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1

22 IEEE power & energy magazine march/april 2011 THE SECURITY OF ENERGY SUP-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to their energy supply infrastructure and at times to their economic devel- opment, in addition to the loss22 IEEE power & energy magazine march/april 2011 T THE SECURITY OF ENERGY SUP- ply has become on a continuous energy supply, but our complete style of living collapses when energy fails. Surges in fuel prices

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

2

High conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly for current generation of PWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a preliminary design of a high conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly applicable for current generation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWRs). The considered fuel assembly has a typical 17 x 17 PWR lattice. However in order to increase the conversion of Th{sup 232} to U{sup 233}, the assembly was subdivided into the two regions called seed and blanket. The central seed region has a higher than blanket U{sup 233} content and acts as a neutron source for the peripheral blanket region. The latest acts as a U{sup 233} breeder. While the seed fuel pins have a standard dimensions the blanket fuel radius was increased in order to reduce the moderation and to facilitate the resonance neutron absorption in blanket Th{sup 232}. The U{sup 233} content in the seed and blanket regions was optimized to achieve maximal initial to discharged fissile inventory ratio (FIR) taking into account the target fuel cycle length of 12 months with 3-batch reloading scheme. In this study the neutronic calculations were performed on the fuel assembly level using Helios deterministic lattice transport code. The fuel cycle length and the core k{sub eff} were estimated by applying the Non Linear Reactivity Model. The applicability of the HELIOS code for the analysis of the Th-based high conversion designs was confirmed with the help of continuous-energy Monte-Carlo code SERPENT. The results of optimization studies show that for the heterogeneous seed and blanket (SB) fuel assembly the FIR of about 0.95 can be achieved. (authors)

Baldova, D.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 510119, Dresden, 01314 (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Estimation of average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors by using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Average burnup of damaged fuels loaded in Fukushima Dai-ichi reactors is estimated, using the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method for measured radioactivities of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs in contaminated soils within the range of 100 km from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plants. As a result, the measured {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio from the contaminated soil is 0.996{+-}0.07 as of March 11, 2011. Based on the {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio method, the estimated burnup of damaged fuels is approximately 17.2{+-}1.5 [GWd/tHM]. It is noted that the numerical results of various calculation codes (SRAC2006/PIJ, SCALE6.0/TRITON, and MVP-BURN) are almost the same evaluation values of {sup 134}Cs/ {sup 137}Cs ratio with same evaluated nuclear data library (ENDF-B/VII.0). The void fraction effect in depletion calculation has a major impact on {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio compared with the differences between JENDL-4.0 and ENDF-B/VII.0. (authors)

Endo, T.; Sato, S.; Yamamoto, A. [Dept. of Materials, Physics and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya Univ., Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya-shi, 464-8603 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

BWR - Spent Fuel Transport and Storage with the TN{sup TM}9/4 and TN{sup TM}24BH Casks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Swiss Nuclear Utilities have started in 2001 to store spent fuel in dry metallic dual-purpose casks at ZWILAG, the Swiss interim storage facility. BKW FMB Energy Ltd., the Muehleberg Nuclear Power Plant owner, is involved in this process and has elected to store its BWR spent fuel in a new high capacity dual-purpose cask, the TNeTeM24BH from the COGEMA Logistics/TRANSNUCLEAR TN{sup TM}24 family. The Muehleberg BWR spent fuels are transported by road in a medium size shuttle transport cask and then transferred to a heavy transport/storage cask (dry transfer) in the hot cell of ZWILAG site. For that purpose, COGEMA Logistics designed and supplied: - Two shuttle casks, TN{sup TM}9/4, mainly devoted to transport of spent fuel from Muehleberg NPP to ZWILAG. Licensed according to IAEA 1996, the TN{sup TM}9/4 is a 40 ton transport cask, for 7 BWR high bum-up spent fuel assemblies. - A series of new high capacity dual-purpose casks, TN{sup TM}24BH, holding 69 BWR spent fuels. Two transport campaigns took place in 2003 and 2004. For each campaign, ten TN{sup TM}9/4 round trips are performed, and one TN{sup TM}24BH is loaded. 5 additional TN{sup TM}24BH are being manufactured for BKW, and the next transport campaigns are scheduled from 2006. The TN{sup TM}24BH high capacity dual purpose cask and the TN{sup TM}9/4 transport cask characteristics and capabilities will then be detailed. (authors)

Wattez, L. [COGEMA LOGISTICS - AREVA Group (France); Marguerat, Y. [BKW FMB Energy Ltd (Switzerland); Hoesli, C. [ZWILAG Zwischenlager Wuerenlingen AG (Switzerland)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Study of the effect of {sup 135}Xe poison on the temperature coefficient of TRIGA fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the influence of {sup 135}Xe on the prompt negative temperature coefficient of the 14-MW Romanian TRIGA reactor has been performed. Because of its large absorption cross section below 0.1 eV, we expected that {sup 135}Xe might make a positive contribution to the temperature coefficient because the higher-energy neutrons are less likely to be absorbed by the Xe. This effect would be largest about 16 hours after reactor shutdown. In order to investigate this phenomenon, we have performed cell and core calculations for various fuel temperatures, burnups, and {sup 135}Xe levels. These calculations indeed show a positive contribution of {sup 135}Xe to the temperature coefficient, especially for high burnups, where little {sup 167}Er remains to absorb the higher-energy neutrons. Work is in progress to evaluate the effect of the smaller negative temperature coefficient on the consequences of reactivity insertion accidents in unfavorable situations of {sup 135}Xe poisoning of the Romanian TRIGA core. (author)

Iorgulis, Constantin [TRIGA Reactor Facility, Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti (Romania)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Feasibility of fissile mass assay of spent nuclear fuel using {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency-analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility was evaluated using MCNP-DSP, an analog Monte Carlo transport cod to simulate source-driven measurements. Models of an isolated Westinghouse 17x17 PWR fuel assembly in a 1500-ppM borated water storage pool were used. In the models, the fuel burnup profile was represented using seven axial burnup zones, each with isotopics estimated by the PDQ code. Four different fuel assemblies with average burnups from fresh to 32 GWd/MTU were modeled and analyzed. Analysis of the fuel assemblies was simulated by inducing fission in the fuel using a {sup 252}Cf source adjacent to the assembly and correlating source fissions with the response of a bank of {sup 3}He detectors adjacent to the assembly opposite the source. This analysis was performed at 7 different axial positions on each of the 4 assemblies, and the source-detector cross-spectrum signature was calculated for each of these 28 simulated measurements. The magnitude of the cross-spectrum signature follows a smooth upward trend with increasing fissile material ({sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu) content, and the signature is independent of the concentration of spontaneously fissioning isotopes (e.g., {sup 244}Cm) and ({alpha},n) sources. Furthermore, the cross-spectrum signature is highly sensitive to changes in fissile material content. This feasibility study indicated that the signature would increase {similar_to}100% in response to an increase of only 0.1 g/cm{sup 3} of fissile material.

Mattingly, J.K.; Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Radioactive Waste Management at the New Conversion Facility of 'TVEL'{sup R} Fuel Company - 13474  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project on the new conversion facility construction is being implemented by Joint Stock Company (JSC) 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises' (SGChE) within TVEL{sup R} Fuel Company. The objective is to construct the up-to-date facility ensuring the industrial and environmental safety with the reduced impact on the community and environment in compliance with the Russian new regulatory framework on radioactive waste (RW) management. The history of the SGChE development, as well as the concepts and approaches to RW management implemented by now are shown. The SGChE future image is outlined, together with its objectives and concept on RW management in compliance with the new act 'On radioactive waste management' adopted in Russia in 2011. Possible areas of cooperation with international companies are discussed in the field of RW management with the purpose of deploying the best Russian and world practices on RW management at the new conversion facility. (authors)

Indyk, S.I.; Volodenko, A.V. [JSC 'TVEL', Russia, Moscow, 49 Kashirskoye Shosse, 115409 (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'TVEL', Russia, Moscow, 49 Kashirskoye Shosse, 115409 (Russian Federation); Tvilenev, K.A.; Tinin, V.V.; Fateeva, E.V. [JSC 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises', Russia, Seversk, 1 Kurchatov Street, 636000 (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises', Russia, Seversk, 1 Kurchatov Street, 636000 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Kinetics of fuel particle weathering and {sup 90}Sr mobility in the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Weathering of fuel particles and the subsequent leaching of radionuclides causes {sup 90}Sr mobility in Chernobyl soils to increase with time after disposition. Studies of {sup 90}Sr speciation in soils collected in 1995 and 1996 from the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone have been used to calculate rates of fuel particles dissolution under natural environmental conditions. Results show that the velocity of fuel particle dissolution is primarily dependent on the physico-chemical characteristics of the particles and partially dependent on soil acidity. Compared to other areas, the fuel particle dissolution rate is significantly lower in the contaminated areas to the west of the Chernobyl reactor where deposited particles were presumably not oxidized prior to release. The data have been used to derive mathematical models that describe the rate of radionuclide leaching from fuel particles in the exclusion zone and changes in soil-to-plant transfer as a function of particle type and soil pH.

Kashparov, V.A.; Zvarich, S.I.; Protsak, V.P.; Levchuk, S.E. [Ukrainian Inst. of Agricultural Radiology, Kiev (Ukraine); Oughton, D.H. [NLH, Aas (Norway). Lab. for Analytical Chemistry

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Preliminary results of calculations for heavy-water nuclear-power-plant reactors employing {sup 235}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 232}Th as a fuel and meeting requirements of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A physical design is developed for a gas-cooled heavy-water nuclear reactor intended for a project of a nuclear power plant. As a fuel, the reactor would employ thorium with a small admixture of enriched uranium that contains not more than 20% of {sup 235}U. It operates in the open-cycle mode involving {sup 233}U production from thorium and its subsequent burnup. The reactor meets the conditions of a nonproliferation of nuclear weapons: the content of fissionable isotopes in uranium at all stages of the process, including the final one, is below the threshold for constructing an atomic bomb, the amount of product plutonium being extremely small.

Ioffe, B. L.; Kochurov, B. P. [Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

L3:RTM.SUP.P9.01 Resonance Self-shielding Method for Fuel Annular  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfraredJeffersonJonathanMultimaterial MultiphysicsKwok#SUP.P9.01 Resonance

11

Addressing the Need for Alternative Transportation Fuels: The Joint BioEnergy Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the U.S. As world demand increases, oil reserves may become2006) Trends in Oil Sup-ply and Demand, the Potential for

Blanch, Harvey

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Joint ECE/PLI Seminar Title: Innovation Growth and Renewal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Joint ECE/PLI Seminar Title: Innovation ­ Growth and Renewal Speaker: Chris Christopher, ECE, business plan development, operations, and executive coaching. He is currently engaged in a management, desktop computer software, operating systems, languages and graphics. He was born in Greece, where he

13

A 48-month extended fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small, rail-shippable pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and an electric power output of 150 MW, which is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height, but otherwise standard, PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array on a 21.5 cm inter-assembly pitch. The B and W mPower core design and cycle management plan, which were performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, follow the pattern of a typical nuclear reactor fuel cycle design and analysis performed by most nuclear fuel management organizations, such as fuel vendors and utilities. However, B and W is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for four years of continuous power operations without refueling and without the hurdles of chemical shim. (authors)

Erighin, M. A. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, 109 Ramsey Place, Lynchburg, VA 24502 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Deformation analysis of local ply curvature in laminated composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composite laminates with local ply curvatures in the main load- carrying layers, Strains in corrugated layers, In-Phase layers, and Out-of-Phase layers are predicted for various geometries and material configurations by assuming matrix layers as elastic.... 2 Copper Matrix Metal Composite Fig. 3 Wavy Layers 12 Fig. 4 Moment Equilibrium in a Corrugated Beam without Matrix Material 18 Fig. 5 Deformation of the Matrix Naterial Due to Stretching of the Initial Curvature of the Main Load...

Lee, Jong-Won

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

An extended conventional fuel cycle for the B and W mPower{sup TM} small modular nuclear reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The B and W mPower{sup TM} reactor is a small pressurized water reactor (PWR) with an integral once-through steam generator and a thermal output of about 500 MW; it is intended to replace aging fossil power plants of similar output. The core is composed of 69 reduced-height PWR assemblies with the familiar 17 x 17 fuel rod array. The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W) is offering a core loading and cycle management plan for a four-year cycle based on its presumed attractiveness to potential customers. This option is a once-through fuel cycle in which the entire core is discharged and replaced after four years. In addition, a conventional fuel utilization strategy, employing a periodic partial reload and shuffle, was developed as an alternative to the four-year once-through fuel cycle. This study, which was performed using the Studsvik core design code suite, is a typical multi-cycle projection analysis of the type performed by most fuel management organizations such as fuel vendors and utilities. In the industry, the results of such projections are used by the financial arms of these organizations to assist in making long-term decisions. In the case of the B and W mPower reactor, this analysis demonstrates flexibility for customers who consider the once-through fuel cycle unacceptable from a fuel utilization standpoint. As expected, when compared to the once-through concept, reloads of the B and W mPower reactor will achieve higher batch average discharge exposure, will have adequate shut-down margin, and will have a relatively flat hot excess reactivity trend at the expense of slightly increased peaking. (authors)

Scarangella, M. J. [Babcock and Wilcox Company, 109 Ramsey Place, Lynchburg, VA 24502 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240} PU core : a cylindrical assemby with mixed (PU, U)-oxide fuel and a central high {sup 240} PU zone.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over a period of 30 years more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. The term 'benchmark' in a ZPR program connotes a particularly simple loading aimed at gaining basic reactor physics insight, as opposed to studying a reactor design. In fact, the ZPR-6/7 Benchmark Assembly (Reference 1) had a very simple core unit cell assembled from plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U3O8, and plutonium. The ZPR-6/7 core cell-average composition is typical of the interior region of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) of the era. It was one part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program,a which provided integral experiments characterizing the important features of demonstration-size LMFBRs. As a benchmark, ZPR-6/7 was devoid of many 'real' reactor features, such as simulated control rods and multiple enrichment zones, in its reference form. Those kinds of features were investigated experimentally in variants of the reference ZPR-6/7 or in other critical assemblies in the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program.

Lell, R. M.; Schaefer, R. W.; McKnight, R. D.; Tsiboulia, A.; Rozhikhin, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Measurements of branching fraction ratios and CP-asymmetries in suppressed B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)K-> and B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)?-> decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)K-> and B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)?-> decays, sensitive to the CKM phase {gamma}, using data from 7 fb<sup>-1sup> of integrated luminosity collected by the CDF II detector at the Tevatron collider. We reconstruct a signal for the B<sup>->? D(? K<sup>+?-)K-> suppressed mode with a significance of 3.2 standard deviations, and measure the ratios of the suppressed to favored branching fractions R(K) = [22.0 8.6(stat) 2.6(syst)] x 10<sup>-3sup>, R<sup>+>(K) = [42.6 13.7(stat) 2.8(syst)] x 10<sup>-3sup>, R<sup>->(K) = [3.8 10.3(stat) 2.7(syst)] x 10<sup>-3sup> as well as the direct CP-violating asymmetry A(K) = -0.820.44(stat)0.09(syst) of this mode. Corresponding quantities for B<sup>-> ? D(? K<sup>+?-)?-> decay are also reported.

Aaltonen, T. [Helsinki Inst. of Physics; Gonzalez, Alvarez B. [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S. [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D. [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A. [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A. [Frascati; Antos, J [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Appel, J. A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A. [Purdue; Arisawa, T. [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Search for the Rare Decays KL??<sup>0sup>?>0sup>+-> and KL??<sup>0sup>?>0sup>X>0sup>? ?<sup>0sup>?>0sup>+->  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The KTeV E799 experiment has conducted a search for the rare decays KL??<sup>0sup>?>0sup>+-> and KL??<sup>0sup>?>0sup>X>0sup>? ?<sup>0sup>?>0sup>+->, where the X<sup>0sup> is a possible new neutral boson that was reported by the HyperCP experiment with a mass of (214.3 0.5) MeV/c<sup>2sup>. We find no evidence for either decay. We obtain upper limits of Br(KL??<sup>0sup>?>0sup>X>0sup> ? ?<sup>0sup>?>0sup>+->) < 1.0 x 10<sup>-10sup> and Br(KL? ?<sup>0sup>?>0sup>+->) < 9.2 x 10<sup>-11sup> at the 90% confidence level. This result rules out the pseudoscalar X<sup>0sup> as an explanation of the HyperCP result under the scenario that the d?sX<sup>0sup> coupling is completely real.

Abouzaid, E [Chicago U., EFI; Arenton, M [Virginia U.; Barker, A R [Colorado U.; Bellantoni, L [Fermilab; Blucher, E [Chicago U., EFI; Bock, G J [Fermilab; Cheu, E [Arizona U.; Coleman, R [Fermilab; Corcoran, M D [Rice U.; Cox, B [Virginia U.; Erwin, A R [Wisconsin U., Madison; Campinas State U.

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

19

ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240}Pu core experiments : a fast reactor core with mixed (Pu,U)-oxide fuel and a centeral high{sup 240}Pu zone.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ZPR-6 Assembly 7 (ZPR-6/7) encompasses a series of experiments performed at the ZPR-6 facility at Argonne National Laboratory in 1970 and 1971 as part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program (Reference 1). Assembly 7 simulated a large sodium-cooled LMFBR with mixed oxide fuel, depleted uranium radial and axial blankets, and a core H/D near unity. ZPR-6/7 was designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, so configurations in the Assembly 7 program were as simple as possible in terms of geometry and composition. ZPR-6/7 had a very uniform core assembled from small plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and Pu-U-Mo alloy loaded into stainless steel drawers. The steel drawers were placed in square stainless steel tubes in the two halves of a split table machine. ZPR-6/7 had a simple, symmetric core unit cell whose neutronic characteristics were dominated by plutonium and {sup 238}U. The core was surrounded by thick radial and axial regions of depleted uranium to simulate radial and axial blankets and to isolate the core from the surrounding room. The ZPR-6/7 program encompassed 139 separate core loadings which include the initial approach to critical and all subsequent core loading changes required to perform specific experiments and measurements. In this context a loading refers to a particular configuration of fueled drawers, radial blanket drawers and experimental equipment (if present) in the matrix of steel tubes. Two principal core configurations were established. The uniform core (Loadings 1-84) had a relatively uniform core composition. The high {sup 240}Pu core (Loadings 85-139) was a variant on the uniform core. The plutonium in the Pu-U-Mo fuel plates in the uniform core contains 11% {sup 240}Pu. In the high {sup 240}Pu core, all Pu-U-Mo plates in the inner core region (central 61 matrix locations per half of the split table machine) were replaced by Pu-U-Mo plates containing 27% {sup 240}Pu in the plutonium component to construct a central core zone with a composition closer to that in an LMFBR core with high burnup. The high {sup 240}Pu configuration was constructed for two reasons. First, the composition of the high {sup 240}Pu zone more closely matched the composition of LMFBR cores anticipated in design work in 1970. Second, comparison of measurements in the ZPR-6/7 uniform core with corresponding measurements in the high {sup 240}Pu zone provided an assessment of some of the effects of long-term {sup 240}Pu buildup in LMFBR cores. The uniform core version of ZPR-6/7 is evaluated in ZPR-LMFR-EXP-001. This document only addresses measurements in the high {sup 240}Pu core version of ZPR-6/7. Many types of measurements were performed as part of the ZPR-6/7 program. Measurements of criticality, sodium void worth, control rod worth and reaction rate distributions in the high {sup 240}Pu core configuration are evaluated here. For each category of measurements, the uncertainties are evaluated, and benchmark model data are provided.

Lell, R. M.; Morman, J. A.; Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

20

Rapid prediction of various physical properties for middle distillate fuel utilizing directly coupled liquid chromatography//sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A group property approach has been developed to predict 17 physical properties of middle distillate (e.g., jet and diesel) fuels from experimentally derived liquid chromatography//sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance (LC//sup 1/H NMR) data. In the LC//sup 1/H NMR technique, the fuel is separated according to chemical class and the average molecular structure for each chemical class is then calculated. These average molecular structures form a basis set to predict the physical properties of the fuel. The physical properties that can be obtained in this manner are cetane number, cetane index, density, specific gravity, pour point, flash point, viscosity, filterability, heat of combustion, cloud point, volume percent aromatics, residual carbon content, and the initial, 10%, 50%, 90%, and end boiling points. Fourteen of the correlation coefficients for the predictions are better than 0.90 with 11 of the predictions falling either within or approximately equal to the ASTM method reproducibility for the measurement of the fuel property. The present method also provides chemical insight concerning the influence of chemical structural changes on the physical properties of the fuel as well as requiring much less analysis time and sample volume than corresponding ASTM methods.

Caswell, K.A.; Glass, T.E.; Swann, M.; Dorn, H.C.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Residual thermal stresses in an unsymmetrical cross-ply graphite/epoxy laminate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in parrial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering RESIDUAL THERMAL STRESSES IN AN UNSYMMETRICAL CROSS-PLY GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATE A Thesis by BRIAN DOUGLAS HARPER Approved as to style and content by: r. Y. N itsman (Chair of Committee) Dr...

Harper, Brian Douglas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

A method for the rapid, accurate prediction of the physical properties of middle distillate fuels from LC- sup 1 H NMR derived data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method has been developed whereby various physical properties of middle distillate fuels may be rapidly and accurately calculated by a group property approach from data obtained from a directly coupled Liquid Chromatograph - {sup 1}H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer (LC-{sup 1}H NMR). The physical properties include cetane number, cetane index, density, specific gravity, pour point, flash point, viscosity, filterability, heat of combustion, cloud point, volume percent aromatics, residual carbon content, and initial, 10%, 50%, 90%, and end boiling points. These property predictions have accuracies approaching the error for measurement of the experimental physical property and require less than two hours analysis time per fuel. An interface was developed between the NMR spectrometer and a personal computer to aid in automation of the LC-{sup 1}H NMR data collection and to perform off-line analysis of the LC-{sup 1}H NMR data. This interface and all associated software is described. Also presented is a series of model compounds studies in which the physical properties of pure hydrocarbons (i.e., alkanes, monocyclic and dicyclic aromatics) were predicted by a similar group property approach.

Caswell, K.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Mastication: A fuel reduction and site preperation alternative* ~ e f f~albrook',Han-Sup an^: Russell T. ~raham',Theresa B. ~ a i n ~and Robert ~ e l i n e r ~  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mastication: A fuel reduction and site preperation alternative* ~ e f f~albrook',Han-Sup an piling/burning site preparation and fuel treatment alternatives. Keywords: mastication. activity fuels of mastication used to treat activity and standing live fuels. In this study, a rotary head masticator was used

Fried, Jeremy S.

24

Application of /sup 252/Cf-source driven noise analysis measurements for subcriticality of HFIR fuel elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The approach-to-critical measurements reported were for a plate-type fuel element where the height of the water moderator and side and top reflector were increased. Measurements were also performed with each of the two annuli of the fuel element to verify both the presence of boron in the fuel plates and the proper uranium loading prior to assembly of the two annuli for full submersion measurements. Measurements were also performed with detectors external to the reflector (> 15 cm of water on top, bottom, and side) for the assembled, submerged HFIR fuel element.

King, W.T.; Mihalczo, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Mod`ele Elements Finis d'un Pli Vocal Artificiel avec Couplage Hydro-elastique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mod`ele El´ements Finis d'un Pli Vocal Artificiel avec Couplage Hydro-´elastique N. Hermanta , F formulation variationnelle du couplage hydro-élastique. Un premier calcul hyper-élastique simule le gonflement dans l'analyse modale des vibrations de petite amplitude du système hydro-élastique, permettant ainsi

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

26

Delamination at Thick Ply Drops in Carbon and Glass Fiber Laminates Under Fatigue Loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

used for glass fibers in wind turbine blades. Introduction The primary structural elements in most wind extent, in wind turbine blade technology. 6,7 Methodologies for predicting delamination under static literature, for the wind turbine blade application the effects of thicker plies and lower cost processing

27

Delamination and Failure at Ply Drops in Carbon Fiber Laminates Under Static and Fatigue Loading  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plies typical of wind turbine blades. Strain levels to produce significant delamination at both carbon commonly used for glass fibers. I. Introduction The primary structural elements in most wind turbine blades attention in the general composites literature1-5 and, to a lesser extent, in wind turbine blade technology

28

Effect of Fiber Orientation and Ply Mix on Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Confined Concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concrete by testing under uniaxial compression a designed array of plain concrete cylinders wrappedEffect of Fiber Orientation and Ply Mix on Fiber Reinforced Polymer-Confined Concrete Ching Au, A concrete lateral strain while the kink stress was found to upshift with increasing jacket stiffness

Entekhabi, Dara

29

X-RAY NUCLEAR ACTIVITY IN S{sup 4}G BARRED GALAXIES: NO LINK BETWEEN BAR STRENGTH AND CO-OCCURRENT SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE FUELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stellar bars can lead to gas inflow toward the center of a galaxy and stimulate nuclear star formation. However, there is no compelling evidence on whether they also feed a central supermassive black hole: by measuring the fractions of barred active and inactive galaxies, previous studies have yielded conflicting results. In this paper, we aim to understand the lack of observational evidence for bar-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by studying a sample of 41 nearby (d < 35 Mpc) barred galaxies from the Spitzer Survey for Stellar Structure in Galaxies. We use Chandra observations to measure nuclear 2-10 keV X-ray luminosities and estimate Eddington ratios, together with Spitzer 3.6 ?m imaging to quantify the strength of the stellar bar in two independent ways: (1) from its structure, as traced by its ellipticity and boxiness, and (2) from its gravitational torque Q{sub b} , taken as the maximum ratio of the tangential force to the mean background radial force. In this way, rather than discretizing the presence of both stellar bars and nuclear activity, we are able to account for the continuum of bar strengths and degrees of AGN activity. We find nuclear X-ray sources in 31 out of 41 galaxies with median X-ray luminosity and Eddington ratio of L{sub X} = 4.3 10{sup 38} erg s{sup 1} and L{sub bol}/L{sub Edd} = 6.9 10{sup 6}, respectively, consistent with low-luminosity AGN activity. Including upper limits for those galaxies without nuclear detections, we find no significant correlation between any of the bar strength indicators and the degree of nuclear activity, irrespective of galaxy luminosity, stellar mass, Hubble type, or bulge size. Strong bars do not favor brighter or more efficient nuclear activity, implying that at least for the low-luminosity regime, supermassive black hole fueling is not closely connected to large-scale features.

Cisternas, Mauricio; Knapen, Johan H.; Gonzlez-Martn, Omaira; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago [Instituto de Astrofsica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Gadotti, Dimitri A.; Kim, Taehyun [European Southern Observatory, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Daz-Garca, Simn; Laurikainen, Eija; Salo, Heikki; Comern, Sbastien; Laine, Jarkko [Division of Astronomy, Department of Physical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu FI-90014 (Finland); Ho, Luis C. [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Zaritsky, Dennis; Hinz, Joannah L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Sheth, Kartik [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, Albert [Aix Marseille Universit, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388 Marseille (France); Gil de Paz, Armando [Departamento de Astrofsica, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Holwerda, Benne W., E-mail: mauricio@iac.es [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); and others

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

30

Experimental Cross Sections for Reactions of Heavy Ions and sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb, sup 2 sup 0 sup 9 Bi, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, and sup 2 sup 4 sup 8 Cm Targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The study of the reactions between heavy ions and sup 2 sup 0 sup 8 Pb, sup 2 sup 0 sup 9 Bi, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, and sup 2 sup 4 sup 8 Cm targets was performed to look at the differences between the cross sections of hot and cold fusion reactions. Experimental cross sections were compared with predictions from statistical computer codes to evaluate the effectiveness of the computer code in predicting production cross sections. Hot fusion reactions were studied with the MG system, catcher foil techniques and the Berkeley Gas-filled Separator (BGS). 3n- and 4n-exit channel production cross sections were obtained for the sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U( sup 1 sup 8 O,xn) sup 2 sup 5 sup 6 sup - sup x Fm, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U( sup 2 sup 2 Ne,xn) sup 2 sup 6 sup 0 sup - sup x No, and sup 2 sup 4 sup 8 Cm( sup 1 sup 5 N,xn) sup 2 sup 6 sup 3 sup - sup x Lr reactions and are similar to previous experimental results. The experimental cross sections were accurately modeled by the predictions of the HIVAP code using the Reisdorf ...

Patin, J B

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Neutron spectral reactivity comparison of /sup 235/U, /sup 233/U, /sup 239/Pu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the process of storing fuel from reactors capable of breeding fissile material, it is possible that the beginning-of-life fissile loadings are not the most reactive for the fuel. In this context, it is necessary to consider the bred fissile isotopes to ensure conservative safety margins on storage of these fuels. Of particular interest for the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant were fuels consisting primarily of /sup 235/U as the fissile isotope, such as those for the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-I and -II) and some light water breeder reactor (LWBR) test elements. This study examines the relative worth of additions of the isotopes /sup 239/Pu, /sup 233/U, and /sup 235/U to a /sup 235/U-fueled critical system. The equivalence relationship between fissile isotopes depends in a complex fashion on the neutron spectrum and the relative abundance of the isotopic species.

McBroom, R.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Inverted List Kinetic Monte Carlo with Rejection ap-plied to Directed Self-Assembly of Epitaxial Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inverted List Kinetic Monte Carlo with Rejection ap- plied to Directed Self-Assembly of Epitaxial of subsequently deposited material using a kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm that combines the use of inverted lists finding is that the relative performance of the inverted list algorithm improves with increasing system

Schulze, Tim

33

Study of e<sup>+e-??+?->J/? and Observation of a Charged Charmoniumlike State at Belle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross section for e<sup>+e???+??>J/? between 3.8 and 5.5 GeV is measured with a 967??fb<sup>?1sup> data sample collected by the Belle detector at or near the ?(nS) (n=1,2,,5) resonances. The Y(4260) state is observed, and its resonance parameters are determined. In addition, an excess of ?<sup>+??>J/? production around 4 GeV is observed. This feature can be described by a Breit-Wigner parametrization with properties that are consistent with the Y(4008) state that was previously reported by Belle. In a study of Y(4260)??<sup>+??>J/? decays, a structure is observed in the M(?<sup>>J/?) mass spectrum with 5.2? significance, with mass M=(3894.56.64.5)??MeV/c<sup>2sup> and width ?=(632426)??MeV/c<sup>2sup>, where the errors are statistical and systematic, respectively. This structure can be interpreted as a new charged charmoniumlike state.

Liu, Z. Q.; Shen, C. P.; Yuan, C. Z.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Brodzicka, J.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, P.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doleal, Z.; Drsal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Feindt, M.; Ferber, T.; Frey, A.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Joffe, D.; Julius, T.; Kah, D. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, K. T.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kody, P.; Korpar, S.; Krian, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Libby, J.; Liu, C.; Lukin, P.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Mohanty, G. B.; Moll, A.; Mussa, R.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Oswald, C.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Pestotnik, R.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Rhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santel, D.; Sanuki, T.; Sato, Y.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Seidl, R.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Simon, F.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stari?, M.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Trabelsi, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Vahsen, S. E.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Wang, P.; Wang, X. L.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Yook, Y.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zupanc, A.; Belle Collaboration

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Measurements of the Angular Distributions in the Decays B ? K<sup>(*)> <sup>+-> at CDF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We reconstruct the decays B ? K<sup>(*)> <sup>+-> and measure their angular distributions in pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.8 fb<sup>-1sup>. The transverse polarization asymmetry AT<sup>(2)sup> and the time-reversal-odd charge-and-parity asymmetry Aim are measured for the first time, together with the K* longitudinal polarization fraction FL and the on forward-backward asymmetry AFB, for the decays B<sup>0sup>?K*>0sup>+-> and B<sup>0sup>?K*++->. Our results are among the most accurate to date and consistent with those from other experiments.

Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Gonzalez, B. Alvarez [Oviedo U, Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S. [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D. [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A. [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A. [Frascati; Antos, J. [Comenius U.; Apollinari, G. [Fermilab; Appel, J. A [Fermilab; Apresyan, A. [Purdue U.; Arisawa, T. [Waseda U., Dubna, JINR

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

35

Labelled biomolecules with sup 1 sup 5 sup 3 Sm, sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re, and sup 9 sup 0 Y for targeted radiotherapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A somatostatin analogue Lanreotide was labelled with sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re, sup 9 sup 9 Tc sup m and sup 1 sup 3 sup 1 I. Labelling was accomplished by reduction of cysteine bridge, which provided sulfhydryl groups for chelation with sup 1 sup 8 sup 8 Re/ sup 9 sup 9 Tc sup m. Stannous chloride was used as reducing agent, while tartrate acted as transchelating agent. The lower redox potential of ReO sub 4 sup - than TcO sub 4 sup - required the addition of excess SnCl sub 2 and medium-chelating agent for stabilizing the excess of SnCl sub 2 in solution. ITLC and HPLC techniques employed for monitoring the labelling yield revealed >95% labelling efficiency. Radioiodination of lanreotide was carried out by Chloramine-T and iodogen methods. The radiolabelling yield varied between 40-80%. Chloramine-T method was found more suitable than Iodogen method, because approx 25% of the initial iodine activity was adsorbed on Iodogen coating. Avidin-biotin system is widely used in medical research, especially in pretargete...

Mushtaq, A; Perverz, S

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Determination of the half-life of the ground state of {sup 229}Th by using {sup 232}U and {sup 233}U decay series  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The half-life of the ground state of {sup 229}Th ({sup 229}Th{sup g}) has become an important factor in nuclear technology, for example, in the geological disposal of nuclear spent fuel. However, the values reported in two previous studies are not in agreement. This study reevaluates the half-life of {sup 229}Th{sup g} by using a simple and reliable method. The {sup 232}U/{sup 233}U activity ratio of a {sup 232,233}U sample was measured by high-resolution {alpha}-particle spectrometry. Next, the {sup 228}Th/{sup 229}Th{sup g} activity ratio of the Th sample, which was grown from the {sup 232,233}U sample, was also measured. The half-life of {sup 229}Th{sup g} was calculated from these activity ratios, the growth time, and the half-lives of {sup 232}U, {sup 233}U, and {sup 228}Th. From the results of these five measurements, the half-life of {sup 229}Th{sup g} is determined to be 7932 {+-} 55 yr at a confidence level of 2{sigma}.

Kikunaga, H. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Suzuki, T.; Nomura, M. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Mitsugashira, T. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Shinohara, A. [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Measurements of delayed neutron decay constants and fission yields from {sup 235}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopes of the higher actinide elements are produced as a result of successive radiative capture reactions in the uranium fuel of nuclear reactors. Typically, these transuranic isotopes decay through long chains, have long half-lives, and dominate the long-term toxicity of spent reactor fuel. One of the options for high level waste management is to remove the higher actinide elements from spent fuel by chemical processing, to load them into new special fuel elements, and to transmute them by neutron-induced fission into shorter-lived fission fragments. Reactors designed to achieve high actinide fission (transmutation) rates are called actinide burners. In such reactors, the actinide wastes would constitute much of the fissionable fuel. Due to the high transuranic isotope loadings in the fuel of actinide burners, the neutronic properties of the higher actinide isotopes will have a significant effect on the criticality and safety characteristics of such reactors. While there is an extensive operational database for reactors fueled with uranium and plutonium, operating experience with fuel containing large amounts of actinide wastes is quite limited. Two important neutronic properties of actinide burner cores are their reactivity and their delayed neutron fraction. Both of these properties will be strongly influenced by the neutronic characteristics of the actinide waste isotopes. Here, delayed neutron yields and decay constants for {sup 235}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am were measured at the Texas A and M University TRIGA reactor using a fast pneumatic transfer system. The detection system consisted of an array of BF{sub 3} proportional counters embedded in a polyethylene cylinder. The measured values of the total delayed neutron yield per 100 fissions from thermal neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am were determined to be 1.59 {+-} 0.04, 1.29 {+-} 0.04, 0.49 {+-} 0.02, and 0.84 {+-} 0.04, respectively.

Saleh, H.H.; Parish, T.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Raman, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shinohara, Nobuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

CalCc CONCEPT ApPLIED TO COMPRESSION OF PEAT3 Discussion by G. Mesri,4 Member, ASCE, T. D. Stark,' Associate Member, ASCE,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CalCc CONCEPT ApPLIED TO COMPRESSION OF PEAT3 Discussion by G. Mesri,4 Member, ASCE, T. D. Stark of natural materials, including peats. organic silts, highly sensitive clays, shales, as well as granular this statement and credit Mesri and Castro (1987) for reporting a C)Cc range of 0.02-0.10 for peats. Ac tually

39

Beneficial uses of /sup 241/Am  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the uses of /sup 241/Am and the associated costs and supply. The study shows that /sup 241/Am-fueled radioisotope thermoelectric generators in the range of 1 to 5 W electrical provide the most promising use of kilogram amounts of this isotope. For medical uses, where purity is essential, irradiation of /sup 241/Am can produce 97% pure /sup 238/Pu at $21,000/g. Using a pyro-metallurgical process, /sup 241/Am could be recovered from molten salt extraction (MSE) residues at an estimated incremental cost of $83/g adjusted to reflect the disposal costs of waste products. This cost of recovery is less than the $300/g cost for disposal of the /sup 241/Am contained in the MSE residues.

Mangeng, C.A.; Thayer, G.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

DILEPTON SIGNATURE IN e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}Hl{sup +}e{sup -}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We calculate the lepton distribution in the reaction e{sup +} e{sup -} {yields} (Higgs boson) + (dilepton) mediated by a neutral gauge boson. Propagator effects favor a slow dilepton for which the study of the joint angular distribution of l{sup +} and l{sup -} is an attractive experimental possibility. This distribution is found to be a sensitive probe of the ZZH vertex.

Kelly, R. L.; Shimada, T.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

U.sup.+4 generation in HTER  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A improved device and process for recycling spent nuclear fuels, in particular uranium metal, that facilitates the refinement and recovery of uranium metal from spent metallic nuclear fuels. The electrorefiner device comprises two anodes in predetermined spatial relation to a cathode. The anodese have separate current and voltage controls. A much higher voltage than normal for the electrorefining process is applied to the second anode, thereby facilitating oxidization of uranium (III), U.sup.+, to uranium (IV), U.sup.+4. The current path from the second anode to the cathode is physically shorter than the similar current path from the second anode to the spent nuclear fuel contained in a first anode shaped as a basket. The resulting U.sup.+4 oxidizes and solubilizes rough uranium deposited on the surface of the cathode. A softer uranium metal surface is left on the cathode and is more readily removed by a scraper.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Gay, Eddie C. (Park Forest, IL); Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Homer Glen, IL)

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

42

8-group relative delayed neutron yields for epithermal neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An 8-group representation of relative delayed neutron yields was obtained for epithermal neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu. These data were compared with ENDF/B-VI data in terms of the average half- life of the delayed neutron precursors and on the basis of the dependence of reactivity on the asymptotic period.

Piksaikin, V M; Kazakov, L E; Korolev, G G; Roshchenko, V A; Tertychnyj, R G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Astrophysical S factors of radiative {sup 3}He{sup 4}He, {sup 3}H{sup 4}He, and {sup 2}H{sup 4}He capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of describing the astrophysical S factors for radiative {sup 3}He{sup 4}He capture at energies of up to 15 keV and radiative {sup 3}H{sup 4}He and {sup 2}H{sup 4}He capture at energies of up 5 keV is considered on the basis of the potential cluster model involving forbidden states.

Dubovichenko, S. B., E-mail: sergey@dubovichenko.r [National Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Kazakstan, Fesenkov Astrophysical Institute (Kazakhstan)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

44

/sup 194/ /sup 196/ /sup 198/Pt(t,. cap alpha. )/sup 193/ /sup 195/ /sup 197/Ir reactions with polarized tritons. [17 MeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The /sup 194/ /sup 196/ /sup 198/Pt(t vector, ..cap alpha..)/sup 193/ /sup 195/ /sup 197/Ir reactions were measured. Angular distributions of cross sections and analyzing powers for levels up to approx. 2.5 MeV in each residual nuclide were obtained, and comparisons with DWBA predictions allowed spins, parities, and pickup spectroscopic strengths to be determined. The results are being analyzed with the aim of testing the existence of supersymmmetric structures in nature. 2 figures.

Cizewski, J.A.; Flynn, E.R.; Sunier, J.W.; Brown, R.E.; Burke, D.G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cryogenic Thermal Expansion of Y-12 Graphite Fuel Elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal expansion measurements betwccn 20K and 300K were made on segments of three uranium-loaded Y-12 uncoated graphite fuel elements. The thermal expansion of these fuel elements over this temperature range is represented by the equation: {Delta}L/L = -39.42 x 10{sup -5} + 1.10 x 10{sup -7} T + 6.47 x 10{sup -9} T{sup 2} - 8.30 x 10{sup -12} T{sup 3}.

Eash, D. T.

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

46

Search for the rare decays B{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +}, B{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K*(892){sup 0}, and B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi} at CDF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We search for b{yields}s{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} transitions in B meson (B{sup +}, B{sup 0}, or B{sub s}{sup 0}) decays with 924 pb{sup -1} of pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We find excesses with significances of 4.5, 2.9, and 2.4 standard deviations in the B{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +}, B{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K*(892){sup 0}, and B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi} decay modes, respectively. Using B{yields}J/{psi}h (h=K{sup +}, K*(892){sup 0}, {phi}) decays as normalization channels, we report branching fractions for the previously observed B{sup +} and B{sup 0} decays, B(B{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K{sup +})=(0.59{+-}0.15{+-}0.04)x10{sup -6}, and B(B{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}K*(892){sup 0})=(0.81{+-}0.30{+-}0.10)x10{sup -6}, where the first uncertainty is statistical, and the second is systematic. We set an upper limit on the relative branching fraction B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}{phi})/B(B{sub s}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{phi})<2.6(2.3)x10{sup -3} at the 95(90)% confidence level, which is the most stringent to date.

Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van [Division of High Energy Physics, Department of Physics, University of Helsinki and Helsinki Institute of Physics, FIN-00014, Helsinki (Finland); Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Kim, Y. K.; Kwang, S.; Levy, S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Wolfe, C.; Yang, U. K. [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] (and others)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Measurements of delayed-neutron emission from {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopes of transuranic elements are produced by successive radiative capture reactions in the fuel of a nuclear reactor. Typically, these transuranic isotopes decay through long chains, have long half-lives, and dominate the long-term toxicity of the spent reactor fuel. One of the options for waste management is to remove the transuranics from spent fuel by chemical processing, to load them into new special fuel elements, and to transmute them by neutron-induced fission into shorter lived fission fragments. Previous studies have shown the feasibility of actinide transmutation in either light water reactors or liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors. Due to the anticipated high transuranic loadings in the fuel of actinide burner reactors, the neutronic properties of the transuranic isotopes will have a significant effect on the operational and safety characteristics of such reactors. Experiments to determine delayed-neutron group yields and decay constants for {sup 237}Np, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am have been designed and carried out. The experiments were conducted at Texas A&M University on the TRIGA reactor using a very fast pneumatic transfer system.

Saleh, H.H.; Parish, T.A. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Raman, S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Delayed neutron energy spectra of {sup 87}Br, {sup 88}Br, {sup 89}Br, {sup 90}Br, {sup 137}I, {sup 138}I, {sup 139}I, and {sup 186}Te  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In prior publications, the authors reported measurements of the energy spectra of delayed neutrons for the isotope-separated fission product precursors {sup 93}Rb, {sup 94}Rb, {sup 95}Rb, {sup 96}Rb, {sup 97}Rb, {sup 143}Cs, {sup 144}Cs, and {sup 145}Cs. Such studies of delayed neutron energy spectra have important applications in reactor physics, primarily relating to the fundamental role played by delayed neutrons in the kinetic behavior of nuclear reactors. Measurement of the energy spectra of delayed neutrons for the isotope-separated, fission product precursors {sup 87}Br, {sup 88}Br, {sup 89}Br, {sup 90}Br, {sup 137}I, {sup 138}I, {sup 139}I, and {sup 136}Te are reported for an energy range up to 1,213 keV and with lower cutoff energies of 11.1, 11.1, 29.9, 48.9, 14.2, 23.3, 29.9, and 48.9 keV, respectively. These data were obtained at the TRISTAN Isotope Separation On-Line facility using H{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} gas-filled proportional counters. The data for each of the bromine, iodine, and tellurium isotopes show good qualitative agreement with the published {sup 3}He ionization chamber data at energies above {approximately}200 keV. In addition, they provide definitive spectral information down to their respective cut-off energies.

Greenwood, R.C.; Watts, K.D. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Spectroscopy and applications of the 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} electronic state of {sup 39}K{sup 85}Rb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report new results on the spectroscopy of the 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} electronic state of {sup 39}K{sup 85}Rb. The observations are based on resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization of ultracold KRb molecules starting in vibrational levels v?? = 1823 of the a?{sup 3}?{sup +} state and ionized via the intermediate 3?{sup 3}?{sup +} state. The a-state ultracold molecules are formed by photoassociation of ultracold {sup 39}K and {sup 85}Rb atoms to the 3(0{sup +}) state of KRb followed by spontaneous emission. We discuss the potential applications of this state to future experiments, as a pathway for populating the lowest vibrational levels of the a state as well as the X state.

Banerjee, Jayita, E-mail: jayitarm@gmail.com; Rahmlow, David; Carollo, Ryan; Bellos, Michael; Eyler, Edward E.; Gould, Phillip L.; Stwalley, William C. [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3046 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3046 (United States)

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Biofuel cells: Electro-enzymatic oxidation of formate using formate dehydrogenase, NAD{sup +}, diaphorase, benzyl viologen, and graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have developed an effective electrochemical method to regenerate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) from NADH. Diaphorase (D) was used to oxidize NADH to NAD{sup +} with the concomitant reduction of two equivalents of benzylviologen (BV{sup 2+}) to the mono cation, BV{sup +} to the mono cation, BV{sup +}. The BV{sup +} was then electrochemically oxidized to BV{sup 2+} at a carbon-felt anode: NADH + 2BV{sup 2+} --(D)--> NAD{sup +} + 2BV{sup +} 2BV{sup +}-->(anode)-->2BV{sup 2+}. This system was incorporated into an enzymatic fuel cell that used formate as fuel. Formate dehydrogenase (FDH) was used to oxidize formate to CO{sub 2} with the concomitant 2 e{sup {minus}}, 2H{sup +} reduction of NAD{sup +} to NADH. The NADH was then regenerated using the system described above. The anode of the fuel cell was used to oxidize BV{sup +} to BV{sup 2+}. Blackened Pt gauze as used as the cathode of the fuel cell. The working parameters of the formate/O{sub 2} biofuel cell will be presented including methods to develop this system into the more complex methanol/O{sub 2} biofuel cell.

Palmmore, G.T.R.; Bertschy, H.; Bergens, S.H.; Whitesides, G.M. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

51

Neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections of /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential-neutron-emission cross sections of /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U, /sup 238/U, /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu are measured between approx. = 1.0 and 3.5 MeV with the angle and magnitude detail needed to provide angle-integrated emission cross sections to approx. < 3% accuracies. Emitted-neutron resolutions are quantitatively defined and vary from approx. = 0.1 to 0.35 MeV. The experimental results are corrected for fisson-neutron contributions to obtain pseudo-elastic-neutron-scattering cross sections which, together with the neutron total cross sections, define the non-elastic cross sections to within well specified energy resolutions. These results imply inelastic-neutron-scattering cross sections which are compared with comparable quantities derived from ENDF/B-V. Good general agreement is noted for /sup 232/Th, /sup 233/U, /sup 235/U and /sup 238/U inelastic-scattering values, poor agreement is observed for /sup 240/Pu, and a serious discrepancy exists in the case of /sup 239/Pu.

Smith, A.B.; Guenther, P.T.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Relative g-factor measurements in {sup 54}Fe, {sup 56}Fe, and {sup 58}Fe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The g factors of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} states in {sup 54}Fe and {sup 58}Fe have been measured relative to the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state g factor of {sup 56}Fe using the transient-field technique in inverse kinematics. The results are in satisfactory agreement with recent shell model calculations in the fp model space. For {sup 56}Fe and {sup 58}Fe the g factors approach Z/A and are therefore also consistent with collective interpretations of these 2{sup +} states.

East, M. C.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Chamoli, S. K.; Kibedi, T. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Pinter, J. S.; Crawford, H. L.; Mantica, P. F. [NSCL and Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, Michigan 48824 (United States); Wilson, A. N. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

2{sup +} excitation of the {sup 12}C Hoyle state  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-energy-resolution magnetic spectrometer has been used to measure the {sup 12}C excitation energy spectrum to search for the 2{sup +} excitation of the 7.65 MeV, 0{sup +} Hoyle state. By measuring in the diffractive minimum of the angular distribution for the broad 0{sup +} background, evidence is found for a possible 2{sup +} state at 9.6(1) MeV with a width of 600(100) keV. The implications for the {sup 8}Be+{sup 4}He reaction rate in stellar environments are discussed.

Freer, M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Fujita, H.; Carter, J.; Usman, I. [School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2050 (South Africa); Buthelezi, Z.; Foertsch, S. V.; Neveling, R.; Perez, S. M.; Smit, F. D. [iThemba LABS, P.O. Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Fearick, R. W. [Physics Department, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Papka, P.; Swartz, J. A. [Physics Department, University of Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7602, Stellenbosch (South Africa)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Organic fuel cells and fuel cell conducting sheets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive direct organic fuel cell includes an organic fuel solution and is operative to produce at least 15 mW/cm.sup.2 when operating at room temperature. In additional aspects of the invention, fuel cells can include a gas remover configured to promote circulation of an organic fuel solution when gas passes through the solution, a modified carbon cloth, one or more sealants, and a replaceable fuel cartridge.

Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); Ha, Su (Champaign, IL); Adams, Brian (Savoy, IL)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

55

On the K{sup {pi}} = 0{sup +} rotational bands in the {sup 178}Hf nucleus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results obtained by studying the angular distributions of gamma rays with respect to the neutron-beam axis in the reaction {sup 178}Hf(n, n'{gamma}) involving the deexcitation of the K{sup {pi}} = 0{sup +} rotational bands of {sup 178}Hf are presented.New information about themultipole-mixing parameter {delta} in gamma transitions from the levels of these bands is obtained. The K{sup {pi}} = 0{sub 4}{sup +} band is constructed anew. The relationship between the parameter {delta} for the (2{sup +}0{sub n}-2{sup +}0{sub 1}) gamma transition and the energy gap {Delta}{sub n} = E{sub lev}(2{sup +}0{sub n}) - E{sub lev}(0{sup +}0{sub n}), on one hand, and the quasiparticle structure of the rotational band, on the other hand, is discussed for {sup 178}Hf on the basis of the quasiparticle-phonon model.

Govor, L. I.; Demidov, A. M.; Kurkin, V. A., E-mail: kurkin@polyn.kiae.su; Mikhailov, I. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Concentrations of /sup 207/Bi and /sup 210/Pb-/sup 210/Bi-/sup 210/Po disequilibrium in fish  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive /sup 207/Bi, produced during nuclear testing at the Pacific Proving Grounds, concentrates in the muscle tissue and organs of goatfish and certain pelagic lagoon fish from Bikini and Enewetak Atolls. It is reasonable to expect that fish capable of accumulating /sup 207/Bi could also be efficient accumulators of other bismuth isotopes - namely /sup 210/Bi, the daughter of naturally occurring /sup 210/Pb. Therefore, /sup 210/Bi and consequently /sup 210/Po, the decay product of /sup 210/Bi, would be expected in notable excess over the precursor /sup 210/Pb in specific tissues. To test this assumption, we compared concentrations of /sup 210/Pb, /sup 210/Bi, and /sup 210/Po in muscle, liver, and bone separated from some reef species from the Marshall Islands. Concentrations of /sup 210/Bi in muscle and liver were found to exceed those of its precursor by factors of 2 to 15. The excess /sup 210/Bi in some species, however, is not from the environmental sources (either food or water) from which /sup 207/Bi is derived. The data suggest that the excess /sup 210/Bi may be translocated to muscle and liver tissue following the decay of /sup 210/Pb in bone.

Noshkin, V.E.; Wong, K.M.; Eagle, R.J.; Jokela, T.A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Production of K<sup>+K?> pairs in proton-proton collisions below the ? meson threshold  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pp?ppK<sup>+K?> reaction was measured below the ? threshold at a beam energy of 2.568 GeV using the COSY-ANKE magnetic spectrometer. By assuming that the four-body phase space is distorted only by the product of two-body final-state interactions, fits to a variety of one-dimensional distributions permit the evaluation of differential and total cross sections. The shapes of the distributions in the Kp and Kpp invariant masses are reproduced only if the K?p interaction is even stronger than that found at higher energy. The cusp effect in the K<sup>+K?> distribution at the K<sup>0sup>K{bar}>0sup> threshold is much more clear and some evidence is also found for coupling between the K?p and K?<sup>0sup>n channels. However, the energy dependence of the total cross section cannot be reproduced by considering only a simple product of such pairwise final-state interactions.

Ye, Q. J.; Hartmann, M.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S.; Dzyuba, A.; Gao, H.; Gebel, R.; Hejny, V.; Kacharava, A.; Lorentz, B.; Mchedlishvili, D.; Merzliakov, S.; Mielke, M.; Mikirtytchiants, S.; Ohm, H.; Papenbrock, M.; Polyanskiy, A.; Serdyuk, V.; Stein, H. J.; Strher, H.; Trusov, S.; Valdau, Yu.; Wilkin, C.; Wstner, P.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Study of the B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay and measurement of the B{sup -}{yields}X(3872)K{sup -} branching fraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the decay B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} using 117x10{sup 6} BB events collected at the Y(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy storage ring. We measure the branching fractions B (B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(116{+-}7(stat.){+-}9(syst.))x10{sup -5} and B (B{sup -}{yields}X(3872)K{sup -})x B (X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(1.28{+-}0.41)x10{sup -5} and find the mass of the X(3872) to be 3873.4{+-}1.4 MeV/c{sup 2}. We search for the h{sub c} narrow state in the decay B{sup -}{yields}h{sub c}K{sup -}, h{sub c}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and for the decay B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, with D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. We set the 90% C.L. limits B(B{sup -}{yields}h{sub c}K{sup -})xB(h{sub c}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})<3.4x10{sup -6} and B(B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}D{sup 0}{pi}{sup -})<5.2x10{sup -5}.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Palano, A.; Pompili, A. [Universita di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039 (China); Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. [University of Bergen, Inst. of Physics, N-5007 Bergen (Norway)] [and others

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Study of the K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state in B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup +}{yields}{psi}'K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using 535x10{sup 6} B-meson pairs collected by the Belle detector at the KEKB e{sup +}e{sup -} collider, we measure branching fractions of (7.16{+-}0.10(stat){+-}0.60(syst)x10{sup -4} for B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and (4.31{+-}0.20(stat){+-}0.50(syst))x10{sup -4} for B{sup +}{yields}{psi}'K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. We perform amplitude analyses to determine the resonant structure of the K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} final state in B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup +}{yields}{psi}'K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and find that the K{sub 1}(1270) is a prominent component of both decay modes. There is significant interference among the different intermediate states, which leads, in particular, to a striking distortion of the {rho} line shape due to the {omega}. Based on the results of the fit to the B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} data, the relative decay fractions of the K{sub 1}(1270) to K{rho}, K{omega}, and K*(892){pi} are consistent with previous measurements, but the decay fraction to K{sub 0}*(1430) is significantly smaller. Finally, by floating the mass and width of the K{sub 1}(1270) in an additional fit of the B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} data, we measure a mass of (1248.1{+-}3.3(stat){+-}1.4(syst)) MeV/c{sup 2} and a width of (119.5{+-}5.2(stat){+-}6.7(syst)) MeV/c{sup 2} for the K{sub 1}(1270).

Guler, H. [University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Universite de Montreal, Montreal (Canada); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Arinstein, K.; Aulchenko, V.; Eidelman, S.; Kuzmin, A.; Poluektov, A.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Aushev, T. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bakich, A. M.; McOnie, S. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Balagura, V.; Liventsev, D.; Mizuk, R.; Pakhlov, P. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Barberio, E.; Julius, T.; Sevior, M. E. [University of Melbourne, School of Physics, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Belous, K. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation)

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Low Energy Fission of {sup 256}No, {sup 270}Sg, {sup 271}Hs and {sup 286}112 Nuclei Formed in Reactions with {sup 22}Ne and {sup 48}Ca Ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fusion-fission reactions {sup 22}Ne + {sup 248}Cm and {sup 22}Ne + {sup 249}Cf were investigated at projectile energies equal to 102 and 127 MeV. Mass-energy distributions and yields are shown. Two-dimensional plots of TKE vs fragment mass are also shown for {sup 48}Ca reactions at 230 MeV with {sup 208}Pb and {sup 238}U, leading to {sup 256}No and {sup 286}112.

Itkis, M.G.; Kondratiev, N.A.; Kozulin, E.M.; Krupa, L.; Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Pokrovsky, I.V.; Prokhorova, E.V.; Rusanov, A. Ya.

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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61

Delayed neutron yield from fast neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurements of the total delayed neutron yield from fast neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U were made. The experimental method based on the periodic irradiation of the fissionable sample by neutrons from a suitable nuclear reaction had been employed. The preliminary results on the energy dependence of the total delayed neutron yield from fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U are obtained. According to the comparison of experimental data with our prediction based on correlation properties of delayed neutron characteristics, it is concluded that the value of the total delayed neutron yield near the threshold of (n,f) reaction is not a constant.

Piksaikin, V M; Isaev, S G; Kazakov, L E; Roshchenko, V A; Tertytchnyi, R G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via ?<sup>*>p ? n?<sup>+> at high Q<sup>2sup>  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the n?<sup>+> channel at relatively high momentum transfer (Q<sup>2sup> up to 4.2 GeV<sup>2sup>). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole (E0+), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor G1 within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor GA. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly 4? CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754-GeV electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the ?-N multipole E0+/GD were measured using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost Q<sup>2sup> independent.

Park, K; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Batourine, V; Bedlinskiy, I; Bennett, R P; Biselli, A S; Bookwalter, C; Boiarinov, S; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Charles, G; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D'Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Deur, A; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Euginio, P; Fedotov, G; Fradi, A; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Graham, L; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Hanretty, C; Heddle, D; Hicks, K; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Khandaker, M; Khertarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, A; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kvaltine, N D; Livingston, K; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, J D; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Pappalardo, L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, S; Anefalos Pereira, S; Phelps, E; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabati ee, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, E S; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strakovsky, I I; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, C E; Tian, Y; Tkachenko, S; Trivedi, A; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vlassov, A V; Voutier, E; Watts, D P; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

63

Dalitz analysis of B{yields}K{pi}{sup +}{psi}{sup '} decays and the Z(4430){sup +}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a Dalitz plot analysis of B{yields}K{pi}{sup +}{psi}{sup '} decays, we find a signal for Z(4430){sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{psi}{sup '} with a mass M=(4443{sub -12-13}{sup +15+19}) MeV/c{sup 2}, width {gamma}=(107{sub -43-56}{sup +86+74}) MeV, product branching fraction B(B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}Z(4430){sup +})xB(Z(4430){sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{psi}{sup '})=(3.2{sub -0.9-1.6}{sup +1.8+5.3})x10{sup -5}, and significance of 6.4{sigma} that agrees with previous Belle measurements based on the same data sample. In addition, we determine the branching fraction B(B{sup 0}{yields}K*(892){sup 0}{psi}{sup '})=(5.52{sub -0.32-0.58}{sup +0.35+0.53})x10{sup -4} and the fraction of K*(892){sup 0} mesons that are longitudinally polarized f{sub L}=(44.8{sub -2.7-5.3}{sup +4.0+4.0})%. These results are obtained from a 605 fb{sup -1} data sample that contains 657x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected near the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

Mizuk, R.; Balagura, V.; Chistov, R.; Danilov, M.; Liventsev, D.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Tikhomirov, I.; Uglov, T. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Adachi, I.; Dalseno, J.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Sakai, Y.; Trabelsi, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)] (and others)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Structure of {sup 81}Ga populated from the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 81}Zn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the results of the {beta}-decay of {sup 81}Zn. The experiment was performed at the CERN ISOLDE facility in the framework of a systematic ultra-fast timing investigation of neutron-rich nuclei populated in the decay of Zn. The present analysis included {beta}-gated {gamma}-ray singles and {gamma}-{gamma} coincidences from the decay of {sup 81}Zn to {sup 81}Ga and leads to a new and much more extensive level scheme of {sup 81}Ga. A new half-life of {sup 81}Zn is provided.

Paziy, V.; Mach, H.; Fraile, L. M.; Olaizola, B.; Udias, J. M. [Grupo de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Aprahamian, A.; Bucher, B. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame (United States); Bernards, C. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Koeln, Germany. and Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, CT-06520 (United States); Briz, J. A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Chiara, C. J. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland, USA. and Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Dlouhy, Z. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the ASCR, Rez (Czech Republic); Gheorghe, I.; Ghita, D.; Lica, R.; Marginean, N.; Marginean, R.; Stanoiu, M.; Stroe, L. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Magurele (Romania); Hoff, P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oslo, Oslo (Norway); Koester, U. [Institut Laue Langevin, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); and others

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

65

Search for B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sup +} and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the results of searches for B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sup +} and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sub S}{sup 0} decays, using a sample of 388x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected with the Belle detector at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance. No statistically significant signal is found for either of the two decay modes and upper limits for the branching fractions are determined to be B(B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sup +})<8.8x10{sup -5} and B(B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{eta}{sup '}K{sub S}{sup 0})<2.5x10{sup -5} at 90% confidence level.

Xie, Q. L.; Zhang, C. C. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Gershon, T.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Sumisawa, K.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)] (and others)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Photopion production in [sup 3]H and [sup 3]He  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The photopion production of [sup 3]He([gamma],[pi][sup +])[sup 3]H has been calculated by the distorted wave impulse approximation in order to include the final state interaction (FSI) between [pi][sup +] and [sup 3]H. The optical potentials used to describe the FSI are the Stricker, McManus, and Carr potential and the Kim potential. The inclusion of the FSI improves significantly the theoretical estimations compared with the results of plane wave impulse approximation. In case of low momentum transfer the contribution of [ital E][sub 1][sup +](3/2) amplitude is shown to play an additional role in obtaining an agreement with the experimental results.

Cheoun, M.K.; Maruyama, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Sasakawa, T. (Tohoku University, Sendai 980 (Japan))

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Development of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production and their chemical processing status 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the world`s supply of {sup 99m}{Tc} for medical purposes is currently produced from {sup 99}Mo derived from the fastening of high enriched uranium (HEU). Substitution of low enriched uranium (LEU) silicide fuel for the HEU alloy and aluminide fuels used in current target designs will allow equivalent {sup 99}Mo yields with little change in target geometries. Substitution of uranium metal for uranium oxide films in other target designs will also allow the substitution of LEU for HEU. In 1993, DOE renewed funding that was terminated in 1990 for development of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production. During the past year, our efforts were to (1) renew contact with {sup 99}Mo producers, (2) define the means to test our process for recovering {sup 99}Mo from irradiated LEU-silicide targets, and (3) begin to test our process on spent LEU-silicide miniplates stored at ANL from past fuel development studies.

Vandegrift, G.F.; Hutter, J.C.; Srinivasan, B.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Fossil fuels -- future fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Regulatory function of cytomegalovirus-specific CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CMV infection is characterized by high of frequencies of CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T cells. Here we demonstrate that CMV-specific CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} cells are regulatory T cells (T{sub R}). CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} cells sorted from CMV-stimulated PBMC of CMV-seropositive donors inhibited de novo CMV-specific proliferation of autologous PBMC in a dose-dependent fashion. Compared with the entire CMV-stimulated CD4{sup +} T-cell population, higher proportions of CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} expressed FoxP3, TGFbeta, granzyme B, perforin, GITR and PD-1, lower proportions expressed CD127 and PD1-L and similar proportions expressed CD25, CTLA4, Fas-L and GITR-L. CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} expanded in response to IL-2, but not to CMV antigenic restimulation. The anti-proliferative effect of CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} significantly decreased after granzyme B or TGFbeta inhibition. The CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} of HIV-infected and uninfected donors had similar phenotypes and anti-proliferative potency, but HIV-infected individuals had higher proportions of CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R}. The CMV-CD4{sup +}CD27{sup -}CD28{sup -} T{sub R} may contribute to the downregulation of CMV-specific and nonspecific immune responses of CMV-infected individuals.

Tovar-Salazar, Adriana; Patterson-Bartlett, Julie; Jesser, Renee [University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Weinberg, Adriana, E-mail: Adriana.Weinberg@ucdenver.ed [University of Colorado Denver School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Two-quasiparticle structures and isomers in {sup 168}Er, {sup 170}Er, and {sup 172}Er  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The stable and neutron-rich isotopes {sup 168}Er, {sup 170}Er, and {sup 172}Er have been studied with Gammasphere using inelastic excitation with energetic {sup 136}Xe beams. The previously assigned structures based on the proposed K{sup p}i=4{sup -} isomeric intrinsic states in both {sup 168}Er and {sup 170}Er have been re-evaluated and an equivalent band identified in {sup 172}Er. In {sup 170}Er, the identification of a K{sup p}i=6{sup -} band with transitions close in energy to those of the 4{sup -} band leads to a modified interpretation, since the overlap would have compromised previous analyses. The g{sub K}-g{sub R} values for the 4{sup -} bands deduced from the in-band gamma-ray intensities for the sequence of isotopes suggest a predominantly two-neutron configuration in {sup 168}Er, an equally mixed two-neutron, two-proton configuration in {sup 170}Er, and a two-proton configuration in {sup 172}Er. A comprehensive decay scheme for the previously proposed 6{sup +} isomer in {sup 172}Er has also been established, as well as band structures built on this isomer that closely resemble the 6{sup +} and 7{sup -} two-neutron structures known in the isotone {sup 174}Yb. The implied K hindrances are discussed. The main decay path of the 6{sup +} isomer occurs through the newly identified 4{sup -} isomer. The measured lifetimes of the 4{sup -} and 6{sup +} isomers in {sup 172}Er are 57(3) and 822(90) ns, respectively. Multiquasiparticle calculations support the suggested configuration changes across the isotopic chain.

Dracoulis, G. D.; Lane, G. J. [Department of Nuclear Physics, R.S.P.E, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Kondev, F. G.; Chiara, C. J. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Watanabe, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; McCutchan, E. A. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Stefanescu, I. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

Improving low temperature properties of synthetic diesel fuels derived from oil shale. Alternative fuels utilization program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of additives to improve the cold flow properties of shale oil derived fuels boiling in the diesel fuel range was evaluated. Because a commercial shale oil industry did not exist to provide actual samples of finished fuels, a representative range of hydroprocessed shale oil fractions was prepared for use in the additive testing work. Crude oil shale from Occidental Shale Company was fractionated to give three liquids in the diesel fuel boiling range. The initial boiling point in each case was 325/sup 0/F (163/sup 0/C). The final boiling points were 640/sup 0/F (338/sup 0/C), 670/sup 0/F (354/sup 0/C) and 700/sup 0/F (371/sup 0/F). Each fraction was hydrotreated to three different severities (800, 1200 and 1500 psi total pressure) over a Shell 324 nickel molybdate on alumina catalyst at 710 to 750/sup 0/F to afford 9 different model fuels. A variety of commercial and experimental additives were evaluated as cold flow improvers in the model fuels at treat levels of 0.04 to 0.4 wt %. Both the standard pour point test (ASTM D97) and a more severe low temperature flow test (LTFT) were employed. Reductions in pour points of up to 70/sup 0/F and improvements in LTFT temperatures up to 16/sup 0/F were achieved. It is concluded that flow improver additives can play an important role in improving the cold flow properties of future synthetic fuels of the diesel type derived from oil shale.

Frankenfeld, J.W.; Taylor, W.F.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Evidence for the Onset of Color Transparency in ?<sup>0sup> Electroproduction off Nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the nuclear transparency of the incoherent diffractive A(e,e'?<sup>0sup>) process in <sup>12sup>C and <sup>56sup>Fe targets relative to <sup>2sup>H using a 5 GeV electron beam. The nuclear transparency, the ratio of the produced {rho}{sup 0}'s on a nucleus relative to deuterium, which is sensitive to ?A interaction, was studied as function of the coherence length (Ic), a lifetime of the hadronic fluctuation of the virtual photon, and the four-momentum transfer squared (Q<sup>2sup>). While the transparency for both <sup>12sup>C and <sup>56sup>Fe showed no Ic dependence, a significant Q<sup>2sup> dependence was measured, which is consistent with calculations that included the color transparency effects.

Guo, L; Hanretty, C; Hicks, K; Holt, R J; Hyde, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jawalker, S S; Keller, D; Khandaker, M; Kheterpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kuznetsov, V; Laget, J M; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I.D. J; Mao, Y; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McAndrew, J; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mineeva, T; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moreno, B; Moutarde, H; Muneva, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Ni, A; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Pappalardo, L; Paremuzyan, R; Park, K; Park, S; Pasyuk, E; Anefalos Pereira, S; Phelps, E; Pisano, S; Pozdniakov, S; Price, J W; Procureur, S; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Reimer, P E; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, E S; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, C E; Tedeschi, D J; Tkachenko, S; Ungaro, M; Vernarsky, B; Vineyard, M F; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Watts, D; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zhao, B; Zhao, Z W

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

Measurement of the mass difference m(B{sup 0})-m(B{sup +})  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using 230x10{sup 6} BB events recorded with the BABAR detector at the e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings PEP-II, we reconstruct approximately 4100 B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and 9930 B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +} decays with J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} and e{sup +}e{sup -}. From the measured B-momentum distributions in the e{sup +}e{sup -} rest frame, we determine the mass difference m(B{sup 0})-m(B{sup +})=(+0.33{+-}0.05{+-}0.03) MeV/c{sup 2}.

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules, IN2P3/CNRS et Universite de Savoie, F-74941 Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E. [Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat de Fisica, Departament ECM, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M. [Universita di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L. [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)] (and others)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Inventory of site-derived {sup 36}Cl in the Snake River plain aquifier, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste management practices at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in Idaho have introduced {sup 36}Cl (T{sub 1/2} = 301,000 yr) into the Snake River Plain aquifer underlying the site. The {sup 36}Cl is believed to originate from neutron activation of stable {sup 35}Cl in nuclear fuels (principally) and in reactor cooling/process water. Wastewater releases of {sup 3}H at the INEL have been documented by the site operators for the period 1952 to 1988. During this time, approximately 1.2 PBq of {sup 3}H (30,000 Ci) were introduced to the subsurface through disposal wells and seepage ponds. By sampling a number of monitoring and production wells downgradient from points of introduction, {sup 3}H movement and dispersion in the groundwater have been documented by the U.S. Geological Survey. The present report uses these historical {sup 3}H release and monitoring data to choose hydrologic parameters (matrix porosity and plume penetration depth) that produce concordance between the {sup 3}H release estimates and the inventory calculated from measurements of {sup 3}H in the subsurface. These parameters are then applied to {sup 36}Cl isopleths to generate an estimated {sup 36}Cl inventory in the subsurface. Using assumptions about irradiation times, neutron fluxes, and total fuel processed, as little as 23 g of stable chloride impurity in fuel elements would be adequate to produce the amount of {sup 36}Cl estimated to be in the groundwaters underlying the site. The highest atom concentration of {sup 36}Cl measured onsite (222x10{sup 10} atoms 1{sup -1}) corresponds to an activity level of {approximately}4 pCi 1{sup -1} and represents 0.2 percent of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) drinking water standard for this radionuclide (2000 pCi 1{sup -1}).

Beasley, T.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for {sup 99}Mo, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 140}Ba, {sup 141,143}Ce, and {sup 147}Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the {sup 147}Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by {approx}5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except for {sup 99}Mo where the present results are about 4%-relative higher for neutrons incident on {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U. Additionally, our results illustrate the importance of representing the incident energy dependence of fission product yields over the fast neutron energy range for high-accuracy work, for example the {sup 147}Nd from neutron reactions on plutonium. An upgrade to the ENDF library, for ENDF/B-VII.1, based on these and other data, is described in a companion paper to this work.

Selby, H.D., E-mail: hds@lanl.go [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Study of the radiative decay J/psi. -->. gamma. eta. pi. /sup +/. pi. /sup -/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mark III collaboration has performed a high statistics study of the reaction J/psi ..-->.. ..gamma..eta..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/, with two different final states of the eta, eta ..-->.. ..gamma gamma.. and eta ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/. Both modes have a broad structure from 1.2 to 1.9 GeV/c/sup 2/ and two structures, which decay via delta/sup + -/..pi../sup - +/, delta/sup + -/ ..-->.. eta..pi../sup + -/, are identified at 1.28 and 1.39 GeV/c/sup 2/. No signal is observed in the iota(1440) signal region.

Becker, J.J.; Blaylock, G.T.; Bolton, T.; Brown, J.S.; Bunnell, K.O.; Burnett, T.H.; Cassell, R.E.; Coffman, D.; Cook, V.; Coward, D.H.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Directional correlation of [gamma] transitions in [sup 72]Ge following the decay of [sup 72]Ga  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Directional correlations of coincident gamma transitions in [sup 72]Ge have been measured following the [beta][sup [minus

Landulfo, E.; Saxena, R.N.; Zamboni, C.B.; Lapolli, A.L. (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear de Brasil, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Model independent measurement of form factors in the decay D{sup +}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present model independent measurements of the helicity basis form factors in the decay D{sup +}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} obtained from about 2 800 decays reconstructed from a 281 pb{sup -1} data sample collected at the {psi}(3770) center-of-mass energy with the CLEO-c detector. We confirm the existence of a previously observed spin-zero K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} component interfering with the K*{sup 0} amplitude. We see no evidence for additional d- or f-wave contributions.

Shepherd, M. R. [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Besson, D. [University of Kansas, Lawrence, Kansas 66045 (United States); Pedlar, T. K. [Luther College, Decorah, Iowa 52101 (United States); Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Gong, D. T.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Smith, A.; Zweber, P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A. [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Ernst, J. [State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States); Severini, H. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)] (and others)

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Observation of a Resonancelike Structure in the {pi}{sup +-}{psi}{sup '} Mass Distribution in Exclusive B{yields}K{pi}{sup +-}{psi}{sup '} Decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A distinct peak is observed in the {pi}{sup {+-}}{psi}{sup '} invariant mass distribution near 4.43 GeV in B{yields}K{pi}{sup {+-}}{psi}{sup '} decays. A fit using a Breit-Wigner resonance shape yields a peak mass and width of M=4433{+-}4(stat){+-}2(syst) MeV and {gamma}=45{sub -13}{sup +18}(stat){sub -13}{sup +30}(syst) MeV. The product branching fraction is determined to be B(B{sup 0}{yields}K{sup {+-}}Z{sup {+-}}(4430))xB(Z{sup {+-}}(4430){yields}{pi}{sup {+-}}{psi}{sup '})=(4.1{+-}1.0(stat){+-}1.4(syst))x10{sup -5}, where Z{sup {+-}}(4430) is used to denote the observed structure. The statistical significance of the observed peak is 6.5{sigma}. These results are obtained from a 605 fb{sup -1} data sample that contains 657x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected near the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

Choi, S.-K. [Gyeongsang National University, Chinju (Korea, Republic of); Olsen, S. L. [University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Adachi, I.; Brodzicka, J.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)] (and others)

2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

80

Dual baseline search for muon neutrino disappearance at 0.5 eV<sup>2sup> < Delta m<sup>2sup> < 40 eV<sup>2sup>  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SciBooNE and MiniBooNE collaborations report the results of a ?? disappearance search in the &Delta'm<sup>2sup> region of 0.5-40 eV<sup>2sup>. The neutrino rate as measured by the SciBooNE tracking detectors is used to constrain the rate at the MiniBooNE Cherenkov detector in the first joint analysis of data from both collaborations. Two separate analyses of the combined data samples set 90% confidence level (CL) limits on ?? disappearance in the 0.5-40 eV<sup>2sup> ?m<sup>2sup> region, with an improvement over previous experimental constraints between 10 and 30 eV<sup>2sup>

Mahn, K B.M. [Columbia U.; Nakajima, Y [Kyoto U.; Aguilar-Arevalo, A A [Mexico U., CEN; Alcaraz-Aunion, J L [Barcelona, IFAE; Anderson, C E [Yale U.; Bazarko, A O [Princeton U.; Brice, S J [Fermilab; Brown, B C [Fermilab; Bugel, L [MIT; Cao, J [Michigan U.; Catala-Perez, J [Valencia U.; Columbia U.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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81

INVESTIGATION ON THE FLAME EXTINCTION LIMIT OF FUEL BLENDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lean flame extinction limits of binary fuel mixtures of methane (CH{sub 4}), propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}), and ethane (C{sub 2}H{sub 6}) were measured using a twin-flame counter-flow burner. Experiments were conducted to generate an extinction equivalence ratio vs. global stretch rate plot and an extrapolation method was used to calculate the equivalence ratio corresponding to an experimentally unattainable zero-stretch condition. The foregoing gases were selected because they are the primary constitutes of natural gas, which is the primary focus of the present study. To validate the experimental setup and methodology, the flame extinction limit of pure fuels at zero stretch conditions were also estimated and compared with published values. The lean flame extinction limits of methane (f{sub ext} = 4.6%) and propane (f{sub ext} = 2.25%) flames measured in the present study agreed with the values reported in the literature. It was observed that the flame extinction limit of fuel blends have a polynomial relation with the concentration of component fuels in the mixture. This behavior contradicts with the commonly used linear Le Chatelier's approximation. The experimentally determined polynomial relations between the flame extinction limits of fuel blends (i.e. methane-propane and methane-ethane) and methane concentration are as follows: (1) Methane-Propane--%f{sub ext} = (1.05 x 10{sup -9}) f{sup 5}-(1.3644 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(6.40299 x 10{sup -6}) f{sup 3}-(1.2108459 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2}+(2.87305329 x 10{sup -3}) f+2.2483; (2) Methane-Ethane--%f{sub ext} = (2.1 x 10{sup -9})f{sup 5}-(3.5752 x 10{sup -7}) f{sup 4}+(2.095425 x 10{sup -5}) f{sup 3}-(5.037353 x 10{sup -4}) f{sup 2} + 6.08980409 f + 2.8923. Where f{sub ext} is the extinction limits of methane-propane and methane-ethane fuel blends, and f is the concentration (% volume) of methane in the fuel mixture. The relations were obtained by fitting fifth order curve (polynomial regression) to experimentally measured extinction limits at different mixture conditions. To extend the study to a commercial fuel, the flame extinction limit for Birmingham natural gas (a blend of 95% methane, 5% ethane and 5% nitrogen) was experimentally determined and was found to be 3.62% fuel in the air-fuel mixture.

Ahsan R. Choudhuri

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Subbarrier fusion of {sup 9}Li with {sup 70}Zn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross section for the fusion of {sup 9}Li with {sup 70}Zn was measured for seven projectile energies spanning the subbarrier and near-barrier region (E{sub c.m.} ranging from 9.7 to 13.4 MeV) using the ISAC facility at TRIUMF. {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of the irradiated target foils along with {beta} counting of the chemically separated Ge and As evaporation residues were used to measure the fusion cross sections. Statistical model calculations were used to correct for the yields of any unobserved nuclei. The observed fusion excitation function shows significant subbarrier fusion enhancement with a large deduced value of the fusion radius, R{sub B}=12.1{+-}1.0 fm. Coupled-channels calculations do not account for the observed subbarrier enhancement. The implications of this finding for understanding the fusion of {sup 11}Li are discussed.

Loveland, W.; Vinodkumar, A. M.; Naik, R. S.; Sprunger, P. H.; Matteson, B.; Neeway, J. [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Trinczek, M.; Dombsky, M.; Machule, P.; Ottewell, D. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Cross, D. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5A 1S6 (Canada); Gagnon, K.; Mills, W. J. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5A 1S6 (Canada)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

First measurements of J/{psi} decays into {sigma}{sup +}{sigma}{sup -} and {xi}{sup 0}{xi}{sup 0}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on 58x10{sup 6} J/{psi} events collected with the BESII detector at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider, the baryon pair processes J/{psi}{yields}{sigma}{sup +}{sigma}{sup -} and J/{psi}{yields}{xi}{sup 0}{xi}{sup 0} are observed for the first time. The branching fractions are measured to be B(J/{psi}{yields}{sigma}{sup +}{sigma}{sup -})=(1.50{+-}0.10{+-}0.22)x10{sup -3} and B(J/{psi}{yields}{xi}{sup 0}{xi}{sup 0})=(1.20{+-}0.12{+-}0.21)x10{sup -3}, where the first errors are statistical and the second ones are systematic.

Ablikim, M.; Bai, J. Z.; Bai, Y.; Cai, X.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, H. X.; Chen, J. C.; Chen, Jin; Chen, Y. B.; Chu, Y. P.; Deng, Z. Y.; Du, S. X.; Fang, J.; Gao, C. S.; Gu, S. D.; Guo, Y. N.; He, K. L.; Heng, Y. K.; Hu, H. M.; Hu, T. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100049 (China)] (and others)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

{sup 129}I, {sup 131}I and {sup 127}I in animal thyroids after the Chernobyl nuclear accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A small number of animal thyroids from Bad Hall, Austria; Ulm, Germany; and Steinkjer, Norway had {sup 131}I (half-life 8.06 d) measured between 21 and 72 d following the nuclear accident at Chernobyl on 26 April 1986. Nine years later {sup 129}I (half-life 1.57 x 10{sup 7} y) fission product and natural {sup 127}I were measured in the same thyroids. The mass ratios, {sup 129}I/{sup 131}I were calculated to the date of the Chernobyl accident and they ranged between 13 and 71. These ratios are compared to the expected ratios within an operating nuclear reactor during 2 y of operation, where the {sup 129}I/{sup 131}I{sup -1} ratio never exceeded 30. The observed ratio of {sup 129}I to natural {sup 127}I in thyroids ranged from 5 to 200 times the ratio before the accident, except that the Norwegian thyroids had {sup 129}I/{sup 127}I ratios which were less than the ratios of pre-Chernobyl thyroids from Ulm. These studies show the {sup 129}I and {sup 131}I from the Chernobyl accident were accumulated with natural {sup 127}I in animal thyroids but the isotope ratios, calculated to the release date, had wide ranges. The {sup 131}I radioactive exposure might be estimated from a fission product mixture by measuring {sup 129}I in thyroids long after the exposure to {sup 131}I, but the results would probably show a wide range of possibilities. The determining variables should be evaluated. We know of no previous data regarding both {sup 131}I and {sup 129}I in thyroid glands during the first 3 mo after the Chernobyl accident. 16 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

VanMiddleworth, L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis, TN (United States); Handle, J. [Radiooekologie Universitaet, Hannover (Germany)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Nuclear Fuel Cladding Performance during 4-Point Tubular Bend Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE NE) established the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program to develop technologies and other solutions to improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development Pathway in the LWRS program encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. Recent investigations of potential options for accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) cladding. One of the proposed SiC-based fuel cladding designs being investigated incorporates a SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) as a structural material supplementing an internal Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) liner tube, referred to as the hybrid clad design. Characterization of the advanced cladding designs will include a number of out-of-pile (nonnuclear) tests, followed by in-pile irradiation testing of the most promising designs. One of the out-of-pile characterization tests provides measurement of the mechanical properties of the cladding tube using four point bend testing. Although the material properties of the different subsystems (materials) will be determined separately, in this paper we present results of 4-point bending tests performed on fully assembled hybrid cladding tube mock-ups, an assembled Zr-4 cladding tube mock-up as a standard and initial testing results on bare SiC-CMC sleeves to assist in defining design parameters. The hybrid mock-up samples incorporated SiC-CMC sleeves fabricated with 7 polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) cycles. To provide comparative information; both 1- and 2-ply braided SiC-CMC sleeves were used in this development study. Preliminary stress simulations were performed using the BISON nuclear fuel performance code to show the stress distribution differences for varying lengths between loading points and clad configurations. The 2-ply sleeve samples show a higher bend momentum compared to those of the 1-ply sleeve samples. This is applicable to both the hybrid mock-up and bare SiC-CMC sleeve samples. Comparatively both the 1- and 2-ply hybrid mock-up samples showed a higher bend stiffness and strength compared with the standard Zr-4 mock-up sample. The characterization of the hybrid mock-up samples showed signs of distress and preliminary signs of fraying at the protective Zr-4 sleeve areas for the 1-ply SiC-CMC sleeve. In addition, the microstructure of the SiC matrix near the cracks at the region of highest compressive bending strain shows significant cracking and flaking. The 2-ply SiC-CMC sleeve samples showed a more bonded, cohesive SiC matrix structure. This cracking and fraying causes concern for increased fretting during the actual use of the design. Tomography was proven as a successful tool to identify open porosity during pre-test characterization. Although there is currently insufficient data to make conclusive statements regarding the overall merit of the hybrid cladding design, preliminary characterization of this novel design has been demonstrated.

IJ van Rooyen; WR Lloyd; TL Trowbridge; SR Novascone; KM Wendt; SM Bragg-Sitton

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Method for determination of .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O and .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H ratios and .sup.3 H (tritium) concentrations of xylem waters and subsurface waters using time series sampling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for determination of .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O and .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H ratios and .sup.3 H concentrations of xylem and subsurface waters using time series sampling, insulating sampling chambers, and combined .sup.18 O/.sup.16 O, .sup.2 H/.sup.1 H and .sup.3 H concentration data on transpired water. The method involves collecting water samples transpired from living plants and correcting the measured isotopic compositions of oxygen (.sup.18 O/.sup.16 O) and hydrogen (.sup.2 H/.sup.1 H and/or .sup.3 H concentrations) to account for evaporative isotopic fractionation in the leafy material of the plant.

Smith, Brian (1126 Delaware St., Berkeley, CA 94702); Menchaca, Leticia (1126 Delaware St., Berkeley, CA 94702)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Branching Ratio of the Electromagnetic Decay of the ?<sup>+>(1385)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CLAS detector was used to obtain the first ever measurement of the electromagnetic decay of the ?*<sup>+>(1385) from the reaction ?p ? K<sup>0sup> ?*<sup>+>(1385). A real photon beam with a maximum energy of 3.8 GeV was incident on a liquid-hydrogen target, resulting in the photoproduction of the kaon and ?* hyperon. Kinematic fitting was used to separate the reaction channel from the background processes. The fitting algorithm exploited a new method to kinematically fit neutrons in the CLAS detector, leading to the partial width measurement of 250.0 56.9(stat)-41.2<sup>+34.3sup>(sys) keV. A U-spin symmetry test using the SU(3) flavor-multiplet representation yields predictions for the ?*<sup>+>(1385) ? ?<sup>+>? and ?*<sup>0sup>(1385) ? ?? partial widths that agree with the experimental measurements.

Keller, D; Adhikari, K P; Adikaram, D; Amaryan, M J; Anghinolfi, M; Baghdasaryan, H; Ball, J; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Biselli, A S; Bookwalter, C; Boiarinov, S; Branford, D; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Carman, D S; Celentano, A; Chandavar, S; Cole, P L; Contalbrigo, M; Crede, V; D& #x27; Angelo, A; Daniel, A; Dashyan, N; De Vita, R; De Sanctis, E; Djalali, C; Doughty, D; Dupre, R; El Alaoui, A; El Fassi, L; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fedotov, G; Gabrielyan, M Y; Gevorgyan, N; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Gohn, W; Golovatch, E; Gothe, R W; Graham, L; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Hafidi, K; Hakobyan, H; Holtrop, M; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Isupov, E L; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Khandaker, M; Khertarpal, P; Kim, A; Kim, W; Klein, F J; Kubarovsky, A; Kubarovsky, V; Kuleshov, S V; Lu, H Y; MacGregor, I.J. D; Mao, Y; Markov, N; Mayer, M; McKinnon, B; Meyer, C A; Mirazita, M; Mokeev, V; Moutarde, H; Munevar, E; Nadel-Turonski, P; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Paolone, M; Pappalardo, L; Paremuzyan, R; Anefalos Pereira, S; Pisano, S; Pogorelko, O; Pozdniakov, S; Procureur, S; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Ricco, G; Rimal, D; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Saini, M S; Salgado, C; Schott, D; Schumacher, R A; Seraydaryan, H; Sharabian, Y G; Smith, E S; Smith, G D; Sober, D I; Sokhan, D; Stepanyan, S S; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tang, W; Taylor, C E; Tkachenko, S; Vernarsky, B; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Voskanyan, H; Voutier, E; Wood, M H; Zachariou, N; Zana, L; Zhao, B

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

88

Supersymmetry and {sup 198}Hg  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energy spectrum and electromagnetic transition properties of the supermultiplet members with two proton fermions can be constructed using the dynamical U{sub v}(6/12) x U{sub {pi}}(6/4) extended supersymmetry. In order to investigate predictions of the two proton fermion--four neutron boson supermultiplet member {sup 198}Hg, an experiment with the HORUS cube {gamma}-ray spectrometer at the Cologne TANDEM accelerator was performed using the {sup 196}Pt({alpha},2n){sup 198}Hg reaction. By analyzing {gamma}{gamma} coincidence spectra and {gamma}{gamma} angular correlations, the required experimental data--level and decay energies, level spins and multipole mixing ratios--could be obtained. For the low-energy states, the experimental data show good agreement with theory.

Bernards, Christian; Heinze, Stefan; Jolie, Jan; Fransen, Christoph; Linnemann, Andreas; Radeck, Desiree [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Strasse 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany)

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

89

Study of the X(3872) and Y(4260) in B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K{sup 0} and B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}K{sup -} decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results of a search for the X(3872) in B{sup 0}{yields}X(3872)K{sub S}{sup 0},X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, improved measurements of B{sup -}{yields}X(3872)K{sup -}, and a study of the J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} mass region above the X(3872). We use 232x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy storage rings. The results include the 90% confidence interval 1.34x10{sup -6}sup 0}{yields}X(3872)K{sup 0},X{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})<10.3x10{sup -6} and the branching fraction B(B{sup -}{yields}X(3872)K{sup -},X{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(10.1{+-}2.5{+-}1.0)x10{sup -6}. We observe a (2.7{+-}1.3{+-}0.2)MeV/c{sup 2} mass difference of the X(3872) produced in the two decay modes. Furthermore, we search for the Y(4260) in B decays and set the 95% C.L. upper limit B(B{sup -}{yields}Y(4260)K{sup -},Y(4260){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})<2.9x10{sup -5}.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Grauges, E. [IFAE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A. [Universita di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039 (China); Eigen, G.; Ofte, I. [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen (Norway)] (and others)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Analysis of T = 1 {sup 10}B States Analogue to {sup 10}Be Cluster States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current status of the search for T = 1 cluster states in {sup 10}Be, {sup 10}B and {sup 10}C is presented. The best known of the three, {sup 10}Be, has an established rotational band (6.18, 7.54 and 10.15 MeV) with unusually large moment of inertia. Search of their isobaric analogue in {sup 10}B is presented, with emphasis on {sup 3}He+{sup 11}B reaction.

Uroic, M.; Miljanic, D.; Blagus, S.; Bogovac, M.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, Zagreb (Croatia); Majer, M.; Milin, M. [Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, Zagreb (Croatia); Lattuada, M.; Musumarra, A. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Acosta, L. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, Huelva (Spain)

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fuel pin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

92

Studies of the /sup 32/S + /sup 182/W reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fission-like products from the reaction /sup 32/S + /sup 182/W were measured over the entire angular range from theta = 10-170/sup 0/ and for bombarding energies of E/sub lab/ = 166, 177, 222, and 260 MeV using an array of eight Si detectors. From the measured energy and flight time the product mass was determined event-by-event by performing the appropriate corrections for the plasma delay and pulse height defect associated with Si detectors. The mass, angular, and total kinetic energy distributions of fission-like fragments are obtained by assuming two-body kinematics. The angular distributions indicate that a fraction of the observed cross section is associated with quasi-fission reactions as observed previously in several other reactions involving /sup 32/S projectiles. Furthermore, we observe an angular dependence of the fragment mass distributions, a feature which is strictly incompatible with compound nucleus decay. Both of these observations indicate that a fraction of fission-like products originate from quasi-fission, a process in which a large degree of mass transfer occurs between the two interaction nuclei in a short time scale. 14 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Back, B.B.; Keller, J.G.; Worsham, A.; Glagola, B.G.; Henderson, D.; Kaufman, S.; Sanders, S.J.; Siemssen, R.; Videbaek, F.; Wilkins, B.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Decay Properties of {sup 266}Bh and {sup 262}Db Produced in the {sup 248}Cm+{sup 23}Na Reaction - Further Confirmation of the {sup 278}113 Decay Chain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decay properties of an isotope {sup 266}Bh and its daughter nucleus {sup 262}Db produced by the {sup 248}Cm({sup 23}Na,5n) reaction were studied by using a gas-filled recoil separator coupled with a position-sensitive semiconductor detector. {sup 266}Bh was clearly identified from the correlation of the known nuclide, {sup 262}Db. The obtained decay properties of {sup 266}Bh and {sup 262}Db are consistent with those observed in the {sup 278}113 chain by RIKEN collaboration, which provided further confirmation of the discovery of {sup 278}113.

Morita, K.; Morimoto, K.; Kaji, D.; Haba, H.; Ozeki, K.; Kudou, Y.; Yoneda, A.; Ichikawa, T.; Katori, K.; Yoshida, A. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Sato, N. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tohoku University, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan); Sumita, T. [RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan); Fujimori, Y.; Tokanai, F. [Department of Physics, Yamagata University, Yamagata 990-8560 (Japan); Goto, S. [Center for Instrumental Analysis, Niigata University, Ikarashi, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Ideguchi, E. [Center for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Kasamatsu, Y.; Koura, H.; Tsukada, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Komori, Y. [Department of Chemistry, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Neutrino cross sections on {sup 12}C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of the charged current reactions {sup 12}C({ital v}{sub e},e{sup -}){sup 12}N and {sup 12}C({ital v}{sub {mu}},{mu}{sup - }){sup 12}N for inclusive transitions to {sup 12}N excited states and exclusive transitions to {sup 12}N , are presented. The data presented represent 3 years of running of the LSND experiments and are from runs in 1993, 1994, and 1995 and total to 14772 Coulombs of protons on target. The {ital v}{sub e} scattering and {ital v}{sub {mu}{sup -}} exclusive scattering results are in good agreement with theoretical expectations, while the {ital v}{sub {mu}{sup -}} inclusive scattering results are smaller than expected from a continuum random phase calculation.

Sandberg, V.D.; LSND Collaboration

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Rotational band properties in {sup 165}Er  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-spin states in {sup 165}Er have been studied experimentally using the {sup 160}Gd({sup 9}Be, 4n) reaction at beam energies of 42 and 45 MeV. The previously known bands based on the 5/2{sup +}[642], 5/2{sup -}[523], and 11/2{sup -}[505] configurations are extended to (49/2{sup +}), (45/2{sup -}), and (31/2{sup -}) states, respectively. The rotational bands in {sup 165}Er generally show gradual alignment processes, indicating strong band interactions associated with the i{sub 13/2} neutron alignments. The band properties are compared with those in the neighboring nuclei and discussed within the framework of the cranked shell model.

Wang, S. T. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou, X. H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Zheng, Y.; Liu, M. L.; Chen, L.; Zhang, N. T.; Hua, W.; Guo, S.; Qiang, Y. H.; Li, G. S.; Ding, B. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Shi, Y.; Xu, F. R. [School of Physics, and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Probability of spent fuel transportation accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transported volume of spent fuel, incident/accident experience and accident environment probabilities were reviewed in order to provide an estimate of spent fuel accident probabilities. In particular, the accident review assessed the accident experience for large casks of the type that could transport spent (irradiated) nuclear fuel. This review determined that since 1971, the beginning of official US Department of Transportation record keeping for accidents/incidents, there has been one spent fuel transportation accident. This information, coupled with estimated annual shipping volumes for spent fuel, indicated an estimated annual probability of a spent fuel transport accident of 5 x 10/sup -7/ spent fuel accidents per mile. This is consistent with ordinary truck accident rates. A comparison of accident environments and regulatory test environments suggests that the probability of truck accidents exceeding regulatory test for impact is approximately 10/sup -9//mile.

McClure, J. D.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Search for {psi}(2S){yields}{eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using 5.63 pb{sup -1} of data accumulated at the {psi}(2S) resonance with the CLEO III and CLEO-c detectors corresponding to 3.08x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) decays, a search is performed for the decay {psi}(2S){yields}{eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} to test a theoretical prediction based upon the assumption that the cc pair in the {psi}(2S) does not annihilate directly into three gluons but rather survives before annihilating. No signal is observed, and a combined upper limit from six {eta}{sub c} decay modes is determined to be B({psi}(2S){yields}{eta}{sub c}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}){<=}1.0x10{sup -3} at 90% C.L. This upper limit is about an order of magnitude below the theoretical expectation.

Pedlar, T. K. [Luther College, Decorah, Iowa 52101 (United States); Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Gong, D. T.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Lang, B. W.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Smith, A.; Zweber, P. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States); Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tomaradze, A. [Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Ernst, J. [State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York 12222 (United States); Severini, H. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Dytman, S. A.; Love, W. [University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States)] (and others)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds"OfficeTourFrom3, 2015 7:00FuelFuelFuel

99

Near-yrast, medium-spin, excited states of {sup 91}Rb, {sup 93}Rb, and {sup 95}Rb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The medium-spin structure of the nuclei {sup 93}Rb and {sup 95}Rb is studied following the neutron-induced fission of {sup 235}U at the PF1B neutron guide, using the FIFI spectrometer, and at the Lohengrin mass spectrometer of the Institut Laue-Langevin Grenoble. These nuclei, plus {sup 91}Rb, are also studied following the spontaneous fission of {sup 248}Cm and {sup 252}Cf sources, using the EUROGAM-II and Gammasphere detector arrays, respectively. A high-spin isomeric state, with a half-life of 111(11) ns, is found in {sup 93}Rb at an excitation energy of 4422.4 keV, which most likely corresponds to the fully aligned [{pi}(g{sub 9/2}) x {nu}(g{sub 7/2}h{sub 11/2})]{sub 27/2}{sup -} configuration. An analogous configuration is proposed for the 5297.9-keV level observed in {sup 91}Rb. A new E3 decay branch of the 1133.9-keV isomer in {sup 91}Rb is found, for which the rather low transition rate of B(E3)=3.8(10) W.u. is determined. The energy of the isomeric state of {sup 95}Rb is now proposed to be at 810.6 keV, with a spin of (9/2{sup +}), and its half-life determined to be T{sub 1/2}=94(7) ns. A cascade of prompt transitions is observed on top of the 810.6-keV isomer in {sup 95}Rb. The near-yrast structures of {sup 91}Rb, {sup 93}Rb, and {sup 95}Rb are compared to the results of shell-model calculations, which support the proposed 27/2{sup -} interpretation of states in {sup 91}Rb and {sup 93}Rb. An analogous 27/2{sup -} state is expected to occur in {sup 95}Rb, as a long-lived isomer at 3.24 MeV. No such isomeric decay could be observed in a measurement using the Lohengrin spectrometer, which shows that, if it exists, its population, following the fission of {sup 235}U, is at least four times lower than that of the analogous 27/2{sup -} isomer in {sup 97}Y.

Simpson, G. S. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, F-38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Urban, W. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue J. Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Sieja, K. [Institute Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, 23 rue du Loess, 67037 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Dare, J. A.; Orlandi, R.; Smith, A. G.; Tsekhanovich, I.; Varley, B. J.; Durell, J. L.; Smith, J. F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, M13 9PL Manchester (United Kingdom); Jolie, J.; Linneman, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicherstr. 77, D-50937 Koeln (Germany); Scherillo, A. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Soldner, T.; Faust, H. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue J. Horowitz, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Zlomaniec, A.; Rzaca-Urban, T. [Faculty of Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoza 69, PL-00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Ahmad, I.; Greene, J. P. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Final state interaction effects in B{sup 0} ? J/??{sup 0} decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this research the exclusive decay of B{sup 0} ? J/??{sup 0} is calculated by QCD factorization (QCDF) method and final-state interaction (FSI). First, the B{sup 0} ? J/??{sup 0} decay is calculated via QCDF method. The result that is found by using the QCDF method is less than the experimental result. So FSI is considered to solve the B{sup 0} ? J/??{sup 0} decay. For this decay, the D{sup +}D{sup ?}* and D{sup 0} D-bar{sup 0*}via the exchange of D{sup ?}, D{sup ?}* and D-bar{sup 0},D-bar{sup 0*}mesons are chosen for the intermediate states. The above intermediate states are calculated by using the QCDF method. The experimental branching ratio of B{sup 0} ? J/??{sup 0} decay is (1.76 0.16) 10{sup ?5} and our results calculated by QCDF and FSI are (0.56 0.11) 10{sup ?5} and (1.3 0.09) 10{sup ?5}, respectively.

Mehraban, Hossein, E-mail: hmehraban@semnan.ac.ir; Asadi, Amin, E-mail: amin_asadi66@yahoo.com [Semnan University, Physics Department (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

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101

Determination of the asymptotic normalization coefficients for <sup>14sup>C + n <--> <sup>15sup>C, the <sup>14sup>C(n, gamma)<sup>15sup>C reaction rate, and evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The <sup>14sup>C + n <--> <sup>15sup>C system has been used as a test case in the evaluation of a new method to determine spectroscopic factors that uses the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC). The method proved to be unsuccessful for this case. As part of this experimental program, the ANCs for the <sup>15sup>C ground state and first excited state were determined using a heavy-ion neutron transfer reaction as well as the inverse kinematics (d,p) reaction, measured at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute. The ANCs were used to evaluate the astrophysical direct neutron capture rate on <sup>14sup>C, which was then compared with the most recent direct measurement and found to be in good agreement. A study of the <sup>15sup>C SF via its mirror nucleus <sup>15sup>F and a new insight into deuteron stripping theory are also presented.

McCleskey, M. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Mukhamedzhanov, A. M. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Trache, L. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Tribble, R. E. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Banu, A. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Eremenko, V. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Goldberg, V. Z. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Lui, Y. W. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); McCleskey, E. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Roeder, B. T. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Spiridon, A. [Texas A and M Univ., Cyclotron Inst., TX (United States); Carstoiu, F. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Burjan, V. [Nuclear Physics Inst., Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Hons, Z. [Nuclear Physics Inst., Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague (Czech Republic); Thompson, I. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

102

JLab Measurement of the <sup>4sup>He Charge Form Factor at Large Momentum Transfers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The charge form factor of <sup>4sup>He has been extracted in the range 29 fm<sup>-2sup> <= Q<sup>2sup> <= 77 fm<sup>-2sup> from elastic electron scattering, detecting <sup>4sup>He nuclei and electrons in coincidence with the High Resolution Spectrometers of the Hall A Facility of Jefferson Lab. The results are in qualitative agreement with realistic meson-nucleon theoretical calculations. The data have uncovered a second diffraction minimum, which was predicted in the Q<sup>2sup> range of this experiment, and rule out conclusively long-standing predictions of dimensional scaling of high-energy amplitudes using quark counting.

Camsonne, Alexandre; Katramatou, A. T.; Olson, M.; Sparveris, Nikolaos; Acha, Armando; Allada, Kalyan; Anderson, Bryon; Arrington, John; Baldwin, Alan; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Craver, Brandon; Decowski, Piotr; Dutta, Chiranjib; Folts, Edward; Frullani, Salvatore; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilman, Ronald; Gomez, Javier; Hahn, Brian; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jian; Iodice, Mauro; Kelleher, Aidan; Khrosinkova, Elena; Kievsky, A.; Kuchina, Elena; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; Lee, Byungwuek; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Lott, Gordon; Lu, H.; Marcucci, Laura; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; Meekins, David; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Norum, Blaine; Petratos, Gerassimos; Puckett, Andrew; Qian, Xin; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segal, John; Hashemi, Mitra; Shahinyan, Albert; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Subedi, Ramesh; Suleiman, Riad; Sulkosky, Vincent; Urciuoli, Guido; Viviani, Michele; Wang, Y.; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Zhang, W. -M.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Role of various mechanisms in the formation of a {sup 12}C nucleus in the reaction {sup 13}C({sup 3}He, {alpha}){sup 12}C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The contributions of various mechanisms to the production of the final nucleus {sup 12}C in the reaction {sup 13}C({sup 3}He, {alpha}){sup 12}C are estimated. These are neutron stripping and the transfer of the heavy cluster {sup 9}Be in the pole approximation or via a sequential transfer of virtual {sup 8}Be and a neutron. It is shown that the sequential mechanism of heavy-cluster transfer must be taken into account in order to describe correctly experimental data over the whole angular range.

Galanina, L. I., E-mail: galanina@nsrd.sinp.msu.ru; Zelenskaja, N. S. [Moscow State University, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Russian Federation); Morzabaev, A. K. [Gumilev National Eurasian University (Kazakhstan)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

On the neutrinoless double ?{sup +}/EC decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutrinoless double positron-emission/electron-capture (0??{sup +}/EC) decays are studied for the magnitudes of the involved nuclear matrix elements (NMEs). Decays to the ground state, 0{sub gs}{sup +}, and excited 0{sup +} states are discussed. The participant many-body wave functions are evaluated in the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA). Effective, G-matrix-derived nuclear forces are used in realistic single-particle model spaces. The channels ?{sup +}?{sup +}, ?{sup +}EC, and the resonant neutrinoless double electron capture (R0?ECEC) are discussed.

Suhonen, Jouni [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyvskyl (Finland)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

The CEBAF e{sup +} Footprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at the Jefferson Laboratory (JLAB) is capable of accelerating e{sup -} to 6 GeV in energy. Presently CEBAF is being upgraded to a maximum energy of 12 GeV. In addition to e{sup -} scattering, the user community has expressed interest in performing e{sup +} scattering experiments with the upgraded CEBAF accelerator. This paper describes the existing and planned CEBAF accelerator complex, possible e{sup +} production locations and the expected e{sup +} beam qualities. Possibilities for production of e{sup +} at the JLAB free electron laser (FEL) is also briefly described.

Freyberger, Arne P. [Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA. 23606 (United States)

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

106

Study of 0{sup +} excitations in {sup 158}Gd with the (n,n{sup '}{gamma}) reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have examined {sup 158}Gd with the (n,n{sup '}{gamma}) reaction at neutron energies up to 3.3 MeV to determine the collective character of 0{sup +} excitations revealed in previous {sup 160}Gd(p, t) reaction studies. Moderately large B(E2;0{sup +}{yields}2{sub 1}{sup +}) values are observed for transitions from some of the 0{sup +} states lying above the pairing gap. From its excitation energy and decay properties, the 0{sup +} excitation at 2276.7 keV is suggested as exhibiting two-phonon {gamma}{gamma} strength. The high density of levels at similar excitation energies makes the identification of the other two-phonon states improbable.

Lesher, S. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia 23173 (United States); Orce, J. N.; Ammar, Z.; Hannant, C. D.; Merrick, M.; Warr, N.; Brown, T. B.; Boukharouba, N.; Fransen, C.; Scheck, M.; McEllistrem, M. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Yates, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

Producing [mu][sup [minus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

After the feasibility of vacuum isolated [mu][sup -]d production was demonstrated at TRIUMF in 1989, development was begun on a target system that would take advantage of the process to aid in the understanding of the muon catalyzed fusion cycle. Minimal neutron backgrounds, the ability to use silicon detectors, and compatibility with tritium were considered important for a very versatile target system. the advantages which the target gives isolating [mu]CF process will be outlined.

Knowles, P.E.; Beer, G.A.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. (Victoria Univ., BC (Canada)); Bailey, J.M. (Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom)); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M. (British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)); Huber, T.M. (Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States)); Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Schellenberg, L. (Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. de Physique); Kammel,

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Excitation functions of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li reactions at low energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential cross sections of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li nuclear reactions have been measured at forward angles (10 deg. and 20 deg.), using particle identification detector telescopes, over the energy range 2.75-10.00 MeV. Excitation functions have been obtained for low-lying residual-nucleus states. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) at beam energy about 8 MeV, first observed by Wyborny and Carlson in 1971 at 0 deg., has been observed at 10 deg., but is less evident at 20 deg. The cross section obtained for the {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(g.s,0{sup +}) reaction is about ten times smaller. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) reaction could correspond to excited states in {sup 14}C, at excitation energies around 30 MeV.

Prepolec, L.; Soic, N.; Blagus, S.; Miljanic, D.; Siketic, Z.; Skukan, N.; Uroic, M. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c. 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Milin, M. [Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka c. 32, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

109

8-group relative delayed neutron yields for monoenergetic neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy dependence of the relative yield of delayed neutrons in an 8-group model representation was obtained for monoenergetic neutron induced fission of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu. A comparison of this data with the available experimental data by other was made in terms of the mean half-life of the delayed neutron precursors.

Piksaikin, V M; Kazakov, L E; Korolev, G G; Roshchenko, V A; Tertychnyj, R G

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Probing the nuclides {sup 102}Pd, {sup 106}Cd, and {sup 144}Sm for resonant neutrinoless double-electron capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Q values for double-electron capture in {sup 102}Pd, {sup 106}Cd, and {sup 144}Sm have been measured by Penning-trap mass spectrometry. The results exclude at present all three nuclides from the list of suitable candidates for a search for resonant neutrinoless double-electron capture.

Goncharov, M.; Blaum, K.; Eliseev, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Minaya Ramirez, E. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Droese, C.; Schweikhard, L. [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, D-17487 Greifswald (Germany); Novikov, Yu. N. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, RU-188300 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, RU-198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zuber, K. [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Technische Universitaet, D-01069 Dresden (Germany)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Synthetic Fuel  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

112

Competing quasiparticle configurations in {sup 163}W  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excited states in the neutron-deficient nuclide {sup 163}W were investigated using the {sup 106}Cd({sup 60}Ni,2pn){sup 163}W reaction at a beam energy of 270 MeV. The level scheme for {sup 163}W was extended significantly with the observation of five new band structures. The yrast band based on a 13/2{sup +} isomeric state is extended up to (57/2{sup +}). Two band structures were established on the 7/2{sup -} ground state. Quasiparticle configuration assignments for the new band structures were made on the basis of cranked Woods-Saxon shell-model calculations. The results reported in this article suggest that the negative-parity nu(f{sub 7/2},h{sub 9/2}) orbitals are responsible for the first rotational alignment in the yrast band.

Thomson, J.; Joss, D. T.; Paul, E. S.; Bianco, L.; Darby, I. G.; Grahn, T.; Page, R. D.; Pakarinen, J.; Sapple, P. J. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Scholey, C.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Ketelhut, S.; Leino, M.; Nyman, M.; Rahkila, P.; Saren, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae, FI-40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Single Spin Asymmetries of Inclusive Hadrons Produced in Electron Scattering from a Transversely Polarized <sup>3sup>He Target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first measurement of target single-spin asymmetries (AN) in the inclusive hadron production reaction, e + <sup>3sup>He??h+X, using a transversely polarized <sup>3sup> He target. The experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab in Hall A using a 5.9-GeV electron beam. Three types of hadrons (?<sup>>, K<sup>> and proton) were detected in the transverse hadron momentum range 0.54 < pT < 0.74 GeV/c. The range of xF for pions was -0.29 < xF< -0.23 and for kaons -0.25 < xF<-0.18. The observed asymmetry strongly depends on the type of hadron. A positive asymmetry is observed for ?<sup>+> and K<sup>+>. A negative asymmetry is observed for ??. The magnitudes of the asymmetries follow |A<sup>?> <sup>?|<|A?> <sup>+|<|AK> <sup>+>|. The K<sup>?> and proton asymmetries are consistent with zero within the experimental uncertainties. The ?<sup>+> and ?<sup>?> asymmetries measured for the 3He target and extracted for neutrons are opposite in sign with a small increase observed as a function of pT.

Allada, Kalyan; Zhao, Yongxiang; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bradshaw, Peter; Bosted, Peter; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chen, Wei; Chirapatpimol, Khem; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Cornejo, Juan; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De, Cornelis; , Jager; De, Raffaele; , Leo; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Ding, Huaibo; Dolph, Peter; Dutta, Chiranjib; Dutta, Dipangkar; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Frullani, Salvatore; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Guo, Lei; Hamilton, David; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jin; Huang, Min; Ibrahim, Hassan; Iodice, Mauro; Jin, Ge; Jones, Mark; Katich, Joseph; Kelleher, Aidan; Kim, Wooyoung; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; LeRose, John; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Y; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lu, Hai-jiang; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Munoz, Carlos; , Camacho; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Oh, Yongseok; Osipenko, Mikhail; Parno, Diana; Peng, Jen-chieh; Phillips, Sarah; Posik, Matthew; Puckett, Andrew; Qian, Xin; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Ransome, Ronald; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Schulte, Elaine; Shahinyan, Albert; Hashemi, Mitra; , Shabestari; Sirca, Simon; Stepanyan, Stepan; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tang, Liguang; Tobias, William; Urciuoli, Guido; Vilardi, Ignazio; Wang, Kebin; Wang, Y; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Z; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yawei; Zhang, Yi; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zong, Xing

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Fuel Economy  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Energy Department is investing in groundbreaking research that will make cars weigh less, drive further and consume less fuel.

115

Irradiation behavior of miniature experimental uranium silicide fuel plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium silicides, because of their relatively high uranium density, were selected as candidate dispersion fuels for the higher fuel densities required in the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program. Irradiation experience with this type of fuel, however, was limited to relatively modest fission densities in the bulk from, on the order of 7 x 10/sup 20/ cm/sup -3/, far short of the approximately 20 x 10/sup 20/ cm/sup -3/ goal established for the RERTR program. The purpose of the irradiation experiments on silicide fuels on the ORR, therefore, was to investigate the intrinsic irradiation behavior of uranium silicide as a dispersion fuel. Of particular interest was the interaction between the silicide particles and the aluminum matrix, the swelling behavior of the silicide particles, and the maximum volume fraction of silicide particles that could be contained in the aluminum matrix.

Hofman, G.L.; Neimark, L.A.; Mattas, R.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Astrophysically important {sup 26}Si states studied with the {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction. II. Spin of the 5.914-MeV {sup 26}Si level and galactic {sup 26}Al production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction has been studied to resolve a controversy surrounding the properties of the {sup 26}Si level at 5.914 MeV and its contribution to the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction rate in novae, which affects interpretations of galactic {sup 26}Al observations. Recent studies have come to contradictory conclusions regarding the spin of this level (0{sup +} or 3{sup +}), with a 3{sup +} assignment implying a large contribution by this level to the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si reaction rate. We have extended our previous study [Bardayan et al., Phys. Rev. C 65, 032801(R) (2002)] to smaller angles and find the angular distribution of tritons populating the 5.914-MeV level in the {sup 28}Si(p,t){sup 26}Si reaction to be consistent with either a 2{sup +} or 3{sup +} assignment. We have calculated reaction rates under these assumptions and used them in a nova nucleosynthesis model to examine the effects of the remaining uncertainties in the {sup 25}Al(p,{gamma}){sup 26}Si rate on {sup 26}Al production in novae.

Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Hix, W. R.; Liang, J. F.; Smith, M. S. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Howard, J. A.; Kozub, R. L. [Physics Department, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, Tennessee 38505 (United States); Brune, C. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Chae, K. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Johnson, M. S. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Bldg 6008, P. O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Jones, K. L.; Pain, S. D.; Thomas, J. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854 (United States); Lingerfelt, E. J.; Scott, J. P. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Livesay, R. J. [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Visser, D. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Overview of advanced technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an overview of potential technologies for stabilization of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has processed {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel into heat sources for space and terrestrial uses for the past several decades. The 88-year half-life of {sup 238}Pu and thermal power of approximately 0.6 watts/gram make this isotope ideal for missions requiring many years of dependable service in inaccessible locations. However, the same characteristic which makes {sup 238}Pu attractive for heat source applications, the high Curie content (17 Ci/gram versus 0.06 Ci/gram for 239{sup Pu}), makes disposal of {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste difficult. Specifically, the thermal load limit on drums destined for transport to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), 0.23 gram per drum for combustible waste, is impossible to meet for nearly all {sup 238}Pu-contaminated glovebox waste. Use of advanced waste treatment technologies including Molten Salt Oxidation (MSO) and aqueous chemical separation will eliminate the combustible matrix from {sup 238}Pu-contaminated waste and recover kilogram quantities of {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} from the waste stream. A conceptual design of these advanced waste treatment technologies will be presented.

Ramsey, K.B.; Foltyn, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Heslop, J.M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Indian Head, MD (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Lowest vibrational states of {sup 4}He{sup 3}He{sup +}: Non-Born-Oppenheimer calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Very accurate quantum mechanical calculations of the first five vibrational states of the {sup 4}He{sup 3}He{sup +} molecular ion are reported. The calculations have been performed explicitly including the coupling of the electronic and nuclear motions [i.e., without assuming the Born-Oppenheimer (BO) approximation]. The nonrelativistic non-BO wave functions were used to calculate the {alpha}{sup 2} relativistic mass velocity, Darwin, and spin-spin interaction corrections. For the lowest vibrational transition, whose experimental energy is established with high precision, the calculated and the experimental results differ by only 0.16 cm{sup -1}.

Stanke, Monika; Bubin, Sergiy [Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Kedziera, Dariusz [Department of Chemistry, Nicholaus Copernicus University, ul. Gagarina 7, PL 87-100 Torun (Poland); Molski, Marcin [Department of Theoretical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, ul. Grunwaldzka 6, Poznan, PL 60-780 (Poland); Adamowicz, Ludwik [Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Analysis of states in {sup 13}C populated in {sup 9}Be + {sup 4}He resonant scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of {sup 9}Be + {alpha} resonant scattering have been performed using the thick-target approach with a {sup 4}He gas volume and a large-area silicon strip detector. {sup 9}Be beam energies in the range 12 to 21.4 MeV were used to measure the {sup 13}C excitation energy spectrum between 13.2 and 16.2 MeV. An R-matrix analysis has been performed to characterize the spins and widths of {sup 13}C resonances, some of which have been proposed to be associated with a 3{alpha}+n molecular band.

Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.; Curtis, N.; Kokalova, Tz.; Wheldon, C. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Scuderi, V.; Torresi, D. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44, Catania (Italy); Grassi, L.; Jelavic Malenica, D.; Koncul, M.; Mijatovic, T.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Szilner, S.; Tokic, V. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka 54, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Milin, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka 32, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in inclusive electroproduction of ?<sup>-> near the Delta<sup>0sup> resonance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The parity-violating (PV) asymmetry of inclusive ?<sup>-> production in electron scattering from a liquid deuterium target was measured at backward angles. The measurement was conducted as a part of the G0 experiment, at a beam energy of 360 MeV. The physics process dominating pion production for these kinematics is quasi-free photoproduction off the neutron via the ?<sup>0sup> resonance. In the context of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory (HB?PT), this asymmetry is related to a low energy constant d?<sup>-> that characterizes the parity-violating ?N? coupling. Zhu et al. calculated d?<sup>-> in a model benchmarked by the large asymmetries seen in hyperon weak radiative decays, and predicted potentially large asymmetries for this process, ranging from A?<sup>-> = -5.2 to +5.2 ppm. The measurement performed in this work leads to A?<sup>-> = -0.36 1.06 0.37 0.03 ppm (where sources of statistical, systematic and theoretical uncertainties are included), which would disfavor enchancements considered by Zhu et al. proportional to Vud/Vus. The measurement is part of a program of inelastic scattering measurements that were conducted by the G0 experiment, seeking to determine the N-? axial transition form-factors using PV electron scattering.

Androic, D; Armstrong, D S; Bailey, S L; Beck, D H; Beise, E J; Benesch, J; Benmokhtar, F; Bimbot, L; Birchall, J; Bosted, P; Breuer, H; Capuano, C L; Chao, Y -C; Coppens, A; Davis, C A; Ellis, C; Flores, G; Franklin, G; Furget, C; Gaskell, D; Gericke, T W; Grames, J; Guillard, G; Hansknecht, J; Horn, T; Jones, M K; King, P M; Korsch, W; Kox, S; Lee, L; Liu, J; Lung, A; Mammei, J; Martin, J W; McKeown, R D; Micherdzinska, A; Mihovilovic, M; Mkrtchyan, H; Muether, M; Page, S A; Papvassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Phillips, S K; Pillot, P; Pitt, M L; Poelker, M; Quinn, B; Ramsay, W D; Real, J -S; Roche, J; Roos, P; Schaub, J; Seva, T; Simicevic, N; Smith, G R; Spayde, D T; Stutzman, M; Suleiman, R; Tadevosyan, V; van Oers, W.T. H; Versteegen, M

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

The puzzle of {sup 32}Mg  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis of results of the {sup 30}Mg(t,p) {sup 32}Mg reaction demonstrates that the ground state is the normal state and the excited 0{sup +} state is the intruder, contrary to popular belief. Additional experiments are suggested.

Fortune, H. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia Pennsylvania, 19104 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Transportation Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatusButler TinaContact-Information-TransmissionLaboratoryFuels

123

Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note:Computing | ArgonnechallengingFryFuel

124

Coulomb excitation of {sup 156}Gd  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiple Coulomb-excitation experiments for {sup 156}Gd were made with a 118 MeV {sup 32}S beam and a 225 MeV {sup 58}Ni beam. The ground-state band, the {beta} band (K=0{sup +}), another K=0{sup +} band, and the {gamma} band (K=2{sup +}) were observed up to the 18{sup +}, 14{sup +}, 8{sup +}, and 12{sup +} states, respectively, while the octupole band (K=1{sup -}) was observed up to the 15{sup -} state, through the analysis of particle-{gamma}-{gamma} data. Compared with the results of the in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopy previously obtained, the present result suggests that a band crossing occurs in the {gamma} band. As for the {beta} band, the excitation energy of the 12{sup +} state was revised and the 14{sup +} state was newly observed in the present experiment. The intrinsic matrix elements entering the generalized intensity relations were obtained so as to reproduce the spin dependence of the E2 matrix elements extracted from the experimental results of particle-{gamma} angular correlation for the transitions within each band and between each band and the ground-state band by the least-squares search code gosia. The change of characters in the {beta} and {gamma} bands is discussed as a possible cause for the variation of the E2 matrix elements in the higher-spin region. The intrinsic matrix elements were also obtained for the E1 and E3 transitions from the ground-state band to the octupole band with K=1{sup -} through analysis by gosia.

Sugawara, M. [Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino, Chiba 275-0023 (Japan); Kusakari, H. [Faculty of Education, Chiba University, Chiba 263-8522 (Japan); Yoshizawa, Y.; Inoue, H. [Faculty of Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Morikawa, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Shizuma, T. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Srebrny, J. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University, Pasteura 5A, PL-02-093 Warsaw (Poland)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Evidence for the F/sup / meson  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Evidence for a narrow state decaying into an F meson and a photon has been obtained in e/sup +/e/sup -/ annihilation events at 29 GeV c.m. energy. This state lies 139.5 +- 8.3(stat) +- 9.7(syst) MeV above the F-meson mass and is consistent with the expected F( meson. The F mesons are identified by a peak in the K/sup +/K/sup -/..pi../sup + -/ mass at 1.948 +- 0.028 +- 0.010 GeV.

Aihara, H.; Alston-Garnjost, M.; Badtke, D.H.; Bakken, J.A.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, A.V.; Barnett, B.A.; Blumenfeld, B.J.; Bross, A.D.; Buchanan, C.D.; Chamberlain, O.; Chiba, J.; Chien, C.; Clark, A.R.; Cordier, A.; Dahl, O.I.; Day, C.T.; Derby, K.A.; Eberhard, P.H.; Enomoto, R.; Fancher, D.L.; Fujii, H.; Fujii, T.; Gabioud, B.; Gary, J.W.; Gorn, W.; Hadley, N.J.; Hauptman, J.M.; Hofmann, W.; Huth, J.E.; Hylen, J.; Iwasaki, H.; Kamae, T.; Kaye, H.S.; Kenney, R.W.; Kerth, L.T.; Koda, R.I.; Kofler, R.R.; Kwong, K.K.; Layter, J.G.; Lindsey, C.S.; Loken, S.C.; Lu, X.; Lynch, G.R.; Madansky, L.; Madaras, R.J.; Majka, R.M.; Martin, P.S.; Maruyama, K.; Marx, J.N.; Matthews, J.A.J.; Melnikoff, S.O.; Moses, W.; Nemethy, P.; Nygren, D.R.; Oddone, P.J.; Park, D.A.; Pevsner, A.; Pripstein, M.; Robrish, P.R.; Ronan, M.T.; Ross, R.R.; Rouse, F.R.; Sauerwein, R.R.; Shapiro, G.; Shapiro, M.D.; Shen, B.C.; Slater, W.E.; Stevenson, M.L.; Stork, D.H.; Ticho, H.K.; Toge, N.; van Daalen Wetters, R.

1984-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

126

Magnetic rotation in {sup 112}In  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high spin states of {sup 112}In have been investigated with in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopic methods using the {sup 110}Pd({sup 7}Li,5n){sup 112}In reaction at a beam energy of 50 MeV. A level scheme with three band structures has been established and their configurations are discussed. The positive-parity dipole band has been assigned as a magnetic rotation band. Particle-rotor model calculations have also been performed to interpret the rotational structures in {sup 112}In.

He, C. Y.; Li, X. Q.; Wu, X. G.; Liu, Y.; Pan, B.; Li, G. S.; Li, L. H.; Wang, Z. M. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Zhu, L. H. [School of Physics and Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); School of Science, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Qi, B.; Wang, S. Y. [School of Space Science and Physics, Shandong University at Weihai, Weihai 264209 (China); Li, Z. Y. [School of Physics and SK Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Xu, Q.; Wang, J. G.; Ding, H. B. [Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhai, J. [Department of Physics, Jilin University, Changchun 130023 (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Lifetime Measurement of the 2{sup +}{sub 1} state in {sup 20}C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Establishing how and when large N/Z values require modified or new theoretical tools is a major quest in nuclear physics. Here we report the first measurement of the lifetime of the 2{sup +}{sub 1} state in the near-dripline nucleus {sup 20}C. The deduced value of {tau}{sub #28;2{sup +}{sub 1}} = 9.8 2.8(stat){sup +0.5}{sub ?1.1}(syst) ps gives a reduced transition probability of B(E2;2{sup +}{sub 1}{yields}0{sup +}{sub g.s.}) = 7.5{sup +3.0}{sub ?1.7}(stat){sup +1.0}{sub ?0.4}(syst) e{sup 2}fm{sup 4} in good agreement with a shell model calculation using isospin-dependent effective charges.

Petri, Marina-Kalliopi; Fallon, Paul; Macchiavelli, Augusto; Paschalis, Stephanos; Starosta, Krzysztof; Baugher, Travis; Bazin, Daniel; Cartegni, Lucia; Clark, Roderick; Crawford, Heather; Cromaz, Mario; Dewald, Alfred; Gade, Alexandra; Grinyer, Geoff; Gros, Sebastian; Hackstein, Matthias; Jeppesen, Hendrick; Lee, I-Yang; McDaniel, Sean; Miller, Doug; Rajabali, Mustafa; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Rother, Wolfram; Voss, Phillip; Walsh, Kathleen Ann; Weisshaar, Dirk; Wiedeking, Mathis; Brown, Boyd Alex

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

Check for chirality in {sup 102}Rh  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excited states in {sup 102}Rh, populated by the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 94}Zr({sup 11}B,3n){sup 102}Rh at a beam energy of 36 MeV, were studied using the INGA spectrometer at IUAC, New Delhi. The angular correlations and the electromagnetic character of some of the gamma-ray transitions observed were investigated in details. A new chiral candidate sister band was found in the level-scheme of {sup 102}Rh. Lifetimes of exited states in {sup 102}Rh were measured by means of the Doppler-shift attenuation technique. The experimental results do not support the presence of static chirality in {sup 102}Rh.

Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Yavahchova, M. S.; Petkov, P.; Angelis, G. de; Bhowmik, R. K.; Singh, R. P.; Muralithar, S.; Madhavan, N.; Kumar, R.; Raju, M. Kumar; Kaur, J.; Mahanto, G.; Singh, A.; Kaur, N.; Garg, R.; Sukla, A.; Marinov, Ts. K.; Brant, S. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria) and INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Italy); Inter-University Accelerator Center, New Delhi (India); Nuclear Physics Department, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam (India); Department of Physics, Punjab University, Chandigarh (India); Inter-University Accelerator Center, New Delhi (India); Department of Physics, Punjab University, Chandigarh (India); Department of Physics and Astrophysics, Delhi University, New Delhi (India); Department of Physics, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagreb University, Zagreb (Croatia)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

129

Search for the Decays {ital B}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{ital D}{sup ({asterisk})+}{ital D}{sup ({asterisk}){minus}}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the CLEO-II data set we have searched for the decays B{sup 0}{r_arrow}D{sup (*)+}D{sup (* ){minus}} . We observe one candidate signal event for the decay B{sup 0}{r_arrow}D{sup *+}D{sup *{minus}} with an expected background of 0.022{plus_minus}0.011 events. This yield corresponds to a branching fraction of B(B{sup 0}{r_arrow}D{sup *+}D{sup *{minus}} )=[5.3{sup +7.1}{sub {minus}3.7}(stat ){plus_minus}1.0(syst)]{times} 10{sup {minus}4} and an upper limit of B(B{sup 0}{r_arrow}D{sup *+}D{sup *{minus}} ){lt}2.2{times}10{sup {minus}3} at the 90% C.L. We see no significant excess of signal above the expected background level in the other modes, and we calculate the 90% C.L.upper limits on the branching fractions to be B(B{sup 0}{r_arrow}D{sup *{plus_minus}}D{sup {minus_plus}}){lt}1.8{times}10{sup {minus}3} and B(B{sup 0}{r_arrow}D{sup +}D{sup {minus}}){lt}1.2{times}10{sup {minus}3} . {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Asner, D.M.; Bliss, D.W.; Brower, W.S.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Sharma, V. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Gronberg, J.; Kutschke, R.; Lange, D.J.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Witherell, M.S. [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)] [University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Balest, R.; Behrens, B.H.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J.G. [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States)] [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0390 (United States); Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; Drell, P.S.; Ecklund, K.M.; Ehrlich, R.; Elia, R.; Foland, A.D.; Gaidarev, P.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Hopman, P.I.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Lee, T.; Liu, Y.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Ogg, M.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Ward, C. [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)] [Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Athanas, M.; Avery, P.; Jones, C.D.; Lohner, M.; Prescott, C.; Yang, S.; Yelton, J.; Zheng, J. [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Brandenburg, G.; Briere, R.A.; Gao, Y.S.; Kim, D.Y.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H. [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)] [Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Browder, T.E.; Li, F.; Li, Y.; Rodriguez, J.L. [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States)] [University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Hans, R.M.; Johnson, E.; Karliner, I.; Marsh, M.A.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J. [University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Edwards, K.W. [Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, K1S 5B6 (Canada)] [Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario, K1S 5B6 (Canada); Bellerive, A.; Janicek, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; McLean, K.W.; Patel, P.M. [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, (Canada)] [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, (Canada)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Dosimetric comparison of {sup 90}Y, {sup 32}P, and {sup 186}Re radiocolloids in craniopharyngioma treatments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In the radionuclide treatment of some forms of brain tumors such as craniopharyngiomas, the selection of the appropriate radionuclide for therapy is a key element in treatment planning. The aim was to study the influence by considering the beta-emitter radionuclide dose rate in an intracranial cyst. Methods: Dosimetry was performed using the MCNP4C radiation transport code. Analytical dosimetry was additionally performed using the Loevinger and the Berger formulas in the MATLAB software. Each result was compared under identical conditions. The advantages and disadvantages of using {sup 90}Y versus {sup 32}P and {sup 186}Re were investigated. Results: The dose rate at the inner surface of the cyst wall was estimated to be 400 mGy/h for a 1 MBq/ml concentration of {sup 90}Y. Under identical conditions of treatment, the corresponding dose rates were 300 mGy/h for {sup 32}P and 160 mGy/h for {sup 186}Re. For a well-defined cyst radius and identical wall thickness, higher dose rates resulted for {sup 90}Y. Conclusions: To achieve the same radiological burden, the required amount of physical activity of injectable solution is lower for {sup 32}P. This is found to be a consequence of both the radionuclide physical half-life and the pattern of energy deposition from the emitted radiation. According to the half-life and dose-rate results, {sup 90}Y would be a good substitute for {sup 32}P.

Sadeghi, Mahdi; Karimi, Elham; Hosseini, S. Hamed [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, P.O. Box 31485/498, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faculty of Engineering, Research and Science Campus, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14155/4933, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

131

Biodiesel Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

publication 442-880 There are broad and increasing interests across the nation in using domestic, renewable bioenergy. Virginia farmers and transportation fleets use considerable amounts of diesel fuel in their operations. Biodiesel is an excellent alternative fuel for the diesel engines. Biodiesel can be produced from crops commonly grown in Virginia, such as soybean and canola, and has almost the same performance as petrodiesel. The purpose of this publication is to introduce the basics of biodiesel fuel and address some myths and answer some questions about biodiesel fuel before farmers and fleet owners use this type of fuel. ASTM standard for biodiesel (ASTM D6751) Biodiesel fuel, hereafter referred to as simply biodiesel,

unknown authors

132

Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityFieldMinds"OfficeTourFrom3, 2015

133

Method of removing Pu(IV) polymer from nuclear fuel reclaiming liquid  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Pu(IV) polymer not extractable from a nuclear fuel reclaiming solution by conventional processes is electrolytically converted to Pu.sup.3+ and PuO.sub.2.sup.2+ ions which are subsequently converted to Pu.sup.4+ ions extractable by the conventional processes.

Tallent, Othar K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Mailen, James C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bell, Jimmy T. (Kingston, TN); Arwood, Phillip C. (Harriman, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Double beta decays of {sup 106}Cd  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two-neutrino (2{nu}2{beta}) and neutrinoless (0{nu}2{beta}) double beta decays of {sup 106}Cd are studied for the transitions to the ground state 0{sub gs}{sup +} and 0{sup +} and 2{sup +} excited states in {sup 106}Pd by using realistic many-body wave functions calculated in the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation. Effective, G-matrix-derived nuclear forces are used in realistic single-particle model spaces. All the possible channels, {beta}{sup +}{beta}{sup +}, {beta}{sup +}EC, and ECEC, are discussed for both the 2{nu}2{beta} and 0{nu}2{beta} decays. The associated half-lives are computed and particular attention is devoted to the study of the detectability of the resonant neutrinoless double electron capture (R0{nu}ECEC) process in {sup 106}Cd. The calculations of the present article constitute the thus far most complete and up-to-date investigation of the double-beta-decay properties of {sup 106}Cd.

Suhonen, Jouni [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 University of Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

135

The {sup 3}He(e,e'p){sup 2}H and {sup 4}He(e,e'p){sup 3}H reactions at high momentum transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present updated calculations for observables in the processes {sup 3}He(e,e'p){sup 2}H, {sup 4}He(e,e'p){sup 3}H and {sup 4}He(e-vector, e'p-vector){sup 3}H. This update entails the implementation of improved nucleon-nucleon (NN) amplitudes to describe final state interactions (FSI) within a Glauber approximation and includes full spin-isospin dependence in the profile operator. In addition, an optical potential, which has also been updated since previous work, is utilized to treat FSI for the {sup 4}He(e,e'p){sup 3}H and {sup 4}He(e-vector, e'p-vector){sup 3}H reactions. The calculations are compared with experimental data and show good agreement between theory and experiment. Comparisons are made between the various approximations in the Glauber treatment, including model dependence due to the NN scattering amplitudes, rescattering contributions, and spin dependence. We also analyze the validity of the Glauber approximation at the kinematics the data is available, by comparing to the results obtained with the optical potential.

Ford, William P. [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Schiavilla, Rocco [Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Van Orden, J. W. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Q values for neutrinoless double-electron capture in {sup 96}Ru, {sup 162}Er, and {sup 168}Yb  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Q values of the neutrinoless double-electron capture transitions in {sup 96}Ru, {sup 162}Er, and {sup 168}Yb have been determined by Penning-trap mass-ratio measurements. Based on our new high-precision results for the Q values, neither of these transitions shows a resonant enhancement of the capture rate. At present, this excludes these nuclides from the list of suitable candidates in the search for neutrinoless double-electron capture.

Eliseev, S.; Blaum, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Nesterenko, D. [Department of Physics, St. Petersburg State University, RU-198504 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Block, M.; Herfurth, F.; Minaya Ramirez, E. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Planckstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Droese, C.; Schweikhard, L. [Institut fuer Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universitaet, D-17487 Greifswald (Germany); Novikov, Yu. N. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, RU-188300 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zuber, K. [Institut fuer Kern- und Teilchenphysik, Technische Universitaet, D-01069 Dresden (Germany)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fuel cell membranes and crossover prevention  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A membrane electrode assembly for use with a direct organic fuel cell containing a formic acid fuel includes a solid polymer electrolyte having first and second surfaces, an anode on the first surface and a cathode on the second surface and electrically linked to the anode. The solid polymer electrolyte has a thickness t:.gtoreq..times..times..times..times. ##EQU00001## where C.sub.f is the formic acid fuel concentration over the anode, D.sub.f is the effective diffusivity of the fuel in the solid polymer electrolyte, K.sub.f is the equilibrium constant for partition coefficient for the fuel into the solid polymer electrolyte membrane, I is Faraday's constant n.sub.f is the number of electrons released when 1 molecule of the fuel is oxidized, and j.sub.f.sup.c is an empirically determined crossover rate of fuel above which the fuel cell does not operate.

Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); York, Cynthia A. (Newington, CT); Waszczuk, Piotr (White Bear Lake, MN); Wieckowski, Andrzej (Champaign, IL)

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

138

Fusion of {sup 6}Li with {sup 159}Tb at near-barrier energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complete and incomplete fusion cross sections for {sup 6}Li + {sup 159}Tb have been measured at energies around the Coulomb barrier by the {gamma}-ray method. The measurements show that the complete fusion cross sections at above-barrier energies are suppressed by {approx}34% compared to coupled-channel calculations. A comparison of the complete fusion cross sections at above-barrier energies with the existing data for {sup 11,10}B + {sup 159}Tb and {sup 7}Li + {sup 159}Tb shows that the extent of suppression is correlated with the {alpha} separation energies of the projectiles. It has been argued that the Dy isotopes produced in the reaction {sup 6}Li + {sup 159}Tb at below-barrier energies are primarily due to the d transfer to unbound states of {sup 159}Tb, while both transfer and incomplete fusion processes contribute at above-barrier energies.

Pradhan, M. K.; Mukherjee, A.; Basu, P.; Goswami, A.; Kshetri, R.; Roy, Subinit; Chowdhury, P. Roy; Sarkar, M. Saha; Palit, R.; Parkar, V. V.; Santra, S.; Ray, M. [Nuclear Physics Division, Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata-700064 (India); Department of Nuclear and Atomic Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai-400005 (India); Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Department of Physics, Behala College, Parnasree, Kolkata-700060 (India)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Delayed neutron alignment in sup 117 I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rotational alignment of {ital h}{sub 11/2} neutrons is considerably delayed ({Delta}{h bar}{omega}{similar to}0.11 MeV) in the {pi}{ital h}{sub 11/2}(550)1/2{sup {minus}} intruder band in {sup 117}I when compared to bands built on normal-parity states. Comparison with cranked shell-model calculations suggests that this effect may indicate a larger quadrupole deformation for the intruder orbital. A strong neutron-proton interaction between the aligning {ital h}{sub 11/2} neutrons and the {ital h}{sub 11/2} proton intruder may also play a role. In addition, noncollective oblate states at {ital I}{sup {pi}}=39/2{sup {minus}},43/2{sup {minus}}, and 45/2{sup {minus}} compete energetically with rotational states of the intruder band which may also perturb the neutron alignment.

Paul, E.S.; Waring, M.P.; Clark, R.M.; Forbes, S.A.; Fossan, D.B.; Hughes, J.R.; LaFosse, D.R.; Liang, Y.; Ma, R.; Vaska, P.; Wadsworth, R. (Oliver Lodge Laboratory, University of Liverpool, P.O. Box 147, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom) Department of Physics, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States) Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO1 5DD (United Kingdom) Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Radiative neutron capture by {sup 2}H, {sup 7}Li, {sup 14}C, and {sup 14}N nuclei at astrophysical energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of describing experimental data on the total cross sections for the n{sup 2}H, n{sup 7}Li, n{sup 14}C, and n{sup 14}N radiative-capture processes within the potential cluster model involving forbidden states and their classification according to Young's tableaux is considered. It is shown that this model and the methods used here to construct potentials make it possible to describe correctly the behavior of the experimental cross sections at energies between 5 to 10 meV (5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}-10 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV) and 1 to 15MeV.

Dubovichenko, S. B., E-mail: dubovichenko@mail.ru [V.G. Fessenkov Astrophysical Institute NCSRT NSA RK (Kazakhstan)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

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141

Coincidence studies of He ionized by C{sup 6+}, Au{sup 24+}, and Au{sup 53+}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recently developed [Phys. Rev. A 79, 042707 (2009)] impact parameter coupled pseudostate approximation (CP) is applied to calculate triple differential cross sections for single ionization of He by C{sup 6+}, Au{sup 24+}, and Au{sup 53+} projectiles at impact energies of 100 and 2 MeV/amu for C{sup 6+} and 3.6 MeV/amu for Au{sup 24+} and Au{sup 53+}. For C{sup 6+}, satisfactory, but not perfect, agreement is found with experimental measurements in coplanar geometry, but there is substantial disagreement with data taken in a perpendicular plane geometry. The CP calculations firmly contradict a projectile-nucleus interaction model which has been used to support the perpendicular plane measurements. For Au{sup 24+} and Au{sup 53+}, there is a complete lack of accord with the available experiments. However, for Au{sup 24+} the theoretical position appears to be quite firm with clear indications of convergence in the CP approximation and very good agreement between CP and the completely different three-distorted-waves eikonal-initial-state (3DW-EIS) approximation. The situation for Au{sup 53+} is different. At the momentum transfers at which the measurements were made, there are doubts about the convergence of the CP approximation and a factor of 2 difference between the CP and 3DW-EIS predictions. The discord between theory and experiment is even greater with the experiment giving cross sections a factor of 10 larger than the theory. A study of the convergence of the CP approximation shows that it improves rapidly with reducing momentum transfer. As a consequence, lower-order cross sections than the triple are quite well converged and present an opportunity for a more reliable test of the experiment.

McGovern, M.; Walters, H. R. J. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, Queen's University, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Assafrao, D.; Mohallem, J. R. [Laboratorio de Atomos e Moleculas Especiais, Departamento de Fisica, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Caixa postal 702, 30123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Whelan, Colm T. [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529-0116 (United States)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

[sup 27]Al NMR, GT-IR and ethanol-[sup 18]O TPD characterization of fluorided alumina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New environmental legislation in the United States requiring reformulation of gasoline and diesel fuels is making its necessary to develop better, alternative acid catalysts for alkylation and isomerization reactions, and for hydrotreating catalysts for sulfur and nitrogen removal from refinery streams. A series of F/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] samples (wt % F = 0 to 20) has been studied using a combination of solid-state [sup 27]Al NMR, FT-IR, and ethanol-[sup 18]O TPD techniques. Solid-state [sup 27]Al NMR is particularly sensitive to amorphous phases or small crystallites present on the catalyst surface, many of which cannot be detected by XRD. [sup 27]Al NMR shows the presence of three types of AlF[sub 3](H[sub 2]O)[sub n] species (with n varying between 0 and 3) on fluorided alumina. FT-IR studies of ethanol adsorption show that fluoride blocks the sites required for dissociative chemisorption of ethanol. A similar analysis of adsorbed pyridine shows an increase in the number of Broensted acid sites with the addition of up to 10 wt % fluoride. However, increasing the fluoride loading to 20 wt % decreases the number of Broensted acid sites. The TPD of ethanol-[sup 18]O from F/Al[sub 2]O[sub 3] samples shows that at low levels fluoride serves to block Lewis acid sites, but at higher levels its predominant role is to increase the Broensted acidity of the alumina surface. The pyridine adsorption and TPD experiments show that fluoride strengthens the remaining Lewis acid sites. 14 figs., 3 tabs.

DeCanio, E.C. (Texaco R D Dept., Beacon, NY (United States) Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States)); Bruno, J.W. (Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States)); Nero, V.P.; Edwards, J.C. (Texaco R D Dept., Beacon, NY (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Coulomb dissociation of [sup 11]Li  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kinematically complete measurements for Coulomb dissociation of [sup 11]Li into [sup 9]Li+2[ital n] were made at 28 MeV/nucleon. The [ital n]-[ital n] correlation function suggests a large source size for the two-neutron emission. The electromagnetic excitation spectrum of [sup 11]Li has a peak, as anticipated in low-energy dipole resonance models, but a large post-breakup Coulomb acceleration of the [sup 9]Li fragment is observed, indicating a very short lifetime of the excited state and favoring direct breakup as the dissociation mechanism.

Ieki, K.; Sackett, D.; Galonsky, A.; Bertulani, C.A.; Kruse, J.J.; Lynch, W.G.; Morrissey, D.J.; Orr, N.A.; Schulz, H.; Sherrill, B.M.; Sustich, A.; Winger, J.A. (National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory and Department of Physics, Michigan State Unversity, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)); Deak, F.; Horvath, A.; Kiss, A. (Department of Atomic Physics, Eoetvoes University, Puskin utca 5-7 H-1088 Budapest 8 (Hungary)); Seres, Z. (KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest 114 (Hungary)); Kolata, J.J. (Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)); Warner, R.E. (Department of Physics, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio 44074 (United States)); Humphrey, D.L. (Department of Physics, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States))

1993-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

144

Possible chiral bands in {sup 194}Tl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High spin states in {sup 194}Tl, excited through the {sup 181}Ta({sup 18}O,5n) fusion evaporation reaction, were studied using the AFRODITE array at iThemba LABS. Candidate chiral bands built on the {pi}h{sub 9/2} x {nu}i{sub 13/2}{sup 1} configuration were found. Furthermore these bands were observed through a band crossing caused by the excitation of a {nu}i{sub 13/2} pair. Above the band crossing the excitation energies remain close, suggesting that chirality may persist for the four quasiparticle configuration too.

Masiteng, P. L.; Ramashidzha, T. M.; Maliage, S. M.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Vymers, P. A. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, 7535 Bellville (South Africa); Lawrie, E. A.; Lawrie, J. J.; Bark, R. A.; Mullins, S. M.; Murray, S. H. T. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); Kau, J.; Komati, F. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of the North West, Private Bag X2046, 2735 Mafikeng (South Africa); Lindsay, R. [University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, 7535 Bellville (South Africa); Matamba, I. [University of Venda for Science and Technology, Thohoyandou (South Africa); Mutshena, P. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of Venda for Science and Technology, Thohoyandou (South Africa); Zhang, Y. [iThemba LABS, P.O Box 722, 7129 (South Africa); University of Cape Town, Private Bag, 7701 Rondebosch (South Africa)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

145

Chiral field theory of 0{sup -+} glueball  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A chiral field theory of 0{sup -+} glueball is presented. The Lagrangian of this theory is constructed by adding a 0{sup -+} glueball field to a successful Lagrangian of the chiral field theory of pseudoscalar, vector, and axial-vector mesons. The couplings between the pseodoscalar glueball field and the mesons are revealed via a U(1) anomaly. Quantitative study of the physical processes of the 0{sup -+} glueball of m=1.405 GeV is presented. The theoretical predictions can be used to identify the 0{sup -+} glueball.

Li Bingan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

{beta}-delayed neutron decay of {sup 19}N and {sup 20}N  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the first spectroscopic studies of delayed neutron and {gamma} emission following the {beta} decay of {sup 19}N and {sup 20}N are reported. Nuclides were produced by fragmenting an 80 MeV/nucleon {sup 22}Ne beam in a 546 mg/cm{sup 2} thick Be target and were separated at high velocities with the A1200 fragment separator. The nuclides were implanted in a thin plastic scintillator at the center of an array of neutron scintillators to determine the neutron time-of-flight spectrum. Two hyperpure germanium detectors were used to observe coincident {gamma} events. The {beta}-{gamma},{beta}-n, and {beta}-n-{gamma} coincidence spectra were analyzed to obtain the energies of the states populated in {sup 18}O, {sup 19}O, and {sup 20}O following the {beta} decay. Eight new neutron energies with a total neutron emission probability of 41.8(9)%, six {gamma} transitions among the excited states of {sup 19}O, and four {gamma} transitions among the excited states of {sup 18}O were identified in the {sup 19}N {beta} decay. Seven new neutron energies with a total neutron emission probability of 42.9(14)%, ten {gamma} transitions among the excited states of {sup 20}O, and two {gamma} transitions among the exited states of {sup 19}O were observed from the {sup 20}N {beta} decay. Half-lives of 336(3) and 136(3) ms were determined for the {sup 19}N and {sup 20}N decays, respectively. The branching ratios of both decays were deduced and compared with USD (universal sd-shell) shell model calculations. The {beta} decay schemes for {sup 19}N and {sup 20}N were de0011duc.

Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Anthony, D. W.; Lofy, P. A.; Morrissey, D. J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) and Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

2{sub 1}{sup +}{yields}0{sub 1}{sup +} transition strengths in Sn nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lifetime of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state at 1256.7 keV in {sup 112}Sn has been determined using the (n,n{sup '}{gamma}) reaction. Angular distribution measurements were carried out at a neutron energy of 1.7 MeV, above the 2{sub 1}{sup +} energy threshold and below that of the second excited level. Through the Doppler-shift attenuation method, the lifetime of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state is determined as 750{sub -90}{sup +125} fs, which gives a B(E2;2{sub 1}{sup +}{yields}0{sub 1}{sup +}) value of 10.9{sub -1.6}{sup +1.5} W.u. This E2 strength in {sup 112}Sn also allows a redetermination of the B(E2;2{sub 1}{sup +}{yields}0{sub 1}{sup +}) in {sup 108}Sn as 10.8(3.0) W.u. These values result in a symmetric trend around the neutron midshell in the systematics of E2 strengths in the even-mass tin isotopes and do not support N=64 or N=66 subshell gaps. The symmetric trend is in agreement with recent shell model predictions, where proton-core excitations were allowed in the calculations.

Orce, J. N.; Choudry, S. N.; Crider, B.; Elhami, E.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Scheck, M.; McEllistrem, M. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Yates, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fission-barrier parameters of the compound nuclei /sup 245/Cm, /sup 247/Cm, and /sup 249/Cm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross section for fission of /sup 248/Cm by neutrons has been measured in the energy interval 0.3< or =E/sub n/< or =5.5 MeV. The measurements were made by the time-of-flight method with use of an underground nuclear explosion as a pulsed neutron source. From the experimental data for the compound nuclei /sup 245/Cm, /sup 247/Cm, and /sup 249/Cm we have evaluated the following characteristics of the fission probability: the inner barrier height E/sup A//sub f/, the curvature parameter h..omega../sub A/ and the ratio of the average neutron and fission widths. Some features of the fission probability curves obtained are discussed, and also the question of the applicability of the systematics for prediction of fission characteristics of heavy nuclei with neutron number N>152.

Fomushkin, E.F.; Novoselov, G.F.; Vinogradov, Y.I.; Gavrilov, V.V.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

{Beta}-delayed neutron decay of {sup 17}C and {sup 18}C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {Beta}-delayed neutron decay of {sup 17}C and {sup 18}C has bear measured to investigate neutron-unbound levels in {sup 17}N and {sup 19}N. Levels of interest in {sup 17}N and {sup 18}N are those near the neutron threshold which may play a role in a astrophysical reprocess during an inhomogeneous Big Bang. Radioactive ion beaming of {sup 17}C and {sup 18}C were produced by beam fragmentation at the NSCL MSU. Ions were implanted in a plastic scintillator which served as a start detector for a time-of-flight measurement. Neutrons were detected in the MSU neutron detector array. Several neutron groups have been observed and the results will be discussed.

Scheller, K.W.; Goerres, J.; Vouzoukas, S.; Wiescher, M. [Univ. of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN (United States)] [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Structure of three-quasiparticle isomers in {sup 169}Ho and {sup 171}Tm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A three-quasiparticle isomer with {tau}=170(8) {mu}s and K{sup {pi}=} (19/2{sup +}) has been identified in the neutron-rich isotope {sup 169}Ho. The isomer decays with K-forbidden transitions to members of a band associated with the 7/2{sup -}[523] proton configuration, whose structure is characterized through analysis of the in-band {gamma}-ray branching ratios. In the isotone {sup 171}Tm, the rotational band based on the known 19/2{sup +}, three-quasiparticle isomer has also been observed. Alternative one-proton two-neutron configurations for the isomer in {sup 169}Ho are discussed in terms of multiquasiparticle calculations and through a comparison with the structures observed in {sup 171}Tm.

Dracoulis, G. D.; Lane, G. J.; Hughes, R. O. [Department of Nuclear Physics, R.S.P.E., Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Kondev, F. G.; Chiara, C. J. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Watanabe, H. [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; McCutchan, E. A. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Stefanescu, I. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Chowdhury, P. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Structure of excitation and fluorescence spectra recorded at the {sup 1}0{sub u}{sup +}(5 {sup 1}P{sub 1})-X {sup 1}0{sub g}{sup +} transition of Cd{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excitation and fluorescence ultraviolet spectra of Cd{sub 2} recorded at the {sup 1}0{sub u}{sup +}(5 {sup 1}P{sub 1})-X {sup 1}0{sub g}{sup +} transition are reported. The Cd{sub 2} molecules (seeded in Ar) produced in a continuous free-jet supersonic beam were excited in a vacuum chamber with a pulsed dye-laser beam. A well-resolved vibrational structure of the {sup 1}0{sub u}{sup +} <- X {sup 1}0{sub g}{sup +} excitation spectrum as well as the isotopic structure of the vibrational components were recorded. Analysis of the spectrum yielded vibrational constants for the {sup 1}0{sub u}{sup +} state: {omega}{sub e}{sup '}=100.50{+-}0.25 cm{sup -1}, {omega}{sub e}{sup '}x{sub e}{sup '}=0.325{+-}0.003 cm{sup -1}, D{sub 0}{sup '}=8638{+-}15 cm{sup -1}, D{sub e}{sup '}=8688{+-}15 cm{sup -1}, and {delta}R{sub e}=R{sub e}{sup ''}-R{sub e}{sup '}=1.04{+-}0.01 A derived for the {sup 226}Cd{sub 2} isotopomer. The {sup 1}0{sub u}{sup +} state potential-energy (PE) curve was obtained numerically using an inverse perturbation approach (IPA) procedure. Condon internal diffraction (CID) patterns in the {sup 1}0{sub u}{sup +}{yields}X {sup 1}0{sub g}{sup +} fluorescence band, emitted upon the selective excitation of the v{sup '}=38 and v{sup '}=39 vibrational components of the {sup 226}Cd{sub 2} isotopomer, were observed and improved the v{sup '} assignments derived from the analysis of the isotopic structure. Analysis of the fluorescence spectrum yielded information on the repulsive part of the ground-state interatomic potential. The result confirms a relatively soft repulsion between two Cd atoms in the short-range (2.53-4.05 A) region and makes allowance for a covalent admixture to the ground-state van der Waals bonding. Quasirelativistic valence ab initio calculations on the PE curves for the investigated states have been performed at the complete-active-space multiconfiguration self-consistent-field (CASSCF/CAS) multireference second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) level with the total of 40 correlated electrons. In the calculations, the Cd atom is considered as a 20-valence electron system whereas the Cd{sup 20+} core is replaced by an energy-consistent pseudopotential which also accounts for scalar-relativistic effects and spin-orbit interaction within the valence shell. A comparison with results obtained from other experiments and ab initio calculations is presented.

Lukomski, M.; Koperski, J. [Instytut Fizyki, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Czuchaj, E. [Instytut Fizyki Teoretycznej i Astrofizyki, Uniwersytet Gdanski, ul. Wita Stwosza 57, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Czajkowski, M. [Department of Physics, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario N9B3P4 (Canada)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Measurement of the decay UPSILON(2S). -->. pi. /sup 0/. pi. /sup 0/UPSILON(1S)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hadronic transitions UPSILON(2S) ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/..pi..UPSILON(1S) ..-->.. ..gamma gamma gamma gamma..l/sup +/l/sup -/ (l = ..mu.. or e) are investigated using the Crystal Ball detector. The analysis is based on 193,000 UPSILON(2S) events produced at the DORIS II e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring from November 1982 to February 1984. We observe 44 events with a muon pair and 46 events with an electron pair in the final state. The signals in both channels are relatively background free. Assuming lepton universality, we average the results for the two channels and obtain the product branching ratio B(UPSILON(2S) ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/UPSILON(1S)) x B/sub ll/(UPSILON(1S)) = (2.3 +- 0.3 +- 0.3) x 10/sup -3/ where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Using the present world average value of B/sub ll/(UPSILON(1S)) = (2.9 +- 0.3)% we derive a branching ratio B(UPSILON(2S) ..-->.. ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/UPSILON(1S)) = (8.0 +- 1.5)% where the statistical and systematic errors have been added in quadrature. This result is compared with previous results for the charged pion transitions UPSILON(2S) ..-->.. ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/UPSILON(1S) and with the expectation from theory. We have also investigated the mass spectrum M/sub ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0// resulting from these decays and find a peaking toward high masses not accounted for the phase space alone. Fits to the ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ mass spectrum are in quantitative agreement with previous results for the ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ transitions. Angular distribution for the ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ system and its decay products are presented in reference frames appropriate for analyzing the spin of the ..pi../sup 0/..pi../sup 0/ system, even if the initial UPSILON(1S) and the di-pion system are emitted in a relative S-wave. We find the decay distributions to be consistent with those expected for a spin zero di-pion system emitted in a relative S-wave with the UPSILON(1S).

Gelphman, D.M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

{beta}-delayed neutron decay in {sup 17}B and {sup 19}C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {beta}-delayed neutron decays of {sup 17}B and {sup 19}C were studied using radioactive ion beams. The neutron energies, measured via time-of-flight, give information on states above the neutron decay threshold in {sup 17}C and {sup 19}N, respectively. These low lying states are of possible interest for Big Bang nucleosynthesis. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

Raimann, G. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Ozawa, A. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-01 (Japan); Boyd, R.N. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)]|[Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Chloupek, F.R. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Fujimaki, M. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-01 (Japan); Kimura, K. [Nagasaki Institute of Applied Science, Nagasaki, Nagasaki 851-01 (Japan); Kobayashi, T. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-01 (Japan); Kolata, J.J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Kubono, S. [Institute of Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, Tanashi, Tokyo 188 (Japan); Tanihata, I.; Watanabe, Y.; Yoshida, K. [The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Wako-shi, Saitama 351-01 (Japan)

1995-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

154

Scattering of {sup 8}He on {sup 208}Pb at 22 MeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The skin nucleus {sup 8}He is investigated by measuring the angular distribution of the elasticly scattered {sup 8}He and the {sup 6,4}He fragments produced in the collision with a {sup 208}Pb target at 22 MeV, just above the Coulomb barrier. The experiment was carried out at SPIRAL/GANIL in 2010. Here we present preliminary results for the elastic scattering.

Marquinez-Duran, G.; Sanchez-Benitez, A. M.; Martel, I.; Berjillos, R.; Duenas, J. A.; Parkar, V. V. [Depto. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva (Spain); Acosta, L. [Depto. de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, 21071 Huelva, Spain and Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Via Santa Sofia 62, 95123, Catania (Italy); Rusek, K. [Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw (Poland); Alvarez, M. A. G.; Gomez-Camacho, J. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, 41092, Sevilla, Spain and Depto. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Borge, M. J. G.; Cruz, C.; Cubero, M.; Pesudo, V.; Tengblad, O. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Chbihi, A. [GANIL, CEA and IN2P3-CNRS, B.P. 5027, 14076 Caen cedex (France); Fernandez-Garcia, J. P.; Moro, A. M. [Depto. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, 41080 Sevilla (Spain); Fernandez-Martinez, B.; Labrador, J. A. [Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, 41092, Sevilla (Spain); and others

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

155

Dynamical deformation effects in subbarrier fusion of {sup 64}Ni+{sup 132}Sn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that dynamical deformation effects play an important role in fusion reactions involving the {sup 64}Ni nucleus, in particular the {sup 64}Ni+{sup 132}Sn system. We calculate fully microscopic interaction potentials and the corresponding subbarrier fusion cross-sections.

Umar, A. S.; Oberacker, V. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Cyclotron production of {sup 61}Cu using natural Zn and enriched {sup 64}Zn targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Copper-61 ({sup 61}Cu) shares with {sup 64}Cu certain advantages for PET diagnostic imaging, but has a shorter half-life (3.4hr vs. 12.7hr) and a greater probability of positron production per disintegration (61% vs. 17.9%). One important application is for in vivo imaging of hypoxic tissue. In this study {sup 61}Cu was produced using the {sup 64}Zn(p,{alpha}){sup 61}Cu reaction on natural Zn or enriched {sup 64}Zn targets. The enriched {sup 64}Zn (99.82%) was electroplated onto high purity gold or silver foils or onto thin Al discs. A typical target bombardment used 30{mu}A; at 11.7, 14.5 or 17.6MeV over 30-60min. The {sup 61}Cu (radiochemical purity of >95%) was separated using a combination of cation and anion exchange columns. The {sup 64}Zn target material was recovered after each run, for re-use. In a direct comparison with enriched {sup 64}Zn-target results, {sup 61}Cu production using the cheaper {sup nat}Zn target proved to be an effective alternative.

Asad, A. H.; Smith, S. V.; Chan, S.; Jeffery, C. M.; Morandeau, L.; Price, R. I. [RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia, Imaging and Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, Australia, and Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Can (Australia); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States) and Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); Center of Excellence in Anti-matter Matter Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, Australia, and Chemistry, University of Western Australia, Pe (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth (Australia); RAPID PET Labs, Medical Technology and Physics, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia and Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

157

Ab initio density functional theory study of non-polar (101{sup }0),?(112{sup }0) and semipolar (202{sup }1) GaN surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The atomic structures of non-polar GaN(101{sup }0),?(112{sup }0) and semipolar GaN(202{sup }1),?(202{sup }1{sup }) surfaces were studied using ab initio calculations within density functional theory. The bulk-like truncated (1??1) structure with buckled Ga-N or Ga-Ga dimers was found stable on the non-polar GaN(101{sup }0) surface in agreement with previous works. Ga-N heterodimers were found energetically stable on the GaN(112{sup }0)-(1??1) surface. The formation of vacancies and substitution site defects was found unfavorable for non-polar GaN surfaces. Semipolar GaN(202{sup }1)-(1??1) surface unit cells consist of non-polar (101{sup }0) and semipolar (101{sup }1) nano-facets. The (101{sup }1) nano-facets consist of two-fold coordinated atoms, which form N-N dimers within a (2??1) surface unit cell on a GaN(202{sup }1) surface. Dimers are not formed on the GaN(202{sup }1{sup }) surface. The stability of the surfaces with single (101{sup }0) or (101{sup }1) nano-facets was analyzed. A single non-polar (101{sup }0)-(1??1) nano-facet was found stable on the GaN(202{sup }1) surface, but unstable on the GaN(202{sup }1{sup }) surface. A single (101{sup }1) nano-facet was found unstable. Semipolar GaN surfaces with (202{sup }1) and (202{sup }1{sup }) polarity can be stabilized with a Ga overlayer at Ga-rich experimental conditions.

Mutombo, P.; Romanyuk, O., E-mail: romanyuk@fzu.cz [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Cukrovarnick 10, 16200 Prague (Czech Republic)

2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

On L{sup 2}-functions with bounded spectrum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the class PW(R{sup n}) of functions in L{sup 2}(R{sup n}), whose Fourier transform has bounded support. We obtain a description of continuous maps {phi}:R{sup m}{yields}R{sup n} such that fo{phi} element of PW(R{sup m}) for every function f element of PW(R{sup n}). Only injective affine maps {phi} have this property. Bibliography: 5 titles.

Lebedev, Vladimir V [Moscow State Institute of Electronics and Mathematics (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Moscow State Institute of Electronics and Mathematics (Technical University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Unconventional fuel: Tire derived fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Material recovery of scrap tires for their fuel value has moved from a pioneering concept in the early 1980`s to a proven and continuous use in the United States` pulp and paper, utility, industrial, and cement industry. Pulp and paper`s use of tire derived fuel (TDF) is currently consuming tires at the rate of 35 million passenger tire equivalents (PTEs) per year. Twenty mills are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. The utility industry is currently consuming tires at the rate of 48 million PTEs per year. Thirteen utilities are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. The cement industry is currently consuming tires at the rate of 28 million PTEs per year. Twenty two cement plants are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. Other industrial boilers are currently consuming tires at the rate of 6.5 million PTEs per year. Four industrial boilers are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. In total, 59 facilities are currently burning over 117 million PTEs per year. Although 93% of these facilities were not engineered to burn TDF, it has become clear that TDF has found acceptance as a supplemental fuel when blending with conventional fuels in existing combustion devices designed for normal operating conditions. The issues of TDF as a supplemental fuel and its proper specifications are critical to the successful development of this fuel alternative. This paper will focus primarily on TDF`s use in a boiler type unit.

Hope, M.W. [Waste Recovery, Inc., Portland, OR (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Measurements of /sup 234/U, /sup 238/U and /sup 230/Th in excreta of uranium-mill crushermen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium and thorium levels in excreta of uranium mill crushermen who are routinely exposed to airborne uranium ore dust were measured. The purpose was to determine whether /sup 230/Th was preferentially retained over either /sup 234/U or /sup 238/U in the body. Urine and fecal samples were obtained from fourteen active crushermen with long histories of exposure to uranium ore dust, plus four retired crushermen and three control individuals for comparison. Radiochemical procedures were used to separate out the uranium and thorium fractions, which were then electroplated on stainless steel discs and assayed by alpha spectrometry. Significantly greater activity levels of /sup 234/U and /sup 238/U were measured in both urine and fecal samples obtained from uranium mill crushermen, indicating that uranium in the inhaled ore dust was cleared from the body with a shorter biological half-time than the daughter product /sup 230/Th. The measurements also indicated that uranium and thorium separate in vivo and have distinctly different metabolic pathways and transfer rates in the body. The appropriateness of current ICRP retention and clearance parameters for /sup 230/Th in ore dust is questioned.

Fisher, D.R.; Jackson, P.O.; Brodacynski, G.G.; Scherpelz, R.I.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ion-molecule interactions in crossed-beams. [N/sup +/-H/sub 2/; F/sup +/-H; CO/sub 2//sup +/-D/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interactions of the ions N/sup +/, F/sup +/, and CO/sub 2//sup +/ with H/sub 2/ and/or its isotopes were examined using the crossed-beam technique in the low (< 4 eV) initial relative energy. For the reaction N/sup +/(/sup 3/P) + H/sub 2/ ..-->.. NH/sup +/ + H, complex formation dominates up to 1.9 eV and a substantial interaction occurs between all collision partners up to 3.6 eV. The distribution of N/sup +/ scattered nonreactively from H/sub 2/ also showed a long-lived complex channel below 1.9 eV. The reaction F/sup +/(/sup 3/P) + H/sub 2/ ..-->..FH/sup +/ + H proceeded by a direct reaction mechanism at 0.20 to 1.07 eV. The reaction CO/sub 2//sup +/ + D/sub 2/ ..-->.. DCO/sub 2//sup +/ + D gives asymmetric product distributions at 0.27 eV and above, indicating a direct reaction mechanism. Results indicated that there are probably barriers in the exit channels for DCO/sub 2//sup +/, DCO/sup +/, and D/sub 2/O/sup +/ products. The electronic state distributions of the N/sup +/, F/sup +/, and CO/sub 2//sup +/ beams was investigated using beam attenuation and total luminescence techniques.

Hansen, S.G.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

BWR Fuel Assembly BWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

BWR Fuel Assembly BWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly The PWR 17x17 assembly is approximately 160 inches long (13.3 feet), 8 inches across, and weighs 1,500 lbs....

163

Structural alterations in SiC as a result of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ implantation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion scattering and channeling techniques were used to study production of disorder and randomization of SiC by implantation of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ at doses of up to 3 x 10/sup 16/ /cm/sup 2/ for Cr/sup +/ and 8 x 10/sup 16/ /cm/sup 2/ for N/sup +/. Experiments were designed so that the calculated damage energy profiles would be well matched for the two ion species. The results were compared for the degree of effectiveness of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ in producing disorder. At higher doses, Cr/sup +/ was much more effective than N/sup +/ for a given damage energy using the same calculational method for Cr/sup +/ as for N/sup +/. In correlated studies of swelling, both species had about the same effectiveness in producing swelling.

Williams, J.M.; McHargue, C.J.; Appleton, B.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A validation of the [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He method for determining groundwater recharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tritium and He isotopes have been measured at a site where groundwater flow is nearly vertical for a travel time of 100 years and where recharge rates are spatially variable. Because the mid-1960s [sup 3]H peak (arising from aboveground testing of thermonuclear devices) is well-defined, the vertical groundwater velocity is known with unusual accuracy at this site. Utilizing [sup 3]H and its stable daughter [sup 3]He to determine groundwater ages, we compute a recharge rate of 0.16 m/yr, which agrees to within about 5% of the value based on the depth of the [sup 3]H peak (measured both in 1986 and 1991) and two-dimensional modeling in an area of high recharge. Zero [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He age occurs at a depth that is approximately equal to the average depth of the annual low water table, even though the capillary fringe extends to land surface during most of the year at the study site. In an area of low recharge (0.05 m/yr) where the [sup 3]H peak (and hence the vertical velocity) is also well-defined, the [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He results could not be used to compute recharge because samples were not collected sufficiently far above the [sup 3]H peak; however, modeling indicates that the [sup 3]H/[sup 3]He age gradient near the water table is an accurate measure of vertical velocities in the low-recharge area. Because [sup 3]H and [sup 3]He have different diffusion coefficients, and because the amount of mechanical mixing is different in the area of high recharge than in the low-recharge area, we have separated the dispersive effects of mechanical mixing from molecular diffusion. We estimate a longitudinal dispersivity of 0.07 m and effective diffusion coefficients for [sup 3]H ([sup 3]HHO) and [sup 3]He of 2.4 x 10[sup [minus]5] and 1.3 x 10[sup [minus]4] m[sup 2]/day, respectively. 26 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Solomon, D.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Schiff, S.L. (Univ. of Waterloo, Onatrio (Canada)); Poreda, R.J. (Univ. Rochester, NY (United States)); Clarke, W.B. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Decay Heat Calculations for PWR and BWR Assemblies Fueled with Uranium and Plutonium Mixed Oxide Fuel using SCALE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In currently operating commercial nuclear power plants (NPP), there are two main types of nuclear fuel, low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, and mixed-oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX) fuel. The LEU fuel is made of pure uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2} or UOX) and has been the fuel of choice in commercial light water reactors (LWRs) for a number of years. Naturally occurring uranium contains a mixture of different uranium isotopes, primarily, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U. {sup 235}U is a fissile isotope, and will readily undergo a fission reaction upon interaction with a thermal neutron. {sup 235}U has an isotopic concentration of 0.71% in naturally occurring uranium. For most reactors to maintain a fission chain reaction, the natural isotopic concentration of {sup 235}U must be increased (enriched) to a level greater than 0.71%. Modern nuclear reactor fuel assemblies contain a number of fuel pins potentially having different {sup 235}U enrichments varying from {approx}2.0% to {approx}5% enriched in {sup 235}U. Currently in the United States (US), all commercial nuclear power plants use UO{sub 2} fuel. In the rest of the world, UO{sub 2} fuel is still commonly used, but MOX fuel is also used in a number of reactors. MOX fuel contains a mixture of both UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}. Because the plutonium provides the fissile content of the fuel, the uranium used in MOX is either natural or depleted uranium. PuO{sub 2} is added to effectively replace the fissile content of {sup 235}U so that the level of fissile content is sufficiently high to maintain the chain reaction in an LWR. Both reactor-grade and weapons-grade plutonium contains a number of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes, with the fraction of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes being dependent on the source of the plutonium. While only RG plutonium is currently used in MOX, there is the possibility that WG plutonium from dismantled weapons will be used to make MOX for use in US reactors. Reactor-grade plutonium in MOX fuel is generally obtained from reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuel, whereas weapons-grade plutonium is obtained from decommissioned nuclear weapons material and thus has a different plutonium (and other actinides) concentration. Using MOX fuel instead of UOX fuel has potential impacts on the neutronic performance of the nuclear fuel and the design of the nuclear fuel must take these differences into account. Each of the plutonium sources (RG and WG) has different implications on the neutronic behavior of the fuel because each contains a different blend of plutonium nuclides. The amount of heat and the number of neutrons produced from fission of plutonium nuclides is different from fission of {sup 235}U. These differences in UOX and MOX do not end at discharge of the fuel from the reactor core - the short- and long-term storage of MOX fuel may have different requirements than UOX fuel because of the different discharged fuel decay heat characteristics. The research documented in this report compares MOX and UOX fuel during storage and disposal of the fuel by comparing decay heat rates for typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with and without weapons-grade (WG) and reactor-grade (RG) MOX fuel.

Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Estimation of multi-group cross section covariances for {sup 235,238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 23}Na and {sup 27}Al  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the methodology used to estimate multi-group covariances for some major isotopes used in reactor physics. The starting point of this evaluation is the modelling of the neutron induced reactions based on nuclear reaction models with parameters. These latest are the vectors of uncertainties as they are absorbing uncertainties and correlation arising from the confrontation of nuclear reaction model to microscopic experiment. These uncertainties are then propagated towards multi-group cross sections. As major breakthroughs were then asked by nuclear reactor physicists to assess proper uncertainties to be used in applications, a solution is proposed by the use of integral experiment information at two different stages in the covariance estimation. In this paper, we will explain briefly the treatment of all type of uncertainties, including experimental ones (statistical and systematic) as well as those coming from validation of nuclear data on dedicated integral experiment (nuclear data oriented). We will illustrate the use of this methodology with various isotopes such as {sup 235,238}U, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 56}Fe, {sup 23}Na and {sup 27}Al. (authors)

De Saint Jean, C.; Archier, P.; Noguere, G.; Litaize, O.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Bernard, D.; Leray, O. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Solving the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C scattering puzzle: is there the '4th elephant'?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential cross sections of the {sup 12}C+{sup 12}C and the {sup 13}C+{sup 12}C elastic scattering were measured at the projectile energies 240 MeV ({sup 12}C) and 250 MeV ({sup 13}C) up to the largest angles. The positions of the 1{sup st} Airy minima known from the former experiments were confirmed.

Demyanova, A. S.; Danilov, A. N.; Ogloblin, A. A. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov sq. 1, 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Goncharov, S. A. [Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bohlen, H. G. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Khlebnikov, S. V.; Tyurin, G. P. [Khlopin Radium Institute, 194021 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Maslov, V. A.; Penionzkevich, Yu. E.; Sobolev, Yu. G. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Trzaska, W. [University of Jyvaskyla, P.O. Box 35, FI-40014 Jyvaskyla (Finland)

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

168

Evidence for beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 31/Mg and /sup 32/Mg  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Investigates the time spectrum of beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 30-34/Na and their descendants using beta -neutron coincidence detection. The authors have been able to assign an upper limit of 0,4% to the probability of beta -delayed neutron emission, p/sub n/, from the /sup 30/Na daugher isotope /sup 30/Mg. In fitting the time spectra of beta -delayed neutrons from /sup 31/Na and /sup 32/Na, we find a definitive component from subsequent daughter decay as well. This provides evidence for beta -delayed neutron emission from /sup 31/Mg and /sup 32/Mg with P/sub n/ values of the order of 2% for each. (7 refs).

Zaidins, C S; De Saint-Simon, M; Dtraz, C; Epherre-Rey-Campagnolle, Marcelle; Guillemaud, D; Klapisch, Robert; Langevin, M; Naulin, F; Thibault, C; Touchard, F

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

THE MAGNESIUM ISOTOPOLOGUES OF MgH IN THE A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using laboratory hollow cathode spectra we have identified lines of the less common magnesium isotopologues of MgH, {sup 25}MgH and {sup 26}MgH, in the A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} system. Based on the previous analysis of {sup 24}MgH, molecular lines have been measured and molecular constants derived for {sup 25}MgH and {sup 26}MgH. Term values and linelists, in both wavenumber and wavelength units, are presented. The A {sup 2}{Pi}-X {sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +} system of MgH is important for measuring the magnesium isotope ratios in stars. Examples of analysis using the new linelists to derive the Mg isotope ratio in a metal poor dwarf and giant are shown.

Hinkle, Kenneth H.; Wallace, Lloyd [National Optical Astronomy Observatories, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States); Ram, Ram S.; Bernath, Peter F. [Department of Chemistry, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Sneden, Christopher [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Lucatello, Sara, E-mail: hinkle@noao.edu, E-mail: wallace@noao.edu, E-mail: rr662@york.ac.uk, E-mail: pbernath@odu.edu, E-mail: chris@verdi.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: sara.lucatello@oapd.inaf.it [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Proton inelastic scattering on {sup 56}Ni in inverse kinematics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inelastic proton scattering to the first excited 2{sup +} state at 2.701 MeV in doubly magic {sup 56}Ni was studied at 101 MeV/u in inverse kinematics. The radioactive {sup 56}Ni ion beam was obtained from the SIS heavy ion synchrotron at GSI Darmstadt via fragmentation of a {sup 58}Ni beam, and separation by the fragment separator (FRS). A value B(E2, 0{sup +} {yields} 2{sup +}) = 600 {+-} 120 e{sup 2} fm{sup 4} was obtained which corresponds to a deformation parameter {beta} ({sup 56}Ni) = 0.173 {+-} 0.017.

Kraus, G.; Egelhof, P.; Fischer, C.; Geissel, H.; Himmler, A.; Nickel, F.; Muenzenberg, G.; Schwab, W.; Weiss, A. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Chulkov, L.; Golovkov, M.; Ogloblin, A. [I.V. Kurchatov Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Friese, J.; Gillitzer, A.; Koerner, H.J.; Peter, M. [TU, Munich (Germany); Henning, W.; Schiffer, J.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Kratz, J.V. [Univ. of Mainz (Germany)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Fossil Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuels A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi - Department of Petroleum Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals...

172

The production of /sup 38/Ar and /sup 39/Ar by 14-MeV neutrons on /sup 39/K  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have determined the cross sections for the production of /sup 38/Ar and /sup 39/Ar from the (n,n'rho) and (n,rho) reactions by neutrons of -- 14 MeV incident on /sup 39/K. Three potassium-bearing specimens were irradiated with fluences of --10/sup 17/ neutrons, and the argon isotopes were measured by mass spectrometry. Previously reported measurements are in substantial disagreement with our results. Values from the three new measurements are consistent with each other and our computational modeling. Nevertheless, there remains an unexplained increase in the cross sections for both reactions as the neutron energy increases from --14.5 to 14.8 MeV.

Foland, K.A.; Borg, R.J.; Mustafa, M.G.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A precision measurement of the branching ratio K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}/K{sup +} {r_arrow} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A measurement of the branching ratio K{sup +} {r_arrow} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}/K{sup +} {r_arrow} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}} was made using stopped kaons from p{anti p} annihilations at rest and a magnetic spectrometer to measure the momenta of the charged decay product to the 1% to 1.5% level. The determination is based on 45,500 events passing final data cuts. The resulting ratio is .3329 {+-} .0047 (statistical) {+-} .0010 (systematic).

Usher, T.; Fero, M.; Gee, M.; Graf, N.A.; Mandelkern, M.; Shultz, D.; Schultz, J.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Self-humidified proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Operation of larger cells and fuel cell stacks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PEM fuel cell is promising as the power source for use in mobile and stationary applications primarily because of its high power density, all solid components, and simplicity of operation. For wide acceptability of this power source, its cost has to be competitive with the presently available energy sources. The fuel cell requires continuous humidification during operation as a power source. The humidification unit however, increases fuel cell volume, weight, and therefore decreases its overall power density. Great advantages in terms of further fuel cell simplification can be achieved if the humidification process can be eliminated or minimized. In addition, cost reductions are associated with the case of manufacturing and operation. At BCS Technology we have developed a technology of self-humidified operation of PEM fuel cells based on the mass balance of the reactants and products and the ability of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) to retain water necessary for humidification under the cell operating conditions. The reactants enter the fuel cell chambers without carrying any form of water, whether in liquid or vapor form. Basic principles of self-humidified operation of fuel cells as practiced by BCS Technology, Inc. have been presented previously in literature. Here, we report the operation of larger self-humidified single cells and fuel cell stacks. Fuel cells of areas Up to 100 cm{sup 2} have been operated. We also show the self-humidified operation of fuel cell stacks of 50 and 100 cm{sup 2} electrode areas.

Dhar, H.P.; Lee, J.H.; Lewinski, K.A. [BCS Technology, Inc., Bryan, TX (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Method for selective recovery of PET-usable quantities of [.sup.18 F] fluoride and [.sup.13 N] nitrate/nitrite from a single irradiation of low-enriched [.sup.18 O] water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- for radiotracer synthesis is disclosed. The process includes producing [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- simultaneously by exposing a low-enriched (20%-30%) [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target to proton irradiation, sequentially isolating the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target, and reducing the [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- to [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3. The [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- products are then conveyed to a laboratory for radiotracer applications. The process employs an anion exchange resin for isolation of the isotopes from the [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O, and sequential elution of [.sup.13 N]NO.sub.2.sup.- /NO.sub.3.sup.- and [ .sup.18 F]F.sup.- fractions. Also the apparatus is disclosed for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [.sup.13 N]NH.sub.3 and [.sup.18 F]F.sup.- from a single irradiation of a single low-enriched [.sup.18 O]H.sub.2 O target.

Ferrieri, Richard A. (Patchogue, NY); Schlyer, David J. (Bellport, NY); Shea, Colleen (Wading River, NY)

1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

176

Study of B{yields}X(3872)K, with X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present measurements of the decays B{sup +}{yields}X(3872)K{sup +} and B{sup 0}{yields}X(3872)K{sup 0} with X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The data sample used, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy storage ring, corresponds to 455x10{sup 6}BB pairs. Branching fraction measurements of B(B{sup +}{yields}X(3872)K{sup +})xB(X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(8.4{+-}1.5{+-}0.7)x10{sup -6} and B(B{sup 0}{yields}X(3872)K{sup 0})xB(X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -})=(3.5{+-}1.9{+-}0.4)x10{sup -6} are obtained. We set an upper limit on the natural width of the X(3872) of {gamma}<3.3 MeV/c{sup 2} at the 90% confidence level.

Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules, IN2P3/CNRS et Universite de Savoie, F-74941 Annecy-Le-Vieux (France); Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E. [Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat de Fisica, Departament ECM, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M. [Universita di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L. [University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen (Norway); Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] (and others)

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

2003-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Synthesis of the isotopes of elements 118 and 116 in the {sup 249}Cf and {sup 245}Cm+{sup 48}Ca fusion reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The decay properties of {sup 290}116 and {sup 291}116, and the dependence of their production cross sections on the excitation energies of the compound nucleus, {sup 293}116, have been measured in the {sup 245}Cm ({sup 48}Ca, xn){sup 293-x}116 reaction. These isotopes of element 116 are the decay daughters of element 118 isotopes, which are produced via the {sup 249}Cf+{sup 48}Ca reaction. We performed the element 118 experiment at two projectile energies, corresponding to {sup 297}118 compound nucleus excitation energies of E*=29.2{+-}2.5 and 34.4{+-}2.3 MeV. During an irradiation with a total beam dose of 4.1x10{sup 19} {sup 48}Ca projectiles, three similar decay chains consisting of two or three consecutive {alpha} decays and terminated by a spontaneous fission (SF) with high total kinetic energy of about 230 MeV were observed. The three decay chains originated from the even-even isotope {sup 294}118 (E{sub {alpha}}=11.65{+-}0.06 MeV, T{sub {alpha}}=0.89{sub -0.31}{sup +1.07} ms) produced in the 3n-evaporation channel of the {sup 249}Cf+{sup 48}Ca reaction with a maximum cross section of 0.5{sub -0.3}{sup +1.6} pb.

Oganessian, Yu. Ts.; Utyonkov, V. K.; Lobanov, Yu. V.; Abdullin, F. Sh.; Polyakov, A. N.; Sagaidak, R. N.; Shirokovsky, I. V.; Tsyganov, Yu. S.; Voinov, A. A.; Gulbekian, G. G.; Bogomolov, S. L.; Gikal, B. N.; Mezentsev, A. N.; Iliev, S.; Subbotin, V. G.; Sukhov, A. M.; Subotic, K.; Zagrebaev, V. I.; Vostokin, G. K.; Itkis, M. G. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)] (and others)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Energy transfer characteristics of silicate glass doped with Er{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, and Ho{sup 3+} for ?2 ?m emission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Er{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} tri-doped silicate glass with good thermal stability is prepared by melt-quenching method. Efficient ?2 ?m emission is observed under 808 nm laser excitation. It is found that the 2.0 ?m emission of Ho{sup 3+} can be enhanced under the excitation at 808 nm by incorporating Er{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}. Based on the measurement of absorption spectra, the JuddOfelt intensity parameters, radiation emission probability, and branching ratio are calculated to evaluate the spectroscopic properties simultaneously. The maximum value of emission cross section of Ho{sup 3+} is 3.54 10{sup ?21} cm{sup 2} at 2008 nm. Additionally, the phonon assistance and the micro-parameters in the energy transfer process are quantitatively analyzed by using Dexter model. The energy transfer coefficient from Tm{sup 3+} to Ho{sup 3+} can reach as high as 21.44 10{sup ?40} cm{sup 6}/s, respectively. The emission property together with good thermal property indicates that Er{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} tri-doped silicate glass is a potential kind of laser glass for efficient 2 ?m laser.

Li, Ming; Liu, Xueqiang [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China) [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Guo, Yanyan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); Hu, Lili [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang, Junjie [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310 018 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310 018 (China)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

180

Dipole Bands in {sup 196}Hg  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High spin states in {sup 196}Hg have been populated in the {sup 198}Pt({alpha},6n) reaction at 65 MeV and the level scheme has been extended. A new dipole band has been observed and a previously observed dipole has been confirmed. Excitation energies, spins and parities of these bands were determined from DCO ratio and linear polarization measurements. Possible quasiparticle excitations responsible for these structures are discussed.

Lawrie, J. J.; Lawrie, E. A.; Newman, R. T.; Sharpey-Schafer, J. F.; Smit, F. D. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Msezane, B. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, University of Zululand, Private Bag X1001, Kwadlangezwa 3886 (South Africa); Benatar, M.; Mabala, G. K.; Mutshena, K. P. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Federke, M.; Mullins, S. M. [Physics Department, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Ncapayi, N. J.; Vymers, P. [iThemba LABS, PO Box 722, Somerset West 7129 (South Africa); Physics Department, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Belleville 7535 (South Africa)

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Laser trapping of {sup 21}Na atoms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive {sup 21}Na (t{sub l/2} = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped {sup 21}Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of {sup 21}Na {yields} {sup 21}Ne + {Beta}{sup +} + v{sub e}, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, {sup 21}Na atoms were produced by bombarding {sup 24}Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The {sup 21}Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

Lu, Zheng-Tian

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Fuel loading and homogeneity analysis of HFIR design fuel plates loaded with uranium silicide fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twelve nuclear reactor fuel plates were analyzed for fuel loading and fuel loading homogeneity by measuring the attenuation of a collimated X-ray beam as it passed through the plates. The plates were identical to those used by the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) but were loaded with uranium silicide rather than with HFIR`s uranium oxide fuel. Systematic deviations from nominal fuel loading were observed as higher loading near the center of the plates and underloading near the radial edges. These deviations were within those allowed by HFIR specifications. The report begins with a brief background on the thermal-hydraulic uncertainty analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor that motivated a statistical description of fuel loading and homogeneity. The body of the report addresses the homogeneity measurement techniques employed, the numerical correction required to account for a difference in fuel types, and the statistical analysis of the resulting data. This statistical analysis pertains to local variation in fuel loading, as well as to ``hot segment`` analysis of narrow axial regions along the plate and ``hot streak`` analysis, the cumulative effect of hot segment loading variation. The data for all twelve plates were compiled and divided into 20 regions for analysis, with each region represented by a mean and a standard deviation to report percent deviation from nominal fuel loading. The central regions of the plates showed mean values of about +3% deviation, while the edge regions showed mean values of about {minus}7% deviation. The data within these regions roughly approximated random samplings from normal distributions, although the chi-square ({chi}{sup 2}) test for goodness of fit to normal distributions was not satisfied.

Blumenfeld, P.E.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

collectors. In a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which is widely regarded as the most promisingFUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Program: Fuel Cells Fuel Cells -- is the key to making it happen. Stationary fuel cells can be used for backup power, power for remote loca

184

Hematological responses after inhaling {sup 238}PuO{sub 2}: An extrapolation from beagle dogs to humans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The alpha emitter plutonium-238 ({sup 238}Pu), which is produced in uranium-fueled, light-water reactors, is used as a thermoelectric power source for space applications. Inhalation of a mixed oxide form of Pu is the most likely mode of exposure of workers and the general public. Occupational exposures to {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} have occurred in association with the fabrication of radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Organs and tissue at risk for deterministic and stochastic effects of {sup 238}Pu-alpha irradiation include the lung, liver, skeleton, and lymphatic tissue. Little has been reported about the effects of inhaled {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} on peripheral blood cell counts in humans. The purpose of this study was to investigate hematological responses after a single inhalation exposure of Beagle dogs to alpha-emitting {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} particles and to extrapolate results to humans.

Scott, B.R.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Welsh, C.A.; Angerstein, D.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Prompt {gamma}-ray spectroscopy of the {sup 104}Mo and {sup 108}Mo fission fragments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The level structures of the neutron-rich {sup 104}Mo and {sup 108}Mo nuclei have been investigated by observing prompt {gamma} rays emitted in the spontaneous fission of {sup 248}Cm with the EUROGAM spectrometer. Levels with spins up to 12{h_bar} have been observed and {gamma} branching obtained. The data can be satisfactorily described when {sup 104,108}Mo are considered as axially symmetric nuclei: in {sup 104}Mo, rotational bands based on the ground state, the one-phonon and the two-phonon {gamma}-vibrational states and a quasiparticle state have been observed, whereas in {sup 108}Mo the information is limited to the yrast band and the one phonon {gamma} band. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

Guessous, A.; Schulz, N.; Bentaleb, M.; Lubkiewicz, E. [Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite Louis Pasteur, 67037 Strasbourg (France)] [Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, Institut National de Physique Nucleaire et de Physique des Particules, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Universite Louis Pasteur, 67037 Strasbourg (France); Durell, J.L.; Pearson, C.J.; Phillips, W.R.; Shannon, J.A.; Urban, W.; Varley, B.J. [Department of Physics, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Ahmad, I.; Lister, C.J.; Morss, L.R.; Nash, K.L.; Williams, C.W. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Khazrouni, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire Appliquee, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra, Maroc (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique Nucleaire Appliquee, Faculte des Sciences, Kenitra, Maroc (France)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Elastic scattering and total reaction cross section of {sup 6}He+{sup 120}Sn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The elastic scattering of {sup 6}He on {sup 120}Sn has been measured at four energies above the Coulomb barrier using the {sup 6}He beam produced at the RIBRAS (Radioactive Ion Beams in Brasil) facility. The elastic angular distributions have been analyzed with the optical model and three- and four-body continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations. The total reaction cross sections have been derived and compared with other systems of similar masses.

Faria, P. N. de; Lichtenthaeler, R.; Pires, K. C. C.; Lepine-Szily, A.; Guimaraes, V.; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Barioni, A.; Morcelle, V.; Morais, M. C.; Camargo, O. Jr.; Alcantara Nunez, J. [Instituto de Fisica-Universidade de Sao Paulo, C. P. 66318, 05389-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Moro, A. M. [Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Arazi, A. [Laboratorio Tandar, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, 1429 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Rodriguez-Gallardo, M. [Departamento de FAMN, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Assuncao, M. [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo, Campus Diadema, 09941-510 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Synthesis of isotopically labeled R- or S-[.sup.13C, .sup.2H] glycerols  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to asymmetric chiral labeled glycerols including at least one chiral atom, from one to two .sup.13C atoms and from zero to four deuterium atoms bonded directly to a carbon atom, e.g., (2S) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol and (2R) [1,2-.sup.13C.sub.2]glycerol, and to the use of such chiral glycerols in the preparation of labeled amino acids.

Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM); Alvarez, Marc A. (Santa Fe, NM)

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

188

The {sup 150}Nd({sup 3}He,t) and {sup 150}Sm(t,{sup 3}He) reactions with applications to {beta}{beta} decay of {sup 150}Nd  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {sup 150}Nd({sup 3}He,t) reaction at 140 MeV/u and {sup 150}Sm(t,{sup 3}He) reaction at 115 MeV/u were measured, populating excited states in {sup 150}Pm. The transitions studied populate intermediate states of importance for the (neutrinoless) {beta}{beta} decay of {sup 150}Nd to {sup 150}Sm. Monopole and dipole contributions to the measured excitation-energy spectra were extracted by using multipole decomposition analyses. The experimental results were compared with theoretical calculations obtained within the framework of the quasiparticle random-phase approximation, which is one of the main methods employed for estimating the half-life of the neutrinoless {beta}{beta} decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) of {sup 150}Nd. The present results thus provide useful information on the neutrino responses for evaluating the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} and 2{nu}{beta}{beta} matrix elements. The 2{nu}{beta}{beta} matrix element calculated from the Gamow-Teller transitions through the lowest 1{sup +} state in the intermediate nucleus is maximally about half that deduced from the half-life measured in 2{nu}{beta}{beta} direct counting experiments, and at least several transitions through 1{sup +} intermediate states in {sup 150}Pm are required to explain the 2{nu}{beta}{beta} half-life. Because Gamow-Teller transitions in the {sup 150}Sm(t,{sup 3}He) experiment are strongly Pauli blocked, the extraction of Gamow-Teller strengths was complicated by the excitation of the 2({h_bar}/2{pi}){omega}, {Delta}L=0, {Delta}S=1 isovector spin-flip giant monopole resonance (IVSGMR). However, the near absence of Gamow-Teller transition strength made it possible to cleanly identify this resonance, and the strength observed is consistent with the full exhaustion of the non-energy-weighted sum rule for the IVSGMR.

Guess, C. J.; Brown, B. A.; Deaven, J. M.; Hitt, G. W.; Meharchand, R.; Zegers, R. G. T. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States); Adachi, T.; Fujita, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Hirota, K.; Ishikawa, D.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Ong, H. J.; Suzuki, T.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.; Zenihiro, J. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Akimune, H. [Department of Physics, Konan University, Okamoto 8-9-1, Higashinada, Kobe 658-8501 (Japan); Algora, A. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Institute of Nuclear Research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Debrecen H-4001 (Hungary)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

Metrological Determination of Natural Radioactive Isotopes {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 210}Pb by Means of Ge Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A metrological method to determine the activity per mass unity (activity concentration) of {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb ({sup 238}U decay series) and {sup 228}Ra ({sup 232}Th series) by gamma-ray spectrometers based on hyper-pure coaxial germanium detector was developed. In the soil the {sup 22}Ra (half-life = 1600 years) exhibits the same level of radioactivity as {sup 238}U (half-life 4.5x10{sup 9} years) because of a natural phenomenon called secular equilibrium. {sup 226}Ra decays into {sup 222}Rn (half-life = 3.8 days), a radioactive inert gas. After several days, the {sup 222}Rn naturally decays to {sup 218}Po (half-life = 3 minutes), where finally {sup 210}Pb (half-life = 22 years) is produced. The metrological capability of high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry for naturally occurring radionuclides at environmental levels is showed, with emphasis on the use of 2 mL standard sources volume in a glass ampoule. Source preparation and calibration procedures are described. Radionuclide standards in an activity range of 10 to 250 Bq/g were produced which can be applied in a variety of environmental sample analysis (water, plant material, sediment, etc.). Uncertainties for {sup 226}Ra and {sup 210}Pb around 3% (k = 1) were obtained.

Almeida, Maria Candida M. de; Delgado, Jose U.; Poledna, Roberto; Oliveira, Estela Maria de; Silva, Ronaldo L. da [Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes, Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear(SEMRA/LNMRI/IRD/CNEN) Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio, Rio de Janeiro, CEP 22780-160, RJ (Brazil)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

190

Study of heavy element structure with in-beam. cap alpha. /sup -/,. beta. /sup -/ and. gamma. -ray spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe our in-beam superconducting conversion electron spectrometer and its use in a (t,p) proton-conversion electron coincidence mode. Several examples of completed and on-going investigations are presented. These include: E0 strength from the /sup 238/U fission isomer; electromagnetic properties of the J/sup ..pi../ = 6/sup +/ and 8/sup +/ states of /sup 210/Pb; single particle and cluster states of /sup 213/Fr; the J/sup ..pi../ = 21/2/sup +/ isomer in /sup 197/Au and /sup 199/Au; and the cluster states of /sup 199/Au. Results of the study of odd-odd deformed /sup 244/Am are presented. The latter results performed using neutron-capture gamma-ray and conversion electron techniques are compared to recent developments in the modeling of deformed odd-odd nuclei. 23 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Meyer, R.A.; Decman, D.J.; Henry, E.A.; Hoff, R.W.; Mann, L.G.; Struble, G.L.; Ussery, L.E.

1984-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

191

Evidence for a highly deformed oblate 0{sup +} state in {sub 36}{sup 74}Kr  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the observation of an isomeric decay in the very neutron deficient nucleus {sub 36}{sup 74}Kr. The isomer is interpreted as an excited 0{sup +} state, consistent with the long standing prediction of high deformation prolate/oblate shape coexistence in this nucleus. The magnitude of the E0 matrix element deduced for the 0{sub 2}{sup +}{r_arrow}0{sub 1}{sup +} transition gives strong support to the prediction of a highly deformed oblate rotor. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

Chandler, A.; Regan, P.H.; Pearson, C.J.; Catford, W.N.; Curtis, N.; Gelletly, W.; Vincent, S.M. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 5XH (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 5XH (United Kingdom); Czajkowski, S.; Janas, Z.; Marchand, C. [CEN Bordeaux-Gradignan, Le Haut-Vigneau, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France)] Bruce, A.M. [Cockcroft Building, University of Brighton, Brighton, BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom); Janas, Z.; Lewitowicz, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Pl-00681, Warsaw (Poland)] [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Pl-00681, Warsaw (Poland); Saint-Lauren, M.G.; Winfield, J.S. [GANIL, BP 5027, F-14000, Caen Cedex (France)] Orr, N.A. [LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ISMRA et Universite de Caen, Bld. du Marechal Juin, F-14050, Caen Cedex (France); Reed, A.T. [Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)] Petrovici, A. [Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, PO Box MG-6, R-76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)] Wadsworth, R. [Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York Y01 4DD (United Kingdom)] Warner, D.D. [CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Evidence for a highly deformed oblate 0[sup +] state in [sub 36][sup 74]Kr  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the observation of an isomeric decay in the very neutron deficient nucleus [sub 36][sup 74]Kr. The isomer is interpreted as an excited 0[sup +] state, consistent with the long standing prediction of high deformation prolate/oblate shape coexistence in this nucleus. The magnitude of the E0 matrix element deduced for the 0[sub 2][sup +][r arrow]0[sub 1][sup +] transition gives strong support to the prediction of a highly deformed oblate rotor. [copyright] [ital 1997] [ital The American Physical Society

Chandler, A.; Regan, P.H.; Pearson, C.J.; Catford, W.N.; Curtis, N.; Gelletly, W.; Vincent, S.M. (Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 5XH (United Kingdom)); Czajkowski, S.; Janas, Z.; Marchand, C. (CEN Bordeaux-Gradignan, Le Haut-Vigneau, F-33175 Gradignan Cedex (France)) Bruce, A.M. (Cockcroft Building, University of Brighton, Brighton, BN2 4GJ (United Kingdom)); Janas, Z.; Lewitowicz, M. (Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Pl-00681, Warsaw (Poland)); Saint-Lauren, M.G.; Winfield, J.S. (GANIL, BP 5027, F-14000, Caen Cedex (France)) Orr, N.A. (LPC, IN2P3-CNRS, ISMRA et Universite de Caen, Bld. du Marechal Juin, F-14050, Caen Cedex (France)); Reed, A.T. (Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)) Petrovici, A. (Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, PO Box MG-6, R-76900 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)) Wadsworth, R. (Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Proliferation resistant fuel for pebble bed modular reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that it is possible to denature the Plutonium produced in Pebble Bed Modular Reactors (PBMR) by doping the nuclear fuel with either 3050 ppm of {sup 237}Np or 2100 ppm of Am vector. A correct choice of these isotopes concentration yields denatured Plutonium with isotopic ratio {sup 238}Pu/Pu {>=} 6%, for the entire fuel burnup cycle. The penalty for introducing these isotopes into the nuclear fuel is a subsequent shortening of the fuel burnup cycle, with respect to a non-doped reference fuel, by 41.2 Full Power Days (FPDs) and 19.9 FPDs, respectively, which correspond to 4070 MWd/ton and 1965 MWd/ton reduction in fuel discharge burnup. (authors)

Ronen, Y.; Aboudy, M.; Regev, D.; Gilad, E. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Synthesis of superheavy element 120 via {sup 50}Ti+{sup A}Cf hot fusion reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synthesis of superheavy element 120 in terms of the {sup 50}Ti+{sup 249-252}Cf fusion-evaporation reactions is evaluated and discussed. It is found that the reactions of {sup 250,251}Cf({sup 50}Ti,3n){sup 297,298}120 and {sup 251,252}Cf({sup 50}Ti,4n){sup 297,298}120 are relatively favorable with the maximum evaporation-residue cross sections of 0.12, 0.09, 0.11, and 0.25 pb, respectively. However, {sup 252}Cf may be difficult to be target because its spontaneous fission will bring about serious background in the experiment. Fusion probabilities for different target-projectile combinations leading to the formation of surperheavy nucleus {sup 302}120 are estimated with the ''fusion-by-diffusion'' model and presented as a function of the Coulomb parameter Z{sub 1}Z{sub 2}/(A{sub 1}{sup 1/3}+A{sub 2}{sup 1/3}). Among the reactions {sup 50}Ti+{sup 252}Cf, {sup 54}Cr+{sup 248}Cm, {sup 58}Fe+{sup 244}Pu, and {sup 64}Ni+{sup 238}U, the reaction {sup 50}Ti+{sup 252}Cf has the largest fusion probability. Synthesis of superheavy element 120 is of essential importance for determining whether the magic proton shell should be at Z=114 or at higher proton numbers Z=120-126. Therefore, the experiment to produce isotopes with Z=120 in the fusion reactions {sup 50}Ti+{sup 250,251}Cf is of great interest.

Liu, Z. H. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China); Bao Jingdong [Department of Physics, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

D{sup 0}-{anti D}{sup 0} mixing and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the D{sup +}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes results from Fermilab experiment E791 on D{sup 0}-{anti D}{sup 0} mixing and doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays of the D{sup +} meson. In order to search for D{sup 0}-{anti D}{sup 0} mixing, the authors use only D{sup 0} mesons from D{sup *+} decays in which case the charge of the pion from the D{sup *+} decay identifies the charm quantum number of the D{sup 0} at birth. When the D{sup 0} decays, the charge of the kaon identifies the charm quantum number and this way one can tell if mixing has occurred. This kind of search can be carried out by CLEO II as well and their conclusion was that there is some evidence of a wrong sign signal (0.77 {+-} 0.25 {+-} 0.25)% of the right sign signal. However, because of a lack of lifetime information, they cannot distinguish between doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decays which are expected at the level of the observed signal and mixing. They use their excellent lifetime sensitivity to obtain separate limits. During the past year, the authors have been working on extracting D{sup +} doubly Cabibbo-suppressed decay signals from E791`s data sample. These decays are interesting both because they have never been observed and because definite predictions have been made about their rates, based on models of D mesons and their decay mechanisms. Preliminary analyses of 1/3 of the data have now been completed. Figure 3 shows the Cabibbo-favored signal D{sup +} {yields} K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} and the next figure shows the signal in the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed mode D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup {minus}}.

Fermilab E791 Collaboration

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Study of ternary and quaternary spontaneous fission of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf with the NESSI detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ternary and quaternary spontaneous decay of sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf was studied with the NESSI detector, a combination of two 4 pi detectors for charged particles, neutrons and gamma-rays. The applied method of particle identification by measuring the energies and relative time-of-flights of the decay products is shown to be very effective for the study of rare decay modes. The energy and angular distributions of the decay products, the associated neutron multiplicities, the total energy of the prompt gamma-radiation as well as correlations between the various observables were measured for the first time in a single full-scale experiment. The characteristics of ternary fission known from previous investigations are confirmed in the frame of a methodically independent experiment. Preliminary estimates of the quaternary fission yield are presented. An attempt is made to determine the mechanism of quaternary fission.

Tishchenko, V G; Hilscher, D; Jahnke, U

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Enhanced conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C.sub.5.sup.+ hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

Coughlin, Peter K. (Yorktown Heights, NY); Rabo, Jule A. (Armonk, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Enhanced catalyst for conversion of syngas to liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Synthesis gas comprising carbon monoxide and hydrogen is converted to C[sub 5][sup +] hydrocarbons suitable for use as liquid motor fuels by contact with a dual catalyst system capable of enhancing the selectivity of said conversion to motor fuel range hydrocarbons and the quality of the resulting motor fuel product. The catalyst composition employs a Fischer-Tropsch catalyst, together with a co-catalyst/support component comprising a SAPO silicoaluminophosphate, non-zeolitic molecular sieve catalyst.

Coughlin, P.K.; Rabo, J.A.

1985-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fireside Corrosion in Oxy-fuel Combustion of Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oxy-fuel combustion is burning a fuel in oxygen rather than air for ease of capture of CO2 from for reuse or sequestration. Corrosion issues associated with the environment change (replacement of much of the N2 with CO2 and higher sulfur levels) from air- to oxy-firing were examined. Alloys studied included model FeCr alloys and commercial ferritic steels, austenitic steels, and nickel base superalloys. The corrosion behavior is described in terms of corrosion rates, scale morphologies, and scale/ash interactions for the different environmental conditions. Evidence was found for a hreshold for severe attack between 10<sup>-4sup> and 10<sup>-3sup> atm of SO3 at 700C.

Holcomb, Gordon R [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Tylczak, Joseph [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Meier, Gerald H [University of Pittsburgh; Lutz, Bradley [University of Pittsburgh; Jung, Keeyoung [Institute of Industrial Science and Technology, Korea; Mu, Nan; Yanar, Nazik M [University of Pittsburgh; Pettit, Frederick S [University of Pittsburgh; Zhu, Jingxi [Carnegie Mellon University; Wise, Adam [Carnegie Mellon University; Laughlin, David E. [Carnegie Mellon University; Sridhar, Seetharaman [Carnegie Mellon University

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The {sup 30}P(p, ?){sup 31}S reaction in classical novae: progress and prospects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unknown thermonuclear rate of the {sup 30}P(p, ?){sup 31}S reaction at classical-nova temperatures currently prohibits the accurate modeling of nova nucleosynthesis in the A ? 30 region. This is hindering the calibration of nova thermometers based on observed O/S, S/Al, O/P, and P/Al abundance ratios in nova ejecta, the calibration of a meter to probe mixing at the core-envelope interface in novae based on the observed Si/H abundance ratio, and the identification of candidate pre-solar nova grains found in primitive meteorites based on laboratory measurements of their {sup 30}Si/{sup 28}Si isotopic ratios. Each of these diagnostics could address key questions in our understanding of classical novae if the {sup 30}P(p, ?){sup 31}S rate were known. We review progress on the determination of the {sup 30}P(p, ?){sup 31}S rate leading to a critical assessment of current interpretations of published data and prospects for future work.

Wrede, C., E-mail: wrede@nscl.msu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy and National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Measurement of the /sup 129/I//sup 131/I ratio in Chernobyl fallout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rainwater collected in the Munich area approximately one week after the Chernobyl reactor accident was investigated for its content of the radioisotopes /sup 129/I (T/sub 1/2/ = 1.6 x 10/sup 7/ y) and /sup 131/I (T/sub 1/2/ = 8.04 d). For the time of release, an isotopic ratio of /sup 129/I//sup 131/I = 19 +- 5 was found. This value was obtained from a gamma-ray activity measurement of /sup 131/I with a GE detector and a concentration measurement of /sup 129/I with accelerator mass spectrometry. From the measured ratio an operating time of the reactor prior to the accident in the vicinity of two years can be estimated, which is in fair agreement with estimates from other long-lived to short-lived radioisotope ratios in the Chernobyl fallout. Some measurements of /sup 131/I activity in thyroids of persons living in the Munich area is also reported.

Kutschera, W.; Fink, D.; Paul, M.; Hollos, G.; Kaufman, A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Measuring W photon couplings in a 500 GeV e sup + e sup - collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Standard Model gives definite predictions for the W-photon couplings. Measuring them would test an important ingredient of the model. In this work we study the capability of a 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider to measure these couplings. We study the most general C and P conserving WW{lambda} vertex. This vertex contains two free parameters, {kappa} and {lambda}. We look at three processes: e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}, e{lambda} {yields} W{nu} and {lambda}{lambda} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup {minus}}. For each process we present analytical expressions of helicity amplitudes for arbitrary values of {kappa} and {lambda}. We consider three different sources for the initial photon(s). The first two are breamsstrahlung and beamstrahlung (photon radiation induced by the collective fields of the opposite bunch). Both occur naturally in the collider environment. The third is a photon beam generated by scattering low energy laser light off a high energy electron beam. We examine potential observables for each process, calculating their sensitivity to {kappa} and {lambda}, and estimating the accuracy with which they can be measured. Assuming Standard Model values are actually measured, we present the region in the {kappa}-{lambda} plane to which the W couplings can be restricted with a given confidence level. We find that combining the three processes, one can measure {kappa} and {lambda} with accuracy of 0.01--0.02.

Yehudai, E.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

/sup 234/Th: /sup 238/U disequilibria within the California Current  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Profiles of dissolved and particulate /sup 234/Th were determined at several stations within the California Current. Modeling of the disequilibria between the /sup 234/Th and /sup 238/U within the surface waters provides for estimates of the residence time of dissolved thorium with respect to particle scavenging, the particle residence time, and the particulate /sup 234/Th flux exiting the surface layer. The model-derived, first-order scavenging rate constant for dissolved thorium is observed to be proportional to the rate of primary production. Particle residence times seem to be governed by the rate of zooplankton grazing and the types of zooplankton present. Model-derived particulate /sup 234/Th fluxes are in good agreement with direct measurements by sediment traps.

Coale, K.H.; Bruland, K.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Coherent photoproduction of {pi}{sup +} from {sup 3}He with CLAS at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have measured the differential cross section for the {gamma}{sup 3}He{yields}{pi}{sup +}t reaction. This reaction was studied using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. Real photons produced with the Hall-B bremsstrahlung tagging system in the energy range from 0.5 to 1.55 GeV were incident on a cryogenic liquid {sup 3}He target. The differential cross sections for the {gamma}{sup 3}He{yields}{pi}{sup +}t reaction were measured as a function of photon-beam energy and pion-scattering angle. Theoretical predictions to date cannot explain the large cross sections except at backward angles, showing that additional components must be added to the model.

Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Berman, Barry [George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States)

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

206

Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel under accident conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fission product release from irradiated LWR fuel is being studied by heating fuel rod segments in flowing steam and an inert carrier gas to simulate accident conditions. Fuels with a range of irradiation histories are being subjected to several steam flow rates over a wide range of temperatures. Fission product release during each test is measured by gamma spectroscopy and by detailed examination of the collection apparatus after the test has been completed. These release results are complemented by a detailed posttest examination of samples of the fuel rod segment. Results of release measurements and fuel rod characterizations for tests at 1400 through 2000/sup 0/C are presented in this paper.

Strain, R.V.; Sanecki, J.E.; Osborne, M.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Observation of B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}p and searches for B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{sigma}{sup 0}p and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}pp decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the observation of B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}p and searches for B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{sigma}{sup 0}p and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}pp decays, using a sample of 275x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected with the Belle detector at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance. We observe a signal of 17.2{+-}4.1 events with a significance of 11.1{sigma} and obtain a branching fraction of B(B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}p)=11.6{+-}2.8(stat){sub -2.3}{sup +1.8}(sys)x10{sup -6}. No signal is found for either of the two decay modes, B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{sigma}{sup 0}p and B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}pp, and upper limits for the branching fractions are determined to be B(B{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{sigma}{sup 0}p)<1.1x10{sup -5} and B(B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}pp)<8.3x10{sup -7} at 90% confidence level.

Xie, Q.L.; Dong, L.Y.; Yuan, Y.; Zang, S.L.; Zhang, C.C. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Gershon, T.; Haba, J.; Hazumi, M.; Ishikawa, A.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Nishida, S.; Nozaki, T.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Takasaki, F. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)] [and others

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

New Features of Shape Coexistence in {sup 152}Sm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Excited states in {sup 152}Sm have been investigated with the {sup 152}Sm(n,n{sup '}gamma) reaction. The lowest four negative-parity band structures have been characterized in detail with respect to their absolute decay properties. Specifically, a new K{sup p}i=0{sup -} band has been assigned with its 1{sup -} band head at 1681 keV. This newly observed band has a remarkable similarity in its E1 transition rates for decay to the first excited K{sup p}i=0{sup +} band at 684 keV to the lowest K{sup p}i=0{sup -} band and its decay to the ground-state band. Based on these decay properties, as well as energy considerations, this new band is assigned as a K{sup p}i=0{sup -} octupole excitation based on the K{sup p}i=0{sub 2}{sup +} state. An emerging pattern of repeating excitations built on the 0{sub 2}{sup +} level similar to those built on the ground state may indicate that {sup 152}Sm is a complex example of shape coexistence rather than a critical point nucleus.

Garrett, P. E. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G2W1 Canada (Canada); Kulp, W. D.; Wood, J. L. [Department of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0430 (United States); Bandyopadhyay, D.; Choudry, S.; Lesher, S. R.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Mynk, M.; Orce, J. N.; Yates, S. W. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Dashdorj, D. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

2009-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Irradiation Test of Advanced PWR Fuel in Fuel Test Loop at HANARO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new fuel test loop has been constructed in the research reactor HANARO at KAERI. The main objective of the FTL (Fuel Test Loop) is an irradiation test of a newly developed LWR fuel under PWR or Candu simulated conditions. The first test rod will be loaded within 2007 and its irradiation test will be continued until a rod average their of 62 MWd/kgU. A total of five test rods can be loaded into the IPS (In-Pile Section) and fuel centerline temperature, rod internal pressure and fuel stack elongation can be measured by an on-line real time system. A newly developed advanced PWR fuel which consists of a HANA{sup TM} alloy cladding and a large grain UO{sub 2} pellet was selected as the first test fuel in the FTL. The fuel cladding, the HANA{sup TM} alloy, is an Nb containing Zirconium alloy that has shown better corrosion and creep resistance properties than the current Zircaloy-4 cladding. A total of six types of HANA{sup TM} alloy were developed and two or three of these candidate alloys will be used as test rod cladding, which have shown a superior performance to the others. A large-grain UO{sub 2} pellet has a 14{approx}16 micron 2D diameter grain size for a reduction of a fission gas release at a high burnup. In this paper, characteristics of the FTL and IPS are introduced and the expected operation and irradiation conditions are summarized for the test periods. Also the preliminary fuel performance analysis results, such as the cladding oxide thickness, fission gas release and rod internal pressure, are evaluated from the test rod safety analysis aspects. (authors)

Yang, Yong Sik; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Sun Ki; Song, Kun Woo [LWR Fuel Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045, Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Su Ki [HANARO Utilization Technology Development Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045, Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Chul Gyo [HANARO Management Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045, Daedeok-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Depth absorbed dose and LET distributions of therapeutic {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 12}C beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The depth absorbed dose and LET (linear energy transfer) distribution of different ions of clinical interest such as {sup 1}H, {sup 4}He, {sup 7}Li, and {sup 12}C ions have been investigated using the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT. The energies of the projectiles correspond to ranges in water and soft tissue of approximately 260 mm. The depth dose distributions of the primary particles and their secondaries have been calculated and separated with regard to their low and high LET components. A LET value below 10 eV/nm can generally be regarded as low LET and sparsely ionizing like electrons and photons. The high LET region may be assumed to start at 20 eV/nm where on average two double-strand breaks can be formed when crossing the periphery of a nucleosome, even though strictly speaking the LET limits are not sharp and ought to vary with the charge and mass of the ion. At the Bragg peak of a monoenergetic high energy proton beam, less than 3% of the total absorbed dose is comprised of high LET components above 20 eV/nm. The high LET contribution to the total absorbed dose in the Bragg peak is significantly larger with increasing ion charge as a natural result of higher stopping power and lower range straggling. The fact that the range straggling and multiple scattering are reduced by half from hydrogen to helium increases the possibility to accurately deposit only the high LET component in the tumor with negligible dose to organs at risk. Therefore, the lateral penumbra is significantly improved and the higher dose gradients of {sup 7}Li and {sup 12}C ions both longitudinally and laterally will be of major advantage in biological optimized radiation therapy. With increasing charge of the ion, the high LET absorbed dose in the beam entrance and the plateau regions where healthy normal tissues are generally located is also increased. The dose distribution of the high LET components in the {sup 7}Li beam is only located around the Bragg peak, characterized by a Gaussian-type distribution. Furthermore, the secondary particles produced by high energy {sup 7}Li ions in tissuelike media have mainly low LET character both in front of and beyond the Bragg peak.

Kempe, Johanna; Gudowska, Irena; Brahme, Anders [Division of Medical Radiation Physics, Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Box 260, SE-171 76 Stockholm (Sweden)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Measurements of {psi}(2S) decays into {phi}{pi}{sup 0}, {phi}{eta}, {phi}{eta}{sup '}, {omega}{eta}, and {omega}{eta}{sup '}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decays of the {psi}(2S) into vector plus pseudoscalar meson final states have been studied with 14x10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events collected with the BESII detector. Branching fractions of {psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{eta}, {phi}{eta}{sup '}, and {omega}{eta}{sup '}, and upper limits of {psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{pi}{sup 0} and {omega}{eta} are obtained: B({psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{eta})=(3.3{+-}1.1{+-}0.5)x10{sup -5}, B({psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{eta}{sup '})=(3.1{+-}1.4{+-}0.7)x10{sup -5}, and B({psi}(2S){yields}{omega}{eta}{sup '})=(3.2{sub -2.0}{sup +2.4}{+-}0.7)x10{sup -5}; and B({psi}(2S){yields}{phi}{pi}{sup 0})<0.40x10{sup -5}, and B({psi}(2S){yields}{omega}{eta})<3.1x10{sup -5} at the 90% C.L. These results are used to test the perturbative QCD ''12% rule.''.

Ablikim, M.; Bai, J.Z.; Bian, J.G.; Cai, X.; Chang, J.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chen, H.X.; Chen, J.C.; Chen Jin; Chen, M.L.; Chen, Y.B.; Chu, Y.P.; Cui, X.Z.; Dai, H.L.; Deng, Z.Y.; Dong, L.Y.; Du, S.X.; Du, Z.Z.; Fang, J.; Fu, C.D. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039 (China)] [and others

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Properties of excited states in {sup 77}Ge.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nucleus {sup 77}Ge was studied through the {sup 76}Ge({sup 13}C,{sup 12}C){sup 77}Ge reaction at a sub-Coulomb energy. The angular distributions of rays depopulating excited states in {sup 77}Ge were measured in order to constrain spin and parity assignments. Some of these assignments are of use in connection with neutrinoless double beta decay, where the population of states near the Fermi surface of {sup 76}Ge was recently explored using transfer reactions.

Kay, B. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Schiffer, J. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Zhu, S.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; McCutchan, E. A.; Seweryniak, D.; Stefanescu, I.; Univ. of Maryland; Horia-Hulubei National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Assessment of SFR fuel pin performance codes under advanced fuel for minor actinide transmutation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is, therefore, an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity and residual power packages as well as the repository area. In the SUPERFACT Experiment four different oxide fuels containing high and low concentrations of {sup 237}Np and {sup 241}Am, representing the homogeneous and heterogeneous in-pile recycling concepts, were irradiated in the PHENIX reactor. The behavior of advanced fuel materials with minor actinide needs to be fully characterized, understood and modeled in order to optimize the design of this kind of fuel elements and to evaluate its performances. This paper assesses the current predictability of fuel performance codes TRANSURANUS and GERMINAL V2 on the basis of post irradiation examinations of the SUPERFACT experiment for pins with low minor actinide content. Their predictions have been compared to measured data in terms of geometrical changes of fuel and cladding, fission gases behavior and actinide and fission product distributions. The results are in good agreement with the experimental results, although improvements are also pointed out for further studies, especially if larger content of minor actinide will be taken into account in the codes. (authors)

Bouineau, V.; Lainet, M.; Chauvin, N.; Pelletier, M. [French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission - CEA, CEA Cadarache, DEN/DEC/SESC, 13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Di Marcello, V.; Van Uffelen, P.; Walker, C. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D- 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Multi-quasiparticle isomers in {sup 174}Lu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four-, six-, and eight-quasiparticle isomers with K{sup {pi}}=14{sup -}, (21{sup +}) and (26{sup -}) have been identified in the deformed nucleus {sup 174}Lu, in addition to the previously reported K{sup {pi}}=13{sup +}, four-quasiparticle isomeric state. Analysis of alignments and in-band crossover-to-cascade branching ratios lead to the characterization of the configurations associated with the K{sup {pi}}=14{sup -} and (21{sup +}) isomers. The excitation energies of the observed states are compared with results from multi-quasiparticle calculations that include effects of blocking and residual nucleon-nucleon interactions. Good agreement is found for medium-spin (I=13-14({Dirac_h}/2{pi})) and the highest spin (I>20({Dirac_h}/2{pi})) states observed, but there remain ambiguities in assigning configurations in the I=15-19({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) region.

Kondev, F. G.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Zhu, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Dracoulis, G. D.; Lane, G. J.; Kibedi, T. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Byrne, A. P. [Department of Nuclear Physics, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Physics, The Faculties, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Chowdhury, P.; Tandel, S. K. [Department of Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Search for intrinsic collective excitations in {sup 152}Sm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 685 keV excitation energy of the first excited 0{sup +} state in {sup 152}Sm makes it an attractive candidate to explore expected two-phonon excitations at low energy. Multiple-step Coulomb excitation and inelastic neutron scattering studies of {sup 152}Sm are used to probe the E2 collectivity of excited 0{sup +} states in this 'soft' nucleus and the results are compared with model predictions. No candidates for two-phonon K{sup {pi}}=0{sup +}quadrupole vibrational states are found. A 2{sup +},K=2 state with strong E2 decay to the first excited K{sup {pi}}=0{sup +} band and a probable 3{sup +} band member are established.

Kulp, W. D.; Wood, J. L.; Allmond, J. M. [School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0430 (United States); Garrett, P. E. [Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N0B 1S0 (Canada); TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Wu, C. Y.; Cline, D.; Hayes, A. B.; Hua, H.; Teng, R. [Nuclear Structure Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Bandyopadhyay, D.; Choudry, S. N.; McEllistrem, M. T.; McKay, C. J.; Orce, J. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Dashdorj, D. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States); Mynk, M. G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Yates, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fuel Processing Valri Lightner  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Hydrogen · Fuel Processors for PEM Fuel Cells Nuvera Fuel Cells, Inc. GE Catalytica ANL PNNL University-Board Fuel Processing Barriers $35/kW Fuel Processor $10/kW Fuel Cell Power Systems $45/kW by 2010 BARRIERS · Fuel processor start-up/ transient operation · Durability · Cost · Emissions and environmental issues

217

Fuel reforming for fuel cell application.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Fossil fuels, such as natural gas, petroleum, and coal are currently the primary source of energy that drives the world economy. However, fossil fuel is (more)

Hung, Tak Cheong

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Alternative Fuel Vehicle Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Alternative fuel vehicles use fuel types other than petroleum and include such fuels as electricity, ethanol, biodiesel, natural gas, hydrogen, and propane. Compared to petroleum, these...

219

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel Grants and Rebates The Arkansas Alternative Fuels Development Program (Program) provides grants to alternative fuel producers, feedstock processors, and...

220

Alternative Fuel Implementation Toolkit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? Alternative Fuels, the Smart Choice: Alternative fuels ­ biodiesel, electricity, ethanol (E85), natural gas...........................................................................................................................................................................6 Trends and Fleet Examples: Alternative Fuel Decision Table

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 1990. These many alternative-fuel initiatives failed tolow-cost, low-carbon alternative fuels would thrive. Theto introduce low-carbon alternative fuels. Former Federal

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Institute 1990 Fuel Cell Status," Proceedings ofMiller, "Introduction: Fuel-Cell-Powered Vehicle DevelopmentPrograms," presented at Fuel Cells for Transportation,

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Characterization of Nuclear Fuel using Multivariate Statistical Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various combinations of reactor type and fuel composition have been characterized using principle components analysis (PCA) of the concentrations of 9 U and Pu isotopes in the 10 fuel as a function of burnup. The use of PCA allows the reduction of the 9-dimensional data (isotopic concentrations) into a 3-dimensional approximation, giving a visual representation of the changes in nuclear fuel composition with burnup. Real-world variation in the concentrations of {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U in the fresh (unirradiated) fuel was accounted for. The effects of reprocessing were also simulated. The results suggest that, 15 even after reprocessing, Pu isotopes can be used to determine both the type of reactor and the initial fuel composition with good discrimination. Finally, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PSLDA) was investigated as a substitute for PCA. Our results suggest that PLSDA is a better tool for this application where separation between known classes is most important.

Robel, M; Robel, M; Robel, M; Kristo, M J; Kristo, M J

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

225

Chemical factors affecting insolubles formation in shale derived diesel fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detrimental changes in fuel properties with time have been a continuing problem in the use of middle distillate fuels. Instability of diesel fuels is usually defined by the formation of insoluble sediments and gums. Gravimetric stability tests have been conducted at 43/sup 0/ and 80/sup 0/C, respectively, using three model nitrogen heterocycles, 2-methylpyridine, 2,6-di methyl quinoline, and dodecahydrocarbazole, as dopants in an otherwise stable shale diesel fuel. Potential interactive effects have been defined for these three model nitrogen heterocycles in the stable fuel in the presence of a second model dopant, t-butyl hydroperoxide. 2-Methyl pyridine and 2,6-dimethyl quinoline were inactive and only 2-methyl pyridine showed slight positive interactive effects. Dodecahydrocarbazole formed large amounts of insolubles by itself and exhibited positive interactive effects.

Beal, E.J.; Mushrush, G.W.; Cooney, J.V. (Fuels Section, Code 6180 Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (US)); Watkins, J.M. (Geo-Centers, Ft. Washington, MD (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Search for CP-violating charge asymmetry in B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} decays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the result of a search for charge asymmetry in B{sup {+-}}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup {+-}} decays using 772x10{sup 6} BB pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance by the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The CP-violating charge asymmetry is measured to be A{sub CP}(B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}K{sup +})=[-0.76{+-}0.50 (stat){+-}0.22 (syst)]%.

Sakai, K.; Kawasaki, T.; Miyata, H.; Watanabe, M. [Niigata University, Niigata (Japan); Aihara, H. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Arinstein, K.; Bondar, A.; Eidelman, S.; Kuzmin, A.; Shwartz, B.; Zyukova, O. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Aushev, T. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bakich, A. M.; McOnie, S.; Varvell, K. E. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Balagura, V.; Liventsev, D.; Pakhlova, G.; Solovieva, E.; Uglov, T. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Oceanic stratified euphotic zone as elucidated by /sup 234/Th:/sup 238/U disequilibria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Profiles of dissolved and particulate /sup 234/Th were determined at the VERTEX 2 and 3 stations off Manzanillo, Mexico, and at the VERTEX 4 station about 900 km north of Hawaii. By modeling the disequilibria between /sup 234/Th and /sup 238/U in the dissolved and particulate form, estimates of scavenging rates for Th from the dissolved to particulate phases, particle residence times, and the flux of Th via particle removal can be obtained. /sup 234/Th:/sup 238/U activity ratio profiles indicate that the euphotic zone can be separated into two layers: an upper oligotrophic layer characterized by low new production values, low net scavenging, and long dissolved /sup 234/Th residence times; and a subsurface eutrophic layer with higher new production values, more intense scavenging, and shorter dissolved /sup 234/Th residence times. New production, rather than total primary production may determine net scavenging rates of reactive elements from oceanic surface waters. These results contribute to the emerging descriptions of the layered structure of oligotrophic euphotic zones and support the notion that this may be a general and ubiquitous feature of global stratified oligotrophic regimes.

Coale, K.H.; Bruland, K.W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Cold collisions of PH ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sup -}) with helium in magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical investigation of the He-PH ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sup -}) complex is presented. We perform ab initio calculations of the interaction potential energy surface and discuss its error bounds with relevance to cold collisions, and we carry out accurate calculations of bound energy levels of the complex including the molecular fine structure and magnetic-field effect. We find the potential has two shallow minima and supports ten and 13 bound levels in complex with {sup 3}He and {sup 4}He, respectively. Based on the potential the quantum scattering calculations are then implemented for elastic and inelastic cross sections of the magnetically trappable low-field-seeking state of PH ({sup 3}{Sigma}{sup -}) in collision with {sup 3}He atom. The cold-collision properties and the influence of the external magnetic field as well as the effect of the uncertainty of interaction potential on the collisionally induced Zeeman relaxation are explored and discussed in detail. The ratio of elastic to inelastic cross sections is large over a wide range of collision energy, magnetic field, and scaling factor of the potential, so that helium buffer-gas loading and evaporative cooling of PH is a good prospect.

Feng, Eryin; Yu, Chunhua; Sun, Chunyan; Shao, Xi; Huang, Wuying [Department of Physics, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000 (China)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Prompt Gamma Rays in {sup 77}Ge after Neutron Capture on {sup 76}Ge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The observation of neutrinoless double beta decay would be proof of the Majorana nature of the neutrino. Half-lives for these decays are very long (for {sup 76}Ge:>10{sup 25} y), so background reduction and rejection is the major task for double beta experiments. The GERDA (GERmanium Detector Array) experiment at the Gran Sasso Laboratory of the INFN (LNGS) searches for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 76}Ge. The isotope {sup 76}Ge is an ideal candidate because it can be used as source and detector at the same time. A large remaining contribution to the background arises from the prompt gamma cascade after neutron capture by {sup 76}Ge followed by {beta}{sup -}-decay of {sup 77}Ge. Since the prompt gamma decay scheme is poorly known, measurements with isotopically enriched Germanium samples were carried out at the PGAA facility at the research reactor FRM II (Munich). With the known prompt gamma spectrum it will be possible to improve the overall veto efficiency of the GERDA experiment.

Meierhofer, Georg; Grabmayr, Peter; Jochum, Josef [Physikalisches Institut, Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 14, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Canella, Lea [Institut fuer Radiochemie, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Jolie, Jan; Kudejova, Petra; Warr, Nigel [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Cologne (Germany)

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

The {beta}-Decay Properties of Scissors Mode 1{sup +} States in {sup 164}Er  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beta decay properties of collective I{sup {pi}}K = 1{sup +}1 states in doubly even deformed {sup 164}Er nuclei are investigated in the framework of the rotational invariant random-phase approximation. It is shown that an essential decrease of the rate of the allowed {beta}-decay to the excited 1{sup +}-states as compared with that to the ground state may be due to the orbital nature of the states. The model Hamiltonian includes restoring rotational invariance of the deformed single particle Hamiltonian forces and the spin-spin interactions. The analytical expressions for the Gamov-Teller (G-T) and Fermi (F) decay matrix elements are derived. The single-particle energies were obtained from the Warsaw deformed Woods-Saxon potential with deformation parameter {delta}{sub 2} = 0.24. The numerical results for {beta}{sup +} transition from {sup 164}Tm to {sup 164}Er indicate the importance of using rotational invariant Hamiltonian to explain experimental data.

Yildirim, Z.; Kuliev, A.; Ozkan, S. [Sakarya University, Department of Physics, 54100, Sakarya (Turkey); Guliyev, E. [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences, H. Cavid Avenue 33, Baku (Azerbaijan); Institut fur Kernphysik, Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

231

Observation of B{sup {+-}}{yields}{psi}(2S){pi}{sup {+-}} and search for direct CP violation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first observation of B{sup {+-}}{yields}{psi}(2S){pi}{sup {+-}}, a Cabibbo- and color-suppressed decay. This analysis is based on 657x10{sup 6} BB events collected at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB energy-asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The measured branching fraction is (2.44{+-}0.22{+-}0.20)x10{sup -5} and the charge asymmetry is A=0.022{+-}0.085{+-}0.016. The ratio of the branching fractions B(B{sup {+-}}{yields}{psi}(2S){pi}{sup {+-}})/B(B{sup {+-}}{yields}{psi}(2S)K{sup {+-}})=(3.99{+-}0.36{+-}0.17)% is also determined.

Bhardwaj, V.; Kumar, R.; Singh, J. B. [Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Adachi, I.; Brodzicka, J.; Dalseno, J.; Hazumi, M.; Itoh, R.; Iwasaki, Y.; Katayama, N.; Kichimi, H.; Krokovny, P.; Nakao, M.; Nishida, S.; Ozaki, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schuemann, J.; Tanaka, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Uehara, S. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan)] (and others)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hexadecapolar excitation in sup 100 Ru  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Attention is drawn to the strong collective {ital L}=4 direct excitation of the state at 2.367 MeV in {sup 100}Ru by inelastic scattering of 16 MeV protons characterized by a deformation parameter {beta}{sub 4}=0.10, one of the highest reported for any region of the mass table.

Sirota, S.; Duarte, J.L.M.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Borello-Lewin, T. (Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sa Paulo, 01498 Sao Paulo, Brasil (BR))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Dielectronic recombination lines of C{sup +}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present paper presents atomic data generated to investigate the recombination lines of C II in the spectra of planetary nebulae. These data include energies of bound and autoionizing states, oscillator strengths and radiative transition probabilities, autoionization probabilities, and recombination coefficients. The R-matrix method of electron scattering theory was used to describe the C{sup 2+} plus electron system.

Sochi, Taha, E-mail: taha.sochi@kcl.ac.uk; Storey, Peter J.

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

An interesting finding in sup 229 Th  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work at INEL has recently established that the first excited states of {sup 229}Th forms a closely spaced doublet with the ground state, the separation being 1 {plus minus} 4 electron volts. A discussion of the data and the reasoning supporting this unprecedented finding is given. Some potential applications are briefly mentioned. 27 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Reich, C.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Fuel cell using a hydrogen generation system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described for storing and generating hydrogen and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

Dentinger, Paul M. (Sunol, CA); Crowell, Jeffrey A. W. (Castro Valley, CA)

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

236

Coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The introduction of coal based fuel systems such as coal/air and coal water mixtures was an attempt to minimize the use of heavy fuel oils in large scale power generation processes. This need was based on forecasts of fuel reserves and future pricing of fuel oils, therefore economic considerations predominated over environmental benefits, if any, which could result from widespread use of these fuels. Coal continued as the major fuel used in the power generation industry and combustion systems were developed to minimize gaseous emissions, such as NOx. Increasing availability of natural gas led to consideration of its use in combination with coal in fuel systems involving combined cycle or topping cycle operations. Dual fuel coal natural gas operations also offered the possibility of improved performance in comparison to 100% coal based fuel systems. Economic considerations have more recently looked at emulsification of heavy residual liquid fuels for consumption in power generation boiler and Orimulsion has emerged as a prime example of this alternative fuel technology. The paper will discuss some aspects of the burner technology related to the application of these various coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels in the power generation industry.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The introduction of coal based fuel systems such as coal/air and coal water mixtures was an attempt to minimise the use of heavy fuel oils in large scale power generation processes. This need was based on forecasts of fuel reserves and future pricing of fuel oils, therefore economic considerations predominated over environmental benefits, if any, which could result from widespread use of these fuels. Coal continued as the major fuel used in the power generation industry and combustion systems were developed to minimise gaseous emissions, such as NO{sub x}. Increasing availability of natural gas led to consideration of its use in combination with coal in fuel systems involving combined cycle or topping cycle operations. Dual fuel coal natural gas operations also offered the possibility of improved performance in comparison to 100% coal based fuel systems. Economic considerations have more recently looked at emulsification of heavy residual liquid fuels for consumption in power generation boiler and Orimulsion has emerged as a prime example of this alternative fuel technology. The next sections of the paper will discuss some aspects of the burner technology related to the application of these various coal based fuels, fuel systems and alternative fuels in the power generation industry.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [ABB Combustion Services Limited, Derby (United Kingdom)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Krypton-85 health risk assessment for a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The risks involved in the routine release of /sup 85/Kr from nuclear fuel reprocessing operations to the environment were compared to those resulting from the capture and storage of /sup 85/Kr. Instead of releasing the /sup 85/Kr to the environment when fuel is reprocessed, it can be captured, immobilized and stored. Two alternative methods of capturing /sup 85/Kr (cryogenic distillation and fluorocarbon absorption) and one method of immobilizing the captured gas (ion implantation/sputtering) were theoretically incorporated into a representative fuel reprocessing plant, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, even though there are no known plans to start up this facility. Given the uncertainties in the models used to generate lifetime risk numbers (0.02 to 0.027 radiation induced fatal cancers expected in the occupational workforce and 0.017 fatal cancers in the general population), the differences in total risks for the three situations, (i.e., no-capture and two-capture alternatives) cannot be considered meaningful. It is possible that no risks would occur from any of the three situations. There is certainly no reason to conclude that risks from /sup 85/Kr routinely released to the environment are greater than those that would result from the other two situations considered. Present regulations mandate recovery and disposal of /sup 85/Kr from the off gases of a facility reprocessing spent fuel from commercial sources. Because of the lack of a clear-cut indication that recovery woud be beneficial, it does not seem prudent to burden the facilities with a requirement for /sup 85/Kr recovery, at least until operating experience demonstrates the incentive. The probable high aging of the early fuel to be processed and the higher dose resulting from the release of the unregulated /sup 3/H and /sup 14/C also encourage delaying implementation of the /sup 85/Kr recovery in the early plants.

Mellinger, P.J.; Brackenbush, L.W.; Tanner, J.E.; Gilbert, E.S.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Status of verification and validation of AREVA's ARCADIA{sup R} code system for PWR applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 2010 the submittal of Topical Reports for ARCADIA{sup R} and COBRA-FLX, the thermal-hydraulic module of ARCADIA{sup R}, to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) concluded a major step in the development of AREVA's new code system for core design and safety analyses. This submittal was dedicated to the application of the code system to uranium fuel in pressurized water reactors. The submitted information comprised results for plants operated in the US (France)) and Germany and provided uncertainties for in-core measuring systems with traveling in-core detectors and for the aero-ball system of the EPR. A reduction of the uncertainties in the prediction of F{sub AH} and F{sub Q} of > 1 % (absolute) was derived compared to the current code systems. This paper extents the verification and validation base for uranium based fuel and demonstrates the basic capabilities of ARCADIA{sup R} of describing MOX. The achieved status of verification and validation is described in detail. All applications followed the same standard without any specific calibration. The paper gives also insight in the new capability of 3D full core steady-state and transient pin-by-pin/sub-channel-by-sub-channel calculations and the opportunities offered by this feature. The gain of margins with increasing detail of the representation is outlined. Currently, the strategies for worldwide implementation of ARCADIA{sup R} are developed. (authors)

Porsch, D. [AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); P.O.Box 1109, 91001 Erlangen (Germany); Leberig, M.; Kuch, S. [AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH (Germany); Magat, P. [AREVA, AREVA NP SAS, Paris (France); Segard, K. [AREVA, AREVA NP Inc., Lynchburg (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

{sup 6}Li({pi}{sup +}, {ital pp}){sup 4}He{sub g.s.} reaction at 100 and 165 MeV incident pion energies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Differential and total cross sections for {pi}{sup +} absorption on {sup 6}Li leading to the {ital pp}+{sup 4}He{sub g.s} final state are presented at incident pion energies of 100 and 165 MeV. The narrow width of the {ital pp} angular correlation is observed and reported.

Papandreou, Z.; Huber, G.; Lolos, G.; Cormier, J.; Mathie, E.; Naqvi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, S4S 0A2 (Canada); Ottewell, D.; Tacik, R.; Walden, P. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada)] [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (Canada); Jones, G.; Trelle, R. [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A6 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A6 (Canada); Aslanoglou, X. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, Ohio 45701 (United States); Humphrey, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, Kentucky 42101 (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Collisional {sup 3}He and {sup 129}Xe Frequency Shifts in Rb-Noble-Gas Mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fermi-contact interaction that characterizes collisional spin exchange of a noble gas with an alkali-metal vapor also gives rise to NMR and EPR frequency shifts of the noble-gas nucleus and the alkali-metal atom, respectively. We have measured the enhancement factor {kappa}{sub 0} that characterizes these shifts for Rb-{sup 129}Xe to be 493{+-}31, making use of the previously measured value of {kappa}{sub 0} for Rb-{sup 3}He. This result allows accurate {sup 129}Xe polarimetry with no need to reference a thermal-equilibrium NMR signal.

Ma, Z. L.; Sorte, E. G.; Saam, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, 115 South 1400 East, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84112-0830 (United States)

2011-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

242

Candidate processes for diluting the {sup 235}U isotope in weapons-capable highly enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is evaluating options for rendering its surplus inventories of highly enriched uranium (HEU) incapable of being used to produce nuclear weapons. Weapons-capable HEU was earlier produced by enriching uranium in the fissile {sup 235}U isotope from its natural occurring 0.71 percent isotopic concentration to at least 20 percent isotopic concentration. Now, by diluting its concentration of the fissile {sup 235}U isotope in a uranium blending process, the weapons capability of HEU can be eliminated in a manner that is reversible only through isotope enrichment, and therefore, highly resistant to proliferation. To the extent that can be economically and technically justified, the down-blended uranium product will be made suitable for use as commercial reactor fuel. Such down-blended uranium product can also be disposed of as waste if chemical or isotopic impurities preclude its use as reactor fuel.

Snider, J.D.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Method for the production of {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo-containing materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method is described for producing {sup 99m}Tc compositions from {sup 99}Mo compounds. {sup 100}Mo metal or {sup 100}MoO{sub 3} is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} with an optimum depth of 0.5--5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten {sup 99}MoO{sub 3} which contains vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}, vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 3}, and vaporized {sup 99m}TcO{sub 2}. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O{sub 2(g)}) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} and vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized {sup 99}MoO{sub 3}. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized {sup 99m}Tc{sub 2}O{sub 7} into a condensed {sup 99m}Tc-containing reaction product which is collected. 1 fig.

Bennett, R.G.; Christian, J.D.; Grover, S.B.; Petti, D.A.; Terry, W.K.; Yoon, W.Y.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Method for the production of .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo-containing materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method for producing .sup.99m Tc compositions from .sup.99 Mo compounds. .sup.100 Mo metal or .sup.100 MoO.sub.3 is irradiated with photons in a particle (electron) accelerator to ultimately produce .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. This composition is then heated in a reaction chamber to form a pool of molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 with an optimum depth of 0.5-5 mm. A gaseous mixture thereafter evolves from the molten .sup.99 MoO.sub.3 which contains vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3, vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.3, and vaporized .sup.99m TcO.sub.2. This mixture is then combined with an oxidizing gas (O.sub.2(g)) to generate a gaseous stream containing vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 and vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Next, the gaseous stream is cooled in a primary condensation stage in the reaction chamber to remove vaporized .sup.99 MoO.sub.3. Cooling is undertaken at a specially-controlled rate to achieve maximum separation efficiency. The gaseous stream is then cooled in a sequential secondary condensation stage to convert vaporized .sup.99m Tc.sub.2 O.sub.7 into a condensed .sup.99m Tc-containing reaction product which is collected.

Bennett, Ralph G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Christian, Jerry D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grover, S. Blaine (Idaho Falls, ID); Petti, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Terry, William K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Yoon, Woo Y. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Measurement of the ratio of branching fractions {ital B}({ital D}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}}{ital e}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ital e}})/{ital B}({ital D}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{ital e}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ital e}})  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using 3.0 fb{sup {minus}1} of data collected with the CLEO-II detector, we study the Cabibbo-suppressed decay {ital D}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}}{ital e}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ital e}}. The ratio of the branching fractions {ital B}({ital D}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}}{ital e}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ital e}})/{ital B}({ital D}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{ital e}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ital e}}) is measured to be (10.3{plus_minus}3.9{plus_minus}1.3)%, corresponding to an upper limit of 15.6% at the 90% confidence level.

Butler, F.; Fu, X.; Nemati, B.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Wood, M.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; Hinson, J.W.; McIlwain, R.L.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Payne, D.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Gibbons, L.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Coan, T.E.; Dominick, J.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Lambrecht, M.; Sanghera, S.; Shelkov, V.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Wei, G.; Artuso, M.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Horwitz, N.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mukhin, Y.; Playfer, S.; Rozen, Y.; Stone, S.; Xing, X.; Zhu, G.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Egyed, Z.; Jain, V.; Gibaut, D.; Kinoshita, K.; Pomianowski, P.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; O`Grady, C.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F.; Asner, D.M.; Athanas, M.; Bliss, D.W.; Brower, W.S.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Gronberg, J.; Korte, C.M.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Tajima, H.; Witherell, M.S.; Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Lohner, M.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; Bebek, C.; Berger, B.E.; Berkelman, K.; Bloom, K.; Browder, T.E.; Cassel, D.G.; Cho, H.A.; Coffman, D.M.; Crowcroft, D.S.; Dickson, M.; Drell, P.S.; Dumas, D.J.; Ehrlich, R.; Elia, R.; Gaidarev, P.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gittelman, B.; Gray, S.W.; Hartill, D.L.; Heltsley, B.K.; Henderson, S.; Jones, C.D.; Jones, S.L.; Kandaswamy, J.; Katayama, N.; Kim, P.C.; Kreinick, D.L.; Liu, Y.; Ludwig, G.S.; Masui, J.; Mevissen, J.; Mistry, N.B.; Ng, C.R.; Nordberg, E.; Patterson, J.R.; Peterson, D.; Riley, D.; Soffer, A.; Avery, P.; Freyberger, A.; Lingel, K.; Rodriguez, J.; Yang, S.; Yelton, J.; Brandenburg, G.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Edwards, K.W.; McLean, K.W.; (CLEO Collabor..

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2}) that simulates the composition of the coal syngas. At 800 C, the stack achieved a power density of 1176 W, which represents the largest power level demonstrated for CO in the literature. Although the FB-DCFC performance results obtained in this project were definitely encouraging and promising for practical applications, DCFC approaches pose significant technical challenges that are specific to the particular DCFC scheme employed. Long term impact of coal contaminants, particularly sulfur, on the stability of cell components and cell performance is a critically important issue. Effective current collection in large area cells is another challenge. Lack of kinetic information on the Boudouard reactivity of wide ranging solid fuels, including various coals and biomass, necessitates empirical determination of such reaction parameters that will slow down development efforts. Scale up issues will also pose challenges during development of practical FB-DCFC prototypes for testing and validation. To overcome some of the more fundamental problems, initiation of federal support for DCFC is critically important for advancing and developing this exciting and promising technology for third generation electricity generation from coal, biomass and other solid fuels including waste.

Turgut Gur

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Properties of the rotational bands in {sup 161}Er  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-spin states in {sup 161}Er have been studied experimentally using the {sup 150}Nd({sup 16}O,5n) reaction at a beam energy of 86 MeV. The 5/2{sup +}[642], 3/2{sup -}[521], and 11/2{sup -}[505] bands are extended up to high-spin states, and particularly the {alpha}=-1/2 branch of the ground state 3/2{sup -}[521] band is revised significantly. The relatively enhanced E1 transitions from the 3/2{sup -}[521] band to the 5/2{sup +}[642] band are observed. The band properties are analyzed within the framework of a triaxial particle-rotor model, and near-prolate shape and triaxial deformation are proposed to the 3/2{sup -}[521] and 5/2{sup +}[642] bands, respectively. Signature inversion occurs in the 3/2{sup -}[521] band after the band crossing in {sup 161}Er, and the systematics of the signature inversion associated with the 3/2{sup -}[521] configuration are discussed. By analyzing the properties of the relatively enhanced E1 transitions, it is found that the R(E1/E2) values show angular momentum dependence before the band crossing, and these enhanced E1 transitions could be attributed to octupole softness.

Chen, L.; Zhou, X. H.; Wang, S. T.; Zhang, N. T.; Zhou, H. B.; Li, G. S.; Wang, H. X.; Ding, B. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Y. H.; Zheng, Y.; Liu, M. L.; Ma, F.; Fang, Y. D.; Hua, W.; Guo, S.; Qiang, Y. H.; Lei, X. G.; Guo, Y. X. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Zhu, L. H.; Wu, X. G. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

DIESEL FUEL TANK FOUNDATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to design structural foundations for the Diesel Fuel Tank and Fuel Pumps.

M. Gomez

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

249

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirementand Fuel-EfficientAlternative Fuel

250

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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251

Alternative Fuel Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle & Fueling Infrastructure

252

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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253

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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254

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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255

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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256

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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257

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer1,Alternative Fuel

258

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels TaxAlternative Fueling

259

Verification of plutonium content in spent fuel assemblies using neutron self-interrogation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The large amounts of plutonium in reactor spent fuel assemblies has led to increased research directed toward the measurement of the plutonium for safeguards verification. The high levels of fission product gamma-ray activity and curium neutron backgrounds have made the plutonium measurement difficult. We have developed a new technique that can directly measure both the {sup 235}U concentration and the plutonium fissile concentration using the intrinsic neutron emission fronl the curium in the fuel assembly. The passive neutron albedo reactivity (PNAR) method has been described previously where the curium neutrons are moderated in the surrounding water and reflect back into the fuel assembly to induce fissions in the fissile material in the assembly. The cadmium (Cd) ratio is used to separate the spontaneous fission source neutrons from the reflected thermal neutron fission reactions. This method can measure the sum of the {sup 235}U and the plutonium fissile mass, but not the separate components. Our new differential die-away self-interrogation method (DDSI) can be used to separate the {sup 235}U from the {sup 239}Pu. The method has been applied to both fuel rods and full assemblies. For fuel rods the epi-thermal neutron reflection method filters the reflected neutrons through thin Cd filters so that the reflected neutrons are from the epi-cadmium energy region. The neutron fission energy response in the epi-cadmium region is distinctly different for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. We are able to measure the difference between {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu by sampling the neutron induced fission rate as a function of time and multiplicity after the initial fission neutron is detected. We measure the neutron fission rate using list-mode data collection that stores the time correlations between all of the counts. The computer software can select from the data base the time correlations that include singles, doubles, and triples. The die-away time for the doubles distribution is distinctly different for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. The {sup 239}Pu has a higher fission cross-section in the epi-cadmium neutron region and larger induced fission moments than {sup 235}U, so the measured die-away time can provide the relative amounts of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U. This paper will present the Monte Carlo simulations for the detector and sample configurations for both fuel pins and full fuel assemblies.

Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Apencer H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Scintillation properties of some Ce[sup 3+] and Pr[sup 3+] doped inorganic crystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scintillations properties of Ce[sup 3+] and Pr[sup 3+] doped complex fluoride crystals of composition CsGd[sub 2]F[sub 7] and K[sub 2]YF[sub 5] and of Pr[sup 3+] doped Y[sub 3]Al[sub 5]O[sub 12] single crystals were studied by means of x-ray and gamma ray excitation. The Ce[sub 3+] and Pr[sub 3+] doped fluoride crystals show 5d-4f luminescences at wavelengths near 340 nm and 240 nm, respectively. 5d-4f luminescence of Pr[sup 3+] doped Y[sub 3]Al[sub 5]O[sub 12] is observed between 300 and 400 nm. The authors present the absolute light yield in photons/MeV together with results from scintillation decay time experiments.

Dorenbos, P.; Visser, R.; Eijk, C.W.E. van (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Dept. of Applied Physics); Khaidukov, N.M. (N.S. Kurnakov Inst. of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Moscow (Russian Federation)); Korzhik, M.V. (Inst. of Nuclear Problems, Minsk (Russian Federation))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Level structure of /sup 101/Ru from the /sup 100/Ru(d,p) reaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy levels of /sup 101/Ru have been studied by the /sup 100/Ru(d,p)/sup 101/Ru reaction at an incident deuteron energy of 12 MeV. Outgoing particles were momentum analyzed by a magnetic spectrograph and detected in nuclear emulsion plates, with an energy resolution of 7.5 keV. A total of 68 levels up to 3.2 MeV excitation energy was identified, about two-thirds of them reported for the first time. Experimental angular distributions were compared to distorted-wave Born approximation predictions and reduced spectroscopic factors obtained. The total l = 2 and 75% of l = 0, 4, and 5 spectroscopic strengths were located. Attention is drawn to transitions to low-lying states in /sup 101/Ru (below E/sub exc/ = 0.75 MeV) with l = 3 and l = 1 character.

Duarte, J.L.M.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L.B.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Dietzsch, O.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Experimental study of the {sup 238}U({sup 36}S,3-5n){sup 269-271}Hs reaction leading to the observation of {sup 270}Hs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deformed doubly magic nucleus {sup 270}Hs has so far only been observed as the four-neutron (4n) evaporation residue of the reaction {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm, where a maximum cross section of 3 pb was measured. Theoretical studies on the formation of {sup 270}Hs in the 4n evaporation channel of fusion reactions with different entrance channel asymmetry in the framework of a two-parameter Smoluchowski equation predict that the reactions {sup 48}Ca+{sup 226}Ra and {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U result in higher cross sections due to lower reaction Q values, in contrast to simple arguments based on the reaction asymmetry, which predict opposite trends. Calculations using hivap predict cross sections for the reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U that are similar to those of the {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm reaction. Here, we report on the first measurement of evaporation residues formed in the complete nuclear fusion reaction {sup 36}S+{sup 238}U and the observation of {sup 270}Hs, which is produced in the 4n evaporation channel, with a measured cross section of 0.8{sub -0.7}{sup +2.6} pb at 51-MeV excitation energy. The one-event cross-section limits (68% confidence level) for the 3n, 4n, and 5n evaporation channels at 39-MeV excitation energy are 2.9 pb, while the cross-section limits of the 3n and 5n channel at 51 MeV are 1.5 pb. This is significantly lower than the 5n cross section of the {sup 26}Mg+{sup 248}Cm reaction at similar excitation energy.

Graeger, R.; Gorshkov, A.; Tuerler, A.; Yakushev, A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Ackermann, D.; Duellmann, Ch. E.; Hessberger, F. P.; Huebner, A.; Jaeger, E.; Khuyagbaatar, J.; Kindler, B.; Krier, J.; Lommel, B.; Schaedel, M.; Schausten, B. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Chelnokov, M.; Chepigin, V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Petrushkin, O. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, RU-141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Dvorak, J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Polarization Observables for K{sup +}{Lambda} and K{sup +}{Sigma}{sup 0} Photoproduction form Polarized Protons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The search for undiscovered excited states of the nucleon continues to be a focus of experiments at Jefferson Lab. Recent LQCD calculations have confirmed long-standing quark-model predictions of many more states than have so far been identified. A large effort for the N* program has been launched using the CLAS detector to provide the database that will allow nearly model-independent partial wave analyses to be carried out in the search for such states. Polarization observables play a crucial role in this effort, as they are essential in disentangling overlapping resonant and non-resonant amplitudes. In 2010, double-polarization data were taken at JLab using circularly polarized photons incident on a transversely polarized frozen-spin butanol target. Our current analysis yields preliminary data of the T and F asymmetries of the K{sup +}{Lambda} and K{sup +}{Sigma}{sup 0} final states, which are compared to predictions of recent multipole analyses. This work is the first of its kind and will significantly broaden the world database for these reactions.

Walford, Natalie K. [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States); Klein, Franz J.W. [Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Method for selective recovery of PET-usable quantities of [{sup 18}F] fluoride and [{sup 13}N] nitrate/nitrite from a single irradiation of low-enriched [{sup 18}O] water  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} for radiotracer synthesis is disclosed. The process includes producing [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} simultaneously by exposing a low-enriched (20%-30%) [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target to proton irradiation, sequentially isolating the [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} from the [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target, and reducing the [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} to [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3}. The [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} products are then conveyed to a laboratory for radiotracer applications. The process employs an anion exchange resin for isolation of the isotopes from the [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O, and sequential elution of [{sup 13}N]NO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}/NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} fractions. Also the apparatus is disclosed for simultaneously producing PET-usable quantities of [{sup 13}N]NH{sub 3} and [{sup 18}F]F{sup {minus}} from a single irradiation of a single low-enriched [{sup 18}O]H{sub 2}O target. 2 figs.

Ferrieri, R.A.; Schlyer, D.J.; Shea, C.

1995-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

265

ABUNDANCE OF {sup 26}Al AND {sup 60}Fe IN EVOLVING GIANT MOLECULAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nucleosynthesis and ejection of radioactive {sup 26}Al (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 0.72 Myr) and {sup 60}Fe, (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 2.5 Myr) into the interstellar medium is dominated by the stellar winds of massive stars and supernova type II explosions. Studies of meteorites and their components indicate that the initial abundances of these short-lived radionuclides in the solar protoplanetary disk were higher than the background levels of the galaxy inferred from {gamma}-ray astronomy and models of the galactic chemical evolution. This observation has been used to argue for a late-stage addition of stellar debris to the solar system's parental molecular cloud or, alternatively, the solar protoplanetary disk, thereby requiring a special scenario for the formation of our solar system. Here, we use supercomputers to model-from first principles-the production, transport, and admixing of freshly synthesized {sup 26}Al and {sup 60}Fe in star-forming regions within giant molecular clouds. Under typical star formation conditions, the levels of {sup 26}Al in most star-forming regions are comparable to that deduced from meteorites, suggesting that the presence of short-lived radionuclides in the early solar system is a generic feature of the chemical evolution of giant molecular clouds. The {sup 60}Fe/{sup 26}Al yield ratio of Almost-Equal-To 0.2 calculated from our simulations is consistent with the galactic value of 0.15 {+-} 0.06 inferred from {gamma}-ray astronomy but is significantly higher than most current solar system measurements indicate. We suggest that estimates based on differentiated meteorites and some chondritic components may not be representative of the initial {sup 60}Fe abundance of the bulk solar system.

Vasileiadis, Aristodimos; Nordlund, Ake; Bizzarro, Martin [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, Ostervoldgade 5-7, DK-1350 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

266

Search for the double beta decay of sup 244 Pu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have searched for the ingrowth of {sup 244}Cm in a 1.45-g sample of {sup 244}Pu. We isolated a curium fraction after an ingrowth period of 1.03 yr; during this time the {sup 244}Pu sample produced {le}0.24 alpha disintegrations per day of {sup 244}Cm (95% C.L.), corresponding to a half-life for the double beta decay of {sup 244}Pu of {ge}1.1{times}10{sup 18} yr.

Moody, K.J.; Lougheed, R.W.; Hulet, E.K. (Nuclear Chemistry Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94551 (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Formulation for Tin-.sup.117m /diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides improved formulations of .sup.117m Sn (Sn.sup.4+) DTPA which allow higher doses of .sup.117m Sn (Sn.sup.4+) to be administered than were previously possible. Methods for making pharmaceutical compositions comprising .sup.117m Sn (Sn.sup.4+) DTPA in which the amount of unchelated DTPA is minimized are disclosed along with methods of using the improved formlulations, both for palliation of bone pain associated with cancer and for treatment of osseous tumors.

Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} in aluminoborosilicate glasses under ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped aluminoborosilicate glasses were prepared by melting in air at high temperature ({approx}1500 {sup o}C). It was shown by luminescence and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements that both Eu{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 2+} ions can exist simultaneously in the glass matrix studied after glass synthesis as well as after exposure to ionizing radiation. Increase of total Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration leads to the increase of Eu{sup 3+} luminescence intensity while the luminescence intensity of Eu{sup 2+} ions tends to decrease. In contrast the EPR indicates that the amount of Eu{sup 2+} ions in the glass increases with total Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration. The difference in the results of the two spectroscopies is explained in terms of energy transfer from Eu{sup 2+} to Eu{sup 3+} leading to an Eu{sup 2+} luminescence quenching. Irradiation results in the increase of reduced Eu{sup 2+} quantity detected by EPR measurements. It was shown that Eu{sup 2+} ions are located in both high (g {approx} 4.6) and low symmetry ('U' spectrum) sites in the structure of aluminoborosilicate glasses. The increase of Eu{sup 2+} content by the increase of the irradiation dose manifests the strong reduction process Eu{sup 3+} {yields} Eu{sup 2+}.

Malchukova, E., E-mail: genia@poly.polytechnique.fr [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, UMR 7642 CEA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Boizot, B. [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, UMR 7642 CEA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, UMR 7642 CEA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Dynamically polarized target for the g<sup>p>2 and G<sup>p>E experiments at Jefferson Lab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a dynamically polarized target that has been utilized for two electron scattering experiments in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. The primary components of the target are a new, high cooling power <sup>4sup> He evaporation refrigerator, and a re-purposed, superconducting split-coil magnet. It has been used to polarize protons in irradiated NH3 at a temperature of 1 K and at fields of 2.5 and 5.0 Tesla. The performance of the target material in the electron beam under these conditions will be discussed. Maximum polarizations of 28% and 95% were obtained at those fields, respectively. To satisfy the requirements of both experiments, the magnet had to be routinely rotated between angles of 0, 6, and 90 degrees with respect to the incident electron beam. This was accomplished using a new rotating vacuum seal which permits rotations to be performed in only a few minutes.

Pierce, Joshua J. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Maxwell, James D. [MIT, Amherst, MA (United States); Badman, Toby E. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Brock, James D. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Carlin, Christopher R. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Crabb, Donald G. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Day, Donal B. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Keith, Christopher D. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Kvaltine, Nicholas D. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Meekins, David G. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States); Mulholland, Jonathan R.L. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Shields, Joshua A. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Slifer, Karl J. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Fuel Cell Technologies Overview: 2011 Fuel Cell Seminar Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the Fuel Cell Seminar on November...

271

Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Presentation covers stationary fuel cells...

272

Theoretical analyses of (n,xn) reactions on sup 235 U, sup 238 U, sup 237 Np, and sup 239 Pu for ENDF/B-VI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Theoretical analyses were performed of neutron-induced reactions on {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, and {sup 239}Pu between 0.01 and 20 MeV in order to calculate neutron emission cross sections and spectra for ENDF/B-VI evaluations. Coupled-channel optical model potentials were obtained for each target nucleus by fitting total, elastic, and inelastic scattering cross section data, as well as low-energy average resonance data. The resulting deformed optical model potentials were used to calculate direct (n,n{prime}) cross sections and transmission coefficients for use in Hauser-Feshbach statistical theory analyses. A fission model with multiple barrier representation, width fluctuation corrections, and preequilibrium corrections were included in the analyses. Direct cross sections for higher-lying vibrational states were calculated using DWBA theory, normalized using B(E{ell}) values determined from (d,d{prime}) and Coulomb excitation data, where available, and from systematics otherwise. Initial fission barrier parameters and transition state density enhancements appropriate to the compound systems involved were obtained from previous analyses, especially fits to charged-particle fission probability data. The parameters for the fission model were adjusted for each target system to obtain optimum agreement with direct (n,f) cross section measurements, taking account of the various multichance fission channels, that is, the different compound systems involved. The results from these analyses were used to calculate most of the neutron (n,n), (n,n{prime}), and (n,xn) cross section data in the ENDF/B/VI evaluations for the above nuclei, and all of the energy-angle correlated spectra. The deformed optical model and fission model parameterizations are described. Comparisons are given between the results of these analyses and the previous ENDF/B-V evaluations as well as with the available experimental data. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Young, P.G.; Arthur, E.D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

High-brightness H/sup -/ accelerators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutral particle beam (NPB) devices based on high-brightness H/sup -/ accelerators are an important component of proposed strategic defense systems. The basic rationale and R and D program are outlined and examples given of the underlying technology thrusts toward advanced systems. Much of the research accomplished in the past year is applicable to accelerator systems in general; some of these activities are discussed.

Jameson, R.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2 DOE Hydrogen andEnzymeAdvancedDepartment

275

Nuclear data sheets for {sup 165}Lu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experimental nuclear structure data for {sup 165}Lu have been compiled and evaluated. Extensive revisions to all the data sets for this nuclide have been made, based on the new high-spin study of 1995Sc39. From the interconnections of different rotational bands in 1995Sc39, the assignment of the ground state and its spin have been revised. There does not seem any evidence to support isomerism in {sup 165}Lu as proposed earlier in the 1987 Nuclear Data Sheets (and the 1992 update) of A=165, the Wall Chart of Nuclides and by 1997Au04. The assignment of 1/2+ to the ground state is also supported by the recent (1998Ge13) laser-spectroscopic measurements of hyperfine structure. A superdeformed (triaxial) structure is reported by 1995Sc39. This revision supersedes earlier {sup 165}Lu data contained in the A-165 update published by L.K. Peker. Nuclear Data Sheets 65, 439 (1992) with literature coverage up to Nov. 1, 1990. The transitions connecting the low lying states to the ground state are expected to be in the low-energy region of 5 to 24 keV for which experiments to measure conversion electrons are needed.

Singh, B.; Chenkin, J.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

California Fuel Cell Partnership: Alternative Fuels Research  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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277

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWayElectricity Fuel Basics to someone byEthanolFueling

278

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWayElectricity Fuel Basics toWithHybridHydrogenFueling

279

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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280

Cross sections for monitor reactions {sup 27}Al((p, x){sup 24}Na, {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 22}Na, and {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 7}Be at proton energies in the range 0.04-2.6 GeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cross sections for the monitor reactions {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 24}Na, {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 22}Na, and {sup 27}Al(p, x){sup 7}Be at 12 proton energies, 2605, 1598, 1199, 799, 600, 400, 249, 147.6, 97.2, 66.0, 44.6, and 40.8 MeV, have been determined with 72 Multiplication-Sign 72-mm square and 10.5-mm-diameter round aluminum foils. The rates of the reactions of the production of {sup 24}Na, {sup 22}Na, and {sup 7}Be in the foils in each irradiation run have been determined by {gamma} spectrometry, whereas the number of protons transmitted through these foils has been determined using calibrated fast current transformers. The cross sections have been determined as the ratios of the corresponding reaction to the average proton fluence.

Titarenko, Yu. E.; Borovlev, S. P.; Butko, M. A.; Zhivun, V. M.; Pavlov, K. V.; Rogov, V. I.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Tikhonov, R. S.; Florya, S. N.; Koldobskiy, A. B. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Russian Federation)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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283

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew YorkLouisianaRetailer LicenseVehicleFuel Inefficient

284

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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285

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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286

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew YorkLouisianaRetailer LicenseVehicleFuelConnecticut

287

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew YorkLouisianaRetailer LicenseVehicleFuelConnecticutNew

288

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew YorkLouisianaRetailerVoluntaryElectricNatural Gas Fueling

289

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirement All AFVs,HybridAlternative Fuel

290

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirement AllFleet UserAlternative Fuel

291

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

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292

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirementand Fuel-Efficient Vehicle

293

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirementand Fuel-Efficient VehicleProvision

294

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirementand Fuel-Efficient

295

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test Requirementand Fuel-EfficientAlternative

296

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions Test RequirementandAnnualEthanolAlternative Fuel

297

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel Fuel Use The Missouri

298

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel Fuel Use The

299

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel Fuel Use

300

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel Fuel UseTax

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel Fuel UseTaxand

302

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel Fuel

303

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel FuelTax Rates

304

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel FuelTax

305

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestState Fleet Biodiesel FuelTaxLicense

306

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestStateBiofuels Tax Deduction AAlternative Fuel

307

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissions TestStateBiofuelsProduction TaxAlternative Fuel

308

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and

309

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV)

310

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel Vehicle

311

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel VehicleImmunity for

312

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel VehicleImmunity

313

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel VehicleImmunityRetail

314

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative Fuel

315

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative FuelDefinition Biodiesel is

316

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative FuelDefinition Biodiesel

317

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative FuelDefinition

318

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropane BoardAlternative FuelDefinitionRenewable

319

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropaneState EnergyIdle ReductionFuel Exclusivity

320

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropaneState EnergyIdle ReductionFuel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNewEmissionsPropaneStateLow-Speedand Methanol Tax EthylFuel

322

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program The Hawaii Department ofAlternative Fuel

323

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program The HawaiiDistributionHydrogen and Fuel Cell

324

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program The HawaiiDistributionHydrogen and Fuel

325

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program The HawaiiDistributionHydrogen and FuelClean

326

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program TheProduction TaxAlternative Fuel and

327

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program TheProduction TaxAlternative Fuel

328

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program TheProduction TaxAlternative FuelBiodiesel

329

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock ProgramPublic AccessStateRenewable Fuels Mandate One

330

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock ProgramPublic AccessStateRenewable Fuels Mandate

331

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock ProgramPublic AccessStateRenewable Fuels

332

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock ProgramPublic AccessStateRenewable FuelsAlternative

333

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock ProgramPublicSchool BusInfrastructureBiofuelandFuel

334

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy FeedstockAuthorization forCompressed NaturalAlternative Fuel

335

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy FeedstockAuthorizationExcisePlug-InSchoolBiodieselIdleFuel

336

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for Plug-InHeavy-DutyAftermarketAlternative Fuel

337

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle &

338

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle &Plug-in Electric Vehicle

339

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle &Plug-in Electric

340

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle &Plug-in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle &Plug-inIncentives

342

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle &Plug-inIncentivesElectric

343

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel Vehicle

344

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel VehicleNatural Gas and Propane Tax

345

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel VehicleNatural Gas and Propane

346

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel VehicleNatural Gas and

347

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel VehicleNatural Gas andZero

348

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel VehicleNatural Gas

349

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel VehicleNatural Gas(AFV) and

350

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel VehicleNatural Gas(AFV)

351

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative Fuel VehicleNatural Gas(AFV)Loans

352

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNation November 1, 2000 hisAlternative Fuel and

353

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNation November 1, 2000 hisAlternative Fuel

354

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNation November 1, 2000Low Carbon Fuels Standard

355

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNation November 1, 2000Low Carbon Fuels

356

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNation November 1, 2000Low Carbon FuelsLow

357

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNation November 1, 2000Low CarbonFuel School

358

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNation November 1, 2000Low CarbonFuel

359

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNation November 1, 2000Low CarbonFuelNatural

360

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNation November 1,Plug-InAlternative Fuel School

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNation November 1,Plug-InAlternative Fuel

362

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNation NovemberU.S.Commercial Alternative Fuel

363

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer License Beginning January

364

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer License Beginning

365

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer License

366

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer LicenseSupply Equipment

367

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer LicenseSupply

368

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer LicenseSupplyKentucky

369

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer

370

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer1, New Mexico joined

371

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer1, New Mexico

372

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer1, New Mexico3,

373

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer1, New

374

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer1,

375

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer1,Alternative

376

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel Dealer1,AlternativeVehicle

377

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuel

378

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuelPlug-In Electric Vehicle (PEV)

379

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuelPlug-In Electric Vehicle

380

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuelPlug-In Electric

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuelPlug-In ElectricAlternative

382

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuelPlug-In

383

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuelPlug-InLow-Speed Vehicle

384

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuelPlug-InLow-Speed

385

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageEmergingNationPlug-InFuelPlug-InLow-SpeedIllinois

386

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York Vehicle Inspection ProgramIn ElectricHighFuel

387

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels Tax Exemption and Refund State

388

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels Tax Exemption and Refund

389

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels Tax Exemption and

390

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels Tax Exemption andEthanol

391

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels Tax Exemption

392

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels Tax ExemptionState Energy

393

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels Tax ExemptionState

394

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels Tax ExemptionStateAlternative

395

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels Tax

396

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels TaxAlternative

397

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels TaxAlternativeSustainable

398

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels TaxAlternativeSustainableTax

399

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative Fuels

400

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative FuelsEthanol Infrastructure Grants

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel sup ply" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative FuelsEthanol Infrastructure

402

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative FuelsEthanol InfrastructureHybrid

403

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative FuelsEthanol

404

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative FuelsEthanolElectric Vehicle Supply

405

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative FuelsEthanolElectric Vehicle

406

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative FuelsEthanolElectric

407

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative FuelsEthanolElectricBiodiesel and

408

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative FuelsEthanolElectricBiodiesel

409

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative FuelsEthanolElectricBiodieselHigh

410

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeNew York VehicleAlternative FuelsEthanolElectricBiodieselHighand

411

Measurements of cross sections and decay properties of the isotopes of elements 112, 114, and 116 produced in the fusion reactions {sup 233,238}U, {sup 242}Pu, and {sup 248}Cm+{sup 48}Ca  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the dependence of the production cross sections of the isotopes {sup 282,283}112 and {sup 286,287}114 on the excitation energy of the compound nuclei {sup 286}112 and {sup 290}114. The maximum cross section values of the xn-evaporation channels for the reaction {sup 238}U({sup 48}Ca,xn){sup 286-x}112 were measured to be {sigma}{sub 3n}=2.5{sub -1.1}{sup +1.8} pb and {sigma}{sub 4n}=0.6{sub -0.5}{sup +1.6} pb; for the reaction {sup 242}Pu({sup 48}Ca,xn){sup 290-x}114: {sigma}{sub 2n}{approx}0.5 pb, {sigma}{sub 3n}=3.6{sub -1.7}{sup +3.4} pb, and {sigma}{sub 4n}=4.5{sub -1.9}{sup +3.6} pb. In the reaction {sup 233}U({sup 48}Ca,2-4n){sup 277-279}112 at E*=34.9=2.2 MeV we measured an upper cross section limit of {sigma}{sub xn}{<=}0.6 pb. The observed shift of the excitation energy associated with the maximum sum evaporation residue cross section {sigma}{sub ER}(E*) to values significantly higher than that associated with the calculated Coulomb barrier can be caused by the orientation of the deformed target nucleus in the entrance channel of the reaction. An increase of {sigma}{sub ER} in the reactions of actinide targets with {sup 48}Ca is consistent with the expected increase of the survivability of the excited compound nucleus upon closer approach to the closed neutron shell N=184. In the present work we detected 33 decay chains arising in the decay of the known nuclei {sup 282}112, {sup 283}112, {sup 286}114, {sup 287}114, and {sup 288}114. In the decay of {sup 287}114({alpha}){yields}{sup 283}112({alpha}){yields}{sup 279}110(SF), in two cases out of 22, we observed decay chains of four and five sequential {alpha} transitions that end in spontaneous fission of {sup 271}Sg (T{sub {alpha}}{sub /SF}=2.4{sub -1.0}{sup +4.3} min) and {sup 267}Rf (T{sub SF}{approx}2.3 h), longer decay chains than reported previously. We observed the new nuclide {sup 292}116 (T{sub {alpha}}=18{sub -6}{sup +16} ms,E{sub {alpha}}=10.66{+-}0.07 MeV) in the irradiation of the {sup 248}Cm target at a higher energy than in previous experiments. The observed nuclear decay properties of the nuclides with Z=104-118 are compared with theoretical nuclear mass calculations and the systematic trends of spontaneous fission properties. As a whole, they give a consistent pattern of decay of the 18 even-Z neutron-rich nuclides with Z=104-118 and N=163-177. The experiments were performed with the heavy-ion beam delivered by the U400 cyclotron of the FLNR (JINR, Dubna) employing the Dubna gas-filled recoil separator.

Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Utyonkov, V.K.; Lobanov, Yu.V.; Abdullin, F.Sh.; Polyakov, A.N.; Shirokovsky, I.V.; Tsyganov, Yu.S.; Gulbekian, G.G.; Bogomolov, S.L.; Gikal, B.N.; Mezentsev, A.N.; Iliev, S.; Subbotin, V.G.; Sukhov, A.M.; Voinov, A.A.; Buklanov, G.V.; Subotic, K.; Zagrebaev, V.I.; Itkis, M.G.; Patin, J.B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russian Research Institute of Experimental Physics, 607190 Sarov (Russian Federation)] [and others

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

First polarization results from the LAMPF /sup 13/C target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A polarized /sup 13/C target has been developed and used to measure spin observables for 500-MeV p - /sup 13/C elastic scattering. The material was ethylene glycol, /sup 13/C/sub 2/H/sub 6/O/sub 2/, enriched to 99% in /sup 13/C. Both the /sup 13/C and /sup 1/H spins were dynamically polarized in a /sup 3/He refrigerator at 2.5-T magnetic field. The polarization of both species was measured by using the NMR thermal equilibrium calibration technique. In addition, the polarization of /sup 1/H was independently measured by p-p scattering. We described the target and reported on the polarizations obtained and the dependence of the polarizations on integrated beam intensity. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Penttila, S.I.; Amann, J.F.; Jarmer, J.J.; Jones, K.W.; Tanaka, N.; Barlett, M.L.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Kielhorn, W.F.; Pauletta, G.; Purcell, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Study of leading strange meson resonances and spin-orbit splittings in K/sup -/p. -->. K/sup -/. pi. /sup +/n at 11 GeV/c  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results from a high-statistics study of K..pi.. elastic scattering in the reaction K/sup -/p ..-->.. K/sup -/..pi../sup +/n are presented. The data for this analysis are taken from an 11-GeV/c K/sup -/p experiment performed on the Large Aperture Solenoidal Spectrometer (LASS) facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). By selecting the very forward produced K/sup -/..pi../sup +/ events, a sample consisting of data for the K..pi.. ..-->.. K..pi.. elastic scattering reaction was extracted. The angular distribution for this meson-meson scattering is studied by use of both a spherical harmonic moments analysis and a partial-wave analysis (PWA). The previously established leading natural spin-parity strange meson resonances (the J/sup P/ = 1/sup -/ K*(895), the 2/sup +/ K*(1430), and the 3/sup -/ K*(1780)) are observed in the results from both the moments analysis and the PWA. In addition, evidence for a new spin 4/sup -/ K* resonance with a mass of 2080 MeV and a width of about 225 MeV is presented. The results from the PWA confirm the existence of a 0/sup +/ kappa (1490) and propose the existence of a second scalar meson resonance, the 0/sup +/ kappa' (1900). Structure in the P-wave amplitude indicates resonance behavior in the mass region near 1700 MeV. In two of the four ambiguous solutions for the mass region above 1800 MeV, there is strong evidence for another P-wave resonant structure near 2100 MeV. The observed strange meson resonances are found to have a natural interpretation in terms of states predicted by the quark model. In particular, the mass splittings of the leading trajectory natural spin-parity strange meson states and the mass splittings between the spin-orbit triplet states are discussed. 59 figures, 17 tables.

Honma, A.K.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Natural variations of /sup 13/C abundance in coal and bitumen as a tool to monitor co-processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of coal to facilitate the generation of transportation grade fuel bitumen, heavy oil for petroleum resids is a topic of continuing research. In order to optimize the upgrading process one needs to know in what proportion each feedstock contributes to each product fraction. Conventional analytical methods are neither able to distinguish the contribution from either feedstock in the synthetic products, nor measure the subtle changes in product character in response to differing process conditions. The inherent difference in the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio between most coals and bitumens can be utilized as an isotopic tracer to assess the efficacy of co-processing. For example Vesta coal and Athabasca bitumen have sufficiently distinct /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios that the measured /sup 13/C//sup 12/C of any product will accurately reflect the proportion of feed incorporated into the product. From the elemental analysis and the /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratio of the feedstock and products one can calculate the amount of carbon derived from coal (CDC) in each product fraction. Analogously the amount of bitumen derived carbon (BDC) can also be independently calculated. In this study the natural variation in /sup 13/C concentration was utilized as an isotopic tracer to evaluate co-processing efficiency of a one litre stirred autoclave under differing process conditions. Process variables examined were coal concentration, several iron based catalysts (Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/; Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ impregnated with TiO/sub 2/, SnO/sub 2/, or ZnO and a sludge obtained from a nickel refinery) and temperature.

Muehlenbachs, K.; Steer, J.G. (Dept. of Geology, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton Alberta, T6G 2E3 (CA)); Hogg, A. (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton Alberta T6G 2E3 (CA)); Ohuchi, T.; Beaulieu, G. (Coal Dept., Alberta Research Council, Devon, Alberta T0C 1E0 (CA))

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Natural variations of sup 13 C abundance in coal and bitumen as a tool to monitor coprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of coal to facilitate the generation of transportation grade fuel from bitumen, heavy oil or petroleum resids is a topic of continuing research. In order to optimize the upgrading process one needs to know in what proportion each feedstock contributes to each product fraction. Conventional analytical methods are neither able to distinguish the contribution from either feedstock in the synthetic products, nor measure the subtle changes in product character in response to differing process conditions. The inherent difference in the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio between most coals and bitumen can be utilized as an isotopic tracer to assess the efficacy of coprocessing. For example Vesta coal and Athabasca bitumen have sufficiently distinct {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratios that the measured {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C of any product will accurately reflect the proportion of feed incorporated into the product. From the elemental analysis and the {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of the feedstock and products one can calculate the amount of carbon derived from coal (CDC) in each product fraction. Analogously the amount of bitumen derived carbon (BDC) can also be independently calculated. In this study the natural variation in {sup 13}C concentration was utilized as an isotopic tracer to evaluate coprocessing efficiency of a one liter stirred autoclave under differing process conditions. Process variables examined were coal concentration, several iron based catalysts (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}; Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} impregnated with TiO{sub 2}, SnO{sub 2}, or ZnO and a sludge obtained from a nickel refinery) and temperature.

Muehlenbachs, K.; Steer, J.G.; Hogg, A.; Ohuchi, T.; Beaulieu, G. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Measurement of the {ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}l{sup +}{nu} and {ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{prime}l{sup +}{nu} branching ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the CLEO II detector we measure {ital B}({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})/{ital B}({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{phi}{ital e}{sup +}{nu}) =1.24{plus_minus}0.12{plus_minus}0.15, {ital B}({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{prime}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})/{ital B} ({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{phi}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})=0.43{plus_minus}0.11{plus_minus}0.07, and {ital B}({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{prime}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})/{ital B} ({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{eta}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})=0.35{plus_minus}0.09{plus_minus}0.07. We find the ratio of vector to pseudoscalar final states, {ital B}{bold (}{ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}{phi}{ital e}{sup +}{nu})/{ital B} ({ital D}{sup +}{sub {ital s}}{r_arrow}({eta}+{eta}{prime}){ital e}{sup +}{nu}{bold )}=0.60{plus_minus}0.06{plus_minus}0.06, which is similar to the ratio found in nonstrange {ital D} decays. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

Brandenburg, G.; Cinabro, D.; Liu, T.; Saulnier, M.; Wilson, R.; Yamamoto, H.; Bergfeld, T.; Eisenstein, B.I.; Ernst, J.; Gladding, G.E.; Gollin, G.D.; Palmer, M.; Selen, M.; Thaler, J.J.; Edwards, K.W.; McLean, K.W.; Ogg, M.; Bellerive, A.; Britton, D.I.; Hyatt, E.R.F.; Janicek, R.; MacFarlane, D.B.; Patel, P.M.; Spaan, B.; Sadoff, A.J.; Ammar, R.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Besson, D.; Coppage, D.; Copty, N.; Davis, R.; Hancock, N.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, N.; Kubota, Y.; Lattery, M.; Momayezi, M.; Nelson, J.K.; Patton, S.; Poling, R.; Savinov, V.; Schrenk, S.; Wang, R.; Alam, M.S.; Kim, I.J.; Ling, Z.; Mahmood, A.H.; O`Neill, J.J.; Severini, H.; Sun, C.R.; Wappler, F.; Crawford, G.; Duboscq, J.E.; Fulton, R.; Fujino, D.; Gan, K.K.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Lee, J.; Sung, M.; White, C.; Wolf, A.; Zoeller, M.M.; Fu, X.; Nemati, B.; Ross, W.R.; Skubic, P.; Wood, M.; Bishai, M.; Fast, J.; Gerndt, E.; Hinson, J.W.; Miao, T.; Miller, D.H.; Modesitt, M.; Shibata, E.I.; Shipsey, I.P.J.; Wang, P.N.; Gibbons, L.; Johnson, S.D.; Kwon, Y.; Roberts, S.; Thorndike, E.H.; Coan, T.E.; Dominick, J.; Fadeyev, V.; Korolkov, I.; Lambrecht, M.; Sanghera, S.; Shelkov, V.; Skwarnicki, T.; Stroynowski, R.; Volobouev, I.; Wei, G.; Artuso, M.; Gao, M.; Goldberg, M.; He, D.; Horwitz, N.; Kopp, S.; Moneti, G.C.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mukhin, Y.; Playfer, S.; Stone, S.; Xing, X.; Bartelt, J.; Csorna, S.E.; Jain, V.; Marka, S.; Gibaut, D.; Kinoshita, K.; Pomianowski, P.; Barish, B.; Chadha, M.; Chan, S.; Cowen, D.F.; Eigen, G.; Miller, J.S.; O`Grady, C.; Urheim, J.; Weinstein, A.J.; Wuerthwein, F.; Asner, D.M.; Athanas, M.; Bliss, D.W.; Brower, W.S.; Masek, G.; Paar, H.P.; Gronberg, J.; Korte, C.M.; Kutschke, R.; Menary, S.; Morrison, R.J.; Nakanishi, S.; Nelson, H.N.; Nelson, T.K.; Qiao, C.; Richman, J.D.; Roberts, D.; Ryd, A.; Tajima, H.; Witherell, M.S.; Balest, R.; Cho, K.; Ford, W.T.; Lohner, M.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Smith, J.G.; Alexander, J.P.; (CLEO Collaborat..

1995-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fuel processor for fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Springer, Thomas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Huff, James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Continuing investigations for technology assessment of /sup 99/Mo production from LEU (low enriched Uranium) targets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Currently much of the world's supply of /sup 99m/Tc for medical purposes is produced from /sup 99/Mo derived from the fissioning of high enriched uranium (HEU). The need for /sup 99m/Tc is continuing to grow, especially in developing countries, where needs and national priorities call for internal production of /sup 99/Mo. This paper presents the results of our continuing studies on the effects of substituting low enriched Uranium (LEU) for HEU in targets for the production of fission product /sup 99/Mo. Improvements in the electrodeposition of thin films of uranium metal are reported. These improvements continue to increase the appeal for the substitution of LEU metal for HEU oxide films in cylindrical targets. The process is effective for targets fabricated from stainless steel or hastaloy. A cost estimate for setting up the necessary equipment to electrodeposit uranium metal on cylindrical targets is reported. Further investigations on the effect of LEU substitution on processing of these targets are also reported. Substitution of uranium silicides for the uranium-aluminum alloy or uranium aluminide dispersed fuel used in other current target designs will allow the substitution of LEU for HEU in these targets with equivalent /sup 99/Mo-yield per target and no change in target geometries. However, this substitution will require modifications in current processing steps due to (1) the insolubility of uranium silicides in alkaline solutions and (2) the presence of significant quantities of silicate in solution. Results to date suggest that both concerns can be handled and that substitution of LEU for HEU can be achieved.

Vandergrift, G.F.; Kwok, J.D.; Marshall, S.L.; Vissers, D.R.; Matos, J.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Low-lying isomeric state in {sup 80}Ga from the {beta}{sup -} decay of {sup 80}Zn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new level scheme was constructed for {sup 80}Ga which is significantly different from the one previously reported. The excitation energy of a new low-lying state recently reported in [2] was identified at 22.4 keV. Properties of the level scheme suggest that the ground state has spin J = 6 and the first excited state has spin J = 3. The spin assignments are in agreement with laser spectroscopy values previously measured. Our work provides the first evidence for the J = 6 being the ground state.

LicA, R.; Marginean, N.; Ghita, D.G. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); and others

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

420

Fuels options conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proceedings of the Fuels Options Conference held May 9-10, 1995 in Atlanta, Georgia are presented. Twenty-three papers were presented at the conference that dealt with fuels outlook; unconventional fuels; fuel specification, purchasing, and contracting; and waste fuels applications. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Search for B{sup +}{yields}X(3872)K{sup +}, X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{gamma}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a study of B{sup +}{yields}J/{psi}{gamma}K{sup +} decays, we find evidence for the radiative decay X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{gamma} with a statistical significance of 3.4{sigma}. We measure the product of branching fractions B(B{sup +}{yields}X(3872)K{sup +}){center_dot}B(X(3872){yields}J/{psi}{gamma})=(3.3{+-}1.0{+-}0.3)x10{sup -6}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. We also measure the branching fraction B(B{sup +}{yields}{chi}{sub c1}K{sup +})=(4.9{+-}0.2{+-}0.4)x10{sup -4}. These results are obtained from (287{+-}3) million BB decays collected at the {upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B Factory at SLAC.

Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Particules, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Grauges, E. [Universitat de Barcelona, Facultat de Fisica Departamento ECM, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Palano, A. [Universita di Bari, Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039 (China); Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. [Unive