestone and bituminous shale (layers being a few decimeters thick), and some millimeter rhythm layers with limestone and bituminous shale laminas. Eleven samples were collected along this profile, each of them dried in the open air during 48 hours, sieved through 4 mm mesh and sealed in cylindrical recipients. Measurements were accomplished using a 66% relative efficiency HPGE detector connected to a standard gamma ray spectrometry electronic chain. The detector efficiency in the range of 60 to 1800 keV was carried out with the certified IAEA-385 sediment sample. The Lower Limit of Detection (LLD) to the system is 2.40 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 1.84 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th and 4.20 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K. Activity concentrations were determined for {sup 226}Ra (from 16.22 to 151.55 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1}), {sup 232}Th (from 2.93 to 56.12 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1}) and {sup 40}K (from 38.45 to 644.63 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1}). The layers enriched with organic matter presented the higher values of activity. The measured concentrations of the natural radioisotopes were lower for limestone samples (average values and respective deviations were 22.81{+-}0.22 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 4.21{+-}0.07 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, and 50.11{+-}0.82 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K). Higher concentrations were measured for the bituminous shale samples (average values and respective deviations were 108.10{+-}12.17 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 43.69{+-}0.30 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, and 465.82{+-}3.99 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K). The concentrations were intermediate for the rhythmite samples (average values and respective deviations were 50.69{+-}1.09 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 7.63{+-}0.21 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, and 85.96{+-}2.47 Bq{center_dot}kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K). As the analyzed rocks are raw materials for the ceramic, cement and soil correction compound industries, the results of this work furnish data to estimate the contribution of these products to the general public's radiation exposure.

  3. Method for the production of {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo-containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, R.G.; Christian, J.D.; Grover, S.B.; Petti, D.A.; Terry, W.K.; Yoon, W.Y.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method is described for producing {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo compounds. {sup 100}Mo metal or {sup 100}MoO{sub 3} is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} with an optimum depth of 0.5--5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} which contains vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}, vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 3}, and vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 2}. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O{sub 2(g)}) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} and vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} into a condensed {sup 99m}Tc-containing reaction product which is collected. 1 fig.

  4. Method for the production of .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo-containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Ralph G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Christian, Jerry D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, S. Blaine (Idaho Falls, ID); Petti, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Terry, William K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Yoon, Woo Y. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method for producing .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo compounds. .sup.100 Mo metal or .sup.100 MoO.sub.3 is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 with an optimum depth of 0.5-5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 which contains vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3, vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.3, and vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.2. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O.sub.2(g)) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 and vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 into a condensed .sup.99m Tc-containing reaction product which is collected.

  5. Status of verification and validation of AREVA's ARCADIA{sup R} code system for PWR applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porsch, D. [AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); P.O.Box 1109, 91001 Erlangen (Germany); Leberig, M.; Kuch, S. [AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); Magat, P. [AREVA, AREVA NP SAS, Paris (France); Segard, K. [AREVA, AREVA NP Inc., Lynchburg (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2010 the submittal of Topical Reports for ARCADIA{sup R} and COBRA-FLX, the thermal-hydraulic module of ARCADIA{sup R}, to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concluded a major step in the development of AREVA's new code system for core design and safety analyses. This submittal was dedicated to the application of the code system to uranium fuel in pressurized water reactors. The submitted information comprised results for plants operated in the US (France)) and Germany and provided uncertainties for in-core measuring systems with traveling in-core detectors and for the aero-ball system of the EPR. A reduction of the uncertainties in the prediction of F{sub AH} and F{sub Q} of > 1 % (absolute) was derived compared to the current code systems. This paper extents the verification and validation base for uranium based fuel and demonstrates the basic capabilities of ARCADIA{sup R} of describing MOX. The achieved status of verification and validation is described in detail. All applications followed the same standard without any specific calibration. The paper gives also insight in the new capability of 3D full core steady-state and transient pin-by-pin/sub-channel-by-sub-channel calculations and the opportunities offered by this feature. The gain of margins with increasing detail of the representation is outlined. Currently, the strategies for worldwide implementation of ARCADIA{sup R} are developed. (authors)

  6. Fireside Corrosion in Oxy-fuel Combustion of Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, Gordon R [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Tylczak, Joseph [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Meier, Gerald H [University of Pittsburgh; Lutz, Bradley [University of Pittsburgh; Jung, Keeyoung [Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, Korea; Mu, Nan; Yanar, Nazik M [University of Pittsburgh; Pettit, Frederick S [University of Pittsburgh; Zhu, Jingxi [Carnegie Mellon University; Wise, Adam [Carnegie Mellon University; Laughlin, David E. [Carnegie Mellon University; Sridhar, Seetharaman [Carnegie Mellon University

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Oxy-fuel combustion is burning a fuel in oxygen rather than air for ease of capture of CO2 from for reuse or sequestration. Corrosion issues associated with the environment change (replacement of much of the N2 with CO2 and higher sulfur levels) from air- to oxy-firing were examined. Alloys studied included model Fe–Cr alloys and commercial ferritic steels, austenitic steels, and nickel base superalloys. The corrosion behavior is described in terms of corrosion rates, scale morphologies, and scale/ash interactions for the different environmental conditions. Evidence was found for a hreshold for severe attack between 10<sup>-4sup> and 10<sup>-3sup> atm of SO3 at 700ºC.

  7. Method for selective recovery of PET-usable quantities of [{sup 18}F] fluoride and [{sup 13}N] nitrate/nitrite from a single irradiation of low-enriched [{sup 18}O] water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferrieri, R.A.; Schlyer, D.J.; Shea, C.

    1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} for radiotracer synthesis is disclosed. The process includes producing [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} simultaneously by exposing a low-enriched (20%-30%) [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target to proton irradiation, sequentially isolating the [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} from the [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target, and reducing the [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3}. The [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} products are then conveyed to a laboratory for radiotracer applications. The process employs an anion exchange resin for isolation of the isotopes from the [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O, and sequential elution of [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} fractions. Also the apparatus is disclosed for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} from a single irradiation of a single low-enriched [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target. 2 figs.

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuels Tax Alternative Fuel License Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals Sustainable Biofuels Production Practices Biodiesel Definition Biodiesel Labeling Requirement Propane...

  9. Scintillation properties of some Ce[sup 3+] and Pr[sup 3+] doped inorganic crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorenbos, P.; Visser, R.; Eijk, C.W.E. van (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Dept. of Applied Physics); Khaidukov, N.M. (N.S. Kurnakov Inst. of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)); Korzhik, M.V. (Inst. of Nuclear Problems, Minsk (Russian Federation))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scintillations properties of Ce[sup 3+] and Pr[sup 3+] doped complex fluoride crystals of composition CsGd[sub 2]F[sub 7] and K[sub 2]YF[sub 5] and of Pr[sup 3+] doped Y[sub 3]Al[sub 5]O[sub 12] single crystals were studied by means of x-ray and gamma ray excitation. The Ce[sub 3+] and Pr[sub 3+] doped fluoride crystals show 5d-4f luminescences at wavelengths near 340 nm and 240 nm, respectively. 5d-4f luminescence of Pr[sup 3+] doped Y[sub 3]Al[sub 5]O[sub 12] is observed between 300 and 400 nm. The authors present the absolute light yield in photons/MeV together with results from scintillation decay time experiments.

  10. Level structure of /sup 101/Ru from the /sup 100/Ru(d,p) reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duarte, J.L.M.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Dietzsch, O.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy levels of /sup 101/Ru have been studied by the /sup 100/Ru(d,p)/sup 101/Ru reaction at an incident deuteron energy of 12 MeV. Outgoing particles were momentum analyzed by a magnetic spectrograph and detected in nuclear emulsion plates, with an energy resolution of 7.5 keV. A total of 68 levels up to 3.2 MeV excitation energy was identified, about two-thirds of them reported for the first time. Experimental angular distributions were compared to distorted-wave Born approximation predictions and reduced spectroscopic factors obtained. The total l = 2 and 75% of l = 0, 4, and 5 spectroscopic strengths were located. Attention is drawn to transitions to low-lying states in /sup 101/Ru (below E/sub exc/ = 0.75 MeV) with l = 3 and l = 1 character.

  11. Cone algorithm jets in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chay, J. [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea)] [Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea); Ellis, S.D. [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of hadronic jets depends not only on the dynamics of QCD but also on the details of the jet finding algorithm and the physical process in which the jet is produced. To study these effects in more detail we calculate the jet cross section and the internal jet structure in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilations and compare them to the results found in hadronic collisions using the {ital same} jet definition, the cone algorithm. The different structures of the overall events in the two cases are evident in the comparison. For a given cone size and jet energy, the distribution of energy inside the cone is more concentrated near the center for jets from e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collisions than for jets from hadronic collisions. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  12. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  13. Fuel Cells and Renewable Gaseous Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3-C: Renewable Gaseous FuelsFuel Cells and Renewable Gaseous FuelsSarah Studer, ORISE Fellow—Fuel Cell Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy

  14. Polarization Observables for K{sup +}{Lambda} and K{sup +}{Sigma}{sup 0} Photoproduction form Polarized Protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walford, Natalie K. [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Klein, Franz J.W. [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for undiscovered excited states of the nucleon continues to be a focus of experiments at Jefferson Lab. Recent LQCD calculations have confirmed long-standing quark-model predictions of many more states than have so far been identified. A large effort for the N* program has been launched using the CLAS detector to provide the database that will allow nearly model-independent partial wave analyses to be carried out in the search for such states. Polarization observables play a crucial role in this effort, as they are essential in disentangling overlapping resonant and non-resonant amplitudes. In 2010, double-polarization data were taken at JLab using circularly polarized photons incident on a transversely polarized frozen-spin butanol target. Our current analysis yields preliminary data of the T and F asymmetries of the K{sup +}{Lambda} and K{sup +}{Sigma}{sup 0} final states, which are compared to predictions of recent multipole analyses. This work is the first of its kind and will significantly broaden the world database for these reactions.

  15. ABUNDANCE OF {sup 26}Al AND {sup 60}Fe IN EVOLVING GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasileiadis, Aristodimos; Nordlund, Ake; Bizzarro, Martin [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Ostervoldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The nucleosynthesis and ejection of radioactive {sup 26}Al (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 0.72 Myr) and {sup 60}Fe, (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 2.5 Myr) into the interstellar medium is dominated by the stellar winds of massive stars and supernova type II explosions. Studies of meteorites and their components indicate that the initial abundances of these short-lived radionuclides in the solar protoplanetary disk were higher than the background levels of the galaxy inferred from {gamma}-ray astronomy and models of the galactic chemical evolution. This observation has been used to argue for a late-stage addition of stellar debris to the solar system's parental molecular cloud or, alternatively, the solar protoplanetary disk, thereby requiring a special scenario for the formation of our solar system. Here, we use supercomputers to model-from first principles-the production, transport, and admixing of freshly synthesized {sup 26}Al and {sup 60}Fe in star-forming regions within giant molecular clouds. Under typical star formation conditions, the levels of {sup 26}Al in most star-forming regions are comparable to that deduced from meteorites, suggesting that the presence of short-lived radionuclides in the early solar system is a generic feature of the chemical evolution of giant molecular clouds. The {sup 60}Fe/{sup 26}Al yield ratio of Almost-Equal-To 0.2 calculated from our simulations is consistent with the galactic value of 0.15 {+-} 0.06 inferred from {gamma}-ray astronomy but is significantly higher than most current solar system measurements indicate. We suggest that estimates based on differentiated meteorites and some chondritic components may not be representative of the initial {sup 60}Fe abundance of the bulk solar system.

  16. Candidate processes for diluting the {sup 235}U isotope in weapons-capable highly enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snider, J.D.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating options for rendering its surplus inventories of highly enriched uranium (HEU) incapable of being used to produce nuclear weapons. Weapons-capable HEU was earlier produced by enriching uranium in the fissile {sup 235}U isotope from its natural occurring 0.71 percent isotopic concentration to at least 20 percent isotopic concentration. Now, by diluting its concentration of the fissile {sup 235}U isotope in a uranium blending process, the weapons capability of HEU can be eliminated in a manner that is reversible only through isotope enrichment, and therefore, highly resistant to proliferation. To the extent that can be economically and technically justified, the down-blended uranium product will be made suitable for use as commercial reactor fuel. Such down-blended uranium product can also be disposed of as waste if chemical or isotopic impurities preclude its use as reactor fuel.

  17. Formulation for Tin-.sup.117m /diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides improved formulations of .sup.117m Sn (Sn.sup.4+) DTPA which allow higher doses of .sup.117m Sn (Sn.sup.4+) to be administered than were previously possible. Methods for making pharmaceutical compositions comprising .sup.117m Sn (Sn.sup.4+) DTPA in which the amount of unchelated DTPA is minimized are disclosed along with methods of using the improved formlulations, both for palliation of bone pain associated with cancer and for treatment of osseous tumors.

  18. Level structures in {sup 147}Pm from {sup 147}Nd decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sainath, M.; Venkataramaniah, K. [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prashanthinilayam 515134 (India)] [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prashanthinilayam 515134 (India); Sood, P.C. [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India)] [Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221 005 (India); [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prashanthinilayam 515134 (India)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The {gamma} and conversion electron spectra following the {beta} decay of {sup 147}Nd are measured using the HPGe detector and the miniorange electron spectrometer. The {sup 147}Pm level scheme comprising of 11 levels up to 686 keV excitation, interconnected by 29 transitions, is presented. The 649 keV (11) /(2) {sup {minus}} level, with six interconnecting (including two E3) transitions, is observed for the first time in decay studies. K-shell conversion coefficients for four transitions and L-shell conversion coefficients for five transitions are being reported for the first time. The I{sup {pi}}= (7) /(2) {sup +} spin-parity assignment for the 680 keV level is confirmed. Specific structure features of the {sup 147}Pm level scheme, depicting the unique coexistence of spherical shell model configurations, particle-phonon coupled multiplets, evolution of octupole collectivity, and well-developed rotational bands, are discussed; certain open questions about the spectroscopy and interpretation of the 633 and the 641 keV levels are highlighted. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Enhanced conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  20. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  1. Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coughlin, P.K.; Rabo, J.A.

    1985-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C[sub 5][sup +] hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising a SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

  2. Micro Fuel Cells Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micro Fuel Cells TM Direct Methanol Fuel Cells for Portable Power A Fuel Cell System Developer-17, 2002 Phoenix, Arizona #12;Micro Fuel Cells Direct Methanol Fuel Cells for Portable Power Outline (1 Energy Content (Wh) Volume(cm^3) Li-Ion Battery DMFC #12;Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Technology

  3. Dynamically polarized target for the g<sup>p>2 and G<sup>p>E experiments at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, Joshua J. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Maxwell, James D. [MIT, Amherst, MA (United States); Badman, Toby E. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Brock, James D. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Carlin, Christopher R. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Crabb, Donald G. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Day, Donal B. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Keith, Christopher D. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Kvaltine, Nicholas D. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Meekins, David G. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Mulholland, Jonathan R.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Shields, Joshua A. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Slifer, Karl J. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a dynamically polarized target that has been utilized for two electron scattering experiments in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. The primary components of the target are a new, high cooling power <sup>4sup> He evaporation refrigerator, and a re-purposed, superconducting split-coil magnet. It has been used to polarize protons in irradiated NH3 at a temperature of 1 K and at fields of 2.5 and 5.0 Tesla. The performance of the target material in the electron beam under these conditions will be discussed. Maximum polarizations of 28% and 95% were obtained at those fields, respectively. To satisfy the requirements of both experiments, the magnet had to be routinely rotated between angles of 0, 6, and 90 degrees with respect to the incident electron beam. This was accomplished using a new rotating vacuum seal which permits rotations to be performed in only a few minutes.

  4. Method of producing .sup.67 Cu

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Jr., Harold A. (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, John W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Thomas, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bentley, Glenn E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing carrier-free .sup.67 Cu by proton spallation combined with subsequent chemical separation and purification is disclosed. A target consisting essentially of pressed zinc oxide is irradiated with a high energy, high current proton beam to produce a variety of spallogenic nuclides, including .sup.67 Cu and other copper isotopes. The irradiated target is dissolved in a concentrated acid solution to which a palladium salt is added. In accordance with the preferred method, the spallogenic copper is twice coprecipitated with palladium, once with metallic zinc as the precipitating agent and once with hydrogen sulfide as the precipitating agent. The palladium/copper precipitate is then dissolved in an acid solution and the copper is separated from the palladium by liquid chromatography on an anion exchange resin.

  5. Measurement of {sup 17}F+p reactions at RESOLUT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linhardt, L. E.; Baby, L.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Gardiner, H.; Johnson, E.; Koschiy, E.; Macon, K. T.; Rasco, B. C.; Rogachev, G.; Santiago-Gonzalez, D.; Wiedenhoever, I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Department of Physics, Florida State University, 315 Keen Building, Tallahasse, FL 32306 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Department of Physics, Florida State University, 315 Keen Building, Tallahasse, FL 32306 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Department of Physics, Florida State University, 315 Keen Building, Tallahasse, FL 32306 (United States)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The {sup 14}O({alpha},p){sup 17}F reaction is important for understanding the {alpha}p process that occurs in X-ray bursts, but the rate of this reaction remains uncertain due to the uncertain properties of states in {sup 18}Ne. We measured the {sup 17}F(p,p){sup 17}F and {sup 17}F(p,{alpha}){sup 14}O reactions to study the properties of states in {sup 18}Ne that are important for the {sup 14}O({alpha},p){sup 17}F reaction using {sup 17}F radioactive beams from the RESOLUT facility at Florida State University. Double-sided silicon strip detectors were used to detect light particles, and recoiling heavy ions were detected in coincidence using a gas ionization chamber at forward angles. The performance of the system was first tested using the {sup 17}O(p,{alpha}){sup 14}N reaction. This was the first measurement using the ASIC electronics and recoil detector being developed for the Array for Nuclear Astrophysics Studies with Exotic Nuclei (ANASEN). We report on the performance and preliminary results.

  6. Theoretical analyses of (n,xn) reactions on sup 235 U, sup 238 U, sup 237 Np, and sup 239 Pu for ENDF/B-VI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, P.G.; Arthur, E.D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical analyses were performed of neutron-induced reactions on {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu between 0.01 and 20 MeV in order to calculate neutron emission cross sections and spectra for ENDF/B-VI evaluations. Coupled-channel optical model potentials were obtained for each target nucleus by fitting total, elastic, and inelastic scattering cross section data, as well as low-energy average resonance data. The resulting deformed optical model potentials were used to calculate direct (n,n{prime}) cross sections and transmission coefficients for use in Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory analyses. A fission model with multiple barrier representation, width fluctuation corrections, and preequilibrium corrections were included in the analyses. Direct cross sections for higher-lying vibrational states were calculated using DWBA theory, normalized using B(E{ell}) values determined from (d,d{prime}) and Coulomb excitation data, where available, and from systematics otherwise. Initial fission barrier parameters and transition state density enhancements appropriate to the compound systems involved were obtained from previous analyses, especially fits to charged-particle fission probability data. The parameters for the fission model were adjusted for each target system to obtain optimum agreement with direct (n,f) cross section measurements, taking account of the various multichance fission channels, that is, the different compound systems involved. The results from these analyses were used to calculate most of the neutron (n,n), (n,n{prime}), and (n,xn) cross section data in the ENDF/B/VI evaluations for the above nuclei, and all of the energy-angle correlated spectra. The deformed optical model and fission model parameterizations are described. Comparisons are given between the results of these analyses and the previous ENDF/B-V evaluations as well as with the available experimental data. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Cross sections for monitor reactions {sup 27}Al((p, x){sup 24}Na, {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 22}Na, and {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 7}Be at proton energies in the range 0.04-2.6 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Borovlev, S. P.; Butko, M. A.; Zhivun, V. M.; Pavlov, K. V.; Rogov, V. I.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Tikhonov, R. S.; Florya, S. N.; Koldobskiy, A. B. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross sections for the monitor reactions {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 24}Na, {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 22}Na, and {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 7}Be at 12 proton energies, 2605, 1598, 1199, 799, 600, 400, 249, 147.6, 97.2, 66.0, 44.6, and 40.8 MeV, have been determined with 72 Multiplication-Sign 72-mm square and 10.5-mm-diameter round aluminum foils. The rates of the reactions of the production of {sup 24}Na, {sup 22}Na, and {sup 7}Be in the foils in each irradiation run have been determined by {gamma} spectrometry, whereas the number of protons transmitted through these foils has been determined using calibrated fast current transformers. The cross sections have been determined as the ratios of the corresponding reaction to the average proton fluence.

  8. First polarization results from the LAMPF /sup 13/C target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penttila, S.I.; Amann, J.F.; Jarmer, J.J.; Jones, K.W.; Tanaka, N.; Barlett, M.L.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Kielhorn, W.F.; Pauletta, G.; Purcell, M.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polarized /sup 13/C target has been developed and used to measure spin observables for 500-MeV p - /sup 13/C elastic scattering. The material was ethylene glycol, /sup 13/C/sub 2/H/sub 6/O/sub 2/, enriched to 99% in /sup 13/C. Both the /sup 13/C and /sup 1/H spins were dynamically polarized in a /sup 3/He refrigerator at 2.5-T magnetic field. The polarization of both species was measured by using the NMR thermal equilibrium calibration technique. In addition, the polarization of /sup 1/H was independently measured by p-p scattering. We described the target and reported on the polarizations obtained and the dependence of the polarizations on integrated beam intensity. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel under accident conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strain, R.V.; Sanecki, J.E.; Osborne, M.F.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel is being studied by heating fuel rod segments in flowing steam and an inert carrier gas to simulate accident conditions. Fuels with a range of irradiation histories are being subjected to several steam flow rates over a wide range of temperatures. Fission product release during each test is measured by gamma spectroscopy and by detailed examination of the collection apparatus after the test has been completed. These release results are complemented by a detailed posttest examination of samples of the fuel rod segment. Results of release measurements and fuel rod characterizations for tests at 1400 through 2000/sup 0/C are presented in this paper.

  10. Assessment of SFR fuel pin performance codes under advanced fuel for minor actinide transmutation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouineau, V.; Lainet, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pelletier, M. [French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission - CEA, CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Di Marcello, V.; Van Uffelen, P.; Walker, C. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D- 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is, therefore, an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and residual power packages as well as the repository area. In the SUPERFACT Experiment four different oxide fuels containing high and low concentrations of {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am, representing the homogeneous and heterogeneous in-pile recycling concepts, were irradiated in the PHENIX reactor. The behavior of advanced fuel materials with minor actinide needs to be fully characterized, understood and modeled in order to optimize the design of this kind of fuel elements and to evaluate its performances. This paper assesses the current predictability of fuel performance codes TRANSURANUS and GERMINAL V2 on the basis of post irradiation examinations of the SUPERFACT experiment for pins with low minor actinide content. Their predictions have been compared to measured data in terms of geometrical changes of fuel and cladding, fission gases behavior and actinide and fission product distributions. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results, although improvements are also pointed out for further studies, especially if larger content of minor actinide will be taken into account in the codes. (authors)

  11. Krypton-85 health risk assessment for a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellinger, P.J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Gilbert, E.S.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The risks involved in the routine release of /sup 85/Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations to the environment were compared to those resulting from the capture and storage of /sup 85/Kr. Instead of releasing the /sup 85/Kr to the environment when fuel is reprocessed, it can be captured, immobilized and stored. Two alternative methods of capturing /sup 85/Kr (cryogenic distillation and fluorocarbon absorption) and one method of immobilizing the captured gas (ion implantation/sputtering) were theoretically incorporated into a representative fuel reprocessing plant, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, even though there are no known plans to start up this facility. Given the uncertainties in the models used to generate lifetime risk numbers (0.02 to 0.027 radiation induced fatal cancers expected in the occupational workforce and 0.017 fatal cancers in the general population), the differences in total risks for the three situations, (i.e., no-capture and two-capture alternatives) cannot be considered meaningful. It is possible that no risks would occur from any of the three situations. There is certainly no reason to conclude that risks from /sup 85/Kr routinely released to the environment are greater than those that would result from the other two situations considered. Present regulations mandate recovery and disposal of /sup 85/Kr from the off gases of a facility reprocessing spent fuel from commercial sources. Because of the lack of a clear-cut indication that recovery woud be beneficial, it does not seem prudent to burden the facilities with a requirement for /sup 85/Kr recovery, at least until operating experience demonstrates the incentive. The probable high aging of the early fuel to be processed and the higher dose resulting from the release of the unregulated /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C also encourage delaying implementation of the /sup 85/Kr recovery in the early plants.

  12. Alternative Fuel Implementation Toolkit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ? Alternative Fuels, the Smart Choice: Alternative fuels ­ biodiesel, electricity, ethanol (E85), natural gas

  13. Natural variations of /sup 13/C abundance in coal and bitumen as a tool to monitor co-processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muehlenbachs, K.; Steer, J.G. (Dept. of Geology, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton Alberta, T6G 2E3 (CA)); Hogg, A. (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton Alberta T6G 2E3 (CA)); Ohuchi, T.; Beaulieu, G. (Coal Dept., Alberta Research Council, Devon, Alberta T0C 1E0 (CA))

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of coal to facilitate the generation of transportation grade fuel bitumen, heavy oil for petroleum resids is a topic of continuing research. In order to optimize the upgrading process one needs to know in what proportion each feedstock contributes to each product fraction. Conventional analytical methods are neither able to distinguish the contribution from either feedstock in the synthetic products, nor measure the subtle changes in product character in response to differing process conditions. The inherent difference in the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio between most coals and bitumens can be utilized as an isotopic tracer to assess the efficacy of co-processing. For example Vesta coal and Athabasca bitumen have sufficiently distinct /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios that the measured /sup 13/C//sup 12/C of any product will accurately reflect the proportion of feed incorporated into the product. From the elemental analysis and the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio of the feedstock and products one can calculate the amount of carbon derived from coal (CDC) in each product fraction. Analogously the amount of bitumen derived carbon (BDC) can also be independently calculated. In this study the natural variation in /sup 13/C concentration was utilized as an isotopic tracer to evaluate co-processing efficiency of a one litre stirred autoclave under differing process conditions. Process variables examined were coal concentration, several iron based catalysts (Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/; Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ impregnated with TiO/sub 2/, SnO/sub 2/, or ZnO and a sludge obtained from a nickel refinery) and temperature.

  14. Natural variations of sup 13 C abundance in coal and bitumen as a tool to monitor coprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muehlenbachs, K.; Steer, J.G.; Hogg, A.; Ohuchi, T.; Beaulieu, G. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of coal to facilitate the generation of transportation grade fuel from bitumen, heavy oil or petroleum resids is a topic of continuing research. In order to optimize the upgrading process one needs to know in what proportion each feedstock contributes to each product fraction. Conventional analytical methods are neither able to distinguish the contribution from either feedstock in the synthetic products, nor measure the subtle changes in product character in response to differing process conditions. The inherent difference in the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio between most coals and bitumen can be utilized as an isotopic tracer to assess the efficacy of coprocessing. For example Vesta coal and Athabasca bitumen have sufficiently distinct {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios that the measured {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C of any product will accurately reflect the proportion of feed incorporated into the product. From the elemental analysis and the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of the feedstock and products one can calculate the amount of carbon derived from coal (CDC) in each product fraction. Analogously the amount of bitumen derived carbon (BDC) can also be independently calculated. In this study the natural variation in {sup 13}C concentration was utilized as an isotopic tracer to evaluate coprocessing efficiency of a one liter stirred autoclave under differing process conditions. Process variables examined were coal concentration, several iron based catalysts (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}; Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} impregnated with TiO{sub 2}, SnO{sub 2}, or ZnO and a sludge obtained from a nickel refinery) and temperature.

  15. Description of {sup 4}He tetramer bound and scattering states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazauskas, Rimantas; Carbonell, Jaume [Groupe de Physique Theorique, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, 53, Avenue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Faddeev-Yakubovski equations are solved numerically for {sup 4}He tetramer and trimer states using realistic helium-helium interaction models. We describe the properties of ground and excited states, and we discuss with a special emphasis the {sup 4}He-{sup 4}He{sub 3} low energy scattering.

  16. Spent fuel dry storage technology development: thermal evaluation of sealed storage cask containing spent fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitten, P.F.; Wright, J.B.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A PWR spent fuel assembly was encapsulated inside the E-MAD Hot Bay and placed in a instrumented above surface storage cell during December 1978 for thermal testing. Instrumentation provided to measure canister, liner and concrete temperatures consisted of thermocouples which were inserted into tubes on the outside of the canister and liner and in three radial positions in the concrete. Temperatures from the SSC test assembly have been recorded throughout the past 16 months. Canister and liner temperatures have reached their peak values of 200{sup 0}F and 140{sup 0}F, respectively. Computer predictions of the transient and steady-state temperatures show good agreement with the test data.

  17. Low-lying isomeric state in {sup 80}Ga from the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 80}Zn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LicA, R.; Marginean, N.; Ghita, D.G. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); and others

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A new level scheme was constructed for {sup 80}Ga which is significantly different from the one previously reported. The excitation energy of a new low-lying state recently reported in [2] was identified at 22.4 keV. Properties of the level scheme suggest that the ground state has spin J = 6 and the first excited state has spin J = 3. The spin assignments are in agreement with laser spectroscopy values previously measured. Our work provides the first evidence for the J = 6 being the ground state.

  18. /sup 238/PuO/sub 2//Mo-50 wt% Re compatibility at 800 and 1000/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaeffer, D.R.; Teaney, P.E.

    1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The compatibility of Mo-50 wt % Re with /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ was investigated after heat treatments of up to 720 days at 800/sup 0/C and 180 days at 1000/sup 0/C. At 800/sup 0/C, a 1-..mu..m thick, continuous layer of molybdenum oxide resulted. At 1000/sup 0/C, the oxide reaction product contained some plutonium and did not appear continuous. At 1000/sup 0/C, a layer of intermetallic formed at the Mo-Re edge, beneath the oxide layer, creating a barrier between the Mo-50 wt % Re and the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/. The intermetallic layer was promoted by the iron impurity in the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/.

  19. Search for B{sup +}{yields}X(3872)K{sup +}, X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{gamma}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Grauges, E. [Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat de Fisica Departamento ECM, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Palano, A. [Universita di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039 (China); Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen (Norway)] (and others)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a study of B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{gamma}K{sup +} decays, we find evidence for the radiative decay X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{gamma} with a statistical significance of 3.4{sigma}. We measure the product of branching fractions B(B{sup +}{yields}X(3872)K{sup +}){center_dot}B(X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{gamma})=(3.3{+-}1.0{+-}0.3)x10{sup -6}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. We also measure the branching fraction B(B{sup +}{yields}{chi}{sub c1}K{sup +})=(4.9{+-}0.2{+-}0.4)x10{sup -4}. These results are obtained from (287{+-}3) million BB decays collected at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC.

  20. Continuing investigations for technology assessment of /sup 99/Mo production from LEU (low enriched Uranium) targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vandergrift, G.F.; Kwok, J.D.; Marshall, S.L.; Vissers, D.R.; Matos, J.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently much of the world's supply of /sup 99m/Tc for medical purposes is produced from /sup 99/Mo derived from the fissioning of high enriched uranium (HEU). The need for /sup 99m/Tc is continuing to grow, especially in developing countries, where needs and national priorities call for internal production of /sup 99/Mo. This paper presents the results of our continuing studies on the effects of substituting low enriched Uranium (LEU) for HEU in targets for the production of fission product /sup 99/Mo. Improvements in the electrodeposition of thin films of uranium metal are reported. These improvements continue to increase the appeal for the substitution of LEU metal for HEU oxide films in cylindrical targets. The process is effective for targets fabricated from stainless steel or hastaloy. A cost estimate for setting up the necessary equipment to electrodeposit uranium metal on cylindrical targets is reported. Further investigations on the effect of LEU substitution on processing of these targets are also reported. Substitution of uranium silicides for the uranium-aluminum alloy or uranium aluminide dispersed fuel used in other current target designs will allow the substitution of LEU for HEU in these targets with equivalent /sup 99/Mo-yield per target and no change in target geometries. However, this substitution will require modifications in current processing steps due to (1) the insolubility of uranium silicides in alkaline solutions and (2) the presence of significant quantities of silicate in solution. Results to date suggest that both concerns can be handled and that substitution of LEU for HEU can be achieved.

  1. Hydration of DNA by tritiated water and isotope distribution: a study by /sup 1/H, /sup 2/H, and /sup 3/H NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur-De Vre, R.; Grimee-Declerck, R.; Lejeune, P.; Bertinchamps, A.J.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydration layer of DNA (0.75%) in tritiated water represents 3.5% of solvent /sup 3/HHO. The combined effects of temperature (-6 to -40/sup 0/C) and H/sub 2/O//sup 2/H/sub 2/O solvent composition on the spin-lattice relaxation times of water protons and deuterons suggest selective distribution of isotopes in the hydration layer. The ''hydration isotope'' effect and the localization of tritiated water molecules in the hydration layer of DNA have important implications in describing the radiobiological effects of tritiated water because the initial molecular damage caused by /sup 3/HHO (internal radiation source) localizes close to /sup 3/H due to the short range and low energy of /sup 3/H ..beta.. rays.

  2. Characterization of Nuclear Fuel using Multivariate Statistical Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robel, M; Robel, M; Robel, M; Kristo, M J; Kristo, M J

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Various combinations of reactor type and fuel composition have been characterized using principle components analysis (PCA) of the concentrations of 9 U and Pu isotopes in the 10 fuel as a function of burnup. The use of PCA allows the reduction of the 9-dimensional data (isotopic concentrations) into a 3-dimensional approximation, giving a visual representation of the changes in nuclear fuel composition with burnup. Real-world variation in the concentrations of {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U in the fresh (unirradiated) fuel was accounted for. The effects of reprocessing were also simulated. The results suggest that, 15 even after reprocessing, Pu isotopes can be used to determine both the type of reactor and the initial fuel composition with good discrimination. Finally, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PSLDA) was investigated as a substitute for PCA. Our results suggest that PLSDA is a better tool for this application where separation between known classes is most important.

  3. Lowest l=0 proton resonance in {sup 26}Si and implications for nucleosynthesis of {sup 26}Al

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peplowski, P. N.; Baby, L. T.; Wiedenhoever, I.; Diffenderfer, E.; Hoeflich, P.; Rojas, A.; Volya, A. [Physics Department, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States); Dekat, S. E.; Gay, D. L. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, University of North Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32224 (United States); Grubor-Urosevic, O. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Purdue University Calumet, Hammond, Indiana 46323 (United States); Kaye, R. A. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Purdue University Calumet, Hammond, Indiana 46323 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio 43015 (United States); Keeley, N. [Department of Nuclear Reactions, Andrezj Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, PL-00681 Warsaw (Poland)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a beam of the radioactive isotope {sup 25}Al, produced with the new RESOLUT facility, we measured the direct (d,n) proton-transfer reaction leading to low-lying proton resonances in {sup 26}Si. We observed the lowest l=0 proton resonance, identified with the 3{sup +} state at 5.914-MeV excitation energy. This result eliminates the largest uncertainty in astrophysical reaction rates involved in the nucleosynthesis of {sup 26}Al.

  4. Effect of O{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}+ O{sub 2}{sup +}, and N{sub 2}{sup +}+ O{sub 2}{sup +} ion-beam irradiation on the field emission properties of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acuna, J. J. S.; Alvarez, F. [Instituto de Fisica 'Gleb Wataghin', UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6165 Campinas, SP, 13083-970 (Brazil); Escobar, M. [INQUIMAE, FCEyN-UBA-CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Depto. Fisica, FECyN, UBA, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Goyanes, S. N. [Depto. Fisica, FECyN, UBA, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Candal, R. J. [INQUIMAE, FCEyN-UBA-CONICET, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, Buenos Aires (Argentina); ECyT, 3iA, UNSAM, Campus Migueletes, San Martin, Pcia. Buenos Aires (Argentina); Zanatta, A. R. [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos-USP, P.O. Box 369, Sao Carlos 13560-250 (Brazil)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of O{sub 2}{sup +}, H{sub 2}{sup +}+ O{sub 2}{sup +}, and N{sub 2}{sup +}+ O{sub 2}{sup +} ion-beam irradiation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) films on the chemical and electronic properties of the material is reported. The CNTs were grown by the chemical vapor deposition technique (CVD) on silicon TiN coated substrates previously decorated with Ni particles. The Ni decoration and TiN coating were successively deposited by ion-beam assisted deposition (IBAD) and afterwards the nanotubes were grown. The whole deposition procedure was performed in situ as well as the study of the effect of ion-beam irradiation on the CNTs by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Raman scattering, field-effect emission gun scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM), and field emission (FE) measurements were performed ex situ. The experimental data show that: (a) the presence of either H{sub 2}{sup +} or N{sub 2}{sup +} ions in the irradiation beam determines the oxygen concentration remaining in the samples as well as the studied structural characteristics; (b) due to the experimental conditions used in the study, no morphological changes have been observed after irradiation of the CNTs; (c) the FE experiments indicate that the electron emission from the CNTs follows the Fowler-Nordheim model, and it is dependent on the oxygen concentration remaining in the samples; and (d) in association with FE results, the XPS data suggest that the formation of terminal quinone groups decreases the CNTs work function of the material.

  5. Fuel cell using a hydrogen generation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dentinger, Paul M. (Sunol, CA); Crowell, Jeffrey A. W. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for storing and generating hydrogen and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  6. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimble, R.E.

    1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

  7. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimble, Ralph E. (Finleyville, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

  8. Electromagnetic dissociation of relativistic {sup 28}Si by nucleon emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnadara, U.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of the electromagnetic dissociation of {sup 28}Si by nucleon emission at E{sub lab}/A = 14.6 (GeV/nucleon was carried out with {sup 28}Si beams interacting on {sup 208}Pb). {sup 120}Sn. {sup 64}C targets. The measurements apparatus consists of detectors in the target area which measure the energy and charged multiplicity, and a forward spectrometer which measures the position, momentum and energy of the reaction fragments. The exclusive electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for decay channels having multiple nucleons in the final state have been measured which enables the selection of events produced in pure electromagnetic interactions. The measured cross sections agree well with previous measurements obtained for the removal of a few nucleons as well as with measurements on total charge removal cross sections from other experiments. The dependence of the integrated cross sections on the target charge Z{sub T} and the target mass AT confirms that for higher Z targets the excitation is largely electromagnetic. Direct measurements of the excitation energy for the electromagnetic dissociation of {sup 28}Si {yields} p+{sup 27}Al and {sup 28}Si {yields} n+{sup 27}Si have been obtained through a calculation of the invariant mass in kinematically, reconstructed events. The excitation energy spectrum for all targets peak near the isovector giant dipole resonance in {sup 28}Si. These distributions are well reproduced by combining the photon spectrum calculated using the Weizsaecker-Williams approximation with the experimental data on the photonuclear {sup 28}Si({sub {gamma},p}){sup 27}Al and {sup 28}Si({sub {gamma},n}){sup 27}Si. The possibilities of observing double giant dipole resonance excitations in {sup 28}Si have been investigated with cross section measurements as well as with excitation energy reconstruction.

  9. Electromagnetic dissociation of relativistic [sup 28]Si by nucleon emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnadara, U.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed study of the electromagnetic dissociation of [sup 28]Si by nucleon emission at E[sub lab]/A = 14.6 (GeV/nucleon was carried out with [sup 28]Si beams interacting on [sup 208]Pb). [sup 120]Sn. [sup 64]C targets. The measurements apparatus consists of detectors in the target area which measure the energy and charged multiplicity, and a forward spectrometer which measures the position, momentum and energy of the reaction fragments. The exclusive electromagnetic dissociation cross sections for decay channels having multiple nucleons in the final state have been measured which enables the selection of events produced in pure electromagnetic interactions. The measured cross sections agree well with previous measurements obtained for the removal of a few nucleons as well as with measurements on total charge removal cross sections from other experiments. The dependence of the integrated cross sections on the target charge Z[sub T] and the target mass AT confirms that for higher Z targets the excitation is largely electromagnetic. Direct measurements of the excitation energy for the electromagnetic dissociation of [sup 28]Si [yields] p+[sup 27]Al and [sup 28]Si [yields] n+[sup 27]Si have been obtained through a calculation of the invariant mass in kinematically, reconstructed events. The excitation energy spectrum for all targets peak near the isovector giant dipole resonance in [sup 28]Si. These distributions are well reproduced by combining the photon spectrum calculated using the Weizsaecker-Williams approximation with the experimental data on the photonuclear [sup 28]Si([sub [gamma],p])[sup 27]Al and [sup 28]Si([sub [gamma],n])[sup 27]Si. The possibilities of observing double giant dipole resonance excitations in [sup 28]Si have been investigated with cross section measurements as well as with excitation energy reconstruction.

  10. {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C reactions at astrophysical energies: Tests of targets behaviour under beam bombardment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morales-Gallegos, L. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Aliotta, M.; Davinson, T. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Di Leva, A.; Imbriani, G.; Romano, M.; Romoli, M. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Naples, Italy and Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Università di Napoli Federico II, Naples (Italy); Gialanella, L. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Naples, Italy and Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Seconda Università degli studi di Napoli, Caserta (Italy); Schürmann, D. [INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); De Cesare, M. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, Australia and INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Strieder, F. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica Seconda Università degli studi di Napoli, Caserta, Italy and Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Bochum (Germany)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,?){sup 20}Ne and {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,p){sup 23}Na are the most important reactions during the carbon burning phase in stars. Direct measurements at the relevant astrophysical energy (E=1.5±0.3MeV) are very challenging because of the extremely small cross sections involved and of the high beam-induced background originating from impurities in the targets. In addition, persistent resonant structures at low energies are not well understood and make the extrapolation of the cross section from high energy data very uncertain. As a preliminary step towards the measurements of the {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,?){sup 20}Ne and {sup 12}C({sup 12}C,p){sup 23}Na reactions we intend to investigate the behaviour of targets under beam bombardment, specifically the quantitative measurement of hydrogen and deuterium content of highly pure stable carbon targets in relation to target temperature. Experiments are taking place at the CIRCE accelerator in Caserta, Italy and preliminary results are presented here.

  11. E691 Dalitz plot analysis of [Lambda][sub c][sup +] [yields] pK[sup [minus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cremaldi, L.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The resonant decays of the [Lambda][sub c][sup +] can give insight into the weak decay mechanism of this charmed baryon. We have performed a Dalitz plot analysis of the final state for a clean sample [Lambda][sub c][sup +] [yields] pK[sup [minus

  12. Spectral properties of the Dirichlet operator ?{sub i=1}{sup d}(??{sub i}{sup 2}){sup s} on domains in d-dimensional Euclidean space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatzinikitas, Agapitos N. [Department of Mathematics, School of Sciences, University of Aegean, Karlovasi 83200, Samos (Greece)] [Department of Mathematics, School of Sciences, University of Aegean, Karlovasi 83200, Samos (Greece)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we investigate the distribution of eigenvalues of the Dirichlet pseudo-differential operator ?{sub i=1}{sup d}(??{sub i}{sup 2}){sup s},?s?(0,1] on an open and bounded subdomain ??R{sup d} and predict bounds on the sum of the first N eigenvalues, the counting function, the Riesz means, and the trace of the heat kernel. Moreover, utilizing the connection of coherent states to the semi-classical approach of quantum mechanics, we determine the sum for moments of eigenvalues of the associated Schrödinger operator.

  13. Narrow spectral emission CaMoO{sub 4}: Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} phosphor crystals for white light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, A. [Smart Lighting Engineering Research Center, 110, 8th Street, Troy, New York, 12180 (United States) [Smart Lighting Engineering Research Center, 110, 8th Street, Troy, New York, 12180 (United States); Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110, 8th Street, Troy, New York, 12180 (United States); Dutta, P.S., E-mail: duttap@rpi.edu [Smart Lighting Engineering Research Center, 110, 8th Street, Troy, New York, 12180 (United States); Electrical, Computer and Systems Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110, 8th Street, Troy, New York, 12180 (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkaline earth metal molybdates are promising candidates as a host material for high efficiency narrow spectral emission phosphors. These phosphors could potentially be used for the fabrication of phosphor-converted light emitting diodes (pc-LEDs). Phosphor crystals of calcium molybdate doped with rare earth dopant Ln{sup 3+}(Ln=Eu, Dy, Tb) grown using flux growth method have been shown to exhibit higher excitation efficiency than the powders synthesized by solid-state reaction process. Molybdenum (VI) oxide has been found to be a suitable flux for growing large size optically transparent high quality crystals at a temperature around 1100 Degree-Sign C. Using the excitation wavelengths of 465 nm, 454 nm and 489 nm for CaMoO{sub 4}: Eu{sup 3+}, CaMoO{sub 4}: Dy{sup 3+} and CaMoO{sub 4}: Tb{sup 3+}, respectively, intense emission lines at wavelengths of 615 nm, 575 nm and 550 nm were observed. The optimized doping concentrations of 12%, 2% and 5% for Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+}, respectively, provided the highest luminescence intensity. - Graphical Abstract: CaMoO{sub 4}: Eu{sup 3+} phosphor crystals grown using a molybdenum (VI) oxide flux exhibited around 1.5 times the emission intensity of powders obtained from solid-state reaction at the same synthesis temperature. These crystals were found to efficiently emit 615 nm red light when excited by near UV light up to a wavelength of 395 nm. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CaMoO{sub 4}: Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) phosphor crystals were successfully grown using high temperature flux (solutions) containing molybdenum (VI) oxide or lithium chloride. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Narrow spectral emission at 615 nm, 575 nm and 550 nm, respectively, was observed from CaMoO{sub 4}: Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) phosphor crystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimized doping concentrations of Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+} in CaMoO{sub 4} for highest emission intensity were determined to be 12%, 2% and 5%, respectively. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The CaMoO{sub 4}: Ln{sup 3+} (Ln=Eu{sup 3+}, Dy{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) phosphor crystals grown with molybdenum (VI) oxide flux exhibited 50% higher emission intensity compared to the crystals grown with lithium chloride flux and the powders synthesized by solid-state reaction.

  14. Carbon-14 in waste packages for spent fuel in a tuff repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Konynenburg, R.A.; Smith, C.F.; Culham, H.W.; Smith, H.D.

    1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon-14 is produced naturally by cosmic ray neutrons in the upper atmosphere. It is also produced in nuclear reactors, in amounts much smaller than the global inventory. About one-third of this is released directly to the atmosphere, and the other two-thirds remains in the spent fuel. Both the Environmental Protection Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have established limits on release of the {sup 14}C in spent fuel. This is of particular concern for the proposed repository in tuff, because of the unsaturated conditions and the consequent possibility of gaseous transport of {sup 14}C as CO{sub 2}. Existing measurements and calculations of the {sup 14}C inventory in spent fuel are reviewed. The physical distribution and chemical forms of the {sup 14}C are discussed. Available data on the release of {sup 14}C from spent fuel in aqueous solutions and in gaseous environments of air, nitrogen, and helium are reviewed. Projected {sup 14}C behavior in a tuff repository is described. It is concluded that {sup 14}C release measurements from spent fuel into moist air at temperatures both above and below the in situ boiling point of water as well as detailed transport calculations for the tuff geological environment will be needed to determine whether the 10CFR60 and 40CFR191 requirements can be met. 56 refs., 1 tab.

  15. Lifetimes of negative parity states in {sup 168}Er

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genilloud, L. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, Perolles, CH-1700 Fribourg, (Switzerland)] [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, Perolles, CH-1700 Fribourg, (Switzerland); Jolie, J. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, Perolles, CH-1700 Fribourg, (Switzerland)] [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, Perolles, CH-1700 Fribourg, (Switzerland); Boerner, H. G. [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, (France)] [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, (France); Lehmann, H. [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, (France)] [Institut Laue-Langevin, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9, (France); Becvar, F. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague 8, (Czech Republic)] [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague 8, (Czech Republic); Krticka, M. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague 8, (Czech Republic)] [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University, CZ-180 00 Prague 8, (Czech Republic); Zamfir, N. V. [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States) [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States); Casten, R. F. [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)] [WNSL, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the GRID method the lifetimes of 12 states belonging to four negative parity bands in {sup 168}Er were measured at the high flux reactor of the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL). For K{sup {pi}}=0{sub 1}{sup -} and K{sup {pi}}=2{sub 1}{sup -} bands the absolute E1 transitions are in agreement with those obtained within the framework of the sdf IBA-1 model and their octupole vibrational character is confirmed. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  16. Is there a bound dineutron in {sup 11}Li?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ieki, K.; Galonsky, A.; Sackett, D.; Kruse, J.J.; Lynch, W.G.; Morrissey, D.J.; Orr, N.A.; Sherrill, B.M.; Winger, J.A. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Deak, F.; Horvath, A.; Kiss, A. [Department of Atomic Physics, Eoetvoes University, Puskin utca 5-7, H-1088 Budapest 8 (Hungary)] [Department of Atomic Physics, Eoetvoes University, Puskin utca 5-7, H-1088 Budapest 8 (Hungary); Seres, Z. [Central Research Institute for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest 114 (Hungary)] [Central Research Institute for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest 114 (Hungary); Kolata, J.J. [Physics Department, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Warner, R.E. [Department of Physics, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio 44074 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio 44074 (United States); Humphrey, D.L. [Department of Physics, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photodisintegration of {sup 11}Li was accomplished by sending a beam of {sup 11}Li at 28 MeV/nucleon through the equivalent photon field of a lead target. By measuring the complete kinematics of the disintegration products, {sup 9}Li+{ital n}+{ital n}, we constructed the correlation of the angle between the two neutrons in the rest frame of the {sup 11}Li. The correlation is independent of angle. This result argues against the existence of a bound dineutron in the ground state of {sup 11}Li. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  17. Actinide production in /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregorich, K.E.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The production cross sections for the actinide products from /sup 136/Xe bombardments of /sup 249/Cf at energies 1.02, 1.09, and 1.16 times the Coulomb barrier were determined. Fractions of the individual actinide elements were chemically separated from recoil catcher foils. The production cross sections of the actinide products were determined by measuring the radiations emitted from the nuclides within the chemical fractions. The chemical separation techniques used in this work are described in detail, and a description of the data analysis procedure is included. The actinide production cross section distributions from these /sup 136/Xe + /sup 249/Cf bombardments are compared with the production cross section distributions from other heavy ion bombardments of actinide targets, with emphasis on the comparison with the /sup 136/Xe + /sup 248/Cm reaction. A technique for modeling the final actinide cross section distributions has been developed and is presented. In this model, the initial (before deexcitation) cross section distribution with respect to the separation energy of a dinuclear complex and with respect to the Z of the target-like fragment is given by an empirical procedure. It is then assumed that the N/Z equilibration in the dinuclear complex occurs by the transfer of neutrons between the two participants in the dinuclear complex. The neutrons and the excitation energy are statistically distributed between the two fragments using a simple Fermi gas level density formalism. The resulting target-like fragment initial cross section distribution with respect to Z, N, and excitation energy is then allowed to deexcite by emission of neutrons in competition with fission. The result is a final cross section distribution with respect to Z and N for the actinide products. 68 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Process of [sup 196]Hg enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Mellor, C.E.

    1993-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple rate equation model shows that by increasing the length of the photochemical reactor and/or by increasing the photon intensity in said reactor, the feedstock utilization of [sup 196]Hg will be increased. Two preferred embodiments of the present invention are described, namely (1) long reactors using long photochemical lamps and vapor filters; and (2) quartz reactors with external UV reflecting films. These embodiments have each been constructed and operated, demonstrating the enhanced utilization process dictated by the mathematical model (also provided).

  19. Process of .sup.196 Hg enrichment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Mellor, Charles E. (Salem, MA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple rate equation model shows that by increasing the length of the photochemical reactor and/or by increasing the photon intensity in said reactor, the feedstock utilization of .sup.196 Hg will be increased. Two preferred embodiments of the present invention are described, namely (1) long reactors using long photochemical lamps and vapor filters; and (2) quartz reactors with external UV reflecting films. These embodiments have each been constructed and operated, demonstrating the enhanced utilization process dictated by the mathematical model (also provided).

  20. Fusion of {sup 48}Ca+{sup 48}Ca Far Below the Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarlassara, F.; Montagnoli, G.; Mason, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica 'G. Galilei', Universita di Padova and INFN Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35231 Padova (Italy); Stefanini, A. M.; Silvestri, R.; Corradi, L.; Fioretto, E.; Guiot, B. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D. [IPHC, CNRS-IN2P3, Universite de Strasbourg, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Szilner, S. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, a puzzling pattern has been observed in fusion cross sections well below the Coulomb barrier, characterized as a departure from the exponential-like behavior predicted by standard coupled-channels models, known as fusion hindrance. We report on recent fusion measurements performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, in particular the {sup 48}Ca+{sup 48}Ca reaction down to the level of 0.6 {mu}b. Unlike most recent results in this field, we do not observe the typical divergent behavior of the logarithmic derivative; but rather a sort of saturation, albeit at a larger value than predicted with a standard nucleus-nucleus potential.

  1. {sup 12}C+{sup 16}O: Properties of sub-barrier resonance {gamma}-decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goasduff, A.; Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Lebhertz, D.; Jenkins, D. G.; Fallis, J.; Ruiz, C.; Hutcheon, D. A.; Amandruz, P.-A.; Davis, C.; Hager, U.; Ottewell, D.; Ruprecht, G. [Universite de Strasbourg, IPHC, 23 rue du Loess 67037 Strasbourg (France) and CNRS, UMR7178, 67037 Strasbourg (France); GANIL, CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent experiment performed at Triumf using the Dragon 0 Degree-Sign spectrometer and its associated BGO array, the complete {gamma}-decay of the radiative capture channel below the Coulomb barrier has been measured for the first time. This measurement has been performed at two energies E{sub c.m.}= 6.6 and 7.2 MeV. A selective contribution of the entrance spins 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} has been evidenced which is consistent with existing results above the barrier.

  2. Measurement of delayed neutron yields from {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kellett, M.A.; Weaver, D.R. [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Filip, A. [CEN Cadarache, St. Paul-les-Durance (France)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Work is in progress at the University of Birmingham, UK, on the preliminary calibration of detectors and neutron beam characterisation required in order to carry out the accurate measurement of the total and absolute delayed neutron yields from the fast fission of uranium 235 and 238. The work is being undertaken in order to try and resolve the discrepancies that exist in the yield for the uranium 238 isotope. The University`s 3 MV Dynamitron accelerator is being used to produce the required neutron fluxes of 10{sup 9} neutrons per steradian per second, as generated via the D(d,n){sup 3}He reaction.

  3. Superconformal generalization of the chaotic inflation model ?/4?{sup 4} - ?/2?{sup 2}R

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei, E-mail: kallosh@stanford.edu, E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu [Stanford Institute for Theoretical Physics and Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of chaotic inflation based on the theory of a scalar field with potential ??{sup 4} perfectly matches the observational data if one adds to it a tiny non-minimal coupling to gravity -?/2?{sup 2} R with ??>0.002. We describe embedding of this model into the superconformal theory with spontaneous breaking of superconformal symmetry, and into supergravity. A model with small ? is technically natural: setting the small parameter ? to zero leads to a point of enhanced symmetry in the underlying superconformal theory.

  4. Spectroscopy and high-spin structure of {sup 209}Fr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dracoulis, G. D.; Davidson, P. M.; Lane, G. J.; Kibedi, T.; Nieminen, P.; Watanabe, H. [Department of Nuclear Physics, R. S. Phys. S. E., Australian National University, Canberra, A. C. T. Australia 0200 (Australia); Byrne, A. P. [Department of Physics, The Faculties, Australian National University, Canberra, A. C. T. Australia 0200 (Australia); Department of Nuclear Physics, R. S. Phys. S. E., Australian National University, Canberra, A. C. T. Australia 0200 (Australia); Wilson, A. N. [Department of Nuclear Physics, R. S. Phys. S. E., Australian National University, Canberra, A. C. T. Australia 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, The Faculties, Australian National University, Canberra, A. C. T. Australia 0200 (Australia)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Excited states in {sup 209}Fr have been studied using the {sup 197}Au({sup 16}O,4n){sup 209}Fr reaction with pulsed beams and {gamma}-ray and electron spectroscopy. A comprehensive scheme has been established up to an excitation energy of about 6 MeV and spins of about 49/2({Dirac_h}/2{pi}). Several isomers have been identified including a J{sup {pi}}=25/2{sup +}, {tau}=48(3) ns state at 2130 keV and a 606(26) ns, 45/2{sup -} state at 4660 keV. The latter state decays via an enhanced E3 transition with a strength of 28.8(12) W.u. It can be identified with a similar isomer in the heavier odd isotopes {sup 211}Fr and {sup 213}Fr, arising from the maximal coupling of the five valence protons in the {pi}h{sub 9/2}{sup 3}i{sub 13/2}{sup 2} configuration. The systematics of the yrast states in the odd-A isotopes are discussed, including the presence of states arising from the main proton configurations coupled to the p{sub 1/2}, f{sub 5/2}, and i{sub 13/2} neutron holes. Shell-model configurations are assigned to many of the observed states. The isotopic assignment differs from earlier work, which is shown to be erroneous.

  5. Evaporation-based Ge/.sup.68 Ga Separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirzadeh, Saed (Albuquerque, NM); Whipple, Richard E. (Los Alamos, NM); Grant, Patrick M. (Los Alamos, NM); O'Brien, Jr., Harold A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro concentrations of .sup.68 Ga in secular equilibrium with .sup.68 Ge in strong aqueous HCl solution may readily be separated in ionic form from the .sup.68 Ge for biomedical use by evaporating the solution to dryness and then leaching the .sup.68 Ga from the container walls with dilute aqueous solutions of HCl or NaCl. The chloro-germanide produced during the evaporation may be quantitatively recovered to be used again as a source of .sup.68 Ga. If the solution is distilled to remove any oxidizing agents which may be present as impurities, the separation factor may easily exceed 10.sup.5. The separation is easily completed and the .sup.68 Ga made available in ionic form in 30 minutes or less.

  6. The decay of a new nuclide /sup 71/Br

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagberg, E; Evans, H C; Hardy, J C; Koslowsky, V T; Schmeing, H; Schrewe, U J; Sharma, K S

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decay of mass-separated samples of the previously unknown nuclide /sup 71/Br have been investigated by means of the Chalk River on-line isotope separator. Eleven gamma -transitions were assigned to the decay of this nuclide and its half-life was measured to be 21.4+or-0.6 s. A simple decay scheme for /sup 71/Br has been constructed incorporating six levels in its daughter, /sup 71/Se. The half-life of the first excited state in /sup 71/Se was measured to be 5.5+or-1.0 mu s and the transition from this state to the ground state was found to be highly converted. Systematic trends in the level schemes of /sup 67 /Zn, /sup 69/Ge and /sup 71/Se are investigated. (16 refs).

  7. Spectral investigations of Sm{sup 3+}-doped oxyfluorosilicate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramachari, D. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Rama Moorthy, L., E-mail: lrmphysics@yahoo.co.in [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India); Department of Physics, Chadalawada Ramanamma Engineering College, Renigunta Road, Tirupati 517506 (India); Jayasankar, C.K. [Department of Physics, Sri Venkateswara University, Tirupati 517502 (India)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: The figure shows the emission spectra of Sm{sup 3+} doped KNSZL glass for different concentrations. Among the four emission transitions {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} ? {sup 6}H{sub 5/2}, {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} ? {sup 6}H{sub 7/2}, {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} ? {sup 6}H{sub 9/2} and {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} ? {sup 6}H{sub 11/2}, the {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} ? {sup 6}H{sub 7/2} transition of KNSZLSm10 glass is more intense compared with all the transitions. The insert figure shows, the color coordinates (0.59, 0.41) of KNSZLSm10 glass is located on the perimeter of the chromaticity diagram at 592 nm which appears to be closest to the orange color. From these results the KNSZLSm10 glass could be useful for optical amplifiers, waveguides, telecommunications and orange LEDs. - Highlights: • From the DTA, the undoped KNSZL glass more precisely in fiberdrawing. • The XRD pattern confirmed the KNbO{sub 3} nanocrystallites of undoped KNSZL glass. • FTIR and Raman data of KNSZLSm10 glass revealed structural properties. • Judd–Ofelt analysis and decay measurements were carried out. • The optical gain parameter of the investigated glass is 18.13 × 10{sup ?25} cm{sup 2} s. - Abstract: Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped oxyfluorosilicate glasses were prepared by melt-quenching method. The differential thermal analysis and X-ray diffraction were carried out to investigate the glass transition temperature and structure of precursor glass. Infrared spectroscopy, Raman, optical absorption, photoluminescence and decay measurements were carried out for Sm{sup 3+}-doped oxyfluorosilicate glasses. From the absorption spectrum, the Judd–Ofelt intensity parameters have been evaluated to predict the radiative properties for the emission levels of Sm{sup 3+} ions. The lifetimes of {sup 4}G{sub 5/2} level are found to decrease from 1.17 to 0.93 ms due to the energy transfer, when the concentration of Sm{sup 3+} ions increases from 0.1 to 2.0 mol%. The optical gain parameter (18.13 × 10{sup ?25} cm{sup 2} s) of the investigated glass is found to be higher than the other Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped glass systems.

  8. California Fuel Cell Partnership: Alternative Fuels Research...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by Chris White of the California Fuel Cell Partnership provides information about alternative fuels research. cafcpinitiativescall.pdf More Documents & Publications The...

  9. Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turgut Gur

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2}) that simulates the composition of the coal syngas. At 800 C, the stack achieved a power density of 1176 W, which represents the largest power level demonstrated for CO in the literature. Although the FB-DCFC performance results obtained in this project were definitely encouraging and promising for practical applications, DCFC approaches pose significant technical challenges that are specific to the particular DCFC scheme employed. Long term impact of coal contaminants, particularly sulfur, on the stability of cell components and cell performance is a critically important issue. Effective current collection in large area cells is another challenge. Lack of kinetic information on the Boudouard reactivity of wide ranging solid fuels, including various coals and biomass, necessitates empirical determination of such reaction parameters that will slow down development efforts. Scale up issues will also pose challenges during development of practical FB-DCFC prototypes for testing and validation. To overcome some of the more fundamental problems, initiation of federal support for DCFC is critically important for advancing and developing this exciting and promising technology for third generation electricity generation from coal, biomass and other solid fuels including waste.

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Hydrogen Production and Retail Requirements All hydrogen fuel produced and sold in Michigan must meet state fuel quality requirements. Any retailer offering hydrogen fuel for sale...

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    fuel. Eligible alternative fuels include electricity, propane, natural gas, or hydrogen fuel. Medium-duty hybrid electric vehicles also qualify. Eligible medium-duty AFVs...

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Acquisition Requirements Renewable Fuel Standard Biofuels Feedstock Requirements Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Requirement Low-Speed...

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    interest in the qualified property. Renewable fuel is defined as a fuel produced from biomass that is used to replace or reduce conventional fuel use. (Reference Florida Statutes...

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    alternative fuels; promotes the development and use of alternative fuel vehicles and technology that will enhance the use of alternative and renewable transportation fuels;...

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuels Promotion and Information The Center for Alternative Fuels (Center) promotes alternative fuels as viable energy sources in the state. The Center must assess the...

  16. Fuel Processing Valri Lightner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Catalysts for Autothermal Reforming · Water-Gas-Shift Membrane Reactor · Hydrogen Enhancement #12;Fuel Applications · Fuel Cell Distributed Power Package Unit: Fuel Processing Based on Autothermal Cyclic Reforming

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Labeling Requirement Alternative fuel retailers must label retail dispensing units with the price, name, and main components of the alternative fuel or alternative...

  18. Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives The Alternative Fuel Transportation Program (Program) will provide loans for up to 80% of the cost to convert fleet vehicles...

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Low Carbon Fuel and Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Requirement Washington state agencies must consider purchasing low carbon fuel vehicles or converting conventional vehicles...

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Resale and Generation Regulations A corporation or individual that resells alternative fuel supplied by a public utility for use in an alternative fuel vehicle...

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements State agencies must purchase flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) capable of operating on E85 fuel unless the desired vehicle model...

  3. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Institute 1990 Fuel Cell Status," Proceedings ofMiller, "Introduction: Fuel-Cell-Powered Vehicle DevelopmentPrograms," presented at Fuel Cells for Transportation,

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Labeling Requirement Biodiesel fuel retailers may not advertise or offer for sale fuel labeled as pure biodiesel unless the fuel contains no other type of petroleum product, is...

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Renewable Fuel Labeling Requirement Biodiesel, biobutanol, and ethanol blend dispensers must be affixed with decals identifying the type of fuel blend. If fuel blends containing...

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel and Green Diesel Fuel Use Requirement Commonwealth agencies and institutions must procure only diesel fuel containing at least 2% biodiesel (B2) or green diesel fuel for...

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    fuel vehicles (AFVs) capable of operating on natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas (propane), or bi-fuel vehicles capable of operating on conventional fuel or natural gas,...

  8. Optical absorption and fluorescence properties of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} codoped lead bismuth alumina borate glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goud, K. Krishna Murthy, E-mail: krishnamurthy.phy@gmail.com; Reddy, M. Chandra Shekhar, E-mail: krishnamurthy.phy@gmail.com; Rao, B. Appa, E-mail: krishnamurthy.phy@gmail.com [Dept. of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad-500007, Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead bismuth alumina borate glasses codoped with Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} were prepared by melt quenching technique. Optical absorption, FTIR and photoluminescence spectra of these glasses have been studied. Judd-Ofelt theory has been applied to to the f ? f transitions for evaluating ?{sub 2}, ?{sub 4} and ?{sub 6} parameters. Radiative properties like branching ratio ?{sub r} and the radiative life time ?{sub R} have been determined on the basis of Judd-Ofelt theory. Upconversion emissions have been observed under 980nm laser excitation at room temperature. Green and red up-conversion emissions are centered at 530, 550 and 656 nm corresponding to {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2}?{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transitions of Er{sup 3+} respectively. The results obtained are discussed quantitatively based on the energy transfer between Yb{sup 3+} and Er{sup 3+}.

  9. Measurements of {psi}(2S) decays into {gamma}KK{pi} and {gamma}{eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Bian, J. G.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Cui, X. Z.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Fu, C. D.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; Guo, Y. Q.; He, K. L. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)] (and others)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiative decays of the {psi}(2S) into {gamma}KK{pi} and {gamma}{eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final states are studied using 14x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events collected with the BESII detector. Branching fractions or upper limits on the branching fractions of {psi}(2S) and {chi}{sub cJ} decays are reported. No significant signal for {eta}(1405)/{eta}(1475) is observed in the KK{pi} or {eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mass spectra, and upper limits on the branching fractions of {psi}(2S){yields}{gamma}{eta}(1405)/{eta}(1475), {eta}(1405)/{eta}(1475){yields}KK{pi}, and {eta}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} are determined.

  10. Electrochemistry at anthracene crystal/aqueous NO/sub 2//sup -/, NO/sub 3//sup -/ solution interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leong, B.; Pope, M.; Steigman, J.

    1988-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Holes (radical cations) were injected into one face of an anthracene crystal slab and discharged at the other face, which was in contact with a neutral aqueous solution containing 1 M NO/sub 3//sup -/ or NO/sub 2//sup -/. Hole current densities (J) of up to 700 ..mu..A cm/sup -2/ generated a variety of surface oxidation products including anthraquinone, 9-nitroanthracene (9NA), oxanthrone, anthrone, bianthronyl (BA), and 9,10-dinitroanthracene with both NO/sub 3//sup -/ and NO/sub 2//sup -/ solutions. The amount of BA and 9NA increased as J/sup 2/. With increasing NO/sub 3//sup -/ concentration the amount of 9NA produced increased, while that of BA decreased. It was concluded that 9NA is made by cooperation of two holes on adjoining molecules at defect sites.

  11. Astrophysical S factors for radiative proton capture by {sup 3}H and {sup 7}Li nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B., E-mail: dubovichenko@gmail.com [Fessenkov Astrophysical Institute, NC SRT NSA RK (Kazakhstan)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the potential cluster model where orbital states are classified according to Young diagrams and isospin, astrophysical S factors are considered for radiative proton capture by {sup 3}H and {sup 7}Li nuclei at energies of up to 1 and 10 keV, respectively. It is shown that the approach used, which takes into account only the E1 transition for the p{sup 3}H capture process, makes it possible to describe well the most recent experimental data at c.m. energies in the range from 50 keV to 5MeV. In the case of proton capture by {sup 7}Li nuclei, an M1 processwas taken into account in addition to the E1 transition, and a general behavior and the magnitude of the experimental S factor could be correctly reproduced owing to this at astrophysical energies, including the region around the resonance at 0.441 MeV (in the laboratory frame).

  12. Radiative recombination data for tungsten ions: II. W{sup 47+}–W{sup 71+}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trzhaskovskaya, M.B., E-mail: Trzhask@MT5605.spb.edu [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Nikulin, V.K. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    New radiative recombination and photoionization cross sections, radiative recombination rate coefficients, and radiated power loss rate coefficients are presented for 23 tungsten impurity ions in plasmas. We consider ions from W{sup 47+} to W{sup 71+} that are of importance to fusion studies for ITER and for experiments using electron beam ion traps. The calculations are fully relativistic and all significant multipoles of the radiative field are taken into account. The Dirac–Fock method is used to compute the electron wavefunctions. Radiative recombination rates and radiated power loss rates are found using the relativistic Maxwell–Jüttner distribution of the continuum electron velocity. The total radiative recombination cross sections are given in the electron energy range from 1 eV to ?80keV. Partial cross sections for ground and excited states are approximated by an analytical expression involving five fit parameters. Radiative recombination rates and radiated power loss rates are calculated in the temperature range from 10{sup 4}K to 10{sup 9}K. The total radiative recombination rates are approximated by another analytical expression with four fit parameters.

  13. Measurements of delayed neutron parameters for {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loaiza, D.; Brunson, G.; Sanchez, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Delayed neutrons play an important role in various reactor applications through the effect they have on the kinetic response of a reactor. Delayed neutrons are produced from the decay of nuclei that are formed following the beta decay of fission products better known as delayed neutron precursors. The percent of delayed neutrons emitted is {approximately}1% of the total neutrons emitted from fission; however, this small quantity plays an important role in reactor control. The purpose of this experiment is to measure the delayed neutron period and yield and the delayed neutron fraction for the six groups of delayed neutrons in {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np. To study the delayed neutron phenomena, a suitable neutron source is required. The bare {sup 235}U metal assembly Godiva IV at Los Alamos Critical Experiment Facility (LACEF) will provide the source of neutrons. Godiva IV will generate {approx}10{sup 10} total fissions in the sample for the `instantaneous` and `infinite` irradiation needed to accentuate, respectively, the shorter and longer periods of delayed neutrons.

  14. Opportunities and requirements for experimentation at high energy e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, C.; Baltay, C.; Barklow, T.L.; Burchat, P.R.; Burke, D.L.; Cooper, A.R.; Dib, C.; Feldman, G.J.; Gunion, J.F.; Haber, H.E.

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past fifteen years of high-energy physics, electron-positron annihilation has been the most productive of all reactions probing the fundamental interactions. The e/sup +/e/sup /minus// annihilation process is unique in offering at the same time copious production of novel particles, low backgrounds from more conventional physics, and the most efficient use of the energy which an accelerator provides. These features have allowed the detailed characterization of the charm and bottom quark-antiquark systems and the unambiguous discovery of gluon jets---the crucial ingredients in the establishment of Quantum Chromodynamics as the correct theory of the strong interactions---as well as the discovery of the tau lepton and confirmation of the weak and electromagnetic properties of all the quarks and leptons at high energy. Over the past few years, experiments will begin at SLC and LEP, and we anticipate new discoveries from the detailed study of the Z/sup 0/ resonance. It is time, then to begin to think out how one might continue this mode experimentation to still higher energies. This document is the report of a committee convened by the Director of SLAC, Burton Richter, to set out the major physics goals of an e/sup +/e/sup /minus// collider in the energy range 600 GeV-1 TeV, corresponding to the next feasible step in accelerator technology. The committee was charged with the task of outlining the main experiments that such a collider might carry out and the requirements which those experiments place on the accelerator design. 106 refs., 105 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. ELECTRON-CAPTURE SUPERNOVAE AS SOURCES OF {sup 60}Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wanajo, Shinya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Janka, Hans-Thomas; Mueller, Bernhard, E-mail: shinya.wanajo@nao.ac.jp [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the nucleosynthesis of the radionuclide {sup 60}Fe in electron-capture supernovae (ECSNe). The nucleosynthetic results are based on a self-consistent, two-dimensional simulation of an ECSN as well as models in which the densities are systematically increased by some factors (low-entropy models). {sup 60}Fe is found to be appreciably made in neutron-rich ejecta during the nuclear quasi-equilibrium phase with greater amounts being produced in the lower-entropy models. Our results, combining them with the yields of core-collapse supernovae in the literature, suggest that ECSNe account for at least 4%-30% of live {sup 60}Fe in the Milky Way. ECSNe co-produce neutron-rich isotopes, {sup 48}Ca, {sup 50}Ti, {sup 54}Cr, some light trans-iron elements, and possibly weak r-process elements including some radionuclides such as {sup 93}Zr, {sup 99}Tc, and {sup 107}Pd, whose association with {sup 60}Fe might have been imprinted in primitive meteorites or in the deep ocean crust on the Earth.

  16. Evidence for {psi}' Decays into {gamma}{pi}{sup 0} and {gamma}{eta}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Berger, N.; Bian, J. M.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Dong, L. Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The decays {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0}, {gamma}{eta} and {gamma}{eta}{sup '} are studied using data collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The processes {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0} and {psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta} are observed for the first time with signal significances of 4.6{sigma} and 4.3{sigma}, respectively. The branching fractions are determined to be B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup 0})=(1.58{+-}0.40{+-}0.13)x10{sup -6}, B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta})=(1.38{+-}0.48{+-}0.09)x10{sup -6}, and B({psi}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{eta}{sup '})=(126{+-}3{+-}8)x10{sup -6}, where the first errors are statistical and the second ones systematic.

  17. Role of high-spin hyperon resonances in the reaction of {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}K{sup +}{Xi}{sup -}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Man, J. Ka Shing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Oh, Yongseok [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Excited Baryon Analysis Center, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Virginia 23606 (United States); Asia Pacific Center for Theoretical Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Nakayama, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent data taken by the CLAS Collaboration at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility for the reaction of {gamma}p{yields}K{sup +}K{sup +}{Xi}{sup -} are reanalyzed within a relativistic meson-exchange model of hadronic interactions. The present model is an extension of the one developed in an earlier work by Nakayama, Oh, and Haberzettl [Phys. Rev. C 74, 035205 (2006)]. In particular, the role of the spin-5/2 and -7/2 hyperon resonances, which were not included in the previous model, is investigated in the present study. It is shown that the contribution of the {Sigma}(2030) hyperon having spin-7/2 and positive parity has a key role to bring the model predictions into a fair agreement with the measured data for the K{sup +}{Xi}{sup -} invariant mass distribution.

  18. Cross-section measurements of the {sup 14}N({alpha},p){sup 17}O and {sup 14}N({alpha},{alpha}){sup 14}N reactions between 3.5 and 6 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwagne, G.; Genard, G. [Centre de Recherche en Physique de la Matiere et du Rayonnement, Laboratoire d'Analyses par Reactions Nucleaires, University of Namur (FUNDP), 61 Rue de Bruxelles, B-5000 Namur (Belgium); Yedji, M.; Ross, G. G. [INRS-Energie, Materiaux et Telecommunications, 1650 Boulevard Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross-section of the {sup 14}N({alpha},p{sub 0}){sup 17}O reaction at angles of 90 deg., 135 deg., and 165 deg. was measured for incident energies between 3.5 and 6.0 MeV simultaneously with the cross-section of the {sup 14}N({alpha},{alpha}){sup 14}N reaction at 165 deg. Interference between these two reactions at the angle of 165 deg. and around 3.9 MeV was taken into account. The technique used is very powerful, thanks to the Ta{sub 450nm}/C target being implanted with a high dose of nitrogen. The {sup 14}N({alpha},p{sub 0}){sup 17}O reaction exhibits some resonances allowing traces of nitrogen to be quantified. This reaction also offers an alternative to the {sup 14}N(d,{alpha}){sup 12}C and {sup 14}N({sup 3}He,p){sup 16}O nuclear reactions for profiling nitrogen in the first few microns below the surface. Moreover, by using {alpha}-particles, Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy can be performed simultaneously with a good mass resolution to depth profile high Z elements in the sample. The sensitivity of these reactions (0.1%) has been tested by measuring the nitrogen traces in a titanium oxide film deposited on silicon. Depth profiling of nitrogen in a TiN layer on a silicon substrate was also performed. In addition, we publish for the first time some cross-sections values for the {sup 14}N({alpha},p{sub 1}){sup 17}O reaction at 90 deg. and 165 deg.; this measurement is a challenging task.

  19. A novel technique for measurement of thermal rate constants and temperature dependences of dissociative recombination: CO{sub 2}{sup +}, CF{sub 3}{sup +}, N{sub 2}O{sup +}, C{sub 7}H{sub 8}{sup +}, C{sub 7}H{sub 7}{sup +}, C{sub 6}H{sub 6}{sup +}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}{sup +}, C{sub 5}H{sub 6}{sup +}, C{sub 4}H{sub 4}{sup +}, and C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, Joseph A.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Melko, Joshua J.; Ard, Shaun G.; Viggiano, Albert A. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico 87117 (United States)

    2013-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel technique using a flowing afterglow-Langmuir probe apparatus for measurement of temperature dependences of rate constants for dissociative recombination (DR) is presented. Low ({approx}10{sup 11} cm{sup -3}) concentrations of a neutral precursor are added to a noble gas/electron afterglow plasma thermalized at 300-500 K. Charge exchange yields one or many cation species, each of which may undergo DR. Relative ion concentrations are monitored at a fixed reaction time while the initial plasma density is varied between 10{sup 9} and 10{sup 10} cm{sup -3}. Modeling of the decrease in concentration of each cation relative to the non-recombining noble gas cation yields the rate constant for DR. The technique is applied to several species (O{sub 2}{sup +}, CO{sub 2}{sup +}, CF{sub 3}{sup +}, N{sub 2}O{sup +}) with previously determined 300 K values, showing excellent agreement. The measurements of those species are extended to 500 K, with good agreement to literature values where they exist. Measurements are also made for a range of C{sub n}H{sub m}{sup +} (C{sub 7}H{sub 7}{sup +}, C{sub 7}H{sub 8}{sup +}, C{sub 5}H{sub 6}{sup +}, C{sub 4}H{sub 4}{sup +}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}{sup +}, C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +}, and C{sub 6}H{sub 6}{sup +}) derived from benzene and toluene neutral precursors. C{sub n}H{sub m}{sup +} DR rate constants vary from 8-12 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 300 K with temperature dependences of approximately T{sup -0.7}. Where prior measurements exist these results are in agreement, with the exception of C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{sup +} where the present results disagree with a previously reported flat temperature dependence.

  20. Summary of Apollo; A D- sup 3 He tokamak reactor design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulcinski, G.L.; Blanchard, T.P.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Emert, G.A.; Khater, H.Y.; Maynard, C.W.; Mogahed, E.A.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Fusion Technology Inst.)

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the key features of Apollo, a conceptual D-{sup 3}He tokamak reactor for commercial electricity production, are summarized. The 1000-MW (electric) design utilizes direct conversion of transport, neutron, and bremsstrahlung radiation power. The direct conversion method uses reactants, and the thermal conversion cycle uses an organic coolant. Apollo operates in the first-stability regime, with a major radius of 7.89 m, a peak magnetic field on the toroidal field coils of 19.3 T, a 53-MA plasma current, and a 6.7% beta value. The low neutron production of the D-{sup 3}He fuel cycle greatly reduces the radiation damage rate and allows a full-lifetime first wall and structure made of standard steels with only slight modifications to reduce activation levels.

  1. DIESEL FUEL TANK FOUNDATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Gomez

    1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to design structural foundations for the Diesel Fuel Tank and Fuel Pumps.

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybridDiesel FuelAlternative Fuel and

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybridDiesel FuelAlternative Fuel

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybridDiesel FuelAlternative FuelProvision

  5. Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+}co-doped bismuth molybdate nanosheets upconversion photocatalyst with enhanced photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adhikari, Rajesh; Gyawali, Gobinda; Cho, Sung Hun [Research Center for Eco-Multifunctional Nanomaterials, Sun Moon University (Korea, Republic of); Narro-García, R. [Centro de Investigaciones en Óptica, A. P.1-948, León, Gto. 37150, México (Mexico); Sekino, Tohru [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University (Japan); Lee, Soo Wohn, E-mail: swlee@sunmoon.ac.kr [Research Center for Eco-Multifunctional Nanomaterials, Sun Moon University (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we report the microwave hydrothermal synthesis of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} upconversion photocatalyst. Crystal structure, morphology, elemental composition, optical properties and BET surface area were analyzed in detail. Infrared to visible upconversion luminescence at 532 nm and 546 nm of the co-doped samples was investigated under excitation at 980 nm. The results revealed that the co-doping of Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} into Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} exhibited enhanced photocatalytic activity for the decomposition of rhodamine B under simulated solar light irradiation. Enhanced photocatalytic activity can be attributed to the energy transfer between Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} and Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} via infrared to visible upconversion from Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} ion and higher surface area of the Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} nanosheets. Therefore, this synthetic approach may exhibit a better alternative to fabricate upconversion photocatalyst for integral solar light absorption. - Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of the upconversion photocatalysis. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Er{sup 3+}/Yb{sup 3+} co-doped Bi{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} upconversion photocatalyst is successfully synthesized. • We obtained the nanosheets having high surface area. • Upconversion of IR to visible light was confirmed. • Upconversion phenomena can be utilized for effective photocatalysis.

  6. THE NEW DETECTIONS OF {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li ISOTOPIC RATIO IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawanomoto, S.; Kajino, T.; Aoki, W.; Ando, H.; Noguchi, K.; Tanaka, W. [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Bessell, M. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mount Stromlo Observatory, 2611 ACT (Australia); Suzuki, T. K. [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Komaba, Meguro, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Honda, S. [Gunma Astronomical Observatory, 6860-86 Nakayama Takayama-mura, Agatsuma-gun, Gunma 377-0702 (Japan); Izumiura, H.; Kambe, E.; Okita, K.; Watanabe, E.; Yoshida, M. [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 3037-5 Honjo, Kamogata, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Sadakane, K. [Astronomical Institute, Osaka-Kyoiku University, Kashiwara-shi, Osaka 582-8582 (Japan); Sato, B. [Global Edge Institute Global Edge Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Tajitsu, A. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Takada-Hidai, M. [Liberal Arts Education Center, Tokai University 1117 Kitakaname, Hisatsuka-shi, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have determined the isotopic abundance ratio of {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li in the interstellar media (ISMs) along lines of sight to HD169454 and HD250290 using the High-Dispersion Spectrograph on the Subaru Telescope. We also observed {zeta} Oph for comparison with previous data. The observed abundance ratios were {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li = 8.1{sup +3.6} {sub -1.8} and 6.3{sup +3.0} {sub -1.7} for HD169454 and HD250290, respectively. These values are in reasonable agreement with those observed previously in the solar neighborhood ISMs within {+-}2{sigma} error bars and are also consistent with our measurement of {sup 7}Li/{sup 6}Li = 7.1{sup +2.9} {sub -1.6} for a cloud along the line of sight to {zeta} Oph. This is good evidence for homogeneous mixing and instantaneous recycling of the gas component in the Galactic disk. We also discuss several source compositions of {sup 7}Li, Galactic cosmic-ray interactions, stellar nucleosynthesis, and big bang nucleosynthesis.

  7. SPECT quantification of myocardial mass with Thallium-201: Comparison of 180/sup 0/ vs 360/sup 0/ acquisitions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summerville, D.A.; Polak, J.F.; English, R.J.; Holman, B.L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has recently been proposed that, for the heart, tomographic acquisitions over 180/sup 0/ (30/sup 0/ RAO to 60/sup 0/ LPO) might yield more relevant reconstructions than for 360/sup 0/. The authors have compared the effect of both formats using an Iowa heart phantom placed in the appropriate orientation in an Alderson torso phantom. Chamber activity of 2 ..mu..Ci/cc was used to emulate myocardial T1-201 uptake whereas background activity in the chest phantom was varied from 0 to .3 ..mu..Ci/cc; the latter encompasses the measured target-to-background ratios obtained on stress and redistribution Tl-201 scintigrams of twelve patients. Transaxial reconstructions were made with and without attenuation compensation (AC) for both 180/sup 0/ (30/sup 0/ RAO to 60/sup 0/ LPO) and 360/sup 0/. After formatting into oblique data sets holding 19 slices perpendicular to the long axis of the heart phantom, an algorithm estimating volumes above a certain count threshold of maximum was used to estimate myocardial mass. Defects were introduced into the phantom and the tomographic acquisitions repeated. Attenuation compensated 180/sup 0/ acquisitions yielded appropriate estimates of myocardial mass, even when large defects were reoriented from the septal to the lateral wall. The authors conclude that Tl-201 SPECT derived estimates of myocardial mass can be made from 180/sup 0/ acquisitions if (1) attenuation compensation is used, (2) corrections are made for different background activities in the ''lungs''.

  8. Prompt and delayed spectroscopy of {sup 199}At

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jakobsson, U.; Uusitalo, J.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Nieminen, P.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Ketelhut, S.; Nyman, M.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Sandzelius, M.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Andgren, K.; Cederwall, B.; Hadinia, B. [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron-deficient nucleus {sup 199}At has been studied through {gamma}-ray and electron spectroscopy, using the recoil-decay tagging technique. Two experiments were conducted, using a gas-filled recoil separator with a focal-plane spectrometer alone and together with a germanium-detector array at the target position. The resulting level scheme for {sup 199}At includes a new isomer with a half-life of 0.80(5) {mu}s and a spin and parity of (29/2{sup +}). The 13/2{sup +} isomer, which de-excites via an M2 transition to the 9/2{sup -} ground state, was measured to have a half-life of 70(20) ns. Our earlier version of the level scheme for {sup 197}At has been updated as well.

  9. Half-life of {sup 151}Sm remeasured

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He Ming; Shen Hongtao; Shi Guozhu; Yin Xinyi; Tian Weizhi; Jiang Shan [Department of Nuclear Physics, China Institute of Atomic Energy, Post Office Box 275-50, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The half-life of {sup 151}Sm was redetermined and compared with literature values. A {sup 151}Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} sample was produced by exposing {sup 150}Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3} to the high neutron flux of the heavy water research reactor at the China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The number of atoms and the activity of {sup 151}Sm in the sample were measured by thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) and liquid scintillation counting (LSC), respectively. The half-life of {sup 151}Sm determined in this work is 96.6 yr, with a standard uncertainty of 2.4 yr based on a quadratic summation of the uncertainty components from the measurements of the number of atoms and the activity of {sup 151}Sm.

  10. Laser system for secondary cooling of {sup 87}Sr atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khabarova, K Yu; Slyusarev, S N; Strelkin, S A; Belotelov, G S; Kostin, A S; Pal'chikov, Vitaly G; Kolachevsky, Nikolai N

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system with a narrow generation line for secondary laser cooling of {sup 87}Sr atoms has been developed and investigated. It is planned to use ultracold {sup 87}Sr atoms loaded in an optical lattice in an optical frequency standard. To this end, a 689-nm semiconductor laser has been stabilised using an external reference ultrastable cavity with vibrational and temperature compensation near the critical point. The lasing spectral width was 80 Hz (averaging time 40 ms), and the frequency drift was at a level of 0.3 Hz s{sup -1}. Comparison of two independent laser systems yielded a minimum Allan deviation: 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -14} for 300-s averaging. It is shown that this system satisfies all requirements necessary for secondary cooling of 87Sr atoms using the spectrally narrow {sup 1}S{sub 0} - {sup 3}P{sub 1} transition ({lambda} = 689 nm). (cooling of atoms)

  11. Measurement of the cross sections for the production of the isotopes {sup 74}As, {sup 68}Ge, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 60}Co from natural and enriched germanium irradiated with 100-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barabanov, I. R.; Bezrukov, L. B.; Gurentsov, V. I.; Zhuykov, B. L.; Kianovsky, S. V.; Kornoukhov, V. N.; Kohanuk, V. M.; Yanovich, E. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross sections for the production of the radioactive isotopes {sup 74}As, {sup 68}Ge, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 60}Co in metallic germanium irradiated with 100-MeV protons were measured, the experiments being performed both with germanium of natural isotopic composition and germanium enriched in the isotope {sup 76}Ge. The targets were irradiated with a proton beam at the facility for the production of radionuclides at the accelerator of the Institute for Nuclear Research (INR, Moscow). The data obtained will further be used to calculate the background of radioactive isotopes formed by nuclear cascades of cosmic-ray muons in new-generation experiments devoted to searches for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of {sup 76}Ge at underground laboratories.

  12. Study of {sup 24}Mg resonances relevant for carbon burning nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toki?, V.; Soi?, N.; Blagus, S.; Fazini?, S.; Jelavi?-Malenica, D.; Miljani?, D.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Szilner, S.; Uroi?, M. [Ru?er Boškovi? Institute, Bijeni?ka cesta 54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Milin, M. [Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijeni?ka cesta 32, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Lattuada, M.; Scuderi, V.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, via S.Sofia 62, 95125 Catania (Italy); Freer, M.; Ziman, V. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied decays of resonances in {sup 24}Mg at excitation energies above the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C decay threshold, using {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,?){sup 24}Mg* reaction. This experiment has been performed at INFNLNS, using Tandem accelerator beam of 16O at E = 94 MeV. Some preliminary results are presented.

  13. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Boehman, A.; Song, C. [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research continued on thermally stable jet fuel from coal liquids and petroleum distillates. The oxidative and thermal stabilities of ten fuels have been studied by differential scanning calorimetry and in microautoclave reactors. The compositions of the stressed fuels (as well as the unreacted fuels) were characterized by gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. In addition, simulated distillation curves were determined by thermogravimetric analysis. The product distributions and reaction mechanisms for the thermal decomposition of n-alkanes in near-critical and supercritical regions were studied. The emphasis of the work in this reporting period has been placed on reaction mechanisms and product distributions. Work is continuing on obtaining additional {sup 13}C-labeled jet fuel components for future thermal stressing studies. Compounds of current interest include 6-{sup 13}C-dodecane and 1-cyclohexyl-1-{sup 13}C-hexane. Further analysis of the formation of solids from the thermal stressing of decane and decalin has been performed.

  14. Observation of the {omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon and measurement of the properties of the {xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van [Division of High Energy Physics, Department of Physics, University of Helsinki and Helsinki Institute of Physics, FIN-00014, Helsinki (Finland); Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Ketchum, W.; Kim, Y. K.; Krop, D.; Kwang, S.; Lee, H. S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M. [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] (and others)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of the bottom, doubly-strange baryon {omega}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay chain {omega}{sub b}{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{omega}{sup -}, where J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {omega}{sup -}{yields}{lambda}K{sup -}, and {lambda}{yields}p{pi}{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data from pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 4.0x10{sup -8}, or 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The {omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 6054.4{+-}6.8(stat){+-}0.9(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The lifetime of the {omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon is measured to be 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.53}(stat){+-}0.02(syst) ps. In addition, for the {xi}{sub b}{sup -} baryon we measure a mass of 5790.9{+-}2.6(stat){+-}0.8(syst) MeV/c{sup 2} and a lifetime of 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat){+-}0.02(syst) ps. Under the assumption that the {xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {omega}{sub b}{sup -} are produced with similar kinematic distributions to the {lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon, we find ({sigma}({xi}{sub b}{sup -})B({xi}{sub b}{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{xi}{sup -})/{sigma}({lambda}{sub b}{sup 0})B({lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}))=0.167{sub -0.025}{sup +0.037}(stat){+-}0.012(syst) and ({sigma}({omega}{sub b}{sup -})B({omega}{sub b}{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{omega}{sup -})/{sigma}({lambda}{sub b}{sup 0})B({lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}))=0.045{sub -0.012}{sup +0.017}(stat){+-} 0.004(syst) for baryons produced with transverse momentum in the range of 6-20 GeV/c.

  15. Lifetime measurement of the metastable 4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state in {sup 88}Sr{sup +} using a single trapped ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letchumanan, V.; Wilson, M.A.; Gill, P.; Sinclair, A.G. [National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The natural lifetime of the metastable 4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state in {sup 88}Sr{sup +} has been measured using a single laser-cooled, trapped ion. The ion was prepared in the 4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state by laser excitation of the 5s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}-4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} quadrupole transition at 674 nm. The decay time was measured by using Dehmelt's electron shelving method to monitor the ion's electronic state. Two separate investigations were conducted under slightly different experimental conditions. 160 000 decay times from the 4d {sup 2}D{sub 5/2} state were observed in total, and two different methods for determining the statistical value of the measured lifetime have been compared. Systematic effects have also been estimated, and including these effects yields a value of {tau}=390.8(1.6) ms (1{sigma} uncertainty) for the natural lifetime.

  16. {sup 3}He MAGNETOMETRY FOR A NEUTRON EDM MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. BANGERT; ET AL

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of small amounts of polarized {sup 3}He in a bath of superfluid {sup 4}He at temperatures below 1 K is critical to a new technique for measuring the EDM of the neutron. We report on studies to enhance the number of ultracold neutrons produced in such a bath, on the development of neutron tomography in gaseous mixtures, on magnet properties associated with the precession of {sup 3}He, and on preparations for tests of the distribution and diffusion coefficients of {sup 3}He in the bath.

  17. No-carrier-added [1.sup.11 c]putrescine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPherson, Daniel W. (Baltimore, MD); Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a new radiolabeled imaging agent, no-carrier-added [1-.sup.11 C]putrescine, and to the use of this very pure material as a radiotracer with positron emission tomography for imaging brain tumors. The invention further relates to the synthesis of no-carrier-added [1-.sup.11 C]putrescine based on the Michael addition of potassium .sup.11 C-labeled cyanide to acrylonitrile followed by reduction of the .sup.11 C-labeled dinitrile. The new method is rapid and efficient and provides radiotracer with a specific activity greater than 1.4 curies per millimol and in a purity greater than 95%.

  18. Cascade calculation of subthreshold. pi. sup 0 production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gavron, A.; Yariv, Y. (Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (US))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intranuclear cascade calculations are found to provide a good description of the various features of subthreshold {pi}{sup 0} production in nucleon-nucleus collisions.

  19. Electron-capture delayed fission properties of [sup 228]Np

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreek, S.A.; Hall, H.L.; Gregorich, K.E.; Henderson, R.A.; Leyba, J.D.; Czerwinski, K.R.; Kadkhodayan, B.; Neu, M.P.; Kacher, C.D.; Hamilton, T.M.; Lane, M.R.; Sylwester, E.R.; Tuerler, A.; Lee, D.M.; Nurmia, M.J.; Hoffman, D.C. (Chemistry Department, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, MS-70A/3307 Berkeley, California 94720 (United States))

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-capture delayed fission was positively identified for the first time in [sup 228]Np produced via the [sup 233]U(50-MeV [ital p],6[ital n])[sup 228]Np reaction. The half-life of the observed fission activity was measured to be 61.4[plus minus]1.4 s. The ECDF mode was verified by an x-ray--fission coincidence experiment. Only about 25% of the expected x-ray--fission coincidences were detected which indicates that [sup 228]U does not have a fission isomer populated by the electron-capture and that the overall lifetime of the high-energy states populated by the electron-capture is less than about 10[sup [minus]17] s. The fission activity was assigned to ECDF of [sup 228]Np based on chemical separation and observation of known progeny activities. The ratio of electron-capture to alpha decay is 1.5[plus minus]0.4 for [sup 228]Np. The production cross section for [sup 228]Np is 35[plus minus]10 [mu]b and the delayed fission probability is (2.0[plus minus]0.9)[times]10[sup [minus]4]. The kinetic energies of coincident fission fragments were measured and a pre-neutron emission, most probable total kinetic energy, of 169[plus minus]6 MeV was obtained. The mass-yield distribution was found to be predominantly asymmetric.

  20. Double-{beta} decay Q value of {sup 150}Nd

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolhinen, V. S.; Eronen, T.; Gorelov, D.; Hakala, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kankainen, A.; Moore, I. D.; Rissanen, J.; Saastamoinen, A.; Suhonen, J.; Aeystoe, J. [Department of Physics, P. O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The double-{beta} decay Q value of {sup 150}Nd was determined by using the JYFLTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer. The measured mass difference between {sup 150}Nd and {sup 150}Sm is 3371.38(20) keV. This new value deviates by 3.7 keV from the previously adopted value of 3367.7(22) keV and is a factor of 10 more precise. Accurate knowledge of this Q value is important because {sup 150}Nd is a primary candidate to be used in the search for neutrinoless double-{beta} decay modes in several experiments.

  1. Application of solar energy for the generation and supply of industrial-process low-to intermediate-pressure steam ranging from 300/sup 0/F-550/sup 0/F (high-temperature steam). Final report, September 30, 1978-June 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matteo, M.; Kull, J.; Luddy, W.; Youngblood, S.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed design was developed for a solar industrial process heat system to be installed at the ERGON, Inc. Bulk Oil Storage Terminal in Mobile, Alabama. The 1874 m/sup 2/ (20160 ft/sup 2/) solar energy collector field will generate industrial process heat at temperatures ranging from 150 to 290/sup 0/C (300 to 550/sup 0/F). The heat will be used to reduce the viscosity of stored No. 6 fuel oil, making it easier to pump from storage to transport tankers. Heat transfer oil is circulated in a closed system, absorbing heat in the collector field and delivering it through immersed heat exchangers to the stored fuel oil. The solar energy system will provide approximately 44 percent of the process heat required.

  2. Stimulation of Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase activity and Na{sup +} coupled glucose transport by {beta}-catenin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopjani, Mentor [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany) [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown); Alesutan, Ioana; Wilmes, Jan [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)] [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Dermaku-Sopjani, Miribane [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany) [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown); Lam, Rebecca S. [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany) [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Department of Molecular Neurogenetics, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Koutsouki, Evgenia [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)] [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Jakupi, Muharrem [Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown)] [Faculty of Medicine, University of Prishtina, Kosovo (Country Unknown); Foeller, Michael [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)] [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany); Lang, Florian, E-mail: florian.lang@uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)] [Department of Physiology, University of Tuebingen (Germany)

    2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Research highlights: {yields} The oncogenic transcription factor {beta}-catenin stimulates the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase. {yields} {beta}-Catenin stimulates SGLT1 dependent Na{sup +}, glucose cotransport. {yields} The effects are independent of transcription. {yields} {beta}-Catenin sensitive transport may contribute to properties of proliferating cells. -- Abstract: {beta}-Catenin is a multifunctional protein stimulating as oncogenic transcription factor several genes important for cell proliferation. {beta}-Catenin-regulated genes include the serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase SGK1, which is known to stimulate a variety of transport systems. The present study explored the possibility that {beta}-catenin influences membrane transport. To this end, {beta}-catenin was expressed in Xenopus oocytes with or without SGLT1 and electrogenic transport determined by dual electrode voltage clamp. As a result, expression of {beta}-catenin significantly enhanced the ouabain-sensitive current of the endogeneous Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase. Inhibition of vesicle trafficking by brefeldin A revealed that the stimulatory effect of {beta}-catenin on the endogenous Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-ATPase was not due to enhanced stability of the pump protein in the cell membrane. Expression of {beta}-catenin further enhanced glucose-induced current (Ig) in SGLT1-expressing oocytes. In the absence of SGLT1 Ig was negligible irrespective of {beta}-catenin expression. The stimulating effect of {beta}-catenin on both Na{sup +}/K{sup +} ATPase and SGLT1 activity was observed even in the presence of actinomycin D, an inhibitor of transcription. The experiments disclose a completely novel function of {beta}-catenin, i.e. the regulation of transport.

  3. REVISED BIG BANG NUCLEOSYNTHESIS WITH LONG-LIVED, NEGATIVELY CHARGED MASSIVE PARTICLES: UPDATED RECOMBINATION RATES, PRIMORDIAL {sup 9}Be NUCLEOSYNTHESIS, AND IMPACT OF NEW {sup 6}Li LIMITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kusakabe, Motohiko; Kim, K. S. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Cheoun, Myung-Ki [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Kajino, Toshitaka [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kino, Yasushi [Department of Chemistry, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Mathews, Grant J., E-mail: motohiko@kau.ac.kr, E-mail: kyungsik@kau.ac.kr, E-mail: cheoun@ssu.ac.kr, E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: y.k@m.tohoku.ac.jp, E-mail: gmathews@nd.edu [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We extensively reanalyze the effects of a long-lived, negatively charged massive particle, X {sup –}, on big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). The BBN model with an X {sup –} particle was originally motivated by the discrepancy between the {sup 6,} {sup 7}Li abundances predicted in the standard BBN model and those inferred from observations of metal-poor stars. In this model, {sup 7}Be is destroyed via the recombination with an X {sup –} particle followed by radiative proton capture. We calculate precise rates for the radiative recombinations of {sup 7}Be, {sup 7}Li, {sup 9}Be, and {sup 4}He with X {sup –}. In nonresonant rates, we take into account respective partial waves of scattering states and respective bound states. The finite sizes of nuclear charge distributions cause deviations in wave functions from those of point-charge nuclei. For a heavy X {sup –} mass, m{sub X} ? 100 GeV, the d-wave ? 2P transition is most important for {sup 7}Li and {sup 7,} {sup 9}Be, unlike recombination with electrons. Our new nonresonant rate of the {sup 7}Be recombination for m{sub X} = 1000 GeV is more than six times larger than the existing rate. Moreover, we suggest a new important reaction for {sup 9}Be production: the recombination of {sup 7}Li and X {sup –} followed by deuteron capture. We derive binding energies of X nuclei along with reaction rates and Q values. We then calculate BBN and find that the amount of {sup 7}Be destruction depends significantly on the charge distribution of {sup 7}Be. Finally, updated constraints on the initial abundance and the lifetime of the X {sup –} are derived in the context of revised upper limits to the primordial {sup 6}Li abundance. Parameter regions for the solution to the {sup 7}Li problem and the primordial {sup 9}Be abundances are revised.

  4. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio G{sub En}/G{sub Mn} via the {sup 2}H(e{yields},e{sup '}n{yields}){sup 1}H reaction to Q{sup 2}=1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plaster, B. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Semenov, A.Yu.; Semenova, I.A. [Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna RU-141980 (Russian Federation); Aghalaryan, A.; Asaturyan, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Stepanyan, S.; Tadevosyan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan 375036 (Armenia); Crouse, E.; Finn, J.M.; Perdrisat, C.; Roche, J. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia 23187 (United States); MacLachlan, G.; Opper, A.K. [Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Tajima, S.; Churchwell, S.; Howell, C.R. [Duke University and TUNL, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Tireman, W. [Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States); Northern Michigan University, Marquette, Michigan 49855 (United States); Ahmidouch, A. [North Carolina A and T State University, Greensboro, North Carolina 27411 (United States); Anderson, B. D. [Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States)] (and others)

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G{sub En}/G{sub Mn}, deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic {sup 2}H(e{yields},e{sup '}n{yields}){sup 1}H reaction, at three Q{sup 2} values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The data at Q{sup 2}=1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2} are the first direct experimental measurements of G{sub En} employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q{sup 2}>1 (GeV/c){sup 2} region and stand as the most precise determinations of G{sub En} for all values of Q{sup 2}.

  5. Adequacy of radioiodine control and monitoring at nuclear fuels reprocessing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheele, R.D.; Burger, L.L.; Soldat, J.K.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present backlog of irradiated reactor fuel leads to projections that no fuel out of the reactor less than 10 years need be reprocessed prior to the year 2000. The only radioiodine present in such aged fuel is /sup 129/I (half-life 1.6 x 10/sup 7/ y). The /sup 131/I initially present in the fuel decays to insignificance in the first few hundred days post-reactor. The /sup 129/I content of irradiated fuel is about 1 Ci per gigawatt-year of electricity generated (Ci/GW(e)-y). The US EPA has specified, in 40 CFR 190, a release limit for /sup 129/I of 5 mCi/GW(e)-y. Thus a retention factor (RF) of 200 for /sup 129/I at the fuel reprocessing plant (FRP) is required. Experience indicates that RF values obtained under actual FRP operating conditions can average as little as 10% of experimentally determined RF values. Therefore processes theoretically capable of achieving RF values of up to 10/sup 4/ have been investigated. The US EPA has also specified in 40 CFR 90 a thyroid dose limit of 75 mrem/y for a member of the general public. This dose limit could be readily met at a typical FRP site with an RF value of about 10 or less. Therefore, the limit of 5 mCi/GW(e)-y is more restrictive than the thyroid dose limit for /sup 129/I. The absence of /sup 131/I in effluents from processing of aged fuels makes analysis of /sup 129/I somewhat easier. However, in-line, real-time monitoring for /sup 129/I in FRP gas streams is currently not feasible. Moisture, chemicals, and other radioactive fission products interfere with in-plant measurements. Samples collected over several days must be taken to a laboratory for /sup 129/I analysis. Measurement techniques currently in use or under investigation include neutron activation analysis, scintillation counting, mass spectroscopy, and gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detection. 26 references, 3 figures, 7 tables.

  6. Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of1 AAccelerated agingDepartmentDevelopment and1 |AdvancedDepartment of

  7. Sub-barrier fusion of {sup 32}S+{sup 48}Ca

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montagnoli, G.; Stefanini, A. M.; Jiang, C. L.; Corradi, L.; Courtin, S. [Dip. di Fisica e Astronomia, Univ. di Padova, and INFN, Sez. di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, I-35020 Legnaro (Padova) (Italy); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); and others

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The fusion excitation function of {sup 32}S+{sup 48}Ca has been measured in a wide energy range, from above the Coulomb barrier down to cross sections in the sub-{mu}b region. The excitation function has a smooth behavior below the barrier with a rather flat slope, and no maximum of astrophysical factor S vs. energy has been observed. However, other interesting features of the dynamics of this system can be noted. In particular, the fusion barrier distribution has an unusual shape with two peaks of similar height, lower and higher than the Akyuez-Winther barrier. Preliminary coupledchannels calculations and a comparison with nearby systems yield information on the possible influence of nucleon transfer channels with positive Q-value.

  8. Constraining the axion portal with B{yields}Kl{sup +}l{sup -}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freytsis, Marat; Thaler, Jesse [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Ligeti, Zoltan [Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the bounds on axionlike states from flavor-changing neutral current b{yields}s decays, assuming the axion couples to the standard model through mixing with the Higgs sector. Such GeV-scale axions have received renewed attention in connection with observed cosmic ray excesses. We find that existing B{yields}Kl{sup +}l{sup -} data impose stringent bounds on the axion decay constant in the multi-TeV range, relevant for constraining the 'axion portal' model of dark matter. Such bounds also constrain light Higgs scenarios in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. These bounds can be improved by dedicated searches in B-factory data and at LHCb.

  9. Measured delayed neutron spectra from the fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlton, W.S.; Comfort, C.; Parish, T.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Raman, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas A and M University (Texas A and M) in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, have been actively studying the delayed neutron emission characteristics of the higher actinide isotopes for several years. Recently, a proton recoil detector system was designed, built, and characterized for use in measuring delayed neutron energy spectra following neutron-induced fission. The system has been used to measure aggregate delayed neutron energy spectra from neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np. These spectra have also been compared to that calculated using individual precursor P{sub n} values, yields, and spectra from the ENDF/B-VI file.

  10. Nuclear Structure Relevant to Neutrinoless Double {beta} Decay: {sup 76}Ge and {sup 76}Se

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiffer, J. P.; Gros, S.; Jiang, C. L.; Rehm, K. E. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Freeman, S. J.; Fitzpatrick, C. R.; Kay, B. P. [University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Clark, J. A.; Deibel, C.; Heinz, A.; Parikh, A.; Parker, P. D.; Werner, V.; Wrede, C. [Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Hirata, D. [GANIL (IN2P3/CNRS -DSM/CEA), B.P. 55027 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Open University, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Villari, A. C. C. [GANIL (IN2P3/CNRS -DSM/CEA), B.P. 55027 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France)

    2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of observing neutrinoless double {beta} decay offers the opportunity of determining the effective neutrino mass if the nuclear matrix element were known. Theoretical calculations are uncertain, and measurements of the occupations of valence orbits by nucleons active in the decay can be important. The occupation of valence neutron orbits in the ground states of {sup 76}Ge (a candidate for such decay) and {sup 76}Se (the daughter nucleus) were determined by precisely measuring cross sections for both neutron-adding and removing transfer reactions. Our results indicate that the Fermi surface is much more diffuse than in theoretical calculations. We find that the populations of at least three orbits change significantly between these two ground states while in the calculations, the changes are confined primarily to one orbit.

  11. Low-energy, electron-spin-polarized {sup 4}He{sup +} ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, D.L.; Lancaster, J.C.; Popple, R.A.; Dunning, F.B.; Walters, G.K. [Department of Physics and the Rice Quantum Institute, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas77251-1892 (United States)] [Department of Physics and the Rice Quantum Institute, Rice University, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, Texas77251-1892 (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A source of low-energy, electron-spin-polarized {sup 4}He{sup +} ions based on an optically pumped, rf-excited helium discharge is described. Ion polarizations P{sub +} of {approximately}0.13 are achieved at beam currents of {approximately}0.1nA, decreasing to {approximately}0.09 at currents of {approximately}0.5nA. Ion beam energies as low as 10 eV have been realized, with an energy spread of {approx_lt}3eV full width half maximum. The ion polarization can be reversed (P{sub +}{r_arrow}{minus}P{sub +}) simply by changing the sense of circular polarization of the optical pumping radiation. The source is suitable for use in a wide variety of applications including surface physics studies. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. Mirror symmetry at high spin in {sup 51}Fe and {sup 51}Mn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bentley, M. A.; Williams, S. J.; Joss, D. T.; O'Leary, C. D.; Bruce, A. M.; Cameron, J. A.; Carpenter, M. P.; Fallon, P.; Frankland, L.; Gelletly, W. (and others)

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma decays from excited states in the T{sub z}=-1/2 nucleus {sup 51}Fe have been observed for the first time. The differences in excitation energies as compared with those of the mirror partner, {sup 51}Mn, have been interpreted in terms of Coulomb effects and the resulting Coulomb energy differences (CED) can be understood intuitively in terms of particle-alignment effects. A new CED effect has been observed, in which different CED trends have been measured for each signature of the rotational structures that characterize these mid-f{sub 7/2} shell nuclei. Large-scale fp-shell model calculations have been used to compute the trends of the CED as a function of spin. The result of comparing these calculations with the data demonstrates an ability to reproduce the fine details of the Coulomb effects with a precision far greater than has been previously achieved.

  13. Evidence for CP Violation in B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0} Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules, IN2P3/CNRS et Universite de Savoie, F-74941 Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E. [Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat de Fisica, Departament ECM, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M. [Universita di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L. [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] (and others)

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the branching fraction and time-dependent CP asymmetries in B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0} decays based on 466x10{sup 6} {upsilon}(4S){yields}BB events collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory. We measure the CP asymmetry parameters S=-1.23{+-}0.21(stat){+-}0.04(syst) and C=-0.20{+-}0.19(stat){+-}0.03(syst), where the measured value of (S, C) is 4.0 standard deviations from (0, 0) including systematic uncertainties. The branching fraction is determined to be B(B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0})=[1.69{+-}0.14(stat){+-}0.07(syst)]x10{sup -5}.

  14. Fusion Cross Section in the {sup 4,6}He+{sup 64}Zn Collisions Around the Coulomb Barrier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisichella, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Messina, Messina (Italy); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Marchetta, C. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Scuderi, V.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); Milin, M. [Department of Physics Faculty of Science University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Skukan, N.; Zadro, M. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    New fusion data for the {sup 4}He+{sup 64}Zn system at sub-barrier energies are measured to cover the same energy region of previous measurements for {sup 6}He+{sup 64}Zn. Aim of the experiment was to compare the fusion excitation functions for the two system to investigate on the effects of the {sup 6}He neutron-halo structure on the fusion reaction mechanism at energies around the Coulomb barrier. The fusion cross section was measured by using an activation technique. Comparing the two systems, we observe an enhancement of the fusion cross section in the reaction induced by {sup 6}He, at and below the Coulomb barrier.

  15. Folding model analysis of pion elastic and inelastic scattering from {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebrahim, A. A., E-mail: aebrahim@aun.edu.eg [Assiut University, Physics Department (Egypt)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    {pi}{sup {+-}}-Nucleus scattering cross sections are calculated applying the Watanabe superposition model with a phenomenological Woods-Saxon potential. The phenomenological potential parameters are searched for {pi}{sup {+-}} scattering from {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C to reproduce not only differential elastic cross sections but also inelastic and total and reaction cross sections at pion kinetic energies from 50 to 672 MeV. The optical potentials of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C are calculated in terms of the alpha particle and deuteron optical potentials. Inelastic scattering has been analyzed using the distorted waves from elastic-scattering data. The values of deformation lengths thus obtained compare very well with the ones reported earlier.

  16. Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Fuel Cell Seminar on November...

  17. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact Sheet Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fact Sheet Fact sheet produced by the Fuel Cell...

  18. Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Presentation covers stationary fuel cells...

  19. Producing {mu}{sup {minus}}d and {mu}{sup {minus}}t in vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowles, P.E.; Beer, G.A.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Bailey, J.M. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Schellenberg, L. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique; Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Mittelenergiephysik; Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Martoff, C.J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    After the feasibility of vacuum isolated {mu}{sup -}d production was demonstrated at TRIUMF in 1989, development was begun on a target system that would take advantage of the process to aid in the understanding of the muon catalyzed fusion cycle. Minimal neutron backgrounds, the ability to use silicon detectors, and compatibility with tritium were considered important for a very versatile target system. the advantages which the target gives isolating {mu}CF process will be outlined.

  20. California Fuel Cell Partnership: Alternative Fuels Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof Energy Change Request |82:91:4Applications | DepartmentFuel Cell

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulaseFuels andConversionsAssumptionsBenefits toFueling

  2. Exploration of the neutron-rich mass surface from sup 11 Li to sup 66 Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Butler, G.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Seifert, H.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States) Giessen Univ. (Germany). 2. Physikalisches Inst.); Zhou, Z.Y. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States) Nanjing Univ., JS (China). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy); Zhou, X.G.; Tu, X.L.; Lind, V.G. (Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A small revolution in our ability to perform mass measurements of light-mass, neutron-rich nuclei has occurred during the last five years with the extension of the direct, total mass measurement method to fast recoiling nuclei. To date the work of two groups, one using the SPEG spectrometer at GANIL and the other using the TOFI spectrometer at LAMPF, has yielded over 85 mass measurements of which 62 had not been reported previously. Extending from the neutron-halo nucleus {sup 11}Li up to {sup 66}Fe, a region relevant to the astrophysical r-process, these measurements have provided a valuable first glimpse into the interesting nuclear structure present in many of these exotic nuclei. Herein we highlight the nuclear structure insight which as been gained from these measurements, especially that learned from a comparison to recent shell model calculations. Attention is given to: (1) the binding of loosely-bound neutron halo nuclei; (2) the N=14--16 region in the neutron-rich isotopes of O, F, and Ne where the strong two-body interaction plays an important role; (3) the deformed intruder state region around {sup 31}Na of long standing interest; (4) the neutron-rich isotopes of sulfur and chlorine; and (5) the question of the isospin dependence (or independence) of neutron and proton pairing energies in the fp shell. Only the briefest account of this work can be given here; emphasis is placed on the most recent results. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Exploration of the neutron-rich mass surface from {sup 11}Li to {sup 66}Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Butler, G.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Seifert, H.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Giessen Univ. (Germany). 2. Physikalisches Inst.; Zhou, Z.Y. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Nanjing Univ., JS (China). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Zhou, X.G.; Tu, X.L.; Lind, V.G. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Physics; Loebner, K.E.G. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Sektion Physik

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A small revolution in our ability to perform mass measurements of light-mass, neutron-rich nuclei has occurred during the last five years with the extension of the direct, total mass measurement method to fast recoiling nuclei. To date the work of two groups, one using the SPEG spectrometer at GANIL and the other using the TOFI spectrometer at LAMPF, has yielded over 85 mass measurements of which 62 had not been reported previously. Extending from the neutron-halo nucleus {sup 11}Li up to {sup 66}Fe, a region relevant to the astrophysical r-process, these measurements have provided a valuable first glimpse into the interesting nuclear structure present in many of these exotic nuclei. Herein we highlight the nuclear structure insight which as been gained from these measurements, especially that learned from a comparison to recent shell model calculations. Attention is given to: (1) the binding of loosely-bound neutron halo nuclei; (2) the N=14--16 region in the neutron-rich isotopes of O, F, and Ne where the strong two-body interaction plays an important role; (3) the deformed intruder state region around {sup 31}Na of long standing interest; (4) the neutron-rich isotopes of sulfur and chlorine; and (5) the question of the isospin dependence (or independence) of neutron and proton pairing energies in the fp shell. Only the briefest account of this work can be given here; emphasis is placed on the most recent results. 24 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Observation of neutron multiplication by delayed neutrons in {sup 237}Np and {sup 235}U

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollas, C.L.; Goulding, C.A.; Moss, C.E.; Myers, W.L.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have applied the method using delayed neutrons developed for the investigation of highly enriched uranium (HEU) systems to investigate {sup 237}Np. This method uses an external radiation probe of 10-MeV bremsstrahlung photons to induce fission of the {sup 237}Np sample. The photon source, a 10-MeV electron linear accelerator (linac), is operated in a pulsed mode with a pulse width of {approximately}6 {micro}s at a frequency of {approximately}50 Hz. For all the measurements, 45,000 pulses from the linac were used. The linac output was {approximately}150 R/min at 1 m from the bremsstrahlung source. Neutrons are detected by a medium-efficiency, {sup 3}He-based, neutron detector system between pulses of the interrogating probe. The data acquisition system is gated off during the linac beam burst and for an additional 2000 {micro}s. The neutron detection times are recorded and subsequently analyzed with the Feynman reduced-variance method. This analysis provides a measure of the number of single (N1/s) and double (N2/s) neutron events detected from fission events. These fission events are predominantly produced by the delayed neutrons from fission products resulting from interactions with the 10-MeV bremsstrahlung photons during the interrogating probe burst.

  5. Ecological half-life of <sup>137sup>Cs in fish from a stream contaminated by nuclear reactor effluents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peles, J. [Pennsylvania State University, McKeesport; BryanJr, A. [Savannah River Ecology Lab; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ribble, D. [Trinity University; Smith, M. [Savannah River Ecology Lab

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiocesium ({sup 137}Cs) concentrations were determined during 1974, 1981 and 1998 for seven species of fish inhabiting a stream (Steel Creek) contaminated by effluents from a nuclear reactor to examine the decline of this radionuclide in a natural ecosystem. Median {sup 137}Cs concentrations were highest in Micropterus salmoides (largemouth bass) during each year of the investigation (1974 = 6.67 Bq g{sup -1} dry wt. of whole body; 1981 = 3.72 Bq g{sup -1}; 1998 = 0.35 Bq g{sup -1}), but no patterns of differences were observed among Aphredoderus sayanus (pirate perch), Esox americanus (redfin pickerel), Lepomis auritus (redbreast sunfish), L. gulosus (warmouth), L. punctatus (spotted sunfish), and Notropis cummingsae (dusky shiner). Results demonstrated a rapid decline in {sup 137}Cs within fish from Steel Creek during the 24-year period. For example, {sup 137}Cs concentrations in all fish species declined significantly among years, even after accounting for radioactive decay. The observed percent declines in {sup 137}Cs concentrations of individual species were 3-4 times greater between 1974 and 1981 compared to that expected by physical decay alone, and 2-3 times greater during 1981-1998. Ecological half-lives (EHLs) of {sup 137}Cs in fish ranged from 4.43 years in A. sayanus to 6.53 years in L. gulosus. The EHL for {sup 137}Cs in all fish species combined was 5.54 years. Current levels of {sup 137}Cs in fish from Steel Creek (1.16 Bq g{sup -1} dry wt. of whole body to below detection limits) indicate that the consumption of fish from this ecosystem poses little risk to humans and sensitive wildlife species. These results demonstrate the importance of incorporating the concept of ecological half-life into determinations concerning the length and severity of potential risks associated with radiocontaminants.

  6. The Caenorhabditis elegans Iodotyrosine Deiodinase Ortholog SUP-18 Functions through a Conserved Channel SC-Box to Regulate the Muscle Two-Pore Domain Potassium Channel SUP-9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Cruz, Ignacio Perez

    Loss-of-function mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans gene sup-18 suppress the defects in muscle contraction conferred by a gain-of-function mutation in SUP-10, a presumptive regulatory subunit of the SUP-9 two-pore ...

  7. Application of Neutron-Absorbing Structural-Amorphous Metal (SAM) Coatings for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Container to Enhance Criticality Safety Controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jor-Shan; Lee, Chuck; Farmer, Joseph; Day, Dan; Wall, Mark; Saw, Cheng [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 94550 (United States); Boussoufi, Moe; Liu, Ben; Egbert, Harold [McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center, McClellan, CA, 95652 (United States); Branagan, Dan [Nanosteel Company, Idaho Falls, ID, 83402 (United States); D'Amato, Andy [Plasma Technology Incorporated, Torrance, CA, 90501 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent nuclear fuel contains fissionable materials ({sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Pu, etc.). To prevent nuclear criticality in spent fuel storage, transportation, and during disposal, neutron-absorbing materials (or neutron poisons, such as borated stainless steel, Boral{sup TM}, Metamic{sup TM}, Ni-Gd, and others) would have to be applied. The success in demonstrating that the High-Performance Corrosion- Resistant Material (HPCRM){sup [1]} can be thermally applied as coating onto base metal to provide for corrosion resistance for many naval applications raises the interest in applying the HPCRM to USDOE/OCRWM spent fuel management program. The fact that the HPCRM relies on the high content of boron to make the material amorphous - an essential property for corrosion resistance - and that the boron has to be homogeneously distributed in the HPCRM qualify the material to be a neutron poison. (authors)

  8. Nuclear vertex constants for the virtual decay {sup 7}Be {yields} {sup 3}He + {sup 4}He of the 7Be bound states from a phase-shift analysis in the effective-range theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orlov, Yu. V., E-mail: orlov@srd.sinp.msu.ru; Nikitina, L. I. [Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase-shift-analysis data for the {sup 3}He{sup 4}He scattering are analyzed using the effective-range theory, with the Coulomb interaction taken into account. We find both the renormalized nuclear vertex constants for the vertex {sup 7}Be {yields} {sup 3}He + {sup 4}He in the ground (3/2{sup -}) and in the first excited (1/2{sup -}) bound states of {sup 7}Be, and the corresponding asymptotic normalization constants of the radial wave functions in these states. The results obtained can be used in an astrophysical S-factor calculation for radiative capture reaction {sup 4}He({sup 3}He, {gamma}){sup 7}Be.

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onConversionsAlternativeE85 Fueling

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid andAlternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV)

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybridDiesel Fuel Blend Tax Exemption

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybridDiesel Fuel Blend Tax

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybridDiesel Fuel Blend

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybridDiesel Fuel BlendNeighborhood

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  16. Measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetry in B{sup 0}{yields}ccK{sup (*)0} decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V. [Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules (LAPP), Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E. [Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat de Fisica, Departament ECM, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M. [INFN Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartmento di Fisica, Universita di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L. [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] (and others)

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present updated measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in fully reconstructed neutral B decays containing a charmonium meson. The measurements reported here use a data sample of (465{+-}5)x10{sup 6} {upsilon}(4S){yields}BB decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings operating at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters measured from J{psi}K{sub S}{sup 0}, J{psi}K{sub L}{sup 0}, {psi}(2S)K{sub S}{sup 0}, {eta}{sub c}K{sub S}{sup 0}, {chi}{sub c1}K{sub S}{sup 0}, and J/{psi}K*(892){sup 0} decays are: C{sub f}=0.024{+-}0.020(stat){+-}0.016(syst) and -{eta}{sub f}S{sub f}=0.687{+-}0.028(stat){+-}0.012(syst)

  17. Measurements of h{sub c}({sup 1}P{sub 1}) in {psi}{sup '} Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Berger, N.; Bian, J. M.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, L. P.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, P.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Deng, Z. Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2010-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the charmonium state h{sub c}({sup 1}P{sub 1}) made with 106x10{sup 6} {psi}{sup '} events collected by BESIII at BEPCII. Clear signals are observed for {psi}{sup '{yields}{pi}0}h{sub c} with and without the subsequent radiative decay h{sub c{yields}{gamma}{eta}c}. First measurements of the absolute branching ratios B({psi}{sup '{yields}{pi}0}h{sub c})=(8.4{+-}1.3{+-}1.0)x10{sup -4} and B(h{sub c{yields}{gamma}{eta}c})=(54.3{+-}6.7{+-}5.2)% are presented. A statistics-limited determination of the previously unmeasured h{sub c} width leads to an upper limit {Gamma}(h{sub c})<1.44 MeV (90% confidence). Measurements of M(h{sub c})=3525.40{+-}0.13{+-}0.18 MeV/c{sup 2} and B({psi}{sup '{yields}{pi}0}h{sub c})xB(h{sub c{yields}{gamma}{eta}c})=(4.58{+-}0.40{+-}0.50)x10{sup -4} are consistent with previous results.

  18. Charged hadron production in e/sup /+//e/sup /-// annihilation at. sqrt. s = 29 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Avery, R.E.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barker, A.R.; Barnett, B.A.; Bauer, D.A.; Bengtsson, H.U.; Bobbink, G.J.; Buchanan, C.D.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used data from the Time Projection Chamber at the SLAC storage ring PEP to study the inclusive production of charged hadrons in e/sup /+//e/sup /-// annihilation at a center of mass energy of 29 GeV. Charged particles were identified by simultaneous dEdx and momentum measurements. We present cross sections and particle fractions for ..pi../sup/plus minus//, k/sup + -/, and p(/ovr/p//) as a function of energy, momentum, rapidity, and transverse momentum. We compare the predictions of various hadronization models to the data and note discrepancies at high momentum.

  19. Momentum distributions for ([sup 11]Li, [sup 9]Li+[ital n]+[ital n]) breakup reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esbensen, H.; Bertsch, G.F.; Ieki, K. (Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States) Institute of Nuclear Theory and Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have calculated the momentum distributions of the three fragments emitted in the breakup reaction ([sup 11]Li,[sup 9]Li+[ital n]+[ital n]), induced by the Coulomb field from a heavy target, and made comparisons to recent three-body coincidence measurements. Our three-body model for [sup 11]Li provides a good description of the measured relative momentum distribution for the two emitted neutrons, and also for the single-neutron momentum distribution. The predicted distribution for the [sup 9]Li recoil is much narrower than observed; a plausible explanation is presented.

  20. Branching ratios from B{sub s} and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew S. Martin

    2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    CDF Run II relative branching ratio measurements for 65 pb{sup -1} of data in the channels B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup {-+}}, {Lambda} {sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and B {yields} h{sup +}h{sup -} are presented. Further, an observation of B{sub s} {yields} K{sup {+-}} K{sup {-+}} and a measurement of A{sub CP} are presented.

  1. Aromatic measurements of diesel fuel - A CRC round-robin study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seizinger, D.E.; Hoekman, S.K.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A round robin study to measure the aromatic levels in diesel fuels was conducted by the Chemical Characterization Panel of the Coordinating Research Council Air Pollution Research Advisory Committee (CRC-APRAC) In-house Program Group, CAPI-1-64. The fuels for this study consisted of a jet fuel, a No. 2 diesel reference fuel, and three fuels used in a CRC-sponsored diesel emission project (CAPE-32). These fuels had 90% distillation temperatures which ranged from 472/sup 0/ to 642/sup 0/ F and aromaticity levels from approximately 18 to 55% by volume. All participants used the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) D1319 or modified D1319 methods to measure the aromatic levels in the selected fuels. Some participants concurrently analyzed the same fuels using other methods such as high-performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, and elution chromatography (ASTM D2549). One non-participating laboratory analyzed the fuels using supercritical fluid chromatography. The results of nine participants using the D1319 methodology and other methods showed good agreement for fuels with 90% distillation temperatures less than 600/sup 0/ F. However, this round robin study showed that: 1) there is no standard method to measure aromatic levels in full boiling range diesel fuels, and 2) there are inadequacies when using the D1319 and modified D1319 methods for fuels outside of the specified property ranges.

  2. p27{sup Kip1} inhibits tissue factor expression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breitenstein, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.breitenstein@usz.ch [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland) [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZHIP), University of Zurich (Switzerland); Akhmedov, Alexander; Camici, Giovanni G.; Lüscher, Thomas F.; Tanner, Felix C. [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland) [Cardiology, University Heart Center, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Cardiovascular Research, Physiology Institute, University of Zurich (Switzerland); Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZHIP), University of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •p27{sup Kip1}regulates the expression of tissue factor at the transcriptional level. •This inhibitory effect of p27{sup Kip1} is independently of its cell regulatory action. •The current study provides new insights into a pleiotrophic function of p27{sup Kip1}. -- Abstract: Background: The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor (CDKI) p27{sup Kip1} regulates cell proliferation and thus inhibits atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling. Expression of tissue factor (TF), the key initator of the coagulation cascade, is associated with atherosclerosis. Yet, it has not been studied whether p27{sup Kip1} influences the expression of TF. Methods and results: p27{sup Kip1} overexpression in human aortic endothelial cells was achieved by adenoviral transfection. Cells were rendered quiescent for 24 h in 0.5% fetal-calf serum. After stimulation with TNF-? (5 ng/ml), TF protein expression and activity was significantly reduced (n = 4; P < 0.001) in cells transfected with p27{sup Kip1}. In line with this, p27{sup Kip1} overexpression reduced cytokine-induced TF mRNA expression (n = 4; P < 0.01) and TF promotor activity (n = 4; P < 0.05). In contrast, activation of the MAP kinases p38, ERK and JNK was not affected by p27{sup Kip1} overexpression. Conclusion: This in vitro study suggests that p27{sup Kip1} inhibits TF expression at the transcriptional level. These data indicate an interaction between p27{sup Kip1} and TF in important pathological alterations such as atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  3. High {sup 222}Rn levels, enhanced plateout, increased diffusion coefficient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, B.E.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In a previous study of plateout and resuspension effects for {sup 222}Rn progeny, an unexpected suppression of the airborne {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po levels, which is total unrelated and not predicted by theory or other works, was observed when high {sup 222}Rn concentrations were utilized in a 0.283-m{sup 3} test chamber. Two separate time-dependent methods were used and are reported here to measure this airborne progeny suppression effect to attempt to possibly determine the magnitude and cause of the effect and possible consequences on prior and current ongoing radon research by others. The earlier buildup method was used to observe the buildup phase of {sup 222} Rn and its daughters from a constant emanation source, a constant air change rate (ACH), and initially zero concentrations Rn and progeny. The data were compared with theory using Leonard`s solutions to the Bateman equations to determine the magnitude of the suppression. The second method, referred to as the {open_quotes}down{close_quotes} method, was to measure the decrease in {sup 222}Rn and progeny concentrations from an initially injected high {sup 222}Rn activity concentration in the test chamber, the decrease resulting from a constant ACH of {approximately}0.1 h{sup -1} imposed by the gradual removal of air from the chamber at a constant rate of {approximately}0.5 l/min. No {sup 222}Rn emanation source was present during the second method after the initial injection so that the level of the {sup 222}Rn underwent a monotonic decrease in concentration.

  4. Fusion-Fission Hybrid for Fissile Fuel Production without Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fratoni, M; Moir, R W; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R; Powers, J J

    2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Two scenarios are typically envisioned for thorium fuel cycles: 'open' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th and fission of {sup 233}U in situ without reprocessing or 'closed' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th followed by reprocessing, and recycling of {sup 233}U either in situ or in critical fission reactors. This study evaluates a third option based on the possibility of breeding fissile material in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor and burning the same fuel in a critical reactor without any reprocessing or reconditioning. This fuel cycle requires the hybrid and the critical reactor to use the same fuel form. TRISO particles embedded in carbon pebbles were selected as the preferred form of fuel and an inertial laser fusion system featuring a subcritical blanket was combined with critical pebble bed reactors, either gas-cooled or liquid-salt-cooled. The hybrid reactor was modeled based on the earlier, hybrid version of the LLNL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE1) system, whereas the critical reactors were modeled according to the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) design. An extensive neutronic analysis was carried out for both the hybrid and the fission reactors in order to track the fuel composition at each stage of the fuel cycle and ultimately determine the plant support ratio, which has been defined as the ratio between the thermal power generated in fission reactors and the fusion power required to breed the fissile fuel burnt in these fission reactors. It was found that the maximum attainable plant support ratio for a thorium fuel cycle that employs neither enrichment nor reprocessing is about 2. This requires tuning the neutron energy towards high energy for breeding and towards thermal energy for burning. A high fuel loading in the pebbles allows a faster spectrum in the hybrid blanket; mixing dummy carbon pebbles with fuel pebbles enables a softer spectrum in the critical reactors. This combination consumes about 20% of the thorium initially loaded in the hybrid reactor ({approx}200 GWd/tHM), partially during hybrid operation, but mostly during operation in the critical reactor. The plant support ratio is low compared to the one attainable using continuous fuel chemical reprocessing, which can yield a plant support ratio of about 20, but the resulting fuel cycle offers better proliferation resistance as fissile material is never separated from the other fuel components.

  5. Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuelcomparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel121, 2011. C. Fischer. Renewable Portfolio Standards: When

  6. High power density solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing ultra-high power density solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The method involves the formation of a multilayer structure cells wherein a buffer layer of doped-ceria is deposited intermediate a zirconia electrolyte and a cobalt iron based electrode using a colloidal spray deposition (CSD) technique. For example, a cobalt iron based cathode composed of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O (LSCF) may be deposited on a zirconia electrolyte via a buffer layer of doped-ceria deposited by the CSD technique. The thus formed SOFC have a power density of 1400 mW/cm.sup.2 at 600.degree. C. and 900 mW/cm.sup.2 at 700.degree. C. which constitutes a 2-3 times increased in power density over conventionally produced SOFCs.

  7. Fuel processor for fuel cell power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Springer, Thomas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Huff, James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

  8. High resolution neutron imaging of water in PEM fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendelow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimal water management in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells is critical to improving the performance and durability of fuel cell systems especially during transient, start-up and shut-down operations. For example, while a high water content is desirable for improved membrane and catalyst ionomer conductivity, high water content can also block gas access to the triple-phase boundary resulting in lowered performance due to catalyst and gas diffusion layer (GDL) flooding. Visualizing liquid water by neutron imaging has been used over the past decade to study the water distribution inside operating fuel cells. In this paper, the results from our imaging at NIST using their recently installed higher resolution ({approx} 25 mm) Microchannel Plate (MCP) detector with a pixel pitch of 14.7 mm are presented. This detector is capable of quantitatively imaging the water inside the MEA (Membrane Electrode Assembly)/GDL (Gas Diffusion Layer) of working fuel cells and can provide the water profiles within these various components in addition to the channel water. Specially designed fuel cells (active area = 2.25 cm{sup 2}) have been used in order to take advantage of the full detector resolution. The cell design is illustrated in a figure where one of the current collector/end plates is shown. The serpentine pattern was machined into a block of aluminum and plated with nickel and then gold to form the flow field. The measurements were performed using beam no. 1 and aperture no. 2 with a fluence rate of 1.9 x 10{sup 6} neutrons cm{sup -2} sec{sup -1}. The cells were assembled with Gore{sup TM} Primea{sup R} MEAs and SGL Sigracet {sup R} 24 series GDLs (PRIMEA, GORE-SELECT and GORE are trademarks of W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc). All the cells were tested at 80 {sup o}C with 1.2 stoichiometry H{sub 2} and 2.0 stoichiometry air flows.

  9. Excitation of the Isomeric {sup 229m}Th Nuclear State via an Electronic Bridge Process in {sup 229}Th{sup +}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porsev, S. G. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Leningrad district, 188300 (Russian Federation); Flambaum, V. V. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052 (Australia); Peik, E.; Tamm, Chr. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the excitation of the nuclear transition {sup 229g}Th-{sup 229m}Th near 7.6 eV in singly ionized thorium via an electronic bridge process. The process relies on the excitation of the electron shell by two laser photons whose sum frequency is equal to the nuclear transition frequency. This scheme allows us to determine the nuclear transition frequency with high accuracy. Based on calculations of the electronic level structure of Th{sup +} which combine the configuration-interaction method and many-body perturbation theory, we estimate that a nuclear excitation rate in the range of 10 s{sup -1} can be obtained using conventional laser sources.

  10. Partial-wave analysis of elastic {sup 4}He{sup 4}He scattering in the energy range 40-50 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B. [Fesenkov Astrophysical Institute (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: sergey@dubovichenko.net

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A partial-wave analysis of elastic {sup 4}He{sup 4}He scattering is performed in the energy range 40-50 MeV.

  11. Strong enhancement of dynamical emission of heavy fragments in the neutron-rich {sup 124}Sn+{sup 64}Ni reaction at 35A MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russotto, P.; Amorini, F.; Cavallaro, S.; Di Toro, M.; Giustolisi, F.; Porto, F.; Rizzo, F. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania, Catania (Italy); De Filippo, E.; Pagano, A.; Cardella, G.; Lanzano, G.; Papa, M.; Pirrone, S. [INFN, Sezione di Catania, Catania (Italy); Piasecki, E. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); A. Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk/Warsaw (Poland); Anzalone, A.; Colonna, M.; Maiolino, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Auditore, L.; Trifiro, A.; Trimarchi, M. [INFN, Gruppo Collegato di Messina and Dipartimento di Fisica, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative comparison is made between the absolute cross sections associated with statistical and dynamical emission of heavy fragments in the {sup 124}Sn+{sup 64}Ni and {sup 112}Sn+{sup 58}Ni collisions experimentally investigated at 35A MeV beam energy using the multidetector CHIMERA. The result shows that the dynamical process is about twice as probable in the neutron-rich {sup 124}Sn+{sup 64}Ni system as in the {sup 112}Sn+{sup 58}Ni neutron-poor one. This unexpected and significant difference indicates that the reaction mechanism is strongly dependent on the entrance-channel isospin (N/Z) content.

  12. The Solubility of <sup>242sup>PuO2 in the Presence of Aqueous Fe(II): The Impact of Precipitate Preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Conradson, Steven D.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Abrecht, David G.; Ilton, Eugene S.

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solubility of different forms of precipitated <sup>242sup>PuO2(am) were examined in solutions containing aqueous Fe(II) over a range of pH values. The first series of <sup>242sup>PuO2(am) suspensions were prepared from a <sup>242sup>Pu(IV) stock that had been treated with thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) to remove the <sup>241sup>Am originating from the decay of <sup>241sup>Pu. These <sup>242sup>PuO2(am) suspensions showed much higher solubilities at the same pH value and Fe(II) concentration than previous studies using <sup>239sup>PuO2(am). X ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy of the precipitates showed a substantially reduced Pu-Pu backscatter over that previously observed in <sup>242sup>PuO2(am) precipitates, indicating that the <sup>242sup>PuO2(am) precipitates purified using TTA lacked the long range order previously found in <sup>239sup>PuO2(am) precipitates. The Pu(IV) stock solution was subsequently repurified using an ion exchange resin and an additional series of <sup>242sup>PuO2(am) precipitates prepared. These suspensions showed higher redox potentials and total aqueous Pu concentrations than the TTA purified stock solution. The higher redox potential and aqueous Pu concentrations were in general agreement with previous studies on <sup>242sup>PuO2(am) precipitates, presumably due to the removal of possible organic compounds originally present in the TTA purified stock. <sup>242sup>PuO2(am) suspensions prepared with both stock solutions showed almost identical solubilities in Fe(II) containing solutions even though the initial aqueous Pu concentrations before the addition of Fe(II) were orders of magnitude different. By examining the solubility of <sup>242sup>PuO2(am) prepared from both stocks in this way we have essentially approached equilibrium from both the undersaturated and oversaturated conditions. The final aqueous Pu concentrations are predictable using a chemical equilibrium model which includes the formation of a nanometer sized Fe(III) reaction product, identified in the <sup>242sup>PuO2(am) suspension both by use of <sup>57sup>Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis.

  13. Construction of a topological charge on fuzzy S{sup 2}xS{sup 2} via a Ginsparg-Wilson relation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aoki, Hajime [Department of Physics, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan); Hirayama, Yoshiko [Miyazaki Information Processing Center Limited, Fukuoka 812-0011 (Japan); Iso, Satoshi [KEK Theory Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) and the Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI), Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a topological charge of gauge field configurations on a fuzzy S{sup 2}xS{sup 2} by using a Dirac operator satisfying the Ginsparg-Wilson relation. The topological charge defined on the fuzzy S{sup 2}xS{sup 2} can be interpreted as a noncommutative (or matrix) generalization of the 2nd Chern character on S{sup 2}xS{sup 2}. We further calculate the number of chiral zero modes of the Dirac operator in topologically nontrivial gauge configurations. Generalizations of our formulation to fuzzy (S{sup 2}){sup k} are also discussed.

  14. Moderation control in low enriched {sup 235}U uranium hexafluoride packaging operations and transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyer, R.H. [USDOE Oak Ridge Operations Office, TN (United States); Kovac, F.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pryor, W.A. [PAI Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moderation control is the basic parameter for ensuring nuclear criticality safety during the packaging and transport of low {sup 235}U enriched uranium hexafluoride before its conversion to nuclear power reactor fuel. Moderation control has permitted the shipment of bulk quantities in large cylinders instead of in many smaller cylinders and, therefore, has resulted in economies without compromising safety. Overall safety and uranium accountability have been enhanced through the use of the moderation control. This paper discusses moderation control and the operating procedures to ensure that moderation control is maintained during packaging operations and transportation.

  15. {sup 16}O neutron cross section evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caro, E. [Lockheed Martin Corp., Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work has resulted from a need to compute more accurately the neutron scattering cross sections and angular distributions for {sup 16}O. Several oxygen evaluations have been performed in the past with R-Matrix theory, including ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI. ENDF/B-VI is an improvement over ENDF/B-V, but still underpredicts in general the forward scattering of neutrons below 2.5 MeV. R-Matrix theory is used in describing cross sections at and near the resonance energies; but may not always be adequate in describing cross sections between resonances, especially when they are widely spaced. The optical (potential well) model of the nucleus is very good in representing cross sections that vary smoothly with energy, but not at describing all of the detailed resonance cross sections. A combination of the potential well model and R-Matrix theory was used for this work to represent cross sections with isolated resonances with large spacings between them. The total neutron cross section of oxygen-16 below 3.0 MeV has widely separated resonances and a dip in the cross section at 2.35 MeV. In the vicinity of resonances, where cross sections vary rapidly with energy, R-Matrix theory has been successful in fitting experimental data. In the region between resonances, an analytical procedure with physical basis is needed that agrees with data over a wide range of energies bracketing regions where experimental measurements are lacking.

  16. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of refueling today's gasoline vehicles. Using currently available high-pressure tank storage technology that can achieve similar performance, at a similar cost, as gasoline fuel storage systems. Compressed gasFUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Storage Hydrogen

  17. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Case Study: Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    through March), cooling water conveys waste heat from the fuel cells to an unfired furnace for space by the boilers. Early in the project, Verizon decided not to utilize the fuel cell's low temperature waste heat the cooling season (April through October), the high-grade waste heat from the fuel cells is used in two 70

  18. Supremal Representation of L{sup {infinity}} Functionals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardaliaguet, Pierre [Laboratoire de Mathematiques UMR 6205, Universite De Brest, 6 avenue Victor Le Gorgeu, CS 93837, F-29238 Brest Cedex 3 (France)], E-mail: Pierre.Cardaliaguet@univ-brest.fr; Prinari, Francesca [Dipartimento di Matematica 'Ennio De Giorgi', Universita di Lecce, Via Prov. le Lecce-Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy)], E-mail: prinari@mail.dm.unipi.it

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We characterize the maps F=F(u,A) defined for u element of W{sup 1,{infinity}} and A open, which can be written as supremal functionals of the form F(u,A)=ess sup{sub xisan} {sub element} {sub ofA} f(x,u(x),Du(x))

  19. Strange particle production in hadronic Z{sup 0} decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baird, K.G. III

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study has been made of neutral strange baryons and pseudoscalar mesons produced in hadronic decays of the weak gauge boson V. The experiment was performed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, which has the unique capability of colliding highly polarized electrons with unpolarized positrons. Overall production rates and spectra of the K{sup 0} and the {Lambda}{sup 0} (+{Lambda}{sup 0}) were measured and compared with other experiments as well as with Quantum Chromodynamics calculations. The combination of the small, stable beam spots produced by the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) and the precision vertexing capabilities of the SLC Large Detector (SLD) permitted the separation of the hadronic events into three quark flavor-enriched samples. An unfolding was performed to obtain flavor-pure samples, and for the first time measurements were made of K{sup 0} and {Lambda}{sup 0} (+{Lambda}{sup 0}) production rates and spectra in uds, c, and b quark events at the Z{sup 0} pole. This measurement revealed significant production differences. Utilizing the large quark production asymmetry due to the polarized electron beam, high-purity quark and antiquark jet samples were obtained. The first measurement of production differences of the {Lambda}{sup 0} baryon in quark and antiquark jets was performed, which provided clear evidence for a leading particle effect at high momenta.

  20. Kinetic energy deficit in the symmetric fission of /sup 259/Md. [Light particle emission in /sup 256/Fm fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulet, E.K.; Wild, J.F.; Lougheed, R.W.; Baisden, P.A.; Dougan, R.J.; Mustafa, M.G.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fragment energies of about 725 coincidence events have now been observed in the spontaneous fission (SF) decay of 105-min /sup 259/Md since its discovery in 1977. The fission of /sup 259/Md is characterized by a symmetric mass distribution, similar to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, but with a broad total kinetic energy (anti TKE) distribution which peaks at about 195 MeV, in contrast to those of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, for which the anti TKE is about 240 MeV. This kinetic energy deficit, approx. 40 MeV, has been postulated to be due to the emission of hydrogen-like particles by /sup 259/Md at the scission point in a large fraction of the fissions, leaving the residual fissioning nucleus with 100 protons. The residual nucleus would then be able to divide into two ultrastable tin-like fission fragments, but with less kinetic energy than that observed in the SF of /sup 258/Fm and /sup 259/Fm, because of binding-energy losses and a reduction in the Coulomb repulsion of the major fragments. To test this hypothesis, counter-telescope experiments aimed at detecting and identifying these light particles were performed. In 439 SF events 3 + 3 protons of the appropriate energy were observed, too few to account for the kinetic energy deficit in the fission of /sup 259/Md. There seems to be no explanation for this problem within the framework of current fission theory. These results are discussed along with preliminary measurements of light-particle emission in the SF of /sup 256/Fm. 5 figures.

  1. Structure, solvation, and dynamics of Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and Ba{sup 2+} complexes with 3-hydroxyflavone and perchlorate anion in acetonitrile medium: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agieienko, Vira N.; Kolesnik, Yaroslav V.; Kalugin, Oleg N., E-mail: onkalugin@gmail.com [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Kharkiv 61022 (Ukraine)

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular dynamics simulations of complexes of Mg{sup 2+}, Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and Ba{sup 2+} with 3-hydroxyflavone (flavonol, 3HF) and ClO {sub 4}{sup ?} in acetonitrile were performed. The united atoms force field model was proposed for the 3HF molecule using the results of DFT quantum chemical calculations. 3HF was interpreted as a rigid molecule with two internal degrees of freedom, i.e., rotation of the phenyl ring and of the OH group with respect to the chromone moiety. The interatomic radial distribution functions showed that interaction of the cations with flavonol occurs via the carbonyl group of 3HF and it is accompanied with substitution of one of the acetonitrile molecules in the cations’ first solvation shells. Formation of the cation–3HF complexes does not have significant impact on the rotation of the phenyl ring with respect to the chromone moiety. However, the orientation of the flavonol's OH-group is more sensitive to the interaction with doubly charged cations. When complex with Mg{sup 2+} is formed, the OH-group turns out of the plane of the chromone moiety that leads to rupture of intramolecular H-bond in the ligand molecule. Complexation of Ca{sup 2+}, Sr{sup 2+}, and BaClO {sub 4}{sup +} with 3HF produces two structures with different OH-positions, as in the free flavonol with the intramolecular H-bond and as in the complex with Mg{sup 2+} with disrupted H-bonding. It was shown that additional stabilization of the [MgClO{sub 4}(3HF)]{sup +} and [BaClO{sub 4}(3HF)]{sup +} complexes is determined by strong affinity of perchlorate anion to interact with flavonol via intracomplex hydrogen bond between an oxygen atom of the anion and the hydrogen atom of the 3-hydroxyl group. Noticeable difference in the values of the self-diffusion coefficients for Kt{sup 2+} from one side and ClO {sub 4}{sup ?}, 3HF, and AN in the cations’ coordination shell from another side implies quite weak interaction between cation, anion, and ligands in the investigated complexes.

  2. Reactor production of sup 252 Cf and transcurium isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexander, C.W.; Halperin, J.; Walker, R.L.; Bigelow, J.E.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkelium, californium, einsteinium, and fermium are currently produced in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and recovered in the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). All the isotopes are used for research. In addition, {sup 252}Cf, {sup 253}Es, and {sup 255}Fm have been considered or are used for industrial or medical applications. ORNL is the sole producer of these transcurium isotopes in the western world. A wide range of actinide samples were irradiated in special test assemblies at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at Hanford, Washington. The purpose of the experiments was to evaluate the usefulness of the two-group flux model for transmutations in the special assemblies with an eventual goal of determining the feasibility of producing macro amounts of transcurium isotopes in the FFTF. Preliminary results from the production of {sup 254g}Es from {sup 252}Cf will be discussed. 14 refs., 5 tabs.

  3. High-spin rotational structures in {sup 76}Kr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valiente-Dobon, J.J.; Svensson, C.E.; Finlay, P.; Grinyer, G.F.; Hyland, B.; Phillips, A.A.; Schumaker, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); O'Leary, C.D.; Jenkins, D.; Johnston-Theasby, F.; Joshi, P.; Kelsall, N.S.; Wadsworth, R. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Ragnarsson, I. [Department of Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Andreoiu, C. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 (Canada); Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Appelbe, D.E. [CLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Daresbury, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Austin, R.A.E.; Cameron, J.A.; Waddington, J.C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Ball, G.C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada)] [and others

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-spin states in {sup 36}{sub 76}Kr{sub 40} have been populated in the {sup 40}Ca({sup 40}Ca,4p){sup 76}Kr fusion-evaporation reaction at a beam energy of 165 MeV and studied using the Gammasphere and Microball multidetector arrays. The ground-state band and two signature-split negative parity bands of {sup 76}Kr have been extended to {approx}30({Dirac_h}/2{pi}). Lifetime measurements using the Doppler-shift attenuation method show that the transition quadrupole moment of these three bands decrease as they approach their maximum-spin states. Two signatures of a new rotational structure with remarkably rigid rotational behavior have been identified. The high-spin properties of these rotational bands are analyzed within the framework of configuration-dependent cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky calculations.

  4. Fuel dissipater for pressurized fuel cell generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Basel, Richard A.; King, John E.

    2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a pressurized fuel cell generator (10) when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated during transient operation, such as a shutdown; where, two electrically resistive elements (two of 28, 53, 54, 55) at least one of which is connected in parallel, in association with contactors (26, 57, 58, 59), a multi-point settable sensor relay (23) and a circuit breaker (24), are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals (21, 22) at two or more contact points, in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel inventory in the generator.

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About BecomeTechnologies | BlandineNaturalEmerging Fuels

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C.Tier 2 andIndependenceFuelsas aBenefitsFuel

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWP RelatedCellulase C.Tier 2NorthAvailabilityBasicsFueling Stations

  8. Confirmation of the X(1835) and Observation of the Resonances X(2120) and X(2370) in J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta}'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablikim, M.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Berger, N.; Bian, J. M.; Cai, X.; Cao, G. F.; Cao, X. X.; Chang, J. F.; Chen, G.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Dai, H. L.; Dai, J. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Dong, L. Y. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    With a sample of (225.2{+-}2.8)x10{sup 6} J/{psi} events registered in the BESIII detector, J/{psi}{yields}{gamma}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta}' is studied using two {eta}{sup '} decay modes: {eta}{sup '}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta} and {eta}{sup '}{yields}{gamma}{rho}{sup 0}. The X(1835), which was previously observed by BESII, is confirmed with a statistical significance that is larger than 20{sigma}. In addition, in the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{eta}' invariant-mass spectrum, the X(2120) and the X(2370), are observed with statistical significances larger than 7.2{sigma} and 6.4{sigma}, respectively. For the X(1835), the angular distribution of the radiative photon is consistent with expectations for a pseudoscalar.

  9. Measurement of charm production cross sections in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at energies between 3.97 and 4.26 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Zweber, P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A. [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Libby, J.; Powell, A.; Wilkinson, G. [University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Ecklund, K. M. [State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York 14260 (United States); Love, W.; Savinov, V. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States); Lopez, A. [University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez, Puerto Rico 00681 (Puerto Rico)] (and others)

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the CLEO-c detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have measured inclusive and exclusive cross sections for the production of D{sup +}, D{sup 0} and D{sub s}{sup +} mesons in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at 13 center-of-mass energies between 3.97 and 4.26 GeV. Exclusive cross sections are presented for final states consisting of two charm mesons (DD, D*D, D*D*, D{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, D{sub s}*{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, and D{sub s}*{sup +}D{sub s}*{sup -}) and for processes in which the charm-meson pair is accompanied by a pion. No enhancement in any final state is observed at the energy of the Y(4260)

  10. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles UCD-ITS-RR-92-14 September bycost than both. Solar-hydrogen fuel- cell vehicles would becost than both. Solar-hydrogen fuel- cell vehicles would be

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Renewable Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit A tax credit is available for 25% of the cost to install or retrofit fueling pumps that dispense gasoline fuel blends of at least 85%...

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel Tax Refund for Taxis A person using alternative fuel to operate a taxi used to transport passengers may be reimbursed for the paid amount of the Wisconsin state fuel tax....

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    contracts awarded for the purchase of diesel fuel must give preference to bids for biofuels or blends of biofuel and petroleum fuel. When purchasing fuel for use in diesel...

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Reduced Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Lease - AGL Atlanta Gas Light (AGL) offers a reduced cost lease on the BRC FuelMaker Phill CNG vehicle home fueling...

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    E85 Definition E85 motor fuel is defined as an alternative fuel that is a blend of ethanol and hydrocarbon, of which the ethanol portion is 75-85% denatured fuel ethanol by volume...

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Fuel Retailer Tax Credit Retailers that sell fuel blends of gasoline containing up to 15% ethanol by volume (E15) are eligible for a motor fuel tax credit of 0.016 per...

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption The first 1,000 gallons of renewable fuel that an individual produces each year are exempt from the motor vehicle fuel...

  18. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vehicles except the methanol/fuel cell vehicle and the BPEVe estimates for the methanol/fuel cell vehicle are based onbiomass-derived methanol used in fuel cell vehicles. Several

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Tax Rate A distributor of any alternative fuel used to operate an internal combustion engine must pay a license tax of 0.0025 for each gallon of alternative fuel...

  20. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S O N I A YE H Low Carbon Fuel Standards The most direct andalternative transportation fuels is to spur innovation withstandard for upstream fuel producers. hen it comes to energy

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Deregulation of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) as a Motor Fuel The sale of CNG by a fueling station for use as fuel to operate a motor vehicle is deregulated; however, separate...

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Missouri Department of Transportation (MoDOT) vehicles and heavy equipment that use diesel fuel must be fueled with biodiesel blends of at least 20% (B20), if such fuel is...

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    all state-owned diesel vehicles and equipment to be fueled with a fuel blend of 20% biodiesel (B20), subject to the availability of the fuel and so long as the price differential...

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel Blender Tax Credit A licensed fuel supplier who blends biodiesel or green diesel with diesel fuel may claim an income tax credit of 0.05 per gallon for fuel containing...

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    or property damage resulting from a person fueling any vehicle with E85 that is not a flexible fuel vehicle. This includes any vehicle equipped to operate when fueled entirely with...

  6. Study of B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup (')} decays and determination of {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Jingwu [Department of Physics, Xu Zhou Normal University, XuZhou 221116 (China); Du Dongsheng [Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing 100049 (China)

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup (')} decays and suggest two methods to determine the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle. We calculate not only the factorizable contribution in the QCD factorization scheme but also the nonfactorizable hard spectator corrections in the pQCD approach. We get the branching ratio of B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}, which is consistent with recent experimental data, and predict the branching ratio of B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '} to be 7.59x10{sup -6}. Two methods for determining the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle are suggested in this paper. For the first method, we get the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle to be about -13.1 deg., which is consistent with others in the literature. The second method depends on fewer parameters and can thus be used to determine the {eta}-{eta}{sup '} mixing angle with better accuracy but needs, as an input, the branching ratio for B{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}, which should be measured in the near future.

  7. Single-crystal sup 40 Ar/ sup 39 Ar dating of the Olorgesailie Formation, southern Kenya rift

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deino, A. (Geochronology Center of the Inst. of Human Origins, Berkeley, CA (United States)); Potts, R. (Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States))

    1990-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-crystal laser fusion {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses and several conventional bulk fusion {sup 40}K- {sup 40}Ar dates have been used to determine the age of volcaniclastic strata within the Olorgesailie Formation and of associated volcanic and sedimentary units of the southern Kenya rift. In the principal exposures along the southern edge of the Legemunge Plain, the formation spans the interval from approximately 500 to 1,000 ka. Deposition continued to the east along the Ol Keju Nyiro river where a tuff near the top of the formation has been dated at 215 ka. In these exposures, the formation is unconformably overlain by sediments dated at 49 ka. A possible source for the Olorgesailie tephra, the Ol Doinyo Nyokie volcanic complex, contains as ash flow dated at {approximately} 1 Ma, extending the known age range of this complex to encompass that of virtually the entire Olorgesailie Formation in the Legemunge Plain. These geologic examples illustrate the importance of the single-crystal {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar dating technique whereby contaminant, altered, or otherwise aberrant grains can be identified and eliminated from the determination of eruptive ages for reworked or altered pyroclastic deposits. The authors have presented a computer-modeling procedure based on an inverse-isochron analysis that promotes a more objective approach to trimming {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar isotope data sets of this type.

  8. Optical properties and energy transfer processes of Ho{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+}- codoped fluorotellurite glass under 1550?nm excitation for 2.0??m applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Feifei; Liu, Xueqiang [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Hu, Lili; Chen, Danping, E-mail: dpchen2008@aliyun.com [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates 2.0??m emission properties and energy transfer processes in the Er{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} codoped fluorotellurite glass. The measured absorption spectra demonstrate that the codoped sample can be pumped by 1550?nm excitation efficiently. Judd-Ofelt and radiative parameters are calculated and discussed. Intensive 2.0??m emission originating from Ho{sup 3+}: {sup 5}I{sub 7}?{sup 5}I{sub 8} transition is observed and a long lifetime (11?ms) of the {sup 5}I{sub 7} level is measured when Ho{sup 3+} ions are sensitized by Er{sup 3+} ions. Meanwhile, the upconversion spectra of the Er{sup 3+} singly and codoped samples are obtained and the energy transfer processes of the two ions is discussed based on the change of the upconversion emissions. The microscopic interaction parameters of the phonon-assisted (Er{sup 3+}: {sup 4}I{sub 13/2}?Ho{sup 3+}:{sup 5}I{sub 7}) process are calculated and the microparameter reaches as high as 10.1?×?10{sup ?41} cm{sup 6}/s. Hence, these results indicate that this Ho{sup 3+}/Er{sup 3+} codoped fluorotellurite glass will be a suitable material for developing solid state laser around 2.0??m.

  9. Development for fissile assay in recycled fuel using lead slowing down spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Je Park, C.; Kim, Ho-Dong; Song, Kee Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Daejeon, Korea, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A future nuclear energy system is under development to turn spent fuels produced by PWRs into fuels for a SFR (Sodium Fast Reactor) through the pyrochemical process. The knowledge of the isotopic fissile content of the new fuel is very important for fuel safety. A lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS) is under development to analyze the fissile material content (Pu{sup 239}, Pu{sup 241} and U{sup 235}) of the fuel. The LSDS requires a neutron source, the neutrons will be slowed down through their passage in a lead medium and will finally enter the fuel and will induce fission reactions that will be analysed and the isotopic content of the fuel will be then determined. The issue is that the spent fuel emits intense gamma rays and neutrons by spontaneous fission. The threshold fission detector screens the prompt fast fission neutrons and as a result the LSDS is not influenced by the high level radiation background. The energy resolution of LSDS is good in the range 0.1 eV to 1 keV. It is also the range in which the fission reaction is the most discriminating for the considered fissile isotopes. An electron accelerator has been chosen to produce neutrons with an adequate target through (e{sup -},?)(?,n) reactions.

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  11. Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStation LocationsGeneseeValleyPerformance

  12. Alternative Fueling Station Locator

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStation LocationsGeneseeValleyPerformance

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStation LocationsGeneseeValleyPerformanceGrants The

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStation LocationsGeneseeValleyPerformanceGrants

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStation LocationsGeneseeValleyPerformanceGrantsCompressed

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStation

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions StudyPolicies for

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse Gas (GHG) EmissionsHigh Occupancy

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse Gas (GHG) EmissionsHigh Occupancyand

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse Gas (GHG) EmissionsHigh

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse Gas (GHG) EmissionsHighAdvanced Vehicle

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse Gas (GHG) EmissionsHighAdvanced

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse Gas (GHG) EmissionsHighAdvancedPlug-In

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse Gas (GHG)

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCaliforniaNew England MEDIA

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCaliforniaNew England MEDIAZero

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCaliforniaNew EnglandState

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCaliforniaNew

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCaliforniaNewState Agency Electric

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCaliforniaNewState Agency

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCaliforniaNewState AgencyAlternative

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCaliforniaNewState

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCaliforniaNewStateMandatory Electric

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCaliforniaNewStateMandatory

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse GasCaliforniaNewStateMandatoryVoluntary

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouse

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid and Zero Emission Truck and Bus

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid and Zero Emission Truck and

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid and Zero Emission Truck andZero

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid and Zero Emission Truck

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid and Zero Emission

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid and Zero EmissionZero Emission

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid and Zero

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid and ZeroResidential Electric

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid and ZeroResidential ElectricVehicle

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid and ZeroResidential

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid and ZeroResidentialEmployer

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid and ZeroResidentialEmployerPlug-In

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid and

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid andAlternative

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid andAlternativeLow Emissions School

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid andAlternativeLow Emissions

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid andAlternativeLow

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid andAlternativeLowAlternative

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybrid

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStationGreenhouseHybridDiesel