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1

Author's personal copy Cost analysis of the US spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this, a 1987 amendment to the US Nuclear Waste Policy Act mandates the Secretary of Energy to report on a site for a second repository by 2010 (Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act, 1987). HoweverAuthor's personal copy Cost analysis of the US spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility E

Deinert, Mark

2

Diversion scenarios in an aqueous reprocessing facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The International Atomic Energy Agency requires nuclear facilities around the world to abide by heavily enforced safeguards to prevent proliferation. Nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities are designed to be proliferation-resistant ...

Calderón, Lindsay Lorraine

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

The distribution of 129I around West Valley, an inactive nuclear fuel reprocessing facility in Western New York  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study of 129I levels in surface waters around an inactive nuclear fuel reprocessing facility at West Valley, Cattaraugus County, New York shows a strong presence of this long-lived radoiisotope (T12 = 15.7 Ma) of iodine around the facility. The signal is strong in creeks which drain the facility as well as those in the general vicinity over two decades after reprocessing activities at the site ceased in 1972. Highest 129I levels (1.36 × 1011 atoms/L) are observed at the site boundary in Buttermilk Creek which drains the site, and the resulting plume can be tracked into Lake Erie via Cattaraugus Creek. Other creeks in the West Valley area which do not receive drainage from the site have 129I concentrations on the order of 109–1010 atoms/L, indicating that atmospheric transport of the radionuclide is significant. 129I levels in surface waters around West Valley are 10–1000 times higher than background lelels in western New York, including 129I levels around active nuclear power plants (reported in Rao and Fehn, in preparation), and 100–10000 times higher than levels of 129I in areas outside western New York. However, 36ClCl and 3H measurements in Buttermilk Creek at the site boundary are consistent with present day rainwater values for the region.

Usha Rao; Udo Fehn

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Reprocessing Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. efforts to promote the international expansion of nuclear energy through the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will result in a dramatic expansion of nuclear fuel cycle facilities in the United States. New demonstration facilities, such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF), the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), and the Consolidated Fuel Treatment Center (CFTC) will use advanced nuclear and chemical process technologies that must incorporate increased proliferation resistance to enhance nuclear safeguards. The ASA-100 Project, “Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities,” commissioned by the NA-243 Office of NNSA, has been tasked with reviewing and developing advanced safeguards approaches for these demonstration facilities. Because one goal of GNEP is developing and sharing proliferation-resistant nuclear technology and services with partner nations, the safeguards approaches considered are consistent with international safeguards as currently implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This first report reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new fuel reprocessing processes to be deployed at the AFCF and CFTC facilities. Similar analyses addressing the ABR and transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication lines at AFCF and CFTC will be presented in subsequent reports.

Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Richard; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

2007-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

5

Integrated international safeguards concepts for fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the fourth in a series of efforts by the Los Alamos National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, to identify problems and propose solutions for international safeguarding of light-water reactor spent-fuel reprocessing plants. Problem areas for international safeguards were identified in a previous Problem Statement (LA-7551-MS/SAND79-0108). Accounting concepts that could be verified internationally were presented in a subsequent study (LA-8042). Concepts for containment/surveillance were presented, conceptual designs were developed, and the effectiveness of these designs was evaluated in a companion study (SAND80-0160). The report discusses the coordination of nuclear materials accounting and containment/surveillance concepts in an effort to define an effective integrated safeguards system. The Allied-General Nuclear Services fuels reprocessing plant at Barnwell, South Carolina, was used as the reference facility.

Hakkila, E.A.; Gutmacher, R.G.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.; Whitty, W.J.; Camp, A.L.; Cameron, C.P.; Bleck, M.E.; Ellwein, L.B.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Operations monitoring concept. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operations monitoring is a safeguards concept which could be applied in future fuel cycle facilities to significantly enhance the effectiveness of an integrated safeguards system. In general, a variety of operations monitoring techniques could be developed for both international and domestic safeguards application. The goal of this presentation is to describe specific examples of operations monitoring techniques as may be applied in a fuel reprocessing facility. The operations monitoring concept involves monitoring certain in-plant equipment, personnel, and materials to detect conditions indicative of the diversion of nuclear material. An operations monitoring subsystem should be designed to monitor operations only to the extent necessary to achieve specified safeguards objectives; there is no intent to monitor all operations in the facility. The objectives of the operations monitoring subsystem include: verification of reported data; detection of undeclared uses of equipment; and alerting the inspector to potential diversion activities. 1 fig.

Kerr, H.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

A REVIEW OF THORIUM FUEL REPROCESSING EX  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

expended on thorium reprocessing outside the United States until recently; however, Germany is currently developing a fully integrated thorium fuel cycle. A 300-MW(e) reactor...

8

Spent nuclear fuel reprocessing modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term wide development of nuclear power requires new approaches towards the realization of nuclear fuel cycle, namely, closed nuclear fuel cycle (CNFC) with respect to fission materials. Plant nuclear fuel cycle (PNFC), which is in fact the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel unloaded from the reactor and the production of new nuclear fuel (NF) at the same place together with reactor plant, can be one variant of CNFC. Developing and projecting of PNFC is a complicated high-technology innovative process that requires modern information support. One of the components of this information support is developed by the authors. This component is the programme conducting calculations for various variants of process flow sheets for reprocessing SNF and production of NF. Central in this programme is the blocks library, where the blocks contain mathematical description of separate processes and operations. The calculating programme itself has such a structure that one can configure the complex of blocks and correlations between blocks, appropriate for any given flow sheet. For the ready sequence of operations balance calculations are made of all flows, i.e. expenses, element and substance makeup, heat emission and radiation rate are determined. The programme is open and the block library can be updated. This means that more complicated and detailed models of technological processes will be added to the library basing on the results of testing processes using real equipment, in test operating mode. The development of the model for the realization of technical-economic analysis of various variants of technologic PNFC schemes and the organization of 'operator's advisor' is expected. (authors)

Tretyakova, S.; Shmidt, O.; Podymova, T.; Shadrin, A.; Tkachenko, V. [Bochvar Institute, 5 Rogova str., Moscow 123098 (Russian Federation); Makeyeva, I.; Tkachenko, V.; Verbitskaya, O.; Schultz, O.; Peshkichev, I. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center - VNIITF E.I. Zababakhin, p.o.box 245, Snezhinsk, 456770 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Chemistry of nuclear fuel reprocessing: Current status  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current status on the chemical aspects of nuclear fuel reprocessing is presented with special emphasis on the Purex process which continues to be the process of choice for the last four decades. Better deconta...

D. D. Sood; S. K. Patil

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The integral fast reactor fuels reprocessing laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The processing of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metal fuel utilizes pyrochemical fuel reprocessing steps. These steps include separation of the fission products from uranium and plutonium by electrorefining in a fused salt, subsequent concentration of uranium and plutonium for reuse, removal, concentration, and packaging of the waste material. Approximately two years ago a facility became operational at Argonne National Laboratory-Illinois to establish the chemical feasibility of proposed reprocessing and consolidation processes. Sensitivity of the pyroprocessing melts to air oxidation necessitated operation in atmosphere-controlled enclosures. The Integral Fast Reactor Fuels Reprocessing Laboratory is described.

Wolson, R.D.; Tomczuk, Z.; Fischer, D.F.; Slawecki, M.A.; Miller, W.E.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility December 22, 2011 - 11:12am Addthis Media Contact Erik Simpson (208) 360-0426 A gravel mound, larger than half a city block and several feet thick, is the only visible feature that remains at the site of a Cold War-era spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho site. About $44 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds helped Idaho Cleanup Project crews accelerate the demolition of the facility that during its 40 years of operation recovered more than $1 billion worth of uranium. "The ability to retain our highly skilled workforce was a huge contributor to the success of this project," said Idaho Cleanup Project

12

Radioactive Flow Characterization for Real-Time Detection Systems in UREX+ Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants. Current large-scale commercial reprocessing facilities around the world make use of the PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction) method, which separates out a pure plutonium and pure uranium stream and puts all the remaining isotopes... products in the fuel. The leading technology option in the U.S. for reprocessing is a sequence of processing methods known as UREX+ (Uranium Extraction+). However, an industrial scale facility implementing this separation procedure will require...

Hogelin, Thomas Russell

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

13

Equipment specifications for an electrochemical fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrochemical reprocessing is a technique used to chemically separate and dissolve the components of spent nuclear fuel, in order to produce new metal fuel. There are several different variations to electrochemical reprocessing. These variations are accounted for by both the production of different types of spent nuclear fuel, as well as different states and organizations doing research in the field. For this electrochemical reprocessing plant, the spent fuel will be in the metallurgical form, a product of fast breeder reactors, which are used in many nuclear power plants. The equipment line for this process is divided into two main categories, the fuel refining equipment and the fuel fabrication equipment. The fuel refining equipment is responsible for separating out the plutonium and uranium together, while getting rid of the minor transuranic elements and fission products. The fuel fabrication equipment will then convert this plutonium and uranium mixture into readily usable metal fuel.

Hemphill, Kevin P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fuel Fabrication Facility  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

15

Plutonium and Reprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...might spawn nuclear terrorism. Less than...reprocessing plant. The U.S. nuclear-energy...current fleet of power reactors (15...operational risk of transmutation...future of nuclear power is clarified...constructed plant increased...

Frank N. von Hippel

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

16

Nuclear fuel reprocessing and the problems of safeguarding against the spread of nuclear weapons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1977, the executive branch reversed its long-standing support for nuclear fuel reprocessing, primarily because of the rick of spreading nuclear weapons. GAO reviewed safeguards technology designed to reduce such risks in Federal reprocessing facilities and found that concerns are warranted. Material in sufficient quantities to construct a nuclear weapon could be diverted and go undetected for a long time. Effective international control and safeguards over the production, storage, and use of separated plutonium are lacking. The United States should increase its efforts to: develop and ensure the use of effective safeguards for reprocessing facilities; and establish, in conjunction with major nuclear fuel users, suppliers, and reprocessors, an international system to control the storage and use of excess plutonium.

Staats, E.B.

1980-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

17

Idaho site completes demolition of Cold War-era nuclear fuel reprocessing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

doe logo CH2M-WG logo Joint News Release For Immediate Release Date: December 22, 2011 Media Contact: Erik Simpson, (208) 360-0426 Idaho site completes demolition of Cold War-era nuclear fuel reprocessing facility A gravel mound, larger than half a city block and several feet thick, is the only visible feature that remains at the site of a Cold War-era spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility at the U.S. Department of Energy�s Idaho site. About $44 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds helped Idaho Cleanup Project crews accelerate the demolition of the facility that during its 40 years of operation recovered more than $1 billion worth of uranium. �The ability to retain our highly skilled workforce was a huge contributor to the success of this project,� said Idaho Cleanup Project

18

Aqueous and pyrochemical reprocessing of actinide fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Processing of the nuclear fuel actinides has developed in two independent directions—aqueous processing and pyroprocessing. Similarities in the two processes, their...

L. Mac Toth Ph.D.; Walter D. Bond Ph.D.; Larry R. Avens Ph.D.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

A REVIEW OF THORIUM FUEL REPROCESSING EX  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

o ***'**** 5,0% DSBPP 233 for recovering both U and thorium from the slugs. By 1964, the demand 233 for U to fuel experimental reactors exceeded the supply and programs were...

20

Electrolysis cell for reprocessing plutonium reactor fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrolytic cell for refining a mixture of metals including spent fuel containing U and Pu contaminated with other metals is claimed. The cell includes a metallic pot containing a metallic pool as one anode at a lower level, a fused salt as the electrolyte at an intermediate level and a cathode and an anode basket in spaced-apart positions in the electrolyte with the cathode and anode being retractable to positions above the electrolyte during which spent fuel may be added to the anode basket. The anode basket is extendable into the lower pool to dissolve at least some metallic contaminants; the anode basket contains the spent fuel acting as a second anode when in the electrolyte.

Miller, W.E.; Steindler, M.J.; Burris, L.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Use of CAP88 PC to infer differences in the chemical form of I-129 emitted from a fuel reprocessing facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emissions of 129I from nuclear fuel separations conducted at the Hanford Site in Washington State have been occurring since the 1940’s. Fuel separation on the Hanford Site stopped in 1988, but emissions of 129I have continued as venting of the building occurred. In this study, atmospheric measurements of 129I concentrations were coupled with an EPA approved plume dispersion model (CAP-88PC) to evaluate the effectiveness of the dispersion model for estimating ambient concentrations at the Hanford Site. This evaluation led to the hypothesis of different chemical forms of iodine being emitted over the years; this hypothesis was developed as an explanation for the model agreeing with measurements over some time periods, but not over all time periods. The model was then run with modified emissions to simulate the short atmospheric half-life of the suspected reactive chemical form of iodine being emitted. This modification resulted in good agreement between the modeled and measured concentrations over the entire 20 year study period, and provided evidence that the hypothesis of a reactive form of iodine being emitted was correct.

Fritz, Brad G.; Phillips, Nathan RJ

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

22

5.14 - Spent Fuel Dissolution and Reprocessing Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The initial motivation for the development of reprocessing technologies came from the need for obtaining pure fissile material for nuclear weapon production. The most prominent among these is the PUREX (plutonium and uranium extraction) process, still used worldwide to reprocess commercial light water reactor fuels at a few thousand tons per year scale. The fuels dissolved in nitric acid are treated with a tributyl phosphate based solvent, the extracted uranium and plutonium are further purified, and the raffinate is vitrified for a safe final disposal. Plutonium is partly recycled as mixed oxide fuel. Since the beginning of this century, a new generation of nuclear reactors is being developed in the framework of the so-called generation IV initiative. For compliance with the sustainability goals defined for the innovative reactor systems, mainly waste minimization through recycling of all actinides, and for the achievement of these goals, the corresponding fuel cycles will play a central role. The new concept of a grouped actinide separation can be derived from aqueous or pyrochemical partitioning processes. For the aqueous schemes, a direct link to PUREX is obvious, namely, with coextraction of Np. The extraction of the remaining actinides can be achieved by using specially designed solvents based on phosphine oxide or diamide molecules. A major focus is on the very challenging separation of lanthanides from the trivalent actinides. The process implementation, especially for the less developed pyrometallurgy, requires a good understanding of the extraction mechanisms. Pyro-reprocessing, where all actinides are recycled, is based on metallic fuels; they are dissolved in molten salts at around 500–900 °C and actinides are selectively recovered, either by electrorefining or by extraction into a liquid metal phase. The fuels of new generation reactors will, at least in the beginning, most likely be oxides. Thus, for pyroprocesses a head-end reduction step for oxide into metals fuels is needed. A very specific reprocessing technology, the so-called direct use of pressurized water reactor spent fuel in CANDU process, is being developed in Korea. Here, used pressurized water reactor fuel is recycled to CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) reactors after a dry treatment where volatile fission products are removed.

J.-P. Glatz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Consolidated Fuel-Reprocessing Program. Progress report, April 1 to June 30, 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All research and development on fuel reprocessing in the United States is managed under the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. Technical progress is reported in overview fashion. Conceptual studies for the proposed Breeder Reprocessing Engineering Test (BRET) have continued. Studies to date have confirmed the feasibility of modifying an existing DOE facility at Hanford, Washington. A study to measure the extent of plutonium polymerization during steam-jet transfers of nitric acid solutions indicated polymer would appear only after several successive transfers at temperatures of 75/sup 0/C or higher. Fast-Flux Test Facility fuel was processed for the first time in the Solvent Extraction Test Facility. Studies of krypton release from pulverized sputter-deposited Ni-Y-Kr matrices have shown that the release rate is inversely proportional to the particle radius at 200/sup 0/C. Preparation of the initial 500-g batch of mixed oxide gel-spheres was completed. Fabrication processing at HEDL of mixed oxide gel-spheres (DIPRES process) was initiated. Operational testing of both 8 packs of the centrifugal contactor has been completed. Fabrication of both the prototypical disassembly system and the prototypical shear system has been initiated. Planning for FY 1984 installation and modification work in the integrated equipment list facility was completed. Acceptance tests of the original Integrated Process Demonstration system have been completed. Instrumentation and controls work with the prototype multiwavelength uranium photometer was successful and has been expanded to continuously and simultaneously monitor three process streams (raffinate, aqueous feed, and organic strip) in the secondary extraction cycle. Major efforts of the environmental, safeguards, and waste management areas were directed toward providing data for BRET.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The used nuclear fuel problem - can reprocessing and consolidated storage be complementary?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes our CISF (Consolidated Interim Storage Facilities) and Reprocessing Facility concepts and show how they can be combined with a geologic repository to provide a comprehensive system for dealing with spent fuels in the USA. The performance of the CISF was logistically analyzed under six operational scenarios. A 3-stage plan has been developed to establish the CISF. Stage 1: the construction at the CISF site of only a rail receipt interface and storage pad large enough for the number of casks that will be received. The construction of the CISF Canister Handling Facility, the Storage Cask Fabrication Facility, the Cask Maintenance Facility and supporting infrastructure are performed during stage 2. The construction and placement into operation of a water-filled pool repackaging facility is completed for Stage 3. By using this staged approach, the capital cost of the CISF is spread over a number of years. It also allows more time for a final decision on the geologic repository to be made. A recycling facility will be built, this facility will used the NUEX recycling process that is based on the aqueous-based PUREX solvent extraction process, using a solvent of tri-N-butyl phosphate in a kerosene diluent. It is capable of processing spent fuels at a rate of 5 MT per day, at burn-ups up to 50 GWD per ton of spent fuels and a minimum of 5 years out-of-reactor cooling.

Phillips, C.; Thomas, I. [EnergySolutions Federal EPC., 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Survey of Dynamic Simulation Programs for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The absence of any industrial scale nuclear fuel reprocessing in the U.S. has precluded the necessary driver for developing the advanced simulation capability now prevalent in so many other industries. Modeling programs to simulate the dynamic behavior of nuclear fuel separations and processing were originally developed to support the US government’s mission of weapons production and defense fuel recovery. Consequently there has been little effort is the US devoted towards improving this specific process simulation capability during the last two or three decades. More recent work has been focused on elucidating chemical thermodynamics and developing better models of predicting equilibrium in actinide solvent extraction systems. These equilibrium models have been used to augment flowsheet development and testing primarily at laboratory scales. The development of more robust and complete process models has not kept pace with the vast improvements in computational power and user interface and is significantly behind simulation capability in other chemical processing and separation fields.

Troy J. Tranter; Daryl R. Haefner

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program progress report, 1 October-31 December 1979. [HEF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported in four areas: process research and development, engineering research, engineering systems, technical support, and HTGR fuel reprocessing. (DLC)

Unger, W.E. (comp.)

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Process for recovery of palladium from nuclear fuel reprocessing wastes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Palladium is selectively removed from spent nuclear fuel reprocessing waste by adding sugar to a strong nitric acid solution of the waste to partially denitrate the solution and cause formation of an insoluble palladium compound. The process includes the steps of: (a) adjusting the nitric acid content of the starting solution to about 10 M; (b) adding 50% sucrose solution in an amount sufficient to effect the precipitation of the palladium compound; (c) heating the solution at reflux temperature until precipitation is complete; and (d) centrifuging the solution to separate the precipitated palladium compound from the supernatant liquid.

Campbell, D.O.; Buxton, S.R.

1980-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

28

NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

None

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

29

A Non-Proliferating Fuel Cycle: No Enrichment, Reprocessing or Accessible Spent Fuel - 12375  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current fuel cycles offer a number of opportunities for access to plutonium, opportunities to create highly enriched uranium and access highly radioactive wastes to create nuclear weapons and 'dirty' bombs. The non-proliferating fuel cycle however eliminates or reduces such opportunities and access by eliminating the mining, milling and enrichment of uranium. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces the production of plutonium per unit of energy created, eliminates reprocessing and the separation of plutonium from the spent fuel and the creation of a stream of high-level waste. It further simplifies the search for land based deep geologic repositories and interim storage sites for spent fuel in the USA by disposing of the spent fuel in deep sub-seabed sediments after storing the spent fuel at U.S. Navy Nuclear Shipyards that have the space and all of the necessary equipment and security already in place. The non-proliferating fuel cycle also reduces transportation risks by utilizing barges for the collection of spent fuel and transport to the Navy shipyards and specially designed ships to take the spent fuel to designated disposal sites at sea and to dispose of them there in deep sub-seabed sediments. Disposal in the sub-seabed sediments practically eliminates human intrusion. Potential disposal sites include Great Meteor East and Southern Nares Abyssal Plain. Such sites then could easily become international disposal sites since they occur in the open ocean. It also reduces the level of human exposure in case of failure because of the large physical and chemical dilution and the elimination of a major pathway to man-seawater is not potable. Of course, the recovery of uranium from sea water and the disposal of spent fuel in sub-seabed sediments must be proven on an industrial scale. All other technologies are already operating on an industrial scale. If externalities, such as reduced terrorist threats, environmental damage (including embedded emissions), long term care, reduced access to 'dirty' bomb materials, the social and political costs of siting new facilities and the psychological impact of no solution to the nuclear waste problem, were taken into account, the costs would be far lower than those of the present fuel cycle. (authors)

Parker, Frank L. [Vanderbilt University (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Waste generation process modeling and analysis for fuel reprocessing technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates of electric power generation requirements for the next century, even when taking the most conservative tack, indicate that the United States will have to increase its production capacity significantly. If the country determines that nuclear power will not be a significant component of this production capacity, the nuclear industry will have to die, as maintaining a small nuclear component will not be justifiable. However, if nuclear power is to be a significant component, it will probably require some form of reprocessing technology. The once-through fuel cycle is only feasible for a relatively small number of nuclear power plants. If we are maintaining several hundred reactors, the once-through fuel cycle is more expensive and ethically questionable.

Kornreich, D. E. (Drew E.); Koehler, A. C. (Andrew C.); Farman, Richard F.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Cost Savings of Nuclear Power with Total Fuel Reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of fast reactor (FR) generated electricity with pyro-processing is estimated in this article. It compares favorably with other forms of energy and is shown to be less than that produced by light water reactors (LWR's). FR's use all the energy in natural uranium whereas LWR's utilize only 0.7% of it. Because of high radioactivity, pyro-processing is not open to weapon material diversion. This technology is ready now. Nuclear power has the same advantage as coal power in that it is not dependent upon a scarce foreign fuel and has the significant additional advantage of not contributing to global warming or air pollution. A jump start on new nuclear plants could rapidly allow electric furnaces to replace home heating oil furnaces and utilize high capacity batteries for hybrid automobiles: both would reduce US reliance on oil. If these were fast reactors fueled by reprocessed fuel, the spent fuel storage problem could also be solved. Costs are derived from assumptions on the LWR's and FR's five cost components: 1) Capital costs: LWR plants cost $106/MWe. FR's cost 25% more. Forty year amortization is used. 2) The annual O and M costs for both plants are 9% of the Capital Costs. 3) LWR fuel costs about 0.0035 $/kWh. Producing FR fuel from spent fuel by pyro-processing must be done in highly shielded hot cells which is costly. However, the five foot thick concrete walls have the advantage of prohibiting diversion. LWR spent fuel must be used as feedstock for the FR initial core load and first two reloads so this FR fuel costs more than LWR fuel. FR fuel costs much less for subsequent core reloads (< LWR fuel) if all spent fuel feedstock is from the fast reactor (i.e., Breeding Ratio =1). 4) Yucca Mountain storage of unprocessed LWR spent fuel is estimated as $360,000/MTHM. But this fuel can be processed to remove TRU for use as fast reactor fuel. The remaining fission products repository costs are only one fifth that of the original fuel. Storage of short half life fission products alone requires less storage time and long term integrity than LWR spent fuel (300 years storage versus 100,000 years.) 5) LWR decommissioning costs are estimated to be $0.3 x 10{sup 6}/MWe. The annual cost for a 40 year licensed plant would be 2.5 % of this or less if interest is taken into account. All plants will eventually have to replace those components which become radiation damaged. FR's should be designed to replace parts rather than decommission. The LWR costs are estimated to be 2.65 cents/kWh. FR costs are 2.99 cents/kWh for the first 7.5 years and 2.39 cents/kWh for the next 32.5 years. The average cost over forty years is 2.50 cents/kWh which is less than the LWR costs. These power costs are similar to coal power, are lower than gas, oil, and much lower than renewable power.(authors)

Solbrig, Charles W.; Benedict, Robert W. [Fuel Cycle Programs Division, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Status of radioiodine control for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the status of radioiodine control in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant with respect to capture, fixation, and disposal. Where possible, we refer the reader to a number of survey documents which have been published in the last four years. We provide updates where necessary. Also discussed are factors which must be considered in developing criteria for iodine control. For capture from gas streams, silver mordenite and a silver nitrate impregnated silica (AC-6120) are considered state-of-the-art and are recommended. Three aqueous scrubbing processes have been demonstrated: Caustic scrubbing is simple but probably will not give an adequate iodine retention by itself. Mercurex (mercuric nitrate-nitric acid scrubbing) has a number of disadvantages including the use of toxic mercury. Iodox (hyperazeotropic nitric acid scrubbing) is effective but employs a very corrosive and hazardous material. Other technologies have been tested but require extensive development. The waste forms recommended for long-term storage or disposal are silver iodide, the iodates of barium, strontium, or calcium, and silver loaded sorbents, all fixed in cement. Copper iodide in bitumen (asphalt) is a possibility but requires testing. The selection of a specific form will be influenced by the capture process used.

Burger, L.L.; Scheele, R.D.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Head-end process for the reprocessing of HTGR spent fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The reprocessing of HTGR spent fuels is in favor of the sustainable development of nuclear energy to realize the maximal use of nuclear resource and the minimum disposal of nuclear waste. The head-end of HTGR spent fuels reprocessing is different from that of the LWR spent fuels reprocessing because of the difference of spent fuel structure. The dismantling of the graphite spent fuel element and the highly effective dissolution of fuel kernel is the most difficult process in the head end of the reprocessing. Recently, some work on the head-end has been done in China. First, the electrochemical method with nitrate salt as electrolyte was studied to disintegrate the graphite matrix from HTGR fuel elements and release the coated fuel particles, to provide an option for the head-end technology of reprocessing. The results show that the graphite matrix can be effectively separated from the coated particle without any damage to the SiC layer. Secondly, the microwave-assisted heating was applied to dissolve the UO{sub 2} kernel from the crashed coated fuel particles. The ceramic UO{sub 2} as the solute has a good ability to absorb the microwave energy. The results of UO{sub 2} kernel dissolution from crushed coated particles by microwave heating show that the total dissolution percentage of UO{sub 2} is more than 99.99% after 3 times cross-flow dissolution with the following parameters: 8 mol/L HNO{sub 3}, temperature 100 Celsius degrees, initial ratio of solid to liquid 1.2 g/ml. (authors)

Chen, J.; Wen, M. [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Bejing 10084 (China)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Concept for a small, colocated fuel cycle facility for oxide breeder fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a United States Department of Energy (USDOE) program to examine innovative liquid-metal reactor (LMR) system designs over the past three years, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) collaborated on studies of mixed oxide fuel cycle options. A principal effort was an advanced concept for a small integrated fuel cycle colocated with a 1300-MW(e) reactor station. The study provided a scoping design and a basis on which to proceed with implementation of such a facility if future plans so dictate. The facility integrated reprocessing, waste management, and refabrication functions in a single facility of nominal 35-t/year capacity utilizing the latest technology developed in fabrication programs at WHC and in reprocessing at ORNL. The concept was based on many years of work at both sites and extensive design studies of prior years.

Burch, W.D.; Stradley, J.G.; Lerch, R.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Production Facility Tax Credit

36

Use of process monitoring for verifying facility design of large-scale reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the decade of the 1990s, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) faces the challenge of implementing safeguards in large, new reprocessing facilities. The Agency will be involved in the design, construction, checkout and initial operation of these new facilities to ensure effective safeguards are implemented. One aspect of the Agency involvement is in the area of design verification. The United States Support Program has initiated a task to develop methods for applying process data collection and validation during the cold commissioning phase of plant construction. This paper summarizes the results of this task. 14 refs., 1 tab.

Hakkila, E.A.; Zack, N.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Ehinger, M.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Franssen, F. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

THE ECONOMICS OF REPROCESSING vs DIRECT DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report assesses the economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The breakeven uranium price at which reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) and recycling the resulting plutonium and uranium in LWRs would become economic is assessed, using central estimates of the costs of different elements of the nuclear fuel cycle (and other fuel cycle input parameters), for a wide range of range of potential reprocessing prices. Sensitivity analysis is performed, showing that the conclusions reached are robust across a wide range of input parameters. The contribution of direct disposal or reprocessing and recycling to electricity cost is also assessed. The choice of particular central estimates and ranges for the input parameters of the fuel cycle model is justified through a review of the relevant literature. The impact of different fuel cycle approaches on the volume needed for geologic repositories is briefly discussed, as are the issues surrounding the possibility of performing separations and transmutation on spent nuclear fuel to reduce the need for additional repositories. A similar analysis is then performed of the breakeven uranium price at which deploying fast neutron breeder reactors would become competitive compared with a once-through fuel cycle in LWRs, for a range of possible differences in capital cost between LWRs and fast neutron reactors. Sensitivity analysis is again provided, as are an analysis of the contribution to electricity cost, and a justification of the choices of central estimates and ranges for the input parameters. The equations used in the economic model are derived and explained in an appendix. Another appendix assesses the quantities of uranium likely to be recoverable worldwide in the future at a range of different possible future prices.

Matthew Bunn; Steve Fetter; John P. Holdren; Bob van der Zwaan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

LMFBR operation in the nuclear cycle without fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substantiation is given to expediency of investigation of nuclear power (NP) development with fast reactors cooled by lead-bismuth alloy operating during extended time in the open nuclear fuel cycle with slightly enriched or depleted uranium make-up. 9 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Toshinsky, S.I. [Institute of Physics and Power Engineering, Kaluga (Russian Federation)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Method for cleaning solution used in nuclear fuel reprocessing  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nuclear fuel processing solution consisting of tri-n-butyl phosphate and dodecane, with a complex of uranium, plutonium, or zirconium and with a solvent degradation product such as di-n-butyl phosphate therein, is contacted with an aqueous solution of a salt formed from hydrazine and either a dicarboxylic acid or a hydroxycarboxylic acid, thereby removing the aforesaid complex from the processing solution.

Tallent, O.K.; Crouse, D.J.; Mailen, J.C.

1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

Collins, Emory D.; Delcul, Guillermo D.; Hunt, Rodney D.; Johnson, Jared A.; Spencer, Barry B.

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

42

Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

Collins, Emory D; Delcul, Guillermo D; Hunt, Rodney D; Johnson, Jared A; Spencer, Barry B

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

43

Process centrifuge operating problems and equipment failures in canyon reprocessing facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) maintains a compilation of operating problems and equipment failures that have occurred in the fuel reprocessing areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). At present, the data bank contains more than 230,000 entries ranging from minor equipment malfunctions to incidents with the potential for injury or contamination of personnel, or for economic loss. The data bank has been used extensively for a wide variety of purposes, such as failure analyses, trend analyses, and preparation of safety analyses. Typical of the data are problems associated with the canyon process centrifuges. This report contains a compilation of the centrifuge operating problems and equipment failures primarily as an aid to organizations with related equipment. Publication of these data was prompted by a number of requests for this information by other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. 11 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Durant, W.S.; Baughman, D.F.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Container for reprocessing and permanent storage of spent nuclear fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single canister process container is described for reprocessing and permanent storage of spent nuclear fuel assemblies comprising zirconium-based cladding and fuel, which process container comprises a collapsible container, having side walls that are made of a high temperature alloy and an array of collapsible support means wherein the container is capable of withstanding temperature necessary to oxidize the zirconium-based cladding and having sufficient ductility to maintain integrity when collapsed under pressure. The support means is also capable of maintaining its integrity at a temperature necessary to oxidize the zirconium-based cladding. The process container also has means to introduce and remove fluids to and from the container. 10 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

45

DOE Permitting Hydrogen Facilities: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stations Stations Public-use hydrogen fueling stations are very much like gasoline ones. In fact, sometimes, hydrogen and gasoline cars can be fueled at the same station. These stations offer self-service pumps, convenience stores, and other services in high-traffic locations. Photo of a Shell fueling station showing the site convenience store and hydrogen and gasoline fuel pumps. This fueling station in Washington, D.C., provides drivers with both hydrogen and gasoline fuels Many future hydrogen fueling stations will be expansions of existing fueling stations. These facilities will offer hydrogen pumps in addition to gasoline or natural gas pumps. Other hydrogen fueling stations will be "standalone" operations. These stations will be designed and constructed to

46

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biofuels Production Biofuels Production Facility Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Production Facility Grants The Renewable Fuels Development Program provides grants for the

47

Dismantling of Highly Contaminated Process Installations of the German Reprocessing Facility (WAK) - Status of New Remote Handling Technology - 13287  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decommissioning and dismantling of the former German Pilot Reprocessing Plant Karlsruhe (WAK) including the Vitrification Facility (VEK) is being executed in different Project steps related to the reprocessing, HLLW storage and vitrification complexes /1/. While inside the reprocessing building the total inventory of process equipment has already been dismantled and disposed of, the HLLW storage and vitrification complex has been placed out of operation since vitrification and tank rinsing procedures where finalized in year 2010. This paper describes the progress made in dismantling of the shielded boxes of the highly contaminated laboratory as a precondition to get access to the hot cells of the HLLW storage. The major challenges of the dismantling of this laboratory were the high dose rates up to 700 mSv/h and the locking technology for the removal of the hot cell installations. In parallel extensive prototype testing of different carrier systems and power manipulators to be applied to dismantle the HLLW-tanks and other hot cell equipment is ongoing. First experiences with the new manipulator carrier system and a new master slave manipulator with force reflection will be reported. (authors)

Dux, Joachim; Friedrich, Daniel; Lutz, Werner; Ripholz, Martina [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O. Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)] [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O. Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Environmental Assessment Exemption on AddThis.com...

49

Hot Fuel Examination Facility/South  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the potential environmental impacts associated with proposed modifications to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility/South (HFEF/S). The proposed action, to modify the existing HFEF/S at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho, would allow important aspects of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept, offering potential advantages in nuclear safety and economics, to be demonstrated. It would support fuel cycle experiments and would supply fresh fuel to the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at the INEL. 35 refs., 12 figs., 13 tabs.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Fuel Cycle Options for Optimized Recycling of Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reduction of transuranic inventories of spent nuclear fuel depends upon the deployment of advanced fuels that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and the availability of facilities to separate and reprocess ...

Aquien, A.

51

President Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Spent Fuel Storage Facility Washington, DC The Reagan Administration announces a nuclear energy policy that anticipates the establishment of a facility for the storage of...

52

Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities. Sections 1-14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Risk Assessment Program was initiated to provide risk assessment methods for assistance in the regulatory process for nuclear fuel cycle facilities other than reactors. This report, the first from the program, defines and describes fuel cycle elements that are being considered in the program. One type of facility (and in some cases two) is described that is representative of each element of the fuel cycle. The descriptions are based on real industrial-scale facilities that are current state-of-the-art, or on conceptual facilities where none now exist. Each representative fuel cycle facility is assumed to be located on the appropriate one of four hypothetical but representative sites described. The fuel cycles considered are for Light Water Reactors with once-through flow of spent fuel, and with plutonium and uranium recycle. Representative facilities for the following fuel cycle elements are described for uranium (or uranium plus plutonium where appropriate): mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, mixed-oxide fuel refabrication, fuel reprocessing, spent fuel storage, high-level waste storage, transuranic waste storage, spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal, low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal, and transportation. For each representative facility the description includes: mainline process, effluent processing and waste management, facility and hardware description, safety-related information and potential alternative concepts for that fuel cycle element. The emphasis of the descriptive material is on safety-related information. This includes: operating and maintenance requirements, input/output of major materials, identification and inventories of hazardous materials (particularly radioactive materials), unit operations involved, potential accident driving forces, containment and shielding, and degree of hands-on operation.

Schneider, K.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Corrosion property of 9Cr-ODS steel in nitric acid solution for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion tests of oxide dispersion strengthened with 9% Cr (9Cr-ODS) steel, which is one of the desirable materials for cladding tube of sodium-cooled fast reactors, in pure nitric acid solution, spent FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution were performed to understand the corrosion behavior in a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, the 9Cr-ODS steel with lower effective chromium content was evaluated to understand the corrosion behavior conservatively. As results, the tube-type specimens of the 9Cr-ODS steels suffered severe weight loss owing to active dissolution at the beginning of the immersion test in pure nitric acid solution in the range from 1 to 3.5 M. In contrast, the weight loss was decreased and they showed a stable corrosion in the higher nitric acid concentration, the dissolved FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution by passivation. The corrosion rates of the 9Cr-ODS steel in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and its simulated solution were 1-2 mm/y and showed good agreement with each other. The passivation was caused by the shift of corrosion potential to noble side owing to increase in nitric acid concentration or oxidative ions in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and the simulated spent fuel solution. (authors)

Takeuchi, M.; Koizumi, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Inoue, M.; Koyama, S.I. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biofuel Production Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit Companies that invest in the development of a biofuel production facility

55

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Production Production Facility Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Production Facility Tax Credit A taxpayer that constructs and places into service a commercial facility

56

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Production Production Facility Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Production Facility Tax Exemption Any newly constructed or expanded biomass-to-energy facility is exempt from

57

Alternative Fuel Production Facility Incentives (Kentucky) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Alternative Fuel Production Facility Incentives (Kentucky) Alternative Fuel Production Facility Incentives (Kentucky) Alternative Fuel Production Facility Incentives (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Utility Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive The Kentucky Economic Development and Finance Authority (KEDFA) provides tax incentives to construct, retrofit, or upgrade an alternative fuel production or gasification facility that uses coal or biomass as a feedstock. Beginning Aug. 1, 2010, tax incentives are also available for energy-efficient alternative fuel production facilities and up to five alternative fuel production facilities that use natural gas or natural gas liquids as a feedstock. Energy-efficient alternative fuels are defined as homogeneous fuels that are produced from processes designed to densify

58

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biofuel Production Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Production Facility Tax Credit A taxpayer who processes biodiesel, ethanol, or gasoline blends consisting

59

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Facility Fee to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Fee on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Facility Fee The cost to submit an air quality permit application for an ethanol production plant is $1,000. An annual renewal fee is also required for the

60

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Production Production Facility Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Production Facility Tax Credit Businesses and individuals are eligible for a tax credit of up to 15% of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blending Facility Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biodiesel Blending Biodiesel Blending Facility Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blending Facility Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blending Facility Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blending Facility Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blending Facility Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blending Facility Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blending Facility Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Blending Facility Tax Credit A tax credit is available for up to 30% of the cost of purchasing or

62

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Ethanol and Hydrogen Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Hydrogen Production Facility Permits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

63

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Facility Property Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

64

Proposed strontium radiosotope thermoelectric generator fuel encapsulation facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed Fuel Encapsulation Facility is a fully equipped facility for processing and encapsulating strontium Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) fuel from presently available Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) capsules. The facility location is on the second building level below ground of the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), Cells 142, 143, and 145. Capsules containing strontium fluoride (SrF[sub 2]) would be received from the WESF in Cell 145 and transferred to the three adjacent cells for processing and encapsulation into the final RTG fuel configuration.

Adkins, H.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, Mail Stop N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States))

1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

65

Pyrochemical reprocessing developments in Japan: overview and some topics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The latest developments in pyrochemical reprocessing technology in Japan is introduced in view of: the feasibility study FBR system; R&D progress; new projects and funding; basic studies in universities; new experimental facilities. Japanese pyrochemical reprocessing developments are being accelerated as new funding recently has been authorised by the government. While electrorefining of metallic fuels has made significant technological progress, attention has been focused on MOX fuels. Universities have participated in these developments by contributing to the basic studies for molten salt systems. Some critical technical subjects have been clarified, and they are being investigated aggressively by various organisations.

Hajimu Yamana

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

DEVELOPMENT OF A HYDROGEN MORDENITE SORBENT FOR THE CAPTURE OF KRYPTON FROM USED NUCLEAR FUEL REPROCESSING OFF-GAS STREAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel new sorbent for the separation of krypton from off-gas streams resulting from the reprocessing of used nuclear fuel has been developed and evaluated. A hydrogen mordenite powder was successfully incorporated into a macroporous polymer binder and formed into spherical beads. The engineered form sorbent retained the characteristic surface area and microporosity indicative of mordenite powder. The sorbent was evaluated for krypton adsorption capacities utilizing thermal swing operations achieving capacities of 100 mmol of krypton per kilogram of sorbent at a temperature of 191 K. A krypton adsorption isotherm was also obtained at 191 K with varying krypton feed gas concentrations. Adsorption/desorption cycling effects were also evaluated with results indicating that the sorbent experienced no decrease in krypton capacity throughout testing.

Mitchell Greenhalgh; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Investigation of the possibility of using hydrogranulation in reprocessing radioactive wastes of radiochemical production facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radio-chemical production facilities are constantly accumulating liquid radioactive wastes (still residues as the result of evaporation of extraction and adsorption solutions etc.) which are a complex multicomponent mixtures. The wastes are frequently stored for extended periods of time while awaiting disposition and in some cases, and this is much worse, they are released into the environment. In this report, I would like to draw your attention to some results we have obtained from investigations aimed at simplifying handing of such wastes by the precipitation of hard to dissolve metal hydroxides, the flocculation of the above into granules with the help of surface-active agents (in this case a polyacrylamide - PAA), quickly precipitated and easily filtered. The precipitate may be quickly dried and calcinated, if necessary, and transformed into a dense oxide sinter. In other words it may be transformed into a material convenient for storage or burial.

Revyakin, V.; Borisov, L.M. [All Russian Scientific and Research Institute of Non-Organic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

UNIT NAME: C-751 Fuel Facility REGULATORY STATUS: AOC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

,93 186 UNIT NUMBER : UNIT NAME: C-751 Fuel Facility REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Inside plant security fence, immediately south of C-720 building. APPROXIMATE DIMENSION: Two...

69

Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A framework for nuclear facility safeguard evaluation using probabilistic methods and expert elicitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the advancement of the next generation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, concerns of the effectiveness of nuclear facility safeguards have been increasing due to the inclusion of highly enriched material and reprocessing ...

Iamsumang, Chonlagarn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Other Research Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Other Research Facilities Other Research Facilities In addition to the laboratories dedicated to hydrogen and fuel cell research, other facilities at NREL provide space for scientists developing hydrogen and fuel cell technologies along with other renewable energy technologies. Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility NREL's Distributed Energy Resources (DER) Test Facility is a working laboratory to test and improve interconnections among renewable energy generation technologies, energy storage systems, and electrical conversion equipment. Research being conducted includes improving the system efficiency of hydrogen production by electrolysis using wind or other renewable energy. This research highlights a promising option for encouraging higher penetrations of renewable energy generation as well as

72

Pyroprocessing of fast flux test facility nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Used nuclear fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was recently transferred to the Idaho National Laboratory and processed by pyroprocessing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility. Approximately 213 kg of uranium from sodium-bonded metallic FFTF fuel was processed over a one year period with the equipment previously used for the processing of EBR-II used fuel. The peak burnup of the FFTF fuel ranged from 10 to 15 atom% for the 900+ chopped elements processed. Fifteen low-enriched uranium ingots were cast following the electrorefining and distillation operations to recover approximately 192 kg of uranium. A material balance on the primary fuel constituents, uranium and zirconium, during the FFTF campaign will be presented along with a brief description of operating parameters. Recoverable uranium during the pyroprocessing of FFTF nuclear fuel was greater than 95% while the purity of the final electro-refined uranium products exceeded 99%. (authors)

Westphal, B.R.; Wurth, L.A.; Fredrickson, G.L.; Galbreth, G.G.; Vaden, D.; Elliott, M.D.; Price, J.C.; Honeyfield, E.M.; Patterson, M.N. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Research Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Characterization Laboratory. Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL NREL conducts hydrogen and fuel cell R&D at a variety of research facilities at our main 327-acre campus in Golden,...

74

Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

is designed to treat 900,000 gallons of radioactive liquid waste stored in underground tanks at a former Cold War spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility located at DOE's Idaho...

75

Measurement of Atmospheric Sea Salt Concentration in the Dry Storage Facility of the Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spent nuclear fuel coming from a Japanese nuclear power plant is stored in the interim storage facility before reprocessing. There are two types of the storage methods which are wet and dry type. In Japan, it is anticipated that the dry storage facility will increase compared with the wet type facility. The dry interim storage facility using the metal cask has been operated in Japan. In another dry storage technology, there is a concrete overpack. Especially in USA, a lot of concrete overpacks are used for the dry interim storage. In Japan, for the concrete cask, the codes of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers and the governmental technical guidelines are prepared for the realization of the interim storage as well as the code for the metal cask. But the interim storage using the concrete overpack has not been in progress because the evaluation on the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the canister is not sufficient. Japanese interim storage facilities would be constructed near the seashore. The metal casks and concrete overpacks are stored in the storage building in Japan. On the other hand, in USA they are stored outside. It is necessary to remove the decay heat of the spent nuclear fuel in the cask from the storage building. Generally, the heat is removed by natural cooling in the dry storage facility. Air including the sea salt particles goes into the dry storage facility. Concerning the concrete overpack, air goes into the cask body and cools the canister. Air goes along the canister surface and is in contact with the surface directly. In this case, the sea salt in the air attaches to the surface and then there is the concern about the occurrence of the SCC. For the concrete overpack, the canister including the spent fuel is sealed by the welding. The loss of sealability caused by the SCC has to be avoided. To evaluate the SCC for the canister, it is necessary to make clear the amount of the sea salt particles coming into the storage building and the concentration on the canister. In present, the evaluation on that point is not sufficient. In this study, the concentration of the sea salt particles in the air and on the surface of the storage facility are measured inside and outside of the building. For the measurement, two sites of the dry storage facility using the metal cask are chosen. This data is applicable for the evaluation on the SCC of the canister to realize the interim storage using the concrete overpack. (authors)

Masumi Wataru; Hisashi Kato; Satoshi Kudo; Naoko Oshima; Koji Wada [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry - CRIEPI (Japan); Hirofumi Narutaki [Electric Power Engineering Systems Co. Ltd. (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Fuel Storage Facility Final Safety Analysis Report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) is an integral part of the Fast Flux Test Facility. Its purpose is to provide long-term storage (20-year design life) for spent fuel core elements used to provide the fast flux environment in FFTF, and for test fuel pins, components and subassemblies that have been irradiated in the fast flux environment. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and its supporting documentation provides a complete description and safety evaluation of the site, the plant design, operations, and potential accidents.

Linderoth, C.E.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

President Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility |  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility | Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > President Reagan Calls for a National Spent ... President Reagan Calls for a National Spent Fuel Storage Facility October 08, 1981

78

Application of curium measurements for safeguarding at reprocessing plants. Study 1: High-level liquid waste and Study 2: Spent fuel assemblies and leached hulls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In large-scale reprocessing plants for spent fuel assemblies, the quantity of plutonium in the waste streams each year is large enough to be important for nuclear safeguards. The wastes are drums of leached hulls and cylinders of vitrified high-level liquid waste. The plutonium amounts in these wastes cannot be measured directly by a nondestructive assay (NDA) technique because the gamma rays emitted by plutonium are obscured by gamma rays from fission products, and the neutrons from spontaneous fissions are obscured by those from curium. The most practical NDA signal from the waste is the neutron emission from curium. A diversion of waste for its plutonium would also take a detectable amount of curium, so if the amount of curium in a waste stream is reduced, it can be inferred that there is also a reduced amount of plutonium. This report studies the feasibility of tracking the curium through a reprocessing plant with neutron measurements at key locations: spent fuel assemblies prior to shearing, the accountability tank after dissolution, drums of leached hulls after dissolution, and canisters of vitrified high-level waste after separation. Existing pertinent measurement techniques are reviewed, improvements are suggested, and new measurements are proposed. The authors integrate these curium measurements into a safeguards system.

Rinard, P.M.; Menlove, H.O.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Costing plutonium: economics of reprocessing in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relative merits of reprocessing and direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel have been widely debated in Europe and the USA. An important aspect of the debate has been the economics of reprocessing. So far there have been no studies of the subject in the Indian context. This study assesses the economics of reprocessing in India and the cost of producing plutonium for the fast breeder reactor programme. Our results suggest that the cost of reprocessing each kilogram of spent fuel would cost approximately Rs. 26,000 (approx. $600) with assumptions favourable to reprocessing, and close to Rs. 30,000 (approx. $675) under other assumptions. These costs are lower than the corresponding figures for reprocessing plants in Europe, the USA, and Japan. As in their case, however, it is unlikely to be an economically viable method of waste disposal.

M.V. Ramana; J.Y. Suchitra

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

EARTHQUAKE CAUSED RELEASES FROM A NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fuel cycle facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory is a nuclear facility which must be licensed in order to operate. A safety analysis is required for a license. This paper describes the analysis of the Design Basis Accident for this facility. This analysis involves a model of the transient behavior of the FCF inert atmosphere hot cell following an earthquake initiated breach of pipes passing through the cell boundary. The hot cell is used to process spent metallic nuclear fuel. Such breaches allow the introduction of air and subsequent burning of pyrophoric metals. The model predicts the pressure, temperature, volumetric releases, cell heat transfer, metal fuel combustion, heat generation rates, radiological releases and other quantities. The results show that releases from the cell are minimal and satisfactory for safety. This analysis method should be useful in other facilities that have potential for damage from an earthquake and could eliminate the need to back fit facilities with earthquake proof boundaries or lessen the cost of new facilities.

Charles W. Solbrig; Chad Pope; Jason Andrus

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Evaluation of existing United States` facilities for use as a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of existing US facilities were evaluated for use as a mixed-oxide fuel fabrication facility for plutonium disposition. These facilities include the Fuels Material Examination Facility (FMEF) at Hanford, the Washington Power Supply Unit 1 (WNP-1) facility at Hanford, the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP) at Barnwell, SC, the Fuel Processing Facility (FPF) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and the P-reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The study consisted of evaluating each facility in terms of available process space, available building support systems (i.e., HVAC, security systems, existing process equipment, etc.), available regional infrastructure (i.e., emergency response teams, protective force teams, available transportation routes, etc.), and ability to integrate the MOX fabrication process into the facility in an operationally-sound manner that requires a minimum amount of structural modifications.

Beard, C.A.; Buksa, J.J.; Chidester, K.; Eaton, S.L.; Motley, F.E.; Siebe, D.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Reprocessing (1): Barnwell, USA: An inevitability forestalled  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the plant in the 1960s. A small-scale reprocessing facility was already in operation at West Valley, New York, and another was on the drawing board for a site at Morris ... . So far, however, the nascent reprocessing industry has been beset by disasters.

Colin Norman

1976-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

84

EIS-0432: Medicine Bow Fuel & Power Coal-to-Liquid Facility in...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Medicine Bow Fuel & Power Coal-to-Liquid Facility in Carbon County, WY EIS-0432: Medicine Bow Fuel & Power Coal-to-Liquid Facility in Carbon County, WY Documents Available for...

85

Impacts of criticality safety on hot fuel examination facility operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) complex comprises four large hot cells. These cells are used to support the nation's nuclear energy program, especially the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor, by providing nondestructive and destructive testing of irradiated reactor fuels and furnishing the hot cell services required for operation of Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). Because it is a research rather than a production facility, HFEF assignments are varied and change from time to time to meet the requirements of our experimenters. Such a variety of operations presents many challenges, especially for nuclear criticality safety. The following operations are reviewed to assure that accidental criticality is not possible, and that all rules and regulations are met: transportation, temporary storage, examinations, and disposition.

Garcia, A.S.; Courtney, J.C.; Bacca, J.P.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport DOE to Build Hydrogen Fuel Test Facility at West Virginia Airport March 25, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) today announced plans to construct and operate a hydrogen fuel production plant and vehicle fueling station at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. The facility will use grid electricity to split water to produce pure hydrogen fuel. The fuel will be used by the airport's operations and the 130th Air Wing of the West Virginia Air National Guard. NETL will begin operations at the Yeager Airport facility in August 2009 and plans to conduct two years of testing and evaluation. The facility will be designed using "open architecture," allowing the capability to add

87

USCG Energy Program Resource Management, Fuel Logistics, and Facility Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Program Energy Program Resource Management, Fuel Logistics, and Facility Energy Presented by Daniel Gore USCG Energy Program Manager Office of Resource Management 1 1 2 Presentation Contents * Overview CG Energy Program * Highlights * Interesting Projects for Utilities * Alternatively Financed Projects Discussion 2 3 Overview 3 USCG Energy Program Growth * CG represents 80% of DHS energy consumption * Obligations up 210% from FY 2000 * Energy = 25% of O&M budget 4 4 Energy Program Dynamics Increasing Expenditures Increasing Politics & Mandates Increasing Scrutiny & Reporting Procurement & Credit Card Transformations Accounting System Improvements Organizational Strategic Transformations 5 5 What is CG Energy Management? * Policies impacting $306M annual obligations

88

Financing Strategies For A Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help meet the nation’s energy needs, recycling of partially used nuclear fuel is required to close the nuclear fuel cycle, but implementing this step will require considerable investment. This report evaluates financing scenarios for integrating recycling facilities into the nuclear fuel cycle. A range of options from fully government owned to fully private owned were evaluated using DPL (Decision Programming Language 6.0), which can systematically optimize outcomes based on user-defined criteria (e.g., lowest lifecycle cost, lowest unit cost). This evaluation concludes that the lowest unit costs and lifetime costs are found for a fully government-owned financing strategy, due to government forgiveness of debt as sunk costs. However, this does not mean that the facilities should necessarily be constructed and operated by the government. The costs for hybrid combinations of public and private (commercial) financed options can compete under some circumstances with the costs of the government option. This analysis shows that commercial operations have potential to be economical, but there is presently no incentive for private industry involvement. The Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) currently establishes government ownership of partially used commercial nuclear fuel. In addition, the recently announced Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) suggests fuels from several countries will be recycled in the United States as part of an international governmental agreement; this also assumes government ownership. Overwhelmingly, uncertainty in annual facility capacity led to the greatest variations in unit costs necessary for recovery of operating and capital expenditures; the ability to determine annual capacity will be a driving factor in setting unit costs. For private ventures, the costs of capital, especially equity interest rates, dominate the balance sheet; and the annual operating costs, forgiveness of debt, and overnight costs dominate the costs computed for the government case. The uncertainty in operations, leading to lower than optimal processing rates (or annual plant throughput), is the most detrimental issue to achieving low unit costs. Conversely, lowering debt interest rates and the required return on investments can reduce costs for private industry.

David Shropshire; Sharon Chandler

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

NETL: News Release - NETL Opens Fuel Cell/Turbine Hybrid Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

May 20, 2004 May 20, 2004 NETL Opens Fuel Cell/Turbine Hybrid Research Facility MORGANTOWN, WV - The Hybrid Performance Facility - called the Hyper facility - is now fully operational at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This one-of-a-kind facility, developed by NETL's Office of Science and Technology, will be used to develop control strategies for the reliable operation of fuel cell/turbine hybrids. - NETL's Fuel Cell/Turbine Hybrid Facility - The Hyper facility allows assessment of dynamic control and performance issues in fuel cell/turbine hybrid systems. Combined systems of turbines and fuel cells are expected to meet power efficiency targets that will help eliminate, at competitive costs, environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for

90

Webinar: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers, originally presented on May 8, 2012.

91

Material Control and Accountability Experience at the Fuel Conditioning Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) treats spent nuclear fuel using an electrometallurgical process that separates the uranium from the fission products, sodium thermal bond, and cladding materials. Material accountancy is necessary at FCF for two reasons: 1) it provides a mechanism for detecting a potential loss of nuclear material for safeguards and security, and 2) it provides a periodic check of inventories to ensure that processes and materials are within control limits. Material Control and Accountability is also a Department of Energy (DOE) requirement (DOE Order 474.1). The FCF employs a computer based Mass Tracking (MTG) System to collect, store, retrieve, and process data on all operations that directly affect the flow of materials through the FCF. The MTG System is important for the operations of the FCF because it supports activities such as material control and accountability, criticality safety, and process modeling. To conduct material control and accountability checks and to monitor process performance, mass balances are routinely performed around the process equipment. The equipment used in FCF for pyro-processing consists of two mechanical choppers and two electro-refiners (the Mark-IV with the accompanying element chopper and Mark-V with the accompanying blanket chopper for processing driver fuel and blanket, respectively), and a cathode processor (used for processing both driver fuel and blanket) and casting furnace (mostly used for processing driver fuel). Performing mass balances requires the measurement of the masses and compositions of several process streams and equipment inventories. The masses of process streams are obtained via in-cell balances (i.e., load cells) that weigh containers entering and leaving the process equipment. Samples taken at key locations are analyzed to determine the composition of process streams and equipment inventories. In cases where equipment or containers cannot be placed on a balance, others methods (e.g., level measurements, volume calibration equations, calculated density via additive volumes) are utilized to measure the inventory mass. This paper will discuss the material control and accountability experience at the FCF after ten-plus years of processing spent nuclear fuel. A particular area of discussion is the calculated electrolyte density via additive volumes and its importance in determining the mass and composition in the FCF electro-refiners for material control and accountability of special nuclear material. (authors)

Vaden, D.; Fredrickson, G.L. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls ID 83415 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Revised Analyses of Decommissioning Reference Non-Fuel-Cycle Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of non-fuel-cycle nuclear facilities that represent a significant decommissioning task in terms of decontamination and disposal activities. This study is a re-evaluation of the original study (NUREG/CR-1754 and NUREG/CR-1754, Addendum 1). The reference facilities examined in this study are the same as in the original study and include: a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 3}H-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 14}C-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 123}I-labeled compounds; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 137}Cs sealed sources; a laboratory for the manufacture of {sup 241}Am sealed sources; and an institutional user laboratory. In addition to the laboratories, three reference sites that require some decommissioning effort were also examined. These sites are: (1) a site with a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank; (2) a site with a contaminated ground surface; and (3) a tailings pile containing uranium and thorium residues. Decommissioning of these reference facilities and sites can be accomplished using techniques and equipment that are in common industrial use. Essentially the same technology assumed in the original study is used in this study. For the reference laboratory-type facilities, the study approach is to first evaluate the decommissioning of individual components (e.g., fume hoods, glove boxes, and building surfaces) that are common to many laboratory facilities. The information obtained from analyzing the individual components of each facility are then used to determine the cost, manpower requirements and dose information for the decommissioning of the entire facility. DECON, the objective of the 1988 Rulemaking for materials facilities, is the decommissioning alternative evaluated for the reference laboratories because it results in the release of the facility for restricted or unrestricted use as soon as possible. For a facility, DECON requires that contaminated components either be: (1) decontaminated to restricted or unrestricted release levels or (2) packaged and shipped to an authorized disposal site. This study considers unrestricted release only. The new decommissioning criteria of July 1997 are too recent for this study to include a cost analysis of the restricted release option, which is now allowed under these new criteria. The costs of decommissioning facility components are generally estimated to be in the range of $140 to $27,000, depending on the type of component, the type and amount of radioactive contamination, the remediation options chosen, and the quantity of radioactive waste generated from decommissioning operations. Estimated costs for decommissioning the example laboratories range from $130,000 to $205,000, assuming aggressive low-level waste (LLW) volume reduction. If only minimal LLW volume reduction is employed, decommissioning costs range from $150,000 to $270,000 for these laboratories. On the basis of estimated decommissioning costs for facility components, the costs of decommissioning typical non-fuel-cycle laboratory facilities are estimated to range from about $25,000 for the decommissioning of a small room containing one or two fume hoods to more than $1 million for the decommissioning of an industrial plant containing several laboratories in which radiochemicals and sealed radioactive sources are prepared. For the reference sites of this study, the basic decommissioning alternatives are: (1) site stabilization followed by long-term care and (2) removal of the waste or contaminated soil to an authorized disposal site. Cost estimates made for decommissioning three reference sites range from about $130,000 for the removal of a contaminated drain line and hold-up tank to more than $23 million for the removal of a tailings pile that contains radioactive residue from ore-processing operations in which tin slag is processed for the recovery of rare metals. Total occupational radiation doses generally range from 0.00007 person-rem to 13 person-rem for

MC Bierschbach; DR Haffner; KJ Schneider; SM Short

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fuel conditioning facility zone-to-zone transfer administrative controls.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The administrative controls associated with transferring containers from one criticality hazard control zone to another in the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) are described. FCF, located at the ANL-West site near Idaho Falls, Idaho, is used to remotely process spent sodium bonded metallic fuel for disposition. The process involves nearly forty widely varying material forms and types, over fifty specific use container types, and over thirty distinct zones where work activities occur. During 1999, over five thousand transfers from one zone to another were conducted. Limits are placed on mass, material form and type, and container types for each zone. Ml material and containers are tracked using the Mass Tracking System (MTG). The MTG uses an Oracle database and numerous applications to manage the database. The database stores information specific to the process, including material composition and mass, container identification number and mass, transfer history, and the operators involved in each transfer. The process is controlled using written procedures which specify the zone, containers, and material involved in a task. Transferring a container from one zone to another is called a zone-to-zone transfer (ZZT). ZZTs consist of four distinct phases, select, request, identify, and completion.

Pope, C. L.

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

94

Independent Oversight Review of the Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility Safety Basis  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT REVIEW OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY FUEL CONDITIONING FACILITY SAFETY BASIS April 2010 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Independent Oversight i INDEPENDENT OVERSIGHT REVIEW OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY FUEL CONDITIONING FACILITY SAFETY BASIS Table of Contents Acronyms ............................................................................................................................ ii Executive Summary ........................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Introduction ..................................................................................................................1

95

Deposition and resuspension of antimony-125 and cesium-137 in the soil-plant system in the environment of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field studies were conducted during the summer of 1987 to characterize the levels of {sup 125}Sb and {sup 137}Cs releases and the distribution of the two radionuclides in vegetation and soil at distances of 0.45 and 0.75 km from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant stack. Samples were collected of sagebrush, wheatgrass, and rabbitbrush and their leaves, stems, roots, and litter were separated. Vegetation samples were dried at 70{degree}C for 48 hours, ground, and concentrations of {sup 125}Sb and {sup 137}Cs were determined by gamma spectrometry. Soil samples were collected from the surface to a depth of 18 cm (at 3 cm increments), dried at 45{degree}C, and the concentrations of {sup 125}Sb and {sup 137}Cs measured in the same manner as for vegetation samples. Results showed that the activity of {sup 125}Sb was higher in the leaves than in the stem and roots. Total activity of {sup 125}Sb (1041.77 Bq m{sup {minus}2}) was distributed as 33.4% in vegetation and 66.6% in soil. Deposition of airborne {sup 125}Sb measured through absorption by transplanted vegetation was about one Bq m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1}. The resuspension rate of {sup 125}Sb from vegetation determined by an air-flux chamber positioned over sagebrush plants was less than 61 x 10{sup {minus}11} sec{sup {minus}1}. Cesium-137 concentrations were lower in the leaves than in the stems and roots indicating slow movement through plant tissues.

Ghuman, G.S. [Savannah State Coll., GA (United States); Motes, B.G.; Fernandez, S.J.; Weesner, F.J.; McManus, G.J.; Wilcox, C.M. [Idaho Research Center, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Nuclear and Environmental Measurements Section

1989-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

96

Integrated Safety Analysis: Why It Is Appropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integrated Safety Analysis: Why It Is Appropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities Executive Summary This paper addresses why the use of an Integrated Safety Analysis ("ISA") is appropriate for fuel recycling facilities 1 which would be licensed under new regulations currently being considered by NRC. The use of the ISA for fuel facilities under Part 70 is described and compared to the use of a Probabilistic Risk Assessment ("PRA") for reactor facilities. A basis is provided for concluding that future recycling facilities - which will possess characteristics similar to today's fuel cycle facilities and distinct from reactors - can best be assessed using established qualitative or semi-quantitative ISA techniques to achieve and demonstrate safety in an effective and efficient manner.

97

Instructions for CEC-1250E-4 Biomass and Fossil Fuel Usage Report for Biomass Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instructions for CEC-1250E-4 Biomass and Fossil Fuel Usage Report for Biomass Facilities Biomass energy input basis in the upcoming calendar year? - Please check "yes" or "no." 12. Types of Biomass Fuel Used - Please report the quantity and supplier of the following types of biomass fuel used

98

Breeder Spent Fuel Handling Program multipurpose cask design basis document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Breeder Spent Fuel Handling (BSFH) Program multipurpose cask Design Basis Document defines the performance requirements essential to the development of a legal weight truck cask to transport FFTF spent fuel from reactor to a reprocessing facility and the resultant High Level Waste (HLW) to a repository. 1 ref.

Duckett, A.J.; Sorenson, K.B.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of SE CT Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location New London County, Connecticut Coordinates 41.5185189°, -72.0468164° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5185189,"lon":-72.0468164,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

100

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Permitting Hydrogen Facilities Home  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Fueling Stations Telecommunication Fuel Cell Use Hazard and Risk Analysis U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Fueling Stations Telecommunication Fuel Cell Use Hazard and Risk Analysis U.S. Department of Energy The objective of this U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Permitting Web site is to help local permitting officials deal with proposed hydrogen fueling stations, fuel cell installations for telecommunications backup power, and other hydrogen projects. Resources for local permitting officials who are looking to address project proposals include current citations for hydrogen fueling stations and a listing of setback requirements on the Alternative Fuels & Advanced Vehicle Data Center Web site. In addition, this overview of telecommunications fuel cell use and an animation that demonstrates telecommunications site layout using hydrogen fuel cells for backup power should provide helpful

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Preoperational Environmental Survey for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document represents the report for environmental sampling of soil, vegetation, litter, cryptograms, and small mammals at the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities located in 100 K and 200 East Areas in support of the preoperational environmental survey.

MITCHELL, R.M.

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

102

Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Technical paper on the development of a hydrogen reformer, vehicle refueling facility, and PEM fuel cell for Las Vegas, NV presented at the 2002 Annual Hydrogen Review held May 6-8, 2002 in Golden, CO.

103

Improving operational efficiency of fuel oil facilities used at gas-and-oil-fired power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results obtained from experimental investigations of energy consumption are described, and ways for considerably reducing it are proposed taking as an example the fuel oil facility at the 2400-MW Lukoml District ...

A. K. Vnukov; F. A. Rozanova; A. A. Bazylenko; V. L. Zhurbilo…

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels and the Resin Regeneration Facility Safety Analysis Report, Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safety Analysis Report documents the safety authorization basis for the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) and the Resin Regeneration Facility (RRF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The present mission of the RBOF and RRF is to continue in providing a facility for the safe receipt, storage, handling, and shipping of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from power and research reactors in the United States, fuel from SRS and other Department of Energy (DOE) reactors, and foreign research reactors fuel, in support of the nonproliferation policy. The RBOF and RRF provide the capability to handle, separate, and transfer wastes generated from nuclear fuel element storage. The DOE and Westinghouse Savannah River Company, the prime operating contractor, are committed to managing these activities in such a manner that the health and safety of the offsite general public, the site worker, the facility worker, and the environment are protected.

Shedrow, C.B.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

Interim Action Determination Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS), DOE/EIS-0283-S2. DOE is evaluating, among many other things, the environmental impacts of any design and operations changes to the MFFF, which is under construction at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE

106

Interim Action Determination Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS), DOE/EIS-0283-S2. DOE is evaluating, among many other things, the environmental impacts of any design and operations changes to the MFFF, which is under construction at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE

107

Effects of an oxidizing atmosphere in a spent fuel packaging facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sufficient oxidation of spent fuel can cause a cladding breach to propagate, resulting in dispersion of fuel particulates and gaseous radionuclides. The literature for spent fuel oxidation in storage and disposal programs was reviewed to evaluate the effect of an oxidizing atmosphere in a preclosure packaging facility on (1) physical condition of the fuel and (2) operations in the facility. Effects such as cladding breach propagation, cladding oxidation, rod dilation, fuel dispersal, {sup 14}C and {sup 85}Kr release, and crud release were evaluated. The impact of these effects, due to oxidation, upon a spent fuel handling facility is generally predicted to be less than the impact of similar effects due to fuel rod breached during handling in an inert-atmosphere facility. Preliminary temperature limits of 240{degree}C and 227{degree}C for a 2-week or 4-week handling period and 175{degree}C for 2-year lag storage would prevent breach propagation and fuel dispersal. Additional data that are needed to support the assumptions in this analysis or complete the database were identified.

Einziger, R.E.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Interim Safety Basis for Fuel Supply Shutdown Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ISB, in conjunction with the IOSR, provides the required basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and administrative controls for the facility until a SAR is prepared in accordance with the new requirements or the facility is shut down. It is concluded that the risks associated with tha current and anticipated mode of the facility, uranium disposition, clean up, and transition activities required for permanent closure, are within risk guidelines.

BENECKE, M.W.

2000-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

Recovery of Information from the Fast Flux Test Facility for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fast Flux Test Facility is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor to operate in the United States. Information from the design, construction, and operation of this reactor was at risk as the facilities associated with the reactor are being shut down. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is a program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to develop new fuel cycle technologies to support both current and advanced reactors. Securing and preserving the knowledge gained from operation and testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility is an important part of the Knowledge Preservation activity in this program.

Nielsen, Deborah L.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Blueprint for GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Startup Fuel Fabrication Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to identify the requirements and issues associated with design of GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Fuel Facility. The report was prepared in support of providing data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives was to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept was proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR was proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu was assumed to be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) was being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. It was estimated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and would take 3 to 5 years to construct.

S. Khericha

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

American Ref-Fuel of Hempstead Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

American Ref-Fuel of Hempstead Biomass Facility American Ref-Fuel of Hempstead Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of Hempstead Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Nassau County, New York Coordinates 40.6546145°, -73.5594128° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.6546145,"lon":-73.5594128,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

112

Nuclear-fuel-cycle risk assessment: descriptions of representative non-reactor facilities, Sections 15-19  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented under the following section headings: fuel reprocessing; spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste storage; spent fuel and high-level and transuranic waste disposal; low-level and intermediate-level waste disposal; and, transportation of radioactive materials in the nuclear fuel cycle. In each of the first three sections a description is given on the mainline process, effluent processing and waste management systems, plant layout, and alternative process schemes. Safety information and a summary are also included in each. The section on transport of radioactive materials includes information on the transportation of uranium ore, uranium ore concentrate, UF/sub 6/, PuO/sub 2/ powder, unirradiated uranium and mixed-oxide fuel assemblies, spent fuel, solidified high-level waste, contact-handled transuranic waste, remote-handled transuranic waste, and low and intermediate level nontransuranic waste. A glossary is included. (JGB)

Schneider, K.J.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

American Ref-Fuel of Niagara Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Niagara Biomass Facility Niagara Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of Niagara Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of Niagara Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Niagara County, New York Coordinates 43.3119496°, -78.7476208° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.3119496,"lon":-78.7476208,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

114

American Ref-Fuel of Delaware Valley Biomass Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of Delaware Valley Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of Delaware Valley Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Delaware County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 39.907793°, -75.3878525° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.907793,"lon":-75.3878525,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

115

American Ref-Fuel of Essex Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Essex Biomass Facility Essex Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name American Ref-Fuel of Essex Biomass Facility Facility American Ref-Fuel of Essex Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Essex County, New Jersey Coordinates 40.7947466°, -74.2648829° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7947466,"lon":-74.2648829,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

116

Fuel Cells for Backup Power in Telecommunications Facilities (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Telecommunications providers rely on backup power to maintain a constant power supply, to prevent power outages, and to ensure the operability of cell towers, equipment, and networks. The backup power supply that best meets these objectives is fuel cell technology.

117

Fuel Cells for Backup Power in Telecommunications Facilities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Telecommunications providers rely on backup power to maintain a constant power supply, to prevent power outages, and to ensure the operability of cell towers, equipment, and networks. The backup power supply that best meets these objectives is fuel cell technology.

Not Available

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Summary of Off-Normal Events in US Fuel Cycle Facilities for AFCI Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a collection and review of system operation and failure experiences for facilities comprising the fission reactor fuel cycle, with the exception of reactor operations. This report includes mines, mills, conversion plants, enrichment plants, fuel fabrication plants, transportation of fuel materials between these centers, and waste storage facilities. Some of the facilities discussed are no longer operating; others continue to produce fuel for the commercial fission power plant industry. Some of the facilities discussed have been part of the military’s nuclear effort; these are included when the processes used are similar to those used for commercial nuclear power. When reading compilations of incidents and accidents, after repeated entries it is natural to form an opinion that there exists nothing but accidents. For this reason, production or throughput values are described when available. These adverse operating experiences are compiled to support the design and decisions needed for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The AFCI is to weigh options for a new fission reactor fuel cycle that is efficient, safe, and productive for US energy security.

L. C. Cadwallader; S. J. Piet; S. O. Sheetz; D. H. McGuire; W. B. Boore

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Criticality experiments with fast flux test facility fuel pins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A United States Department of Energy program was initiated during the early seventies at the Hanford Critical Mass Laboratory to obtain experimental criticality data in support of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The criticality experiments program was to provide basic physics data for clean well defined conditions expected to be encountered in the handling of plutonium-uranium fuel mixtures outside reactors. One task of this criticality experiments program was concerned with obtaining data on PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} fuel rods containing 20--30 wt % plutonium. To obtain this data a series of experiments were performed over a period of about twelve years. The experimental data obtained during this time are summarized and the associated experimental assemblies are described. 8 refs., 7 figs.

Bierman, S.R.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Alternative and Renewable fuels and Vehicle Technology Program Subject Area: Biofuels production Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alternative and Renewable fuels and Vehicle Technology Program Subject Area: Biofuels production: Commercial Facilities · Applicant's Legal Name: Yokayo Biofuels, Inc. · Name of project: A Catalyst for Success · Project Description: Yokayo Biofuels, an industry veteran with over 10 years experience

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

MORTALITY AMONG WORKERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NUCLEAR FUELS PRODUCTION FACILITY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MORTALITY AMONG WORKERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NUCLEAR FUELS MORTALITY AMONG WORKERS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NUCLEAR FUELS PRODUCTION FACILITY Donna L. Cragle and Janice P. Watkins, Center for Epidemiologic Research; Kathryn Robertson-DeMers, Bechtel Hanford, Inc. Donna Cragle, Oak Ridge Associated Universities, P.O. Box 117, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 Key Words: mortality study, radiation exposure, leukemia, occupational cohort, trend test INTRODUCTION Since 1952 the Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, South Carolina, has operated as a Department of Energy (DOE) production facility for nuclear fuels and other materials. A previous study 1 through 1980 of 9,860 white males employed at least 90 consecutive days at the SRS between 1952 and 1974 found an increased number of leukemia deaths among

122

An electronic procedure system for WSRC fuel material facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of naval fuel, like many production processes within the Westinghouse complex, depends very heavily on strict procedure compliance. Thus operators need to have quick access to procedures and they need to have some assurance that they are using the most current revision. This is often both difficult and time consuming on a production floor. In order to resolve some of these problems two members of the Naval Fuel Product Team are currently developing an electronic procedure system. It is the intent of the system to have workstations on the production floor. These workstations will be networked to a centralized computer used exclusively as a file server for holding the current revision of each procedure. By simply clicking a mouse on the appropriate icon, a user will be able to access any procedure required in his portion of the process. In this user friendly environment the operator can either read the procedure on the workstation screen or print a copy of the procedure at a nearby printer. Since it is often the case that a graphic is used in one procedure is also used in other procedures, we plan to store individual graphics separately from a given procedure. In this way when a graphic changes, only one correction needs to be made in order for that graphic to be automatically updated in every procedure in which it is used. In the future we plan to expand the system so that the operator will be able to enter procedure data into the procedure. We have plans for this to be a platform for both the Distributive Control and Nuclear Accountability Systems. Farther down the road we envision operating in a real-time environment were the workstation would be able to read data directly from equipment in the process. 14 figs.

Derr, S.M.; Sloan, C.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Sodium Loop Safety Facility W-2 experiment fuel pin rupture detection system. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) W-2 experiment is to characterize the combined effects of a preconditioned full-length fuel column and slow transient overpower (TOP) conditions on breeder reactor (BR) fuel pin cladding failures. The W-2 experiment will meet this objective by providing data in two technological areas: (1) time and location of cladding failure, and (2) early post-failure test fuel behavior. The test involves a seven pin, prototypic full-length fast test reactor (FTR) fuel pin bundle which will be subjected to a simulated unprotected 5 cents/s reactivity transient overpower event. The outer six pins will provide the necessary prototypic thermal-hydraulic environment for the center pin.

Hoffman, M.A.; Kirchner, T.L.; Meyers, S.C.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

U.S. Army Energy and Environmental Requirements and Goals: Opportunities for Fuel Cells and Hydrogen- Facility Locations and Hydrogen Storage/Delivery Logistics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Overview of DoD Energy Use, Federal Facilities Goals and Requirements, Federal Vehicles and Fuel Goals, Opportunities & Conclusions

125

Coprocessed nuclear fuels containing (U, Pu) values as oxides, carbides or carbonitrides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method for direct coprocessing of nuclear fuels derived from a product stream of fuels reprocessing facility containing uranium, plutonium, and fission product values comprising nitrate stabilization of said stream vacuum concentration to remove water and nitrates, neutralization to form an acid deficient feed solution for the internal gelation mode of sol-gel technology, green spherule formation, recovery and treatment for loading into a fuel element by vibra packed or pellet formation technologies.

Lloyd, M.H.

1981-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

126

W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility experiment centerline fuel thermocouple performance. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The W-1 Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) experiment is the fifth in a series of experiments sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the National Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) Safety Assurance Program. The experiments are being conducted under the direction of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). The irradiation phase of the W-1 SLSF experiment was conducted between May 27 and July 20, 1979, and terminated with incipient fuel pin cladding failure during the final boiling transient. Experimental hardware and facility performed as designed, allowing completion of all planned tests and test objectives. This paper focuses on high temperature in-fuel thermocouples and discusses their development, fabrication, and performance in the W-1 experiment.

Meyers, S.C.; Henderson, J.M.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Initial concepts on energetics and mass releases during nonnuclear explosive events in fuel cycle facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-nuclear explosions are one of the initiating events (accidents) considered in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission study of formal methods for estimating the airborne release of radionuclides from fuel cycle facilities. Methods currently available to estimate the energetics and mass airborne release from the four types of non-nuclear explosive events (fast and slow physical explosions and fast and slow chemical explosions) are reviewed. The likelihood that fast physical explosions will occur in fuel cycle facilities appears to be remote and this type of explosion is not considered. Methods to estimate the consequences of slow physical and fast chemical explosions are available. Methods to estimate the consequences of slow chemical explosions are less well defined.

Halverson, M.A.; Mishima, J.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Materials and Fuels Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Fuels Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers OCTOBER 2011 Fuel Cell Technologies Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2 October 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily

130

Accident safety analysis for 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the accident safety analysis is to identify and analyze a range of credible events, their cause and consequences, and to provide technical justification for the conclusion that uranium billets, fuel assemblies, uranium scrap, and chips and fines drums can be safely stored in the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility, the contaminated equipment, High-Efficiency Air Particulate filters, ductwork, stacks, sewers and sumps can be cleaned (decontaminated) and/or removed, the new concretion process in the 304 Building will be able to operate, without undue risk to the public, employees, or the environment, and limited fuel handling and packaging associated with removal of stored uranium is acceptable.

Johnson, D.J.; Brehm, J.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Radioactive Waste Management at the New Conversion Facility of 'TVEL'{sup R} Fuel Company - 13474  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project on the new conversion facility construction is being implemented by Joint Stock Company (JSC) 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises' (SGChE) within TVEL{sup R} Fuel Company. The objective is to construct the up-to-date facility ensuring the industrial and environmental safety with the reduced impact on the community and environment in compliance with the Russian new regulatory framework on radioactive waste (RW) management. The history of the SGChE development, as well as the concepts and approaches to RW management implemented by now are shown. The SGChE future image is outlined, together with its objectives and concept on RW management in compliance with the new act 'On radioactive waste management' adopted in Russia in 2011. Possible areas of cooperation with international companies are discussed in the field of RW management with the purpose of deploying the best Russian and world practices on RW management at the new conversion facility. (authors)

Indyk, S.I.; Volodenko, A.V. [JSC 'TVEL', Russia, Moscow, 49 Kashirskoye Shosse, 115409 (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'TVEL', Russia, Moscow, 49 Kashirskoye Shosse, 115409 (Russian Federation); Tvilenev, K.A.; Tinin, V.V.; Fateeva, E.V. [JSC 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises', Russia, Seversk, 1 Kurchatov Street, 636000 (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'Siberian Group of Chemical Enterprises', Russia, Seversk, 1 Kurchatov Street, 636000 (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxford ; New York ; Oxford University Press. Fuel- Trac,Spent Fuel / Reprocessing, in Nuclear Industry Statusto Burn Non-Fissile Fuels. 2008. GA. Energy Multiplier

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The potential utilization of nuclear hydrogen for synthetic fuels production at a coal–to–liquid facility / Steven Chiuta.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The production of synthetic fuels (synfuels) in coal–to–liquids (CTL) facilities has contributed to global warming due to the huge CO2 emissions of the process. This… (more)

Chiuta, Steven

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Drying studies for corroded DOE aluminum plate fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) currently stores a wide variety of spent nuclear fuel. The fuel was originally intended to be stored underwater for a short period of thermal cooling, then removed and reprocessed. However, it has been stored underwater for much longer thank originally anticipated. During this time dust and airborne desert soil have entered the oldest INEL pool, accumulating on the fuel. Also, the aluminum fuel cladding has corroded compromising the exposed surfaces of the fuel. Plans are now underway to move some the the more vulnerable aluminum plate type fuels into dry storage in an existing vented and filtered fuel storage facility. In preparation for dry storage of the fuel a drying and canning station is being built at the INEL. The two primary objectives of this facility are to determine the influence of corrosion products on the drying process and to establish temperature distribution inside the canister during heating.

Lords, R.E.; Windes, W.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Crepeau, J.C.; Sidwell, R.W. [Idaho Univ., Idaho Falls, ID (United States) Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Spent Fuel Background Report Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an overview of current spent nuclear fuel management in the DOE complex. Sources of information include published literature, internal DOE documents, interviews with site personnel, and information provided by individual sites. Much of the specific information on facilities and fuels was provided by the DOE sites in response to the questionnaire for data for spent fuels and facilities data bases. This information is as accurate as is currently available, but is subject to revision pending results of further data calls. Spent fuel is broadly classified into three categories: (a) production fuels, (b) special fuels, and (c) naval fuels. Production fuels, comprising about 80% of the total inventory, are those used at Hanford and Savannah River to produce nuclear materials for defense. Special fuels are those used in a wide variety of research, development, and testing activities. Special fuels include fuel from DOE and commercial reactors used in research activities at DOE sites. Naval fuels are those developed and used for nuclear-powered naval vessels and for related research and development. Given the recent DOE decision to curtail reprocessing, the topic of main concern in the management of spent fuel is its storage. Of the DOE sites that have spent nuclear fuel, the vast majority is located at three sites-Hanford, INEL, and Savannah River. Other sites with spent fuel include Oak Ridge, West Valley, Brookhaven, Argonne, Los Alamos, and Sandia. B&W NESI Lynchburg Technology Center and General Atomics are commercial facilities with DOE fuel. DOE may also receive fuel from foreign research reactors, university reactors, and other commercial and government research reactors. Most DOE spent fuel is stored in water-filled pools at the reactor facilities. Currently an engineering study is being performed to determine the feasibility of using dry storage for DOE-owned spent fuel currently stored at various facilities. Delays in opening the deep geologic repository and the decision to phase out reprocessing of production fuels are extending the need for interim storage. The report describes the basic storage conditions and the general SNF inventory at individual DOE facilities.

Abbott, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Experience With Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel at U.S. DOE Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes some of the challenges encountered and solutions implemented to ensure safe storage and handling of damaged spent nuclear fuels (SNF). It includes a brief summary of some SNF storage environments and resulting SNF degradation, experience with handling and repackaging significantly degraded SNFs, and the associated lessons learned. This work provides useful insight and resolutions to many engineering challenges facing SNF handling and storage facilities. The context of this report is taken from a report produced at Idaho National Laboratory and further detailed information, such as equipment design and usage, can be found in the appendices to that report. (authors)

Carlsen, Brett; Fillmore, Denzel; Woolstenhulme, Eric [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); McCormack, Roger L. [Fluor Hanford Site, Richland, Wash. (United States); Sindelar, Robert; Spieker, Timothy [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project: Feasibility of BNFP Site as MOX Fuel Supply Facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation was made of the technical feasibility, cost, and schedule for converting the existing unused Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Facility (BNFP) into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) CANDU fuel fabrication plant for disposition of excess weapons plutonium. This MOX fuel would be transported to Ontario where it would generate electricity in the Bruce CANDU reactors. Because CANDU MOX fuel operates at lower thermal load than natural uranium fuel, the MOX program can be licensed by AECB within 4.5 years, and actual Pu disposition in the Bruce reactors can begin in 2001. Ontario Hydro will have to be involved in the entire program. Cost is compared between BNFP and FMEF at Hanford for converting to a CANDU MOX facility.

NONE

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Fully integrated safeguards and security for reprocessing plant monitoring.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel reprocessing plants contain a wealth of plant monitoring data including material measurements, process monitoring, administrative procedures, and physical protection elements. Future facilities are moving in the direction of highly-integrated plant monitoring systems that make efficient use of the plant data to improve monitoring and reduce costs. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM) is an analysis tool that is used for modeling advanced monitoring systems and to determine system response under diversion scenarios. This report both describes the architecture for such a future monitoring system and present results under various diversion scenarios. Improvements made in the past year include the development of statistical tests for detecting material loss, the integration of material balance alarms to improve physical protection, and the integration of administrative procedures. The SSPM has been used to demonstrate how advanced instrumentation (as developed in the Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies campaign) can benefit the overall safeguards system as well as how all instrumentation is tied into the physical protection system. This concept has the potential to greatly improve the probability of detection for both abrupt and protracted diversion of nuclear material.

Duran, Felicia Angelica; Ward, Rebecca; Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Middleton, Bobby D.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Spent fuel pyroprocessing demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major element of the shutdown of the US liquid metal reactor development program is managing the sodium-bonded spent metallic fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II to meet US environmental laws. Argonne National Laboratory has refurbished and equipped an existing hot cell facility for treating the spent fuel by a high-temperature electrochemical process commonly called pyroprocessing. Four products will be produced for storage and disposal. Two high-level waste forms will be produced and qualified for disposal of the fission and activation products. Uranium and transuranium alloys will be produced for storage pending a decision by the US Department of Energy on the fate of its plutonium and enriched uranium. Together these activities will demonstrate a unique electrochemical treatment technology for spent nuclear fuel. This technology potentially has significant economic and technical advantages over either conventional reprocessing or direct disposal as a high-level waste option.

McFarlane, L.F.; Lineberry, M.J.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

HFIR spent fuel management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems' Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel to Savannah River Site (SRS) for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up in the February 1994 to February 1995 time frame. If a management altemative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented before the HFIR pools are full, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study investigated several alternatives for managing the HFIR spent fuel, attempting to identify options that could be implemented before the HFIR pools are full. The options investigated were: installing a dedicated dry cask storage facility at ORNL, increasing HFIR pool storage capacity by clearing the HFIR pools of debris and either close-packing or stacking the spent fuel elements, storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, and shipping the spent fuel offsite for reprocessing or storage elsewhere.

Begovich, J.M.; Green, V.M.; Shappert, L.B.; Lotts, A.L.

1992-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

HFIR spent fuel management alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Martin Marietta Energy Systems` Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been unable to ship its spent fuel to Savannah River Site (SRS) for reprocessing since 1985. The HFIR storage pools are expected to fill up in the February 1994 to February 1995 time frame. If a management altemative to existing HFIR pool storage is not identified and implemented before the HFIR pools are full, the HFIR will be forced to shut down. This study investigated several alternatives for managing the HFIR spent fuel, attempting to identify options that could be implemented before the HFIR pools are full. The options investigated were: installing a dedicated dry cask storage facility at ORNL, increasing HFIR pool storage capacity by clearing the HFIR pools of debris and either close-packing or stacking the spent fuel elements, storing the spent fuel at another ORNL pool, storing the spent fuel in one or more hot cells at ORNL, and shipping the spent fuel offsite for reprocessing or storage elsewhere.

Begovich, J.M.; Green, V.M.; Shappert, L.B.; Lotts, A.L.

1992-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

The Use of Staff Augmentation Subcontracts at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility, IG-0887  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Use of Staff Augmentation The Use of Staff Augmentation Subcontracts at National Nuclear Security Administration's Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility DOE/IG-0887 May 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 May 15, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Use of Staff Augmentation Subcontracts at the National Nuclear Security Administration's Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility" BACKGROUND Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC (MOX Services) is responsible for the design and construction of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nearly $5 billion Mixed

143

Plutonium and Reprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear...Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain (YMP-0106...not committed funding to build...Repository for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear...Radioactive Waste at Yucca Mountain (YMP-0106, Yucca Mountain Project, North...

Frank N. von Hippel

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

144

Assessment of External Hazards at Radioactive Waste and Used Fuel Management Facilities - 13505  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the key lessons from the Fukushima accident is the importance of having a comprehensive identification and evaluation of risks posed by external events to nuclear facilities. While the primary focus has been on nuclear power plants, the Canadian nuclear industry has also been updating hazard assessments for radioactive waste and used fuel management facilities to ensure that lessons learnt from Fukushima are addressed. External events are events that originate either physically outside the nuclear site or outside its control. They include natural events, such as high winds, lightning, earthquakes or flood due to extreme rainfall. The approaches that have been applied to the identification and assessment of external hazards in Canada are presented and analyzed. Specific aspects and considerations concerning hazards posed to radioactive waste and used fuel management operations are identified. Relevant hazard identification techniques are described, which draw upon available regulatory guidance and standard assessment techniques such as Hazard and Operability Studies (HAZOPs) and 'What-if' analysis. Consideration is given to ensuring that hazard combinations (for example: high winds and flooding due to rainfall) are properly taken into account. Approaches that can be used to screen out external hazards, through a combination of frequency and impact assessments, are summarized. For those hazards that cannot be screened out, a brief overview of methods that can be used to conduct more detailed hazard assessments is also provided. The lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident have had a significant impact on specific aspects of the approaches used to hazard assessment for waste management. Practical examples of the effect of these impacts are provided. (authors)

Gerchikov, Mark; Schneider, Glenn; Khan, Badi; Alderson, Elizabeth [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)] [AMEC NSS, 393 University Ave., Toronto, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Results of initial operation of the Jupiter Oxygen Corporation oxy-fuel 15 MWth burner test facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jupiter Oxygen Corporation (JOC), in cooperation with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), constructed a 15 MWth oxy-fuel burner test facility with Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPRTM) to test high flame temperature oxy-fuel combustion and advanced carbon capture. Combustion protocols include baseline air firing with natural gas, oxygen and natural gas firing with and without flue gas recirculation, and oxygen and pulverized coal firing with flue gas recirculation. Testing focuses on characterizing burner performance, determining heat transfer characteristics, optimizing CO2 capture, and maximizing heat recovery, with an emphasis on data traceability to address retrofit of existing boilers by directly transforming burner systems to oxy-fuel firing.

Thomas Ochs, Danylo Oryshchyn, Rigel Woodside, Cathy Summers, Brian Patrick, Dietrich Gross, Mark Schoenfield, Thomas Weber and Dan O'Brien

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

147

Relative age-specific radiation dose commitment factors for major radionuclides released from nuclear fuel facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the licensing process for nuclear fuel facilities, committed dose equivalents must be calculated for potential exposures to people in the area around these facilities. These committed dose equivalents are usually calculated from tabulated dose-conversion factors that convert the quantity of radioactive material potentially taken in by individuals through ingestion or inhalation. For calculating committed dose equivalents to children, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission has in the past appealed to age-specific dose-conversion factors listed in NUREG-0172 (1977), which is based on a computational methodology found in ICRP Publication 2 (1959). Since the publication of NUREG-0172 new models and new concepts of risk have been provided in ICRP Publications 26 and 30 (1977, 1979). These documents provide a detailed methodology for calculating dose-conversion factors for the various radionuclides for an adult reference man. In this report are tabulated age-specific dose-conversion factors, given as multiples of the adult values, for inhalation or ingestion of each of the following isotopes: U-234, U-235, U-238, Th-228, Th-230, Th-232, Ra-226, Ra-228, Pb-210, or Po-210. Our methodology is consistent as far as practical with that of ICRP Publications 26 and 30, but we have modified and extended the ICRP methodology as necessary to include age dependence and to include metabolic and dosimetric information that has been developed since the issuance of these ICRP documents.

Cristy, M.; Leggett, R.W.; Dunning, D.E. Jr.; Eckerman, K.F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Technology development program for Idaho Chemical Processing Plant spent fuel and waste management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Acidic high-level radioactive waste (HLW) resulting from fuel reprocessing at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been solidified to a calcine since 1963 and stored in stainless steel bins enclosed by concrete vaults. Several different types of unprocessed irradiated DOE-owned fuels are also in storage at the ICPP. In April, 1992, DOE announced that spent fuel would no longer be reprocessed to recover enriched uranium and called for a shutdown of the reprocessing facilities at the ICPP. A new Spent Fuel and HLW Technology Development program was subsequently initiated to develop technologies for immobilizing ICPP spent fuels and HLW for disposal, in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. The Program elements include Systems Analysis, Graphite Fuel Disposal, Other Spent Fuel Disposal, Sodium-Bearing Liquid Waste Processing, Calcine Immobilization, and Metal Recycle/Waste Minimization. This paper presents an overview of the ICPP radioactive wastes and current spent fuels, and describes the Spent Fuel and HLW Technology program in more detail.

Ermold, L.F.; Knecht, D.A.; Hogg, G.W.; Olson, A.L.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Can the Administration Sell Reprocessing!  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the Unit-ed States has been limited to a plant at West Valley, New York, which closed down in 1972 because of contamination...shutdown in the early 1970's of the reprocessing plant in West Valley and "give the industry a further black eye." While...

JOHN WALSH

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Review of K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operatioons, August 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operations May 2011 August 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

151

Review of K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operatioons, August 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operations May 2011 August 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy i Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ................................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 2

152

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

providers to install biofuel fueling facilities. Fueling facilities include storage tanks and fuel pumps dedicated to dispensing E85 and biodiesel blends of 20% (B20). TDOT...

153

Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes Final  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes Final Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes Final Milestone, Begins Startup Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes Final Milestone, Begins Startup April 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Erik Simpson, 208-390-9464 Danielle Miller, 208-526-5709 The Idaho site today initiated the controlled, phased startup of a new waste treatment facility scheduled to begin treating 900,000 gallons of radioactive liquid waste stored in underground tanks at a former Cold War spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility next month. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) operational readiness review team (made up of Subject Matter Experts across the country) in early April identified a dozen issues for the cleanup contractor CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) to

154

Letter from Nuclear Energy Institute regarding Integrated Safety Analysis: Why it is Appropropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

082 l F: 202.533.0166 l rxm@nei.org l www.nei.org 082 l F: 202.533.0166 l rxm@nei.org l www.nei.org Rod McCullum DIRECTOR FUEL CYCLE PROJECTS NUCLEAR GENERATION DIVISION September 10, 2010 Ms. Catherine Haney Director Office of Nuclear Material Safety and Safeguards U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Washington, DC 20555-0001 Subject: Integrated Safety Analysis: Why It Is Appropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities Project Number: 689 Dear Ms. Haney: Enclosed for your review is a Nuclear Energy Institute white paper on the use of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) at U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-licensed recycling facilities. This paper is intended as an information source for the NRC and should serve as a foundation for discussion with industry representatives on the issue.

155

Hazard Evaluation for Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Sludge at the Solid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) storage basin clean-up project, sludge that has accumulated in the K Basins due to corrosion of damaged irradiated N Reactor will be loaded into containers and placed in interim storage. The Hanford Site Treatment Complex (T Plant) has been identified as the location where the sludge will be stored until final disposition of the material occurs. Long term storage of sludge from the K Basin fuel storage facilities requires identification and analysis of potential accidents involving sludge storage in T Plant. This report is prepared as the initial step in the safety assurance process described in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports and HNF-PRO-704, Hazards and Accident Analysis Process. This report documents the evaluation of potential hazards and off-normal events associated with sludge storage activities. This information will be used in subsequent safety analyses, design, and operations procedure development to ensure safe storage. The hazards evaluation for the storage of SNF sludge in T-Plant used the Hazards and Operability Analysis (HazOp) method. The hazard evaluation identified 42 potential hazardous conditions. No hazardous conditions involving hazardous/toxic chemical concerns were identified. Of the 42 items identified in the HazOp study, eight were determined to have potential for onsite worker consequences. No items with potential offsite consequences were identified in the HazOp study. Hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker or offsite consequences are candidates for quantitative consequence analysis. The hazardous conditions with potential onsite worker consequences were grouped into two event categories, Container failure due to overpressure - internal to T Plant, and Spill of multiple containers. The two event categories will be developed into accident scenarios that will be quantitatively analyzed to determine release consequences. A third category, Container failure due to overpressure--external to T Plant, was included for completeness but is not within the scope of the hazards evaluation. Container failures external to T Plant will be addressed as part of the transportation analysis. This document describes the HazOp analysis performed for the activities associated with the storage of SNF sludge in the T Plant.

SCHULTZ, M.V.

2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

156

Use of curium spontaneous fission neutrons for safeguardability of remotely-handled nuclear facilities: Fuel fabrication in pyroprocessing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Advanced nuclear reactor systems (NESs) will utilize remotely-handled facilities in which batch-type processing will occur in hot cells. There are no current formalized criteria for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards for these systems. This creates new challenges to develop methodologies for demonstrating the safeguardability of these facilities. A High Reliability Safeguards (HRS) approach therefore has been proposed to enhance intrinsic proliferation resistance by establishing an envelope of adaptable functional components as part of a facility design strategy. Additionally, system assessment can be modeled concurrently with safety and physical security by a risk-informed approach. The HRS approach is currently applied to a commercial pyroprocessing facility as an example system. A scoping study is presented as the first in a series of quantitative modeling efforts to extend the HRS approach. These efforts currently focus on investigating the magnitude of neutron fluxes due to spontaneous fission of curium for commercial batch sizes and held up materials for important processes in the system. Here, the fuel fabrication process is studied. The intent of these initial studies is to learn how the intrinsic properties of materials in the pyroprocessing system will affect facility design and safeguards. The model presented in this paper is intended to be adaptable to more practical and complex scenarios in order to evaluate the safeguardability of remotely-handled nuclear facilities.

R.A. Borrelli

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This step-by-step manual guides readers through the process of implementing a fuel cell stationary power project. The guide outlines the basics of fuel cell technology and describes how fuel cell projects can meet on-site energy service needs as well as support strategic agency objectives and sustainability requirements. This guide will help agencies decide whether a fuel cell project may be feasible and economically viable at their site. The guide then presents a four-part process for implementing a fuel cell project.

158

Transformative monitoring approaches for reprocessing.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The future of reprocessing in the United States is strongly driven by plant economics. With increasing safeguards, security, and safety requirements, future plant monitoring systems must be able to demonstrate more efficient operations while improving the current state of the art. The goal of this work was to design and examine the incorporation of advanced plant monitoring technologies into safeguards systems with attention to the burden on the operator. The technologies examined include micro-fluidic sampling for more rapid analytical measurements and spectroscopy-based techniques for on-line process monitoring. The Separations and Safeguards Performance Model was used to design the layout and test the effect of adding these technologies to reprocessing. The results here show that both technologies fill key gaps in existing materials accountability that provide detection of diversion events that may not be detected in a timely manner in existing plants. The plant architecture and results under diversion scenarios are described. As a tangent to this work, both the AMUSE and SEPHIS solvent extraction codes were examined for integration in the model to improve the reality of diversion scenarios. The AMUSE integration was found to be the most successful and provided useful results. The SEPHIS integration is still a work in progress and may provide an alternative option.

Cipiti, Benjamin B.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm Facility |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm Facility Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm Facility Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Tank Farm Facility The Secretary of Energy signed Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 basis of determination for the disposal of grouted residual waste in the tank systems at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Tank Farm Facility (TFF) on November 19, 2006. Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 authorizes the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, to reclassify certain waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from high-level waste to low-level waste if it meets the criteria set

160

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Derived Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Agriculturally-Derived Fuel Production Facility Loan Guarantees on AddThis.com...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fresh and Spent Nuclear Fuel Repatriation from the IRT-2000 Research Reactor Facility, Sofia, Bulgaria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IRT 2000 research reactor, operated by the Bulgarian Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped all of their Russian-origin nuclear fuel from the Republic of Bulgaria to the Russian Federation beginning in 2003 and completing in 2008. These fresh and spent fuel shipments removed all highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Bulgaria. The fresh fuel was shipped by air in December 2003 using trucks and a commercial cargo aircraft. One combined spent fuel shipment of HEU and low enriched uranium (LEU) was completed in July 2008 using high capacity VPVR/M casks transported by truck, barge, and rail. The HEU shipments were assisted by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) and the LEU spent fuel shipment was funded by Bulgaria. This report describes the work, approvals, organizations, equipment, and agreements required to complete these shipments and concludes with several major lessons learned.

K. J. Allen; T. G. Apostolov; I. S. Dimitrov

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Manufacturing Facility Opened Using EERE-Supported Low-Cost Fuel...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and institutional barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cells. Addthis Related Articles Nebraska: Company More than Doubles Annual Sales and...

163

Evolution of isotopic composition of reprocessed uranium during the multiple recycling in light water reactors with natural uranium feed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complex approach based on the consistent modeling of neutron-physics processes and processes of cascade separation of isotopes is applied for analyzing physical problems of the multiple usage of reprocessed uranium in the fuel cycle of light water reactors. A number of scenarios of multiple recycling of reprocessed uranium in light water reactors are considered. In the process, an excess absorption of neutrons by the {sup 236}U isotope is compensated by re-enrichment in the {sup 235}U isotope. Specific consumptions of natural uranium for re-enrichment of the reprocessed uranium depending on the content of the {sup 232}U isotope are obtained.

Smirnov, A. Yu., E-mail: a.y.smirnoff@rambler.ru; Sulaberidze, G. A. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation); Alekseev, P. N.; Dudnikov, A. A.; Nevinitsa, V. A., E-mail: neva@dhtp.kiae.ru; Proselkov, V. N.; Chibinyaev, A. V. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

A computer code to estimate accidental fire and radioactive airborne releases in nuclear fuel cycle facilities: User's manual for FIRIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual describes the technical bases and use of the computer code FIRIN. This code was developed to estimate the source term release of smoke and radioactive particles from potential fires in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. FIRIN is a product of a broader study, Fuel Cycle Accident Analysis, which Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The technical bases of FIRIN consist of a nonradioactive fire source term model, compartment effects modeling, and radioactive source term models. These three elements interact with each other in the code affecting the course of the fire. This report also serves as a complete FIRIN user's manual. Included are the FIRIN code description with methods/algorithms of calculation and subroutines, code operating instructions with input requirements, and output descriptions. 40 refs., 5 figs., 31 tabs.

Chan, M.K.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Owczarski, P.C.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Distributed mobile conversion facilities using either fast pyrolysis or torrefaction processes can be used to convert forest residues to more energy dense substances (bio-oil, bio-slurry… (more)

Brown, Duncan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Cleaning residual NaK in the fast flux test facility fuel storage cooling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, is a liquid metal-cooled test reactor. The FFTF was constructed to support the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The bulk of the alkali metal (sodium and NaK) has been drained and will be stored onsite prior to final disposition. Residual NaK needed to be removed from the pipes, pumps, heat exchangers, tanks, and vessels in the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) cooling system. The cooling system was drained in 2004 leaving residual NaK in the pipes and equipment. The estimated residual NaK volume was 76 liters in the storage tank, 1.9 liters in the expansion tank, and 19-39 liters in the heat transfer loop. The residual NaK volume in the remainder of the system was expected to be very small, consisting of films, droplets, and very small pools. The NaK in the FSF Cooling System was not radiologically contaminated. The portions of the cooling system to be cleaned were divided into four groups: 1. The storage tank, filter, pump, and associated piping; 2. The heat exchanger, expansion tank, and associated piping; 3. Argon supply piping; 4. In-vessel heat transfer loop. The cleaning was contracted to Creative Engineers, Inc. (CEI) and they used their superheated steam process to clean the cooling system. It has been concluded that during the modification activities (prior to CEI coming onsite) to prepare the NaK Cooling System for cleaning, tank T-914 was pressurized relative to the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and NaK was pushed from the tank back into the Cooler and that on November 6, 2005, when the gas purge through the In-Vessel NaK Cooler was increased from 141.6 slm to 283.2 slm, NaK was forced from the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and it contacted water in the vent line and/or scrubber. The gases from the reaction then traveled back through the vent line coating the internal surface of the vent line with NaK and NaK reaction products. The hot gases also exited the scrubber through the stack and due to the temperature of the gas, the hydrogen auto ignited when it mixed with the oxygen in the air. There was no damage to equipment, no injuries, and no significant release of hazardous material. Even though the FSF Cooling System is the only system at FFTF that contains residual NaK, there are lessons to be learned from this event that can be applied to future residual sodium removal activities. The lessons learned are: - Before cleaning equipment containing residual alkali metal the volume of alkali metal in the equipment should be minimized to the extent practical. As much as possible, reconfirm the amount and location of the alkali metal immediately prior to cleaning, especially if additional evolutions have been performed or significant time has passed. This is especially true for small diameter pipe (<20.3 centimeters diameter) that is being cleaned in place since gas flow is more likely to move the alkali metal. Potential confirmation methods could include visual inspection (difficult in all-metal systems), nondestructive examination (e.g., ultrasonic measurements) and repeating previous evolutions used to drain the system. Also, expect to find alkali metal in places it would not reasonably be expected to be. - Staff with an intimate knowledge of the plant equipment and the bulk alkali metal draining activities is critical to being able to confirm the amount and locations of the alkali metal residuals and to safely clean the residuals. - Minimize the potential for movement of alkali metal during cleaning or limit the distance and locations into which alkali metal can move. - Recognize that when working with alkali metal reactions, occasional pops and bangs are to be anticipated. - Pre-plan emergency responses to unplanned events to assure responses planned for an operating reactor are appropriate for the deactivation phase.

Burke, T.M.; Church, W.R. [Fluor Hanford, PO Box 1000, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Hodgson, K.M. [Fluor Government Group, PO Box 1050, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Waste treatment facility passes federal inspection, completes final  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

23, 2012 23, 2012 Media Contact: Danielle Miller, 208-526-5709 Erik Simpson, 208-390-9464 Waste treatment facility passes federal inspection, completes final milestone, begins startup The Idaho site today initiated the controlled, phased startup of a new waste treatment facility scheduled to begin treating 900,000 gallons of radioactive liquid waste stored in underground tanks at a former Cold War spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility next month. An exterior view of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) operational readiness review team (made up of Subject Matter Experts across the country) in early April identified a dozen issues for the cleanup contractor CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) to resolve before the 53,000-square-foot Integrated Waste Treatment Unit

168

A demonstration of variance and covariance calculations using MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Good decision-making in materials accounting requires a valid calculation of control limits and detection sensitivity for facilities handling special nuclear materials (SNM). A difficult aspect of this calculation is determining the appropriate variance and covariance values for the terms in the materials balance (MB) equation. Computer software such as MAVARIC (Materials Accounting VARIance Calculator) and PROFF (PROcessing and Fuel Facilities calculator) can efficiently select and combine variance terms. These programs determine the variance and covariance of an MB equation by first obtaining relations for the variance and covariance of each term in the MB equation through propagating instrument errors and then substituting the measured quantities and their uncertainties into these relations. MAVARIC is a custom spreadsheet used with the second release of LOTUS 1-2-3.** PROFF is a stand-alone menu-driven program requiring no commercial software. Programs such as MAVARIC and PROFF facilitate the complex calculations required to determine the detection sensitivity of an SNM facility. These programs can also be used to analyze materials accounting systems.

Barlich, G.L.; Nasseri, S.S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A facility effluent monitoring plan is required by the US. Department of Energy in DOE Order 5400.1 for any operations that involve hazardous materials and radioactive substances that could impact employee or public safety or the environment. This document was prepared using the specific guidelines identified in Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC)-EP-0438-1, ''A Guide for Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans'', and assesses effluent monitoring systems and evaluates whether they are adequate to ensure the public health and safety as specified in applicable federal, state, and local requirements. This facility effluent monitoring plan is the third revision to the original annual report. This document is reviewed annually even if there are no operational changes, and it is updated as necessary.

HUNACEK, G.S.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility vacuum and purge system design description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Vacuum and Purge System (VPS) . The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-O02, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-002, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the VPS equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SDD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

IRWIN, J.J.

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) activities on spent fuel management options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many countries have in the past several decades opted for storage of spent fuel for undefined periods of time. They have adopted the 'wait and see' strategy for spent fuel management. A relatively small number of countries have adopted reprocessing and use of MOX fuel as part of their strategy in spent fuel management. From the 10, 000 tonnes of heavy metal that is removed annually from nuclear reactors throughout the world, only approximately 30 % is currently being reprocessed. Continuous re-evaluation of world energy resources, announcement of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and the Russian initiative to form international nuclear centers, including reprocessing, are changing the stage for future development of nuclear energy. World energy demand is expected to more than double by 2050, and expansion of nuclear energy is a key to meeting this demand while reducing pollution and greenhouse gases. Since its foundation, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has served as an interface between countries in exchanging information on the peaceful development of nuclear energy and at the same time guarding against proliferation of materials that could be used for nuclear weapons. The IAEA's Department of Nuclear Energy has been generating technical documents, holding meetings and conferences, and supporting technical cooperation projects to facilitate this exchange of information. This paper focuses on the current status of IAEA activities in the field of spent fuel management being carried out by the Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology. Information on those activities could be found on the web site link www.iaea.org/OurWork/ST/NE/NEFW/nfcms. To date, the IAEA has given priority in its spent fuel management activities to supporting Member States in their efforts to deal with growing accumulations of spent power reactor fuel. There is technical consensus that the present technologies for spent fuel storage, wet and dry, provide adequate protection to people and environment. As storage durations grow, the IAEA has expanded its work related to the implications of extended storage periods. Operation and maintenance of containers for storage and transport have also been investigated related to long term storage periods. In addition, as international interest in reprocessing of spent fuel increases, the IAEA continues to serve as a crossroads for sharing the latest developments in spent fuel treatment options. A Coordinated Research Project is currently addressing spent fuel performance assessment and research to evaluate long term effects of storage on spent fuel. The effect of increased burnup and mixed oxide fuels on spent fuel management is also the focus of interest as it follows the trend in optimizing the use of nuclear fuel. Implications of damaged fuel on storage and transport as well as burnup credit in spent fuel applications are areas that the IAEA is also investigating. Since spent fuel management considerations require social stability and institutional control, those aspects are taken into account in most IAEA activities. Data requirements and records management as storage durations extend were also investigated as well as the potential for regional spent fuel storage facilities. Spent fuel management activities continue to be coordinated with others in the IAEA to ensure compliance and consistency with efforts in the Department of Safety and Security and the Department of Safeguards, as well as with activities related to geologic disposal. Either disposal of radioactive waste or spent fuel will be an ultimate consideration in all spent fuel management options. Updated information on spent fuel treatment options that include fuel reprocessing as well as transmutation of minor actinides are investigated to optimize the use of nuclear fuel and minimize impact on environment. Tools for spent fuel management economics are also investigated to facilitate assessment of industrial applicability for these options. Most IAEA spent fuel management activities will ultimately be reported in o

Lovasic, Z.; Danker, W. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Module 10: Maintenance and Fueling Guidelines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This course covers safety guidelines for hydrogen, safe maintenance facilities, safety guidelines for hydrogen fueling facilities

173

Dose evaluation in criticality accident conditions using transient critical facilities fueled with a fissile solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......first verify the reliability of the measurement...is a pulse-type reactor fueled with 10...conditions in the TRACY reactor room. The results...measurement and analysis are shown in Table...31. Table 1. Analysis of measured and...is also a pulsed reactor similar to the TRACY......

T. Nakamura; K. Tonoike; Y. Miyoshi

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Emission Reduction Using RTP Green Fuel in Industry Facilities: A Life Cycle Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scenario analyses were also conducted to determine responses to model assumptions including different biomass feedstocks, feedstock transport mode and distance, and geographical locations of the pyrolysis process. ... The savings of GHG emissions compared to fossil heavy fuel oil is greater than 80% for all of these biomass feedstocks. ...

Jiqing Fan; David Shonnard; Tom Kalnes; Monique Streff; Geoff Hopkins

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

175

Development of a Safeguards Approach for a Small Graphite Moderated Reactor and Associated Fuel Cycle Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in it and how nuclear material flows between facilities. The goals of the safeguards system were established next, using the normal IAEA standards for the non-detection and false alarm probabilities. The 5 MWe Reactor was modeled for both plutonium production...

Rauch, Eric B.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fuel cycle facility control system for the Integral Fast Reactor Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) Fuel Demonstration, a new distributed control system designed, implemented and installed. The Fuel processes are a combination of chemical and machining processes operated remotely. To meet this special requirement, the new control system provides complete sequential logic control motion and positioning control and continuous PID loop control. Also, a centralized computer system provides near-real time nuclear material tracking, product quality control data archiving and a centralized reporting function. The control system was configured to use programmable logic controllers, small logic controllers, personal computers with touch screens, engineering work stations and interconnecting networks. By following a structured software development method the operator interface was standardized. The system has been installed and is presently being tested for operations.

Benedict, R.W.; Tate, D.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Spatial correction factors for YALINA Booster facility loaded with medium and low enriched fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor is used in analyses of subcritical assemblies to correct the experimental reactivity as function of the detector position. Besides the detector position, several other parameters affect the correction factor: the energy weighting function of the detector, the detector size, the energy-angle distribution of source neutrons, and the reactivity of the subcritical assembly. This work focuses on the dependency of the correction factor on the detector material and it investigates the YALINA Booster subcritical assembly loaded with medium (36%) and low (10%) enriched fuels. (authors)

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Routkovskaya, C. [Joint Inst. for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny, 99 Academician A.K.Krasin Str, Minsk 220109 (Belarus)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility safety equipment list  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the safety equipment list (SEL) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). The SEL was prepared in accordance with the procedure for safety structures, systems, and components (SSCs) in HNF-PRO-516, ''Safety Structures, Systems, and Components,'' Revision 0 and HNF-PRO-097, Engineering Design and Evaluation, Revision 0. The SEL was developed in conjunction with HNF-SO-SNF-SAR-O02, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998). The SEL identifies the SSCs and their safety functions, the design basis accidents for which they are required to perform, the design criteria, codes and standards, and quality assurance requirements that are required for establishing the safety design basis of the SSCs. This SEL has been developed for the CVDF Phase 2 Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future phases of the CVDF SAR until the CVDF final SAR is approved.

IRWIN, J.J.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

179

Neptunium flow-sheet verification at reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to their fissile nature, neptunium and americium have at least a theoretical potential application as nuclear explosives and their proliferation potential was considered by the IAEA in studies in the late 1990's. This work was motivated by an increased awareness of the proliferation potential of americium and neptunium and a number of emerging projects in peaceful nuclear programmes which could result in an increase in the available quantities of these minor actinides. The studies culminated in proposals for various voluntary measures including the reporting of international transfers of separated americium and neptunium, declarations concerning the amount of separated neptunium and americium held by states and the application of flow-sheet verification to ensure that facilities capable of separating americium or neptunium are operated in a manner consistent with that declared. This paper discusses the issue of neptunium flowsheet verification in reprocessing plants. The proliferation potential of neptunium is first briefly discussed and then the chemistry of neptunium relevant to reprocessing plants described with a view to indicating a number of issues relevant to the verification of neptunium flow-sheets. Finally, the scope of verification activities is discussed including analysis of process and engineering design information, plant monitoring and sampling and the potential application of containment and surveillance measures. (authors)

Rance, P.; Chesnay, B.; Killeen, T.; Murray, M.; Nikkinen, M.; Petoe, A.; Plumb, J.; Saukkonen, H. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

U.S. Army Energy and Environmental Requirements and Goals: Opportunities for Fuel Cells and Hydrogen - Facility Locations and Hydrogen Storage/Delivery Logistics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

US Army Corps US Army Corps of Engineers ® Engineer Research and Development Center U.S. Army Energy and Environmental Requirements and Goals: Opportunities for Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Facility Locations and Hydrogen Storage/Delivery Logistics Nicholas M. Josefik 217-373-4436 N-josefik@cecer.army.mil www.dodfuelcell.com Franklin H. Holcomb Project Leader, Fuel Cell Team 27 OCT 08 Distributed Generation H 2 Generation & Storage Material Handling H2 Vehicles 2 US Army Corps of Engineers ® Engineer Research and Development Center Presentation Outline * DoD Energy Use * Federal Facilities Goals and Requirements * Federal Vehicles and Fuel Goals * Opportunities & Conclusions 3 US Army Corps of Engineers ® Engineer Research and Development Center Where Does the Energy Go? * Tactical and Combat Vehicles (Jets,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Environmentally based siting assessment for synthetic-liquid-fuels facilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed assessment of the major environmental constraints to siting a synthetic fuels industry and the results of that assessment are used to determine on a regional basis the potential for development of such an industry with minimal environmental conflicts. Secondly, the ability to mitigate some of the constraining impacts through alternative institutional arrangements, especially in areas that are judged to have a low development potential is also assessed. Limitations of the study are delineated, but specifically, the study is limited geographically to well-defined boundaries that include the prime coal and oil shale resource areas. The critical factors used in developing the framework are air quality, water availability, socioeconomic capacity, ecological sensitivity, environmental health, and the management of Federally owned lands. (MCW)

None

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Manganite nanorods supported palladium - a facile electrocatalyst for direct glycerol fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Manganite (MnOOH) nanorods were synthesised by a hydrothermal method and then used as a supportive material for Palladium towards glycerol electrooxidation in alkaline medium. The smaller quantities (5 and 15 weight %) of palladium are coated on the manganite nanorods by in situ reduction method. The electrooxidation of glycerol at Pd/Manganite electrode exhibits peak current vertexes at ?0.2 V, which is lower than Pd/C. By varying the alkali (KOH) and glycerol concentrations the electrocatalytic behaviour has been changed considerably and was discussed. The present study reveals that the manganite nanorods act as active support material for Pd. The support material will help to oxidise the intermediates formed during electrooxidation of fuel. The possibilities for the removal of poisonous intermediates were also discussed. The effect of support material on the electrooxidation reaction was explained by proper mechanism.

Ramanujam Kannan; Palanisamy Ravichandiran; Kulandaivelu Karunakaran

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

RELAP5 Model of a Two-phase ThermoSyphon Experimental Facility for Fuels and Materials Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) does not have a separate materials-irradiation flow loop and requires most materials and all fuel experiments to be placed inside a containment. This is necessary to ensure that internal contaminants such as fission products cannot be released into the primary coolant. As part of the safety basis justification, HFIR also requires that all experiments be able to withstand various accident conditions (e.g., loss of coolant) without generating vapor bubbles on the surface of the experiment in the primary coolant. As with any parallel flow system, HFIR is vulnerable to flow excursion events when vapor is generated in one of those flow paths. The effects of these requirements are to artificially increase experiment temperatures by introducing a barrier between the experimental materials and the HFIR coolant and to reduce experiment heat loads to ensure boiling doesn t occur. A new experimental facility for materials irradiation and testing in the HFIR is currently being developed to overcome these limitations. The new facility is unique in that it will have its own internal cooling flow totally independent of the reactor primary coolant and boiling is permitted. The reactor primary coolant will cool the outside of this facility without contacting the materials inside. The ThermoSyphon Test Loop (TSTL), a full scale prototype of the proposed irradiation facility to be tested outside the reactor, is being designed and fabricated (Ref. 1). The TSTL is a closed system working as a two-phase thermosyphon. A schematic is shown in Fig. 1. The bottom central part is the boiler/evaporator and contains three electric heaters. The vapor generated by the heaters will rise and be condensed in the upper condenser, the condensate will drain down the side walls and be circulated via a downcomer back into the bottom of the boiler. An external flow system provides coolant that simulates the HFIR primary coolant. The two-phase flow code RELAP5-3D (Ref. 2) is the main tool employed in this design. The model has multiple challenges: boiling, condensation and natural convection flows need to be modeled accurately.

Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL] [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Iodine Pathways and Off-Gas Stream Characteristics for Aqueous Reprocessing Plants – A Literature Survey and Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Used nuclear fuel is currently being reprocessed in only a few countries, notably France, England, Japan, and Russia. The need to control emissions of the gaseous radionuclides to the air during nuclear fuel reprocessing has already been reported for the entire plant. But since the gaseous radionuclides can partition to various different reprocessing off-gas streams, for example, from the head end, dissolver, vessel, cell, and melter, an understanding of each of these streams is critical. These off-gas streams have different flow rates and compositions and could have different gaseous radionuclide control requirements, depending on how the gaseous radionuclides partition. This report reviews the available literature to summarize specific engineering data on the flow rates, forms of the volatile radionuclides in off-gas streams, distributions of these radionuclides in these streams, and temperatures of these streams. This document contains an extensive bibliography of the information contained in the open literature.

R. T. Jubin; D. M. Strachan; N. R. Soelberg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

3S (Safeguards, Security, Safety) based pyroprocessing facility safety evaluation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The big advantage of pyroprocessing for the management of spent fuels against the conventional reprocessing technologies lies in its proliferation resistance since the pure plutonium cannot be separated from the spent fuel. The extracted materials can be directly used as metal fuel in a fast reactor, and pyroprocessing reduces drastically the volume and heat load of the spent fuel. KAERI has implemented the SBD (Safeguards-By-Design) concept in nuclear fuel cycle facilities. The goal of SBD is to integrate international safeguards into the entire facility design process since the very beginning of the design phase. This paper presents a safety evaluation plan using a conceptual design of a reference pyroprocessing facility, in which 3S (Safeguards, Security, Safety)-By-Design (3SBD) concept is integrated from early conceptual design phase. The purpose of this paper is to establish an advanced pyroprocessing hot cell facility design concept based on 3SBD for the successful realization of pyroprocessing technology with enhanced safety and proliferation resistance.

Ku, J.H.; Choung, W.M.; You, G.S.; Moon, S.I.; Park, S.H.; Kim, H.D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI, 989-111 Daeduk-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

187

Unattended system for monitoring skip movement at the Sellafield Facility in the United Kingdom  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An unattended system for monitoring spent-fuel movement in the storage area of a reprocessing facility has been developed and tested. The system uses radiation detectors to determine when fuel is being moved and a video system to record images of the container movement. In addition to the recorded image, other recorded data include the date and time of the movement and ''fingerprint'' information from the radiation detectors. The direction of motion either into or out of the storage pond is indicated on the video image and on the printed readout. This system was extensively tested at the Sellafield Facility in the United Kingdom. This paper gives the details of the system design and presents results of the field evaluation. 1 ref., 10 figs.

Bosler, G.E.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Johnson, C.S.; Hale, W.R.; Marsh, R.D.; Dickinson, R.J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Sensitivity analysis and optimization of the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sensitivity study has been conducted to assess the robustness of the conclusions presented in the MIT Fuel Cycle Study. The Once Through Cycle (OTC) is considered as the base-line case, while advanced technologies with fuel recycling characterize the alternative fuel cycles. The options include limited recycling in LWRs and full recycling in fast reactors and in high conversion LWRs. Fast reactor technologies studied include both oxide and metal fueled reactors. The analysis allowed optimization of the fast reactor conversion ratio with respect to desired fuel cycle performance characteristics. The following parameters were found to significantly affect the performance of recycling technologies and their penetration over time: Capacity Factors of the fuel cycle facilities, Spent Fuel Cooling Time, Thermal Reprocessing Introduction Date, and in core and Out-of-core TRU Inventory Requirements for recycling technology. An optimization scheme of the nuclear fuel cycle is proposed. Optimization criteria and metrics of interest for different stakeholders in the fuel cycle (economics, waste management, environmental impact, etc.) are utilized for two different optimization techniques (linear and stochastic). Preliminary results covering single and multi-variable and single and multi-objective optimization demonstrate the viability of the optimization scheme. (authors)

Passerini, S.; Kazimi, M. S.; Shwageraus, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Analysis of Transuranic Mixed Oxide Fuel in a CANDU Nuclear Reactor.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The reprocessing of spent fuel is a key component in reducing the end waste from nuclear power plant operations and creating a sustainable closed… (more)

Morreale, Andrew C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

5.15 - Degradation Issues in Aqueous Reprocessing Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The long-term sustainability of nuclear power generation will be enhanced by the reprocessing of used fuel. This will extend the supply of natural uranium and mitigate the environmental consequences of nuclear waste disposal. This chapter surveys the radiolysis and hydrolysis of the main complexing agents being considered for use in the advanced fuel cycle. A disparate group of ligands is being considered worldwide for the extraction of actinides, fission products, and lanthanides from dissolved nuclear fuel, yet their important reactions in irradiated nitric acid have much in common. Oxidation and nitration of ligands occurs due to the reactions with nitric acid alone, and with enhanced yields due to radiolytically produced transient species, such as •OH and •NO3 radical, and radiolytically produced nitrous acid. The result may be decreased solvent-extraction efficiency and reduced separation factors. While these effects cannot be eliminated, understanding of the mechanisms of these reactions may be successfully used to mitigate the effects of radiolysis and hydrolysis in solvent-extraction systems.

B.J. Mincher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Cleanup of Nuclear Licensed Facility 57  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary describes the operations to clean up the equipment of the Nuclear Licensed Facility 57 (NLF 57). Due to the diversity of the research and development work carried out on the reprocessing of spent fuel in it, this installation is emblematic of many of the technical and organizational issues liable to be encountered in the final closure of nuclear facilities. The French atomic energy commission's center at Fontenay aux Roses (CEA-FAR) was created in 1946 to house pile ZOE. Laboratories for fuel cycle research were installed in existing buildings at the site. Work was later concentrated on spent fuel reprocessing, in a pilot workshop referred to as the 'Usine Pu'. In the early sixties, after the dismantling of these first generation facilities, a radiochemistry laboratory dedicated to research and development work on reprocessing was constructed, designated Building 18. During the same decade, more buildings were added: Building 54, storehouses and offices, Building 91, a hall and laboratories for chemical engineering research on natural and depleted uranium. Together, these three building constitute NLF 57. Building 18 architecture featured four similar modules. Each module had three levels: a sub-level consisting of technical galleries and rooms for the liquid effluent tanks, a ground floor and roof space in which the ventilation was installed. Offices, change rooms, four laboratories and a hall were situated on the ground floor. The shielded lines were installed in the laboratories and the halls. Construction of the building took place between 1959 and 1962, and its commissioning began in 1961. The research and development programs performed in NLF 57 related to studies of the reprocessing of spent fuel, including dry methods and the Purex process, techniques for the treatment of waste (vitrification, alpha waste decontamination, etc.) as well as studies and production of transuranic elements for industry and research. In addition to this work, the necessary methods of analysis for monitoring it were also developed. The research and development program finally ended on 30 June 1995. The NLF 57 cleanup program was intended to reduce the nuclear and conventional hazards and minimize the quantities of HLW and MLW during the subsequent dismantling work. To facilitate the organization of the cleanup work, it was divided into categories by type: - treatment and removal of nuclear material, - removal of radioactive sources, - treatment and removal of aqueous liquid waste, - treatment and removal of organic effluents, - treatment and removal of solid waste, - pumping out of the PETRUS tank, - flushing and decontamination of the tanks, - cleanup of Buildings 18 and 91/54. To estimate the cost of the operations and to monitor the progress of the work, an indicator system was put in place based on work units representative of the operation. The values of the work units were periodically updated on the basis of experience feedback. The cleanup progress is now 92% complete (06/12/31): - treatment and removal of nuclear material: 100%, - removal of radioactive sources: 100%, - treatment and removal of aqueous liquid waste: 64%, - treatment and removal of organic effluents: 87%, - treatment and removal of solid waste: 99%, - pumping out of the PETRUS tank: 69%, - flushing and decontamination of tank: 75%, - section cleaning of Buildings 18 and 91/: 90%. The DRSN/SAFAR is the delegated Project Owner for cleanup and dismantling operations. It is also the prime contractor for the cleanup and dismantling operations. SAFAR itself is responsible for operations relating to the CEA activity and those with technical risks (Removal of nuclear materials, Removal of radioactive sources, Pumping out plutonium and transuranic contaminated solvent and Flushing and decontamination of tanks and pipes). All other operations are sub-contracted to specialist companies. The NLF57 cleanup program as executed is capable of attaining activity levels compatible with a future dismantling operation using known and mastered techniques and producing a

Jeanjacques, Michel; Bremond, Marie Pierre; Marchand, Carole; Poyau, Cecile; Viallefont, Cecile; Gautier, Laurent; Masure, Frederic [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Direction de l'Energie Nucleaire, Direction deleguee des Activites Nucleaires de Saclay, Departement des Reacteurs et des Services Nucleaires, Service d'Assainissement de Fontenay Aux Roses: 18, route du Panorama, BP6, 92265 Fontenay aux Roses Cedex (France)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Fuel Pond Sludge - Lessons Learned from Initial De-sludging of Sellafield's Pile Fuel Storage Pond - 12066  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pile Fuel Storage Pond (PFSP) at Sellafield was built and commissioned between the late 1940's and early 1950's as a storage and cooling facility for irradiated fuel and isotopes from the two Windscale Pile reactors. The pond was linked via submerged water ducts to each reactor, where fuel and isotopes were discharged into skips for transfer along the duct to the pond. In the pond the fuel was cooled then de-canned underwater prior to export for reprocessing. The plant operated successfully until it was taken out of operation in 1962 when the First Magnox Fuel Storage Pond took over fuel storage and de-canning operations on the site. The pond was then used for storage of miscellaneous Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) and fuel from the UK's Nuclear Programme for which no defined disposal route was available. By the mid 1970's the import of waste ceased and the plant, with its inventory, was placed into a passive care and maintenance regime. By the mid 1990s, driven by the age of the facility and concern over the potential challenge to dispose of the various wastes and fuels being stored, the plant operator initiated a programme of work to remediate the facility. This programme is split into a number of key phases targeted at sustained reduction in the hazard associated with the pond, these include: - Pond Preparation: Before any remediation work could start the condition of the pond had to be transformed from a passive store to a plant capable of complex retrieval operations. This work included plant and equipment upgrades, removal of redundant structures and the provision of a effluent treatment plant for removing particulate and dissolved activity from the pond water. - Canned Fuel Retrieval: Removal of canned fuel, including oxide and carbide fuels, is the highest priority within the programme. Handling and export equipment required to remove the canned fuel from the pond has been provided and treatment routes developed utilising existing site facilities to allow the fuel to be reprocessed or conditioned for long term storage. - Sludge Retrieval: In excess of 300 m{sup 3} of sludge has accumulated in the pond over many years and is made up of debris arising from fuel and metallic corrosion, wind blown debris and bio-organic materials. The Sludge Retrieval Project has provided the equipment necessary to retrieve the sludge, including skip washer and tipper machines for clearing sludge from the pond skips, equipment for clearing sludge from the pond floor and bays, along with an 'in pond' corral for interim storage of retrieved sludge. Two further projects are providing new plant processing routes, which will initially store and eventually passivate the sludge. - Metal Fuel Retrieval: Metal Fuel from early Windscale Pile operations and various other sources is stored within the pond; the fuel varies considerably in both form and condition. A retrieval project is planned which will provide fuel handling, conditioning, sentencing and export equipment required to remove the metal fuel from the pond for export to on site facilities for interim storage and disposal. - Solid Waste Retrieval: A final retrieval project will provide methods for handling, retrieval, packaging and export of the remaining solid Intermediate Level Waste within the pond. This includes residual metal fuel pieces, fuel cladding (Magnox, aluminium and zircaloy), isotope cartridges, reactor furniture, and miscellaneous activated and contaminated items. Each of the waste streams requires conditioning to allow it to be and disposed of via one of the site treatment plants. - Pond Dewatering and Dismantling: Delivery of the above projects will allow operations to progressively remove the radiological inventory, thereby reducing the hazard/risk posed by the plant. This will then allow subsequent dewatering of the pond and dismantling of the structure. (authors)

Carlisle, Derek; Adamson, Kate [Sellafield Ltd, Sellafield, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

An improved characterization method for international accountancy measurements of fresh and irradiated mixed oxide (MOX) fuel: helping achieve continual monitoring and safeguards through the fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel accountancy measurements are conducted at several points through the nuclear fuel cycle to ensure continuity of knowledge (CofK) of special nuclear material (SNM). Non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements are performed on fresh fuel (prior to irradiation in a reactor) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) post-irradiation. We have developed a fuel assembly characterization system, based on the novel concept of 'neutron fingerprinting' with multiplicity signatures to ensure detailed CofK of nuclear fuel through the entire fuel cycle. The neutron fingerprint in this case is determined by the measurement of the various correlated neutron signatures, specific to fuel isotopic composition, and therefore offers greater sensitivity to variations in fissile content among fuel assemblies than other techniques such as gross neutron counting. This neutron fingerprint could be measured at the point of fuel dispatch (e.g. from a fuel fabrication plant prior to irradiation, or from a reactor site post-irradiation), monitored during transportation of the fuel assembly, and measured at a subsequent receiving site (e.g. at the reactor site prior to irradiation, or reprocessing facility post-irradiation); this would confirm that no unexpected changes to the fuel composition or amount have taken place during transportation and/ or reactor operations. Changes may indicate an attempt to divert material for example. Here, we present the current state of the practice of fuel measurements for both fresh mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and SNF (both MOX and uranium dioxide). This is presented in the framework of international safeguards perspectives from the US and UK. We also postulate as to how the neutron fingerprinting concept could lead to improved fuel characterization (both fresh MOX and SNF) resulting in: (a) assured CofK of fuel across the nuclear fuel cycle, (b) improved detection of SNM diversion, and (c) greater confidence in safeguards of SNF transportation.

Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, S. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schear, M. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worrall, Andrew [U.K. NNL

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

194

An improved characterization method for international accountancy measurements of fresh and irradiated mixed oxide (MOX) fuel: helping achieve continual monitoring and safeguards through the fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel accountancy measurements are conducted at several points through the nuclear fuel cycle to ensure continuity of knowledge (CofK) of special nuclear material (SNM). Non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements are performed on fresh fuel (prior to irradiation in a reactor) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) post-irradiation. We have developed a fuel assembly characterization system, based on the novel concept of 'neutron fingerprinting' with multiplicity signatures to ensure detailed CofK of nuclear fuel through the entire fuel cycle. The neutron fingerprint in this case is determined by the measurement of the various correlated neutron signatures, specific to fuel isotopic composition, and therefore offers greater sensitivity to variations in fissile content among fuel assemblies than other techniques such as gross neutron counting. This neutron fingerprint could be measured at the point of fuel dispatch (e.g. from a fuel fabrication plant prior to irradiation, or from a reactor site post-irradiation), monitored during transportation of the fuel assembly, and measured at a subsequent receiving site (e.g. at the reactor site prior to irradiation, or reprocessing facility post-irradiation); this would confirm that no unexpected changes to the fuel composition or amount have taken place during transportation and/or reactor operations. Changes may indicate an attempt to divert material for example. Here, we present the current state of the practice of fuel measurements for both fresh mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and SNF (both MOX and uranium dioxide). This is presented in the framework of international safeguards perspectives from the US and UK. We also postulate as to how the neutron fingerprinting concept could lead to improved fuel characterization (both fresh MOX and SNF) resulting in: (a) assured CofK of fuel across the nuclear fuel cycle, (b) improved detection of SNM diversion, and (c) greater confidence in safeguards of SNF transportation.

Evans, Louise G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, S. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, B. D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, H. O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schear, M. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Worrall, Andrew [U.K., NNL

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

195

Prospects of Using Reprocessed Uranium in CANDU Reactors, in the U.S. GNEP Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) plans envision reprocessing spent fuel (SF) with view to minimizing high-level waste (HLW) repository use and recovering actinides (U, Np, Pu, Am, and Cm) for transmutation in reactors as fuel and targets. The reprocessed uranium (RU), however, is to be disposed of. This paper presents a limited-scope analysis of possible reuse of RU in CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) Reactors, within the context of the US GNEP program. Other papers on this topic submitted to this conference discuss the possibility of RU reuse in light-water reactors (LWRs) (with enrichment) and offer an independent economic analysis of RU reuse. A representative RU uranium 'vector', from reprocessed spent LWR fuel, comprises 98.538 wt% 238U, 0.46 wt% {sup 236}U, 0.986 wt% {sup 235}U, and 0.006 wt% {sup 234}U. After multiple recyclings, the concentration of {sup 234}U can approach 0.02 wt%. The presence of {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U in RU reduces the reactivity and fuel lifetime (exit burnup), which is particularly an issue in LWRs. While in PWR analyses, the burnup penalty caused by the concentration of {sup 236}U in RU needs to be offset by additional {sup 235}U enrichment in the amount of {approx}25% to 30% of the weight percentage of the {sup 236}U; however, the effect in CANDU is much smaller. Furthermore, since the {sup 235}U content in RU exceeds that of natural uranium, CANDU offers the advantageous option of uranium recycling without reenrichment. The exit burnup of CANDU RU-derived fuel is considerably larger than that for natural uranium-fueled scenario, despite the presence of {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U.

Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Radiological transportation risk assessment of the shipment of sodium-bonded fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document was written in support of Environmental Assessment: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It analyzes the potential radiological risks associated with the transportation of sodium-bonded metal alloy and mixed carbide fuel from the FFTF on the Hanford Site in Washington State to the Idaho Engineering Laboratory in Idaho in the T-3 Cask. RADTRAN 4 is used for the analysis which addresses potential risk from normal transportation and hypothetical accident scenarios.

Green, J.R.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Sodium removal process development for LMFBR fuel subassemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two 37-pin scale models of Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant fuel subassemblies were designed, fabricated and used at Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division in the development and proof-testing of a rapid water-based sodium removal process for the ORNL Hot Experimental Facility, Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Cycle. Through a series of development tests on one of the models, including five (5) sodium wettings and three (3) high temperature sodium removal operations, optimum process parameters for a rapid water vapor-argon-water rinse process were identified and successfully proof-tested on a second model containing argon-pressurized, sodium-corroded model fuel pins simulating the gas plenum and cladding conditions expected for spent fuel pins in full scale subassemblies. Based on extrapolations of model proof test data, preliminary process parameters for a water vapor-nitrogen-water rinse process were calculated and recommended for use in processing full scale fuel subassemblies in the Sodium Removal Facility of the Fuel Receiving Cell, ORNL HEF.

Simmons, C.R.; Taylor, G.R.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Analysis of nuclear proliferation resistance reprocessing and recycling technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PUREX process has been progressively and continuously improved during the past three decades, and these improvements account for successful commercialization of reprocessing in a few countries. The renewed interest in nuclear energy and the international growth of nuclear electricity generation do not equate – and should not be equated -with increasing proliferation risks. Indeed, the nuclear renaissance presents a unique opportunity to enhance the culture of non-proliferation. With the recent revival of interest in nuclear technology, technical methods for prevention of nuclear proliferation are being revisited. Robust strategies to develop new advanced separation technologies are emerging worldwide for sustainability and advancement of nuclear energy with enhanced proliferation resistance. On the other hand, at this moment, there are no proliferation resistance advanced technologies. . Until now proliferation resistance as it applies to reprocessing has been focused on not separating a pure stream of weapons-usable plutonium. France, as an example, has proposed a variant of the PUREX process, the COEX TM process, which does not result on a pure plutonium product stream. A further step is to implement a process based on group extraction of actinides and fission products associated with a homogeneous recycling strategy (UNEX process in the US, GANEX process in France). Such scheme will most likely not be deployable on an industrial scale before 2030 or so because it requires intensive R&D and robust flowsheets. Finally, future generation recycling schemes will handle the used nuclear fuel in fast neutron reactors. This means that the plutonium throughput of the recycling process may increase. The need is obvious for advanced aqueous recycling technologies that are intrinsically more proliferation resistant than the commercial PUREX process. In this paper, we review the actual PUREX process along with the advanced recycling technologies that will enhance technical barriers, making plutonium diversion more difficult by not isolating plutonium or/and coexistence of fission products with plutonium.

Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Gary Cerefice; Marcela Stacey; Steven Bakhtiar

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Tax Incentive Alternative fuel production facilities, including biodiesel, biomass, biogas, and ethanol production facilities, may qualify for a reduced property tax rate of 3%...

200

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

or individual that owns, controls, operates, or manages a facility that generates electricity exclusively for use in AFV charging or fueling facilities is not subject to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Vitrification of IFR and MSBR halide salt reprocessing wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both of the genuinely sustainable (breeder) nuclear fuel cycles (IFR - Integral Fast Reactor - and MSBR - Molten Salt Breeder Reactor -) studied by the USA's national laboratories would generate high level reprocessing waste (HLRW) streams consisting of a relatively small amount ( about 4 mole %) of fission product halide (chloride or fluoride) salts in a matrix comprised primarily (about 95 mole %) of non radioactive alkali metal halide salts. Because leach resistant glasses cannot accommodate much of any of the halides, most of the treatment scenarios previously envisioned for such HLRW have assumed a monolithic waste form comprised of a synthetic analog of an insoluble crystalline halide mineral. In practice, this translates to making a 'substituted' sodalite ('Ceramic Waste Form') of the IFR's chloride salt-based wastes and fluoroapatite of the MSBR's fluoride salt-based wastes. This paper discusses my experimental studies of an alternative waste management scenario for both fuel cycles that would separate/recycle the waste's halide and immobilize everything else in iron phosphate (Fe-P) glass. It will describe both how the work was done and what its results indicate about how a treatment process for both of those wastes should be implemented (fluoride and chloride behave differently). In either case, this scenario's primary advantages include much higher waste loadings, much lower overall cost, and the generation of a product (glass) that is more consistent with current waste management practices. (author)

Siemer, D.D. [Idaho National Laboratory, 12N 3167E, Idaho Falls, ID 83402 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Lessons Learned in International Safeguards - Implementation of Safeguards at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this report is lessons learned at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP). However, the subject of lessons learned for application of international safeguards at reprocessing plants includes a cumulative history of inspections starting at the West Valley (New York, U.S.A.) reprocessing plant in 1969 and proceeding through all of the efforts over the years. The RRP is the latest and most challenging application the International Atomic Energy Agency has faced. In many ways the challenges have remained the same, timely inspection and evaluation with limited inspector resources, with the continuing realization that planning and preparations can never start early enough in the life cycle of a facility. Lessons learned over the years have involved the challenges of using ongoing advances in technology and dealing with facilities with increased throughput and continuous operation. This report will begin with a review of historical developments and lessons learned. This will provide a basis for a discussion of the experiences and lessons learned from the implementation of international safeguards at RRP.

Ehinger, Michael H [ORNL; Johnson, Shirley [Tucker Creek Consulting

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Designing and Operating for Safeguards: Lessons Learned From the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper will address the lessons learned during the implementation of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) which are relevant to the issue of ‘safeguards by design’. However, those lessons are a result of a cumulative history of international safeguards experiences starting with the West Valley reprocessing plant in 1969, continuing with the Barnwell plant, and then with the implementation of international safeguards at WAK in Germany and TRP in Japan. The design and implementation of safeguards at RRP in Japan is the latest and most challenging that the IAEA has faced. This paper will discuss the work leading up to the development of a safeguards approach, the design and operating features that were introduced to improve or aid in implementing the safeguards approach, and the resulting recommendations for future facilities. It will provide an overview of how ‘safeguardability’ was introduced into RRP.

Johnson, Shirley J.; Ehinger, Michael

2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

204

Universal method makes used nuclear fuel reprocessing cooler...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

its disposal safer has been developed by researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. A significant...

205

Energy Return on Investment - Fuel Recycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a methodology and requisite data to assess the potential Energy Return On Investment (EROI) for nuclear fuel cycle alternatives, and applies that methodology to a limited set of used fuel recycle scenarios. This paper is based on a study by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and a parallel evaluation by AREVA Federal Services LLC, both of which were sponsored by the DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program. The focus of the LLNL effort was to develop a methodology that can be used by the FCT program for such analysis that is consistent with the broader energy modeling community, and the focus of the AREVA effort was to bring industrial experience and operational data into the analysis. This cooperative effort successfully combined expertise from the energy modeling community with expertise from the nuclear industry. Energy Return on Investment is one of many figures of merit on which investment in a new energy facility or process may be judged. EROI is the ratio of the energy delivered by a facility divided by the energy used to construct, operate and decommission that facility. While EROI is not the only criterion used to make an investment decision, it has been shown that, in technologically advanced societies, energy supplies must exceed a minimum EROI. Furthermore, technological history shows a trend towards higher EROI energy supplies. EROI calculations have been performed for many components of energy technology: oil wells, wind turbines, photovoltaic modules, biofuels, and nuclear reactors. This report represents the first standalone EROI analysis of nuclear fuel reprocessing (or recycling) facilities.

Halsey, W; Simon, A J; Fratoni, M; Smith, C; Schwab, P; Murray, P

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

206

Analysis of measures to enhance safeguards, and proliferation resistance in thorium based fuel fabrication plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The presence of high energy gamma rays emitted by U232, which is always associated in ppm quantities with reprocessed U233, lends robustness or physical protection to the thorium fuel cycle. India is currently setting up a thorium based fuel cycle for its Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR). Identification and deployment of suitable extrinsic measures for fuel fabrication facilities would help in strengthening overall proliferation resistance. The extrinsic measures proposed in this paper include several measures which have been identified for the first time. A quantitative assessment of the contribution of these measures to overall safeguardability of the fuel fabrication plant has been carried out. Multi Attribute Utility Analysis (MAUA) has been used to evaluate the Proliferation Resistance (PR) value for two hypothetical facilities, one employing none of these measures and the other employing some or all of these measures. The analysis is based on the expert opinion of designers, operators, quality control managers and implementers of safeguards in fuel cycle facilities. Sensitivity analysis for all the proposed measures has also been carried out to study the effect of the influence of individual measures on the overall proliferation resistance of the fuel fabrication plant. The analysis ranks various safeguards measures based on the importance factor of a measure which is defined as the ratio of overall proliferation resistance with and without the measure. Important measures identified based on ranking are near real time monitoring, automation, safeguards-by-design, dynamic nuclear material accounting, and plant imaging.

Suresh Gangotra; R.B. Grover; K.L. Ramakumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8 * November 2010 8 * November 2010 The NREL hydrogen safety sensor test facility (Robert Burgess/NREL) PIX 18240 NREL Develops Test Facility and Test Protocols for Hydrogen Sensor Performance Team: Safety Codes & Standards Group, Hydrogen Technologies & Systems Center Accomplishment: The NREL Hydrogen Sensor Test Facility was recently commissioned for the quantitative assessment of hydrogen safety sensors (first reported in April 2010). Testing of sensors has started and is ongoing. Test Apparatus: The Test Facility was designed to test hydrogen sensors under precisely controlled conditions. The apparatus can simultaneously test multiple sensors and can handle all common electronic interfaces, including voltage, current, resistance,

208

MPA-11 Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Our Cleanroom Facility is available for use by LANL researchers MPA-11 Facilities Fuel cell testing, acoustics laboratories, and a wide spectrum of characterization equipment are essential to the research conducted in our group. Fuel Cell Testing. ........Acoustics. ........Characterization . ........ Many other multi-disciplinary staff and experimental/computational capabilities throughout Los Alamos National Laboratory are available to support our research. Access to enabling capabilities for the Fuel Cell Program is facilitated by the Laboratory's Institute for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research. Fuel Cell Testing Experimental equipment that is essential to our fuel cell efforts is housed in 24 laboratories at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. A partial list of

209

Coupling fuel cycles with repositories: how repository institutional choices may impact fuel cycle design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The historical repository siting strategy in the United States has been a top-down approach driven by federal government decision making but it has been a failure. This policy has led to dispatching fuel cycle facilities in different states. The U.S. government is now considering an alternative repository siting strategy based on voluntary agreements with state governments. If that occurs, state governments become key decision makers. They have different priorities. Those priorities may change the characteristics of the repository and the fuel cycle. State government priorities, when considering hosting a repository, are safety, financial incentives and jobs. It follows that states will demand that a repository be the center of the back end of the fuel cycle as a condition of hosting it. For example, states will push for collocation of transportation services, safeguards training, and navy/private SNF (Spent Nuclear Fuel) inspection at the repository site. Such activities would more than double local employment relative to what was planned for the Yucca Mountain-type repository. States may demand (1) the right to take future title of the SNF so if recycle became economic the reprocessing plant would be built at the repository site and (2) the right of a certain fraction of the repository capacity for foreign SNF. That would open the future option of leasing of fuel to foreign utilities with disposal of the SNF in the repository but with the state-government condition that the front-end fuel-cycle enrichment and fuel fabrication facilities be located in that state.

Forsberg, C. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Room 24-207A Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Miller, W.F. [Texas A.M. University System, MS 3133 College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Fuel Processing [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

28 June 1990 research-article Fuel Processing [and Discussion] R. H. Allardice R. S...efficiently, reliably and economically through the reactor and fuel cycle facilities. Thus the fuel cycle is an integral and essential part of the system...

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Achieving increased spent fuel storage capacity at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HFIR facility was originally designed to store approximately 25 spent cores, sufficient to allow for operational contingencies and for cooling prior to off-site shipment for reprocessing. The original capacity has now been increased to 60 positions, of which 53 are currently filled (September 1994). Additional spent cores are produced at a rate of about 10 or 11 per year. Continued HFIR operation, therefore, depends on a significant near-term expansion of the pool storage capacity, as well as on a future capability of reprocessing or other storage alternatives once the practical capacity of the pool is reached. To store the much larger inventory of spent fuel that may remain on-site under various future scenarios, the pool capacity is being increased in a phased manner through installation of a new multi-tier spent fuel rack design for higher density storage. A total of 143 positions was used for this paper as the maximum practical pool capacity without impacting operations; however, greater ultimate capacities were addressed in the supporting analyses and approval documents. This paper addresses issues related to the pool storage expansion including (1) seismic effects on the three-tier storage arrays, (2) thermal performance of the new arrays, (3) spent fuel cladding corrosion concerns related to the longer period of pool storage, and (4) impacts of increased spent fuel inventory on the pool water quality, water treatment systems, and LLLW volume.

Cook, D.H.; Chang, S.J.; Dabs, R.D.; Freels, J.D.; Morgan, K.A.; Rothrock, R.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Griess, J.C. [Griess (J.C.), Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Loans Fuel Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Loans The Oregon Department of Energy administers the State Energy Loan Program (SELP) which offers low-interest loans for qualified projects. Eligible alternative fuel projects include fuel production facilities, dedicated

213

Benchmarking the Remote-Handled Waste Facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Facility decontamination activities at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), the site of a former commercial nuclear spent fuel reprocessing facility near Buffalo, New York, have resulted in the removal of radioactive waste. Due to high dose and/or high contamination levels of this waste, it needs to be handled remotely for processing and repackaging into transport/disposal-ready containers. An initial conceptual design for a Remote-Handled Waste Facility (RHWF), completed in June 1998, was estimated to cost $55 million and take 11 years to process the waste. Benchmarking the RHWF with other facilities around the world, completed in November 1998, identified unique facility design features and innovative waste pro-cessing methods. Incorporation of the benchmarking effort has led to a smaller yet fully functional, $31 million facility. To distinguish it from the June 1998 version, the revised design is called the Rescoped Remote-Handled Waste Facility (RRHWF) in this topical report. The conceptual design for the RRHWF was completed in June 1999. A design-build contract was approved by the Department of Energy in September 1999.

O. P. Mendiratta; D. K. Ploetz

2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

214

UK FT PDU Facility Draft EA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Process Development Unit Facility February 2014 The facility is sized as a small-scale pilot CBTL plant that would produce research quantities of FT liquid fuels at...

215

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Carbon Fiber Technology Facility 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

216

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Carbon Fiber Technology Facility 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

217

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Carbon Fiber Technology Facility 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

218

Issues related to EM management of DOE spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a summary of the important issues involved in managing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) owned by the Department of Energy (DOE). Issues related to civilian SNF activities are not discussed. DOE-owned SNF is stored primarily at the Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Savannah River Site (SRS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and West Valley Demonstration Project. Smaller quantities of SNF are stored at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There is a wide variety of fuel types, including both low and high enrichment fuels from weapons production, DOE reactors, research and development programs, naval programs, and universities. Most fuel is stored in pools associated with reactor or reprocessing facilities. Smaller quantities are in dry storage. Physical conditions of the fuel range from excellent to poor or severely damaged. An issue is defined as an important question that must be answered or decision that must be made on a topic or subject relevant to achieving the complimentary objectives of (a) storing SNF in compliance with applicable regulations and orders until it can be disposed, and (b) safely disposing of DOE`s SNF. The purpose of this document is to define the issues; no recommendations are made on resolutions. As DOE`s national SNF management program is implemented, a system of issues identification, documentation, tracking, and resolution will be implemented. This document is an initial effort at issues identification. The first section of this document is an overview of issues that are common to several or all DOE facilities that manage SNF. The common issues are organized according to specific aspects of spent fuel management. This is followed by discussions of management issues that apply specifically to individual DOE facilities. The last section provides literature references.

Abbott, D.G. [EG& G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Abashian, M.S.; Chakraborti, S.; Roberson, K.; Meloin, J.M. [IT Corp. (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Waste Calcining Facility remote inspection report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) remote inspections was to evaluate areas in the facility which are difficult to access due to high radiation fields. The areas inspected were the ventilation exhaust duct, waste hold cell, adsorber manifold cell, off-gas cell, calciner cell and calciner vessel. The WCF solidified acidic, high-level mixed waste generated during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Solidification was accomplished through high temperature oxidation and evaporation. Since its shutdown in 1981, the WCFs vessels, piping systems, pumps, off-gas blowers and process cells have remained contaminated. Access to the below-grade areas is limited due to contamination and high radiation fields. Each inspection technique was tested with a mock-up in a radiologically clean area before the equipment was taken to the WCF for the actual inspection. During the inspections, essential information was obtained regarding the cleanliness, structural integrity, in-leakage of ground water, indications of process leaks, indications of corrosion, radiation levels and the general condition of the cells and equipment. In general, the cells contain a great deal of dust and debris, as well as hand tools, piping and miscellaneous equipment. Although the building appears to be structurally sound, the paint is peeling to some degree in all of the cells. Cracking and spalling of the concrete walls is evident in every cell, although the east wall of the off-gas cell is the worst. The results of the completed inspections and lessons learned will be used to plan future activities for stabilization and deactivation of the facility. Remote clean-up of loose piping, hand tools, and miscellaneous debris can start immediately while information from the inspections is factored into the conceptual design for deactivating the facility.

Patterson, M.W.; Ison, W.M.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Realization of the German Concept for Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel - Current Situation and Prospects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The German government has determined a phase out of nuclear power. With respect to the management of spent fuel it was decided to terminate transports to reprocessing plants by 2005 and to set up interim storage facilities on power plant sites. This paper gives an overview of the German concept for spent fuel management focused on the new on-site interim storage concept and the applied interim storage facilities. Since the end of the year 1998, the utilities have applied for permission of on-site interim storage in 13 storage facilities and 5 storage areas; one application for the interim storage facility Stade was withdrawn due to the planned final shut down of Stade nuclear power plant in autumn 2003. In 2001 and 2002, 3 on-site storage areas and 2 on-site storage facilities for spent fuel were licensed by the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS). A main task in 2002 and 2003 has been the examination of the safety and security of the planned interim storage facilities and the verification of the licensing prerequisites. In the aftermath of September 11, 2001, BfS has also examined the attack with a big passenger airplane. Up to now, these aircraft crash analyses have been performed for three on-site interim storage facilities; the fundamental results will be presented. It is the objective of BfS to conclude the licensing procedures for the applied on-site interim storage facilities in 2003. With an assumed construction period for the storage buildings of about two years, the on-site interim storage facilities could then be available in the year 2005.

Thomauske, B. R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

NUCLEAR MATERIAL ATTRACTIVENESS: AN ASSESSMENT OF MATERIAL ASSOCIATED WITH A CLOSED FUEL CYCLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with the various processing steps required for a closed fuel cycle. This paper combines the results from earlier studies that examined the attractiveness of SNM associated with the processing of spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel by various reprocessing schemes and the recycle of plutonium as a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in LWR with new results for the final, repeated burning of SNM in fast-spectrum reactors: fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS). The results of this paper suggest that all reprocessing products evaluated so far need to be rigorously safeguarded and provided moderate to high levels of physical protection. These studies were performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and are based on the calculation of "attractiveness levels" that has been couched in terms chosen for consistency with those normally used for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities. The methodology and key findings will be presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance (e.g. by increasing impediments to the diversion, theft, or undeclared production of SNM for the purpose of acquiring a nuclear weapon), and how they could be used to help inform policy makers, will be discussed.

Bathke, C. G.; Ebbinghaus, B.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Wallace, R. K.; Collins, Brian A.; Hase, Kevin R.; Robel, Martin; Jarvinen, G. D.; Bradley, Keith S.; Ireland, J. R.; Johnson, M. W.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Smith, Brian W.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

222

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fuels Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

about related NREL biomass research projects that focus on converting renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels, chemicals, and products. Facilities NREL conducts...

223

West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluation  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

West Valley Demonstration Project West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Incidental to Reprocessing Evaluation for the Concentrator Feed Makeup Tank and the Melter Feed Hold Tank February 2013 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy West Valley, New York This page is intentionally blank. WASTE-INCIDENTAL-TO-REPROCESSING EVALUATION FOR THE WVDP CFMT AND MFHT CONTENTS Revision 0 i NOTATION (Acronyms, Abbreviations, and Units).................................................. v 1.0 INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................................... 1 1.1 Purpose. ................................................................................................................. 2

224

Reliability Engineering Approach to Probabilistic Proliferation Resistance Analysis of the Example Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cooled fast reactor and pyroprocessing facility were designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the purpose of facilitating discussion on the subject of fast reactor and pyroprocessing safeguards in the absence of a safeguards confidential design... proliferators due to the presence of bulk nuclear material and the ability to acquire plutonium in a form easier to convert to a weapon. The ESFR design includes four 800 MWth (300 MWe) reactors (Argonne National Laboratory 2006) and an on...

Cronholm, Lillian Marie

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

225

Energy, environmental, health and cost benefits of cogeneration from fossil fuels and nuclear energy using the electrical utility facilities of a province  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is investigated for increasing the utilization efficiency of energy resources and reducing environmental emissions, focusing on utility-scale cogeneration and the contributions of nuclear energy. A case study is presented for Ontario using the nuclear and fossil facilities of the main provincial electrical utility. Implementation of utility-based cogeneration in Ontario or a region with a similar energy system and attributes is seen to be able to reduce significantly annual and cumulative uranium and fossil fuel use and related emissions, provide economic benefits for the province and its electrical utility, and substitute nuclear energy for fossil fuels. The reduced emissions of greenhouse gases are significant, and indicate that utility-based cogeneration can contribute notably to efforts to combat climate change. Ontario and other regions with similar energy systems and characteristics would benefit from working with the regional electrical utilities and other relevant parties to implementing cogeneration in a careful and optimal manner. Implementation decisions need to balance the interests of the stakeholders when determining which cogeneration options to adopt and barriers to regional utility-based cogeneration need to be overcome.

Marc A. Rosen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers Federal Facilities Guide to Fuel Cells May 8, 2012 - Outline * Distributed Generation and...

227

Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers This...

228

CANDU fuel cycle flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High neutron economy, on-power refuelling, and a simple bundle design provide a high degree of flexibility that enables CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium; registered trademark) reactors to be fuelled with a wide variety of fuel types. Near-term applications include the use of slightly enriched uranium (SEU), and recovered uranium (RU) from reprocessed spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. Plutonium and other actinides arising from various sources, including spent LWR fuel, can be accommodated, and weapons-origin plutonium could be destroyed by burning in CANDU. In the DUPIC fuel cycle, a dry processing method would convert spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel to CANDU fuel. The thorium cycle remains of strategic interest in CANDU to ensure long-term resource availability, and would be of specific interest to those countries possessing large thorium reserves, but limited uranium resources.

Torgerson, D.F.; Boczar, P.G. [Chalk River Lab., Ontario (Canada); Dastur, A.R. [AECL CANDU, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Mandate All state-owned diesel fueling facilities must provide fuel containing at least 5% biodiesel (B5) at all diesel pumps. (Reference South Carolina Code of Laws 12-63-3...

230

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (Department) must evaluate the cost, efficiency, and commercial availability of alternative fuels for automotive purposes...

231

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

100 million for an alternative fuel or gasification facility that uses coal, oil shale, or tar sands as the primary feedstock; 25 million for an energy-efficient...

232

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Dakota offers loan guarantees for eligible entities constructing facilities using biomass for agriculturally-derived fuel production. Through July 31, 2015, a single loan...

233

Workers Complete Asbestos Removal at West Valley to Prepare Facility for Demolition  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 1, 2011 September 1, 2011 Workers Complete Asbestos Removal at West Valley to Prepare Facility for Demolition WEST VALLEY, N.Y. - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work- ers safely cleared asbestos from more than 5,500 feet of piping in the Main Plant Process Building. Project completion is an important step in preparing the former commercial nuclear fuel reprocessing building for demolition. Recovery Act workers also cleaned up more than 1,700 square feet of material containing asbestos, mostly floor tiles in the building's former control room. "Completion of this work is a significant accomplishment and another major step forward as we prepare the Main Plant Process Building for demolition," said Bryan Bower, the DOE Director at West Valley.

234

Large-scale Demonstration and Deployment Project for D&D of Fuel Storage Canals and Associated Facilities at INEEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology (OST), Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA), sponsored a Large Scale Demonstration and Deployment Project (LSDDP) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) under management of the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The INEEL LSDDP is one of several LSDDPs sponsored by DOE. The LSDDP process integrates field demonstrations into actual decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) operations by comparing new or improved technologies against existing baseline technologies using a side-by-side comparison. The goals are (a) to identify technologies that are cheaper, safer, faster, and cleaner (produce less waste), and (b) to incorporate those technologies into D&D baseline operations. The INEEL LSDDP reviewed more than 300 technologies, screened 141, and demonstrated 17. These 17 technologies have been deployed a total of 70 times at facilities other than those where the technology was demonstrated, and 10 have become baseline at the INEEL. Fifteen INEEL D&D needs have been modified or removed from the Needs Management System as a direct result of using these new technologies. Conservatively, the ten-year projected cost savings at the INEEL resulting from use of the technologies demonstrated in this INEEL LSDDP exceeds $39 million dollars.

Whitmill, Larry Joseph

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

FURTHER ASSESSMENTS OF THE ATTRACTIVENESS OF MATERIALS IN ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLES FROM A SAFEGUARDS PERSPECTIVE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of an extension to an earlier study [ ] that examined the attractiveness of materials mixtures containing special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with the PUREX, UREX+, and COEX reprocessing schemes. This study focuses on the materials associated with the UREX, COEX, THOREX, and PYROX reprocessing schemes. This study also examines what is required to render plutonium as “unattractive.” Furthermore, combining the results of this study with those from the earlier study permits a comparison of the uranium and thorium based fuel cycles on the basis of the attractiveness of the SNM associated with each fuel cycle. Both studies were performed at the request of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and are based on the calculation of “attractiveness levels” that has been couched in terms chosen for consistency with those normally used for nuclear materials in DOE nuclear facilities [ ]. The methodology and key findings will be presented. Additionally, how these attractiveness levels relate to proliferation resistance (e.g. by increasing impediments to the diversion, theft, undeclared production of SNM for the purpose of acquiring a nuclear weapon), and how they could be used to help inform policy makers, will be discussed.

Bathke, C. G.; Jarvinen, G. D.; Wallace, R. K.; Ireland, J. R.; Johnson, M. W.; Sleaford, Brad W.; Ebbinghaus, B. B.; Bradley, Keith S.; Collins, Brian A.; Smith, Brian W.; Prichard, Andrew W.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake of plutonium in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake and translocation to grain. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the US Department of Energy`s H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site was used to estimated parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining > resuspension of soil to grain surfaces > root uptake. Approximately 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} of a year`s atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} of the soil inventory is absorbed by roots and translocated to grains.

Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C. [Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States); Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. [Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake of Pu in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the U.S. Department of Energy's H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site were used to estimate parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension, and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining greater than resuspension of soil to grain surfaces greater than root uptake. Approximately 3.9 X 10(-5) of a year's atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 X 10(-9) of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 X 10(-10) of the soil Pu inventory is absorbed and translocated to grains.

Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C.; Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. (Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Aiken, SC (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake of plutonium in corn and other grain-producing agroecosystems near a nuclear fuel facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium released to the environment may contribute to dose to humans through inhalation or ingestion of contaminated foodstuffs. Plutonium contamination of agricultural plants may result from interception and retention of atmospheric deposition, resuspension of Pu-bearing soil particles to plant surfaces, and root uptake and translocation to grain. Plutonium on vegetation surfaces may be transferred to grain surfaces during mechanical harvesting. Data obtained from corn grown near the US Department of Energy's H-Area nuclear fuel chemical separations facility on the Savannah River Site was used to estimated parameters of a simple model of Pu transport in agroecosystems. The parameter estimates for corn were compared to those previously obtained for wheat and soybeans. Despite some differences in parameter estimates among crops, the relative importances of atmospheric deposition, resuspension and root uptake were similar among crops. For even small deposition rates, the relative importances of processes for Pu contamination of corn grain should be: transfer of atmospheric deposition from vegetation surfaces to grain surfaces during combining > resuspension of soil to grain surfaces > root uptake. Approximately 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} of a year's atmospheric deposition is transferred to grain. Approximately 6.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}9} of the Pu inventory in the soil is resuspended to corn grain, and a further 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} of the soil inventory is absorbed by roots and translocated to grains.

Pinder, J.E. III; McLeod, K.W.; Adriano, D.C. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (United States)); Corey, J.C.; Boni, A.L. (Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (United States))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Spent fuel storage system for LMFBR fuel experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel that had been irradiated in the Argonne National Laboratory Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) at Idaho Falls, Idaho, and examined at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory at Richland, Washington, was placed in long term retrievable storage utilizing a system designed at Hanford. The Spent Fuel Storage Cask system was designed for transport and storage of a large quantity of spent fuel at the Hanford 200 Area transuranic (TRU) asphalt storage pad. The entire system is designed for long term retrievable storage to allow future reprocessing of the fuel. The system was designed to meet the criticality, shielding, and thermal requirements for a maximum fuel load of four kilograms fissile. The Spent Fuel Storage Cask was built to transport and store the fuel from EBR-II on the TRU asphalt storage pad.

Seay, J.M.; Gruber, W.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

New INL High Energy Battery Test Facility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

INL High Energy Battery Test Facility New INL High Energy Battery Test Facility 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit...

242

Post-test Cell Characterization Facility | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

test Cell Characterization Facility Post-test Cell Characterization Facility 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

243

Economic prospects of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IFR fuel cycle based on pyroprocessing involves only few operational steps and the batch-oriented process equipment systems are compact. This results in major cost reductions in all of three areas of reprocessing, fabrication, and waste treatment. This document discusses the economic aspects of this fuel cycle.

Chang, Y.I.; Till, C.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose reduction activities, with a focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and aocelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts. An author index and a subject index are provided to facilitate use. Both indices contain the abstract numbers from previous volumes, as well as the current volume. Information that the reader feels might be included in the next volume of this bibliography should be submitted to the BNL ALARA Center.

Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

IFR fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The next major milestone of the IFR program is engineering-scale demonstration of the pyroprocess fuel cycle. The EBR-II Fuel Cycle Facility has just entered a startup phase, which includes completion of facility modifications and installation and cold checkout of process equipment. This paper reviews the development of the electrorefining pyroprocess, the design and construction of the facility for the hot demonstration, the design and fabrication of the equipment, and the schedule and initial plan for its operation.

Battles, J.E.; Miller, W.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Nuclear Fuel Cycle Integrated System Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cycle Integrated System Analysis Fuel Cycle Integrated System Analysis Abdellatif M. Yacout Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear Engineering Division The nuclear fuel cycle is a complex system with multiple components and activities that are combined to provide nuclear energy to a variety of end users. The end uses of nuclear energy are diverse and include electricity, process heat, water desalination, district heating, and possibly future hydrogen production for transportation and energy storage uses. Components of the nuclear fuel cycle include front end components such as uranium mining, conversion and enrichment, fuel fabrication, and the reactor component. Back end of the fuel cycle include used fuel coming out the reactor, used fuel temporary and permanent storage, and fuel reprocessing. Combined with those components there

247

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Procuring Fuel Cells Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Procuring Fuel Cells for

248

Methods for developing seismic and extreme wind-hazard models for evaluating critical structures and equipment at US Department of Energy facilities and commercial plutonium facilities in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing seismic and wind hazard models for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The work is part of a three-phase effort to establish building design criteria developed with a uniform methodology for seismic and wind hazards at the various DOE sites throughout the United States. In Phase 1, LLNL gathered information on the sites and their critical facilities, including nuclear reactors, fuel-reprocessing plants, high-level waste storage and treatment facilities, and special nuclear material facilities. Phase 2 - development of seismic and wind hazard models - is discussed in this paper, which summarizes the methodologies used by seismic and extreme-wind experts and gives sample hazard curves for the first sites to be modeled. These hazard models express the annual probability that the site will experience an earthquake (or windspeed) greater than some specified magnitude. In the final phase, the DOE will use the hazards models and LLNL-recommended uniform design criteria to evaluate critical facilities. The methodology presented in this paper also was used for a related LLNL study - involving the seismic assessment of six commercial plutonium fabrication plants licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Details and results of this reassessment are documented in reference.

Coats, D.W.; Murray, R.C.; Bernreuter, D.L.

1981-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

249

Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA; Volume 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Promoting the exchange of information related to implementation of the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) philosophy is a continuing objective for the Department of Energy (DOE). This report was prepared by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) ALARA Center for the DOE Office of Health. It contains the fifth in a series of bibliographies on dose reduction at DOE facilities. The BNL ALARA Center was originally established in 1983 under the sponsorship of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to monitor dose-reduction research and ALARA activities at nuclear power plants. This effort was expanded in 1988 by the DOE`s Office of Environment, Safety and Health, to include DOE nuclear facilities. This bibliography contains abstracts relating to various aspects of ALARA program implementation and dose-reduction activities, with a specific focus on DOE facilities. Abstracts included in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings, journals, research reports, searches of the DOE Energy, Science and Technology Database (in general, the citation and abstract information is presented as obtained from this database), and reprints of published articles provided by the authors. Facility types and activities covered in the scope of this report include: radioactive waste, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel storage and reprocessing, facility decommissioning, hot laboratories, tritium production, research, test and production reactors, weapons fabrication and testing, fusion, uranium and plutonium processing, radiography, and accelerators. Information on improved shielding design, decontamination, containments, robotics, source prevention and control, job planning, improved operational and design techniques, as well as on other topics, has been included. In addition, DOE/EH reports not included in previous volumes of the bibliography are in this volume (abstracts 611 to 684). This volume (Volume 5 of the series) contains 217 abstracts.

Dionne, B.J.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Plan for fully decontaminating and decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Fuel Laboratories at Cheswick, Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project scope of work included the complete decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the Westinghouse ARD Fuel Laboratories at the Cheswick Site in the shortest possible time. This has been accomplished in the following four phases: (1) preparation of documents and necessary paperwork; packaging and shipping of all special nuclear materials in an acceptable form to a reprocessing agency; (2) decontamination of all facilities, glove boxes and equipment; loading of generated waste into bins, barrels and strong wooden boxes; (3) shipping of all bins, barrels and boxes containing waste to the designated burial site; removal of all utility services from the laboratories; (4) final survey of remaining facilities and certification for nonrestricted use; preparation of final report. This volume contains the following 3 attachments: (1) Plan for Fully Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Fuel Laboratories at Cheswick; (2) Environmental Assessment for Decontamination and Decommissioning the Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories, Cheswick, PA; and (3) WARD-386, Quality Assurance Program Description for Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Subject: Integrated Safety Analysis: Why It Is Appropriate for Fuel Recycling Facilities Project Number: 689Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Letter, 9/10/10  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Enclosed for your review is a Nuclear Energy Institute white paper on the use of Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA) at U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission-licensed recycling facilities. This paper is...

252

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S. (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated. (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass. (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Carter, J.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

253

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S; (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated; (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass; and (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Jones, R.; Carter, J.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

254

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

to a facility so that it may sell diesel fuel containing at least 2% biodiesel or green diesel. A retailer may only claim the credit for up to five years and is limited to...

255

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines and Related Technologies Course Manual...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Module 10: Maintenance and Fueling Facility Guidelines Module 11: Glossary and Conversions Home About the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery...

256

Characterization of Nuclear Fuel using Multivariate Statistical Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various combinations of reactor type and fuel composition have been characterized using principle components analysis (PCA) of the concentrations of 9 U and Pu isotopes in the 10 fuel as a function of burnup. The use of PCA allows the reduction of the 9-dimensional data (isotopic concentrations) into a 3-dimensional approximation, giving a visual representation of the changes in nuclear fuel composition with burnup. Real-world variation in the concentrations of {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U in the fresh (unirradiated) fuel was accounted for. The effects of reprocessing were also simulated. The results suggest that, 15 even after reprocessing, Pu isotopes can be used to determine both the type of reactor and the initial fuel composition with good discrimination. Finally, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PSLDA) was investigated as a substitute for PCA. Our results suggest that PLSDA is a better tool for this application where separation between known classes is most important.

Robel, M; Robel, M; Robel, M; Kristo, M J; Kristo, M J

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

Analysis of a Nuclear Accident: Fission and Activation Product Releases from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Facility as Remote Indicators of Source Identification, Extent of Release, and State of Damaged Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of several radionuclides within environmental samples taken from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear facility and reported on the Tokyo Electric Power Company website following the recent tsunami-initiated catastrophe were evaluated for the purpose of identifying the source term, reconstructing the release mechanisms, and estimating the extent of the release. 136Cs/137Cs and 134Cs/137Cs ratios identified Units 1-3 as the major source of radioactive contamination to the surface soil close to the facility. A trend was observed between the fraction of the total core inventory released for a number of fission product isotopes and their corresponding Gibbs Free Energy of formation for the primary oxide form of the isotope, suggesting that release was dictated primarily by chemical volatility driven by temperature and reduction potential within the primary containment vessels of the vented reactors. The absence of any major fractionation beyond volatilization suggested all coolant had evaporated by the time of venting. High estimates for the fraction of the total inventory released of more volatile species (Te, Cs, I) indicated the damage to fuel bundles was likely extensive, minimizing any potential containment due to physical migration of these species through the fuel matrix and across the cladding wall. 238Pu/239,240Pu ratios close-in and at 30 km from the facility indicated that the damaged reactors were the major contributor of Pu to surface soil at the source but that this contribution likely decreased rapidly with distance from the facility. The fraction of the total Pu inventory released to the environment from venting units 1 and 3 was estimated to be ~0.003% based upon Pu/Cs isotope ratios relative to the within-reactor modeled inventory prior to venting and was consistent with an independent model evaluation that considered chemical volatility based upon measured fission product release trends. Significant volatile radionuclides within the spent fuel at the time of venting but not as yet observed and reported within environmental samples are suggested as potential analytes of concern for future environmental surveys around the site.

Schwantes, Jon M.; Orton, Christopher R.; Clark, Richard A.

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

258

NETL's Hybrid Performance, or Hyper, facility  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's Hybrid Performance, or Hyper, facility is a one-of-a-kind laboratory built to develop control strategies for the reliable operation of fuel cell/turbine hybrids and enable the simulation, design, and implementation of commercial equipment. The Hyper facility provides a unique opportunity for researchers to explore issues related to coupling fuel cell and gas turbine technologies.

None

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

259

LANSCE | Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Isotope Production Facility (IPF) Lujan Neutron Scattering Center Materials Test Station (MTS) Proton Radiography (pRad) Ultracold Neutrons (UCN) Weapons Neutron Research Facility...

260

Reproductive Life Events in the Population Living in the Vicinity of a Nuclear Waste Reprocessing Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reproductive Life Events in the Population Living in the Vicinity of a Nuclear Waste Reprocessing: There is concern about the health of populations living close to nuclear waste reprocessing plants. We conducted a comparative study on reproductive life events in the general population living near the nuclear waste

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Underground Facilities Information (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facilities Information (Iowa) Facilities Information (Iowa) Underground Facilities Information (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Residential Transportation Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Utilities Board This section applies to any excavation which may impact underground facilities, including those used for the conveyance of electricity or the transportation of hazardous liquids or natural gas. Excavation is prohibited unless notification takes place, as described in this chapter

262

Chemical behavior of degradation products of tributylphosphate in purex reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical behavior of butyl nitrate/butyl alcohol, degradation products from dealkylation of tri-n-butylphosphate(TBP) in PUREX reprocessing, which has not so far been reported, was investigated. No accumulation of those compounds in the organic phase of TBP(30%)-dodecane was observed in any separation cycle of PUREX despite the fact that the apparent distribution of the compounds lies to the organic phase at their high concentrations. The distribution of butyl nitrate/butyl alcohol between organic/aqueous phases is found to be dependent on their concentrations and on nitric acid concentration, which could explain the above phenomena. Only butyl nitrate of the above two compounds was slightly detected in the organic streams. It is probable from this investigation that butyl nitrate is removed into aqueous waste stream primarily through alkali scrubber.

Kuno, Y.; Sato, S.; Masui, J. [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

December 3, 2004 [Facility News] December 3, 2004 [Facility News] First Deployment of ARM Mobile Facility to Occur on California Coast Bookmark and Share Image - Point Reyes Beach Image - Point Reyes Beach Point Reyes National Seashore, on the California coast north of San Francisco, has been identified as the official location for the first deployment of the DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF). As part of a 6-month field campaign beginning in March 2005 to study the microphysical characteristics of marine stratus and, in particular, marine stratus drizzle processes, the AMF will provide a mature instrument system to help fill information gaps in the existing limited surveys of marine stratus microphysical structure. Marine stratus clouds are known to be susceptible to the byproducts of fossil fuel consumption, a

264

Argonne Transportation Technology R&D Center - Research Facilities - APRF,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation Research Facilities Transportation Research Facilities Argonne provides a wide range of facilities and laboratories for conducting cutting-edge transportation research and testing. The facilities offer state-of-the-art equipment and capabilities. APRF Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Battery Post-Test Facility Battery Post-Test Facility Battery testing at the EADL Electrochemical Analysis and Diagnostics Laboratory Engine Research Facility Engine Research Facility Fuel cell research Fuel Cell Test Facility Materials Engineering Research Facility Materials Engineering Research Facility Transportation APS Beamline Transportation Beamline at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source tribology lab Tribology Laboratory TRACC Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center

265

German concept and status of the disposal of spent fuel elements from German research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eight research reactors with a power {>=} 100 kW are currently being operated in the Federal Republic of Germany. These comprise three TRIGA-type reactors (power 100 kW to 250 kW), four swimming-pool reactors (power 1 MW to 10 MW) and one DIDO type reactor (power 23 MW). The German research reactors are used for neutron scattering for basic research in the field of solid state research, neutron metrology, for the fabrication of isotopes and for neutron activation analysis for medicine and biology, for investigating the influence of radiation on materials and for nuclear fuel behavior. It will be vital to continue current investigations in the future. Further operation of the German research reactors is therefore indispensable. Safe, regular disposal of the irradiated fuel elements arising now and in future operation is of primary importance. Furthermore, there are several plants with considerable quantities of spent fuel, the safe disposal of which is a matter of urgency. These include above all the VKTA facilities in Rossendorf and also the TRIGA reactors, where disposal will only be necessary upon decommissioning. The present paper report is concerned with the disposal of fuel from the German research reactors. It briefly deals with the situation in the USA since the end of 1988, describes interim solutions for current disposal requirements and then mainly concentrates on the German disposal concept currently being prepared. This concept initially envisages the long-term (25--50 years) dry interim storage of fuel elements in special containers in a central German interim store with subsequent direct final disposal without reprocessing of the irradiated fuel.

Komorowski, K. [Bundesministerium fuer Bildung Wissenschaft, Bonn (Germany); Storch, S.; Thamm, G. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Improving the Estimates of Waste from the Recycling of Used Nuclear Fuel - 13410  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimates are presented of wastes arising from the reprocessing of 50 GWD/tonne, 5 year and 50 year cooled used nuclear fuel (UNF) from Light Water Reactors (LWRs), using the 'NUEX' solvent extraction process. NUEX is a fourth generation aqueous based reprocessing system, comprising shearing and dissolution in nitric acid of the UNF, separation of uranium and mixed uranium-plutonium using solvent extraction in a development of the PUREX process using tri-n-butyl phosphate in a kerosene diluent, purification of the plutonium and uranium-plutonium products, and conversion of them to uranium trioxide and mixed uranium-plutonium dioxides respectively. These products are suitable for use as new LWR uranium oxide and mixed oxide fuel, respectively. Each unit process is described and the wastes that it produces are identified and quantified. Quantification of the process wastes was achieved by use of a detailed process model developed using the Aspen Custom Modeler suite of software and based on both first principles equilibrium and rate data, plus practical experience and data from the industrial scale Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) at the Sellafield nuclear site in the United Kingdom. By feeding this model with the known concentrations of all species in the incoming UNF, the species and their concentrations in all product and waste streams were produced as the output. By using these data, along with a defined set of assumptions, including regulatory requirements, it was possible to calculate the waste forms, their radioactivities, volumes and quantities. Quantification of secondary wastes, such as plant maintenance, housekeeping and clean-up wastes, was achieved by reviewing actual operating experience from THORP during its hot operation from 1994 to the present time. This work was carried out under a contract from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and, so as to enable DOE to make valid comparisons with other similar work, a number of assumptions were agreed. These include an assumed reprocessing capacity of 800 tonnes per year, the requirement to remove as waste forms the volatile fission products carbon-14, iodine-129, krypton-85, tritium and ruthenium-106, the restriction of discharge of any water from the facility unless it meets US Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standards, no intentional blending of wastes to lower their classification, and the requirement for the recovered uranium to be sufficiently free from fission products and neutron-absorbing species to allow it to be re-enriched and recycled as nuclear fuel. The results from this work showed that over 99.9% of the radioactivity in the UNF can be concentrated via reprocessing into a fission-product-containing vitrified product, bottles of compressed krypton storage and a cement grout containing the tritium, that together have a volume of only about one eighth the volume of the original UNF. The other waste forms have larger volumes than the original UNF but contain only the remaining 0.1% of the radioactivity. (authors)

Phillips, Chris; Willis, William; Carter, Robert [EnergySolutions Federal EPC., 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States)] [EnergySolutions Federal EPC., 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA, 99354 (United States); Baker, Stephen [UK National Nuclear Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom)] [UK National Nuclear Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Fusion-Fission Hybrid for Fissile Fuel Production without Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two scenarios are typically envisioned for thorium fuel cycles: 'open' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th and fission of {sup 233}U in situ without reprocessing or 'closed' cycles based on irradiation of {sup 232}Th followed by reprocessing, and recycling of {sup 233}U either in situ or in critical fission reactors. This study evaluates a third option based on the possibility of breeding fissile material in a fusion-fission hybrid reactor and burning the same fuel in a critical reactor without any reprocessing or reconditioning. This fuel cycle requires the hybrid and the critical reactor to use the same fuel form. TRISO particles embedded in carbon pebbles were selected as the preferred form of fuel and an inertial laser fusion system featuring a subcritical blanket was combined with critical pebble bed reactors, either gas-cooled or liquid-salt-cooled. The hybrid reactor was modeled based on the earlier, hybrid version of the LLNL Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE1) system, whereas the critical reactors were modeled according to the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) and the Pebble Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR) design. An extensive neutronic analysis was carried out for both the hybrid and the fission reactors in order to track the fuel composition at each stage of the fuel cycle and ultimately determine the plant support ratio, which has been defined as the ratio between the thermal power generated in fission reactors and the fusion power required to breed the fissile fuel burnt in these fission reactors. It was found that the maximum attainable plant support ratio for a thorium fuel cycle that employs neither enrichment nor reprocessing is about 2. This requires tuning the neutron energy towards high energy for breeding and towards thermal energy for burning. A high fuel loading in the pebbles allows a faster spectrum in the hybrid blanket; mixing dummy carbon pebbles with fuel pebbles enables a softer spectrum in the critical reactors. This combination consumes about 20% of the thorium initially loaded in the hybrid reactor ({approx}200 GWd/tHM), partially during hybrid operation, but mostly during operation in the critical reactor. The plant support ratio is low compared to the one attainable using continuous fuel chemical reprocessing, which can yield a plant support ratio of about 20, but the resulting fuel cycle offers better proliferation resistance as fissile material is never separated from the other fuel components.

Fratoni, M; Moir, R W; Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Meier, W R; Powers, J J

2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

268

Sustainability Considerations in Spent Light-water Nuclear Fuel Retrievability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines long-term cost differences between two competing Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels: Uranium Oxide (UOX) and Mixed Uranium Oxide-Plutonium Oxide (MOX). Since these costs are calculated on a life-cycle basis, expected savings from lower future MOX fuel prices can be used to value the option of substituting MOX for UOX, including the value of maintaining access to the used UOX fuel that could be reprocessed to make MOX. The two most influential cost drivers are the price of natural uranium and the cost of reprocessing. Significant and sustained reductions in reprocessing costs and/or sustained increases in uranium prices are required to give positive value to the retrievability of Spent Nuclear Fuel. While this option has positive economic value, it might not be exercised for 50 to 200 years. Therefore, there are many years for a program during which reprocessing technology can be researched, developed, demonstrated, and deployed. Further research is required to determine whether the cost of such a program would yield positive net present value and/or increases the sustainability of LWR energy systems.

Wood, Thomas W.; Rothwell, Geoffrey

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

269

A framework for nuclear facility safeguard evaluation using probabilistic methods and expert elicitation .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??With the advancement of the next generation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, concerns of the effectiveness of nuclear facility safeguards have been increasing due to… (more)

Iamsumang, Chonlagarn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Energy Conversion and Transmission Facilities (South Dakota) | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Conversion and Transmission Facilities (South Dakota) Energy Conversion and Transmission Facilities (South Dakota) Energy Conversion and Transmission Facilities (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Retail Supplier Institutional Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Dakota Public Utilities Commission This legislation applies to energy conversion facilities designed for or capable of generating 100 MW or more of electricity, wind energy facilities with a combined capacity of 100 MW, certain transmission facilities, and

271

Extraction of uranium from spent fuels using liquefied gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels, a novel method to extract actinides from spent fuel using highly compressed gases, nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide was proposed. As a fundamental study, the nitrate conversion with liquefied nitrogen dioxide and the nitrate extraction with supercritical carbon dioxide were demonstrated by using uranium dioxide powder, uranyl nitrate and tri-n-butylphosphate complex in the present study. (authors)

Sawada, Kayo; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

273

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

274

Certified Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Industrial Leaders: The industrial facilities shown below are among the first to earn certification for Superior Energy Performance® (SEP™).

275

The Results From the First High-Pressure Melt Ejection Test Completed in the Molten Fuel Moderator Interaction Facility at Chalk River Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-pressure melt ejection test using prototypical corium was conducted at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Chalk River Laboratories. This test was planned by the CANDU Owners Group to study the potential for an energetic interaction between molten fuel and water under postulated single-channel flow-blockage events. The experiments were designed to address regulator concerns surrounding this very low probability postulated accident events in CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors. The objective of the experimental program is to determine whether a highly energetic 'steam explosion' and associated high-pressure pulse, is possible when molten material is finely fragmented as it is ejected from a fuel channel into the heavy-water moderator. The finely fragmented melt particles would transfer energy to the moderator as it is dispersed, creating a modest pressure pulse in the calandria vessel. The high-pressure melt ejection test consisted of heating up a {approx} 5 kg thermite mixture of U, U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, Zr, and CrO{sub 3} inside a 1.14-m length of insulated pressure tube. When the molten material reached the desired temperature of {approx} 2400 deg C, the pressure inside the tube was raised to 11.6 MPa, failing the pressure tube at a pre-machined flaw, and releasing the molten material into the surrounding tank of 68 deg C water. The experiment investigated the dynamic pressure history, debris size, and the effects of the material interacting with tubes representing neighbouring fuel channels. The measured mean particle size was 0.686 mm and the peak dynamic pressures were between 2.54 and 4.36 MPa, indicating that an energetic interaction between the melt and the water did not occur in the test. (authors)

Nitheanandan, T.; Kyle, G.; O'Connor, R.; Sanderson, DB. [Chalk River Laboratories, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Summary of national and international fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Worldwide activities related to nuclear fuel cycle and radioactive waste management programs are summarized. Several trends have developed in waste management strategy: All countries having to dispose of reprocessing wastes plan on conversion of the high-level waste (HLW) stream to a borosilicate glass and eventual emplacement of the glass logs, suitably packaged, in a deep geologic repository. Countries that must deal with plutonium-contaminated waste emphasize pluonium recovery, volume reduction and fixation in cement or bitumen in their treatment plans and expect to use deep geologic repositories for final disposal. Commercially available, classical engineering processing are being used worldwide to treat and immobilize low- and intermediate-level wastes (LLW, ILW); disposal to surface structures, shallow-land burial and deep-underground repositories, such as played-out mines, is being done widely with no obvious technical problems. Many countries have established extensive programs to prepare for construction and operation of geologic repositories. Geologic media being studied fall into three main classes: argillites (clay or shale); crystalline rock (granite, basalt, gneiss or gabbro); and evaporates (salt formations). Most nations plan to allow 30 years or longer between discharge of fuel from the reactor and emplacement of HLW or spent fuel is a repository to permit thermal and radioactive decay. Most repository designs are based on the mined-gallery concept, placing waste or spent fuel packages into shallow holes in the floor of the gallery. Many countries have established extensive and costly programs of site evaluation, repository development and safety assessment. Two other waste management problems are the subject of major R and D programs in several countries: stabilization of uranium mill tailing piles; and immobilization or disposal of contaminated nuclear facilities, namely reactors, fuel cycle plants and R and D laboratories.

Harmon, K.M.; Lakey, L.T.; Leigh, I.W.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

New developments and prospects on COSI, the simulation software for fuel cycle analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COSI, software developed by the Nuclear Energy Direction of the CEA, is a code simulating a pool of nuclear power plants with its associated fuel cycle facilities. This code has been designed to study various short, medium and long term options for the introduction of various types of nuclear reactors and for the use of associated nuclear materials. In the frame of the French Act for waste management, scenario studies are carried out with COSI, to compare different options of evolution of the French reactor fleet and options of partitioning and transmutation of plutonium and minor actinides. Those studies aim in particular at evaluating the sustainability of Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) deployment and the possibility to transmute minor actinides. The COSI6 version is a completely renewed software released in 2006. COSI6 is now coupled with the last version of CESAR (CESAR5.3 based on JEFF3.1.1 nuclear data) allowing the calculations on irradiated fuel with 200 fission products and 100 heavy nuclides. A new release is planned in 2013, including in particular the coupling with a recommended database of reactors. An exercise of validation of COSI6, carried out on the French PWR historic nuclear fleet, has been performed. During this exercise quantities like cumulative natural uranium consumption, or cumulative depleted uranium, or UOX/MOX spent fuel storage, or stocks of reprocessed uranium, or plutonium content in fresh MOX fuel, or the annual production of high level waste, have been computed by COSI6 and compared to industrial data. The results have allowed us to validate the essential phases of the fuel cycle computation, and reinforces the credibility of the results provided by the code.

Eschbach, R.; Meyer, M.; Coquelet-Pascal, C.; Tiphine, M.; Krivtchik, G.; Cany, C. [Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission - CEA, CEA-Cadarache, DEN, DER, SPRC, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Advanced Fuel Cycles Activities in IAEA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considerable scientific and technical progress in many areas of Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) has been recognized as probable answers to ever-growing issues threatening sustainability, environmental protection and non-proliferation. These recent global developments such as Russian initiative on Global Nuclear Infrastructure-International Fuel Centre and the US initiative on Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) have made advanced fuel cycles as one of the decisive influencing factor for the future growth of nuclear energy. International Atomic Energy Agency has initiated the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) with overall objective of bringing together technology holders and technology users to consider jointly the international and national actions required achieving desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. One of the interesting common features of these initiatives (INPRO, GNEP and GNI-IFC) is closed fast reactor fuel cycles and proliferation resistance. Any fuel cycle that integrate P and T into it is also known as 'Advanced Fuel Cycle' (AFC) that could achieve reduction of plutonium and Minor Actinide (MA) elements (namely Am, Np, Cm, etc.). In this regard, some Member States are also evaluating alternative concepts involving the use of thorium fuel cycle, inert-matrix fuel or coated particle fuel. Development of 'fast reactors with closed fuel cycles' would be the most essential step for implementation of P and T. The scale of realization of any AFC depends on the maturity of the development of all these elemental technologies such as recycling MA, Pu as well as reprocessed uranium. In accordance with the objectives of the Agency, the programme B entitled 'Nuclear Fuel cycle technologies and materials' initiated several activities aiming to strengthen the capabilities of interested Member States for policy making, strategic planning, technology development and implementation of safe, reliable, economically efficient, proliferation resistant, environmentally sound and secure nuclear fuel cycle programmes. The paper describes some on-going IAEA activities in the area of: MA-fuel and target, thorium fuel cycle, coated particle fuel, MA-property database, inert matrix fuels, liquid metal cooled fast reactor fuels and fuel cycles, management of reprocessed uranium and proliferation resistance in fuel cycle. (authors)

Nawada, H.P.; Ganguly, C. [Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Materials Section, Division of Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Technology, Department of Nuclear Energy, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility- August 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Review of Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operations

280

Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) on Mono-uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US National Energy Policy of 2001 advocated the development of advanced fuel and fuel cycle technologies that are cleaner, more efficient, less waste-intensive, and more proliferation resistant. The need for advanced fuel development is emphasized in on-going DOE-supported programs, e.g., Global Nuclear Energy Initiative (GNEI), Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and GEN-IV Technology Development. The Directorates of Energy & Environment (E&E) and Chemistry & Material Sciences (C&MS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are interested in advanced fuel research and manufacturing using its multi-disciplinary capability and facilities to support a design concept of a small, secure, transportable, and autonomous reactor (SSTAR). The E&E and C&MS Directorates co-sponsored this Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) Project on Mono-Uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications. In fact, three out of the six GEN-IV reactor concepts consider using the nitride-based fuel, as shown in Table 1. SSTAR is a liquid-metal cooled, fast reactor. It uses nitride fuel in a sealed reactor vessel that could be shipped to the user and returned to the supplier having never been opened in its long operating lifetime. This sealed reactor concept envisions no fuel refueling nor on-site storage of spent fuel, and as a result, can greatly enhance proliferation resistance. However, the requirement for a sealed, long-life core imposes great challenges to research and development of the nitride fuel and its cladding. Cladding is an important interface between the fuel and coolant and a barrier to prevent fission gas release during normal and accidental conditions. In fabricating the nitride fuel rods and assemblies, the cladding material should be selected based on its the coolant-side corrosion properties, the chemical/physical interaction with the nitride fuel, as well as their thermal and neutronic properties. The US NASA space reactor, the SP-100 was designed to use mono-uranium nitride fuel. Although the SP-100 reactor was not commissioned, tens of thousand of nitride fuel pellets were manufactured and lots of them, cladded in Nb-1-Zr had been irradiated in fast test reactors (FFTF and EBR-II) with good irradiation results. The Russian Naval submarines also use nitride fuel with stainless steel cladding (HT-9) in Pb-Bi coolant. Although the operating experience of the Russian submarine is not readily available, such combination of fuel, cladding and coolant has been proposed for a commercial-size liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (BREST-300). Uranium mono-nitride fuel is studied in this LDRD Project due to its favorable properties such as its high actinide density and high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of mono-nitride is 10 times higher than that of oxide (23 W/m-K for UN vs. 2.3 W/m-K for UO{sub 2} at 1000 K) and its melting temperature is much higher than that of metal fuel (2630 C for UN vs. 1132 C for U metal). It also has relatively high actinide density, (13.51 gU/cm{sup 3} in UN vs. 9.66 gU/cm{sup 3} in UO{sub 2}) which is essential for a compact reactor core design. The objective of this LDRD Project is to: (1) Establish a manufacturing capability for uranium-based ceramic nuclear fuel, (2) Develop a computational capability to analyze nuclear fuel performance, (3) Develop a modified UN-based fuel that can support a compact long-life reactor core, and (4) Collaborate with the Nuclear Engineering Department of UC Berkeley on nitride fuel reprocessing and disposal in a geologic repository.

Choi, J; Ebbinghaus, B; Meiers, T; Ahn, J

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NNSA B-Roll: MOX Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1999, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) signed a contract with a consortium, now called Shaw AREVA MOX Services, LLC to design, build, and operate a Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility. This facility will be a major component in the United States program to dispose of surplus weapon-grade plutonium. The facility will take surplus weapon-grade plutonium, remove impurities, and mix it with uranium oxide to form MOX fuel pellets for reactor fuel assemblies. These assemblies will be irradiated in commercial nuclear power reactors.

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

282

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Webmaster  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Printable Version Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Research Home Projects Success Stories Research Staff Facilities Working with Us...

283

NREL: Electricity Integration Research - Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL's electricity integration research is conducted in state-of-the-art facilities. These facilities assist industry in the development of power systems and address the operational challenges of full system integration. The Energy Systems Integration Facility can be used to design, test, and analyze components and systems to enable economic, reliable integration of renewable electricity, fuel production, storage, and building efficiency technologies with the U.S. electricity delivery infrastructure. New grid integration capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center will allow testing of many grid integration aspects of multi-megawatt, utility-scale variable renewable generation and storage technologies. The Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility can be used to characterize,

284

International auspices for the storage of spent nuclear fuel as a nonproliferation measure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The maintenance of spent nuclear fuel from power reactors will pose problems regardless of how or when the debate over reprocessing is resolved. At present, many reactor sites contain significant buildups of spent fuel stored in holding pools, and no measure short of shutting down reactors with no remaining storage capacity will alleviate the need for away-from-reactor storage. Although the federal government has committed itself to dealing with the spent fuel problem, no solution has been reached, largely because of a debate over differing projections of storage capacity requirements. Proliferation of weapons grade nuclear material in many nations presents another pressing issue. If nations with small nuclear programs are forced to deal with their own spent fuel accumulations, they will either have to reprocess it indigenously or contract to have it reprocessed in a foreign reprocessing plant. In either case, these nations may eventually possess sufficient resources to assemble a nuclear weapon. The problem of spent fuel management demands real global solutions, and further delay in solving the problem of spent nuclear fuel accumulation, both nationally and globally, can benefit only a small class of elected officials in the short term and may inflict substantial costs on the American public, and possibly the world. (JMT)

O'Brien, J.N.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

The Economic, repository and proliferation implications of advanced nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare the effects of recycling actinides using fast burner reactors, with recycle that would be done using inert matrix fuel burned in conventional light water reactors. In the fast reactor option, actinides from both spent light water and fast reactor fuel would be recycled. In the inert matrix fuel option, actinides from spent light water fuel would be recycled, but the spent inert matrix fuel would not be reprocessed. The comparison was done over a limited 100-year time horizon. The economic, repository and proliferation implications of these options all hinge on the composition of isotopic byproducts of power production. We took the perspective that back-end economics would be affected by the cost of spent fuel reprocessing (whether conventional uranium dioxide fuel, or fast reactor fuel), fuel manufacture, and ultimate disposal of high level waste in a Yucca Mountain like geological repository. Central to understanding these costs was determining the overall amount of reprocessing needed to implement a fast burner, or inert matrix fuel, recycle program. The total quantity of high level waste requiring geological disposal (along with its thermal output), and the cost of reprocessing were also analyzed. A major advantage of the inert matrix fuel option is that it could in principle be implemented using the existing fleet of commercial power reactors. A central finding of this project was that recycling actinides using an inert matrix fuel could achieve reductions in overall actinide production that are nearly very close to those that could be achieved by recycling the actinides using a fast burner reactor.

Mark Deinert; K.B. Cady

2011-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

286

Effects of the shutdown of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant on nearby streams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a study conducted in 1971, levels of tritium were found in Cattaraugus-Creek, a stream in Western New York State. This material was attributed to the operation in West Valley, New York of the world's first...

B. A. Bolton; M. A. Salerno; Ph. K. Hopke

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from the commercial facilities. In support of the development of the CRWMS, OCRWM sponsored the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project. The objective of this project was to assess the capability of each commercial facility to handle various spent nuclear fuel shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. The project was conducted in two phases. During Phase I, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the data base for the project was created. During Phase II, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the data base was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed.

Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States); Pope, R.B. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Science Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Microscopy Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE) Proton Radiography Trident Laser Facility LOOK INTO LANL - highlights...

289

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Ryder Opens Natural Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility on AddThis.com... June 28, 2011 Ryder Opens Natural Gas Vehicle Maintenance Facility

290

December 5, 2005 Facilities Management Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in areas adjacent to smoker's stations and will deposit all cigarette butts in smoker's stations. Grounds within 50 feet of gas pumps and other fueling areas. Philip Jones Associate Vice Chancellor Facilities

Howitt, Ivan

291

Fuel cycle options for optimized recycling of nuclear fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The accumulation of transuranic inventories in spent nuclear fuel depends on both deployment of advanced reactors that can be loaded with recycled transuranics (TRU), and on availability of the facilities that separate and ...

Aquien, Alexandre

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Effect of reduced enrichment on the fuel cycle for research reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new fuels developed by the RERTR Program and by other international programs for application in research reactors with reduced uranium enrichment (<20% EU) are discussed. It is shown that these fuels, combined with proper fuel-element design and fuel-management strategies, can provide at least the same core residence time as high-enrichment fuels in current use, and can frequently significantly extend it. The effect of enrichment reduction on other components of the research reactor fuel cycle, such as uranium and enrichment requirements, fuel fabrication, fuel shipment, and reprocessing are also briefly discussed with their economic implications. From a systematic comparison of HEU and LEU cores for the same reference research reactor, it is concluded that the new fuels have a potential for reducing the research reactor fuel cycle costs while reducing, at the same time, the uranium enrichment of the fuel.

Travelli, A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Preparation for the Recovery of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) at Andreeva Bay, North West Russia - 13309  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Andreeva Bay is located near Murmansk in the Russian Federation close to the Norwegian border. The ex-naval site was used to de-fuel nuclear-powered submarines and icebreakers during the Cold War. Approximately 22,000 fuel assemblies remain in three Dry Storage Units (DSUs) which means that Andreeva Bay has one of the largest stockpiles of highly enriched spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the world. The high contamination and deteriorating condition of the SNF canisters has made improvements to the management of the SNF a high priority for the international community for safety, security and environmental reasons. International Donors have, since 2002, provided support to projects at Andreeva concerned with improving the management of the SNF. This long-term programme of work has been coordinated between the International Donors and responsible bodies within the Russian Federation. Options for the safe and secure management of SNF at Andreeva Bay were considered in 2004 and developed by a number of Russian Institutes with international participation. This consisted of site investigations, surveys and studies to understand the technical challenges. A principal agreement was reached that the SNF would be removed from the site altogether and transported to Russia's reprocessing facility at Mayak in the Urals. The analytical studies provided the information necessary to develop the construction plan for the site. Following design and regulatory processes, stakeholders endorsed the technical solution in April 2007. This detailed the processes, facilities and equipment required to safely remove the SNF and identified other site services and support facilities required on the site. Implementation of this strategy is now well underway with the facilities in various states of construction. Physical works have been performed to address the most urgent tasks including weather protection over one of the DSUs, installation of shielding over the cells, provision of radiation protection infrastructure and general preparation of the site for construction of the facilities for the removal of the SNF. This paper describes the development and implementation of the strategy and work to improve the safe and secure management of SNF, preparing it for retrieval and removal from Andreeva Bay. (authors)

Field, D.; McAtamney, N. [Nuvia Limited (United Kingdom)] [Nuvia Limited (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

295

Mobile Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. To explore science questions beyond those addressed by ARM's fixed sites at

296

Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Decision Makers  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation slides from the May 8, 2012, Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar, Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers.

297

The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2010: Why Top Companies are Purchasing Fuel Cells Today  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report profiles companies and corporations that are deploying or demonstrating fuel cells for power in warehouses, stores, manufacturing facilities, hotels, and telecommunications sites.

298

Remote Facilities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remote Facilities Remote Facilities Remote Facilities October 16, 2013 - 4:55pm Addthis Renewable Energy Options for Renovations in Remote Areas Photovoltaics (PV) Small Wind Daylighting Solar Water Heating Passive Solar Design Biomass Heating When a Federal building or facility is located away from existing power lines, many renewable energy technologies including photovoltaics and wind become cost-effective options when compared to extending utilities or transporting fuel for onsite generators. Photovoltaics Photovoltaics (PV) are often cost-effective in remote power applications. In these circumstances, the system is coupled with batteries and can provide complete facility power. Proper system design is critical and must account for the building electrical loads and be sized to meet that load

299

Virginia Regional Industrial Facilities Act (Virginia) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Regional Industrial Facilities Act (Virginia) Regional Industrial Facilities Act (Virginia) Virginia Regional Industrial Facilities Act (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Regional Industrial Facility Authorities The Virginia Regional Industrial Facilities Act is meant to aid the economic development of localities within the Commonwealth. The Act provides a mechanism for localities to establish regional industrial facility authorities, enabling them to pool financial resources to stimulate economic development. The purpose of a regional industrial

300

NETL- Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NETL's Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany studies how new and old materials will stand up to new operating conditions. Work done in the lab supports NETL's oxy-fuel combustion oxidation work, refractory materials stability work, and the fuels program, in particular the hydrogen membrane materials stability work, to determine how best to upgrade existing power plants.

None

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

NETL- Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's Severe Environment Corrosion Erosion Facility in Albany studies how new and old materials will stand up to new operating conditions. Work done in the lab supports NETL's oxy-fuel combustion oxidation work, refractory materials stability work, and the fuels program, in particular the hydrogen membrane materials stability work, to determine how best to upgrade existing power plants.

None

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

302

Interim Storage Facility decommissioning. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Interim Storage Facility were completed. Activities included performing a detailed radiation survey of the facility, removing surface and imbedded contamination, excavating and removing the fuel storage cells, restoring the site to natural conditions, and shipping waste to Hanford, Washington, for burial. The project was accomplished on schedule and 30% under budget with no measurable exposure to decommissioning personnel.

Johnson, R.P.; Speed, D.L.

1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Facts and issues of direct disposal of spent fuel; Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews those facts and issues that affect the direct disposal of spent reactor fuels. It is intended as a resource document for those impacted by the current Department of Energy (DOE) guidance that calls for the cessation of fuel reprocessing. It is not intended as a study of the specific impacts (schedules and costs) to the Savannah River Site (SRS) alone. Commercial fuels, other low enriched fuels, highly enriched defense-production, research, and naval reactor fuels are included in this survey, except as prevented by rules on classification.

Parks, P.B.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Advanced Powertrain Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

95F 95F Vehicle Setup Information Vehicle architecture PHEV Test cell location Front Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Document date 10/18/2013 Vehicle dynamometer Input Revision Number 1 Test weight [lb] 3518 Notes: Target A [lb] 21.47 Target B [lb/mph] 0.21588 Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.012508 Test Fuel Information Revision Number 1 Test weight [lb] 3518 Test Fuel Information Fuel type EPA Tier II EEE HF0437 Fuel density [g/ml] 0.742 Fuel Net HV [BTU/lbm] 18475 Fuel type EPA Tier II EEE HF0437 T e s t I D [ # ] C y c l e C o l d s t a r t ( C S t ) H o t s t a r t [ H S t ] D a t e T e s t C e l l T e m p [ C ] T e s t C e l l R H [ % ] T e s t C e l l B a r o [ i n / H g ] V e h i c l e c o o l i n g f a n s p e e d : S p e e d M a t c h [ S M ] o r c o n s t a n t s p e e d [ C S ] S o l a r L a m p s [ W / m 2 ] V e i c l e C l i m a t e C o n t r o l s e t t i n g s H o o d P o s i t i o n [ U p ] o r [ C l o s e d ] W i n d o w P o s i t i o n [ C l o s e d ] o r [ D o w n ] C y

305

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Dose reconstruction for an occupational cohort at the Savannah River nuclear facility: evaluation of a hybrid method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......reprocessing of reactor fuels(19). However...type and number of reactors operating at SRS...dose. Statistical analysis The proportion of...her coworker. The reliability of this estimation...Statistical Nuclear Reactors statistics & numerical...methods Tritium analysis United States...

Ghassan Hamra; Leena A. Nylander-French; David Richardson

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

308

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

309

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and the System Engineer Program.Chg 1 incorporates the use of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, mandatory for Hazard Category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 420.1A.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

310

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

DOE-STD-1104 contains the Department's method and criteria for reviewing and approving nuclear facility's documented safety analysis (DSA). This review and approval formally document the basis for DOE, concluding that a facility can be operated safely in a manner that adequately protects workers, the public, and the environment. Therefore, it is appropriate to formally require implementation of the review methodology and criteria contained in DOE-STD-1104.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hydrogen Fuel Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past 6 years, open discussions and/or meetings have been held and are still on-going with OEM, Hydrogen Suppliers, other test facilities from the North America Team and International collaborators regarding experimental results, fuel clean-up cost, modeling, and analytical techniques to help determine levels of constituents for the development of an international standard for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12). Significant progress has been made. The process for the fuel standard is entering final stages as a result of the technical accomplishments. The objectives are to: (1) Determine the allowable levels of hydrogen fuel contaminants in support of the development of science-based international standards for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12); and (2) Validate the ASTM test method for determining low levels of non-hydrogen constituents.

Rockward, Tommy [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

312

VISION - Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. DOE Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative’s (AFCI) fundamental objective is to provide technology options that - if implemented - would enable long-term growth of nuclear power while improving sustainability and energy security. The AFCI organization structure consists of four areas; Systems Analysis, Fuels, Separations and Transmutations. The Systems Analysis Working Group is tasked with bridging the program technical areas and providing the models, tools, and analyses required to assess the feasibility of design and deployment options and inform key decision makers. An integral part of the Systems Analysis tool set is the development of a system level model that can be used to examine the implications of the different mixes of reactors, implications of fuel reprocessing, impact of deployment technologies, as well as potential "exit" or "off ramp" approaches to phase out technologies, waste management issues and long-term repository needs. The Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model (VISION) is a computer-based simulation model that allows performing dynamic simulations of fuel cycles to quantify infrastructure requirements and identify key trade-offs between alternatives. It is based on the current AFCI system analysis tool "DYMOND-US" functionalities in addition to economics, isotopic decay, and other new functionalities. VISION is intended to serve as a broad systems analysis and study tool applicable to work conducted as part of the AFCI and Generation IV reactor development studies.

Steven J. Piet; A. M. Yacout; J. J. Jacobson; C. Laws; G. E. Matthern; D. E. Shropshire

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Renewable Energy Co-Location of Distribution Facilities (Virginia) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Co-Location of Distribution Facilities (Virginia) Co-Location of Distribution Facilities (Virginia) Renewable Energy Co-Location of Distribution Facilities (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia State Corporation Commission This legislation applies to distribution facilities, which include poles and wires, cables, pipelines, or other underground conduits by which a renewable generator is able to (i) supply electricity generated at its

314

Pyroprocessing of IFR Metal Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle features the use of an innovative reprocessing method, known as {open_quotes}pyroprocessing{close_quotes} featuring fused-salt electrofining of the spent fuel. Electrofining of IFR spent fuel involves uranium recovery by electro-transport to a solid steel cathode. The thermodynamics of the system preclude plutonium recovery in the same way, so a liquid cadmium cathode located in the electrolyte salt phase is utilized. The deposition of Pu, Am, Np, and Cm takes place at the liquid cadmium cathode in the form of cadmium intermetallic compounds (e.g, PuCd{sub 6}), and uranium deposits as the pure metal when cadmium saturation is reached. A small amount of rare earth fission products deposit together with the heavy metals at both the solid and liquid cadmium cathodes, providing a significant degree of self-protection. A full scope demonstration of the IFR fuel cycle will begin in 1993, using fuel irradiated in EBR-II.

Laidler, J.J. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the health and safety impact of fossil fuel emissions.to public health and safety, of any fossil fuel plant areHEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel and Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

317

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

318

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Arkansas Incentives and Laws Arkansas Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Electric Vehicle (EV) Equipment and Fuel Cell Income Tax Credit Repealed: 03/06/2009 The following was repealed by House Bill 2081, 2009: An income tax credit is available to Arkansas taxpayers to offset the costs of an Arkansas-based facility that designs, develops, or produces advanced technologies, including EV equipment and fuel cells. The credit is equal to 50% of the amount spent during the taxable year to purchase or construct the facility, including land acquisition, infrastructure improvements, renovation,

319

NETL: Research Capabilities and Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities and Facilities Research Capabilities and Facilities Onsite Research Research Capabilities and Facilities Lab Worker As the lead field center for the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's research and development program, NETL has established a strong onsite research program conducted by Federal scientists and engineers. Onsite R&D – managed by NETL's Office of Research and Development – makes important contributions to NETL's mission of implementing a research, development, and demonstration program to resolve the environmental, supply, and reliability constraints of producing and using fossil resources. With its expert research staff and state-of-the-art facilities, NETL has extensive experience in working with the technical issues related to fossil resources. Onsite researchers also participate with NETL's industrial partners to solve problems that become barriers to commercialization of power systems, fuels, and environmental and waste management. Onsite research capabilities are strengthened by collaborations with well-known research universities.

320

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Fossil-Fuel and Geothermal Power Plants", Lawrenceof fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants. Choosing whatfor solid waste in geothermal power plants is the same as

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Program Market Readiness Workshop DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program February 16, 2011 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Fuel Cells - Where are we today? Fuel Cells for Transportation In the U.S., there are currently: > 200 fuel cell vehicles ~ 20 active fuel cell buses ~ 60 fueling stations In the U.S., there are currently: ~9 million metric tons of H 2 produced annually > 1200 miles of H 2 pipelines Fuel Cells for Stationary Power, Auxiliary Power, and Specialty Vehicles Fuel cells can be a cost-competitive option for critical-load facilities, backup power, and forklifts. The largest markets for fuel cells today are in

322

Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to present and analyze the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. During Phase 1, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the database for the project was created. During Phase 2, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the database was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed. Each assessment of cask-handling capability contains three parts: the current capability of the facility (planning base); the potential enhanced capability if revisions were made to the facility licensing and/or administrative controls; and the potential enhanced capability if limited physical modifications were made to the facility. The main conclusion derived from the planning base assessments is that the current facility capabilities will not allow handling of any of the FICA Casks at 49 of the 122 facilities evaluated. However, consideration of potential revisions and/or modifications showed that all but one of the 49 facilities could be adapted to handle at least one of the FICA Casks. For this to be possible, facility licensing, administrative controls, and/or physical aspects of the facility would need to be modified.

Pope, R.B. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); MacDonald, R.R. [ed.] [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, Vienna, VA (United States); Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Draft (12-01-2006): GHRS Instrument Science Report No. 92 Final reprocessing of GHRS data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

instrument team members are gone or busy supporting other instruments ­ we were facing the danger of losing for GHRS and so the files in the Archive were static and did not get reprocessed as better reference files came along later in the mission. We wanted to process the entire GHRS holding with a consistent set

Sirianni, Marco

324

Small Power Production Facilities (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facilities (Montana) Facilities (Montana) Small Power Production Facilities (Montana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Interconnection Provider Montana Public Service Commission For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that: : (a) produces electricity by the use, as a primary energy source, of biomass, waste, water, wind, or other renewable resource, or any combination of those sources; or : (b) produces electricity and useful forms of thermal energy, such as heat

325

Property Tax Abatement for Production and Manufacturing Facilities |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Abatement for Production and Manufacturing Facilities Abatement for Production and Manufacturing Facilities Property Tax Abatement for Production and Manufacturing Facilities < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Solar Heating & Cooling Swimming Pool Heaters Water Heating Heating Wind Program Info Start Date 5/25/2007 State Montana Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Rebate Amount 50% tax abatement Provider Montana Department of Revenue In May 2007, Montana enacted legislation (H.B. 3) that allows a property tax abatement for new renewable energy production facilities, new renewable energy manufacturing facilities, and renewable energy research and

326

IFR fuel cycle--pyroprocess development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle is based on the use of a metallic fuel alloy, with nominal composition U-2OPu-lOZr. In its present state of development, this fuel system offers excellent high-burnup capabilities. Test fuel has been carried to burnups in excess of 20 atom % in EBR-II irradiations, and to peak burnups over 15 atom % in FFTF. The metallic fuel possesses physical characteristics, in particular very high thermal conductivity, that facilitate a high degree of passive inherent safety in the IFR design. The fuel has been shown to provide very large margins to failure in overpower transient events. Rapid overpower transient tests carried out in the TREAT reactor have shown the capability to withstand up to 400% overpower conditions before failing. An operational transient test conducted in EBR-II at a power ramp rate of 0.1% per second reached its termination point of 130% of normal power without any fuel failures. The IFR metallic fuel also exhibits superior compatibility with the liquid sodium coolant. Equally as important as the performance advantages offered by the use of metallic fuel is the fact that this fuel system permits the use of an innovative reprocessing method, known as ``pyroprocessing,`` featuring fused-salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Development of the IFR pyroprocess has been underway at the Argonne National Laboratory for over five years, and great progress has been made toward establishing a commercially-viable process. Pyroprocessing offers a simple, compact means for closure of the fuel cycle, with anticipated significant savings in fuel cycle costs.

Laidler, J.J.; Miller, W.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

IFR fuel cycle--pyroprocess development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel cycle is based on the use of a metallic fuel alloy, with nominal composition U-2OPu-lOZr. In its present state of development, this fuel system offers excellent high-burnup capabilities. Test fuel has been carried to burnups in excess of 20 atom % in EBR-II irradiations, and to peak burnups over 15 atom % in FFTF. The metallic fuel possesses physical characteristics, in particular very high thermal conductivity, that facilitate a high degree of passive inherent safety in the IFR design. The fuel has been shown to provide very large margins to failure in overpower transient events. Rapid overpower transient tests carried out in the TREAT reactor have shown the capability to withstand up to 400% overpower conditions before failing. An operational transient test conducted in EBR-II at a power ramp rate of 0.1% per second reached its termination point of 130% of normal power without any fuel failures. The IFR metallic fuel also exhibits superior compatibility with the liquid sodium coolant. Equally as important as the performance advantages offered by the use of metallic fuel is the fact that this fuel system permits the use of an innovative reprocessing method, known as pyroprocessing,'' featuring fused-salt electrorefining of the spent fuel. Development of the IFR pyroprocess has been underway at the Argonne National Laboratory for over five years, and great progress has been made toward establishing a commercially-viable process. Pyroprocessing offers a simple, compact means for closure of the fuel cycle, with anticipated significant savings in fuel cycle costs.

Laidler, J.J.; Miller, W.E.; Johnson, T.R.; Ackerman, J.P.; Battles, J.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Spent Nuclear Fuel Self-Induced XRF to Predict Pu to U Content  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area of interest, would improve input accountability and shipper/receiver differences. XRF measurements were made on individual PWR fuel rods with varying fuel ages and final burn-ups at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in July 2008 and January... Committee NRF Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence viii ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pu Plutonium PUREX Plutonium and Uranium Recovery by Extraction PWR Pressurized Water Reactor RPP Reprocessing Plant SNM Special Nuclear Material...

Stafford, Alissa Sarah

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

329

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. Cancels DOE 5480.7A, DOE 5480.24, DOE 5480.28 and Division 13 of DOE 6430.1A. Canceled by DOE O 420.1A.

1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

330

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1B, DOE G 420.1-2 and DOE G 420.1-3.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

331

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Use Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

332

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

333

RADIATION DOSE ASPECTS IN THE HANDLING OF EMERGING NUCLEAR FUELS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......transmutation in LMFBR, and uranium (U) matrix fuels...161. 15 NUREG. Standard review plan for the review of an application...16 IAEA. Safety of uranium fuel fabrication facilities...2010) IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSG-6......

G. Nicolaou

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

RADIATION DOSE ASPECTS IN THE HANDLING OF EMERGING NUCLEAR FUELS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Prot. (2008) 28:161. 15 NUREG. Standard review plan for the review of an application for a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel...fabrication facility. (2000) NUREG-1718, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. 16 IAEA. Safety of uranium fuel fabrication......

G. Nicolaou

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Fuel Services Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Fuel Services GNEP would build and strengthen a reliable international fuel services consortium under which "fuel supplier nations" would choose to operate both nuclear power plants and fuel production and handling facilities, providing reliable fuel services to "user nations" that choose to only operate nuclear power plants. This international consortium is a critical component of the GNEP initiative to build an improved, more proliferation-resistant nuclear fuel cycle that recycles used fuel, while Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Fact Sheet - Establish Reliable Fuel Services More Documents & Publications

336

Used Fuel Testing Transportation Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies shipping packages/casks that might be used by the Used Nuclear Fuel Disposition Campaign Program (UFDC) to ship fuel rods and pieces of fuel rods taken from high-burnup used nuclear fuel (UNF) assemblies to and between research facilities for purposes of evaluation and testing. Also identified are the actions that would need to be taken, if any, to obtain U.S. Nuclear Regulatory (NRC) or other regulatory authority approval to use each of the packages and/or shipping casks for this purpose.

Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Maheras, Steven J.; Jensen, Philip J.; England, Jeffery L.; LeDuc, Dan

2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

337

Computational Fuel Cell Research and SOFC Modeling at Penn State  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Research and Component Fabrication Kinetics and Thermal Transport Fuel Cell/Battery Simulation multidisciplinary research on fuel cells and advanced batteries for vehicle propulsion, distributed power generation, DMFC, and SOFC #12;ECEC Facilities (>5,000 sq ft) Fuel Cell/Battery Experimental Labs Fuel Cell

338

A fuel for sub-critical fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Along with the problem of the nuclear waste transmutation, the problem of minimization of waste production is of current interest. It is not possible to eliminate production of waste at a nuclear power plant, but, as is shown in this report, it is in principle possible to arrange a fuel composition with no net production of transuranic elements. The idea is to find the transuranic elements composition to which the depleted uranium is continuously supplied during frequent reprocessing, and amount of each other transuranic fuel component remains unchanged in time. For each transuranic component, the balance is achieved by equating burnup and production rates. The production is due to neutron capture by the neighboring lighter isotope and subsequent beta-decay. The burnup includes fission, neutron capture and decays. For the calculations a simplified burnup model which accounts for 9 isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium is used. The calculated fuel composition consists mainly of uranium with minority of plutonium isotopes. Such a fuel, after usage in a sub-critical fast reactor, should be reprocessed. The fission product content increases during burnup, representing a net production of waste, while the transuranic elements and {sup 238}U should be recycled into a new fuel. For such a fuel cycle, the net consumption is only for 238U, and the net waste production is just fission products.

Moiseenko, V. E.; Chernitskiy, S. V.; Agren, O.; Noack, K. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center 'Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology', Akademichna St. 1, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Science Center 'Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology', Akademichna St. 1, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Uppsala University, Angstroem Laboratory, Division of Electricity, Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

339

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

is currently posted on the Energy Department's blog. The facility uses fuel cells and biogas from the Orange County Sanitation District's wastewater treatment plant to produce...

340

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Events EventsDetail  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facility located at NREL in Golden, Colorado. February 11, 2014 Online Webinar: Additive Manufacturing for Fuel Cells This webinar will focus on additive manufacturing to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Energy Department Invests $7 Million to Commercialize Fuel Cells...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

per fueling and test 20 of these trucks at FedEx facilities in Tennessee and California. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., of Allentown, Pennsylvania, and Structural Composites...

342

LANL disassembles "pits," makes mixed-oxide fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at the MOX facility in South Carolina, the plutonium oxide from LANL will be blended with depleted uranium, fabricated into MOX fuel, and irradiated in domestic nuclear...

343

No Fossil Fuel - Kingston | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

No Fossil Fuel - Kingston No Fossil Fuel - Kingston Jump to: navigation, search Name No Fossil Fuel - Kingston Facility No Fossil Fuel - Kingston Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner No Fossil Fuel LLC Developer No Fossil Fuel LLC Energy Purchaser Net-metered Location Kingston MA Coordinates 41.97388106°, -70.72577477° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.97388106,"lon":-70.72577477,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

344

Farm Fuel Safety Accidents in the handling, use and storage of gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel, LP-gas and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

112 Farm Fuel Safety Accidents in the handling, use and storage of gasoline, gasohol, diesel fuel and by keeping fuel storage facilities in top condition. Flammable Liquids and Gases Gasoline, diesel fuel, LP flammability and safety precautions. Do not keep gasoline inside the home or transport it in the trunks

345

Fuel pin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 324 Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 324 Facility [Waste Technology Engineering Laboratory] in the 300 Area primarily supports the research and development of radioactive and nonradioactive waste vitrification technologies, biological waste remediation technologies, spent nuclear fuel studies, waste mixing and transport studies, and tritium development programs. All of the above-mentioned programs deal with, and have the potential to, release hazardous and/or radioactive material. The potential for discharge would primarily result from (1) conducting research activities using the hazardous materials, (2) storing radionuclides and hazardous chemicals, and (3) waste accumulation and storage. This report summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents, and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterizing effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

SGP Central Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

348

ARM - SGP Central Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

349

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at W. Va. Airport August 19, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Major General Allen Tackett of the National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing dispenses the first fill-up of hydrogen fuel from the Yeager facility. Major General Allen Tackett of the National Guard's 130th Airlift Wing dispenses the first fill-up of hydrogen fuel from the Yeager facility. Washington, D.C. -- A hydrogen production and dispensing station constructed and operated with support from the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) was officially opened Monday at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. The facility is an example of how domestically produced fuels may be used to power a variety of vehicles

350

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - National Fuel Cell Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center The National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC) at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) plays a crucial role in NREL's independent, third-party analysis of hydrogen fuel cell technologies in real-world operation. The NFCTEC is designed for secure management, storage, and processing of proprietary data from industry. Access to the off-network NFCTEC is limited to NREL's Technology Validation Team, which analyzes detailed data and reports on fuel cell technology status, progress, and technical challenges. Graphic representing NREL's Hydrogen Secure Data Center and the variety of applications from which it gathers data, including fuel cell (FC) stacks, FC backup power, FC forklifts, FC cars, FC buses, and FC prime power, and hydrogen infrastructure.

351

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Digg

352

Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstration Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Responses to Public Comments on the Draft Waste- Responses to Public Comments on the Draft Waste- Incidental-to-Reprocessing Evaluation for the West Valley Demonstration Project Concentrator Feed Makeup Tank and Melter Feed Hold Tank 1 Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is providing responses to the comments received from the public and from state and county agencies on the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Draft Waste-Incidental-to-Reprocessing (WIR) Evaluation for the Concentrator Feed Makeup Tank (CFMT) and the Melter Feed Hold Tank (MFHT), referred to hereafter as the Draft Evaluation. As a matter of policy and to provide greater transparency in its efforts to cleanup waste at the WVDP, DOE made the Draft Evaluation available for public and state review and comment, as

353

Fuel System and Fuel Measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fuel management provides optimal solutions to reduce fuel consumption. Merchant vessels, such as container ships, drive at a reduced speed to save fuel since the reduction of the speed from...?1 lowers consumption

Michael Palocz-Andresen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Facility Design  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Design Throughout the Energy Systems Integration Facility design process, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory hosted workshops in which stakeholders from across the...

355

Energy Facility Evaluation, Siting, Construction and Operation (New  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Facility Evaluation, Siting, Construction and Operation (New Energy Facility Evaluation, Siting, Construction and Operation (New Hampshire) Energy Facility Evaluation, Siting, Construction and Operation (New Hampshire) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Program Info State New Hampshire Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider NH Department of Environmental Services, Public Information and Permitting Unit The statute establishes a procedure for the review, approval, monitoring,

356

North Dakota Energy Conversion and Transmission Facility Siting Act (North  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dakota Energy Conversion and Transmission Facility Siting Act Dakota Energy Conversion and Transmission Facility Siting Act (North Dakota) North Dakota Energy Conversion and Transmission Facility Siting Act (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Line Extension Analysis

357

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are a variety of motivations for quantifying Pu in spent (used) fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthen the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies to safeguards nuclear facilities, quantifying shipper/receiver difference, determining the input accountability value at reprocessing facilities and providing quantitative input to burnup credit determination for repositories. For the purpose of determining the Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies, twelve NDA techniques were identified that provide information about the composition of an assembly. A key point motivating the present research path is the realization that none of these techniques, in isolation, is capable of both (1) quantifying the elemental Pu mass of an assembly and (2) detecting the diversion of a significant number of pins. As such, the focus of this work is determining how to best integrate 2 or 3 techniques into a system that can quantify elemental Pu and to assess how well this system can detect material diversion. Furthermore, it is important economically to down-select among the various techniques before advancing to the experimental phase. In order to achieve this dual goal of integration and down-selection, a Monte Carlo library of PWR assemblies was created and is described in another paper at Global 2009 (Fensin et al.). The research presented here emphasizes integration among techniques. An overview of a five year research plan starting in 2009 is given. Preliminary modeling results for the Monte Carlo assembly library are presented for 3 NDA techniques: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, and Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence. As part of the focus on integration, the concept of"Pu isotopic correlation" is discussed and the role of cooling time determination.

Tobin, S. J.; Fensin, M. L.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Menlove, H. O.; Quiter, B. J.; Sandoval, N. P.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Thompson, S. J.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

358

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility A photo of a grey, three-story research facility on a large campus. The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) incorporates a large number of energy efficiency and sustainability practices into its cutting-edge design. This facility received a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Gold-level certification from the U.S. Green Building Council and supports a variety of advanced biofuels projects and enables researchers and industry partners to develop, test, evaluate, and demonstrate processes for the production of bio-based products and fuels. Fast Facts Cost: $33.5M Square feet: 27,000 Occupants: 32 Labs/Equipment: high-bay biochemical conversion pilot plant that

359

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Hazardous Waste Facility Siting Act (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This Act establishes the means by which developers of proposed hazardous waste facilities will work with the community in which they wish to construct a facility. When the intent to construct, maintain, and/or operate a hazardous waste facility in a city or town is demonstrated, a local assessment committee will be established by that community. The

360

Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab (CPFDL) | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab May 30, 2013 Computer controlled fluidized bed CVD particle coating system The Coated Particle Fuel Development Laboratory is a modern, integrated facility for laboratory scale fabrication and characterization of uranium-bearing coated particle fuel (CPF). Within this facility, tri-isotropic (TRISO) coatings are deposited on various fuel kernels by chemical vapor deposition (CVD), particles are pressed into fuel compacts for irradiation, and state-of-the-art materials property characterization is performed, all under an NQA-1 compliant Quality Assurance program. Current work includes fabrication and characterization of coated particle fuels to support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, Advanced Small Modular Reactors, Nuclear Thermal Propulsion, and Advanced Light Water Reactor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

1990 Washington State directory of biomass energy facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This second edition is an update of biomass energy production and use in Washington State for 1989. The purpose of this directory is to provide a listing of known biomass users within the state and some basic information about their facilities. The data can be helpful to persons or organizations considering the use of biomass fuels. The directory is divided into three sections of biomass facilities with each section containing a map of locations and a data summary table. In addition, a conversion table, a glossary and an index are provided in the back of the directory. The first section deals with biogas production from wastewater treatment plants. The second section provides information on the wood combustion facilities in the state. This section is subdivided into two categories. The first is for facilities connected with the forest products industries. The second category include other facilities using wood for energy. The third section is composed of three different types of biomass facilities -- ethanol, municipal solid waste, and solid fuel processing. Biomass facilities included in this directory produce over 64 trillion Btu (British thermal units) per year. Wood combustion facilities account for 91 percent of the total. Biogas and ethanol facilities each produce close to 800 billion Btu per year, MSW facilities produce 1845 billion BTU, and solid fuel processing facilities produce 2321 billion Btu per year. To put these numbers in perspective, Washington's industrial section uses 200 trillion Btu of fuels per year. Therefore, biomass fuels used and/or produced by facilities listed in this directory account for nearly 32 percent of the state's total industrial fuel demand. This is a sizable contribution to the state's energy needs.

Deshaye, J.A.; Kerstetter, J.D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Initial measurements of BN-350 spent fuel in dry storage casks using the dual slab verification detonator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dual Slab Verification Detector (DSVD) has been developed, built, and characterized by Los Alamos National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as part of the dry storage safeguards system for the spent fuel from the BN-350 fast reactor. The detector consists of two rows of 3He tubes embedded in a slab of polyethylene which has been designed to be placed on the outer surface of the dry storage cask. By performing DSVD measurements at several different locations around the outer surface of the DUC, a signature 'fingerprint' can be established for each DUC based on the neutron flux emanating from inside the dry storage cask. The neutron fingerprint for each individual DUC will be dependent upon the spatial distribution of nuclear material within the cask, thus making it sensitive to the removal of a certain amount of material from the cask. An initial set of DSVD measurements have been performed on the first set of dry storage casks that have been loaded with canisters of spent fuel and moved onto the dry storage pad to both establish an initial fingerprint for these casks as well as to quantify systematic uncertainties associated with these measurements. The results from these measurements will be presented and compared with the expected results that were determined based on MCNPX simulations of the dry storage facility. The ability to safeguard spent nuclear fuel is strongly dependent on the technical capabilities of establishing and maintaining continuity of knowledge (COK) of the spent fuel as it is released from the reactor core and either reprocessed or packaged and stored at a storage facility. While the maintenance of COK is often done using continuous containment and surveillance (C/S) on the spent fuel, it is important that the measurement capabilities exist to re-establish the COK in the event of a significant gap in the continuous CIS by performing measurements that independently confirm the presence and content of Plutonium (Pu) in the spent fuel. The types of non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements that can be performed on the spent fuel are strongly dependent on the type of spent fuel that is being safeguarded as well as the location in which the spent fuel is being stored. The BN-350 Spent Fuel Disposition Project was initiated to improve the safeguards and security of the spent nuclear fuel from the BN-350 fast-breeder reactor and was developed cooperatively to meet the requirements of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) as well as the terms of the 1993 CTR and MPC&A Implementing Agreements. The unique characteristics of fuel from the BN-350 fast-breeder reactor have allowed for the development of an integrated safeguards measurement program to inventory, monitor, and if necessary, re-verify Pu content of the spent fuel throughout the lifetime of the project. This approach includes the development of a safeguards measurement program to establish and maintain the COK on the spent fuel during the repackaging and eventual relocation of the spent-fuel assemblies to a long-term storage site. As part of the safeguards measurement program, the Pu content of every spent-fuel assembly from the BN-350 reactor was directly measured and characterized while the spent-fuel assemblies were being stored in the spent-fuel pond at the BN-350 facility using the Spent Fuel Coincidence Counter (SFCC). Upon completion of the initial inventory of the Pu content of the individual spent-fuel assemblies, the assemblies were repackaged into welded steel canisters that were filled with inert argon gas and held either four or six individual spent-fuel assemblies depending on the type of assembly that was being packaged. This repackaging of the spent-fuel assemblies was performed in order to improve the stability of the spent-fuel assemblies for long-term storage and increase the proliferation resistance of the spent fuel. To maintain the capability of verifying the presence of the spent-fuel assemblies inside the welded steel canisters, measurements were performed on the canis

Santi, Peter Angelo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Browne, Michael C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Freeman, Corey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Robert F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Richard B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Current projects include various catalyst development projects, a system contaminant project, and the manufacturing project. Testing capabilities include but are not limited to single cell fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Fuel cycle cost uncertainty from nuclear fuel cycle comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examined the uncertainty in fuel cycle cost (FCC) calculation by considering both model and parameter uncertainty. Four different fuel cycle options were compared in the analysis including the once-through cycle (OT), the DUPIC cycle, the MOX cycle and a closed fuel cycle with fast reactors (FR). The model uncertainty was addressed by using three different FCC modeling approaches with and without the time value of money consideration. The relative ratios of FCC in comparison to OT did not change much by using different modeling approaches. This observation was consistent with the results of the sensitivity study for the discount rate. Two different sets of data with uncertainty range of unit costs were used to address the parameter uncertainty of the FCC calculation. The sensitivity study showed that the dominating contributor to the total variance of FCC is the uranium price. In general, the FCC of OT was found to be the lowest followed by FR, MOX, and DUPIC. But depending on the uranium price, the FR cycle was found to have lower FCC over OT. The reprocessing cost was also found to have a major impact on FCC.

Li, J.; McNelis, D. [Institute for the Environment, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Yim, M.S. [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

4858 recreation facility [n  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

plan. recr. (Installation and equipment provided for recreation; ? simply-provided recreation facility , ? well-provided recreation facility ...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Facilities | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Research Facility Distributed Energy Research Center Engine Research Facility Heat Transfer Laboratory Tribology Laboratory Transportation Beamline at the Advanced...

367

San Diego County - Design Standards for County Facilities | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Design Standards for County Facilities Design Standards for County Facilities San Diego County - Design Standards for County Facilities < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Energy Sources Solar Wind Other Program Info State California Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider San Diego County The San Diego County Board of Supervisors established design standards for county facilities and property. Among other requirements, the policy requires that all new county buildings or major building renovations obtain U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) LEED Building Certification.

368

Utility Facility Siting and Environmental Protection Act (South Carolina) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Utility Facility Siting and Environmental Protection Act (South Utility Facility Siting and Environmental Protection Act (South Carolina) Utility Facility Siting and Environmental Protection Act (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider South Carolina Public Service Commission This legislation applies to electric generating plants and associated facilities designed for or capable of operation at a capacity of more than 75 MW. A certificate from the Public Service Commission is required prior

369

Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Provider Utilities Protection Center of Georgia The Georgia Utility Facility Protection Act (GUFPA) was established to protect the underground utility infrastructure of Georgia. GUFPA mandates that, before starting any mechanized digging or excavation work, you must

370

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel and Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions

371

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Motor Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax Effective January 1, 2014, a person who operates a commercial motor vehicle

372

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Case Studies to Case Studies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Case Studies on AddThis.com... Case Studies Find case studies and success stories about alternative transportation technologies and alternative fuels. A Chevy Volt sedan is plugged into a charging station in a parking area outside the City of Fort Collins fleet facility. Fort Collins: A Multi-Fuel Approach to Sustainable Fleet Operations A diversity of fuels and technologies offers flexibility in reaching energy

373

Microstructured Hydrogen Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micro fuel cells ; Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells ; Proton exchange membrane fuel cells ...

Luc G. Frechette

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition The definition of an alternative fuel includes natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, electricity, hydrogen, fuel mixtures containing not less

375

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fueling Stations Photo of an ethanol fueling station. Thousands of ethanol fueling stations are available in the United States.

376

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Promotion The Missouri Alternative Fuels Commission (Commission) promotes the continued production and use of alternative transportation fuels in

377

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Fueling Stations Photo of a hydrogen fueling station. A handful of hydrogen fueling stations are available in the United States

378

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fueling Stations Photo of a biodiesel fueling station. Hundreds of biodiesel fueling stations are available in the United States.

379

Rates for Alternate Energy Production Facilities (Iowa) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rates for Alternate Energy Production Facilities (Iowa) Rates for Alternate Energy Production Facilities (Iowa) Rates for Alternate Energy Production Facilities (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Iowa Program Type Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Iowa Utilities Board The Utilities Board may require public utilities furnishing gas, electricity, communications, or water to public consumers, to own alternate energy production facilities, enter into long-term contracts to purchase power from such facilities, and/or provide supplemental or backup power to alternate energy production facilities. Uniform rates for these transactions will be set by the board. Some exemptions apply

380

Facility Representatives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

063-2011 063-2011 February 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2011 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Facility Representatives  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2006 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should

382

Facility Type!  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ITY: ITY: --&L~ ----------- srct-r~ -----------~------~------- if yee, date contacted ------------- cl Facility Type! i I 0 Theoretical Studies Cl Sample 84 Analysis ] Production 1 Diepasal/Storage 'YPE OF CONTRACT .--------------- 1 Prime J Subcontract&- 1 Purchase Order rl i '1 ! Other information (i.e., ---------~---~--~-------- :ontrait/Pirchaee Order # , I C -qXlJ- --~-------~~-------~~~~~~ I I ~~~---~~~~~~~T~~~ FONTRACTING PERIODi IWNERSHIP: ,I 1 AECIMED AECMED GOVT GOUT &NTtiAC+OR GUN-I OWNED ----- LEEE!? M!s LE!Ps2 -LdJG?- ---L .ANDS ILJILDINGS X2UIPilENT IRE OR RAW HA-I-L :INAL PRODUCT IASTE Z. RESIDUE I I kility l pt I ,-- 7- ,+- &!d,, ' IN&"E~:EW AT SITE -' ---------------- , . Control 0 AEC/tlED managed operations

383

Research Facility,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collecting and Delivering the Data Collecting and Delivering the Data As a general condition for use of the ARM Climate Research Facility, users are required to include their data in the ARM Data Archive. All data acquired must be of sufficient quality to be useful and must be documented such that users will be able to clearly understand the meaning and organization of the data. Final, quality-assured data sets are stored in the Data Archive and are freely accessible to the general scientific community. Preliminary data may be shared among field campaign participants during and shortly following the campaign. To facilitate sharing of preliminary data, the ARM Data Archive establishes restricted access capability, limited to participants and data managers.

384

Facility Operations 1993 fiscal year work plan: WBS 1.3.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Facility Operations program is responsible for the safe, secure, and environmentally sound management of several former defense nuclear production facilities, and for the nuclear materials in those facilities. As the mission for Facility Operations plants has shifted from production to support of environmental restoration, each plant is making a transition to support the new mission. The facilities include: K Basins (N Reactor fuel storage); N Reactor; Plutonium-Uranium Reduction Extraction (PUREX) Plant; Uranium Oxide (UO{sub 3}) Plant; 300 Area Fuels Supply (N Reactor fuel supply); Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP).

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

EM Recovery Act Press Releases  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

press-releases Office of Environmental press-releases Office of Environmental Management 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 202-586-7709 en Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility http://energy.gov/em/articles/idaho-site-completes-demolition-cold-war-era-nuclear-fuel-reprocessing fuel-reprocessing" class="title-link">Idaho Site Completes Demolition of Cold War-era Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Facility

386

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Delaware Incentives and Laws Delaware Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fuel Rate Reduction Archived: 01/01/2009 Chesapeake Utilities has one publicly accessible quick-fill CNG fueling station in Dover. CNG is offered at a 20% discount as compared to the American Automobile Association (AAA) list price. Biodiesel Production Facility Grants Expired: 09/01/2007 The State Energy Office will administer moneys in the Green Energy Fund through a program of environmental incentive grants and loans for the development, promotion and support of energy efficiency programs and

387

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Kansas Incentives and Laws Kansas Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Biofuel Blending Equipment Tax Incentives Expired: 01/01/2012 A Storage and Blending Equipment Credit is available for the purchase, construction, or installation of qualified equipment used for storing and blending petroleum-based fuel with biodiesel, ethanol, or other biofuel. The equipment must be installed at a fuel terminal, refinery, or biofuel production facility. The tax credit is equal to 10% of the qualified investment for the first $10,000,000 invested, and 5% of the investment in excess of $10,000,000. The credit may be taken in 10 equal annual

388

NETL: News Release - Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at West Virginia Airport Hydrogen Production and Dispensing Facility Opens at West Virginia Airport Station Provides Transportation Fuel from Domestic Resources for Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicles Washington, D.C. - A hydrogen production and dispensing station constructed and operated with support from the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) was officially opened Monday at the Yeager Airport in Charleston, W.Va. The facility is an example of how domestically produced fuels may be used to power a variety of vehicles and equipment, lessening U.S. dependence on foreign oil. The facility will produce, compress, store and dispense hydrogen as a fuel source for vehicles that have been converted to run on hydrogen, as well as other types of ground equipment at the airport.

389

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

390

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com...

391

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on AddThis.com...

392

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on AddThis.com... More in this section...

393

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel and Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on AddThis.com...

394

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Sandia Pulsed Reactor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia scientist John Ford places fuel rods in the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX) at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) test reactor - a reactor stripped down to its simplest form. The Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) provides a flexible, shielded location for performing critical experiments that employ different reactor core configurations and fuel types. The facility is also available for hands-on nuclear criticality safety training. Research and other activities The 7% series, an evaluation of various core characteristics for higher commercial-fuel enrichment, is currently under way at the SPRF/CX. Past critical experiments at the SPRF/CX have included the Burnup Credit

395

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Facility Harrisburg Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Dauphin County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 40.2734277°, -76.7336521° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2734277,"lon":-76.7336521,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

396

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Facility Brookhaven Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

397

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - ReFUEL Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development focuses on overcoming barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass, and improving vehicle efficiency. Using biofuels and improving vehicle efficiency reduces our dependence on imported petroleum and enhances our national energy security. The ReFUEL Laboratory houses the following specialized equipment: Heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with a simulation capability of 8,000 to 80,000 lbs for vehicle performance and emissions research Heavy-duty (up to 600 hp) and light-duty (up to 75 hp) engine

398

Uncertainty Analyses of Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing technology, experimental protocols, computational methods, systems analysis software, and many other capabilities in order to advance the nuclear power infrastructure through the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFDI). Our project, is intended to facilitate will-informed decision making for the selection of fuel cycle options and facilities for development.

Laurence F. Miller; J. Preston; G. Sweder; T. Anderson; S. Janson; M. Humberstone; J. MConn; J. Clark

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities.

LEROY, P.G.

2000-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fuel Cell Opportunities in Marine Corps Garrison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% 315,343, 4% 1,585,200, 19% 5,937,358, 73% E85 CNG B100 Diesel Gasoline #12;1 3 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 FY01 fuel cell vehicle operations & maintenance · Partner with Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, TARDEC, General Motors (GMT800 pickup) · Temporary fueling capability Current Phase... Demonstrate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com...

402

Cold vacuum drying facility 90% design review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains review comment records for the CVDF 90% design review. Spent fuels retrieved from the K Basins will be dried at the CVDF. It has also been recommended that the Multi-Conister Overpacks be welded, inspected, and repaired at the CVD Facility before transport to dry storage.

O`Neill, C.T.

1997-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

403

In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient PEM fuel cell performance requires effective water management. The materials used, their durability, and the operating conditions under which fuel cells run, make efficient water management within a practical fuel cell system a primary challenge in developing commercially viable systems. We present experimental measurements of water content within operating fuel cells. in response to operational conditions, including transients and freezing conditions. To help understand the effect of components and operations, we examine water transport in operating fuel cells, measure the fuel cell water in situ and model the water transport within the fuel cell. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging (using NIST's facilities) were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable GDL properties. Ice formation in freezing cells was also monitored both during operation and shut-down conditions.

Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendalow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Development of alternate extractant systems for fast reactor fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the limitations of TBP in processing of high burn-up, Pu-rich fast reactor fuels, there is a need to develop alternate extractants for fast reactor fuel processing. In this context, our Centre has been examining the suitability of alternate tri-alkyl phosphates. Third phase formation in the extraction of Th(IV) by TBP, tri-n-amyl phosphate (TAP) and tri-2-methyl-butyl phosphate (T2MBP) from nitric acid media has been investigated under various conditions to derive conclusions on their application for extraction of Pu at macro levels. The chemical and radiolytic degradation of tri-n-amyl-phosphate (TAP) diluted in normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) in the presence of nitric acid has been investigated by the measurement of plutonium retention in organic phase. The potential application of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been explored. Extraction of uranium (VI) and palladium (II) from nitric acid medium by commercially available RTIL and tri-n-butyl phosphate solution in RTIL have been studied and the feasibility of electrodeposition of uranium as uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) and palladium (II) as metallic palladium from the loaded organic phase have been demonstrated. This paper describes results of the above studies and discusses the suitability of the systems for fast reactor fuel reprocessing. (authors)

Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Suresh, A.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Raj, Baldev [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam - 603 102 (India)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Synthetic Fuel  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

407

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emergencies, Le. , accidents at nuclear facilities, there isas a result of nuclear accidents; these are the Protectiveassociated with a nuclear accident is of greater importance

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Benefits and concerns of a closed nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power can play an important role in our energy future, contributing to increasing electricity demand while at the same time decreasing carbon dioxide emissions. However, the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States today is unsustainable. As stated in the 1982 Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for disposing of spent nuclear fuel generated by commercial nuclear power plants operating in a “once-through” fuel cycle in the deep geologic repository located at Yucca Mountain. However, unyielding political opposition to the site has hindered the commissioning process to the extant that the current administration has recently declared the unsuitability of the Yucca Mountain site. In light of this the DOE is exploring other options, including closing the fuel cycle through recycling and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The possibility of closing the fuel cycle is receiving special attention because of its ability to minimize the final high level waste (HLW) package as well as recover additional energy value from the original fuel. The technology is, however, still very controversial because of the increased cost and proliferation risk it can present. To lend perspective on the closed fuel cycle alternative, this presents the arguments for and against closing the fuel cycle with respect to sustainability, proliferation risk, commercial viability, waste management, and energy security.

Widder, Sarah H.

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

409

International Facility Management Association Strategic Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facility Management Association Facility Management Association Strategic Facility Planning: A WhIte PAPer Strategic Facility Planning: A White Paper on Strategic Facility Planning © 2009 | International Facility Management Association For additional information, contact: 1 e. Greenway Plaza, Suite 1100 houston, tX 77046-0104 USA P: + 1-713-623-4362 F: + 1-713-623-6124 www.ifma.org taBle OF cOntentS PreFace ......................................................... 2 executive Summary .................................... 3 Overview ....................................................... 4 DeFinitiOn OF Strategic Facility Planning within the Overall cOntext OF Facility Planning ................. 5 SPecializeD analySeS ................................ 9 OrganizatiOnal aPPrOacheS tO SFP ... 10 the SFP PrOceSS .......................................

410

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Radiation Control Program The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in Maine. The Legislature

411

Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Wind Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% Provider Office of the State Tax Commissioner Electrical generating facilities are exempt from sales and use taxes in North Dakota. The exemption is granted for the purchase of building materials, production equipment, and any other tangible personal property that is used for constructing or expanding the facility. In order to qualify, the facility must have at least one electrical generation unity

412

Biofuels Company Builds New Facility in Nebraska | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biofuels Company Builds New Facility in Nebraska Biofuels Company Builds New Facility in Nebraska Biofuels Company Builds New Facility in Nebraska March 24, 2010 - 2:54pm Addthis Novozymes was awarded a $28.4 million tax credit to build an enzyme facility in Blair, Neb. | Photo courtesy of Novozymes Novozymes was awarded a $28.4 million tax credit to build an enzyme facility in Blair, Neb. | Photo courtesy of Novozymes Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE The biofuels company Novozymes received a $28.4 million tax credit under the Recovery Act for the construction of a new facility in Blair, Neb., that produces enzymes to turn waste into fuel. The project, sparked by the increasing demand for cellulosic fuel, will create 100 green jobs and reduce the company's transportation costs and carbon footprint.

413

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January 11, 2011 Facility News ARM Mobile Facility Completes Extended Campaign in the Azores; Next Stop-India Bookmark and Share The ARM Mobile Facility obtained data on Graciosa...

414

Facilities Services Overview & Discussion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Finance Facilities Services Director: Jeff Butler Human Resources Administrative Services Engineering) Environmental Services Morrison (3) Admin Services Evans (1) Human Resources Engineering (4) ·EngineeringFacilities Services Overview & Discussion Jeff Butler Director ­ Facilities Services November 2011

Maxwell, Bruce D.

415

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fueling Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

416

Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

Jean Ragusa; Karen Vierow

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Emerging Fuels Emerging Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Emerging Alternative Fuels Several emerging alternative fuels are under development or already developed and may be available in the United States. These fuels may

418

Sandia National Laboratories: Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Center in Vermont Achieves Milestone Installation On September 23, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Facilities, National Solar Thermal Test Facility, News, News &...

419

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

January 15, 2008 Facility News ARM Mobile Facility Completes Field Campaign in Germany Bookmark and Share Researchers will study severe precipitation events that occurred in...

420

from Isotope Production Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel reprocessing facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Programs & User Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities Programs & User Facilities Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy...

422

Facility Data Policy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facility Data Policy About ESnet Our Mission The Network ESnet History Governance & Policies ESnet Policy Board ESCC Acceptable Use Policy Facility Data Policy Career Opportunities...

423

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 15, 2005 Facility News More Server Power Improves Performance at the ARM Data Management Facility Bookmark and Share Recently, several new Sun servers joined the...

424

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

approximately 22,500 square kilometers, or the approximate area of a modern climate model grid cell. Centered around the SGP Central Facility, these extended facilities are...

425

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

From Coastal Clouds to Desert Dust: ARM Mobile Facility Headed to Africa Bookmark and Share ARM operations staff prepare the ARM Mobile Facility in Point Reyes, California, for...

426

Deep Burn: Development of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors- Monthly Highlights September 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DB Program monthly highlights report for August 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/184, was distributed to program participants by email on September 17. This report discusses: (1) Core and Fuel Analysis - (a) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Prismatic Design (Logos), (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Microfuel analysis for the DB HTR (INL, GA, Logos); (2) Spent Fuel Management - (a) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) repository behavior (UNLV), (b) Repository performance of TRISO fuel (UCB); (3) Fuel Cycle Integration of the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) - Synergy with other reactor fuel cycles (GA, Logos); (4) TRU (transuranic elements) HTR Fuel Qualification - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (5) HTR Spent Fuel Recycle - (a) TRU Kernel Development (ORNL), (b) Coating Development (ORNL), (c) Characterization Development and Support, (d) ZrC Properties and Handbook; and (6) HTR Fuel Recycle - (a) Graphite Recycle (ORNL), (b) Aqueous Reprocessing, (c) Pyrochemical Reprocessing METROX (metal recovery from oxide fuel) Process Development (ANL).

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well as the space shuttle. Although fuel cells have been successfully used in such applications, they have proven difficult to make more cost-effective and durable for commercial applications, particularly for the rigors of daily transportation. Since the 1970s, scientists at Los Alamos have managed to make various scientific breakthroughs that have contributed to the development of modern fuel cell systems. Specific efforts include the following: * Finding alternative and more cost-effective catalysts than platinum. * Enhancing the durability of fuel cells by developing advanced materials and

428

Nuclear Facilities | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Facilities Nuclear Facilities Locator Map Numerical map data points indicate two or more nuclear facilities in the same geographic location. Nuclear...

429

Spent fuel storage requirements 1993--2040  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical inventories of spent fuel are combined with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) projections of future discharges from commercial nuclear reactors in the United States to provide estimates of spent fuel storage requirements through the year 2040. The needs are estimated for storage capacity beyond that presently available in the reactor storage pools. These estimates incorporate the maximum capacities within current and planned in-pool storage facilities and any planned transshipments of spent fuel to other reactors or facilities. Existing and future dry storage facilities are also discussed. The nuclear utilities provide historical data through December 1992 on the end of reactor life are based on the DOE/Energy Information Administration (EIA) estimates of future nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Facility Representative Program: 2003 Facility Representative Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Facility Representative Workshop 3 Facility Representative Workshop May 13 - 15, 2003 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathleen Carlson Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Keynote Address Savannah River Site and Facility Reps - A Shared History and Common Future Jeffrey M. Allison Manager, Savannah River Operations Office 9:00 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

431

NREL: Research Facilities - Test and User Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Test and User Facilities Test and User Facilities NREL has test and user facilities available to industry and other organizations for researching, developing, and evaluating renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Here you'll find an alphabetical listing and brief descriptions of NREL's test and user facilities. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Advanced Research Turbines At our wind testing facilities, we have turbines available to test new control schemes and equipment for reducing loads on wind turbine components. Learn more about the Advanced Research Turbines on our Wind Research website. Back to Top D Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility This facility was designed to assist the distributed power industry in the

432

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 Facility Representative Workshop 0 Facility Representative Workshop May 16-18, 2000 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Tuesday, May 16, 2000 Theme for Day 1: Sustaining the Success of the Facility Representative Program 8:00 a.m. - Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:05 a.m. - Welcome - Kenneth Powers, Deputy Manager Nevada Operations Office 8:15 a.m. - Deputy Secretary Remarks - T. J. Glauthier, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Jerry Lyle, Assistant Manager for Environmental Management, Idaho Operations Office 9:00 a.m. - Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Departmental Representative 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Results and Goals - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager

433

Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Environmental Quality After a proposed power plant has received approval from the State Corporation Commission (SCC) and location approval from the local government, it must apply for all applicable permits from the Virginia

434

Thermal analysis for fuel handling system for sodium cooled reactor considering minor actinide-bearing metal fuel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) is one of the components of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) used to close the fuel cycle. ABR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor that is used to consume transuranic elements resulting from the reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel. ABR-1000 [1000 MW(thermal)] is a fast reactor concept created at Argonne National Laboratory to be used as a reference concept for various future trade-offs. ABR-1000 meets the GNEP goals although it uses what is considered base sodium fast reactor technology for its systems and components. One of the considerations of any fast reactor plant concept is the ability to perform fuel-handling operations with new and spent fast reactor fuel. The transmutation fuel proposed as the ABR fuel has a very little experience base, and thus, this paper investigates a fuel-handling concept and potential issues of handling fast reactor fuel containing minor actinides. In this study, two thermal analyses supporting a conceptual design study on the ABR-1000 fuel-handling system were carried out. One analysis investigated passive dry spent fuel storage, and the other analysis investigated a fresh fuel shipping cask. Passive dry storage can be made suitable for the ABR-1000 spent fuel storage with sodium-bonded metal fuel. The thermal analysis shows that spent fast reactor fuel with a decay heat of 2 kW or less can be stored passively in a helium atmosphere. The 2-kW value seems to be a reasonable and practical level, and a combination of reasonably-sized in-sodium storage followed by passive dry storage could be a candidate for spent fuel storage for the next-generation sodium-cooled reactor with sodium-bonded metal fuel. Requirements for the shipping casks for minor actinide-bearing fuel with a high decay heat level are also discussed in this paper. The shipping cask for fresh sodium-cooled-reactor fuel should be a dry type to reduce the reaction between residual moisture on fresh fuel and the sodium coolant. The cladding temperature requirement is maintained below the creep temperature limit to avoid any damage before core installation. The thermal analysis shows that a helium gas-filled cask can accommodate ABR-1000 fresh minor actinide-bearing fuel with 700-W decay heat. The above analysis results revealed the overall requirement for minor actinide-bearing metal fuel handling. The information is thought to be helpful in the design of the ABR-1000 and future sodium-cooled-reactor fuel-handling system.

Chikazawa, Y.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Nitride fuel performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in an increase of the cost of enrichment. As a result, a new procedure has been developed based on the pyrochemical reprocessing technique (Suzuki et al. , 1998). The pyrochemical process was originally developed at Argonne National Laboratory...

Reynaud, Sylvie Marie Aurel?ie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

436

Solvent extraction of heptavalent technetium and rhenium by tributyl phosphate. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program and Basic Energy Sciences Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The literature pertaining to the solvent extraction of heptavalent technetium and rhenium from aqueous solution by tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been compiled, critically evaluated, and supplemented with new data in some areas. The effects of adding mineral acids, alkali metal nitrates, alkali metal chlorides, uranyl nitrate, thorium nitrate, and plutonium(IV) nitrate to these systems were also examined. Discussions of the possible nature of the organic-phase complexes are presented, along with values of ..delta..G, ..delta..H, ..delta..S, and the equilibrium constant for the extraction reaction in several systems. Mathematical models correlating the distribution behavior over a wide range of conditions were also developed. Equations are given for calculating the distribution coefficients for the extraction of Re(VII) or Tc(VII) from 0.2 to 4 M HCl by 0.339 to 2.90 M TBP at 298 to 333/sup 0/K. Equations are given for calculating the distribution coefficients under the same conditions, but with HNO/sub 3/ (instead of HCl) present in the aqueous phase. 28 references, 27 figures, 3 tables.

Pruett, D.J.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Speciation and spectroscopy of the uranyl and tetravalent plutonium nitrate systems: Fundamental studies and applications to used fuel reprocessing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation explores the use of UV-Visible spectroscopy and Time Resolved Laser Induced Fluorescence spectroscopy as near real time process monitors of uranium and plutonium… (more)

Smith, Nicholas A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Casting of metallic fuel containing minor actinide additions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant attribute of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept is the transmutation of long-lived minor actinide fission products. These isotopes require isolation for thousands of years, and if they could be removed from the waste, disposal problems would be reduced. T