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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Idle Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Heavy-Duty Idle Reduction Requirement Heavy-duty vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating greater than 8,500

2

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Vehicle Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Reduction Grants

3

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Fuel Contracts Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment

4

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

82 Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Additional Description: A heavy-duty truck designed for regional-haul applications....

5

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T660 Tractor Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISX12 G Additional Description: A Class 8 heavy-duty truck designed for on-highway...

6

Feature - Fuel Economy for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Report Looks at Fuel Economy for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles New Report Looks at Fuel Economy for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles heavy duty trucks Argonne researcher Aymeric Rousseau was part of a National Academy of Science (NAS) committee established to make recommendations on improving and regulating fuel consumption for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. On March 31, the committee issued a report that evaluates various technologies and methods that could improve the fuel economy of these vehicles. As a system analysis engineer at Argonne's Center for Transportation Research, Rousseau contributed his expertise on vehicle modeling and simulation to the committee, which was comprised of 19 members from industry, research organizations and academia. Rousseau, who leads the development of Argonne's PSAT and Autonomie software tools, helped the committee determine how modeling and simulation tools can be used to:

7

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Alternative Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Purchase Vouchers on AddThis.com...

8

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technologies on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Onboard Equipment Truck Stop Electrification

9

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search on AddThis.com... Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search Search our database to find and compare specific vehicles, engines, or hybrid propulsion systems and generate printable reports.

10

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Requirements

11

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Emissions Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Heavy-Duty Emissions Reduction Grant Program

12

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Truck Stop Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Truck Stop Electrification for Heavy-Duty Trucks on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles

13

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Data Collection Methods to someone by E-mail Data Collection Methods to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods on AddThis.com... Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Data Collection Methods To maintain the Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search tool, the National

14

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Diesel Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Diesel Vehicle Vouchers - San Joaquin Valley on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

15

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Vehicle Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

16

Clean Cities' Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Guide describes the alternative fuel and advanced medium- and heavy-duty vehicles available on the market, including buses, vans, refuse haulers, and more.

Not Available

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Using LNG as a Fuel in Heavy-Duty Tractors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recognizing the lack of operational data on alternative fuel heavy-truck trucks, NREL contracted with the Trucking Research Institute (TRI) in 1994 to obtain a cooperative agreement with Liquid Carbonic. The purpose of this agreement was to (1) purchase and operate liquid natural gas- (LNG-) powered heavy-duty tractor-trailers with prototype Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) Series 60 natural gas (S60G) engines in over-the-road commercial service applications; and (2) collect and provide operational data to DDC to facilitate the on-road prototype development of the engine and to NREL for the Alternative Fuels Data Center. The vehicles operated from August 1994 through April of 1997 and led to a commercially available, emissions-certified S60G in 1998. This report briefly documents the engine development, the operational characteristics of LNG, and the lessons learned during the project.

Liquid Carbonic, Inc. and Trucking Research Institute

1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

18

Utilization of Fuel Consumption Data in an Ecodriving Incentive System for Heavy-Duty Vehicle Drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Driver behavior is one of the greatest factors determining fuel consumption and, thus, carbon dioxide emissions from a heavy-duty vehicle. The difference in fuel consumption can be up to 30%, depending on the driver. Education, monitoring, and feedback ...

Heikki Liimatainen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Alternative fuels for heavy duty engines: Status of fleet trials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of Annex 3 are to collect, assess and disseminate data on the use of methanol and natural gas in heavy duty compression ignition engines. Originally, the objective was directed at methanol, but in 1990 the mandate of Annex 3 was broadened to include natural gas. This is the latest update on field trials using these two fuels. The report outlines progress being made and identifies major trends. The more important events since the last progress report include: the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Certification of Detroit Diesel Corporation's 6V-92 methanol engine; the introduction of transit buses in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, using DDC methanol engines; an introduction of two DDC engined ethanol fueled transit buses at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada; the testing of catalytic converters, by Detroit Diesel Corporation, with alcohol powered engines; the discontinuance of methanol in MAN engines/buses at Seattle Metro; a tender for over 100 methanol powered transit buses for South Coast Rapid Transit District (SCRTD), Los Angeles, California; the potential purchase of an additional 150 methanol powered buses for SCRTD, in addition to 10 buses for Sacramento Regional Transit District; and, the expanded interest of transit properties in using natural gas in both compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) engines. 21 figs.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Demonstrating and evaluating heavy-duty alternative fuel operations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project was to understand the effects of using an alternative fuel on a truck operating fleet through actual operation of trucks. Information to be gathered was expected to be anecdotal, as opposed to statistically viable, because the Trucking Research institute (TRI) recognized that projects could not attract enough trucks to produce statistically credible volumes of data. TRI was to collect operational data, and provide them to NREL, who would enter the data into the alternative fuels database being constructed for heavy-duty trucks at the time. NREL would also perform data analysis, with the understanding that the demonstrations were generally pre-production model engines and vehicles. Other objectives included providing information to the trucking industry on the availability of alternative fuels, developing the alternative fuels marketplace, and providing information on experience with alternative fuels. In addition to providing information to the trucking industry, an objective was for TRI to inform NREL and DOE about the industry, and give feedback on the response of the industry to developments in alternative fuels in trucking. At the outset, only small numbers of vehicles participated in most of the projects. Therefore, they had to be considered demonstrations of feasibility, rather than data gathering tests from which statistically significant conclusions might be drawn. Consequently, data gathered were expected to be useful for making estimates and obtaining valuable practical lessons. Project data and lessons learned are the subjects of separate project reports. This report concerns itself with the work of TRI in meeting the overall objectives of the TRI-NREL partnership.

Peerenboom, W. [Trucking Research Inst., Alexandria, VA (United States)] [Trucking Research Inst., Alexandria, VA (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Development of a direct-injected natural gas engine system for heavy-duty vehicles: Final report phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transportation sector accounts for approximately 65% of US petroleum consumption. Consumption for light-duty vehicles has stabilized in the last 10--15 years; however, consumption in the heavy-duty sector has continued to increase. For various reasons, the US must reduce its dependence on petroleum. One significant way is to substitute alternative fuels (natural gas, propane, alcohols, and others) in place of petroleum fuels in heavy-duty applications. Most alternative fuels have the additional benefit of reduced exhaust emissions relative to petroleum fuels, thus providing a cleaner environment. The best long-term technology for heavy-duty alternative fuel engines is the 4-stroke cycle, direct injected (DI) engine using a single fuel. This DI, single fuel approach maximizes the substitution of alternative fuel for diesel and retains the thermal efficiency and power density of the diesel engine. This report summarizes the results of the first year (Phase 1) of this contract. Phase 1 focused on developing a 4-stroke cycle, DI single fuel, alternative fuel technology that will duplicate or exceed diesel power density and thermal efficiency, while having exhaust emissions equal to or less than the diesel. Although the work is currently on a 3500 Series DING engine, the work is viewed as a basic technology development that can be applied to any engine. Phase 1 concentrated on DING engine component durability, exhaust emissions, and fuel handling system durability. Task 1 focused on identifying primary areas (e.g., ignition assist and gas injector systems) for future durability testing. In Task 2, eight mode-cycle-averaged NO{sub x} emissions were reduced from 11.8 gm/hp-hr (baseline conditions) to 2.5 gm/hp-hr (modified conditions) on a 3501 DING engine. In Task 3, a state-of-the-art fuel handling system was identified.

NONE

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

22

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Collins Bus Corp. - NexBus Propane Thomas Built Buses - Minotour Propane General Motors - 6.0L V8 - CleanFUEL USA liquid propane injection (LPI) system Fuel Type: Propane...

23

GEI 41040G - Specification for Fuel Gases for COmbustion in Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Turbine Gas Turbine Revised, January 2002 GEI 41040G These instructions do not purport to cover all details or variations in equipment nor to provide for every possible contingency to be met in connection with installation, operation or maintenance. Should further information be desired or should particular problems arise which are not covered sufficiently for the purchaser's purposes the matter should be referred to the GE Company. © 1999 GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY Specification for Fuel Gases for Combustion in Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines GEI 41040G Specification for Fuel Gases for Combustion in Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

24

Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles (Book), Clean Cities, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus * Shuttle Bus * Transit Bus * Refuse Truck * Tractor * Van * Vocational Truck School Bus * Shuttle Bus * Transit Bus * Refuse Truck * Tractor * Van * Vocational Truck Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles 2 Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles 3 Table of Contents About the Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Heavy-Duty Vehicle Application Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Heavy-Duty Emission Standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Multiple-Stage Construction of Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Chassis Selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

25

Fuel comsumption of heavy-duty trucks : potential effect of future technologies for improving energy efficiency and emission.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of an analysis of heavy-duty truck (Classes 2b through 8) technologies conducted to support the Energy Information Administration's long-term projections for energy use are summarized. Several technology options that have the potential to improve the fuel economy and emissions characteristics of heavy-duty trucks are included in the analysis. The technologies are grouped as those that enhance fuel economy and those that improve emissions. Each technology's potential impact on the fuel economy of heavy-duty trucks is estimated. A rough cost projection is also presented. The extent of technology penetration is estimated on the basis of truck data analyses and technical judgment.

Saricks, C. L.; Vyas, A. D.; Stodolsky, F.; Maples, J. D.; Energy Systems; USDOE

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles (Book)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Today's fleets are increasingly interested in medium-duty and heavy-duty vehicles that use alternative fuels or advanced technologies that can help reduce operating costs, meet emissions requirements, improve fleet sustainability, and support U.S. energy independence. Vehicle and engine manufacturers are responding to this interest with a wide range of options across a steadily growing number of vehicle applications. This guide provides an overview of alternative fuel power systems?including engines, microturbines, electric motors, and fuel cells?and hybrid propulsion systems. The guide also offers a list of individual medium- and heavy-duty vehicle models listed by application, along with associated manufacturer contact information, fuel type(s), power source(s), and related information.

Not Available

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Van Hool - A300L Fuel Cel Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hydrogen Maximum Seating: 28 Power Source(s): UTC Power - PureMotion Model 120 Fuel Cell System...

28

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Champion Bus Inc. - Defender Azure Dynamics - Balance Parallel Hybrid Drive Fuel Type: Hybrid - Gasoline...

29

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Freightliner - M2 106 Hybrid Applications: Tractor, Vocational truck Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric...

30

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Front Load (Contender, Atlantic, Low-Profile) Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 2...

31

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compatible Vehicles: Vision Motor Corp. - Tyrano Eaton - Hybrid Drive System Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric...

32

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Vision Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 77 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane fuel...

33

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Thomas Built Buses - Minotour Propane Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 30 Power Source(s): General Motors - 6.0L V8 - CleanFUEL USA liquid propane...

34

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Collins Bus Corp. - NexBus Propane Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 30 Power Source(s): General Motors - 6.0L V8 - CleanFUEL USA liquid propane...

35

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Vision Blue Bird Corp. - Micro Bird G5 Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane fuel system Fuel Type: Propane Displacement: 6.8...

36

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vision Motor Corp. - Tyrano Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Hydrogen Power Source(s): Vision Motor Corp. - 65kW Hydrogen Fuel Cell Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Hybrid Drive System...

37

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Freightliner - Cascadia 113 NG Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISX12 G...

38

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kenworth - W900S Application: Vocational truck Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISX12 G...

39

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Elgin Sweeper Company - Broom BearCrosswindEaglePelican General Motors - 3.0L Fuel Type: CNG Displacement: 3...

40

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Volvo - VNM Daycab Application: Tractor Fuel Type: CNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Trans Tech - ETrans Smith Electric Vehicles - 120kW induction motor with lithium-ion batteries Fuel Type: Electricity...

42

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compatible Vehicles: Hino - 195h Hino - Hino 5L Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Hydraulic Displacement: 5.0 liters...

43

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

New Flyer - Xcelsior Applications: Bus - Transit, Trolley Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hydrogen, Electricity, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: varies Power Source(s): Cummins...

44

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Freightliner - Business Class M2 112 Applications: Tractor, Vocational truck Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

45

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

114SD Application: Vocational truck Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins Westport - ISX12 G...

46

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

20 G Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

47

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cargotec - Ottawa 4x2 Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

48

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Volvo - VNL Daycab Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISX12 G Volvo - D12-LNG...

49

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Peterbilt Motors - 384 Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Maximum Seating: 2 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

50

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

ElDorado National - XHF Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Maximum Seating: 39 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

51

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heil Environmental - RapidRail Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 3 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

52

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Odyssey XLT Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 50 Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid Additional Description:...

53

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

86HE Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Power Source(s): Paccar - MX-13 Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid...

54

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T370 hybrid truck Application: Vocational truck Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 2 Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid Additional Description:...

55

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Elgin Sweeper Company - Broom BearCrosswindEaglePelican Ford Motor Co. - 2.5L Propane Fuel Type: Propane Displacement: 2.5 liters...

56

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Champion Bus Inc. - CTS - Front Engine Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 32 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

57

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Capacity Trucks - TJ5000TJ7000 General Motors - 8.0L V8 Fuel Type: Propane Displacement: 8.0 liters...

58

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

ElDorado National - Axess Ebus - EBUS22FC New Flyer - Xcelsior Ballard Power Systems - FCvelocity-HD6 fuel cell...

59

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

XE-30 Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Electricity Power Source(s): Balqon - 200-hp, 230V, AC induction motor with 215kWh, 600V, lithium...

60

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Champion Bus Inc. - Defender Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Type: Hybrid - Gasoline Electric Hybrid System(s): Azure Dynamics - Balance Parallel Hybrid Drive Additional...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicles International - EVI-MD Application: Vocational truck Fuel Type: Electricity Power Source(s): Electric Vehicles International - 260-hp AC permanent magnet motor...

62

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Thomas Built Buses - Saf-T-Liner C2e Hybrid Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 81...

63

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mule M150 Application: Vocational truck Fuel Type: Electricity Power Source(s): Balqon - 200-hp AC induction motor with lithium...

64

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Peterbilt Motors - 320 HLA Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Hydraulic Power Source(s): Cummins - ISL 8.9L Hybrid System(s):...

65

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Motor Coach Industries - D4500 CT Hybrid Commuter Coach Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 57 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport -...

66

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Gillig Corp. - Diesel-Electric Hybrid Bus and CNG Bus Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport -...

67

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - All American Rear Engine Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 84 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

68

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Boulder Electric Vehicle - DV-500 Delivery Truck Application: Van Fuel Type: Electricity Power Source(s): Boulder Electric Vehicle - AC brushless induction motor with lithium-ion...

69

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Boulder Electric Vehicle - DV-500 Delivery Truck Boulder Electric Vehicle - AC brushless induction motor with lithium-ion batteries Fuel Type: Electricity...

70

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hino - 195h Application: Vocational truck Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Power Source(s): Hino - Hino 5L Hybrid System(s): Hino - Hino Hybrid Drive...

71

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ford Motor Co. - Transit Connect Ford Motor Co. - 2.0L I-4 Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Displacement: 2.0 liters...

72

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Nova Bus - LFS HEV Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Cummins - ISB 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Allison Transmission -...

73

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Nova Bus - LFS Artic HEV Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 62 Power Source(s): Cummins - ISB 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Allison...

74

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

- W900S Freightliner - Cascadia 113 NG Kenworth - T660 Tractor Kenworth - T800 Short Hood Volvo - VNL Daycab Cummins Westport - ISX12 G Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Displacement: 11.9...

75

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Axess Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hydrogen, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 41 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Ballard Power Systems -...

76

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

North American Bus Industries - 42BRT Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 43 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

77

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T800 Short Hood Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISX12 G Additional Description: Can be configured to accomplish a variety of...

78

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

CrosswindEaglePelican Applications: Street sweeper, Vocational truck Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Propane Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Ford Motor Co. - 2.5L Propane...

79

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

60BRT Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 43 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins - ISL 8.9L Hybrid...

80

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

E-Z Rider II BRT Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 33 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins - ISB 6.7L...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T440 Tractor Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Additional Description: Can be a Class 7 or a Class 8 truck...

82

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kenworth - T470 Tractor Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Additional Description: Can be a Class 7 or a Class 8 truck...

83

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kenworth - T370 diesel electric tractor Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 3 Power Source(s): Paccar - PX-6 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Eaton -...

84

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

IC Bus - HC Hybrid Series Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 45 Power Source(s): Navistar - MaxxForce DT Hybrid System(s): Eaton -...

85

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T270 hybrid Applications: Tractor, Vocational truck Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Power Source(s): Paccar - PX-6 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid...

86

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kenworth - T270 hybrid Kenworth - T370 diesel electric tractor Peterbilt Motors - 337338 Peterbilt Motors - 330 Hybrid Paccar - PX-6 6.7L Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Hydraulic...

87

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Transit Connect Application: Van Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 2.0L I-4 Additional Description: CNG and propane models are available from contract...

88

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Micro Bird G5 Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 30 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane...

89

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Turtle Top - Van Terra Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Maximum Seating: 15 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Additional Description: Turtle Top...

90

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ford Motor Co. - E-Series Cargo VanWagon Application: Van Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Ford Motor Co. - 5.4L V-8 Additional Description:...

91

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

North American Bus Industries - CompoBus Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 47 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

92

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Capacity Trucks - TJ5000TJ7000 Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Propane Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 General Motors - 8.0L V8...

93

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

DesignLine Corp. - Eco-Smart 1 Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Electricity Maximum Seating: 28 Power Source(s): Bosch Rexroth - Two 120kW induction motors Additional...

94

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

DesignLine Corp. - EcoSaver IV Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: Hybrid - CNG Electric, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Capstone Turbine Corp. -...

95

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

StarTrans - Senator Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 17 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Ford Motor Co. - 5.4L V-8 Additional Description: May...

96

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

31LFW 35LFW 40LFW Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins - ISL 8.9L...

97

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Odyssey XL Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Maximum Seating: 41 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Additional Description: Available as a Ford F-550...

98

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cutaway and Stripped Chassis Application: Vocational truck Fuel Types: CNG, Propane, Ethanol Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Ford Motor Co. - 5.4L V-8 Additional...

99

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Enova Systems - Enova Ze step van Application: Van Fuel Type: Electricity Power Source(s): Enova Systems - 120kW all-electric drive system Additional Description: Built on a...

100

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ebus - EBUS22FC Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: Hydrogen, Hybrid - Gasoline Electric Maximum Seating: 22 Power Source(s): Capstone Turbine Corp. - C30 (30kW) Micro Turbine...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

LFX Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: Varies Power Source(s): Cummins - ISL 8.9L Cummins - ISB 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Allison...

102

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Autocar - E3 Hybrid Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Power Source(s): Cummins - ISL 8.9L Hybrid System(s): Parker Hannifin Corp. - RunWise...

103

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Thomas Built Buses - Saf-T-Liner HDX CNG Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 90 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

104

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Odyssey Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Maximum Seating: 24 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Additional Description: Available as Chevrolet G4500 or...

105

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Goshen Coach - GCIIG-Force Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Maximum Seating: 33 Power Source(s): General Motors - 6.0L V-8 Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Additional...

106

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

StarTrans - Senator Ford Motor Co. - E-Series Cutaway and Stripped Chassis Ford Motor Co. - E-Series Cargo VanWagon Ford Motor Co. - 5.4L V-8 Fuel Types: CNG, Propane, Ethanol...

107

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Proterra - EcoRide BE35 Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Electricity Maximum Seating: 35 Power Source(s): UQM - PowerPhase 150kW permanent magnet motor Hybrid System(s):...

108

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Trans Tech - ETrans Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Electricity Maximum Seating: 52 Power Source(s): Smith Electric Vehicles - 120kW induction motor with lithium-ion...

109

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Balqon - XE-20 Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Electricity Power Source(s): Balqon - 200-hp, 230V, AC induction motor with 215kWh, 312V, lithium-ion batteries...

110

Evaluations of 1997 Fuel Consumption Patterns of Heavy Duty Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed 21st Century Truck program selected three truck classes for focused analysis. On the basis of gross vehicle weight (GVW) classification, these were Class 8 (representing heavy), Class 6 (representing medium), and Class 2b (representing light). To develop and verify these selections, an evaluation of fuel use of commercial trucks was conducted, using data from the 1997 Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS). Truck fuel use was analyzed by registered GVW class, and by body type.

Santini, Danilo

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

111

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Natural Gas as a Future Fuel for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In addition to their significant environmental impacts, medium-duty and heavy-duty (HD) vehicles are high volume fuel users. Development of such vehicles, which include transit buses, refuse trucks, and HD Class 6-8 trucks, that are fueled with natural gas is strategic to market introduction of natural gas vehicles (NGV). Over the past five years the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) has funded technological developments in NGV systems to support the growth of this sector in the highly competitive transportation market. The goals are to minimize emissions associated with NGV use, to improve on the economies of scale, and to continue supporting the testing and safety assessments of all new systems. This paper provides an overview of the status of major projects under a program supported by DOE/OHVT and managed by Brookhaven National Laboratory. The discussion focuses on the program's technical strategy in meeting specific goals proposed by the N GV industry and the government. Relevant projects include the development of low-cost fuel storage, fueling infrastructure, and HD vehicle applications.

Wai-Lin Litzke; James Wegrzyn

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

113

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

43 McCormick, 2005 (Canola-1) McCormick,2005 (Soy-1)A: Animal-based; C: Canola; S: Soy-based; H-D: Heavy-Duty H-

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evaluation of fuel consumption potential of medium and heavy duty vehicles through modeling and simulation.  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this report is to provide quantitative data to support the Committee in its task of establishing a report to support rulemaking on medium- and heavy-duty fuel efficiency improvement. In particular, it is of paramount importance for the Committee to base or illustrate their conclusions on established models and actual state-of-the art data. The simulations studies presented in the report have been defined and requested by the members of the National Academy committee to provide quantitative inputs to support their recommendations. As such, various technologies and usage scenarios were considered for several applications. One of the objective is to provide the results along with their associated assumptions (both vehicle and drive cycles), information generally missing from public discussions on literature search. Finally, the advantages and limitations of using simulation will be summarized. The study addresses several of the committee tasks, including: (1) Discussion of the implication of metric selection; (2) Assessing the impact of existing technologies on fuel consumption through energy balance analysis (both steady-state and standard cycles) as well as real world drive cycles; and (3) Impact of future technologies, both individually and collectively.

Delorme, A.; Karbowski, D.; Sharer, P.; Energy Systems

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

115

Characteristics of Emitted Carbonyl Compounds by using Biodiesel fuel with constant H2/O2 in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The emission tests were conducted under steady-state cycle condition in a heavy-duty diesel engine using 0% to 30% ratios of biodiesel fuel with constant H2/O2… (more)

Shih, Jia-Yu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development for Auxiliary Power in Heavy Duty Vehicle Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changing economic and environmental needs of the trucking industry is driving the use of auxiliary power unit (APU) technology for over the road haul trucks. The trucking industry in the United States remains the key to the economy of the nation and one of the major changes affecting the trucking industry is the reduction of engine idling. Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC (Delphi) teamed with heavy-duty truck Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) PACCAR Incorporated (PACCAR), and Volvo Trucks North America (VTNA) to define system level requirements and develop an SOFC based APU. The project defines system level requirements, and subsequently designs and implements an optimized system architecture using an SOFC APU to demonstrate and validate that the APU will meet system level goals. The primary focus is on APUs in the range of 3-5 kW for truck idling reduction. Fuels utilized were derived from low-sulfur diesel fuel. Key areas of study and development included sulfur remediation with reformer operation; stack sensitivity testing; testing of catalyst carbon plugging and combustion start plugging; system pre-combustion; and overall system and electrical integration. This development, once fully implemented and commercialized, has the potential to significantly reduce the fuel idling Class 7/8 trucks consume. In addition, the significant amounts of NOx, CO2 and PM that are produced under these engine idling conditions will be virtually eliminated, inclusive of the noise pollution. The environmental impact will be significant with the added benefit of fuel savings and payback for the vehicle operators / owners.

Daniel T. Hennessy

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Diesel-fueled solid oxide fuel cell auxiliary power units for heavy-duty vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper explores the potential of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCS) as 3--10 kW auxiliary power units for trucks and military vehicles operating on diesel fuel. It discusses the requirements and specifications for such units, and the advantages, challenges, and development issues for SOFCS used in this application. Based on system design and analysis, such systems should achieve efficiencies approaching 40% (lower heating value), with a relatively simple system configuration. The major components of such a system are the fuel cell stack, a catalytic autothermal reformer, and a spent gas burner/air preheater. Building an SOFC-based auxiliary power unit is not straightforward, however, and the tasks needed to develop a 3--10 kW brassboard demonstration unit are outlined.

Krause, T.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Simulated fuel economy and emissions performance during city and interstate driving for a heavy-duty hybrid truck  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare simulated fuel economy and emissions for both conventional and hybrid class 8 heavy-duty diesel trucks operating over multiple urban and highway driving cycles. Both light and heavy freight loads were considered, and all simulations included full aftertreatment for NOx and particulate emissions controls. The aftertreatment components included a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC), urea-selective catalytic NOx reduction (SCR), and a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF). Our simulated hybrid powertrain was configured with a pre-transmission parallel drive, with a single electric motor between the clutch and gearbox. A conventional HD truck with equivalent diesel engine and aftertreatment was also simulated for comparison. Our results indicate that hybridization can significantly increase HD fuel economy and improve emissions control in city driving. However, there is less potential hybridization benefit for HD highway driving. A major factor behind the reduced hybridization benefit for highway driving is that there are fewer opportunities to utilize regenerative breaking. Our aftertreatment simulations indicate that opportunities for passive DPF regeneration are much greater for both hybrid and conventional trucks during highway driving due to higher sustained exhaust temperatures. When passive DPF regeneration is extensively utilized, the fuel penalty for particulate control is virtually eliminated, except for the 0.4%-0.9% fuel penalty associated with the slightly higher exhaust backpressure.

Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Effects of diesel fuel combustion-modifier additives on In-cylinder soot formation in a heavy-duty Dl diesel engine.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on a phenomenological model of diesel combustion and pollutant-formation processes, a number of fuel additives that could potentially reduce in-cylinder soot formation by altering combustion chemistry have been identified. These fuel additives, or ''combustion modifiers'', included ethanol and ethylene glycol dimethyl ether, polyethylene glycol dinitrate (a cetane improver), succinimide (a dispersant), as well as nitromethane and another nitro-compound mixture. To better understand the chemical and physical mechanisms by which these combustion modifiers may affect soot formation in diesel engines, in-cylinder soot and diffusion flame lift-off were measured, using an optically-accessible, heavy-duty, direct-injection diesel engine. A line-of-sight laser extinction diagnostic was employed to measure the relative soot concentration within the diesel jets (''jetsoot'') as well as the rates of deposition of soot on the piston bowl-rim (''wall-soot''). An OH chemiluminescence imaging technique was utilized to measure the lift-off lengths of the diesel diffusion flames so that fresh oxygen entrainment rates could be compared among the fuels. Measurements were obtained at two operating conditions, using blends of a base commercial diesel fuel with various combinations of the fuel additives. The ethanol additive, at 10% by mass, reduced jet-soot by up to 15%, and reduced wall-soot by 30-40%. The other fuel additives also affected in-cylinder soot, but unlike the ethanol blends, changes in in-cylinder soot could be attributed solely to differences in the ignition delay. No statistically-significant differences in the diesel flame lift-off lengths were observed among any of the fuel additive formulations at the operating conditions examined in this study. Accordingly, the observed differences in in-cylinder soot among the fuel formulations cannot be attributed to differences in fresh oxygen entrainment upstream of the soot-formation zones after ignition.

Musculus, Mark P. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dietz, Jeff (The Lubrizol Corp.)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. , Gottesfeld, S. , 1999. Direct methanol fuel cells.Fuel cells for transportation. 1999 Annual Progress Report.Auxiliary power units; Fuel cells 1. Introduction A large

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cells for transportation. 1999 Annual Progress Report.J. , Gottesfeld, S. , 1999. Direct methanol fuel cells.Auxiliary power units; Fuel cells 1. Introduction A large

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Study of Fuel Property Effects Using Future Low Emissions Heavy Duty Truck Engine Hardware  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel properties have had substantial impact on engine emissions. Fuel impact varies with engine technology. An assessment of fuel impact on future low emission designs was needed as part of an EMAEPA-API study effort

Li, Sharon

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

123

Development of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model 2. Brown, S. ,Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model Clark, N. N. andModal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model 4.6. E XHAUST A

Barth, Matthew; Younglove, Theodore; Scora, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel use. Mesoscale Modeling Data Set and Mesoscale Modelobserved, quantified in the data set, and modeled to improveerrors for the validation data set are less than 2% for fuel

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Heavy-Duty Trucks Poised to Accelerate Growth of American Alternative Transportation Fuels Market  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Background Background Since 1988, federal and state legislation has mandated the adoption of alternative transportation fuels, primarily because of environmental and energy security concerns. Recently, however, much of the alternative fuels activity has shifted. With the electoral revolution of 1992, Congress is rethinking environmental regulation and cutting federal appro- priations for alternative fueled vehi- cles (AFVs). The U.S. Enviromental Protection Agency (EPA) may delay implementation of stringent emission standards, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has delayed requirements for alternative fuel adoption that were set to go into effect on September 1, 1995. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, as federal and state legislation was being crafted across the country,

126

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ballard Power Systems (3) Balqon (3) Bosch Rexroth (1) Boulder Electric Ballard Power Systems (3) Balqon (3) Bosch Rexroth (1) Boulder Electric Vehicle (1) Capstone Turbine Corp. (2) Cummins (2) Cummins Westport (2) Electric Vehicles International (1) Enova Systems (1) Ford Motor Co. (5) General Motors (5) Hino (1) KEM (1) Navistar (1) Paccar (2) Smith Electric Vehicles (2) UQM (2) UTC Power (1) Valence (1) Vision Motor Corp. (2) Volvo (1) Westport Innovations (1) Fuel Type All CNG (8) Electricity (11) Ethanol (2) Hybrid - Diesel Hydraulic (5) Hydrogen (3) LNG (4) Propane (10) Application All Bus - School (6) Bus - Shuttle (9) Bus - Transit (11) Refuse hauler (2) Street sweeper (5) Tractor (13) Trolley (3) Van (9) Vocational truck (16) Go Compare Ballard Power Systems - FCvelocity-HD6 fuel cell Ballard Power Systems - Hydrogen Fuel Cell

127

Smart Materials for Fuel Injection Actuation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The demands of stringent emissions and a robust engine dynamic torque response characteristic require innovative, accurate and repeatable control of the fuel injection event. Recent advances in piezo-material actuators have warranted the pursuit of its application to advanced heavy-duty truck fuel injection systems. This presentation will report on design and testing of an advanced electronic unit injector for the Detroit Diesel Series 60 truck engine.

Hakim, Nabil

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

128

Liquefied natural gas as a transportation fuel for heavy-duty trucks: Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains Volume 1 of a three-volume manual designed for use with a 2- to 3-day liquefied natural gas (LNG) training course. Transportation and off-road agricultural, mining, construction, and industrial applications are discussed. This volume provides a brief introduction to the physics and chemistry of LNG; an overview of several ongoing LNG projects, economic considerations, LNG fuel station technology, LNG vehicles, and a summary of federal government programs that encourage conversion to LNG.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Comparative study of heavy-duty engine operation with diesel fuel and ignition-improved methanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methanol can be made suitable for compression ignition engines by ignition-improving additives. The ignition improver demand can be minimized by increasing the compression ratio. The technical suitability of this fuel can be regarded as proven, since most of the problems connected with its use have been solved. Its economic viability, however, has still to be doubted. From an environmental point of view, ignition-improved methanol deserves great interest due to the total absence of soot in the exhaust and the considerably reduced NO/sub x/ emission.

Hardenberg, H.O.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Allison Transmission (2) Azure Dynamics (1) BAE Systems (1) DesignLine Allison Transmission (2) Azure Dynamics (1) BAE Systems (1) DesignLine Corp. (1) Eaton (3) Hino (1) Parker Hannifin Corp. (1) Proterra (1) Smith Electric Vehicles (1) Fuel Type All Hybrid - Diesel Electric (8) Hybrid - Gasoline Electric (1) Application All Bus - School (4) Bus - Shuttle (2) Bus - Transit (6) Refuse hauler (2) Tractor (2) Trolley (2) Vocational truck (2) Go Compare Allison Transmission - Allison H 40 EP Allison Transmission - Allison H 50 EP Azure Dynamics - Balance Parallel Hybrid Drive BAE Systems - HybriDrive DesignLine Corp. - ECOSaver IV Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid Eaton - Hybrid Drive System Eaton - Hybrid Hydraulic Launch Assist (HLA) Hino - Hino Hybrid Drive Parker Hannifin Corp. - RunWise Proterra - ProDrive System Smith Electric Vehicles - 120 kw induction motor with Lithium-ion batteries

131

Opportunities for Low Cost Titanium in Reduced Fuel Consumption, Improved Emissions, and Enhanced Durability Heavy Duty Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine which components of heavy-duty highway vehicles are candidates for the substitution of titanium materials for current materials if the cost of those Ti components is very significantly reduced from current levels. The processes which could be used to produce those low cost components were also investigated. Heavy-duty highway vehicles are defined as all trucks and busses included in Classes 2C through 8. These include heavy pickups and vans above 8,500 lbs. GVWR, through highway tractor trailers. Class 8 is characterized as being a very cyclic market, with ''normal'' year volume, such as in 2000, of approximately 240,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-7 are less cyclic, with ''normal'' i.e., year 2000, volume totaling approximately 325,000 new vehicles. Classes 3-8 are powered about 88.5% by diesel engines, and Class 2C at very roughly 83% diesel. The engine portion of the study therefore focused on diesels. Vehicle production volumes were used in estimates of the market size for candidate components.

Kraft, E.H.

2002-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

132

The ethanol heavy-duty truck fleet demonstration project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was designed to test and demonstrate the use of a high- percentage ethanol-blended fuel in a fleet of heavy-duty, over-the- road trucks, paying particular attention to emissions, performance, and repair and maintenance costs. This project also represents the first public demonstration of the use of ethanol fuels as a viable alternative to conventional diesel fuel in heavy-duty engines.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Development of a direct-injected natural gas engine system for heavy-duty vehicles: Final report phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of Phase 2 of this contract. The authors completed four tasks under this phase of the subcontract. (1) They developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a 3500 direct injected natural gas (DING) engine gas injection/combustion system and used it to identify DING ignition/combustion system improvements. The results were a 20% improvement in efficiency compared to Phase 1 testing. (2) The authors designed and procured the components for a 3126 DING engine (300 hp) and finished assembling it. During preliminary testing, the engine ran successfully at low loads for approximately 2 hours before injector tip and check failures terminated the test. The problems are solvable; however, this phase of the program was terminated. (3) They developed a Decision & Risk Analysis model to compare DING engine technology with various other engine technologies in a number of commercial applications. The model shows the most likely commercial applications for DING technology and can also be used to identify the sensitivity of variables that impact commercial viability. (4) MVE, Inc., completed a preliminary design concept study that examines the major design issues involved in making a reliable and durable 3,000 psi LNG pump. A primary concern is the life of pump seals and piston rings. Plans for the next phase of this program (Phase 3) have been put on indefinite hold. Caterpillar has decided not to fund further DING work at this time due to limited current market potential for the DING engine. However, based on results from this program, the authors believe that DI natural gas technology is viable for allowing a natural gas-fueled engine to achieve diesel power density and thermal efficiency for both the near and long terms.

Cox, G.B.; DelVecchio, K.A.; Hays, W.J.; Hiltner, J.D.; Nagaraj, R.; Emmer, C.

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

134

On-Road Development of the C-Gas Plus Engine in Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fact sheet details on-road development of C-Gas Plus natural gas engine in Viking Freight heavy-duty trucks, including emissions, fuel costs, and petroleum displacement.

Not Available

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medium- and Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Google Bookmark Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Delicious Rank Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles on AddThis.com... Home Overview Light-Duty Vehicles Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Transit Vehicles Trucks Idle Reduction Oil Bypass Filter Airport Ground Support Equipment Medium and Heavy Duty Hybrid Electric Vehicles

136

HEAVY-DUTY VEHICLE IN USE EMISSION PERFORMANCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Engines for heavy-duty vehicles are emission certified by running engines according to specified load pattern or duty cycle. In the US, the US Heavy-Duty Transient cycle has been in use already for a number of years, and Europe is, according to the requirements of the Directive 1999/96/EC gradually switching to transient-type testing. Evaluating the in-use emission performance of heavy-duty vehicles presents a problem. Taking engines out of vehicles for engine dynamometer testing is difficult and costly. In addition, engine dynamometer testing does not take into account the properties of the vehicle itself (i.e. mass, transmission etc.). It is also debatable, how well the standardized duty cycles reflect real-life -driving patterns. VTT Processes has recently commissioned a new emission laboratory for heavy-duty vehicles. The facility comprises both engine test stand and a fully transient heavy-duty chassis dynamometer. The roller diameter of the dynamometer is 2.5 meters. Regulated emissions are measured using a full-flow CVS system. The HD vehicle chassis dynamometer measurements (emissions, fuel consumption) has been granted accreditation by the Centre of Metrology and Accreditation (MIKES, Finland). A national program to generate emission data on buses has been set up for the years 2002-2004. The target is to generate emission factors for some 50 different buses representing different degree of sophistication (Euro 1 to Euro5/EEV, with and without exhaust gas aftertreatment), different fuel technologies (diesel, natural gas) and different ages (the effect of aging). The work is funded by the Metropolitan Council of Helsinki, Helsinki City Transport, The Ministry of Transport and Communications Finland and the gas company Gasum Oy. The International Association for Natural Gas Vehicles (IANGV) has opted to buy into the project. For IANGV, VTT will deliver comprehensive emission data (including particle size distribution and chemical and biological characterization of particles) for up-to-date diesel and natural gas vehicles. The paper describes the methodology used for the measurements on buses, the test matrix and some preliminary emission data on both regulated and unregulated emissions.

Nylund, N; Ikonen, M; Laurikko, J

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

137

Review of Heavy-Duty Engine Combustion Research at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this paper are to describe the research efforts in diesel engine combustion at Sandia National Laboratories' Combustion Research Facility and to provide recent experimental results. We have four diesel engine experiments supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies: a one-cylinder version of a Cummins heavy-duty engine, a diesel simulation facility, a one-cylinder Caterpillar engine to evaluate combustion of alternative fuels, and a homogeneous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) engine facility is under development. Recent experimental results to be discussed are: the effects of injection timing and diluent addition on late-combustion soot burnout, diesel-spray ignition and premixed-burn behavior, a comparison of the combustion characteristics of M85 (a mixture of 85% methanol and 15% gasoline) and DF2 (No.2 diesel reference fuel), and a description of our HCCI experimental program and modeling work.

Robert W. Carling; Gurpreet Singh

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

138

Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL/TM-200015 ORNL/TM-200015 MANAGED BY UT-BATTELLE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY A Vector Approach to Regression Analysis and Its Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions November 2000 Prepared by H. 1. McAdams AccaMath Services Carrolton, Illinois R. W. Crawford R.W. Crawford Energy Systems Tucson, Arizona G. R. Hadder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee - UT-BATTELLE -. ORNL-27 (4.00) II ORNL/TM-200015 A VECTOR APPROACH TO REGRESSION ANALYSIS AND ITS APPLICATION TO HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EMISSIONS H. T. McAdams AccaMath Services Carrollton, Illinois R. W. Crawford RWCrawford Energy Systems Tucson, Arizona G. R. Hadder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee November 2000 Prepared for Office of Energy Effkiency and Renewable Energy

139

NOx Adsorbers for Heavy Duty Truck Engines-Testing and Simulation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This feasibility study of NOx adsorbers in heavy-duty diesel engines examined three configurations (dual-leg, single-leg and single-leg-bypass) in an integrated experimental setup, composed of a Detroit Diesel Class-8 truck engine, a catalyzed diesel particulate filter and the NOx absorber system. The setup also employed a reductant injection concept, sensors and advanced control strategies.

Hakim, N; Hoelzer, J.; Liu, Y.

2002-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

140

Characterization of exhaust emissions from palm oil-based and soybean oil-based biodiesel fueled heavy-duty transit buses.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biodiesel blends offer a renewable energy fueling option for compression-ignition internal combustion engines. Typically, biodiesel blended at or less than 20% (B20), by volume, will… (more)

Efaw, Trampas J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Medium and Heavy Duty Hybrid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an electric vehicle. Medium and heavy duty HEV testing results to date are posted below. Vehicle Testing Reports INL Hybrid Shuttle Busses INL Hybrid Shuttle Busses INL Hybrid...

142

A Distributed Framework for Coordinated Heavy-duty Vehicle ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 28, 2013 ... Abstract: Heavy-duty vehicles traveling in a single file with small intervehicle distances experience a reduced aerodynamic drag and therefore ...

143

08FFL-0020Influence of High Fuel Rail Pressure and Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction on PM Formation in an Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of fuel rail pressure (FRP) and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on particulate matter (PM) formation is investigated in this paper along with notes regarding the NOx and other emissions. Increasing FRP was shown to reduce the overall soot and total PM mass for four operating conditions. These conditions included two high speed conditions (2400 rpm at 540 and 270 Nm of torque) and two moderated speed conditions (1400 rpm at 488 and 325 Nm). The concentrations of CO2 and NOx increased with fuel rail pressure and this is attributed to improved fuel-air mixing. Interestingly, the level of unburned hydrocarbons remained constant (or increased slightly) with increased FRP. PM concentration was measured using an AVL smoke meter and scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS); and total PM was collected using standard gravimetric techniques. These results showed that the smoke number and particulate concentrations decrease with increasing FRP. However the decrease becomes more gradual as very high rail pressures. Additionally, the total PM decreased with increasing FRP; however, the soluble organic fraction (SOF) reaches a maximum after which it declines with higher rail pressure. The total PM was collected for the two 1400 rpm conditions downstream of the engine, diesel oxidation catalyst, and a urea-SCR catalyst. The results show that significant PM reduction occurs in the SCR catalyst even during high rates of urea dosage. Analysis of the PM indicates that residual SOF is burned up in the SCR catalyst.

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Domingo, Norberto [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Hennepin County`s experience with heavy-duty ethanol vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From November 1993 to October 1996, Hennepin County, which includes Minneapolis, field-tested two heavy-duty snowplow/road maintenance trucks fueled by ethanol. The overall objective of this program was to collect data from original equipment manufacturer alternative fuel heavy-duty trucks, along with comparable data from a similarly configured diesel-powered vehicle, to establish economic, emissions, performance, and durability data for the alternative fuel technology. These ethanol trucks, along with an identical third truck equipped with a diesel engine, were operated year round to maintain the Hennepin county roads. In winter, the trucks were run in 8-hour shifts plowing and hauling snow from urban and suburban roads. For the rest of the year, the three trucks were used to repair and maintain these same roads. As a result of this project, a considerable amount of data was collected on E95 fuel use, as well as maintenance, repair, emissions, and operational characteristics. Maintenance and repair costs of the E95 trucks were considerably higher primarily due to fuel filter and fuel pump issues. From an emissions standpoint, the E95 trucks emitted less particulate matter and fewer oxides of nitrogen but more carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons. Overall, the E95 trucks operated as well as the diesel, as long as the fuel filters were changed frequently. This project was a success in that E95, a domestically produced fuel from a renewable energy source, was used in a heavy-duty truck application and performed the same rigorous tasks as the diesel counterparts. The drawbacks to E95 as a heavy-duty fuel take the form of higher operational costs, higher fuel costs, shorter range, and the lack of over-the-road infrastructure.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

SCR SYSTEMS FOR HEAVY DUTY TRUCKS: PROGRESS TOWARDS MEETING EURO 4 EMISSION STANDARDS IN 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emissions of diesel engines contain some components, which support the generation of smog and which are classified hazardous. Exhaust gas aftertreatment is a powerful tool to reduce the NOx and Particulate emissions. The NOx-emission can be reduced by the SCR technology. SCR stands for Selective Catalytic Reduction. A reduction agent has to be injected into the exhaust upstream of a catalyst. On the catalyst the NOx is reduced to N2 (Nitrogen) and H2O (Water). This catalytic process was developed in Japan about 30 years ago to reduce the NOx emission of coal-fired power plants. The first reduction agent used was anhydrous ammonia (NH3). SCR technology was used with diesel engines starting mid of the 80s. First applications were stationary operating generator-sets. In 1991 a joint development between DaimlerChrysler, MAN, IVECO and Siemens was started to use SCR technology for the reduction of heavy duty trucks. Several fleet tests demonstrated the durability of the systems. To day, SCR technology is the most promising technology to fulfill the new European Regulations EURO 4 and EURO 5 being effective Oct. 2005 and Oct. 2008. The efficient NOx reduction of the catalyst allows an engine calibration for low fuel consumption. DaimlerChrysler decided to use the SCR technology on every heavy duty truck and bus in Europe and many other truck manufacturers will introduce SCR technology to fulfill the 2005 emission regulation. The truck manufacturers in Europe agreed to use aqueous solution of Urea as reducing agent. The product is called AdBlue. AdBlue is a non toxic, non smelling liquid. The consumption is about 5% of the diesel fuel consumption to reduce the NOx emissions. A small AdBlue tank has to be installed to the vehicle. With an electronically controlled dosing system the AdBlue is injected into the exhaust. The dosing system is simple and durable. It has proven its durability during winter and summer testing as well as in fleet tests. The infrastructure for AdBlue is under evaluation in Europe by Urea Producers and Mineral Oil companies to be readily available in time. Urea is one of the most common chemical products in the world and the production and the distribution very much experienced. However, a pure grade is needed for automotive application and requires special attention.

Frank, W; Huethwohl, G; Maurer, B

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

146

Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also quantified during selected studies. A laboratory was established at WVU to provide for studies which supported and augmented the Translab research, and to provide for development of superior emissions measurement systems. This laboratory research focused on engine control and fuel sulfur issues. In recent years, as engine and aftertreatment technologies advanced, emissions levels were reduced such that they were at or below the Translab detectable limits, and in the same time frame the US Environmental Protection Agency required improved measurement methodologies for engine emissions certification. To remain current and relevant, the researchers designed a new Translab analytic system, housed in a container which can be transported on a semi-trailer. The new system's dilution tunnel flow was designed to use a subsonic venturi with closed loop control of blower speed, and the secondary dilution and particulate matter filter capture were designed to follow new EPA engine certification procedures. A further contribution of the program has been the development of techniques for creating heavy-duty vehicle test schedules, and the creation of schedules to mimic a variety of truck and bus vocations.

David Lyons

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Remote Sensing of In-Use Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Sensing of In-Use Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks D A N I E L A . B U R G A R D , G A R Y A . B I this study suggest that on-road remote sensing can detect illegal, high sulfur fuel use from individual heavy,HDDvehiclesemissionshavereceivedgrowing attentioninavarietyofstudiessuchaschassisdynamometers (5, 6), in a tunnel (7), and remote sensing (8-10) as well as one critical review (4

Denver, University of

148

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2003 City of Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service: LNG Heavy-Duty Trucks Coca-Cola Hybrid Electric Delivery Trucks Coca-Cola Refreshments...

149

Improving Energy Use in Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

advances in consumer automobiles may dominate the headlines, but heavy-duty trucks and trains also have challenges that need to be addressed. From excessive idling to engine wear,...

150

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction Testing and Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction Testing and Analysis Overview Volvo Group Powertrain Engineering is interested in increasing fuel efficiency through the reduction of parasitic friction and pumping losses. A test cell

Demirel, Melik C.

151

Durability Evaluation of Urea SCR Catalysts for Heavy Duty Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Assess the potential long-term durability of various SCR catalyst formulations for mobile heavy duty diesel application.

Koshkarian, Kent

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

3M heavy duty roto peen: Baseline report; Greenbook (chapter)  

SciTech Connect

The heavy-duty roto peen technology is being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the human factors assessment for safety and health issues. The heavy-duty roto peen allows for the selective removal of concrete substrates. The peen is a tungsten carbide shot brazed to a hardened steel rivet that is supported by a heavy-duty flexible flap. The shot rivet is kept captive to the tool by mounting the roto peen in a slotted hub. The heavy-duty roto peen is designed to be used with several commercially available pieces of equipment. The equipment being used will determine the width of each pass. The equipment being used with the roto peen is then connected to a vacuum system for dust collection during scabbling. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

NONE

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

3M heavy duty roto peen: Baseline report  

SciTech Connect

The heavy-duty roto peen technology was being evaluated at Florida International University (FIU) as a baseline technology. It is a commercially available technology and has been used for various projects at locations throughout the country. In conjunction with FIU`s evaluation of efficiency and cost, this report covers the human factors assessment for safety and health issues. The heavy-duty roto peen allows for the selective removal of concrete substrates. The peen is a tungsten carbide shot brazed to a hardened steel rivet that is supported by a heavy-duty flexible flap. The shot rivet is kept captive to the tool by mounting the roto peen in a slotted hub. The heavy-duty roto peen is designed to be used with several commercially available pieces of equipment. The equipment being used will determine the width of each pass. The equipment being used with the roto peen is then connected to a vacuum system for dust collection during scabbling. The safety and health evaluation during the human factors assessment focused on two main areas: noise and dust.

NONE

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Impact of Heavy Duty Vehicle Emissions Reductions on Global Climate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of a specified set of emissions reductions from heavy duty vehicles on climate change is calculated using the MAGICC 5.3 climate model. The integrated impact of the following emissions changes are considered: CO2, CH4, N2O, VOC, NOx, and SO2. This brief summarizes the assumptions and methods used for this calculation.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Natural Gas-optimized Advanced Heavy-duty Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas-optimized Advanced Heavy-duty Engine Transportation Research PIER Transportation of natural gas vehicles as a clean alternative is currently limited to smaller engine displacements and spark ignition, which results in lower performance. A large displacement natural gas engine has

156

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility, hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide from transit buses and heavy-duty vehicles when they are tested on simulated includes a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer, required for conducting these tests, as well as a heavy

Lee, Dongwon

157

The transportable heavy-duty engine emissions testing laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

West Virginia University has designed and constructed a Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for measuring emissions from heavy duty vehicles, such as buses and trucks operating on conventional and alternative fuels. The laboratory facility can be transported to a test site located at, or nearby, the home base of the vehicles to be tested. The laboratory has the capability of measuring vehicle emissions as the vehicle is operated under either transient or steady state loads and speeds. The exhaust emissions from the vehicle is sampled and the levels of the constituents of the emission are measured. The laboratory consists of two major units; a power absorber unit and an emissions measurement unit. A power absorber unit allows for the connection of a dynamic load to the drive train of the vehicle so that the vehicle can be driven'' through a test cycle while actually mounted on a stationary test bed. The emissions unit contains instrumentation and equipment which allows for the dilution of the vehicle's exhaust with air. The diluteed exhaust is sampled and analyzed to measure the level of concentration of those constituents which have been identified to have impact on the clean environment. Sampling probes withdraw diluted exhaust which is supplied to a number of different exhaust gas analysis instruments. The exhaust gas analysis instruments have the capability to measure the levels of the following exhaust gas constituents: carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), formaldehyde (HCHO), methane and particulate matter. Additional instruments or sampling devices can be installed whenever measurements of additional constituents are desired. A computer based, data acquisition system is used to continuously monitor a wide range of parameters important to the operation of the test and to record the test results.

Not Available

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

The transportable heavy-duty engine emissions testing laboratory  

SciTech Connect

West Virginia University has designed and constructed a Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for measuring emissions from heavy duty vehicles, such as buses and trucks operating on conventional and alternative fuels. The laboratory facility can be transported to a test site located at, or nearby, the home base of the vehicles to be tested. The laboratory has the capability of measuring vehicle emissions as the vehicle is operated under either transient or steady state loads and speeds. The exhaust emissions from the vehicle is sampled and the levels of the constituents of the emission are measured. The laboratory consists of two major units; a power absorber unit and an emissions measurement unit. A power absorber unit allows for the connection of a dynamic load to the drive train of the vehicle so that the vehicle can be driven'' through a test cycle while actually mounted on a stationary test bed. The emissions unit contains instrumentation and equipment which allows for the dilution of the vehicle's exhaust with air. The diluteed exhaust is sampled and analyzed to measure the level of concentration of those constituents which have been identified to have impact on the clean environment. Sampling probes withdraw diluted exhaust which is supplied to a number of different exhaust gas analysis instruments. The exhaust gas analysis instruments have the capability to measure the levels of the following exhaust gas constituents: carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), formaldehyde (HCHO), methane and particulate matter. Additional instruments or sampling devices can be installed whenever measurements of additional constituents are desired. A computer based, data acquisition system is used to continuously monitor a wide range of parameters important to the operation of the test and to record the test results.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Heavy Duty Truck Engine Advancement Adoption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

petroleum consumption. According to the DOE Energy Information Administration's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2009, U.S. heavy truck fuel consumption will increase 23 percent between...

160

On-Road Remote Sensing of Heavy-duty Diesel Truck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Road Remote Sensing of Heavy-duty Diesel Truck Emissions in the Austin- San Marcos Area: August Denver, CO 80208 November 1998 UNIVERSITY Of DENVER #12;Remote Sensing of Heavy-duty Trucks in Austin be observed by probing the exhaust. In the process of measuring the ratios, the remote sensing unit results

Denver, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

A Vector Approach to Regression Analysis and Its Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An alternative approach is presented for the regression of response data on predictor variables that are not logically or physically separable. The methodology is demonstrated by its application to a data set of heavy-duty diesel emissions. Because of the covariance of fuel properties, it is found advantageous to redefine the predictor variables as vectors, in which the original fuel properties are components, rather than as scalars each involving only a single fuel property. The fuel property vectors are defined in such a way that they are mathematically independent and statistically uncorrelated. Because the available data set does not allow definitive separation of vehicle and fuel effects, and because test fuels used in several of the studies may be unrealistically contrived to break the association of fuel variables, the data set is not considered adequate for development of a full-fledged emission model. Nevertheless, the data clearly show that only a few basic patterns of fuel-property variation affect emissions and that the number of these patterns is considerably less than the number of variables initially thought to be involved. These basic patterns, referred to as ''eigenfuels,'' may reflect blending practice in accordance with their relative weighting in specific circumstances. The methodology is believed to be widely applicable in a variety of contexts. It promises an end to the threat of collinearity and the frustration of attempting, often unrealistically, to separate variables that are inseparable.

McAdams, H.T.

2001-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

Regulated Emissions from Biodiesel Tested in Heavy-Duty Engines Meeting 2004 Emission Standards  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel produced from soybean oil, canola oil, yellow grease, and beef tallow was tested in two heavy-duty engines. The biodiesels were tested neat and as 20% by volume blends with a 15 ppm sulfur petroleum-derived diesel fuel. The test engines were the following: 2002 Cummins ISB and 2003 DDC Series 60. Both engines met the 2004 U.S. emission standard of 2.5 g/bhp-h NO{sub x}+HC (3.35 g/kW-h) and utilized exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). All emission tests employed the heavy-duty transient procedure as specified in the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations. Reduction in PM emissions and increase in NO{sub x} emissions were observed for all biodiesels in all engines, confirming observations made in older engines. On average PM was reduced by 25% and NO{sub x} increased by 3% for the two engines tested for a variety of B20 blends. These changes are slightly larger in magnitude, but in the same range as observed in older engines. The cetane improver 2-ethyl hexyl nitrate was shown to have no measurable effect on NO{sub x} emissions from B20 in these engines, in contrast to observations reported for older engines. The effect of intake air humidity on NO{sub x} emissions from the Cummins ISB was quantified. The CFR NO{sub x}/humidity correction factor was shown to be valid for an engine equipped with EGR, operating at 1700 m above sea level, and operating on conventional or biodiesel.

McCormick, R. L.; Tennant, C. J.; Hayes, R. R.; Black, S.; Ireland, J.; McDaniel, T.; Williams, A.; Frailey, M.; Sharp, C. A.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Onboard Idle Reduction Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction

164

Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks program (DE-FC26-04NT42189), commonly referred to as the AES program, focused on areas that will primarily benefit fuel economy and improve heat rejection while driving over the road. The AES program objectives were to: (1) Analyze, design, build, and test a cooling system that provided a minimum of 10 percent greater heat rejection in the same frontal area with no increase in parasitic fan load. (2) Realize fuel savings with advanced power management and acceleration assist by utilizing an integrated starter/generator (ISG) and energy storage devices. (3) Quantify the effect of aerodynamic drag due to the frontal shape mandated by the area required for the cooling system. The program effort consisted of modeling and designing components for optimum fuel efficiency, completing fabrication of necessary components, integrating these components into the chassis test bed, completing controls programming, and performance testing the system both on a chassis dynamometer and on the road. Emission control measures for heavy-duty engines have resulted in increased engine heat loads, thus introducing added parasitic engine cooling loads. Truck electrification, in the form of thermal management, offers technological solutions to mitigate or even neutralize the effects of this trend. Thermal control offers opportunities to avoid increases in cooling system frontal area and forestall reduced fuel economy brought about by additional aerodynamic vehicle drag. This project explored such thermal concepts by installing a 2007 engine that is compliant with current regulations and bears additional heat rejection associated with meeting these regulations. This newer engine replaced the 2002 engine from a previous project that generated less heat rejection. Advanced power management, utilizing a continuously optimized and controlled power flow between electric components, can offer additional fuel economy benefits to the heavy-duty trucking industry. Control software for power management brings added value to the power distribution and energy storage architecture on board a truck with electric accessories and an ISG. The research team has built upon a previous truck electrification project, formally, 'Parasitic Energy Loss Reduction and Enabling Technologies for Class 7/8 Trucks', DE-FC04-2000AL6701, where the fundamental concept of electrically-driven accessories replacing belt/gear-driven accessories was demonstrated on a Kenworth T2000 truck chassis. The electrical accessories, shown in Figure 1, were controlled to provide 'flow on demand' variable-speed operation and reduced parasitic engine loads for increased fuel economy. These accessories also provided solutions for main engine idle reduction in long haul trucks. The components and systems of the current project have been integrated into the same Kenworth T2000 truck platform. Reducing parasitic engine loading by decoupling accessory loads from the engine and driving them electrically has been a central concept of this project. Belt or gear-driven engine accessories, such as water pump, air conditioning compressor, or air compressor, are necessarily tied to the engine speed dictated by the current vehicle operating conditions. These conventional accessory pumps are sized to provide adequate flow or pressure at low idle or peak torque speeds, resulting in excess flow or pressure at cruising or rated speeds. The excess flow is diverted through a pressure-minimizing device such as a relief valve thereby expending energy to drive unnecessary and inefficient pump operation. This inefficiency causes an increased parasitic load to the engine, which leads to a loss of usable output power and decreased fuel economy. Controlling variable-speed electric motors to provide only the required flow or pressure of a particular accessory system can yield significant increases in fuel economy for a commercial vehicle. Motor loads at relatively high power levels (1-5 kW, or higher) can be efficiently provided

Larry Slone; Jeffrey Birkel

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

165

Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Electric Systems and Aerodynamics for Efficiency Improvements in Heavy Duty Trucks program (DE-FC26-04NT42189), commonly referred to as the AES program, focused on areas that will primarily benefit fuel economy and improve heat rejection while driving over the road. The AES program objectives were to: (1) Analyze, design, build, and test a cooling system that provided a minimum of 10 percent greater heat rejection in the same frontal area with no increase in parasitic fan load. (2) Realize fuel savings with advanced power management and acceleration assist by utilizing an integrated starter/generator (ISG) and energy storage devices. (3) Quantify the effect of aerodynamic drag due to the frontal shape mandated by the area required for the cooling system. The program effort consisted of modeling and designing components for optimum fuel efficiency, completing fabrication of necessary components, integrating these components into the chassis test bed, completing controls programming, and performance testing the system both on a chassis dynamometer and on the road. Emission control measures for heavy-duty engines have resulted in increased engine heat loads, thus introducing added parasitic engine cooling loads. Truck electrification, in the form of thermal management, offers technological solutions to mitigate or even neutralize the effects of this trend. Thermal control offers opportunities to avoid increases in cooling system frontal area and forestall reduced fuel economy brought about by additional aerodynamic vehicle drag. This project explored such thermal concepts by installing a 2007 engine that is compliant with current regulations and bears additional heat rejection associated with meeting these regulations. This newer engine replaced the 2002 engine from a previous project that generated less heat rejection. Advanced power management, utilizing a continuously optimized and controlled power flow between electric components, can offer additional fuel economy benefits to the heavy-duty trucking industry. Control software for power management brings added value to the power distribution and energy storage architecture on board a truck with electric accessories and an ISG. The research team has built upon a previous truck electrification project, formally, 'Parasitic Energy Loss Reduction and Enabling Technologies for Class 7/8 Trucks', DE-FC04-2000AL6701, where the fundamental concept of electrically-driven accessories replacing belt/gear-driven accessories was demonstrated on a Kenworth T2000 truck chassis. The electrical accessories, shown in Figure 1, were controlled to provide 'flow on demand' variable-speed operation and reduced parasitic engine loads for increased fuel economy. These accessories also provided solutions for main engine idle reduction in long haul trucks. The components and systems of the current project have been integrated into the same Kenworth T2000 truck platform. Reducing parasitic engine loading by decoupling accessory loads from the engine and driving them electrically has been a central concept of this project. Belt or gear-driven engine accessories, such as water pump, air conditioning compressor, or air compressor, are necessarily tied to the engine speed dictated by the current vehicle operating conditions. These conventional accessory pumps are sized to provide adequate flow or pressure at low idle or peak torque speeds, resulting in excess flow or pressure at cruising or rated speeds. The excess flow is diverted through a pressure-minimizing device such as a relief valve thereby expending energy to drive unnecessary and inefficient pump operation. This inefficiency causes an increased parasitic load to the engine, which leads to a loss of usable output power and decreased fuel economy. Controlling variable-speed electric motors to provide only the required flow or pressure of a particular accessory system can yield significant increases in fuel economy for a commercial vehicle. Motor loads at relatively high power levels (1-5 kW, or higher) can be efficiently provided

Larry Slone; Jeffrey Birkel

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Gaseous Fuel Injection Modeling using a Gaseous Sphere Injection Methodology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The growing interest in gaseous fuels (hydrogen and natural gas) for internal combustion engines calls for the development of computer models for simulation of gaseous fuel injection, air entrainment and the ensuing combustion. This paper introduces a new method for modeling the injection and air entrainment processes for gaseous fuels. The model uses a gaseous sphere injection methodology, similar to liquid droplet in injection techniques used for liquid fuel injection. In this paper, the model concept is introduced and model results are compared with correctly- and under-expanded experimental data.

Hessel, R P; Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

167

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Locate Stations Search by Location Map a Route Laws & Incentives Search Federal State Key Legislation Data &...

168

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Balqon - XE-20 Balqon - 200-hp, 230V, AC induction motor with 215kWh, 312V, lithium-ion batteries...

169

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

ElDorado National - E-Z Rider II BRT Thomas Built Buses - Saf-T-Liner C2e Hybrid Freightliner - M2 106 Hybrid Nova Bus - LFS Artic HEV Nova Bus - LFS HEV Nova Bus - LFX Cummins -...

170

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Balqon - XE-30 Balqon - 200-hp, 230V, AC induction motor with 215kWh, 600V, lithium-ion batteries...

171

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

60BRT North American Bus Industries - 31LFW 35LFW 40LFW ElDorado National - E-Z Rider II BRT ElDorado National - Axess Gillig Corp. - Diesel-Electric Hybrid Bus and CNG Bus...

172

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Goshen Coach - GCIIG-Force Turtle Top - Terra Transport General Motors - ExpressSavana cutaway van General Motors - ExpressSavana cargo van Greenkraft - 1061 General Motors -...

173

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

North American Bus Industries - 60BRT North American Bus Industries - 31LFW 35LFW 40LFW ElDorado National - Axess Motor Coach Industries - D4500 CT Hybrid Commuter Coach...

174

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicles International - EVI-MD Electric Vehicles International - 260-hp AC permanent magnet motor with...

175

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compatible Vehicles: StarTrans - Senator Turtle Top - Odyssey XL Turtle Top - Odyssey Goshen Coach - GCIIG-Force Turtle Top - Van Terra Capacity Trucks - TJ5000TJ7000 Ford Motor...

176

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Peterbilt Motors - 386HE Kenworth - T370 hybrid truck Kenworth - T270 hybrid IC Bus - HC Hybrid Series Turtle Top - Odyssey XLT Kenworth - T370 diesel electric tractor Thomas Built...

177

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

31LFW 35LFW 40LFW Motor Coach Industries - D4500 CT Hybrid Commuter Coach North American Bus Industries - 42BRT Nova Bus - LFX Allison Transmission - Allison H 5...

178

Heavy-duty truck population, activity and usage patterns. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the study was to update the heavy-duty truck (HDT) population, activity (e.g., vehicle miles traveled (VMT), numbers of starts and trips, trip duration, etc.), and usage patterns type of service/business (e.g., delivery, construction, etc.), area of operation (i.e., local, short-haul, long-haul) for HDT`s registered and/or operated in California. The population and activity estimates were done on a weight-class-specific basis light-heavy-duty, medium-heavy-duty and heavy-heavy-duty. Population, activity and usage estimates were based primarily on Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) registration data and Truck Inventory and Usage Survey (TIUS) data. In addition to the analysis of existing data (i.e., DMV and TIUS), 42 HDTs were fitted with on-board data loggers that recorded numbers of trips and starts, daily VMT and travel by time-of-day.

Fischer, M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Design of an instrumented multifunctional foot for application to a heavy duty mobile robot manufacturing system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design of a multifunctional foot for application to a mobile robotic system for heavy duty manufacturing is presented. The requirements for a target manufacturing task are presented and translated into requirements for ...

Menon, Manas Chandran

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Getting performance without sacrificing economy or emissions control in a heavy-duty LPG engine  

SciTech Connect

A commercial 637 CID liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) engine was evaluated as a candidate powerplant for new bus purchases and/or as a replacement for obsolete LPG engines currently being used in metropolitan Chicago bus service. Limited route service experience with LPG conversion of a gasoline engine indicated both its potential and the need for its optimization in order to take advantage of the unique characteristics of LPG. The engine-dynamometer study, with emphasis on fuel system-ignition relationships, led to substantial improvement in fuel economy without depreciation of engine power. The 637 CID LPG engine fuel economy was increased from an average of 1.77 mpg for 1965 to 1971 to 2.60 mpg for the Dec. 1971 to April 1972 period in Chicago field tests. Cylinder head redesign permitted lean mixture operation that reduced exhaust emissions to levels calculated to conform to the 1973 Federal standards and the 1973-1974 California Air Resources Board requirements for heavy-duty engines. The exhaust emissions data obtained with the optimized 7.5:1 CR engine based on the California 13-mode cycle were 8.3 g/bhp/hr carbon monoxide and 9.9 g/bhp/hr hydrocarbons plus nitrogen dioxide.

Mengelkamp, R.A.; Linnard, R.E.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Design Evolution, Durability and Reliability of Alstom Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines: Pedigree Matrices, Volume 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced technology heavy-duty gas turbines carry a degree of technical risk because of new technologies used in their design. This report reviews the design evolution of specific Alstom (formerly ABB) industrial gas turbines in a standard format, which allows a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the technical risks involved in their operation. The report establishes a pedigree matrix, or qualitative analysis, for standard production and newly introduced heavy-duty gas turbines, including ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

182

Design Evolution, Durability, and Reliability of Alstom Heavy-Duty Combustion Turbines: Pedigree Matrices, Volume 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced technology heavy-duty combustion turbines carry a degree of technical risk because of new technologies used in their design. This report reviews the design evolution of specific Alstom (formerly ABB) industrial combustion turbines in a standard format, which allows a qualitative and quantitative assessment of the technical risks involved in their operation. The report establishes a pedigree matrix, or qualitative analysis, for standard production and newly introduced heavy-duty combustion turbin...

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

183

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Largest U.S. Port Complex Embraces LNG for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Largest U.S. Port Largest U.S. Port Complex Embraces LNG for Heavy-Duty Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Largest U.S. Port Complex Embraces LNG for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Largest U.S. Port Complex Embraces LNG for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Largest U.S. Port Complex Embraces LNG for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Largest U.S. Port Complex Embraces LNG for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Largest U.S. Port Complex Embraces LNG for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Largest U.S. Port Complex Embraces LNG for Heavy-Duty Trucks on AddThis.com...

184

Materials-Enabled High-Efficiency (MEHE) Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, Inc. and Caterpillar, Inc. was to improve diesel engine efficiency by incorporating advanced materials to enable higher combustion pressures and temperatures necessary for improved combustion. The project scope also included novel materials for use in advanced components and designs associated with waste-heat recovery and other concepts for improved thermal efficiency. Caterpillar initially provided ORNL with a 2004 Tier 2 C15 ACERT diesel engine (designed for on-highway use) and two 600 hp motoring dynamometers. The first year of the CRADA effort was focused on establishing a heavy-duty experimental engine research cell. First year activities included procuring, installing and commissioning the cell infrastructure. Infrastructure components consisted of intake air handling system, water tower, exhaust handling system, and cell air conditioning. Other necessary infrastructure items included the fuel delivery system and bottled gas handling to support the analytical instrumentation. The second year of the CRADA focused on commissioning the dynamometer system to enable engine experimentation. In addition to the requirements associated with the dynamometer controller, the electrical system needed a power factor correction system to maintain continuity with the electrical grid. During the second year the engine was instrumented and baseline operated to confirm performance and commission the dynamometer. The engine performance was mapped and modeled according to requirements provided by Caterpillar. This activity was further supported by a Work-for-Others project from Caterpillar to evaluate a proprietary modeling system. A second Work-for-Others activity was performed to evaluate a novel turbocharger design. This project was highly successful and may lead to new turbocharger designs for Caterpillar heavy-duty diesel engines. During the third (and final) year of the CRADA, a novel valve material was evaluated to assess high temperature performance and durability. A series of prototype valves, composed of a unique nickel-alloy was placed in the engine head. The engine was aggressively operated using a transient test cycle for 200 hours. The valve recession was periodically measured to determine valve performance. Upon completion of the test the valves were removed and returned to Caterpillar for additional assessment. Industrial in-kind support was available throughout the project period. Review of the status and research results were carried out on a regular basis (meetings and telecons) which included direction for future work activities. A significant portion of the industrial support was in the form of information exchange and technical consultation.

Kass, M.; Veliz, M. (Caterpillar, Inc.)

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Fuel injection device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injection system and method provide for shaping a combustion plume within a combustion chamber to effectively recirculate hot combustion gases for stable combustion conditions while providing symmetrical combustion conditions. Char and molten slag are passed to the outer boundary layer to complete combustion of char while permitting initial substoichiometric combustion in a reductive atmosphere for reducing discharge of nitrogen oxides. Shaping of the plume is accomplished by an axially adjustable pintle which permits apportionment of driving pressure between elements which contribute tangential and those which contribute radial directional components to oxidant flow entering the combustion chamber.

Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fuel injection device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injection system and method provide for shaping a combustion plume within a combustion chamber to effectively recirculate hot combustion gases for stable combustion conditions while providing symmetrical combustion conditions. Char and molten slag are passed to the outer boundary layer to complete combustion of char while permitting initial substoichiometric combustion in a reductive atmosphere for reducing discharge of nitrogen oxides. Shaping of the plume is accomplished by an axially adjustable pintle which permits apportionment of driving pressure between elements which contribute tangential and those which contribute radial directional components to oxidant flow entering the combustion chamber.

Carlson, L.W.

1983-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

187

Top U.S. Automakers Collaborate to Improve Heavy-Duty Freight Efficiency |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Top U.S. Automakers Collaborate to Improve Heavy-Duty Freight Top U.S. Automakers Collaborate to Improve Heavy-Duty Freight Efficiency Top U.S. Automakers Collaborate to Improve Heavy-Duty Freight Efficiency November 22, 2013 - 5:37pm Addthis As part of the 21st Century Truck Partnership, the Army will demonstrate technology that converts waste heat from an exhaust system to electricity used in its Stryker vehicle. | Photo courtesy of courtesy of U.S. Army As part of the 21st Century Truck Partnership, the Army will demonstrate technology that converts waste heat from an exhaust system to electricity used in its Stryker vehicle. | Photo courtesy of courtesy of U.S. Army Natalie Committee Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Detroit, the hub of America's automotive industry hosted a gathering of

188

Design Evolution, Durability and Reliability of Mitsubishi Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced, heavy-duty gas turbines carry a degree of technical risk because of new technologies incorporated into their designs. This report reviews the design evolution of specific Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., heavy-duty industrial gas turbines in a standard format that facilitates an assessment of technical risks involved in their operation. The pedigree matrix includes performance and design features of the M501D/701D, M501F/701F, M501G/701G, M501H/701H, and M501J/701J machines. The report ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

189

Access to alternative transportation fuel stations varies across ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

LNG is typically only used in heavy-duty vehicles. Compared to the number of existing LNG fuel stations, there is a large network of stations planned along ...

190

Consumption of alternative transportation fuels held steady in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The consumption of propane in heavy duty vehicles has ... Many fleets have replaced their light duty vehicles with flexible fueled and gasoline hybrid vehicles ...

191

The transportable heavy-duty engine emissions testing laboratory. Annual progress report, April 1990--April 1991  

SciTech Connect

West Virginia University has designed and constructed a Transportable Emissions Testing Laboratory for measuring emissions from heavy duty vehicles, such as buses and trucks operating on conventional and alternative fuels. The laboratory facility can be transported to a test site located at, or nearby, the home base of the vehicles to be tested. The laboratory has the capability of measuring vehicle emissions as the vehicle is operated under either transient or steady state loads and speeds. The exhaust emissions from the vehicle is sampled and the levels of the constituents of the emission are measured. The laboratory consists of two major units; a power absorber unit and an emissions measurement unit. A power absorber unit allows for the connection of a dynamic load to the drive train of the vehicle so that the vehicle can be ``driven`` through a test cycle while actually mounted on a stationary test bed. The emissions unit contains instrumentation and equipment which allows for the dilution of the vehicle`s exhaust with air. The diluteed exhaust is sampled and analyzed to measure the level of concentration of those constituents which have been identified to have impact on the clean environment. Sampling probes withdraw diluted exhaust which is supplied to a number of different exhaust gas analysis instruments. The exhaust gas analysis instruments have the capability to measure the levels of the following exhaust gas constituents: carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), unburned hydrocarbons (HC), formaldehyde (HCHO), methane and particulate matter. Additional instruments or sampling devices can be installed whenever measurements of additional constituents are desired. A computer based, data acquisition system is used to continuously monitor a wide range of parameters important to the operation of the test and to record the test results.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

THE EFFECTS OF BIODIESEL BLENDS AND ARCO EC-DIESEL ON EMISSIONS from LIGHT HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL VEHICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chassis dynamometer tests were performed on 7 light heavy-duty diesel trucks comparing the emissions of a California diesel fuel with emissions from 4 other fuels: ARCO EC-diesel (EC-D) and three 20% biodiesel blends (1 yellow grease and 2 soy-based). The EC-D and the yellow grease biodiesel blend both showed significant reductions in THC and CO emissions over the test vehicle fleet. EC-D also showed reductions in PM emission rates. NOx emissions were comparable for the different fuel types over the range of vehicles tested. The soy-based biodiesel blends did not show significant or consistent emissions differences over all test vehicles. Total carbon accounted for more than 70% of the PM mass for 4 of the 5 sampled vehicles. Elemental and organic carbon ratios varied significantly from vehicle-to-vehicle but showed very little fuel dependence. Inorganic species represented a smaller portion of the composite total, ranging from 0.2 to 3.3% of the total PM. Total PAH emissions ranged from approximately 1.8 mg/mi to 67.8 mg/mi over the different vehicle/fuel combinations representing between 1.6 and 3.8% of the total PM mass.

Durbin, Thomas

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

Heavy-duty diesel engine oil aging effects on emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel engines are highly reliable, durable and are used for wide range of applications with low fuel usage owing to its higher thermal efficiency compared… (more)

Dam, Mrinmoy.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A Distributed Framework for Coordinated Heavy-duty Vehicle ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to greenhouse gas emissions (road transport generates 16% of the CO2 pollution in Europe ..... fuel savings. Algorithm 1: Pseudocode for the savings calculation in

195

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Engine Dynamometer Test Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engine Dynamometer Test Cells Engine Dynamometer Test Cells The ReFUEL Laboratory features two engine dynamometer test cells-one for heavy-duty engines and another for light-duty engines. Heavy-Duty Engine Dynamometer Test Cell Capabilities Photo of heavy-duty engine dynamometer test cell in laboratory setting. Heavy-duty engines are certified as meeting emission regulations by the manufacturer using an engine dynamometer. These protocols, known as the Heavy-Duty Federal Test Procedures (HD-FTP), are highly standardized, and results can be readily compared between laboratories. Because the heavy-duty engine dynamometer test cell performs the HD-FTP on engines up to 600 hp, advanced fuels can be evaluated in a way that is meaningful to the engine-research community. In addition to testing a wide

196

Analysis of parasitic losses in heavy duty diesel engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel economy of large, on-road diesel engines has become even more critical in recent years for engine manufactures, vehicle OEMs, and truck operators, in view of pending CO2 emission regulations. Demands for increased ...

James, Christopher Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Mixed Mode Fuel Injector And Injection System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injector includes a homogenous charge nozzle outlet set and a conventional nozzle outlet set that are controlled respectively by first and second three way needle control valves. Each fuel injector includes first and second concentric needle valve members. One of the needle valve members moves to an open position for a homogenous charge injection event, while the other needle valve member moves to an open position for a conventional injection event. The fuel injector has the ability to operate in a homogenous charge mode with a homogenous charge spray pattern, a conventional mode with a conventional spray pattern or a mixed mode.

Stewart, Chris Lee (Normal, IL); Tian, Ye (Bloomington, IL); Wang, Lifeng (Normal, IL); Shafer, Scott F. (Morton, IL)

2005-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

High temperature solid lubricant materials for heavy duty and advanced heat engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced engine designs incorporate higher mechanical and thermal loading to achieve efficiency improvements. This approach often leads to higher operating temperatures of critical sliding elements (e.g. piston ring/cylinder wall contacts and valve guides) which compromise the use of conventional and even advanced synthetic liquid lubricants. For these applications solid lubricants must be considered. Several novel solid lubricant composites and coatings designated PS/PM200 have been employed to dry and marginally oil lubricated contacts in advanced heat engines. These applications include cylinder kits of heavy duty diesels, and high temperature sterling engines, sidewall seals of rotary engines and various exhaust valve and exhaust component applications. The following paper describes the tribological and thermophysical properties of these tribomaterials and reviews the results of applying them to engine applications. Other potential tribological materials and applications are also discussed with particular emphasis to heavy duty and advanced heat engines.

DellaCorte, C.; Wood, J.C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Heavy-duty diesel vehicle Nox? aftertreatment in 2010 : the infrastructure and compliance challenges of urea-SCR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasingly stringent heavy-duty vehicle emission regulations are prompting the use of PM and NOx aftertreatment systems in the US, the EU and Japan. In the US, the EPA Highway Diesel Rule, which will be fully implemented ...

Bodek, Kristian M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Combustion oscillation control by cyclic fuel injection  

SciTech Connect

A number of recent articles have demonstrated the use of active control to mitigate the effects of combustion instability in afterburner and dump combustor applications. In these applications, cyclic injection of small quantities of control fuel has been proposed to counteract the periodic heat release that contributes to undesired pressure oscillations. This same technique may also be useful to mitigate oscillations in gas turbine combustors, especially in test rig combustors characterized by acoustic modes that do not exist in the final engine configuration. To address this issue, the present paper reports on active control of a subscale, atmospheric pressure nozzle/combustor arrangement. The fuel is natural gas. Cyclic injection of 14% control fuel in a premix fuel nozzle is shown to reduce oscillating pressure amplitude by a factor of 0.30 (i.e., {approximately}10 dB) at 300 Hz. Measurement of the oscillating heat release is also reported.

Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.J. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Robey, E. [EG& G Technical Services of West Virginia, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Cowell, L.; Rawlins, D. [Solar Turbines, Inc., San Diedgo, CA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Emission and Performance Comparison of the Natural Gas C-Gas Plus Engine in Heavy-Duty Trucks: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details results of on-road development and emissions characteristics of C-Gas Plus natural gas engine in Viking Freight heavy duty trucks. The objective of this project was to develop, on road and in service, a natural gas truck/bus engine (the C-Gas Plus) with higher horsepower, lower cost, and better performance and diagnostics than the previous C8.3G natural gas engine. The engine was to have an advanced engine management control system to enable implementation of proven technologies that improve engine performance and power density (hp/L). The C-Gas Plus engine was designed to meet the following objectives: (1) Higher engine ratings (280 hp and 850 ft-lb torque for the C-Gas Plus) than the C8.3G natural gas engine; (2) Lower capital cost than the C8.3G engine; and (3) Low emission standards: California Air Resources Board (CARB) low-NO{sub x} (oxides of nitrogen) (2.0 g/bhp-h) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Clean Fuel Fleet Program ultra-low emission vehicle (ULEV) emission certifications.

Lyford-Pike, E. J.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Photos | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Biofuels ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Fuel economy ---Fuel injection ---Heavy-duty...

203

In The News | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Biofuels ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Fuel economy ---Fuel injection ---Heavy-duty...

204

Downloads | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Biofuels ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Fuel economy ---Fuel injection ---Heavy-duty...

205

Feature Stories | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Biofuels ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Fuel economy ---Fuel injection ---Heavy-duty...

206

Press Releases | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Biofuels ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Fuel economy ---Fuel injection ---Heavy-duty...

207

Videos | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Biofuels ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Fuel economy ---Fuel injection ---Heavy-duty...

208

Ejector device for direct injection fuel jet  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is a device for increasing entrainment and mixing in an air/fuel zone of a direct fuel injection system. The device comprises an ejector nozzle in the form of an inverted funnel whose central axis is aligned along the central axis of a fuel injector jet and whose narrow end is placed just above the jet outlet. It is found that effective ejector performance is achieved when the ejector geometry is adjusted such that it comprises a funnel whose interior surface diverges about 7.degree. to about 9.degree. away from the funnel central axis, wherein the funnel inlet diameter is about 2 to about 3 times the diameter of the injected fuel plume as the fuel plume reaches the ejector inlet, and wherein the funnel length equal to about 1 to about 4 times the ejector inlet diameter. Moreover, the ejector is most effectively disposed at a separation distance away from the fuel jet equal to about 1 to about 2 time the ejector inlet diameter.

Upatnieks, Ansis (Livermore, CA)

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

Evaluation of Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) Evaluation of Oil Bypass Filter Technology on Heavy-Duty Vehicles James Francfort American Filtration and Separations Society April 2005 Presentation Outline * Background & Objectives * Oil bypass filters - features & reported benefits * INL testing method * puraDYN oil bypass filters * Refined Global Solutions (RGS) oil bypass filters * Testing results & trends * Particulate and ferrography testing * Initial INL Oil Bypass Filter Economics * Potential fleet oil savings * Testing Status Bypass Filter Evaluation - Background * Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program (Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity) * Vehicles operated by Idaho National Laboratory's Fleet Operations group * Idaho National Laboratory

210

Combustion Commonality and Differences Between HSDI and Heavy Duty Truck Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental understanding of the diesel spray and combustion process at the fundamental level has helped advance the virtual lab simulation tools. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based simulation has been globally verified in many engines, providing substantial credibility to the use of this technology in advanced engine development. This paper highlights the common aspects and differences between the smallbore HSDI and the larger displacement heavy-duty truck engine spray and combustion processes. Implications for combustion system strategies will be delineated. Detroit Diesel integrated ''Wired'' approach will be explained with pointers towards future tool enhancements.

Chen, Rong

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

211

Large heavy-duty gas turbines for base-load power generation and heat cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

The predominant role of large gas turbines has shifted from peaking-load duty to midrange and base-load electric power generation, especially within combined-cycle plants. Such applications require heavy-duty industrial gas turbines to ensure the same high reliability and availability for continuous service as the associated steam turbines. It is also important that the gas turbines be designed for low maintenance to minimize the necessary outage times and costs for component repair and replacement. The basic design principles and applications of Model V94 gas turbines are discussed with special reference to highly reliable and economic bulk power generation.

Joyce, J.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Near and long term efficiency improvements to natural gas heavy duty engines. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1997--September 30, 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Trucking Research Institute (TRI) in cooperation with the Department of Energy Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (DOE), South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), and Gas Research Institute (GRI), requests proposals designed to support the Natural Gas Engine Enhanced Efficiency Program. This effort, which contains Programs A & B, is designed to fund projects that advance both the part and full load fuel efficiency of heavy-duty (250 hp plus) natural gas engines. Approximately $1.2 million will be available in Program A to fund up to three projects. These projects may target either or both near-term, and longer-term engine efficiency goals in addition, it is possible that one of the projects funded under Program A will be selected for additional funding for up to 42 months under Program B funding amounts are to be determined.

NONE

1997-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technology Demonstations - 2005 Status Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 30, 2006 June 30, 2006 Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technology Demonstrations 2005 Status Report Fred Wagner Energetics Incorporated NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

214

Heavy-Duty Emissions Control: Plasma-Facilitated vs Reformer-Assisted Lean NOx Catalysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress has been made in the control of combustion processes to limit the formation of environmentally harmful species, but lean burn vehicles, such as those powered by diesel engines used for the majority of commercial trucking and off-road applications, remain a major source of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. Tighter control of the combustion process coupled with exhaust gas recirculation has brought emissions in line with 2004 targets worldwide. Additional modifications to the engine control system, somewhat limited NOx control, and PM filters will likely allow the 2007 limits to be met for the on-highway regulations for heavy-duty engines in the United States. Concern arises when the NOx emission limit of 0.2 g/bhphr set for the year 2010 is considered.

(1)Aardahl, C; (1)Rozmiarek, R; (1)Rappe, K; (1)Mendoza, D (2)Park, P

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

215

Study Reveals Fuel Injection Timing Impact on Particle Number Emissions (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Start of injection can improve environmental performance of fuel-efficient gasoline direct injection engines.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Development of the High-Pressure Direct-Injection ISX G Natural Gas Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet details work by Cummins and Westport Innovations to develop a heavy-duty, low-NOx, high-pressure direct-injection natural gas engine for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle activity.

Not Available

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Investigation of impact of fuel injection strategy and biodiesel fueling on engine emissions and performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Both biodiesel fueling and changes of fuel injection pressure have significant impacts on diesel engine emissions. The investigations of their impacts on engine exhaust NOx… (more)

Ye, Peng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Study Reveals Fuel Injection Timing Impact on Particle Number...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In an ongoing quest to meet ever-more-rigorous fuel economy and emissions requirements, vehicle manufacturers are increasingly turning to gasoline direct injection (GDI) coupled...

219

Controlled air injection for a fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for injecting oxygen into a fuel cell reformate stream to reduce the level of carbon monoxide while preserving the level of hydrogen in a fuel cell system.

Fronk, Matthew H. (Honeove Falls, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Premixed direct injection nozzle for highly reactive fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel/air mixing tube for use in a fuel/air mixing tube bundle is provided. The fuel/air mixing tube includes an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis between an inlet end and an exit end, the outer tube wall having a thickness extending between an inner tube surface having a inner diameter and an outer tube surface having an outer tube diameter. The tube further includes at least one fuel injection hole having a fuel injection hole diameter extending through the outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Uhm, Jong Ho; Zuo, Baifang

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Study of Oil Degradation in Extended Idle Operation Heavy Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in engine oil technology and increased combustion efficiency has resulted in the longer oil intervals in vehicles. Current oil change interval practice only takes into account the mileage a vehicle has driven and does not consider other vehicle operations that affect oil life like extended idle. Routine oil sampling is one way to ensure optimal oil intervals, but the price continuous analysis can be prohibitive. It is possible to use on board diagnostic (OBD) data to correlate oil degradation to engine usage in order to develop an algorithm that is applicable to many vehicles. While much research has been conducted for light duty vehicles, little has been completed for heavy duty vehicles, in particular vehicles that idle a majority of their time. This study uses multiple heavy duty vehicles that are monitored by monthly routine oil analysis and logging of on board diagnostic data to determine the effects extended idle has on the wear rate of oil. The vehicles were used in their normal operation; this resulted in an average idle run time of 60% of run time and no less than 50% in a single vehicle. At each sample the quality of the oil and the operation of the engines were assessed. The results of the oil analysis showed very little degradation of oil. As expected, a negative correlation was seen in viscosity and total base number (TBN) but not abnormal when compared to base oil. Significant degradation was not seen even after using the vehicle passed the manufacturer recommended oil intervals. Analysis of engine operation showed that the temperature of the oil was optimal for 85% of idle operation. In addition, oil pressures at idle were sufficiently higher than the minimum pressure recommended by the manufacturer, but was less than half of the average in use oil pressure. The combination of low pressure and optimal temperature has resulted in little oil degradation. The results from the study have shown that extended idling in the study vehicles can be treated similar to long trip interval service for oil degradation. Additionally, extended idling did not result in abnormal engine wear or excessive contamination.

Kader, Michael Kirk

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Development of the High-Pressure Direct-Injected, Ultra Low-NOx Natural Gas Engine: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details work done by Cummins and Westport Innovations to develop a heavy-duty, low-NOx, high-pressure direct-injection natural gas engine for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle activity.

Duggal, V. K.; Lyford-Pike, E. J.; Wright, J. F.; Dunn, M.; Goudie, D.; Munshi, S.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Research and development of hydrogen direct-injection internal combustion engine system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research and development of hydrogen-internal combustion engine (ICE) system for heavy-duty trucks, with the goal of allowing carbon dioxide (CO2)-free operation in transportation department, has been carried out. The high-pressure hydrogen ... Keywords: NOx emission reduction, NOx storage reduction catalyst, carbon dioxide-free, direct injection, heavy-duty truck, high-pressure hydrogen injector, hydrogen, internal combustion engine

Yoshio Sato; Atsuhiro Kawamura; Tadanori Yanai; Kaname Naganuma; Kimitaka Yamane; Yasuo Takagi

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Such advancedhorizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing. Such advanced

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sizable 44% increase. 51 Shale gas production, which alreadyof this expansion, with shale gas production going from 6.8sizable 44% increase. 2 Shale gas production, which already

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a wide range of engine and aftertreatment configurations. 6–differences in the engine and aftertreatment technologies,especially as diesel engine and aftertreatment technology

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a target to increase the annual production of biofuels froma target to increase the annual production of biofuels fromtargets the production of 36 billion gallons of biofuels in

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Development of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997), “Emission from CNG and diesel Refuse Haulers Using1997), “Emission from CNG and diesel Refuse Haulers Using

Barth, Matthew; Younglove, Theodore; Scora, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sizable 44% increase. 51 Shale gas production, which alreadyexpansion, with shale gas production going from 6.8 trillionsizable 44% increase. 2 Shale gas production, which already

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20% share of biodiesel and bioethanol should be blended with20% share of biodiesel and bioethanol shall be blended with

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compounds, while animal or tallow-based biodiesel isg FAME for animal-based or tallow biodiesel and 125.5 mg Iyellow grease and animal tallow, also showed predominantly

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. Review of Biodiesel Composition, Properties, andM. Review of Biodiesel Composition, Properties, andM. Review of Biodiesel Composition, Properties, and

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the amount of wasted energy (or increased emissions) due toa certain amount of energy is wasted due to inefficiencies

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Dieseland Specifications. Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviewstheir Reduction Approaches. Renewable and Sustainable Energy

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as ethane, propane, butanes, pentanes and hexanes plus,such as ethane, propane, butanes, pentanes and hexanes plus,LM6 is a high propane, high butane gas with a WN of 1385 and

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Emissions Benefits From Renewable Fuels and Other Alternatives for Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAE Technical Paper Iijima, M. Biofuels Annual:Japan toFocus on Next Generation Biofuels; 2011.. Sordaa, G. ;T. Evaluation of the Impacts of Biofuels on Emissions for a

Hajbabaei, Maryam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Demonstration of Alternative Fuel, Light and Heavy Duty Vehicles in State and Municipal Vehicle Fleets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project involved the purchase of two Compressed Natural Gas School Buses and two electric Ford Rangers to demonstrate their viability in a municipal setting. Operational and maintenance data were collected for analysis. In addition, an educational component was undertaken with middle school children. The children observed and calculated how electric vehicles could minimize pollutants through comparison to conventionally powered vehicles.

Kennedy, John H.; Polubiatko, Peter; Tucchio, Michael A.

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

238

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine Search  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Compatible Vehicles: Compatible Vehicles: Cargotec - Ottawa 4x2 Elgin Sweeper Company - Broom Bear/Crosswind/Eagle/Pelican North American Bus Industries - 60BRT North American Bus Industries - 31LFW / 35LFW / 40LFW ElDorado National - E-Z Rider II BRT ElDorado National - Axess ElDorado National - XHF Champion Bus Inc. - CTS - Front Engine Motor Coach Industries - D4500 CT Hybrid Commuter Coach Gillig Corp. - Diesel-Electric Hybrid Bus and CNG Bus Freightliner - Business Class M2 112 Blue Bird Corp. - All American Rear Engine Capacity Trucks - TJ9000 Heil Environmental - RapidRail McNeilus - Rear Load (Std, HD, XC, Tag, MS, Metro-Pak) McNeilus - CNG Cement Mixer North American Bus Industries - 42BRT Heil Environmental - DuraPack Python Heil Environmental - Rear Loader Thomas Built Buses - Saf-T-Liner HDX CNG

239

A Fuel-Based Inventory for Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Resources Board, Sacramento, CA, 1996. Harvey, G.W. ;of Transportation, Sacramento, CA. Personal Communication,Board, Mobile Source Division, Sacramento, CA, 1993.

Dreher, David B.; Harley, Robert A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Adaptable Inverter for Injection of Fuel Cell and Photovoltaic Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

important to apply renewable energies and efficient technologies. For power injection of photovoltaic with different energy sources such as photovoltaic, fuel cell and battery. It is possible to adjust active inverter. These inverters for injection of photovoltaic energy are developed only for this purpose

Kulig, Stefan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Gasoline Sprays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasoline Sprays Gasoline Sprays Animated image of fuel emerging from a gasoline injector Animated image of fuel emerging from a gasoline injector (simulated environment). Some newer automobiles in the U.S. use gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. These advanced gasoline engines inject the fuel directly into the engine cylinder rather than into the intake port. These engines can achieve higher fuel efficiency, but they depend on a precise fuel/air mixture at the spark plug to initiate ignition. This leads to more stringent requirements on spray quality and reproducibility. GDI also enables new combustion strategies for gasoline engines such as lean burn engines that use less fuel and air. Lean burn engines may achieve efficiencies near those of diesels while producing low emissions. This

242

Coal-fueled diesel technology development -- Fuel injection equipment for coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of the abrasive and corrosive nature of coal water slurries, the development of coal-fueled diesel engine technology by GE-Transportation Systems (GE-TS) required special fuel injection equipment. GE-Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD) undertook the design and development of fuel injectors, piston pumps, and check valves for this project. Components were tested at GE-CRD on a simulated engine cylinder, which included a cam-actuated jerk pump, prior to delivery to GE-TS for engine testing.

Johnson, R.N.; Hayden, H.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Water injected fuel cell system compressor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell system including a dry compressor for pressurizing air supplied to the cathode side of the fuel cell. An injector sprays a controlled amount of water on to the compressor's rotor(s) to improve the energy efficiency of the compressor. The amount of water sprayed out the rotor(s) is controlled relative to the mass flow rate of air inputted to the compressor.

Siepierski, James S. (Williamsville, NY); Moore, Barbara S. (Victor, NY); Hoch, Martin Monroe (Webster, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Alternative Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sprays Alternative fuel sprays Non-petroleum fuels are gaining popularity in the U.S. Ethanol is being blended with gasoline in varying proportions, and biodiesel is being sold at...

245

Aftertreatment Technologies for Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to explore a combination of advanced injection control and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) to reduce the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from a Tier 2 off-highway diesel engine to Tier 3 emission targets while maintaining fuel efficiency. The engine used in this investigation was a 2004 4.5L John Deere PowerTechTM; this engine was not equipped with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Under the original CRADA, the principal objective was to assess whether Tier 3 PM emission targets could be met solely by increasing the rail pressure. Although high rail pressure will lower the total PM emissions, it has a contrary effect to raise NOx emissions. To address this effect, a urea-SCR system was used to determine whether the enhanced NOx levels, associated with high rail pressure, could be reduced to Tier 3 levels. A key attraction for this approach is that it eliminates the need for a Diesel particulate filter (DPF) to remove PM emissions. The original CRADA effort was also performed using No.2 Diesel fuel having a maximum sulfur level of 500 ppm. After a few years, the CRADA scope was expanded to include exploration of advanced injection strategies to improve catalyst regeneration and to explore the influence of urea-SCR on PM formation. During this period the emission targets also shifted to meeting more stringent Tier 4 emissions for NOx and PM, and the fuel type was changed to ultra-low sulfur Diesel (ULSD) having a maximum sulfur concentration of 15 ppm. New discoveries were made regarding PM formation at high rail pressures and the influences of oxidation catalysts and urea-SCR catalysts. These results are expected to provide a pathway for lower PM and NOx emissions for both off- and on-highway applications. Industrial in-kind support was available throughout the project period. Review of the research results were carried out on a regular basis (annual reports and meetings) followed by suggestions for improvement in ongoing work and direction for future work. A significant portion of the industrial support was in the form of experimentation, data analysis, data exchange, and technical consultation.

Kass, M.D.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

UPS CNG Truck Fleet Final Results: Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides transportation professionals with quantitative, unbiased information on the cost, maintenance, operational and emissions characteristics of CNG as one alternative to conventional diesel fuel for heavy-duty trucking applications.

Not Available

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Alternative fuel vehicles: The emerging emissions picture. Interim results, Summer 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this pamphlet, program goal, description, vehicles/fuels tested, and selected emissions results are given for light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles. Other NREL R&D programs and publications are mentioned briefly.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ultra low injection angle fuel holes in a combustor fuel nozzle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel nozzle for a combustor includes a mixing passage through which fluid is directed toward a combustion area and a plurality of swirler vanes disposed in the mixing passage. Each swirler vane of the plurality of swirler vanes includes at least one fuel hole through which fuel enters the mixing passage in an injection direction substantially parallel to an outer surface of the plurality of swirler vanes thereby decreasing a flameholding tendency of the fuel nozzle. A method of operating a fuel nozzle for a combustor includes flowing a fluid through a mixing passage past a plurality of swirler vanes and injecting a fuel into the mixing passage in an injection direction substantially parallel to an outer surface of the plurality of swirler vanes.

York, William David

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

PLIF flow visualization of methane gas jet from spark plug fuel injector in a direct injection spark ignition engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Spark Plug Fuel Injection (SPFI), which is a combination of a fuel injector and a spark plug was developed with the aim to convert any gasoline port injection spark ignition engine to gaseous fuel direct injection [1]. A direct fuel injector is combined ... Keywords: air-fuel mixing, direct fuel injection, flow visualization, gaseous fuel, laser-induced fluorescent

Taib Iskandar Mohamad; How Heoy Geok

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Optical Diagnostics and Direct Injection of Liquid Fuel Sprays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research described here addresses the problem of a paucity of high quality data on the full field structure of high pressure liquid fuel sprays for gasoline direct injection, GDI, engines. The paper describes the application of phase Doppler anemometry, ... Keywords: GDI, PDA, laser sheet, spray, visualisation

G. K. Hargrave; G. Wigley; J. Allen; A. Bacon

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials February 2013 FINAL REPORT This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise,

252

IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. This project complements another ongoing project titled ''Development of a Dimethyl Ether (DME)-Fueled Shuttle Bus Demonstration Project''. The objectives of that research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, they have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. To date, the activities have covered two areas: development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. This report provides summaries of the progress toward completion of both experimental systems and a summary of the plan for completion of the project objectives.

Elana M. Chapman; Andre L. Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Apparatus and method for controlling the secondary injection of fuel  

SciTech Connect

A combustor (28) for a gas turbine engine is provided comprising a primary combustion chamber (30) for combusting a first fuel to form a combustion flow stream (50) and a transition piece (32) located downstream from the primary combustion chamber (30). The transition piece (32) comprises a plurality of injectors (66) located around a circumference of the transition piece (32) for injecting a second fuel into the combustion flow stream (50). The injectors (66) are effective to create a radial temperature profile (74) at an exit (58) of the transition piece (32) having a reduced coefficient of variation relative to a radial temperature profile (64) at an inlet (54) of the transition piece (32). Methods for controlling the temperature profile of a secondary injection are also provided.

Martin, Scott M.; Cai, Weidong; Harris, Jr., Arthur J.

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

254

Development of LNG-Powered Heavy-Duty Trucks in Commercial Hauling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the U.S. Department of Energy's development, deployment, and evaluation of alternative fuels, NREL and the Trucking Research Institute contracted with Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) to develop and operate a liquid natural gas fueled tractor powered by a DDC Series 50 prototype natural gas engine. This is the final report on the project.

Detroit Diesel Corporation; Trucking Research Institute

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

255

Study and program plan for improved heavy duty gas turbine engine ceramic component development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A five-year program plan was generated from the study activities with the objectives of demonstrating a fuel economy of 213 mg/W . h (0.35 lb/hp-hr) brake specific fuel consumption by 1981 through use of ceramic materials, with conformance to current and projected Federal noise and emission standards, and to demonstrate a commercially viable engine. Study results show that increased turbine inlet and regenerator inlet temperatures, through the use of ceramic materials, contribute the greatest amount to achieving fuel economy goals. Further, improved component efficiencies (for the compressor, gasifier turbine, power turbine, and regenerator disks show significant additional gains in fuel economy. Fuel saved in a 500,000-mile engine life, risk levels involved in development, and engine-related life cycle costs for fleets (100 units) of trucks and buses were used as criteria to select work goals for the planned program.

Helms, H.E.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Demonstration of a Low-NOx Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of a Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle engine research project: A Caterpillar C-12 natural gas engine with Clean Air Power Dual-Fuel technology and exhaust gas recirculation demonstrated low NOx and PM emissions.

Not Available

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

FUEL FORMULATION EFFECTS ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION, COMBUSTION, EMISSIONS AND EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes work under a U.S. DOE sponsored Ultra Clean Fuels project entitled ''Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas,'' Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41098. In this study we have examined the incremental benefits of moving from low sulfur diesel fuel and ultra low sulfur diesel fuel to an ultra clean fuel, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel produced from natural gas. Blending with biodiesel, B100, was also considered. The impact of fuel formulation on fuel injection timing, bulk modulus of compressibility, in-cylinder combustion processes, gaseous and particulate emissions, DPF regeneration temperature and urea-SCR NOx control has been examined. The primary test engine is a 5.9L Cummins ISB, which has been instrumented for in-cylinder combustion analysis and in-cylinder visualization with an engine videoscope. A single-cylinder engine has also been used to examine in detail the impacts of fuel formulation on injection timing in a pump-line-nozzle fueling system, to assist in the interpretation of results from the ISB engine.

Boehman, A; Alam, M; Song, J; Acharya, R; Szybist, J; Zello, V; Miller, K

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

258

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO[sub x], CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if logical'' refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO[sub x]; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO{sub x}, CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if ``logical`` refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO{sub x}; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is an increasing industry interest in integrated gas turbine combined cycle plants in which coal gasifiers provide the fuel for the gas turbines. Some gasifier plant designs, including the air-blown processes, some integrated oxygen blown processes and some oxygen-blown processes followed by heavy moisturization, produce fuel gases which have lower heating values ranging from 130 to below 100 BTU/scf for which there is little gas turbine combustion experience. This program has the objectives to: Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition; determine emissions characteristics including NO[sub x], CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents; operate with two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions; determine if logical'' refinements to the fuel nozzle will yield improved performance for LBTU fuels; determine the conversion rate of ammonia to NO[sub x]; determine the effects of methane inclusion in the fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Maxwell, G.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Heavy duty gas turbine combustion tests with simulated low BTU coal gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program has the objectives to: A. Parametrically determine the effects of moisture, nitrogen and carbon dioxide as diluents so that the combustion characteristics of many varieties of gasification product gases can be reasonably predicted without physically testing each specific gas composition. B. Determine emissions characteristics including NO, NO{sub x}, CO, levels etc. associated with each of the diluents, and C. Operate with at least two syngas compositions; DOE chosen air-blown and integrated oxygen-blown, to confirm that the combustion characteristics are in line with predictions. As a result of this program: 1. GE Engineering is now confident that the syngas fuels produced by all currently--viable coal gasifiers can be accommodated by the GE advanced (``F`` Technology) combustion system, and 2. For proposed syngas fuels with varying amounts of steam, nitrogen or CO{sub 2} diluent, the combustion and emissions characteristics can be reasonably estimated without undertaking expensive new screening tests for each different fuel.

Ekstrom, T.E.; Battista, R.A.; Belisle, F.H.; Maxwell, G.P.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

An experimental study of fuel injection strategies in CAI gasoline engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion of gasoline in a direct injection controlled auto-ignition (CAI) single-cylinder research engine was studied. CAI operation was achieved with the use of the negative valve overlap (NVO) technique and internal exhaust gas re-circulation (EGR). Experiments were performed at single injection and split injection, where some amount of fuel was injected close to top dead centre (TDC) during NVO interval, and the second injection was applied with variable timing. Additionally, combustion at variable fuel-rail pressure was examined. Investigation showed that at fuel injection into recompressed exhaust fuel reforming took place. This process was identified via an analysis of the exhaust-fuel mixture composition after NVO interval. It was found that at single fuel injection in NVO phase, its advance determined the heat release rate and auto-ignition timing, and had a strong influence on NO{sub X} emission. However, a delay of single injection to intake stroke resulted in deterioration of cycle-to-cycle variability. Application of split injection showed benefits of this strategy versus single injection. Examinations of different fuel mass split ratios and variable second injection timing resulted in further optimisation of mixture formation. At equal share of the fuel mass injected in the first injection during NVO and in the second injection at the beginning of compression, the lowest emission level and cyclic variability improvement were observed. (author)

Hunicz, J.; Kordos, P. [Department of Combustion Engines and Transport, Lublin University of Technology, Nadbystrzycka 36, 20-618 Lublin (Poland)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal.

Robben, Franklin A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device are claimed for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Robben, F.A.

1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

265

IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, we have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Our strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, we have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. To date, our activities have covered three areas: examination of the impact of lubricity additives on the viscosity of DME, development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. This report provides summaries of the progress toward evaluation of the viscosity impacts of lubricity additives, completion of both experimental systems and a summary of the plan for completion of the project objectives.

Elana M. Chapman; Andre Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fuel injection system and method of operating the same for an engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injector is coupled to an engine. The fuel injector includes an injection opening configured to vary in cross-section between a open state and a fully closed state. The fuel injector is configured to provide a plurality of discrete commanded fuel injections into an engine cylinder by modulating the size of the injection opening without completely closing the opening to the fully closed state.

Topinka, Jennifer Ann (Niskayuna, NY); DeLancey, James Peter (Corinth, NY); Primus, Roy James (Niskayuna, NY); Pintgen, Florian Peter (Niskayuna, NY)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

Outdoor Electric Heavy-Duty Lift Truck Demonstration at Progress Energy Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric lift trucks now represent well over 50% of the U.S. lift truck market, their sales propelled by improved performance, life-cycle cost savings, and operational, health, and environmental benefits. In fact, research shows that electric lift trucks over their lifetime cost approximately $1 per operating hour less per unit than internal combustion trucks due to lower fuel and maintenance costs. Despite these market successes, however, some users perceive that electric lift trucks do not perform ...

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

268

IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, we have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Our strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, we have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. Our activities have covered three areas: examination of the impact of lubricity additives on the viscosity of DME, development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. The first two of these areas have resulted in valuable information about the limitations of lubricity and viscosity additives that are presently available in terms of their impact on the viscosity of DME and on wear rates on injector hardware. The third area, that of development of an injector durability test stand, has not resulted in a functioning experiment. Some information is provided in this report to identify the remaining tasks that need to be performed to make the injector stand operational. The key observations from the work are that when blended at 25 wt.% in either diesel fuel or Biodiesel fuel, DME requires more than 5 wt.% additive of all viscosity and lubricity additives tested here to even approach the lower limit of the ASTM diesel fuel viscosity requirement. To treat neat DME sufficiently to make DME comply with the ASTM diesel fuel viscosity requirement would require a viscosity additive with 10{sup 45} cSt viscosity, which is not possible with current additive technologies.

Elana M. Chapman; Andre Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Proceedings of the 1996 Windsor workshop on alternative fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains information which was presented at the 1996 Windsor Workshop on Alternative Fuels. Topics include: international links; industry topics and infrastructure issues; propane; engine developments; the cleanliness of alternative fuels; heavy duty alternative fuel engines; California zev commercialization efforts; and in-use experience.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Second Stage Intercooling Using LNG for Turbocharged Heavy Duty Road Vehicles Phase I Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is well documented in engine performance literature that reduced engine inlet air temperature increases power output and reduces NO, emissions for both diesel and spark ignited (SI) engines. In addition, reduced inlet temperature increases the knock resistance of SI engines. In that most HD natural gas engines are SI derivatives of diesel engines it is appropriate to evaluate the benefits of reduced engine air temperature through LNG fuel. This project investigated the ''real world'' possibilities of a patented process for utilizing the ''cold'' in LNG to chill engine inlet air. The results support the conclusion that doing so is a practical means to increase engine power and reduce engine-out NO{sub x}.

None

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

271

Fuel injection and mixing systems having piezoelectric elements and methods of using the same  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel injection and mixing system is provided that is suitable for use with various types of fuel reformers. Preferably, the system includes a piezoelectric injector for delivering atomized fuel, a gas swirler, such as a steam swirler and/or an air swirler, a mixing chamber and a flow mixing device. The system utilizes ultrasonic vibrations to achieve fuel atomization. The fuel injection and mixing system can be used with a variety of fuel reformers and fuel cells, such as SOFC fuel cells.

Mao, Chien-Pei (Clive, IA); Short, John (Norwalk, IA); Klemm, Jim (Des Moines, IA); Abbott, Royce (Des Moines, IA); Overman, Nick (West Des Moines, IA); Pack, Spencer (Urbandale, IA); Winebrenner, Audra (Des Moines, IA)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

272

Materials for High-Pressure Fuel Injection Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The high-level goal of this multi-year effort was to facilitate the Advanced Combustion Engine goal of 20% improvement (compared to 2009 baseline) of commercial engine efficiency by 2015. A sub-goal is to increase the reliability of diesel fuel injectors by investigating modelbased scenarios that cannot be achieved by empirical, trial and error methodologies alone. During this three-year project, ORNL developed the methodology to evaluate origins and to record the initiation and propagation of fatigue cracks emanating from holes that were electrodischarge machined (EDM), the method used to form spray holes in fuel injector tips. Both x-ray and neutron-based methods for measuring residual stress at four different research facilities were evaluated to determine which, if any, was most applicable to the fuel injector tip geometry. Owing to the shape and small volumes of material involved in the sack area, residual stress data could only be obtained in the walls of the nozzle a few millimeters back from the tip, and there was a hint of only a small compressive stress. This result was consistent with prior studies by Caterpillar. Residual stress studies were suspended after the second year, reserving the possibility of pursuing this in the future, if and when methodology suitable for injector sacks becomes available. The smooth specimen fatigue behavior of current fuel injector steel materials was evaluated and displayed a dual mode initiation behavior. At high stresses, cracks started at machining flaws in the surface; however, below a critical threshold stress of approximately 800 MPa, cracks initiated in the bulk microstructure, below the surface. This suggests that for the next generation for high-pressure fuel injector nozzles, it becomes increasingly important to control the machining and finishing processes, especially if the stress in the tip approaches or exceeds that threshold level. Fatigue tests were also conducted using EDM notches in the gage sections. Compared to the smooth specimens, EDM notching led to a severe reduction in total fatigue life. A reduction in fatigue life of nearly four orders of magnitude can occur at an EDM notch the approximate size of fuel injector spray holes. Consequently, the initiation and propagation behavior of cracks from small spray holes is relevant for generation of design quality data for the next generation diesel fuel injection devices. This is especially true since the current design methodologies usually rely on the less conservative smooth specimen fatigue testing results, and since different materials can have varying levels of notch fatigue resistance.

Blau, P.; Shyam, A.; Hubbard, C.; Howe, J.; Trejo, R.; Yang, N. (Caterpillar, Inc. Technical Center); Pollard, M. (Caterpillar, Inc. Technical Center)

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Effects of different fuels on a turbocharged, direct injection, spark ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following pages describe the experimentation and analysis of two different fuels in GM's high compression ratio, turbocharged direct injection (TDI) engine. The focus is on a burn rate analysis for the fuels - gasoline ...

Negrete, Justin E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

An Innovative Injection and Mixing System for Diesel Fuel Reforming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project focused on fuel stream preparation improvements prior to injection into a solid oxide fuel cell reformer. Each milestone and the results from each milestone are discussed in detail in this report. The first two milestones were the creation of a coking formation test rig and various testing performed on this rig. Initial tests indicated that three anti-carbon coatings showed improvement over an uncoated (bare metal) baseline. However, in follow-up 70 hour tests of the down selected coatings, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis revealed that no carbon was generated on the test specimens. These follow-up tests were intended to enable a down selection to a single best anti-carbon coating. Without the formation of carbon it was impossible to draw conclusions as to which anti-carbon coating showed the best performance. The final 70 hour tests did show that AMCX AMC26 demonstrated the lowest discoloration of the metal out of the three down selected anti-carbon coatings. This discoloration did not relate to carbon but could be a useful result when carbon growth rate is not the only concern. Unplanned variations in the series of tests must be considered and may have altered the results. Reliable conclusions could only be drawn from consistent, repeatable testing beyond the allotted time and funding for this project. Milestones 3 and 4 focused on the creation of a preheating pressure atomizer and mixing chamber. A design of experiment test helped identify a configuration of the preheating injector, Build 1, which showed a very uniform fuel spray flow field. This injector was improved upon by the creation of a Build 2 injector. Build 2 of the preheating injector demonstrated promising SMD results with only 22psi fuel pressure and 0.7 in H2O of Air. It was apparent from testing and CFD that this Build 2 has flow field recirculation zones. These recirculation zones may suggest that this Build 2 atomizer and mixer would require steam injection to reduce the auto ignition potential. It is also important to note that to achieve uniform mixing within a short distance, some recirculation is necessary. Milestone 5 generated CFD and FEA results that could be used to optimize the preheating injector. CFD results confirmed the recirculation zones seen in test data and confirmed that the flow field would not change when attached to a reformer. The FEA predicted fuel wetted wall temperatures which led to several suggested improvements that could possibly improve nozzle efficiency. Milestone 6 (originally an optional task) took a different approach than the preheating pressure atomizer. It focused on creation and optimization of a piezoelectric injector which could perform at extremely low fuel pressures. The piezoelectric atomizer showed acceptable SMD results with fuel pressure less than 1.0 psig and air pressure less than 1.0 in H2O. These SMD values were enhanced when a few components were changed, and it is expected would improve further still at elevated air temperatures. It was demonstrated that the piezoelectric injector could accomplish the desired task. The addition of phase tracking and a burst mode to the frequency controller increased the usability of the piezoelectric injector. This injector is ready to move on to the next phase of development. Engine Components has met the required program milestones of this project. Some of the Milestones were adjusted to allow Milestone 6 to be completed in parallel with the other Milestones. Because of this, Task 3.10 and 3.13 were made optional instead of Milestone 6. Engine Components was extremely grateful for the support that was provided by NETL in support of this work.

Spencer Pack

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Engine with hydraulic fuel injection and ABS circuit using a single high pressure pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An engine system comprises a hydraulically actuated fuel injection system and an ABS circuit connected via a fluid flow passage that provides hydraulic fluid to both the fuel injection system and to the ABS circuit. The hydraulically actuated system includes a high pressure pump. The fluid control passage is in fluid communication with an outlet from the high pressure pump.

Bartley, Bradley E. (Manito, IL); Blass, James R. (Bloomington, IL); Gibson, Dennis H. (Chillicothe, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst: Final Report, 24 February 2004 -- 23 February 2006  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst Final Report February 24, 2004 - February 23, 2006 T. Reppert Mack Trucks, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania J. Chiu Southwest Research Institute San Antonio, Texas Subcontract Report NREL/SR-540-38222 September 2005 Heavy-Duty Waste Hauler with Chemically Correct Natural Gas Engine Diluted with EGR and Using a Three-Way Catalyst Final Report February 24, 2004 - February 23, 2006 T. Reppert Mack Trucks, Inc. Allentown, Pennsylvania J. Chiu Southwest Research Institute San Antonio, Texas NREL Technical Monitor: R. Parish Prepared under Subcontract No. ZCI-4-32049-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-540-38222 September 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

278

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - ReFUEL Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development focuses on overcoming barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass, and improving vehicle efficiency. Using biofuels and improving vehicle efficiency reduces our dependence on imported petroleum and enhances our national energy security. The ReFUEL Laboratory houses the following specialized equipment: Heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with a simulation capability of 8,000 to 80,000 lbs for vehicle performance and emissions research Heavy-duty (up to 600 hp) and light-duty (up to 75 hp) engine

279

IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Annual Technical Progress Report for Project Entitled "Impact Annual Technical Progress Report for Project Entitled "Impact of DME-Diesel Fuel Blend Properties on Diesel Fuel Injection Systems" May 16, 2002 - May 15, 2003 Elana M. Chapman, Andre Boehman, Kimberly Wain, Wallis Lloyd, Joseph M. Perez, Donald Stiver, Joseph Conway Report Issue Date: June 2003 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-01NT41115 The Pennsylvania State University The Energy Institute University Park, PA 16802 ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

280

Micronized-coal-water slurry sprays from a diesel engine positive displacement fuel injection system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments have been conducted to characterize the sprays from a modified positive displacement fuel injection system for a diesel engine. Diesel fuel water and three concentrations of micronized-coal-water slurry were used in these experiments. The injection system includes an injection jerk pump driven by an electric motor, a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal slurry fuel from the pump, and a single-hole fuel nozzle. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies and still photographs of the sprays were obtained. In addition, instaneous fuel line pressures and needle lifts were obtained. Data were acquired as a function of fluid, nozzle orifice diameter, rack setting and chamber conditions. The high speed movies were used to determine spray penetration and spray growth.

Caton, J.A.; Kihm, K.D.; Seshadri, A.K.; Zicterman, G. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

283

FY2002 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels for Advanced Compression Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by Stephen Goguen November 2002 Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines FY 2002 Progress Report iii CONTENTS CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii INDEX OF PRIMARY CONTACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. FUEL/LUBRICANT EFFECTS TESTING ON ENGINE PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . 13 A. Oil Consumption Contribution to CIDI PM Emissions during Transient Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

284

Alternative Fuel Transit Buses: DART's (Dallas Area Rapid Transit) LNG Bus Fleet Final Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1998, Dallas Area Rapid Transit, a public transit agency in Dallas, Texas, began operating a large fleet of heavy-duty buses powered by liquefied natural gas. As part of a $16 million commitment to alternative fuels, DART operates 139 LNG buses serviced by two new LNG fueling stations.

Chandler, K. [Battelle (US); Norton, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (US); Clark, N.

2000-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

285

Assessment of heavy-duty gasoline and diesel vehicles in California: population and use patterns. Final report, June 1983-March 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents an inventory of Vehicle Miles Travelled (VMT) in California by heavy-duty vehicles (HDV) in each of the 58 counties and 14 air basins. To compile the inventory, PES used data generated by two California Department of Transportation (CAL TRANS) annual studies. These data were supplemented by several types of auxiliary data compiled by a literature search, a special truck traffic survey on 21 different routes selected from city and county roads, and an owner/operator telephone questionnaire on vehicle usage of 622 randomly selected HDV's. Out-of-state truck activities in California were estimated by analyzing data from the 1976 Interstate Transportation and Traffic Engineering Survey and the 1971 Institute of Transportation and Traffic Engineering Survey.

Horie, Y.; Rapoport, R.; Pantalone, J.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Coal-water slurry spray characteristics of a positive displacement fuel injection system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments have been completed to characterized coal-water slurry sprays from a modified positive displacement fuel injection system of a diesel engine. The injection system includes an injection jerk pump driven by an electric motor, a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal from the pump, and a single-hole fuel nozzle. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies and instantaneous fuel line pressures were obtained. For injection pressures of order 30 MPa or higher, the sprays were similar for coal-water slurry, diesel fuel and water. The time until the center core of the spray broke-up (break-up time) was determined from both the movies and from a model using the fuel line pressures. Results from these two independent procedures were in good agreement. For the base conditions, the break-up time was 0.58 and 0.50 ms for coal-water slurry and diesel fuel, respectively. The break-up times increased with increasing nozzle orifice size and with decreasing chamber density. The break-up time was not a function of coal loading for coal loadings up to 53%. Cone angles of the sprays were dependent on the operating conditions and fluid, as well as on the time and location of the measurement. For one set of cases studied, the time-averaged cone angle was 15.9{degree} and 16.3{degree} for coal-water slurry and diesel fuel, respectively.

Seshadri, A.K.; Caton, J.A.; Kihm, K.D. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - X-rays, Diesel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

procedure since the physics of spray atomization and its influence on combustion, pollutant formation and fuel efficiency are not well understood. A deeper...

288

Apparatus for injection casting metallic nuclear energy fuel ...  

Molds for making metallic nuclear fuel rods are provided which present reduced risks to the environment by reducing radioactive waste. In one embodiment, the mold is ...

289

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Dynamic Imaging of Injector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel injectors in motion Fuel injectors in motion This animated image is a result of the high penetrating power of X-rays which make it possible to permeate the outer steel structure and capture the internal components of fuel injectors in motion. Dynamic Imaging of Injector Operation The high-penetrating, powerful X-rays go through the outer steel structure to get a picture of the fuel injector parts as they move. The high X-ray flux at Argonne's APS makes this possible. These measurements are critical for the development of computational spray models, since they can precisely measure the time-dependent geometry of the fuel passages inside the injector. Injector manufacturers also use these measurements since they can reveal whether a particular component is functioning as designed.

290

Apparatus for injection casting metallic nuclear energy fuel rods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Molds for making metallic nuclear fuel rods are provided which present reduced risks to the environment by reducing radioactive waste. In one embodiment, the mold is consumable with the fuel rod, and in another embodiment, part of the mold can be re-used. Several molds can be arranged together in a cascaded manner, if desired, or several long cavities can be integrated in a monolithic multiple cavity re-usable mold.

Seidel, Bobby R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tracy, Donald B. (Firth, ID); Griffiths, Vernon (Butte, MT)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Injection Timing Effects on Brake Fuel Conversion Efficiency and Engine System's Respones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Societal concerns on combustion-based fuel consumption are ever-increasing. With respect to internal combustion engines, this translates to a need to increase brake fuel conversion efficiency (BFCE). Diesel engines are a relatively efficient internal combustion engine to consider for numerous applications, but associated actions to mitigate certain exhaust emissions have generally deteriorated engine efficiency. Conventionally, diesel engine emission control has centered on in-cylinder techniques. Although these continue to hold promise, the industry trend is presently favoring the use of after-treatment devices which create new opportunities to improve the diesel engine's brake fuel conversion efficiency. This study focuses on injection timing effects on the combustion processes, engine efficiency, and the engine system's responses. The engine in the study is a medium duty diesel engine (capable of meeting US EPA Tier III off road emission standards) equipped with common rail direct fuel injection, variable geometry turbo charging, and interfaced with a custom built engine controller. The study found that injection timing greatly affected BFCE by changing the combustion phasing. BFCE would increase up to a maximum then begin to decrease as phasing became less favorable. Combustion phasing would change from being mostly mixing controlled combustion to premixed combustion as injection timing would advance allowing more time for fuel to mix during the ignition delay. Combustion phasing, in turn, would influence many other engine parameters. As injection timing is advanced, in-cylinder temperatures and pressures amplify, and intake and exhaust manifold pressures deteriorate. Rate of heat release and rate of heat transfer increase when injection timing is advanced. Turbocharger speed falls with the advancing injection timing. Torque, however, rose to a maximum then fell off again even though engine speed and fueling rate were held constant between different injection timings. Interestingly, the coefficient of heat transfer changes from a two peak curve to a smooth one peak curve as the injection timing is advanced further. The major conclusion of the study is that injection advance both positively and negatively influences the diesel engine's response which contributes to the brake fuel conversion efficiency.

McLean, James Elliott

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Dual-Fuel Truck Fleet: Start-Up Experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although dual-fuel engine technology has been in development and limited use for several years, it has only recently moved toward full-scale operational capability for heavy-duty truck applications. Unlike a bifuel engine, which has two separate fuel systems that are used one at a time, a dual-fuel engine uses two fuel systems simultaneously. One of California's South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) current programs is a demonstration of dual-fuel engine technology in heavy-duty trucks. These trucks are being studied as part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Alternative Fuel Truck Program. This report describes the start-up experience from the program.

NREL

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Diesel Sprays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Sprays Diesel Sprays Chris Powell and fuel spray xray beamline Christopher Powell, an engine research scientist, fits a specially designed X-ray pressure window to a high-pressure chamber used in diesel spray research. These windows allow Argonne researchers to use X-rays to probe diesel sprays under the high-density conditions found in diesel engines. Diesel sprays Diesel engines are significantly more fuel-efficient than their gasoline counterparts, so wider adoption of diesels in the U.S. would decrease the nationÂ’s petroleum consumption. However, diesels emit much higher levels of pollutants, especially particulate matter and NOx (nitrogen oxides). These emissions have prevented more manufacturers from introducing diesel passenger cars. Researchers are exploring ways to reduce pollution formation in the engine

294

Propane-Fueled Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Propane-Fueled Vehicle Basics Propane-Fueled Vehicle Basics Propane-Fueled Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:16am Addthis There are more than 270,000 on-road propane vehicles in the United States and more than 10 million worldwide. Many are used in fleets, including light- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, taxicabs, police cars, and rental and delivery vehicles. Compared with vehicles fueled with conventional diesel and gasoline, propane vehicles can produce significantly fewer harmful emissions. The availability of new light-duty original equipment manufacturer propane vehicles has declined in recent years. However, certified installers can economically and reliably retrofit many light-duty vehicles for propane operation. Propane engines and fueling systems are also available for heavy-duty vehicles such as school buses and street sweepers.

295

LNG Vehicle High-Pressure Fuel System and ''Cold Energy'' Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-pressure fuel system for LNG vehicles with direct-injection natural gas engines has been developed and demonstrated on a heavy-duty truck. A new concept for utilizing the ''cold energy'' associated with LNG vehicles to generate mechanical power to drive auxiliary equipment (such as high-pressure fuel pumps) has also been developed and demonstrated in the laboratory. The high-pressure LNG fuel system development included the design and testing of a new type of cryogenic pump utilizes multiple chambers and other features to condense moderate quantities of sucked vapor and discharge supercritical LNG at 3,000 to 4,000 psi. The pump was demonstrated on a Class 8 truck with a Westport high-pressure direct-injection Cummins ISX engine. A concept that utilizes LNG's ''cold energy'' to drive a high-pressure fuel pump without engine attachments or power consumption was developed. Ethylene is boiled and superheated by the engine coolant, and it is cooled and condensed by rejecting h eat to the LNG. Power is extracted in a full-admission blowdown process, and part of this power is applied to pump the ethylene liquid to the boiler pressure. Tests demonstrated a net power output of 1.1. hp at 1.9 Lbm/min of LNG flow, which is adequate to isentropically pump the LNG to approximately 3,400 psi..

powers,Charles A.; Derbidge, T. Craig

2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

296

Research on the Performance and Emission of a Port Fuel Injection Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2.0L nature aspirate gasoline engine was modified to port fuel injection (PFI) hydrogen internal combustion engine (HICE) and a series dynamometer tests were carried out. The in-cylinder combustion process was analyzed, the performance, thermal efficiency ... Keywords: hydrogen ICE, performance, emission, combustion characteristics

Dawei Sun; Fushui Liu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Research on the Performance and Emission of a Port Fuel Injection Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2.0L nature aspirate gasoline engine was modified to port fuel injection (PFI) hydrogen internal combustion engine (HICE) and a series dynamometer tests were carried out. The in-cylinder combustion process was analyzed, the performance, thermal efficiency ... Keywords: hydrogen ICE, performance, emission, combustion characteristics

Dawei Sun; Fushui Liu

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Cold start fuel management of port-fuel-injected internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to investigate how changes in fueling strategy in the second cycle of engine operation influence the delivered charge fuel mass and engine out hydrocarbon (EOHC) emissions in that and subsequent ...

Cuseo, James M. (James Michael)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Demonstration of Air-Power-Assist Engine Technology for Clean Combustion and Direct Energy Recovery in Heavy Duty Application  

SciTech Connect

The first phase of the project consists of four months of applied research, starting from September 1, 2005 and was completed by December 31, 2005. During this time, the project team heavily relied on highly detailed numerical modeling techniques to evaluate the feasibility of the APA technology. Specifically, (i) A GT-Power{sup TM}engine simulation model was constructed to predict engine efficiency at various operating conditions. Efficiency was defined based on the second-law thermodynamic availability. (ii) The engine efficiency map generated by the engine simulation was then fed into a simplified vehicle model, which was constructed in the Matlab/Simulink environment, to predict fuel consumption of a refuse truck on a simple collection cycle. (iii) Design and analysis work supporting the concept of retrofitting an existing Sturman Industries Hydraulic Valve Actuation (HVA) system with the modifications that are required to run the HVA system with Air Power Assist functionality. A Matlab/Simulink model was used to calculate the dynamic response of the HVA system. Computer aided design (CAD) was done in Solidworks for mechanical design and hydraulic layout. At the end of Phase I, 11% fuel economy improvement was predicted. During Phase II, the engine simulation group completed the engine mapping work. The air handling group made substantial progress in identifying suppliers and conducting 3D modelling design. Sturman Industries completed design modification of the HVA system, which was reviewed and accepted by Volvo Powertrain. In Phase II, the possibility of 15% fuel economy improvement was shown with new EGR cooler design by reducing EGR cooler outlet temperature with APA engine technology from Air Handling Group. In addition, Vehicle Simulation with APA technology estimated 4 -21% fuel economy improvement over a wide range of driving cycles. During Phase III, the engine experimental setup was initiated at VPTNA, Hagerstown, MD. Air Handling system and HVA system were delivered to VPTNA and then assembly of APA engine was completed by June 2007. Functional testing of APA engine was performed and AC and AM modes testing were completed by October 2007. After completing testing, data analysis and post processing were performed. Especially, the models were instrumental in identifying some of the key issues with the experimental HVA system. Based upon the available engine test results during AC and AM modes, the projected fuel economy improvement over the NY composite cycle is 14.7%. This is close to but slightly lower than the originally estimated 18% from ADVISOR simulation. The APA project group demonstrated the concept of APA technology by using simulation and experimental testing. However, there are still exists of technical challenges to meet the original expectation of APA technology. The enabling technology of this concept, i.e. a fully flexible valve actuation system that can handle high back pressure from the exhaust manifold is identified as one of the major technical challenges for realizing the APA concept.

Hyungsuk Kang; Chun Tai

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Coal-water slurry spray characteristics of an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments have been complete to characterize coal-water slurry sprays from a electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system of diesel engine. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies, fuel pressures and needle lifts were obtained as a function of time, orifice diameter, coal loading, gas density in the chamber, and accumulator fuel pressure. For the base conditions 50% (by mass) coal loading, 0.4 mm diameter nozzle hole, coal-water slurry pressure of 82 MPa (12,000 psi), and a chamber density of 25 kg/m{sup 3}, the break-up time was 0. 30 ms. An empirical correlation for both spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity was developed. For the conditions of this study, the spray tip penetration and initial jet velocity were 15% greater for coal-water slurry than for diesel fuel or water. Cone angles of the sprays were dependent on the operating conditions and fluid, as well as the time and locations of the measurement. The time-averaged cone angle for the base case conditions was 13.6{degree}. Results of this study and the correlation are specific to the tested coal-water slurry and are not general for other coal-water slurry fuels.

Caton, J.A.; Payne, S.E.; Terracina, D.P.; Kihm, K.D. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Dimpled/grooved face on a fuel injection nozzle body for flame stabilization and related method  

SciTech Connect

A fuel injection head for a fuel nozzle used in a gas turbine combustor includes a substantially hollow body formed with an upstream end face, a downstream end face and a peripheral wall extending therebetween. A plurality of pre-mix tubes or passages extend axially through the hollow body with inlets at the upstream end face and outlets at the downstream end face. An exterior surface of the downstream end face is formed with three-dimensional surface features that increase a total surface area of the exterior surface as compared to a substantially flat, planar downstream end face.

Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo; Zuo, Baifang

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

302

NREL: Learning - Alternative Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuels Alternative Fuels Photo of a man standing next to a large heavy-duty truck cab while the truck is being filled with biodiesel at a refueling station. As part of its work for the Clean Cities program, NREL helps people find and use alternative fuels such as biodiesel. Credit: L.L. Bean To reduce our growing dependence on imported oil, our nation's researchers are working with industry to develop several different kinds of alternative fuels. Some of these fuels can either be blended with petroleum while some are alternatives to petroleum. Using alternative fuels can also help to curb exhaust emissions and contribute to a healthier environment. Most of today's conventional cars, vans, trucks, or buses can already run on some alternative fuels, such as blends of gasoline or diesel fuel that

303

The effect of TDC temperature and density on the liquid-phase fuel penetration in a D.I. Diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A parametric study of the liquid-phase fuel penetration of evaporating Diesel fuel jets has been conducted in a directinjection Diesel engine using laser elastic-scatter imaging. The experiments were conducted in an optically accessible Diesel engine of the ``heavy-duty`` size class at a representative medium speed (1200 rpm) operating condition. The density and temperature at TDC were varied systematically by adjusting the intake temperature and pressure. At all operating conditions the measurements show that initially the liquid fuel penetrates almost linearly with increasing crank angle until reaching a maximum length. Then, the liquid-fuel penetration length remains fairly constant although fuel injection continues. At a TDC density of 16.6 kg/m{sup 3} and a temperature of about 1000 K the maximum penetration length is approximately 23 mm. However, it varies significantly as TDC conditions are changed, with the liquid-length being less at higher temperatures and at higher densities. The corresponding apparent heat release rate plots are presented and the results of the liquid-phase fuel penetration are discussed with respect to the ignition delay and premixed bum fraction.

Espey, C. [Daimler-Benz AG, Stuttgart (Germany); Dec, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Reducing cold start hydrocarbon emissions from port fuel injected spark ignition engines with improved management of hardware & controls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to investigate strategies for reducing cold start hydrocarbon (HC) emissions from port fuel injected (PFI) spark ignition (SI) engines with better use of existing hardware and control ...

Lang, Kevin R., 1980-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed optically accessible D.I. diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two-dimensional (2-D) laser-sheet imaging has been used to examine the soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed, optically accessible, direct-injection Diesel engine of the heavy-duty size class. The design of this engine preserves the intake port geometry and basic dimensions of a Cummins N-series production engine. It also includes several unique features to provide considerable optical access. Liquid-phase fuel and soot distribution studies were conducted at a medium speed (1,200 rpm) using a Cummins closed-nozzle fuel injector. The scattering was used to obtain planar images of the liquid-phase fuel distribution. These images show that the leading edge of the liquid-phase portion of the fuel jet reaches a maximum length of 24 mm, which is about half the combustion bowl radius for this engine. Beyond this point virtually all the fuel has vaporized. Soot distribution measurements were made at a high load condition using three imaging diagnostics: natural flame luminosity, 2-D laser-induced incandescence, and 2-D elastic scattering. This investigation showed that the soot distribution in the combusting fuel jet develops through three stages. First, just after the onset of luminous combustion, soot particles are small and nearly uniformly distributed throughout the luminous region of the fuel jet. Second, after about 2 crank angle degrees a pattern develops of a higher soot concentration of larger sized particles in the head vortex region of the jet and a lower soot concentration of smaller sized particles upstream toward the injector. Third, after fuel injection ends, both the soot concentration and soot particle size increase rapidly in the upstream portion of the fuel jet.

Dec, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Espey, C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Do alternative fuel vehicles Do alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) improve air quality? How does the use of alternative fuels affect smog formation? You may find answers to these and other questions through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC)-the nation's most com- prehensive repository of perfor- mance data and general informa- tion on AFVs. To date, more than 600 vehi- cles-including light-duty cars, trucks, vans, transit buses, and heavy-duty trucks-have been tested on various alternative and conventional fuels with the goal of identifying the potential for alter- native fuels to displace petroleum and improve our nation's air quality. Although comparing regu- lated emissions between fuels may seem straightforward, evaluating emissions is complicated by

307

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles

308

Development of a Liquid to Compressed Natural Gas (LCNG) Fueling Station. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program objective was the development of equipment and processes to produce compressed natural gas (CNG) from liquified natural gas (LNG) for heavy duty vehicular applications. The interest for this technology is a result of the increased use of alternative fuels for the reduction of emissions and dependency of foreign energy. Technology of the type developed under this program is critical for establishing natural gas as an economical alternative fuel.

Moore, J. A.

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development: Task 2, Market assessment and economic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on the preliminary coal engine design developed, this task was conducted to identify the best opportunity(s) to enter the market with the future coal-fueled, high-speed diesel engine. The results of this market and economic feasibility assessment will be used to determine what specific heavy duty engine application(s) are most attractive for coal fuel, and also define basic economic targets for the engine to be competitive.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Heavy-Duty Stoichiometric Compression Ignition Engine with Improved Fuel Economy over Alternative Technologies for Meeting 2010 On-Highway Emission  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

determined that EGR is not necessary for this advanced concept engine, and this greatly simplifies the concept.

Kirby J. Baumgard; Richard E. Winsor

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

© 1999 GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANYGEI 41040G Specification for Fuel Gases for Combustion in Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines TABLE OF CONTENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

These instructions do not purport to cover all details or variations in equipment nor to provide for every possible contingency to be met in connection with installation, operation or maintenance. Should further information be desired or should particular problems arise which are not covered sufficiently for the purchaser’s purposes the matter should be referred to the GE Company.

I. Introduction

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Heavy-Duty Stoichiometric Compression Ignition Engine with Improved Fuel Economy over Alternative Technologies for Meeting 2010 On-Highway Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the reported work were: to apply the stoichiometric compression ignition (SCI) concept to a 9.0 liter diesel engine; to obtain engine-out NO{sub x} and PM exhaust emissions so that the engine can meet 2010 on-highway emission standards by applying a three-way catalyst for NO{sub x} control and a particulate filter for PM control; and to simulate an optimize the engine and air system to approach 50% thermal efficiency using variable valve actuation and electric turbo compounding. The work demonstrated that an advanced diesel engine can be operated at stoichiometric conditions with reasonable particulate and NOx emissions at full power and peak torque conditions; calculated that the SCI engine will operate at 42% brake thermal efficiency without advanced hardware, turbocompounding, or waste heat recovery; and determined that EGR is not necessary for this advanced concept engine, and this greatly simplifies the concept.

Kirby J. Baumgard; Richard E. Winsor

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

A Study of NO{sub x} Reduction by Fuel Injection Recirculation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flue-gas recirculation (FGR) is a well-known method used to control oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub X}) in industrial burner applications. Recent small- and large-scale experiments in natural-gas fired boilers have shown that introducing the recirculated flue gases with the fuel results in a much greater reduction in NO{sub X}, per unit mass of gas recirculated, in comparison to introducing the flue gases with the combustion air. That fuel injection recirculation (FIR) is more effective than windbox FGR is quite remarkable. At present, however, there is no definitive understanding of why FIR is more effective than conventional FGR. The objective of the present investigation is to ascertain whether or not chemical and/or molecular transport effects alone can explain the differences in NO{sub X} reduction observed between FIR and FGR by studying laminar diffusion flames. The purpose of studying laminar flames is to isolate chemical effects from the effects of turbulent mixing and heat transfer, which are inherent in practical boilers. Numerical simulations of H{sub 2}-air and CH{sub 4}-air counterflow diffusion flames using full kinetics were performed and NO{sub X} emission indices calculated for various conditions. Studies were conducted in which a N{sub 2} diluent was added either on the fuel- or air-side of the flame for conditions of either fixed initial velocities or fixed fuel mass flux. Results from these simulation studies indicate that a major factor in diluent effectiveness is the differential effect on flame zone residence times associated with fuel-side verses air-side dilution. Simulations in which flow velocities were fixed as diluent was added either to the air or fuel stream showed lower NO{sub X} emissions for air-side dilution; however, if instead, fuel mass fluxes were fixed as diluent was added, which results in an increase in the velocity of the streams, fuel-side dilution was more effective. These results were independent of whether H{sub 2} or Ch{sub 4} was used as the fuel.

Feese, J.J.; Turns, S.R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

In-Cylinder Reaction Chemistry and Kinetics During Negative Valve Overlap Fuel Injection Under Low-Oxygen Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel injection into the negative valve overlap (NVO) period is a common method for controlling combustion phasing in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) as well as other forms of advanced combustion. During this event, at least a portion of the fuel hydrocarbons can be converted to products containing significant levels of H2 and CO, as well as other short chain hydrocarbons by means of thermal cracking, water-gas shift, and partial oxidation reactions, depending on the availability of oxygen and the time-temperature-pressure history. The resulting products alter the autoignition properties of the combined fuel mixture for HCCI. Fuel-rich chemistry in a partial oxidation environment is also relevant to other high efficiency engine concepts (e.g., the dedicated EGR (D-EGR) concept from SWRI). In this study, we used a unique 6-stroke engine cycle to experimentally investigate the chemistry of a range of fuels injected during NVO under low oxygen conditions. Fuels investigated included iso-octane, iso-butanol, ethanol, and methanol. Products from NVO chemistry were highly dependent on fuel type and injection timing, with iso-octane producing less than 1.5% hydrogen and methanol producing more than 8%. We compare the experimental trends with CHEMKIN (single zone, 0-D model) predictions using multiple kinetic mechanisms available in the current literature. Our primary conclusion is that the kinetic mechanisms investigated are unable to accurately predict the magnitude and trends of major species we observed.

Kalaskar, Vickey B [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL; Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Vehicle Data for Alternative Fuel Vehicles (AFVs) and Hybrid Fuel Vehicles (HEVs) from the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (AFCD)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The AFDC provides search capabilities for many different models of both light-duty and heavy-duty vehicles. Engine and transmission type, fuel and class, fuel economy and emission certification are some of the facts available. The search will also help users locate dealers in their areas and do cost analyses. Information on alternative fuel vehicles and on advanced technology vehicles, along with calculators, resale and conversion information, links to incentives and programs such as Clean Cities, and dozens of fact sheets and publications make this section of the AFDC a valuable resource for car buyers.

316

Solid oxide fuel cells for transportation: A clean, efficient alternative for propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells show great promise for providing clean and efficient transportation power. Of the fuel cell propulsion systems under investigation, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is particularly attractive for heavy duty transportation applications that have a relatively long duty cycle, such as locomotives, trucks, and barges. Advantages of the SOFC include a simple, compact system configuration; inherent fuel flexibility for hydrocarbon and alternative fuels; and minimal water management. The specific advantages of the SOFC for powering a railroad locomotive are examined. Feasibility, practicality, and safety concerns regarding SOFCs in transportation applications are discussed, as am the major R D issues.

Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Solid oxide fuel cells for transportation: A clean, efficient alternative for propulsion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells show great promise for providing clean and efficient transportation power. Of the fuel cell propulsion systems under investigation, the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is particularly attractive for heavy duty transportation applications that have a relatively long duty cycle, such as locomotives, trucks, and barges. Advantages of the SOFC include a simple, compact system configuration; inherent fuel flexibility for hydrocarbon and alternative fuels; and minimal water management. The specific advantages of the SOFC for powering a railroad locomotive are examined. Feasibility, practicality, and safety concerns regarding SOFCs in transportation applications are discussed, as am the major R&D issues.

Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Emissions All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 3 results Generated_thumb20130810-31804-53z5da Carbon Intensity of Alternative Fuels in California Heavy-Duty Vehicles Generated_thumb20130810-31804-53z5da California Low Carbon Fuel Program's assessment of lifecycle GHG emissions from alternative fuels Last update March 2011 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1b2rnlz

319

Synchronized droplet size measurements for coal-water-slurry (CWS) diesel sprays of an electronically-controlled fuel injection system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique was used to measure the spray diameters (Sauter mean diameter, SMD) assuming the Rosin-Rammler two parameter model. In order to ensure an accurate synchronization of the measurement with the intermittent sprays, a new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation. This technique allowed measurement of SMDs near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 {mu}m mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. Injection pressures ranging from 28 to 110 MPa, two different nozzle orifice diameters, 0.2 ad 0.4 mm, and four axial measurement locations from 60 to 120 mm from the nozzle orifice were studied. Measurements were made for pressurized (2.0 MPa in gauge) and for ambient chamber conditions. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure. A correlation of the Sauter mean diameter with the injection conditions was determined. The results were also compared with previous SMD correlations that were available only for diesel fuel sprays.

Kihm, K.D.; Terracina, D.P.; Payne, S.E.; Caton, J.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Modeling the Effect of Fuel Ethanol Concentration on Cylinder Pressure Evolution in Direct-Injection Flex-Fuel Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the compression stroke. The residues calculated from the proposed model were validated with those generated from to detect the fuel ethanol concentration by placing them in the tank or in the fuel line. However by means of the closed-loop air/fuel ratio correction signal based on the Exhaust Gas Oxygen (EGO) sensor

Stefanopoulou, Anna

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Method of electrolytically finishing spray-hole of fuel injection nozzle  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a method of finishing at least one spray-hole bored by machining in a body of a fuel injection nozzle for an internal combustion engine by removing burrs that remain after the machining around an inside mouth of each spray-hole. The method consists of subjecting an inner surface of the nozzle body in an area containing the inside mouth of each spray-hole to an electrolytic polishing treatment. The nozzle body is made the anode by inserting a tubular electrode having an insulator cover into the nozzle body such that an end portion of the electrode comes close to each spray-hole and supplies a pressurized electrolyte liquid into the interior of the nozzle body through the tubular electrode to flow out through each spray-hole. The method is characterized in that a portion of the insulator cover is so formed as to completely cover the end portion of the electrode. An outer surface makes close contact with the area of the inner surface of the nozzle body, that for each spray-hole the insulator cover is formed with a liquid passage which communicates with the interior of the tubular electrode and has an outlet port in the outer spray-hole and is only slightly larger in diameter than the mouth of the spray-hole. During the electrolytic polishing treatment, the electrolyte liquid is supplied through the tubular electrode flow out of the insulator cover only through the passage formed for each spray-hole.

Matsui, Y.; Uchiyama, M.

1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

322

Analysis of C1, C2, and C10 through C33 particle-phase and semi-volatile organic compound emissions from heavy-duty diesel engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engines Aftertreatment technology Diesel particulate filter Chemical speciation a b s t r a c t To meet by individual aftertreatment components using the same engine and fuel has been assessed and published engine emissions have made it necessary to implement exhaust aftertreat- ment technology to lower

Wu, Mingshen

323

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fleet Test and Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory works in partnership with commercial and government fleets and industry groups to evaluate the performance of alternative fuels and advanced technologies in medium- and heavy-duty fleet vehicles. The team's project areas include: Fleet DNA: Vehicle Drive Cycle Analysis Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Hydraulic Hybrid Drive Systems Truck Stop Electrification Alternative Fuels Truck Efficiency Key aspects of this work involve meeting with industry stakeholders to understand market factors and customer requirements, evaluating the performance of advanced technology vehicles versus their conventional

324

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Motor vehicles may not idle unnecessarily for longer than five consecutive minutes during any 60-minute period. This includes heavy-duty diesel

325

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Biofuels Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuels Projects Biofuels Projects NREL biofuels projects help overcome technical barriers and expand markets for renewable, biodegradable vehicle fuels. These new liquid fuels include higher-level ethanol blends, butanol, biodiesel, renewable diesel, and other biomass-derived fuels. NREL's biofuels research and development helps improve engine efficiency, reduce polluting emissions, and improve U.S. energy security by reducing petroleum dependency. Biofuels for Diesel Engines NREL's diesel biofuels research and development focuses on developing fuel quality standards and demonstrating compatibility with engines and emission control systems. Highly efficient heavy-duty diesel truck engines are the primary power source for global transportation of freight. Light-duty diesel-fueled passenger vehicles have much higher fuel economy than

326

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Control Emissions Control Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Control Requirement Heavy-duty diesel vehicles used to perform federally funded state public works contracts must be powered by engines with Level 3 emissions control

327

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement On-road heavy-duty motor vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of 8,500 pounds or greater may not idle for more than three consecutive

328

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction to Idle Reduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles School Buses Laws & Incentives Research & Development Related Links Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Idle Reduction Photo of fleet trucks

329

Fifth annual report to congress. Federal alternative motor fuels programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the status of the US Department of Energy`s alternative fuel vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs being conducted in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. These programs comprise the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative transportation fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The report summarizes tests and results from the fifth year. Electric vehicles are not included in these programs, and the annual report does not include information on them. Since the inception of the programs, great strides have been made in developing commercially viable alternative fuel vehicle technologies. However, as is the case in the commercialization of all new technologies, some performance problems have been experienced on vehicles involved in early demonstration efforts. Substantial improvements have been recorded in vehicle practicality, safety, and performance in real-world demonstrations. An aspect of particular interest is emissions output. Results from light duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated superior inservice emissions performance. Heavy duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated dramatic reductions in particulate emissions. However, emissions results from vehicles converted to run on alternative fuel have not been as promising. Although the technologies available today are commercially viable in some markets, further improvements in infrastructure and economics will result in greater market expansion. Information is included in this report on light and heavy duty vehicles, transit buses, vehicle conversions, safety, infrastructure support, vehicle availability, and information dissemination.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor fueling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three separate papers are included which report research progress during this period: (1) A new railgun configuration with perforated sidewalls, (2) development of a fuseless small-bore railgun for injection of high-speed hydrogen pellets into magnetically confined plasmas, and (3) controls and diagnostics on a fuseless railgun for solid hydrogen pellet injection.

Kim, K.; Zhang, J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Effect of directed port air flow on liquid fuel transport in a port fuel injected spark ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With highly efficient modem catalysts, startup HC emissions have become a significant portion of the trip total. Liquid fuel is a major source of HC emissions during the cold start and fast idle period. Thus the control ...

Scaringe, Robert J. (Robert Joseph)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

NREL: Fleet Test and Evaluation - Alternative Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuels Alternative Fuels NREL's Fleet Test and Evaluation Team works with industry partners to evaluate the use of alternative fuels in delivery, transit, and freight vehicles. Although biodiesel is the most commonly used alternative fuel in medium- and heavy-duty diesel vehicles, compressed and liquefied natural gas and Fischer-Tropsch diesel are also viable options for trucking companies. Learn more about the team's evaluations of alternative fuels in fleet operations: Biodiesel Compressed Natural Gas Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Liquefied Natural Gas Printable Version Fleet Test and Evaluation Home Research & Development Vehicle Drive Cycle Analysis Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Electric & Plug-in Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Hydraulic Hybrid Drive Systems Truck Stop Electrification

334

A study of NO{sub x} reduction by fuel injection recirculation. Topical report, January 1995--May 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flue-gas recirculation (FGR) is a well-known method used to control oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) in industrial burner applications. Recent small- and large-scale experiments by Carnot (Tustin, CA) have shown that introducing the recirculated flue gases with the fuel results in a much greater reduction in NO{sub x}, per unit mass of gas recirculated, in comparison to introducing the flue gases with the combustion air. That fuel injection recirculation (FIR) is more effective than windbox FGR is quite remarkable. At present, however, there is no definitive understanding of why FIR is more effective than conventional FGR. One speculation is that introducing the diluent gases on the fuel side of the flame affects the prompt-NO mechanism causing the greater effectiveness. The objective of our research is to ascertain whether or not chemical and/or molecular transport effects alone can explain the differences in NO{sub x} reduction observed between FIR and FGR. This knowledge will aid in the rational application and optimization of FIR in a wide variety of industrial applications. A combined modeling and experimental program is in progress to achieve the research objectives. This report discusses computer modeling studies of counterflow diffusion flames employing detailed chemical kinetics for fuel (hydrogen or methane) combustion and NO{sub x} formation. These simulations allow the calculation of NO{sub x} emission indices for a wide range of conditions. Parametric studies were conducted in which the diluent was added either on the fuel or air side of the flame for a wide range of flow conditions. Preliminary results from these simulation studies indicate that a major factor in FIR effectiveness is the differential effect on flame zone residence times associated with fuel-side versus air-side dilution.

Turns, S.R.; Feese, J.J.; Frenklach, M.Y.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Effects of piston surface treatments on performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct injection, stratified charge engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of thermal barrier coatings and/or surface treatments on the performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct-injection, stratified-charge (DISC) engine. A Ricardo Hydra Mark III engine was used for this work and in previous experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary focus of the study was to examine the effects of various piston insert surface treatments on hydrocarbon (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions. Previous studies have shown that engines of this class have a tendency to perform poorly at low loads and have high unburned fuel emissions. A blank aluminum piston was modified to employ removable piston bowl inserts. Four different inserts were tested in the experiment: aluminum, stainless steel with a 1.27-mm (0.050-in.) air gap (to act as a thermal barrier), and two stainless steel/air-gap inserts with coatings. Two stainless steel inserts were dimensionally modified to account for the coating thickness (1.27-mm) and coated identically with partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). One of the coated inserts then had an additional seal-coat applied. The coated inserts were otherwise identical to the stainless steel/air-gap insert (i.e., they employed the same 1.27-mm air gap). Thermal barrier coatings were employed in an attempt to increase combustion chamber surface temperatures, thereby reducing wall quenching and promoting more complete combustion of the fuel in the quench zone. The seal-coat was applied to the zirconia to reduce the surface porosity; previous research suggested that despite the possibly higher surface temperatures obtainable with a ceramic coating, the high surface area of a plasma-sprayed coating may actually allow fuel to adhere to the surface and increase the unburned fuel emissions and fuel consumption.

West, B.; Green, J.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Methods and apparatus for injection casting metallic nuclear energy fuel rods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Molds for making metallic nuclear fuel rods are provided which present reduced risks to the environment by reducing radioactive waste. In one embodiment, the mold is consumable with the fuel rod, and in another embodiment, part of the mold can be re-used. Several molds can be arranged together in a cascaded manner, if desired, or several long cavities can be integrated in a monolithic multiple cavity re-usable mold. 6 figs.

Seidel, B.R.; Tracy, D.B.; Griffiths, V.

1989-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

337

Transportation Fuel Basics - Propane | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Propane Propane Transportation Fuel Basics - Propane July 30, 2013 - 4:31pm Addthis Photo of a man standing next to a propane fuel pump with a tank in the background. Propane, also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or LP-gas), or autogas in Europe, is a high-energy alternative fuel. It has been used for decades to fuel light-duty and heavy-duty propane vehicles. Propane is a three-carbon alkane gas (C3H8). Stored under pressure inside a tank, propane turns into a colorless, odorless liquid. As pressure is released, the liquid propane vaporizes and turns into gas that is used for combustion. An odorant, ethyl mercaptan, is added for leak detection. Propane has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic and presents no threat to soil,

338

Series 50 propane-fueled Nova bus: Engine development, installation, and field trials  

SciTech Connect

The report describes a project to develop the Detroit Diesel series 50 liquefied propane gas (LPG) heavy-duty engine and to conduct demonstrations of LPG-fuelled buses at selected sites (Halifax Regional Municipality and three sites in the United States). The project included five main elements: Engine development and certification, chassis re-engineering and engine installation, field demonstration, LPG fuel testing, and LPG fuel variability testing. Lessons learned with regard to engine design and other issues are discussed, and recommendations are made for further development and testing.

Smith, B.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Early Hydrogen Water Chemistry Injection in Boiling Water Reactors: Impact on Fuel Performance and Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early injection of hydrogen during plant startup has been proposed to further mitigate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in boiling water reactors (BWRs). To assess the effectiveness of early hydrogen water chemistry (EHWC), laboratory tests were performed under simulated BWR startup conditions at 200-400°F in the absence of radiation with pre-oxidized stainless steel specimens treated with noble metals to simulate plant surfaces. The ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

340

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Availability  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Availability to someone by E-mail Availability to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Availability on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Availability on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Availability on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Availability on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Availability on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Availability on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Maintenance & Safety Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Vehicle Availability There are limited light- and heavy-duty natural gas vehicles (NGVs)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Weight Idle Reduction Weight Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Weight Exemption A heavy-duty vehicle that is equipped with qualified idle reduction technology may exceed the Arizona weight limitations specified in Arizona

342

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles School Buses Laws & Incentives

343

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle Requirement All Model Year (MY) 2007 and later heavy-duty vehicles sold, leased, or

344

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Weight Idle Reduction Weight Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Weight Exemption A heavy-duty vehicle equipped with an auxiliary power unit may exceed the state's gross vehicle weight limit by up to 400 pounds to compensate for

345

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School Bus Idle School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles School Buses Laws & Incentives Research & Development

346

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Medium-Duty Vehicle Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles

347

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Weight Idle Reduction Weight Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Weight Exemption Any heavy-duty vehicle equipped with an auxiliary power unit or other qualified idle reduction technology may exceed the state gross, axle,

348

Demonstration of Automated Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by compressed natural gas (CNG) in spark-ignition engines,buses are powered by a CNG spark-ignition engine, providedno matter whether it is a CNG or a diesel engine [4, 5].

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Demonstration of Automated Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standard width of 12 ft. (3.6 m), providing opportunities for considerable savings in construction and right-of-way

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Demonstration of Automated Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

torque passed onto wheel T rtd ? transmission retarderas: r d r g T net ? ( r d T rtd + T b + F a h r + F total htr ? tr tr tr ? T + ? ? V rtd ( t ? ? tr ) , ? dr ? ? , t <

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Demonstration of Automated Heavy-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this wireless communication are strict; real- time operationthis wireless communication are strict; real-time operationwireless communication system are strict, requiring real-time operation

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL helps industry partners develop the next generation of energy efficient, high performance vehicles and fuels. NREL's transportation research spans from the materials to the systems level. NREL conducts research on the full range of vehicle types, from light-duty passenger cars to heavy-duty freight trucks. NREL's credible transportation research is grounded in real-world data. NREL's integrated approach links automotive technology advances to the full spectrum of renewable energy solutions. NREL researchers examine infrastructure, market conditions and driver behavior, as well as fuels and vehicles. NREL helps put fuel-efficient, low-emission cars and trucks on the road through research and innovation in electric vehicle, biofuel, and conventional automotive technologies. Researchers collaborate with industry

353

UNPERMITTED INJECTION OF DIESEL FUELS THROUGH HYDRAULIC FRACTURING IS A VIOLATION...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (“EPA”) development of UIC Class II permitting guidance for hydraulic fracturing activities that use diesel fuels in fracturing fluids. The Natural Resources Defense Council (“NRDC”) is a national, non-profit legal and scientific organization with 1.3 million members and activists worldwide. Since its founding in 1970, NRDC has been active on a wide range of environmental issues, including fossil fuel extraction and drinking water protection. NRDC is actively engaged in issues surrounding oil and gas development and hydraulic fracturing, particularly in the Rocky Mountain West and Marcellus Shale regions. Earthjustice is a non-profit public interest law firm originally founded in 1971. Earthjustice works to protect natural resources and the environment, and to defend the right of all people to a healthy environment. Earthjustice is actively addressing threats to air, water, public health and wildlife from oil and gas development and hydraulic fracturing in the Marcellus Shale and Rocky Mountain regions. Founded in 1892, the Sierra Club works to protect communities, wild places, and the planet itself. With 1.4 million members and activists worldwide, the Club works to provide healthy communities in which to live, smart energy solutions to combat global warming, and an enduring legacy of for America’s wild

Ariel Rios Building

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

VISION Model for Vehicle Technologies and Alternative Fuels | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

VISION Model for Vehicle Technologies and Alternative Fuels VISION Model for Vehicle Technologies and Alternative Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: VISION Model for Vehicle Technologies and Alternative Fuels Agency/Company /Organization: Argonne National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Phase: Create a Vision Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.transportation.anl.gov/modeling_simulation/VISION/ OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool, VISION Model for Vehicle Technologies and Alternative Fuels References: The VISION Model [1] Estimate the potential energy use, oil use, and carbon emission impacts of advanced light and heavy-duty vehicle technologies and alternative fuels through 2050. The VISION model has been developed to provide estimates of the potential

355

HYDROGEN COMMERCIALIZATION: TRANSPORTATION FUEL FOR THE 21ST CENTURY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1999, SunLine Transit Agency has worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) to develop and test hydrogen infrastructure, fuel cell buses, a heavy-duty fuel cell truck, a fuel cell neighborhood electric vehicle, fuel cell golf carts and internal combustion engine buses operating on a mixture of hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG). SunLine has cultivated a rich history of testing and demonstrating equipment for leading industry manufacturers in a pre-commercial environment. Visitors to SunLine's "Clean Fuels Mall" from around the world have included government delegations and agencies, international journalists and media, industry leaders and experts and environmental and educational groups.

APOLONIO DEL TORO

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

356

Alternative fuel transit buses: Interim results from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Vehicle Evaluation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transit bus program is designed to provide a comprehensive study of the alternative fuels currently used by the transit bus industry. The study focuses on the reliability, fuel economy, operating costs, and emissions of vehicles running on the various fuels and alternative fuel engines. The alternative fuels being tested are methanol, ethanol, biodiesel and natural gas. The alternative fuel buses in this program use the most common alternative fuel engines from the heavy-duty engine manufacturers. Data are collected in four categories: Bus and route descriptions; Bus operating data; Emissions data; and, Capital costs. The goal is to collect 18 months of data on each test bus. This report summarizes the interim results from the project to date. The report addresses performance and reliability, fuel economy, costs, and emissions of the busses in the program.

Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.J.; Chandler, K.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Use of LIF image acquisition and analysis in developing a calibrated technique for in-cylinder investigation of the spatial distribution of air-to-fuel mixing in direct injection gasoline engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the role of image acquisition and analysis in the development of a new strategy for the calibration of measurements of fuel distribution in gasoline direct injection engines. Images are acquired from a motored experimental engine ... Keywords: LIF, air-to-fuel mixing, gasoline direct injection engine, image analysis, intensified image acquisition, laser-induced fluorescence

Guillaume de Sercey; Graeme Awcock; Morgan Heikal

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Use of LIF image acquisition and analysis in developing a calibrated technique for in-cylinder investigation of the spatial distribution of air-to-fuel mixing in direct injection gasoline engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the role of image acquisition and analysis in the development of a new strategy for the calibration of measurements of fuel distribution in gasoline direct injection engines. Images are acquired from a motored experimental engine ... Keywords: Air-to-fuel mixing, Gasoline direct injection engine, Image analysis, Intensified image acquisition, LIF, Laser-induced fluorescence

Guillaume de Sercey; Graeme Awcock; Morgan Heikal

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Ignition assist systems for direct-injected, diesel cycle, medium-duty alternative fuel engines: Final report phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of Phase 1 of this contract. The objective was to evaluate the potential of assist technologies for direct-injected alternative fuel engines vs. glow plug ignition assist. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ignition system life of 10,000 hours and a system cost of less than 50% of the glow plug system, while meeting or exceeding the engine thermal efficiency obtained with the glow plug system. There were three tasks in Phase 1. Under Task 1, a comprehensive review of feasible ignition options for DING engines was completed. The most promising options are: (1) AC and the ''SmartFire'' spark, which are both long-duration, low-power (LDLP) spark systems; (2) the short-duration, high-power (SDHP) spark system; (3) the micropilot injection ignition; and (4) the stratified charge plasma ignition. Efforts concentrated on investigating the AC spark, SmartFire spark, and short-duration/high-power spark systems. Using proprietary pricing information, the authors predicted that the commercial costs for the AC spark, the short-duration/high-power spark and SmartFire spark systems will be comparable (if not less) to the glow plug system. Task 2 involved designing and performing bench tests to determine the criteria for the ignition system and the prototype spark plug for Task 3. The two most important design criteria are the high voltage output requirement of the ignition system and the minimum electrical insulation requirement for the spark plug. Under Task 3, all the necessary hardware for the one-cylinder engine test was designed. The hardware includes modified 3126 cylinder heads, specially designed prototype spark plugs, ignition system electronics, and parts for the system installation. Two 3126 cylinder heads and the SmartFire ignition system were procured, and testing will begin in Phase 2 of this subcontract.

Chan, A.K.

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

360

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heavy-Duty Vehicles ULSD LNG Biodiesel (Soy) Renew. Diesel (Soy) CNG Hydrogen (NG) Electricity Renew. Diesel (Tallow) Biodiesel (Grease) Dairy CNG Landfill CNG Total Carbon...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

G. Uniform Engine Fuels and Automotive Lubricants ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is intended for use in light- to heavy-duty vehicles including ... 2.9. Compressed Natural Gas (CNG). ... Vans, Sport Utility Vehicles, and Light-Duty Trucks ...

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

362

Achieve Continuous Injection of Solid Fuels into Advanced Combustion System Pressures  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is the development of a mechanical rotary-disk feeder, known as the Stamet Posimetric High Pressure Solids Feeder System, to feed dry granular coal continuously and controllably into pressurized environments of up to 35 kg/cm{sup 2} (500 psi). This was to be accomplished in two phases. The first task was to review materials handling experience in pressurized operations as it related to the target pressures for this project, and review existing coal preparation processes and specifications currently used in advanced combustion systems. Samples of existing fuel materials were obtained and tested to evaluate flow, sealing and friction properties. This provided input data for use in the design of the Stamet Feeders for the project, and ensured that the material specification used met the requirements of advanced combustion & gasification systems. Ultimately, Powder River Basin coal provided by the PSDF facility in Wilsonville, AL was used as the basis for the feeder design and test program. Based on the material property information, a Phase 1 feeder system was designed and built to accomplish feeding the coal to an intermediate pressure up to 21 kg/cm{sup 2} (300 psi) at feed rates of approximately 100 kilograms (220lbs) per hour. The pump & motor system was installed in a custom built test rig comprising an inlet vessel containing an active live-wall hopper mounted in a support frame, transition into the pump inlet, transition from pump outlet and a receiver vessel containing a receiver drum supported on weigh cells. All pressure containment on the rig was rated for the final pressure requirement of 35 kg/cm{sup 2} (500psi). A program of testing and modification was carried out in Stamet's facility in CA, culminating in successful feeding of coal into the Phase 1 target of 21 kg/cm{sup 2} (300psi) gas pressure in December 2003. Further testing was carried out at CQ Inc's facility in PA, providing longer run times and experience of handling and feeding the coal in winter conditions. Based on the data developed through the testing of the Phase I unit, a Phase II system was designed for feeding coal into pressures of up to 35 kg/cm{sup 2} (500 psi). A further program of testing and modification was then carried out in Stamet's facility, with the target pressure being achieved in January 2005. Repeated runs at pressure were achieved, and optimization of the machine resulted in power reductions of 60% from the first successful pressure runs. General design layout of a commercial-scale unit was conducted, and preliminary cost estimates for a commercial unit obtained.

Derek L. Aldred; Timothy Saunders

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Synchronized droplet size measurements of intermittent coal-water slurry diesel sprays from an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments have been completed to characterize atomization of intermittent coal-water slurry sprays from an electronically controlled accumulator fuel injection system of a diesel fuel engine. A synchronized laser diffraction particle analyzer technique was used to measure the spray tip Sauter mean diameters (SMD). The Rosin-Rammler two parameter model was assumed for the droplet distribution. The measurements were made at the spray tip where laser obscuration was low and the chance of multiscattering bias was minimal. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading by mass containing 5gm volume mean diameter coal particles was used. Injection pressures were ranged from 28 to II 0 MPa. Three different nozzle orifice diameters, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 mm, four axial measurement locations from 60 to 120 mm downstream of the nozzle tip were studied. Measurements were made for both pressurized (2.07 MPa, 300 psig) and unpressurized (ambient, 0 gage) chamber conditions. The spray tip SMD showed an increase with chamber gas density, and with axial measurement location, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure. The effect of nozzle orifice diameter on spray tip SMDs of completely developed sprays for such high pressure injections was found to be negligible. A regression equation for CWS-50 spray tip SMDs was determined as SMD = 0.279-P(inj).?702 r(amb) 2?85 x .521 where Pinj is the injection pressure in Mpa, r(amb) is the ambient density in kg/m3, and x is the axial measurement location downstream of the nozzle tip in mm. The equation shows very good agreement with the measured SMD data by having a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.97. The results were also compared with previous SMD regression equations that were originally obtained for diesel fuel sprays.

Terracina, Dwayne Paul

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Light-Duty Vehicle Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Light-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles

365

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9010: Benefits of Fuel Cell APU on Trucks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Date: November 3, 2009 0 Date: November 3, 2009 Title: Benefits of Fuel Cell APU on Trucks Originator: Tien D. Nguyen and Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: November 25, 2009 Item: Approximately 700 million gallons of diesel can be saved annually through the use of fuel cell auxiliary power units (APUs) in the trucking industry, resulting in a reduction of 8.9 million metric tons of CO 2 per year. Data and Assumptions 1. Total number of trucks with sleeper berths is estimated to be 931,000 in 2030: The total number of heavy-duty freight trucks forecasted in EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2009 is 5.21 millions in 2010, increasing to 6.93 millions in 2030. In a survey published in 2006, the American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) received responses from

366

The Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1988, the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) became Public Law 100-494. The AMFA encourages the production and use of motor vehicles designed to operate on alternative fuels. The alternative fuels specified in the law are methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. The Department of Energy (DOE), along with several other federal, state, and local agencies, has undertaken numerous activities aimed at fulfilling the AMFA directives. Among these activities is the establishment of the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC), operated and managed by the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) in Golden Colorado. The AMFA targets activities for three vehicle types using alternative fuels: (1) light-duty vehicles such as automobiles, mini-vans, and light-duty; (2) heavy-duty vehicles such as tractor trailers and garbage trucks; and (3) urban transit buses. The primary purpose of the AFDC is to gather and analyze information on the fuel consumption, emissions, operation, and durability of these vehicles types. The AFDC staff work with an Oracle Relational Database Management System and statistical software to provide information to users.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Interim Results from Alternative Fuel Truck Evaluation Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty trucks operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Data collection from up to eight sites is planned. Currently, the project has four sites: Raley's in Sacramento, CA (Kenworth, Cummins LlO-300G, liquefied natural gas - LNG); Pima Gro Systems, Inc. in Fontana, CA (White/GMC, Caterpillar 31768 Dual-Fuel, compressed natural gas - CNG); Waste Management in Washington, PA (Mack, Mack E7G, LNG); and United Parcel Service in Hartford, CT (Freightliner Custom Chassis, Cummins B5.9G, CNG). This paper summarizes current data collection and evaluation results from this project.

Kevin L. Chandler; Paul Norton; Nigel Clark

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

368

An indirect sensing technique for diesel fuel quantity control. Technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work has proceeded intensely with the objective of completing the commercial prototype system prior to the end of the contract period. At the time of this report, testing and refinement of the commercial version of the system has not been completed. During this reporting period, several major milestones were reached and many significant lessons were learned. These are described. The experimental retrofit system has achieved all performance objectives in engine dynamometer tests. The prototype commercial version of the system will begin demonstration service on the first of several Santa Maria Area Transit (SMAT) transit buses on February 1, 1999. The commercial system has been redesignated the Electronic Diesel Smoke Reduction System (EDSRS) replacing the original internal pseudonym ADSC. The focus has been narrowed to a retrofit product suitable for installation on existing mechanically-governed diesel engines. Included in this potential market are almost all diesel-powered passenger cars and light trucks manufactured prior to the introduction of the most recent clean diesel engines equipped with particulate traps and electronic controls. Also included are heavy-duty trucks, transit vehicles, school buses, and agricultural equipment. This system is intended to prevent existing diesel engines from overfueling to the point of visible particulate emissions (smoke), while allowing maximum smoke-limited torque under all operating conditions. The system employs a microcontroller and a specialized exhaust particulate emission sensor to regulate the maximum allowable fuel quantity via an adaptive throttle-limit map. This map specifies a maximum allowable throttle position as a function of engine speed, turbocharger boost pressure and engine coolant temperature. The throttle position limit is mechanized via a servo actuator inserted in the throttle cable leading to the injection pump.

MacCarley, C.A.

1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

369

Compressed natural gas fueled vehicles: The Houston experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report describes the experience of the City of Houston in defining the compressed natural gas fueled vehicle research scope and issues. It details the ways in which the project met initial expectations, and how the project scope, focus, and duration were adjusted in response to unanticipated results. It provides examples of real world successes and failures in efforts to commercialize basic research in adapting a proven technology (natural gas) to a noncommercially proven application (vehicles). Phase one of the demonstration study investigates, develops, documents, and disseminates information regarding the economic, operational, and environmental implications of utilizing compressed natural gas (CNG) in various truck fueling applications. The four (4) truck classes investigated are light duty gasoline trucks, medium duty gasoline trucks, medium duty diesel trucks and heavy duty diesel trucks. The project researches aftermarket CNG conversions for the first three vehicle classes and original equipment manufactured (OEM) CNG vehicles for light duty gasoline and heavy duty diesel classes. In phase two of the demonstration project, critical issues are identified and assessed with respect to implementing use of CNG fueled vehicles in a large vehicle fleet. These issues include defining changes in local, state, and industry CNG fueled vehicle related codes and standards; addressing vehicle fuel storage limitations; using standardized vehicle emission testing procedures and results; and resolving CNG refueling infrastructure implementation issues and related cost factors. The report identifies which CNG vehicle fueling options were tried and failed and which were tried and succeeded, with and without modifications. The conclusions include a caution regarding overly optimistic assessments of CNG vehicle technology at the initiation of the project.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Wear, durability, and lubricating oil performance of a straight vegetable oil (Karanja) blend fueled direct injection compression ignition engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depletion of fossil fuel resources and resulting associated environmental degradation has motivated search for alternative transportation fuels. Blending small quantity of Karanja oil (straight vegetable oil) with mineral diesel is one of the simplest available alternatives

Avinash Kumar Agarwal; Atul Dhar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Rich catalytic injection  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

Veninger, Albert (Coventry, CT)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

Update from the NREL Alternative Fuel Transit Bus Evaluation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of this project, which is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is to provide a comprehensive comparison of heavy-duty urban transit buses operating on alternative fuels and diesel fuel. Final reports from this project were produced in 1996 from data collection and evaluation of 11 transit buses from eight transit sites. With the publication of these final reports, three issues were raised that needed further investigation: (1) the natural gas engines studied were older, open-loop control engines; (2) propane was not included in the original study; and (3) liquefied natural gas (LNG) was found to be in the early stages of deployment in transit applications. In response to these three issues, the project has continued by emissions testing newer natural gas engines and adding two new data collection sites to study the newer natural gas technology and specifically to measure new technology LNG buses.

Chandler, K. (Battelle); Norton, P. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Clark, N. (West Virginia University)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Argonne Transportation - Clean Cities Area of Interest 4: Alternative Fuel,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Cities Area of Interest 4: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program Emissions Benefit Tool Download Clean Cities Area of Interest 4 Emissions Benefit Tool (Excel 57 KB) This tool has been created for the Clean Cities Funding Opportunity Announcement for Area of Interest 4: Alternative Fuel and Advanced Technology Vehicles Pilot Program. The tool is based off the AirCRED model's methodology using EPA's MOBILE6 model and light duty vehicle and heavy duty engine certification data to generate criteria air pollutant emission credits. However, for this tool, the GREET model is also used to generate data for vehicles not certified and well-to-wheel greenhouse gas emissions. This tool requires the user to input: The number of vehicles planned to be purchased

374

Staged direct injection diesel engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diesel engine having staged injection for using lower cetane number fuels than No. 2 diesel fuel. The engine includes a main fuel injector and a pilot fuel injector. Pilot and main fuel may be the same fuel. The pilot injector injects from five to fifteen percent of the total fuel at timings from 20.degree. to 180.degree. BTDC depending upon the quantity of pilot fuel injected, the fuel cetane number and speed and load. The pilot fuel injector is directed toward the centerline of the diesel cylinder and at an angle toward the top of the piston, avoiding the walls of the cylinder. Stratification of the early injected pilot fuel is needed to reduce the fuel-air mixing rate, prevent loss of pilot fuel to quench zones, and keep the fuel-air mixture from becoming too fuel lean to become effective. In one embodiment, the pilot fuel injector includes a single hole for injection of the fuel and is directed at approximately 48.degree. below the head of the cylinder.

Baker, Quentin A. (San Antonio, TX)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Adaptive engine injection for emissions reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

NOx and soot emissions from internal combustion engines, and in particular compression ignition (diesel) engines, are reduced by varying fuel injection timing, fuel injection pressure, and injected fuel volume between low and greater engine loads. At low loads, fuel is injected during one or more low-pressure injections occurring at low injection pressures between the start of the intake stroke and approximately 40 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke. At higher loads, similar injections are used early in each combustion cycle, in addition to later injections which preferably occur between about 90 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke, and about 90 degrees after top dead center during the expansion stroke (and which most preferably begin at or closely adjacent the end of the compression stroke). These later injections have higher injection pressure, and also lower injected fuel volume, than the earlier injections.

Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI): Sun, Yong (Madison, WI)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

376

Emissions from Trucks using Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process can be used to synthesize diesel fuels from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuels may also be economically competitive with California B- diesel fuel if produced in large volumes. overview of Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel production and engine emissions testing is presented. Previous engine laboratory tests indicate that F-T diesel is a promising alternative fuel because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and substantial exhaust emissions reductions can be realized. The authors have performed preliminary tests to assess the real-world performance of F-T diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks. Seven White-GMC Class 8 trucks equipped with Caterpillar 10.3 liter engines were tested using F-T diesel fuel. Vehicle emissions tests were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The trucks were found to perform adequately on neat F-T diesel fuel. Compared to a California diesel fuel baseline, neat F-T diesel fuel emitted about 12% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 24% lower particulate matter over a five-mile driving cycle.

Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Brent Bailey; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

377

Heavy Vehicle and Engine Resource Guide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive product catalog of medium and heavy-duty engines and vehicles with alternative fuel and advanced powertrain options.

Not Available

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

ULTRA-LOW SULFUR REDUCTION EMISSION CONTROL DEVICE/DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-BOARD FUEL SULFUR TRAP  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell is actively working on a 3-year program to develop and demonstrate proof-of-concept for an ''on-vehicle'' desulfurization fuel filter for heavy-duty diesel engines. Integration of the filter into the vehicle fuel system will reduce the adverse effects sulfur has on post combustion emission control devices such as NO{sub x} adsorbers. The NO{sub x} adsorber may be required to meet the proposed new EPA Tier II and ''2007-Rule'' emission standards. The proposed filter concept is based on Honeywell's reactive filtration technology and experience in liquids handling and conditioning. A regeneration and recycling plan for the spent filters will also be examined. We have chosen to develop and demonstrate this technology based on criteria set forth for a heavy duty CIDI engine system because it represents a more challenging set of conditions of service intervals and overall fuel usage over light duty systems. It is anticipated that the technology developed for heavy-duty applications will be applicable to light-duty as well. Further, technology developed under this proposal would also have application for the use of liquid based fuels for fuel cell power generation. The program consists of four phases. Phase I will focus on developing a concept design and analysis and resolution of technical barriers concerning removal of sulfur-containing species in low sulfur fuels. In Phase II we will concentrate on prototype filter design and preparation followed by qualification testing of this component in a fuel line application. Phase III will study life cycle and regeneration options for the spent filter. Phase IV will focus on efficacy and life testing and component integration. The project team will include a number of partners, with Honeywell International as the prime contractor. The partners include an emission control technology developer (Honeywell International), a fuel technology developer (Marathon Ashland Petroleum), a catalyst technology developer (Johnson Matthey), a CIDI engine manufacturer (Mack Trucks Inc.), a filter recycler (American Wastes Industries), and a low-sulfur fuel supplier (Equilon, a joint venture between Shell and Texaco).

Ron Rohrbach; Gary Zulauf; Tim Gavin

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

PCR+ In Diesel Fuels and Emissions Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In past work for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), PCR+ was developed as an alternative methodology for building statistical models. PCR+ is an extension of Principal Components Regression (PCR), in which the eigenvectors resulting from Principal Components Analysis (PCA) are used as predictor variables in regression analysis. The work was motivated by the observation that most heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine research was conducted with test fuels that had been ''concocted'' in the laboratory to vary selected fuel properties in isolation from each other. This approach departs markedly from the real world, where the reformulation of diesel fuels for almost any purpose leads to changes in a number of interrelated properties. In this work, we present new information regarding the problems encountered in the conventional approach to model-building and how the PCR+ method can be used to improve research on the relationship between fuel characteristics and engine emissions. We also discuss how PCR+ can be applied to a variety of other research problems related to diesel fuels.

McAdams, H.T.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Revised projections of fuel economy and technology for highway vehicles. Task 22. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Both the methodology used to forecast fuel economy and the technological and tooling plan data central to the derivation of the forecast for all those vehicle classes are updated here. Forecasts were prepared for a scenario where oil prices stay flat through 1985 (in current real dollars) and increase at the rate of one percent per year in the 1985 to 1995 period. Estimates of the mix of vehicles sold and projections for diesel penetration are documented. Revised forecasts for cars and light duty truck analysis are detailed. Heavy-duty truck fuel economy forecast revisions are described. The DOE automotive R and D programs are examined in the context of the newly revised projections. (MHR)

1983-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To help ensure that sulfates in engine exhaust do not To help ensure that sulfates in engine exhaust do not prevent manufacturers of heavy-duty diesel engines from meeting new particulate emissions standards for 1994 and later model years, 1 the Clean Air Act Amend- ments of 1990 (CAAA90) require refiners to reduce the sulfur content of on-highway diesel fuel from current average levels of 0.30 percent by weight to no more than 0.05 percent by weight. The new standard, which goes into effect October 1, 1993, also requires that on-highway diesel fuel have a minimum cetane index of 40 or a maximum aromatic content of 35 percent by volume. 2 (See list of terms and definitions on the fol- lowing page.) This provision is designed to prevent any future rises in aromatics levels. 3 Since the direct mea- surement of aromatics is complex, a minimum cetane

382

Alternative Fuel News Vol.2 - No.6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NT NT Y A U E O F E N E R G D E P A R T M E N I T E D S T A T S O F A E R I C M T axis T ransit Parks School Buses Delivery Fleets Airports Shuttle Buses Heavy- Duty T rucks The Niche Market Principle The Niche Market Principle ALTERNATIVE FUEL NEWS The Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center U. S. D E P A R T M E N T o f E N E R G Y An Official Publication of the Clean Cities Network and the Alternative Fuels Data Center Vol. 2 - No. 6 From the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy ear Clean Cities Stakeholders: By the time you read this issue of Alternative Fuel News (AFN), we will be well into the new year. But I think it is still appropriate to wish the proverbial "Happy New Year" to each of you, so I will. May 1999 be a healthy and prosperous year for you and your family.

383

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

384

Common Rail Injection System Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The collaborative research program between the Department of energy and Electro-Motive Diesels, Inc. on the development of common rail fuel injection system for locomotive diesel engines that can meet US EPA Tier 2 exhaust emissions has been completed. This final report summarizes the objectives of the program, work scope, key accomplishments and research findings. The major objectives of this project encompassed identification of appropriate injection strategies by using advanced analytical tools, development of required prototype hardware/controls, investigations of fuel spray characteristics including cavitation phenomena, and validation of hareware using a single-cylinder research locomotive diesel engine. Major milestones included: (1) a detailed modeling study using advanced mathematical models - several various injection profiles that show simultaneous reduction of NOx and particulates on a four stroke-cycle locomotive diesel engine were identified; (2) development of new common rail fuel injection hardware capable of providing these injection profiles while meeting EMD engine and injection performance specifications. This hardware was developed together with EMD's current fuel injection component supplier. (3) Analysis of fuel spray characteristics. Fuel spray numerical studies and high speed photographic imaging analyses were performed. (4) Validation of new hardware and fuel injection profiles. EMD's single-cylinder research diesel engine located at Argonne National Laboratory was used to confirm emissions and performacne predictions. These analytical ane experimental investigations resulted in optimized fuel injection profiles and engine operating conditions that yield reductions in NOx emissions from 7.8 g/bhp-hr to 5.0 g/bhp-hr at full (rated) load. Additionally, hydrocarbon and particulate emissions were reduced considerably when compared to baseline Tier I levels. The most significant finding from the injection optimization process was a 2% to 3% improvement in fuel economy over EMD's traditional Tier I engine hardware configuration. the common rail fuel injection system enabled this added benefit by virtue of an inherent capability to provide multiple injections per power stroke at high fuel rail pressures. On the basis of the findings in this study, EMD concludes that the new electronically-controlled high-pressure common rail injection system has the potential to meet locomotive Tier 2 NOx and particulates emission standards without sacrificing the fuel economy. A number of areas to further improve the injection hardware and engine operating characteristics to further exploit the benefits of common rail injection system have also been identified.

Electro-Motive,

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Direct liquid injection of liquid petroleum gas  

SciTech Connect

A fuel injector and injection system for injecting liquified petroleum gas (LPG) into at least one air/fuel mixing chamber from a storage means that stores pressurized LPG in its liquid state. The fuel injector (including a body), adapted to receive pressurized LPG from the storage means and for selectively delivering the LPG to the air/fuel mixing chamber in its liquified state. The system including means for correcting the injector activation signal for pressure and density variations in the fuel.

Lewis, D.J.; Phipps, J.R.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

386

Development of the High-Pressure Direct-Injection ISX G Natural...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

IMPACT This project developed the heavy-duty ISX G natural gas engine with advanced emission reduction strategies, which demonstrated oxides of nitrogen (NO x ) emissions of 0.6 g...

387

Clean Cities Now, Vol. 14, No. 1: Workshops Bring Fleets and Fuels Together (Newsletter)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 March 2010 Repowering Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Engines Calculate Your GHG Emissions Workshops Bring Fleets and Fuels Together Dear Readers, The more things change, the more they stay the same. This certainly rings true with changes you'll see in this issue of our bi-annual newsletter, Clean Cities Now (CCN). After five years of publishing online, we're returning CCN to its roots and presenting it in the magazine-style format we started with years ago. The change was inspired by unwavering requests from coordinators to have printed copies of the program newsletter to distribute at industry and stakeholder events. Like before, this format crosses two lines of communications: electronic and print. It's still distributed to subscribers via e-mail, but that e-mail no longer links to a Web-generated newsletter. Rather, it

388

Fuel Cell Vehicle World Survey 2003-Fuel Cells in Transit Buses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

range of heavy-duty diesel, compressed natural gas (CNG), and liquefied natural gas (LNG) transit buses. NABI, Inc., is a wholly owned subsidiary of NABI Rt., which was...

389

Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavy-water-moderated, light-water-moderated and liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors fueled with natural or low-enriched uranium and containing thorium mixed with the uranium or in separate target channels. U-232 decays with a 69-year half-life through 1.9-year half-life Th-228 to Tl-208, which emits a 2.6 MeV gamma ray upon decay. We find that pressurized light-water-reactors fueled with LEU-thorium fuel at high burnup (70 MWd/kg) produce U-233 with U-232 contamination levels of about 0.4 percent. At this contamination level, a 5 kg sphere of U-233 would produce a gammaray dose rate of 13 and 38 rem/hr at 1 meter one and ten years after chemical purification respectively. The associated plutonium contains 7.5 percent of the undesirable heat-generating 88-year half-life isotope Pu-238. However, just as it is possible to produce weapon-grade plutonium in low-burnup fuel, it is also practical to use heavy-water reactors to produce U-233 containing only a few ppm of U-232 if the thorium is segregated in “target ” channels and discharged a few times more frequently than the natural-uranium “driver ” fuel. The dose rate from a 5-kg solid sphere of U-233 containing 5 ppm U-232 could be reduced by a further factor of 30, to about 2 mrem/hr, with a close-fitting lead sphere weighing about 100 kg. Thus the proliferation resistance of thorium fuel cycles depends very much upon how they are implemented. The original version of this manuscript was received by Science & Global Security on

Jungmin Kang A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Coal-liquid fuel/diesel engine operating compatibility. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work is intended to assess the possibilities of using coal-derived liquids (CDL) represented by a specific type (SRC II) and shale-derived distillate fuel in blends of petroleum-derived fuels in medium-speed, high-output, heavy-duty diesel engines. Conclusions are as follows: (1) Blends of solvent refined coal and diesel fuel may be handled safely by experienced diesel engine mechanics. (2) A serious corrosion problem was found in the fuel pump parts when operating with solvent refined coal blended with petroleum. It is expected that a metallurgy change can overcome this problem. (3) Proper selection of materials for the fuel system is required to permit handling coal-derived liquid fuels. (4) A medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine can be operated on blends of solvent refined coal and petroleum without serious consequences save the fuel system corrosion previously mentioned. This is based on a single, short durability test. (5) As represented by the product evaluated, 100% shale-derived distillate fuel may be used in a medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engine without significant consequences. (6) The shale product evaluated may be blended with petroleum distillate or petroleum residual materials and used as a fuel for medium speed, high horsepower, 4-cycle diesel engines. 7 references, 24 figures, 20 tables.

Hoffman, J.G.; Martin, F.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program. Final report, volume 2: Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFVs) in typical applications in New York State. This report, Volume 2, includes 13 appendices to Volume 1 that expand upon issues raised therein. Volume 1 provides: (1) Information about the purpose and scope of the AFV-FDP; (2) A summary of AFV-FDP findings organized on the basis of vehicle type and fuel type; (3) A short review of the status of AFV technology development, including examples of companies in the State that are active in developing AFVs and AFV components; and (4) A brief overview of the status of AFV deployment in the State. Volume 3 provides expanded reporting of AFV-FDP technical details, including the complete texts of the brochure Garage Guidelines for Alternative Fuels and the technical report Fleet Experience Survey Report, plus an extensive glossary of AFV terminology. The appendices cover a wide range of issues including: emissions regulations in New York State; production and health effects of ozone; vehicle emissions and control systems; emissions from heavy-duty engines; reformulated gasoline; greenhouse gases; production and characteristics of alternative fuels; the Energy Policy Act of 1992; the Clean Fuel Fleet Program; garage design guidelines for alternative fuels; surveys of fleet managers using alternative fuels; taxes on conventional and alternative fuels; and zero-emission vehicle technology.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of multi-component fuel/air mixing in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine: Effects of residual exhaust gas on quantitative PLIF  

SciTech Connect

A study of in-cylinder fuel-air mixing distributions in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine is reported using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. A multi-component fuel synthesised from three pairs of components chosen to simulate light, medium and heavy fractions was seeded with one of three tracers, each chosen to co-evaporate with and thus follow one of the fractions, in order to account for differential volatility of such components in typical gasoline fuels. In order to make quantitative measurements of fuel-air ratio from PLIF images, initial calibration was by recording PLIF images of homogeneous fuel-air mixtures under similar conditions of in-cylinder temperature and pressure using a re-circulation loop and a motored engine. This calibration method was found to be affected by two significant factors. Firstly, calibration was affected by variation of signal collection efficiency arising from build-up of absorbing deposits on the windows during firing cycles, which are not present under motored conditions. Secondly, the effects of residual exhaust gas present in the firing engine were not accounted for using a calibration loop with a motored engine. In order to account for these factors a novel method of PLIF calibration is presented whereby 'bookend' calibration measurements for each tracer separately are performed under firing conditions, utilising injection into a large upstream heated plenum to promote the formation of homogeneous in-cylinder mixtures. These calibration datasets contain sufficient information to not only characterise the quantum efficiency of each tracer during a typical engine cycle, but also monitor imaging efficiency, and, importantly, account for the impact of exhaust gas residuals (EGR). By use of this method EGR is identified as a significant factor in quantitative PLIF for fuel mixing diagnostics in firing engines. The effects of cyclic variation in fuel concentration on burn rate are analysed for different fuel injection strategies. Finally, mixture distributions for late injection obtained using quantitative PLIF are compared to predictions of computational fluid dynamics calculations. (author)

Williams, Ben; Ewart, Paul [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Wang, Xiaowei; Stone, Richard [Department of Engineering Science, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Ma, Hongrui; Walmsley, Harold; Cracknell, Roger [Shell Global Solutions (UK), Shell Research Centre Thornton, P. O. Box 1, Chester, CH1 3SH (United Kingdom); Stevens, Robert; Richardson, David; Fu, Huiyu; Wallace, Stan [Jaguar Cars, Engineering Centre, Abbey Road, Whitley, Coventry, CV3 4LF (United Kingdom)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Performance evaluation of diesel particulate filters on heavy duty vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel particulate filters, or DPFs, are exhaust aftertreatment devices used to reduce exhaust emissions from diesel powered vehicles. Typical designs have a wall flow filter… (more)

Rosepiler, Stephen G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technology Demonstrations 2007...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that include Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Vermont; and Tribal lands belonging...

395

Heavy-Duty Truck Idle Reduction Technology Demonstrations - 2006...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use. All projects must benefit the air quality in the geographic regions that include Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. (http:www.eere.energy.govcleancitiesprogsafdc...

396

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Multi-Dimensional Modeling - Fuel Spray...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

primary breakup mechanisms. In a diesel engine, liquid fuel is injected into the combustion chamber near the end of the compression stroke. Following injection, the fuel...

397

National Program Plan Fuel Cells in Transportation. Executive Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are being developed for application in the transportation sector because they will convert hydrogen to electric power at high efficiencies with virtually no detrimental environmental impact. To realize these energy, environmental, and economic benefits, developers of FCVs need to (1) reduce the size and weight of current designs, (2) develop fuel cell propulsion systems with rapid start-up and greater load-following capability, (3) reduce system cost and/or improve performance, and (4) utilize alternative fuels to a large extent. This Plan addresses the FCV-related requirements of the Energy Act, describing a development program for light- and heavy-duty propulsion systems, a basic R&D program on fuel cell technology that is separate from, but feeds into, the system development activities, and supporting analyses. Implementation of the Program Plan by means of industry/government alliances will accelerate the commercialization of FCVs. In the long term, the successful deployment of large numbers of FCVs promises to eliminate the transportation sector as a major contributor to the nation`s environmental problems.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program was to develop low-emissions, efficient fuel-flexible combustion technology which enables operation of a given gas turbine on a wider range of opportunity fuels that lie outside of current natural gas-centered fuel specifications. The program encompasses a selection of important, representative fuels of opportunity for gas turbines with widely varying fundamental properties of combustion. The research program covers conceptual and detailed combustor design, fabrication, and testing of retrofitable and/or novel fuel-flexible gas turbine combustor hardware, specifically advanced fuel nozzle technology, at full-scale gas turbine combustor conditions. This project was performed over the period of October 2008 through September 2011 under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-08NT05868 for the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled "Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines". The overall objective of this program was met with great success. GE was able to successfully demonstrate the operability of two fuel-flexible combustion nozzles over a wide range of opportunity fuels at heavy-duty gas turbine conditions while meeting emissions goals. The GE MS6000B ("6B") gas turbine engine was chosen as the target platform for new fuel-flexible premixer development. Comprehensive conceptual design and analysis of new fuel-flexible premixing nozzles were undertaken. Gas turbine cycle models and detailed flow network models of the combustor provide the premixer conditions (temperature, pressure, pressure drops, velocities, and air flow splits) and illustrate the impact of widely varying fuel flow rates on the combustor. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were employed to compare some fundamental combustion characteristics of the target fuels, including flame speeds and lean blow-out behavior. Perfectly premixed combustion experiments were conducted to provide experimental combustion data of our target fuels at gas turbine conditions. Based on an initial assessment of premixer design requirements and challenges, the most promising sub-scale premixer concepts were evaluated both experimentally and computationally. After comprehensive screening tests, two best performing concepts were scaled up for further development. High pressure single nozzle tests were performed with the scaled premixer concepts at target gas turbine conditions with opportunity fuels. Single-digit NOx emissions were demonstrated for syngas fuels. Plasma-assisted pilot technology was demonstrated to enhance ignition capability and provide additional flame stability margin to a standard premixing fuel nozzle. However, the impact of plasma on NOx emissions was observed to be unacceptable given the goals of this program and difficult to avoid.

Venkatesan, Krishna

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

Greenhouse Gases - Part 2 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Soy diesel vehicles: range, fuel storage, and energy use. Soydiesel has been added as a fuel for heavy-duty vehicles. ... (Motor Vehicle Manufacturer's Association, ...

400

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2003 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: Fuels and Lubrication, Part 2 Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) using Oil Sands Derived Fuels Stuart Neill National Research...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Knock limits in spark ignited direct injected engines using gasoline/ethanol blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct Fuel Injection (DI) extends engine knock limits compared to Port Fuel Injection (PFI) by utilizing the in-cylinder charge cooling effect due to fuel evaporation. The use of gasoline/ethanol blends in DI is therefore ...

Kasseris, Emmanuel P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Application of railgun principle to high-velocity hydrogen pellet injection for magnetic fusion reactor fueling. Progress report, August 16, 1991--September 30, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three separate papers are included which report research progress during this period: (1) A new railgun configuration with perforated sidewalls, (2) development of a fuseless small-bore railgun for injection of high-speed hydrogen pellets into magnetically confined plasmas, and (3) controls and diagnostics on a fuseless railgun for solid hydrogen pellet injection.

Kim, K.; Zhang, J.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Fuel injector system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injection system particularly adapted for injecting coal slurry fuels at high pressures includes an accumulator-type fuel injector which utilizes high-pressure pilot fuel as a purging fluid to prevent hard particles in the fuel from impeding the opening and closing movement of a needle valve, and as a hydraulic medium to hold the needle valve in its closed position. A fluid passage in the injector delivers an appropriately small amount of the ignition-aiding pilot fuel to an appropriate region of a chamber in the injector's nozzle so that at the beginning of each injection interval the first stratum of fuel to be discharged consists essentially of pilot fuel and thereafter mostly slurry fuel is injected.

Hsu, Bertrand D. (Erie, PA); Leonard, Gary L. (Schenctady, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Clean Cities' Guide to Alternative Fuel and Advanced Medium-...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

in the presence of a catalyst to convert smog-forming NO x into harmless nitrogen and water vapor. Conversion emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles manufactured before 2010...

405

CARB Executive Order Exemption Process for a Hydrogen-fueled...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

engine base vehicle to a HICE vehicle. 2. BASE TRUCK INFORMATION The base, build-from truck utilizes a General Motors factory KL5 CNG option 6.0L engine, which is heavy duty...

406

Radial lean direct injection burner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

407

Evaluation of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for natural gas and LPG vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for vehicles fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Most of the CNG and LPG vehicles studied were converted to the alternative fuel after purchase. There are wide variations in the quality of the conversion hardware and the installation. This leads to questions about the overall quality of the converted vehicles, in terms of emissions, safety, and performance. There is a considerable body of emissions data for converted light-duty vehicles, and a smaller amount for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. However, very few of these data involve real world conditions, and there is growing concern about in-use emissions. This report also attempts to assess factors that could allow in-use emissions to vary from the best-case'' results normally reported. The study also addresses issues of fuel supply, fuel composition, performance, safety, and warranty waivers. The report is based on an extensive literature and product survey and on the author's experience with fuel delivery systems for light-duty vehicles.

Willson, B. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Evaluation of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for natural gas and LPG vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for vehicles fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Most of the CNG and LPG vehicles studied were converted to the alternative fuel after purchase. There are wide variations in the quality of the conversion hardware and the installation. This leads to questions about the overall quality of the converted vehicles, in terms of emissions, safety, and performance. There is a considerable body of emissions data for converted light-duty vehicles, and a smaller amount for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. However, very few of these data involve real world conditions, and there is growing concern about in-use emissions. This report also attempts to assess factors that could allow in-use emissions to vary from the ``best-case`` results normally reported. The study also addresses issues of fuel supply, fuel composition, performance, safety, and warranty waivers. The report is based on an extensive literature and product survey and on the author`s experience with fuel delivery systems for light-duty vehicles.

Willson, B. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Evaluation of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for natural gas and LPG vehicles  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of aftermarket fuel delivery systems for vehicles fueled by compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Most of the CNG and LPG vehicles studied were converted to the alternative fuel after purchase. There are wide variations in the quality of the conversion hardware and the installation. This leads to questions about the overall quality of the converted vehicles, in terms of emissions, safety, and performance. There is a considerable body of emissions data for converted light-duty vehicles, and a smaller amount for medium- and heavy-duty vehicles. However, very few of these data involve real world conditions, and there is growing concern about in-use emissions. This report also attempts to assess factors that could allow in-use emissions to vary from the best-case'' results normally reported. The study also addresses issues of fuel supply, fuel composition, performance, safety, and warranty waivers. The report is based on an extensive literature and product survey and on the author's experience with fuel delivery systems for light-duty vehicles.

Willson, B. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Effects of EGR, water/N2/CO2 injection and oxygen enrichment on the availability destroyed due to combustion for a range of conditions and fuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study was directed at examining the effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), water/N2/CO2 injections and oxygen enrichment on availability destroyed because of combustion in… (more)

Sivadas, Hari Shanker

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Emissions from Buses with DDC 6V92 Engines Using Synthetic Diesel Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Synthetic diesel fuel can be made from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, synthetic diesel fuels may also economically competitive with California diesel fuel if .roduced in large volumes. Previous engine laboratory and field tests using a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer indicate that synthetic diesel fuel made using the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process is a promising alternative fuel, because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and can reduce exhaust emissions substantially. The objective of this study was a preliminary assessment of the emissions from older model transit operated on Mossgas synthetic diesel fuel. The study compared emissions from transit buses operating on Federal no. 2 Diesel fuel, Mossgas synthetic diesel (MGSD), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. The buses were equipped with unmodified Detroit Diesel 6V92 2-stroke diesel engines. Six 40-foot buses were tested. Three of the buses had recently rebuilt engines and were equipped with an oxidation catalytic converter. Vehicle emissions measurements were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The emissions were measured over the Central Business District (CBD) driving cycle. The buses performed well on both neat and blended MGSD fuel. Three buses without catalytic converters were tested. Compared to their emissions when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel, these buses emitted an average of 5% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 20% lower particulate matter (PM) when operating on neat MGSD fuel. Catalyst equipped buses emitted an average of 8% lower NOx and 31% lower PM when operating on MGSD than when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel.

Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Mridul Gautam; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

1999-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

412

Ultra-low Sulfur Reduction Emission Control Device/Development of an On-board Fuel Sulfur Trap  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Honeywell has completed working on a multiyear program to develop and demonstrate proof-of-concept for an 'on-vehicle' desulfurization fuel filter for both light duty and heavy-duty diesel engines. Integration of the filter into the vehicle fuel system will reduce the adverse effects sulfur has on post combustion emission control devices such as NOx adsorbers. The NOx adsorber may be required to meet the proposed new EPA Tier II and '2007-Rule' emission standards. The proposed filter concept is based on Honeywell's reactive filtration technology and experience in liquids handling and conditioning. A regeneration and recycling plan for the spent filters was also examined. We have chosen to develop and demonstrate this technology based on criteria set forth for a heavy duty CIDI engine system because it represents a more challenging set of conditions of service intervals and overall fuel usage over light duty systems. In the second phase of the program a light duty diesel engine test was also demonstrated. Further, technology developed under this proposal would also have application for the use of liquid based fuels for fuel cell power generation. The program consisted of four phases. Phase I focused on developing a concept design and analysis and resolution of technical barriers concerning removal of sulfur-containing species in low sulfur fuels. In Phase II concentrated on prototype filter design and preparation followed by qualification testing of this component in a fuel line application. Phase III studied life cycle and regeneration options for the spent filter. Phase IV focused on efficacy and benefits in the desulfation steps of a NOx adsorber on both a heavy and light duty engine. The project team included a number of partners, with Honeywell International as the prime contractor. The partners include an emission control technology developer (Honeywell International), a fuel technology developer (Marathon Ashland Petroleum), a catalyst technology developer (Johnson Matthey), a CIDI engine manufacturer (Navistar Inc. (formerly International Truck & Engine Corporation) and Mack Trucks Inc.), and filter recycler (American Wastes Industries).

Rohrbach, Ron; Barron, Ann

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Alternative fuels for vehicles fleet demonstration program final report. Volume 1: Summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Alternative Fuels for Vehicles Fleet Demonstration Program (AFV-FDP) was a multiyear effort to collect technical data for use in determining the costs and benefits of alternative-fuel vehicles in typical applications in New York State. During 3 years of collecting data, 7.3 million miles of driving were accumulated, 1,003 chassis-dynamometer emissions tests were performed, 862,000 gallons of conventional fuel were saved, and unique information was developed about garage safety recommendations, vehicle performance, and other topics. Findings are organized by vehicle and fuel type. For light-duty compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles, technology has evolved rapidly and closed-loop, electronically-controlled fuel systems provide performance and emissions advantages over open-loop, mechanical systems. The best CNG technology produces consistently low tailpipe emissions versus gasoline, and can eliminate evaporative emissions. Reduced driving range remains the largest physical drawback. Fuel cost is low ($/Btu) but capital costs are high, indicating that economics are best with vehicles that are used intensively. Propane produces impacts similar to CNG and is less expensive to implement, but fuel cost is higher than gasoline and safety codes limit use in urban areas. Light-duty methanol/ethanol vehicles provide performance and emissions benefits over gasoline with little impact on capital costs, but fuel costs are high. Heavy-duty CNG engines are evolving rapidly and provide large reductions in emissions versus diesel. Capital costs are high for CNG buses and fuel efficiency is reduced, but the fuel is less expensive and overall operating costs are about equal to those of diesel buses. Methanol buses provide performance and emissions benefits versus diesel, but fuel costs are high. Other emerging technologies were also evaluated, including electric vehicles, hybrid-electric vehicles, and fuel cells.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

aeo12www.federalregister.govarticles201109152011-20740greenhouse-gas-emissions-standards-and-fuel-efficiency-standards-for-medium--and-heavy-duty-engines...

415

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY MACK TRUCKS, INC. FOR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for all subject inventions made under the above subject cooperative agreement: "Very High Fuel Economy, Heavy Duty, Constant Speed, Truck, Engine Optimized Via Unique Energy...

416

Argonne TTRDC - Transportation Publications - TransForum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Make Mine a Burger, Fries, and Side of Extra Fuel Optimizing Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Cooling Nanoscale 'Goldilocks' Phenomenon Could Improve Biofuel Production Larry Johnson...

417

Transportation Efficiency Strategies  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Medium- and Heavy-Duty Vehicles past present future Today Air Quality Climate Change Energy Sustainability Developing alternative fuel technology (vehicles and infrastructure)...

418

Federal Energy Management Program: News  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

buildings, boost efficiency standards for appliances and federal buildings, and develop fuel economy standards for heavy-duty vehicles. More July 3, 2013 EPA Strengthens Energy...

419

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Provide direct financial support to accelerate the introduction of ligh, medium, and heavy duty alternative fuel vehicles and advanced vehicle technologies into local...

420

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY THE JOHN DEERE PRODUCT...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

awarded a cooperative agreement for the performance of work entitled, "Heavy-Duty Stoichiometric Compression Ignition Engine with Improved Fuel Economy over Alternative...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Photos | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photos Photos Browse By - Any - General Argonne Information -Awards -Honors Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Biofuels ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Fuel economy ---Fuel injection ---Heavy-duty vehicles ---Hybrid & electric vehicles ---Hydrogen & fuel cells ---Internal combustion ---Maglev systems ---Powertrain research ---Vehicle testing --Building design ---Construction ---Industrial heating & cooling ---Industrial lighting --Manufacturing -Energy sources --Renewable energy ---Bioenergy ---Geothermal energy ---Hydropower ---Solar energy ---Wind energy --Fossil fuels ---Coal ----Carbon capture & sequestration ---Oil ---Natural Gas --Hydrogen --Nuclear energy ---Nuclear energy modeling & simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ----Geology & disposal

422

Robin Graham | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Browse by Topic Browse by Topic Energy Energy efficiency Vehicles Alternative fuels Automotive engineering Biofuels Diesel Fuel economy Fuel injection Heavy-duty vehicles Hybrid & electric vehicles Hydrogen & fuel cells Internal combustion Powertrain research Vehicle testing Building design Manufacturing Energy sources Renewable energy Bioenergy Solar energy Wind energy Fossil fuels Oil Nuclear energy Nuclear energy modeling & simulation Nuclear fuel cycle Geology & disposal Reactors Nuclear reactor safety Nuclear reactor materials Energy usage Energy life-cycle analysis Energy storage Batteries Lithium-ion batteries Lithium-air batteries Smart Grid Energy economy Energy policy Environment Biology Environmental biology Molecular biology Proteomics Environmental science & technology Air quality

423

Thomas Wallner | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne National Laboratory's Omnivorous Engine Argonne National Laboratory's Omnivorous Engine Argonne National Laboratory's Omnivorous Engine Argonne National Laboratory's Omnivorous Engine Browse by Topic Energy Energy efficiency Vehicles Alternative fuels Automotive engineering Biofuels Diesel Fuel economy Fuel injection Heavy-duty vehicles Hybrid & electric vehicles Hydrogen & fuel cells Internal combustion Powertrain research Vehicle testing Building design Manufacturing Energy sources Renewable energy Bioenergy Solar energy Wind energy Fossil fuels Oil Nuclear energy Nuclear energy modeling & simulation Nuclear fuel cycle Geology & disposal Reactors Nuclear reactor safety Nuclear reactor materials Energy usage Energy life-cycle analysis Energy storage Batteries Lithium-ion batteries Lithium-air batteries Smart Grid

424

Ali Erdemir | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Browse by Topic Browse by Topic Energy Energy efficiency Vehicles Alternative fuels Automotive engineering Biofuels Diesel Fuel economy Fuel injection Heavy-duty vehicles Hybrid & electric vehicles Hydrogen & fuel cells Internal combustion Powertrain research Vehicle testing Building design Manufacturing Energy sources Renewable energy Bioenergy Solar energy Wind energy Fossil fuels Oil Nuclear energy Nuclear energy modeling & simulation Nuclear fuel cycle Geology & disposal Reactors Nuclear reactor safety Nuclear reactor materials Energy usage Energy life-cycle analysis Energy storage Batteries Lithium-ion batteries Lithium-air batteries Smart Grid Energy economy Energy policy Environment Biology Environmental biology Molecular biology Proteomics Environmental science & technology Air quality

425

Sami Gopalsami | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Press Releases Feature Stories In the News Experts Guide Media Contacts Social Media Photos Videos Fact Sheets, Brochures and Reports Summer Science Writing Internship Browse by Topic Energy Energy efficiency Vehicles Alternative fuels Automotive engineering Biofuels Diesel Fuel economy Fuel injection Heavy-duty vehicles Hybrid & electric vehicles Hydrogen & fuel cells Internal combustion Powertrain research Vehicle testing Building design Manufacturing Energy sources Renewable energy Bioenergy Solar energy Wind energy Fossil fuels Oil Nuclear energy Nuclear energy modeling & simulation Nuclear fuel cycle Geology & disposal Reactors Nuclear reactor safety Nuclear reactor materials Energy usage Energy life-cycle analysis Energy storage Batteries Lithium-ion batteries Lithium-air batteries

426

In The News | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In The News In The News Topic - Any - General Argonne Information Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Biofuels ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Fuel economy ---Fuel injection ---Heavy-duty vehicles ---Hybrid & electric vehicles ---Hydrogen & fuel cells ---Internal combustion ---Powertrain research --Building design --Manufacturing -Energy sources --Renewable energy ---Bioenergy ---Geothermal energy ---Hydropower ---Solar energy ---Wind energy --Fossil fuels ---Coal ----Carbon capture & sequestration ---Natural Gas --Nuclear energy ---Nuclear energy modeling & simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ---Reactors ----Nuclear reactor safety ----Nuclear system technologies & diagnostics -Energy usage --Energy life-cycle analysis --Energy storage

427

Videos | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Videos Videos Browse By - Any - General Argonne Information -Awards -Honors Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Biofuels ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Fuel economy ---Fuel injection ---Heavy-duty vehicles ---Hybrid & electric vehicles ---Hydrogen & fuel cells ---Internal combustion ---Maglev systems ---Powertrain research ---Vehicle testing --Building design ---Construction ---Industrial heating & cooling ---Industrial lighting --Manufacturing -Energy sources --Renewable energy ---Bioenergy ---Geothermal energy ---Hydropower ---Solar energy ---Wind energy --Fossil fuels ---Coal ----Carbon capture & sequestration ---Oil ---Natural Gas --Hydrogen --Nuclear energy ---Nuclear energy modeling & simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ----Geology & disposal

428

Downloads | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Downloads Downloads Topic - Any - General Argonne Information -Awards -Honors Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Biofuels ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Fuel economy ---Fuel injection ---Heavy-duty vehicles ---Hybrid & electric vehicles ---Hydrogen & fuel cells ---Internal combustion ---Maglev systems ---Powertrain research ---Vehicle testing --Building design ---Construction ---Industrial heating & cooling ---Industrial lighting --Manufacturing -Energy sources --Renewable energy ---Bioenergy ---Geothermal energy ---Hydropower ---Solar energy ---Wind energy --Fossil fuels ---Coal ----Carbon capture & sequestration ---Oil ---Natural Gas --Hydrogen --Nuclear energy ---Nuclear energy modeling & simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ----Geology & disposal

429

Photos | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photos Photos Browse By - Any - General Argonne Information -Awards -Honors Energy -Energy efficiency --Vehicles ---Alternative fuels ---Automotive engineering ---Biofuels ---Diesel ---Electric drive technology ---Fuel economy ---Fuel injection ---Heavy-duty vehicles ---Hybrid & electric vehicles ---Hydrogen & fuel cells ---Internal combustion ---Maglev systems ---Powertrain research ---Vehicle testing --Building design ---Construction ---Industrial heating & cooling ---Industrial lighting --Manufacturing -Energy sources --Renewable energy ---Bioenergy ---Geothermal energy ---Hydropower ---Solar energy ---Wind energy --Fossil fuels ---Coal ----Carbon capture & sequestration ---Oil ---Natural Gas --Hydrogen --Nuclear energy ---Nuclear energy modeling & simulation ---Nuclear fuel cycle ----Geology & disposal

430

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

Grimble, R.E.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

431

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

Grimble, Ralph E. (Finleyville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fuel processor for fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Springer, Thomas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Huff, James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Late - Cycle Injection of Air/Oxygen - Enriched Air for Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reduce the ''Engine Out'' particulates using the ''In Cylinder'' technique of late cycle auxiliary gas injection (AGI). Reduce the ''Engine Out'' NOx by combining AGI with optimization of fuel injection parameters. Maintain or Improve the Fuel Efficiency.

Mather, Daniel

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell System (SOFC) Technology R&D Needs (Presentation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2.5kW to 4.0kW 4 DOE Pre-Solicitation Workshop, Golden CO Field Office Heavy Duty Truck Market Drivers: Increasingly Stringent Emission & Anti-Idling Regulations Annually,...

435

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

profit incentive to increase natural gas or electricityincentives for technological and behavioral change (for example, for buses and heavy-duty vehicles to change from diesel to natural gas),

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

profit incentive to increase natural gas or electricityincentives for technological and behavioral change (for example, for buses and heavy-duty vehicles to change from diesel to natural gas),

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

FISCHER-TROPSCH FUELS PRODUCTION AND DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has two primary purposes: (1) Build a small-footprint (SFP) fuel production plant to prove the feasibility of this relatively transportable technology on an intermediate scale (i.e. between laboratory-bench and commercial capacity) and produce as much as 150,000 gallons of hydrogen-saturated Fischer-Tropsch (FT) diesel fuel; and (2) Use the virtually sulfur-free fuel produced to demonstrate (over a period of at least six months) that it can not only be used in existing diesel engines, but that it also can enable significantly increased effectiveness and life of the next-generation exhaust-after-treatment emission control systems that are currently under development and that will be required for future diesel engines. Furthermore, a well-to-wheels economic analysis will be performed to characterize the overall costs and benefits that would be associated with the actual commercial production, distribution and use of such FT diesel fuel made by the process under consideration, from the currently underutilized (or entirely un-used) energy resources targeted, primarily natural gas that is stranded, sub-quality, off-shore, etc. During the first year of the project, which is the subject of this report, there have been two significant areas of progress: (1) Most of the preparatory work required to build the SFP fuel-production plant has been completed, and (2) Relationships have been established, and necessary project coordination has been started, with the half dozen project-partner organizations that will have a role in the fuel demonstration and evaluation phase of the project. Additional project tasks directly related to the State of Alaska have also been added to the project. These include: A study of underutilized potential Alaska energy resources that could contribute to domestic diesel and distillate fuel production by providing input energy for future commercial-size SFP fuel production plants; Demonstration of the use of the product fuel in a heavy-duty diesel vehicle during the Alaska winter; a comparative study of the cold-starting characteristics of FT and conventional diesel fuel; and demonstration of the use of the fuel to generate electricity for rural Alaskan villages using both a diesel generator set, and a reformer-equipped fuel cell.

Stephen P. Bergin

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

438

Diesel engine emissions reduction by multiple injections having increasing pressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple fuel charges are injected into a diesel engine combustion chamber during a combustion cycle, and each charge after the first has successively greater injection pressure (a higher injection rate) than the prior charge. This injection scheme results in reduced emissions, particularly particulate emissions, and can be implemented by modifying existing injection system hardware. Further enhancements in emissions reduction and engine performance can be obtained by using known measures in conjunction with the invention, such as Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR).

Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI); Thiel, Matthew P. (Madison, WI)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Alternatives to Diesel Fuel in California - Fuel Cycle Energy and Emission Effects of Possible Replacements Due to the TAC Diesel Particulate Decision  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limitations on petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies, each of which results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, with substantial displacement of compression ignition by spark ignition engines, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles. Gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters (8.5 million gallons) per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter (3.6 million gallon) equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, ressionignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Fuel replacement by di-methyl ether yields the greatest overall reduction in NOx emissions, though all scenarios bring about PM10 reductions relative to the 2010 baseline, with greatest reductions from the first case described above and the least from fuel replacement by Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not formally evaluated.

Christopher L. Saraicks; Donald M. Rote; Frank Stodolsky; James J. Eberhardt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Alternatives to diesel fuel in California - fuel cycle energy and emission effects of possible replacements due to the TAC diesel particulate decision.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limitations on petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible mid-course strategies, each of which results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, with substantial displacement of compression-ignition by spark-ignition engines, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles. Gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters (8.5 million gallons) per day overall, about 21% above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter (3.6 million gallon) equivalents per day, about 7% above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case the authors estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Fuel replacement by di-methyl ether yields the greatest overall reduction in NOX emissions, though all scenarios bring about PM{sub 10} reductions relative to the 2010 baseline, with greatest reductions from the first case described above and the least from fuel replacement by Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not formally evaluated.

Saricks, C. L.; Rote, D. M.; Stodolsky, F.; Eberhardt, J. J.

1999-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EIA - AEO2010 - Naturall gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Natural gas as a fuel for heavy trucks: Issues and incentives Environmental and energy security concerns related to petroleum use for transportation fuels, together with recent growth in U.S. proved reserves and technically recoverable natural gas resources, including shale gas, have sparked interest in policy proposals aimed at stimulating increased use of natural gas as a vehicle fuel, particularly for heavy trucks. In 2008, U.S. freight trucks used more than 2 million barrels of petroleum-based diesel fuel per day. In the AEO2010 Reference case, they are projected to use 2.7 million barrels per day in 2035. Petroleum-based diesel use by freight trucks in 2008 accounted for 15 percent of total petroleum consumption (excluding biofuels and other non-petroleum-based products) in the transportation sector (13.2 million barrels per day) and 12 percent of the U.S. total for all sectors (18.7 million barrels per day). In the Reference case, oil use by freight trucks grows to 20 percent of total transportation use (13.7 million barrels per day) and 14 percent of the U.S. total (19.0 million barrels per day) by 2035. The following analysis examines the potential impacts of policies aimed at increasing sales of heavy-duty natural gas vehicles (HDNGVs) and the use of natural gas fuels, and key factors that lead to uncertainty in these estimates.

442

Alternatives to conventional diesel fuel-some potential implications of California's TAC decision on diesel particulate.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limitations on the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to provisions of the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies. (1) Increased penetration of natural gas and greater gasoline use in the transportation fuels market, to the extent that some compression-ignition (CI) applications revert to spark-ignition (SI) engines. (2) New specifications requiring diesel fuel reformulation based on exhaust products of individual diesel fuel constituents. Each of these alternatives results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles, and gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not evaluated.

Eberhardt, J. J.; Rote, D. M.; Saricks, C. L.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

443

Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) Underground Injection Control Permits and Registrations (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Fuel Distributor Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Safety and Operational Guidelines Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Chapter 27 of the Texas Water Code (the Injection Well Act) defines an "injection well" as "an artificial excavation or opening in the ground made by digging, boring, drilling, jetting, driving, or some other

444

Environmental, health, and safety issues of fuel cells in transportation. Volume 1: Phosphoric acid fuel-cell buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) chartered the Phosphoric Acid Fuel-Cell (PAFC) Bus Program to demonstrate the feasibility of fuel cells in heavy-duty transportation systems. As part of this program, PAFC- powered buses are being built to meet transit industry design and performance standards. Test-bed bus-1 (TBB-1) was designed in 1993 and integrated in March 1994. TBB-2 and TBB-3 are under construction and should be integrated in early 1995. In 1987 Phase I of the program began with the development and testing of two conceptual system designs- liquid- and air-cooled systems. The liquid-cooled PAFC system was chosen to continue, through a competitive award, into Phase H, beginning in 1991. Three hybrid buses, which combine fuel-cell and battery technologies, were designed during Phase III. After completing Phase II, DOE plans a comprehensive performance testing program (Phase HI) to verify that the buses meet stringent transit industry requirements. The Phase III study will evaluate the PAFC bus and compare it to a conventional diesel bus. This NREL study assesses the environmental, health, and safety (EH&S) issues that may affect the commercialization of the PAFC bus. Because safety is a critical factor for consumer acceptance of new transportation-based technologies the study focuses on these issues. The study examines health and safety together because they are integrally related. In addition, this report briefly discusses two environmental issues that are of concern to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The first issue involves a surge battery used by the PAFC bus that contains hazardous constituents. The second issue concerns the regulated air emissions produced during operation of the PAFC bus.

Ring, S.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Design and Performance of a Low Btu Fuel Rich-Quench-Lean Gas Turbine Combustor  

SciTech Connect

General Electric Company is developing gas turbines and a high temperature desulfurization system for use in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. High temperature desulfurization, or hot gas cleanup (HGCU), offers many advantages over conventional low temperature desulfurization processes, but does not reduce the relatively high concentrations of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) that are typically found in low Btu fuel. When fuels containing bound nitrogen are burned in conventional gas turbine combustors, a significant portion of the FBN is converted to NO{sub x}. Methods of reducing the NO{sub x} emissions from IGCC power plants equipped with HGCU are needed. Rich-quench-lean (RQL) combustion can decrease the conversion of FBN to NO{sub x} because a large fraction of the FBN is converted into non-reactive N{sub 2} in a fuel rich stage. Additional air, required for complete combustion, is added in a quench stage. A lean stage provides sufficient residence time for complete combustion. Objectives General Electric has developed and tested a rich-quench-lean gas turbine combustor for use with low Btu fuels containing FBN. The objective of this work has been to design an RQL combustor that has a lower conversion of FBN to N{sub x} than a conventional low Btu combustor and is suitable for use in a GE heavy duty gas turbine. Such a combustor must be of appropriate size and scale, configuration (can-annular), and capable of reaching ``F`` class firing conditions (combustor exit temperature = 2550{degrees}F).

Feitelberg, A.S.; Jackson, M.R.; Lacey, M.A.; Manning, K.S.; Ritter, A.M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Study on Zero CO2 Emission SOFC Hybrid Power System with Steam Injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on a traditional SOFC hybrid power system, a zero CO2 emission SOFC hybrid power system with steam injection is proposed in this paper and its performance is analyzed. Oxy-fuel combustion can burn the fuel gas from anode thoroughly, and increases ... Keywords: solid oxide fuel cell, Aspen Plus, hybrid power system, zero CO2 emission, steam injection

Liqiang Duan; Xiaoyuan Zhang; Yongping Yang; Gang Xu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

GRANT SOLICITATION APPLICATIONPACKAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, · Biomass-based diesel, and · Natural gas. The intent of this solicitation is to upgrade public and private-, and heavy-duty vehicle technologies; · Retrofit medium- and heavy-duty on-road and non-road vehicle fleets and Vehicle Technology Program Solicitation Number PON-09-006 Subject Area: Alternative and Renewable Fuel

448

Motor vehicles in the 1990s: Emerging environmental constraints on current fuels, and emissions and energy trade-offs related to nonpetroleum alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Manufacturers of motor vehicles and engines may face substantial compliance challenges because of existing or proposed environmental regulations. Among the challenges due to existing regulations is the need for improved control of evaporative emissions from gasoline vehicles and emissions of particulate matter from heavy-duty diesel trucks. Potential future challenges could arise from the need to control refueling emissions and from more stringent emission standards for hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen. Virtually all of these regulations require technological changes to vehicles and engines, assuming that gasoline and diesel fuel remain as the operating fuels. However, recent speculation has centered on the possibility of meeting some or all of these regulatory challenges with alternative fuels such as natural gas or methanol. This study addresses that possibility by examining current and potential standards, characterizing vehicles that use alternative fuels, and assessing -- via an informal canvass of manufacturers -- the likelihood of meeting the regulations with both conventional and alternative fuels. A selective literature review compares emissions, energy use, and costs associated with both types of fuels. Finally, a plausible scenario of introducing methanol- fueled autos and light trucks by the early 1990s is defined as the basis for examining changes in emission levels nationally. While the overall reduction -- from all transportation sources -- of reactive hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen due to these vehicles is less than 1% by 1997, the potential remains for greater levels of reduction within urbanized areas, especially if tax-based incentives and other measures are used to encourage the use of vehicles powered by alternative fuels. 68 refs., 2 figs., 23 tabs.

Singh, M.K.; Saricks, C.L.; LaBelle, S.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Monolithic fuel injector and related manufacturing method  

SciTech Connect

A monolithic fuel injection head for a fuel nozzle includes a substantially hollow vesicle body formed with an upstream end face, a downstream end face and a peripheral wall extending therebetween, an internal baffle plate extending radially outwardly from a downstream end of the bore, terminating short of the peripheral wall, thereby defining upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body, in fluid communication by way of a radial gap between the baffle plate and the peripheral wall. A plurality of integral pre-mix tubes extend axially through the upstream and downstream fuel plenums in the vesicle body and through the baffle plate, with at least one fuel injection hole extending between each of the pre-mix tubes and the upstream fuel plenum, thereby enabling fuel in the upstream plenum to be injected into the plurality of pre-mix tubes. The fuel injection head is formed by direct metal laser sintering.

Ziminsky, Willy Steve (Greenville, SC); Johnson, Thomas Edward (Greenville, SC); Lacy, Benjamin (Greenville, SC); York, William David (Greenville, SC); Stevenson, Christian Xavier (Greenville, SC)

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

450

DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

Qu, Jun [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Testing of a new aftertreatment system for lean burn direct injected gasoline engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A gasoline direct injected engine operating under lean conditions can offer a reduction in fuel consumption and a reduction of CO2 emissions but meanwhile suffer… (more)

Thulin, Andeas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Slit injection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser cavity electron beam injection device provided with a single elongated slit window for passing a suitably shaped electron beam and means for varying the current density of the injected electron beam.

Alger, Terry W. (Livermore, CA); Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA); Bradley, Laird P. (Livermore, CA)

1976-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

453

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines - Direct Injection - Omnivorous Engine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Omnivorous Engine Omnivorous Engine Setup Omnivorous Engine Setup New engine technology has made possible engines that will operate on a wide variety of fuel inputs, from gasoline to naptha to ethanol to methanol, without driver intervention. Although flexible fuel vehicles have been produced in the millions, their engines have always been optimized for gasoline operation while accepting significant performance and efficiency degradations when using the alternative fuel. This project seeks to combine in-cylinder measurement technology, and advanced controls to optimize spark timing, the quantity and timing of injected fuel, to produce an "omnivorous engine"--one that will be able to run on any liquid spark ignition fuel with optimal efficiency and low

454

Beam injection into RHIC  

SciTech Connect

During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Geothermal injection monitoring project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is provided on the geothermal brine injection problem and each of the project tasks is outlined in detail. These tasks are: evaluation of methods of monitoring the movement of injected fluid, preparation for an eventual field experiment, and a review of groundwater regulations and injection programs. (MHR)

Younker, L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

William J. Clinton, 2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fuels in light, medium, and heavy-duty vehicles; the acquisition of vehicles with higher fuel economy, including hybrid vehicles; the sub- stitution of cars for light trucks; an...

457

Beyond Diesel - Renewable Diesel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CTTS fact sheet describing NREL's new Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Research Laboratory, which will be used to facilitate increased renewable diesel use in heavy-duty vehicles.

Not Available

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Microsoft Word - FinalReport_R1-V0.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supplementary Firing and Post Combustion CO and NO X Controls (heavy duty) X X Charlie Refinery Process Heater with NO X Controls X X Delta Dual-Fuel (Natural Gas and No. 6 Fuel...

459

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY DELPHI AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with PACCAR and Volvo Truck North America to develop a 3-5kw Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) auxiliary power unit capable of operating on diesel fuel for the heavy-duty trucking...

460

Influence of water injection on performance and emissions of a direct-injection hydrogen research engine.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as an internal combustion (IC) engine fuel has been under investigation for several decades. The favorable physical properties of hydrogen make it an excellent alternative fuel for IC engines and hence it is widely regarded as the energy carrier of the future. Direct injection of hydrogen allows optimizing this potential as it provides multiple degrees of freedom to influence the in-cylinder combustion processes and consequently engine efficiency and exhaust emissions.

Nande, A. M.; Wallner, T.; Naber, J. (Energy Systems); (MIchigan Technological Univ.)

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel injection heavy-duty" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

Preventing CO poisoning in fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell performance with CO contamination of the H.sub.2 fuel stream is substantially improved by injecting O.sub.2 into the fuel stream ahead of the fuel cell. It is found that a surface reaction occurs even at PEM operating temperatures below about 100.degree. C. to oxidatively remove the CO and restore electrode surface area for the H.sub.2 reaction to generate current. Using an O.sub.2 injection, a suitable fuel stream for a PEM fuel cell can be formed from a methanol source using conventional reforming processes for producing H.sub.2.

Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

IMPACT OF OXYGENATED FUEL ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As evidenced by recent lawsuits brought against operators of large diesel truck fleets [1] and by the Consent Decree brought against the heavy-duty diesel manufacturers [2], the environmental and health effects of diesel engine emissions continue to be a significant concern. Reduction of diesel engine emissions has traditionally been achieved through a combination of fuel system, combustion chamber, and engine control modifications [3]. Catalytic aftertreatment has become common on modern diesel vehicles, with the predominant device being the diesel oxidation catalytic converter [3]. To enable advanced after-treatment devices and to directly reduce emissions, significant recent interest has focused on reformulation of diesel fuel, particularly the reduction of sulfur content. The EPA has man-dated that diesel fuel will have only 15 ppm sulfur content by 2007, with current diesel specifications requiring around 300 ppm [4]. Reduction of sulfur will permit sulfur-sensitive aftertreatment devices, continuously regenerating particulate traps, NOx control catalysts, and plasma assisted catalysts to be implemented on diesel vehicles [4]. Another method of reformulating diesel fuel to reduce emissions is to incorporate oxygen in the fuel, as was done in the reformulation of gasoline. The use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in reformulated gasoline has resulted in contamination of water resources across the country [5]. Nonetheless, by relying on the lessons learned from MTBE, oxygenation of diesel fuel may be accomplished without compromising water quality. Oxygenation of diesel fuel offers the possibility of reducing particulate matter emissions significantly, even for the current fleet of diesel vehicles. The mechanism by which oxygen content leads to particulate matter reductions is still under debate, but recent evidence shows clearly that ''smokeless'' engine operation is possible when the oxygen content of diesel fuel reaches roughly 38% by weight [6]. The potential improvements in energy efficiency within the transportation section, particularly in sport utility vehicles and light-duty trucks, that can be provided by deployment of diesel engines in passenger cars and trucks is a strong incentive to develop cleaner burning diesel engines and cleaner burning fuels for diesel engines. Thus, serious consideration of oxygenated diesel fuels is of significant practical interest and value to society. In the present work, a diesel fuel reformulating agent, CETANERTM, has been examined in a popular light-medium duty turbodiesel engine over a range of blending ratios. This additive is a mixture of glycol ethers and can be produced from dimethyl ether, which itself can be manufactured from synthesis gas using Air Products' Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME TM) technology. CETANERTM is a liquid, has an oxygen content of 36 wt.%, has a cetane number over 100 and is highly miscible in diesel fuel. This combination of physical and chemical properties makes CETANERTM an attractive agent for oxygenating diesel fuel. The present study considered CETANERTM ratios from 0 to 40 wt.% in a California Air Resources Board (CARB) specification diesel fuel. Particulate matter emissions, gaseous emissions and in-cylinder pressure traces were monitored over the AVL 8-Mode engine test protocol [7]. This paper presents the results from these measurements and discusses the implications of using high cetane number oxygenates in diesel fuel reformulation.

Boehman, Andre L.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

463

Overview of the Safety Issues Associated with the Compressed Natural Gas Fuel System and Electric Drive System in a Heavy Hybrid Electric Vehicle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the hazards that are unique to a compressed-natural-gas (CNG)-fueled heavy hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) design compared with a conventional heavy vehicle. The unique design features of the heavy HEV are the CNG fuel system for the internal-combustion engine (ICE) and the electric drive system. This report addresses safety issues with the CNG fuel system and the electric drive system. Vehicles on U. S. highways have been propelled by ICEs for several decades. Heavy-duty vehicles have typically been fueled by diesel fuel, and light-duty vehicles have been fueled by gasoline. The hazards and risks posed by ICE vehicles are well understood and have been generally accepted by the public. The economy, durability, and safety of ICE vehicles have established a standard for other types of vehicles. Heavy-duty (i.e., heavy) HEVs have recently been introduced to U. S. roadways, and the hazards posed by these heavy HEVs can be compared with the hazards posed by ICE vehicles. The benefits of heavy HEV technology are based on their potential for reduced fuel consumption and lower exhaust emissions, while the disadvantages are the higher acquisition cost and the expected higher maintenance costs (i.e., battery packs). The heavy HEV is more suited for an urban drive cycle with stop-and-go driving conditions than for steady expressway speeds. With increasing highway congestion and the resulting increased idle time, the fuel consumption advantage for heavy HEVs (compared with conventional heavy vehicles) is enhanced by the HEVs' ability to shut down. Any increase in fuel cost obviously improves the economics of a heavy HEV. The propulsion system for a heavy HEV is more complex than the propulsion system for a conventional heavy vehicle. The heavy HEV evaluated in this study has in effect two propulsion systems: an ICE fueled by CNG and an electric drive system with additional complexity and failure modes. This additional equipment will result in a less reliable vehicle with a lower availability than a conventional heavy vehicle. Experience with heavy HEVs to date supports this observation. The key safety concern for the electric drive system is the higher voltages and currents that are required in the electric drive system. Faults that could expose personnel to these electric hazards must be considered, addressed, and minimized. The key issue for the CNG-fueled ICE is containment of the high-pressure natural gas. Events that can result in a release of natural gas with the possibility of subsequent ignition are of concern. These safety issues are discussed. The heavy HEV has the potential to have a safety record that is comparable to that of the conventional vehicle, but adequate attention to detail will be required.

Nelson, S.C.

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

464

Neural network control of air-to-fuel ratio in a bi-fuel engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a neural network-based control system is proposed for fine control of the intake air/fuel ratio in a bi-fuel engine. This control system is an add-on module for an existing vehicle manufacturer's electronic control units (ECUs). Typically ... Keywords: Artificial neural networks, bi-fuel engines, compressed natural gas (CNG), fuel injection control

G. Gnanam; S. R. Habibi; R. T. Burton; M. T. Sulatisky

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

BWR Fuel Deposit Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With zinc injection to BWR feedwater for plant radiation dose reduction, fuel deposits often contain significant amounts of zinc and the inner layers of deposits become more adherent to the cladding. Fuel surveillance programs have revealed thick tenacious crud with surface spallation at several plants. This project determined the chemical composition and morphological features of crud flake samples from Duane Arnold Cycle 17 and Browns Ferry 2 Cycle 12 and compared the data with those obtained from othe...

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector  

SciTech Connect

A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine, and which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

Phatak, Ramkrishna G. (San Antonio, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Air blast type coal slurry fuel injector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device to atomize and inject a coal slurry in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine is disclosed which eliminates the use of a conventional fuel injection pump/nozzle. The injector involves the use of compressed air to atomize and inject the coal slurry and like fuels. In one embodiment, the breaking and atomization of the fuel is achieved with the help of perforated discs and compressed air. In another embodiment, a cone shaped aspirator is used to achieve the breaking and atomization of the fuel. The compressed air protects critical bearing areas of the injector.

Phatak, R.G.

1984-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

468

Emissions From Various Biodiesel Sources Compared to a Range of Diesel Fuels in DPF Equipped Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of various sources of petroleum-based and bio-based diesel fuels on regulated emissions and fuel economy in diesel particulate filter (DPF) equipped diesel engines. Two model year 2008 diesel engines were tested with nine fuels including a certification ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), local ULSD, high aromatic ULSD, low aromatic ULSD, and twenty percent blends of biodiesel derived from algae, camelina, soy, tallow, and yellow grease. Regulated emissions were measured over the heavy duty diesel transient test cycle. Measurements were also made of DPF-out particle size distribution and total particle count from a 13-mode steady state test using a fast mobility particle sizer. Test engines were a 2008 Cummins ISB and a 2008 International Maxx Force 10, both equipped with actively regenerated DPFs. Fuel consumption was roughly 2% greater over the transient test cycle for the B20 blends versus certification ULSD in both engines, consistent with the slightly lower energy content of biodiesel. Unlike studies conducted on older model engines, these engines equipped with diesel oxidation catalysts and DPFs showed small or no measurable fuel effect on the tailpipe emissions of total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM). No differences in particle size distribution or total particle count were seen in a comparison of certification ULSD and B20 soy, with the exception of engine idling conditions where B20 produced a small reduction in the number of nucleation mode particles. In the Cummins engine, B20 prepared from algae, camelina, soy, and tallow resulted in an approximately 2.5% increase in nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) compared to the base fuel. The International engine demonstrated a higher degree of variability for NO{sub x} emissions, and fuel effects could not be resolved (p > 0.05). The group of petroleum diesel test fuels produced a range of NO{sub x} emissions very similar to that caused by blending of biodiesel. Test cycles where an active regeneration of the DPF occurred resulted in a nearly threefold increase in NO{sub x} emissions and a 15% increase in fuel consumption. The full quantification of DPF regeneration events further complicates the accurate calculation of fuel impacts on emissions and fuel consumption.

Williams, A.; Burton, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.; Tester, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Fueling Program Review May 2000 LRB 1 Fueling Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fueling? Fusion power is a strong function of density ­ Pf = nDnTWDT Gas puffing has limited ability at high density e ne-1 (Alcator C, DIII, TFTR) Density Limits Exceeded ­ Gas fueled density limits proposed as improvement mechanism. · Similar scaling seen on DIII with multiple centrifuge pellet injection

470

Geysers injection modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our research is concerned with mathematical modeling techniques for engineering design and optimization of water injection in vapor-dominated systems. The emphasis in the project has been on the understanding of physical processes and mechanisms during injection, applications to field problems, and on transfer of numerical simulation capabilities to the geothermal community. This overview summarizes recent work on modeling injection interference in the Southeast Geysers, and on improving the description of two-phase flow processes in heterogeneous media.

Pruess, K.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Underground Injection Control (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Injection and Mining Division (IMD) has the responsibility of implementing two major federal environmental programs which were statutorily charged to the Office of Conservation: the Underground...

472

TECHNICAL NOTE HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL VEHICLE (HDDV) IDLING ACTIVITY AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The model was implemented using PHAST [54], a saturated flow and reactive transport computer code. PHAST directly. However, it was found that PHAST is computationally more efficient. Moreover, the same model PHAST. 3.3. Model calibration Field monitoring data were available for several components

473

Evaluating heavy-duty diesel engine aftertreatment devices with a split exhaust configuration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??West Virginia University evaluated diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) and lean-NOx catalysts as part of the Diesel Emissions Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) program. In order to perform… (more)

Corrigan, Eric R.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Cycles and weight effects on emissions and development of predictive emissions models for heavy duty trucks.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??NOX and PM emissions data from the 5-mode CARB HHDDT Schedule, UDDS, and AC5080 were reviewed, with reference to each other. Next, two-dimensional correlations were… (more)

Vora, Kuntal A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Pneumatic brake control for precision stopping of heavy-duty vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stopping” of a 40 foot CNG bus for the Bus Precision Dockingfor two different 40 foot CNG buses (c1 and c2). Althoughpressure of two different CNG buses (c1 and c2) speeds since

Bu, Fanping; Tan, Han-Shue

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z