National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fuel including federal

  1. NREL: Technology Deployment - NREL's Federal Fueling Station...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) hoping to locate additional fuel provisions from private and federal facilities. FEMP then tapped NREL to provide data on the ...

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Center: Federal Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data

  3. EO 13031: Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EO 13031: Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership The purpose of this order is to ensure that the Federal Government exercise leadership in the use of alternative fueled ...

  4. Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers This ...

  5. Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings Document details Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption ...

  6. Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document describes guidance on the importance of (and steps to) including retro-commissioning in federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs).

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Electricity

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Electricity Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Electricity to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Electricity on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Electricity on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Electricity on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Hydrogen on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Propane

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Propane Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Propane to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Propane on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Propane on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Propane on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for

  12. Fuel Cell Meeting Agenda: Matching Federal Government Needs with Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficient Fuel Cells | Department of Energy Meeting Agenda: Matching Federal Government Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells Fuel Cell Meeting Agenda: Matching Federal Government Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells This agenda provides information about the Fuel Cell Meeting on April 26, 2007 in Washington, DC. fuel_cell_mtng_agenda.pdf (108.15 KB) More Documents & Publications Draft Agenda U.S. Fuel Cell Council: The Voice of the Fuel Cell Industry Agenda

  13. Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decision Makers Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Decision Makers Download presentation slides from the May 8, 2012, Fuel Cell Technologies Program ...

  14. Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings OIRA Comparison Document Document details the Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption ...

  15. Federal Government Support for Fuel Cell Technologies | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Government Support for Fuel Cell Technologies Federal Government Support for Fuel Cell Technologies Presented by the U.S. Department of Energy on Hydrogen and Fuel Cell State and Regional Initiatives, June 11, 2009 state_and_regional_initiatives_budget_2009.pdf (2.07 MB) More Documents & Publications Federal Support for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies FY 2011 Budget Roll-Out Presentation Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 2011 IPHE Stationary Fuel Cell Workshop

  16. Fact #682: July 4, 2011 Federal Alternative Fuel Use

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Government used nearly 9 million gasoline-gallon equivalents of alternative fuel in 2010. The majority of the fuel used (92%) was E-85, a combination of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline....

  17. Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Federal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Incentives and Laws Database Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Federal and State Incentives and...

  18. EO 13031: Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership (1996)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this order is to ensure that the Federal Government exercise leadership in the use of alternative fueled vehicles (AFVs).

  19. Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells This presentation by Keith Spitznagel of LOGANEnergy was given at the Fuel Cell Meeting in April 2007. fuel_cell_mtng_spitznagel.pdf (1.42 MB) More Documents & Publications Presentation for Hydrogen State and Regional Workshop, March 30, 2008, Sacramento, CA CleanDistributedGeneration.pdf MCFC and PAFC R&D Workshop

  20. Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Matching Federal Government Energy Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells Keith A Spitznagel Keith A Spitznagel Senior VP, Marketing Senior VP, Marketing - - LOGANEnergy LOGANEnergy US Fuel Cell Council US Fuel Cell Council Hotel Palomar Hotel Palomar April 26, 2007 April 26, 2007 Micro & Man-Portable * Less Than 100 Watts * Consumer electronics, defense (solder power), speciality applications Portable, Backup, APU *

  1. Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enabling Mass-Scale Financing for Federal Energy, Water, and Sustainability Projects Retro-Commissioning Increases Data Center Efficiency at Low Cost Energy Savings Performance ...

  2. DOE Releases Request for Information on Critical Materials, Including Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cell Platinum Group Metal Catalysts | Department of Energy Releases Request for Information on Critical Materials, Including Fuel Cell Platinum Group Metal Catalysts DOE Releases Request for Information on Critical Materials, Including Fuel Cell Platinum Group Metal Catalysts February 17, 2016 - 3:03pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has released a Request for Information (RFI) on critical materials in the energy sector, including fuel cell platinum group metal catalysts. The RFI

  3. Federal Support for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Federal Support for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Federal Support for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies This presentation, which focuses on federal support for hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, was given by Patrick Davis at the State and Regional Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Initiatives Meeting in May 2007. states_call0507.pdf (1.16 MB) More Documents & Publications FY 2011 Budget Roll-Out Presentation FY 2007 Operating Plan for DOE--March 16, 2007.xls FY 2007 Operating Plan

  4. Federal Fuel Cell Tax Incentives: An Investment in Clean and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Fuel Cell Tax Incentives; An investment in clean and efficient technologies On ... OWNER (Section 103) * Credit of 30% of the cost up to 3,000 per kW * Minimum 0.5 kW ...

  5. Federal Fuels Taxes and Tax Credits (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    Provides a review and update of the handling of federal fuels taxes and tax credits, focusing primarily on areas for which regulations have changed or the handling of taxes or credits has been updated in Annual Energy Outlook 2009.

  6. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2012 ii This report...

  7. Fuel cell repeater unit including frame and separator plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yamanis, Jean; Hawkes, Justin R; Chiapetta, Jr., Louis; Bird, Connie E; Sun, Ellen Y; Croteau, Paul F

    2013-11-05

    An example fuel cell repeater includes a separator plate and a frame establishing at least a portion of a flow path that is operative to communicate fuel to or from at least one fuel cell held by the frame relative to the separator plate. The flow path has a perimeter and any fuel within the perimeter flow across the at least one fuel cell in a first direction. The separator plate, the frame, or both establish at least one conduit positioned outside the flow path perimeter. The conduit is outside of the flow path perimeter and is configured to direct flow in a second, different direction. The conduit is fluidly coupled with the flow path.

  8. Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings OIRA Comparison Document

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Document details the Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings in an OIRA Comparison Document.

  9. Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document details Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings in a Supplemental Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.

  10. Including Retro-Commissioning in Federal Energy Savings Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the cost of the survey. Developing a detailed scope of work and a fixed price for this work is important to eliminate risk to the Agency and the ESCo. Including a detailed scope...

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws

  12. Guidance. Requirements for Installing Renewable Fuel Pumps at Federal Fleet Fueling Centers under EISA Section 246

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-04-01

    On December 19, 2007, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) was signed into law as Public Law 110-140. Section 246(a) of EISA directs Federal agencies to install at least one renewable fuel pump at each Federal fleet fueling center under their jurisdiction by January 1, 2010. Section 246(b) requires the President to submit an annual report to Congress on Federal agency progress in meeting this renewable fuel pump installation mandate. This guidance document provides guidelines to help agencies understand these requirements and how to comply with EISA Section 246.

  13. Refueling Behavior of Flexible Fuel Vehicle Drivers in the Federal Fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daley, R.; Nangle, J.; Boeckman, G.; Miller, M.

    2014-05-01

    Federal fleets are a frequent subject of legislative and executive efforts to lead a national transition to alternative fuels and advanced vehicle technologies. Section 701 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 requires that all dual-fueled alternative fuel vehicles in the federal fleet be operated on alternative fuel 100% of the time when they have access to it. However, in Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, drivers of federal flex fuel vehicles (FFV) leased through the General Services Administration refueled with E85 24% of the time when it was available--falling well short of the mandate. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory completed a 2-year Laboratory Directed Research and Development project to identify the factors that influence the refueling behavior of federal FFV drivers. The project began with two primary hypotheses. First, information scarcity increases the tendency to miss opportunities to purchase E85. Second, even with perfect information, there are limits to how far drivers will go out of their way to purchase E85. This paper discusses the results of the project, which included a June 2012 survey of federal fleet drivers and an empirical analysis of actual refueling behavior from FY 2009 to 2012. This research will aid in the design and implementation of intervention programs aimed at increasing alternative fuel use and reducing petroleum consumption.

  14. Webinar: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decision Makers | Department of Energy Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Decision Makers Webinar: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Decision Makers Download presentation slides from the May 8, 2012, Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar, "Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers." Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers Webinar

  15. Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Decision Makers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation slides from the May 8, 2012, Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar, Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers.

  16. Procuring Stationary Fuel Cells For CHP: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinton, David P; McGervey, Joseph; Curran, Scott

    2011-11-01

    fuel cell projects easier to put into service. In this environment, federal decision makers can focus on being smart buyers of fuel cell energy instead of attempting to become experts in fuel cell technology. For agencies that want to pursue a fuel cell CHP this guide presents a four step process for a successful project. 1. Perform a preliminary screening of the energy needs energy costs and incentives. 2. Compare a detailed project plan. 3. Make a financing and contracting decision. 4. Execute the project plan including financing, installation, and operation. The simplest procurement method is designated funding for the outright purchase of the fuel cell CHP system, although this is usually not the most cost-effective option. This guide describes the following financing options: Power purchase agreement Energy savings performance contract Utility energy services contract Enhanced use lease Fuel cell CHP technology can help federal facility managers comply with agency objectives for reducing energy consumption and air pollution emissions. Fuel cells do not generate particulate pollutants, unburned hydrocarbons or the gases that produce acid rain. Fuel cells emit less carbon dioxide (CO2) than other, less efficient technologies and use of renewable fuels can make them carbon neutral. Fuel cell CHP technology can deliver reliable electricity and heat with high efficiency (70% to 85%) in a small physical footprint with little noise, making it a cost-effective option for federal facilities.

  17. Fifth annual report to congress. Federal alternative motor fuels programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    This report presents the status of the US Department of Energy`s alternative fuel vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs being conducted in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act. These programs comprise the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative transportation fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The report summarizes tests and results from the fifth year. Electric vehicles are not included in these programs, and the annual report does not include information on them. Since the inception of the programs, great strides have been made in developing commercially viable alternative fuel vehicle technologies. However, as is the case in the commercialization of all new technologies, some performance problems have been experienced on vehicles involved in early demonstration efforts. Substantial improvements have been recorded in vehicle practicality, safety, and performance in real-world demonstrations. An aspect of particular interest is emissions output. Results from light duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated superior inservice emissions performance. Heavy duty alternative fuel vehicles have demonstrated dramatic reductions in particulate emissions. However, emissions results from vehicles converted to run on alternative fuel have not been as promising. Although the technologies available today are commercially viable in some markets, further improvements in infrastructure and economics will result in greater market expansion. Information is included in this report on light and heavy duty vehicles, transit buses, vehicle conversions, safety, infrastructure support, vehicle availability, and information dissemination.

  18. FY17 SBIR Phase I Release 1 Topics Announced: Includes Fuel Cell...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The fuel cell subtopic includes novel, durable supports for low-platinum group metal (PGM) catalysts for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The hydrogen delivery ...

  19. Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Decision Makers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers Federal Facilities Guide to Fuel Cells May 8, 2012 - Outline * Distributed Generation and Fuel Cell Power Overview (Pete Devlin 1 ) * How Does a Fuel Cell Work (Jacob Spendelow 2 ) * Guide Summary - How FC CHP can help Federal Facilities (Pete Devlin 1 ) - Third Party Financing (Greg Moreland 3 ) - Project Screening (Joe McGervey 3 ) - Detailed Planning (Joe McGervey 3 ) - Model (Michael Penev 4 ) - Project

  20. Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-05-17

    The Order establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Cancels DOE O 440.1A. Certified 6/17/2011. Canceled by DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

  1. FY17 SBIR Phase I Release 1 FOA Released: Includes Fuel Cell...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FY17 SBIR Phase I Release 1 FOA Released: Includes Fuel Cell Catalysts and Hydrogen Delivery FY17 SBIR Phase I Release 1 FOA Released: Includes Fuel Cell Catalysts and Hydrogen ...

  2. Federal Fuel Cell Tax Incentives: An Investment in Clean and Efficient

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies | Department of Energy Fuel Cell Tax Incentives: An Investment in Clean and Efficient Technologies Federal Fuel Cell Tax Incentives: An Investment in Clean and Efficient Technologies A brief created by the US Fuel Cell Council that covers federal fuel cell tax incentives 200810_itc.pdf (126.3 KB) More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Financing for Tax-Exempt Entities Fuel Cell Tax Incentives: How Monetization Lowers the Government Outlay ITC Role in U.S. Fuel Cell Projects

  3. Webinar: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility Decision Makers | Department of Energy Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers Webinar: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers," originally presented on May 8, 2012. In addition to this text version of the audio, you can access the

  4. NNSS Alternative Fuel Vehicle Management Program receives federal...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    award. The NNSS increased its renewable fuel use by 195 percent from its 2005 ... of E-85. This significant increase in renewable fuel use effectively supports the ...

  5. SBIR/STTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells SBIR/STTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells October 31, 2014 - 12:05pm Addthis The 2015 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I Release 2 topics have been released and include two hydrogen and fuel cell related topics: fuel cell-battery electric hybrid trucks and in-line quality control devices for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel

  6. Federal Fuel Cell Tax Incentives: An Investment in Clean and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon 200810itc.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Financing for Tax-Exempt Entities Fuel Cell Tax Incentives: How Monetization Lowers the Government Outlay ITC Role ...

  7. Fourth annual report to Congress, Federal Alternative Motor Fuels Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    This annual report to Congress presents the current status of the alternative fuel vehicle programs being conducted across the country in accordance with the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. These programs, which represent the most comprehensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative fuels, are beginning their fifth year. This report summarizes tests and results from the fourth year.

  8. Guidance: Requirements for Installing Renewable Fuel Pumps at Federal Fleet Fueling Centers under EISA Section 246: Federal Fleet Program, Federal Energy Management Program, U.S. Department of Energy, March 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-03-01

    On December 19, 2007, the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA) was signed into law as Public Law 110-140. Section 246(a) of EISA directs Federal agencies to install at least one renewable fuel pump at each Federal fleet fueling center under their jurisdiction by January 1, 2010. Section 246(b) requires the President to submit an annual report to Congress on Federal agency progress in meeting this renewable fuel pump installation mandate. This guidance document provides guidelines to help agencies understand these requirements and how to comply with EISA Section 246.

  9. Fuel Cell Meeting Agenda: Matching Federal Government Needs with...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This agenda provides information about the Fuel Cell Meeting on April 26, 2007 in Washington, DC. fuelcellmtngagenda.pdf (108.15 KB) More Documents & Publications Draft Agenda ...

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Federal Laws and Incentives for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... This partnership is designed to reduce greenhouse gases and air pollution by accelerating the adoption of advanced technologies and operational practices which increase fuel ...

  11. Executive Order 13031-Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Executive Order 12969-Federal Acquisition and Community RightTo-Know EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL ...

  12. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This paper was prepared in response to recent requests that the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) provide updated summary information regarding fossil fuel production on federal and...

  13. SBIR/STTR FY16 Phase 1 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Four for Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cell Membrane Development | Department of Energy 6 Phase 1 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Four for Fuel Cell Membrane Development SBIR/STTR FY16 Phase 1 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Four for Fuel Cell Membrane Development January 28, 2016 - 12:36pm Addthis The Energy Department has announced the 2016 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I Release 1 Awards, including four projects focused on durable and inexpensive polymer

  14. FY17 SBIR Phase I Release 1 Topics Announced: Includes Fuel Cell Catalysts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Hydrogen Delivery | Department of Energy FY17 SBIR Phase I Release 1 Topics Announced: Includes Fuel Cell Catalysts and Hydrogen Delivery FY17 SBIR Phase I Release 1 Topics Announced: Includes Fuel Cell Catalysts and Hydrogen Delivery July 21, 2016 - 1:22pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has announced the 2017 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I Release 1 topics, including two subtopics focused on hydrogen and fuel

  15. Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner 22nd Operations Group Fuel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency Office | Department of Energy 22nd Operations Group Fuel Efficiency Office Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner 22nd Operations Group Fuel Efficiency Office fewm13_mcconnellafb_highres.pdf (4.97 MB) fewm13_mcconnellafb.pdf (2.03 MB) More Documents & Publications Air Force Achieves Fuel Efficiency through Industry Best Practices Potential for the Use of Energy Savings Performance Contracts to Reduce Energy Consumption and Provide Energy and Cost Savings in

  16. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Map Appendix State/area maps Figure A1. Fossil fuel production on federal and Indian lands, FY 2014 Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration based on U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Natural Resources Revenue. "ONNR Statistical Information Site" (http://statistics.onrr.gov). July 2015 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014 24 Figure A2. Changes in fossil fuels production (trillion

  17. AMO Issues Request for Information on Clean Energy Manufacturing Topics, Including Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The AMO seeks information on mid-Technology Readiness Level R&D needs, market challenges, supply chain challenges, and shared facility needs addressing clean energy manufacturing topics, including the fuel cell and hydrogen sectors.

  18. SBIR/STTR FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel Cell Catalyst and Hydrogen Contamination Detection R&D SBIR... DOE's key hydrogen objectives are to reduce the cost of producing and ...

  19. Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-05-17

    The Order establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing DOE and NNSA Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Chg 1 dated 8-21-12. Cancels DOE M 440.1-1A. Admin Chg 1, dated 3-14-13.

  20. Worker Protection Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-05-17

    The Order establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent injuries, illnesses, and accidental losses by providing DOE and NNSA Federal workers with a safe and healthful workplace. Supersedes DOE O 440.1B Chg 1.

  1. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014 July 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014 i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data,

  2. Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Federal Test Procedure Emissions Test Results from Ethanol Variable-Fuel Vehicle Chevrolet Luminas Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy,

  3. Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers OCTOBER 2011 Fuel Cell Technologies Program Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2 October 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

  4. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 Table 3. Sales of crude oil and lease condensate production from federal and Indian lands, FY 2003-14 million barrels Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Onshore federal excludes volumes on Indian lands. Offshore federal only includes areas in federal waters. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration based on U.S. Department of the Interior, Office of Natural Resources Revenue. "ONNR Statistical Information Site"

  5. Bootstrapping a Sustainable North American PEM Fuel Cell Industry: Could a Federal Acquisition Program Make a Difference?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Duleep, Dr. K. G.

    2008-10-01

    , visits to two production facilities, review of the literature on potential markets in North America and potential federal government procurements, development of a cost model reflecting economies of scale and learning-by-doing, and estimation of the impact of federal PEM fuel cell procurements on fuel cell system costs and the evolution of private market demand. This report presents the findings of that study. Section 2 outlines the status of the industry and describes potential markets based on interviews of manufacturers and the existing literature. Section 3 describes the modeling methodology including key premises and assumptions, and presents estimates of market evolution under four scenarios: (1) Base Case with no federal government procurement program, (2) Scenario 1, an aggressive program beginning with less than 200 units procured in 2008 ramping up to more than 2,000 units in 2012, (3) Scenario 2 which is identical to Scenario 1 except that the private market is assumed to be twice as sensitive to price, and (4) Scenario 3, a delayed, smaller federal procurement program beginning in 2011 increasing to a maximum of just over 1,000 units per year in 2012. The analysis suggests that the aggressive program of Scenario 1 would likely stimulate a sustainable, competitive North American non-automotive PEM fuel cell industry. Given plausible assumptions about learning rates and scale economies, the procurements assumed in Scenario 1 appear to be sufficient to drive down costs to target levels. These findings are conditional on the evolution of acceptable hydrogen supply strategies, which were not explicitly analyzed in this study. Success is less certain under Scenarios 2 and 3, and there appears to be a strong probability that existing OEMs would not survive until 2011. In the Base Case, no program, a viable North American industry does not emerge before 2020.

  6. Alternative fuel vehicles for the Federal fleet: Results of the 5-year planning process. Executive Order 12759, Section 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    This report describes five-year plans for acquisition of alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) by the Federal agencies. These plans will be used to encourage Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) to expand the variety of AFVs produced, reduce the incremental cost of AFVs, and to encourage fuel suppliers to expand the alternative fuel infrastructure and alternative fuel availability. This effort supplements and extends the demonstration and testing of AFVs established by the Department of Energy under the alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988.

  7. Analysis of advanced european nuclear fuel cycle scenarios including transmutation and economical estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merino Rodriguez, I.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Martin-Fuertes, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this work the transition from the existing Light Water Reactors (LWR) to the advanced reactors is analyzed, including Generation III+ reactors in a European framework. Four European fuel cycle scenarios involving transmutation options have been addressed. The first scenario (i.e., reference) is the current fleet using LWR technology and open fuel cycle. The second scenario assumes a full replacement of the initial fleet with Fast Reactors (FR) burning U-Pu MOX fuel. The third scenario is a modification of the second one introducing Minor Actinide (MA) transmutation in a fraction of the FR fleet. Finally, in the fourth scenario, the LWR fleet is replaced using FR with MOX fuel as well as Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) for MA transmutation. All scenarios consider an intermediate period of GEN-III+ LWR deployment and they extend for a period of 200 years looking for equilibrium mass flows. The simulations were made using the TR-EVOL code, a tool for fuel cycle studies developed by CIEMAT. The results reveal that all scenarios are feasible according to nuclear resources demand (U and Pu). Concerning to no transmutation cases, the second scenario reduces considerably the Pu inventory in repositories compared to the reference scenario, although the MA inventory increases. The transmutation scenarios show that elimination of the LWR MA legacy requires on one hand a maximum of 33% fraction (i.e., a peak value of 26 FR units) of the FR fleet dedicated to transmutation (MA in MOX fuel, homogeneous transmutation). On the other hand a maximum number of ADS plants accounting for 5% of electricity generation are predicted in the fourth scenario (i.e., 35 ADS units). Regarding the economic analysis, the estimations show an increase of LCOE (Levelized cost of electricity) - averaged over the whole period - with respect to the reference scenario of 21% and 29% for FR and FR with transmutation scenarios respectively, and 34% for the fourth scenario. (authors)

  8. SBIR/STTR Phase I Release 2 Technical Topics Announced for FY14 Fuel Cell Topics Included

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Phase I Release 2 technical topics include prototype fuel cell-battery electric hybrid trucks for waste transportation and novel membranes and non-platinum group metal catalysts for direct methanol as well as hydrogen fuel cells.

  9. Hydraulically actuated fuel injector including a pilot operated spool valve assembly and hydraulic system using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shafer, Scott F.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to hydraulic systems including hydraulically actuated fuel injectors that have a pilot operated spool valve assembly. One class of hydraulically actuated fuel injectors includes a solenoid driven pilot valve that controls the initiation of the injection event. However, during cold start conditions, hydraulic fluid, typically engine lubricating oil, is particularly viscous and is often difficult to displace through the relatively small drain path that is defined past the pilot valve member. Because the spool valve typically responds slower than expected during cold start due to the difficulty in displacing the relatively viscous oil, accurate start of injection timing can be difficult to achieve. There also exists a greater difficulty in reaching the higher end of the cold operating speed range. Therefore, the present invention utilizes a fluid evacuation valve to aid in displacement of the relatively viscous oil during cold start conditions.

  10. SBIR/STTR Release 2 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and in-line quality control devices for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. ... for PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assembly (MEA) component manufacturing processes. ...

  11. SBIR/STTR FY15 Phase 1 Release 2 Awards Announced-Includes Fuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    measurement of fuel cell membrane thickness. US Hybrid Corporation of Torrance, California, will develop and demonstrate polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell-battery ...

  12. A STUDY OF THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN FEDERAL AND STATE MEASUREMENTS OF ON-HIGHWAY FUEL CONSUMPTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, HL

    2003-08-11

    Annual highway fuel taxes are collected by the Treasury Department and placed in the Highway Trust Fund (HTF). There is, however, no direct connection between the taxes collected by the Treasury Department and the gallons of on-highway fuel use, which can lead to a discrepancy between these totals. This study was conducted to determine how much of a discrepancy exists between the total fuel usages estimated based on highway revenue funds as reported by the Treasury Department and the total fuel usages used in the apportionment of the HTF to the States. The analysis was conducted using data from Highway Statistics Tables MF-27 and FE-9 for the years 1991-2001. It was found that the overall discrepancy is relatively small, mostly within 5% difference. The amount of the discrepancy varies from year to year and varies among the three fuel types (gasoline, gasohol, special fuels). Several potential explanations for these discrepancies were identified, including issues on data, tax measurement, gallon measurement, HTF receipts, and timing. Data anomalies caused by outside forces, such as deferment of tax payments from one fiscal year to the next, can skew fuel tax data. Fuel tax evasion can lead to differences between actual fuel use and fuel taxes collected. Furthermore, differences in data collection and reporting among States can impact fuel use data. Refunds, credits, and transfers from the HTF can impact the total fuel tax receipt data. Timing issues, such as calendar year vs. fiscal year, can also cause some discrepancy between the two data sources.

  13. Zirconium-based alloys, nuclear fuel rods and nuclear reactors including such alloys, and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mariani, Robert Dominick

    2014-09-09

    Zirconium-based metal alloy compositions comprise zirconium, a first additive in which the permeability of hydrogen decreases with increasing temperatures at least over a temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C., and a second additive having a solubility in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. At least one of a solubility of the first additive in the second additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. and a solubility of the second additive in the first additive over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. is higher than the solubility of the second additive in zirconium over the temperature range extending from 350.degree. C. to 750.degree. C. Nuclear fuel rods include a cladding material comprising such metal alloy compositions, and nuclear reactors include such fuel rods. Methods are used to fabricate such zirconium-based metal alloy compositions.

  14. Decision-maker's guide to wood fuel for small industrial energy users. Final report. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levi, M. P.; O'Grady, M. J.

    1980-02-01

    The technology and economics of various wood energy systems available to the small industrial and commercial energy user are considered. This book is designed to help a plant manager, engineer, or others in a decision-making role to become more familiar with wood fuel systems and make informed decisions about switching to wood as a fuel. The following subjects are discussed: wood combustion, pelletized wood, fuel storage, fuel handling and preparation, combustion equipment, retrofitting fossil-fueled boilers, cogeneration, pollution abatement, and economic considerations of wood fuel use. (MHR)

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuels Tax Exemption and Refund for Government Fleet Vehicles State excise tax does not apply to special fuels, including gaseous special fuels, when used in state or federal government owned vehicles. Special fuels include compressed and liquefied natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane), hydrogen, and fuel suitable for use in diesel engines. In addition, state excise tax paid on special fuels used in state or federal government vehicles is subject to a refund, as long as the tax was

  16. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Table 1. Fossil fuel sales of production from federal lands, FY 2003-14 Fiscal Year Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Natural Gas Plant Liquids 2 Natural Gas Coal Fossil Fuels Million Barrels 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Million Barrels 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Billion Cubic Feet 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Million Short Tons 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total 2003 679 3,939 33.0% 93 347 14.7% 6,798 6,981 35.7% 436 8,960 40.6%

  17. Neutronics Benchmarks for the Utilization of Mixed-Oxide Fuel: Joint US/Russian Progress Report for Fiscal 1997. Volume 3 - Calculations Performed in the Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    This volume of the progress report provides documentation of reactor physics and criticality safety studies conducted in the Russian Federation during fiscal year 1997 and sponsored by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program of the US Department of Energy. Descriptions of computational and experimental benchmarks for the verification and validation of computer programs for neutron physics analyses are included. All benchmarks include either plutonium, uranium, or mixed uranium and plutonium fuels. Calculated physics parameters are reported for all of the contaminated benchmarks that the United States and Russia mutually agreed in November 1996 were applicable to mixed-oxide fuel cycles for light-water reactors.

  18. SBIR/STTR FY15 Phase 1 Release 2 Awards Announced—Includes Fuel Cell-Battery Electric Hybrid Truck and Fuel Cell Manufacturing Quality Control Processes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I Release 2 Awards, including projects demonstrating fuel cell-battery electric hybrid trucks and developing a real-time, in-line optical detector for the measurement of fuel cell membrane thickness.

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Search Federal State Local Examples Summary Tables Key Federal Legislation The information below includes a brief chronology and

  20. Performance of Trasuranic-Loaded Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel in LWRs Interim Report, Including Void Reactivity Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; Brian Boer; Gilles Youinou; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2011-03-01

    The current focus of the Deep Burn Project is on once-through burning of transuranice (TRU) in light water reactors (LWRs). The fuel form is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle design from high-temperature reactor technology. In the Deep Burn LWR (DB-LWR) concept, these fuel particles would be pressed into compacts using SiC matrix material and loaded into fuel pins for use in conventional LWRs. The TRU loading comes from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Unit cell calculations have been performed using the DRAGON-4 code in order assess the physics attributes of TRU-only FCM fuel in an LWR lattice. Depletion calculations assuming an infinite lattice condition were performed with calculations of various reactivity coefficients performed at each step. Unit cells containing typical UO2 and MOX fuel were analyzed in the same way to provide a baseline against which to compare the TRU-only FCM fuel. Loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into a pin without significant quantities of uranium challenges the design from the standpoint of several key reactivity parameters, particularly void reactivity, and to some degree, the Doppler coefficient. These unit cells, while providing an indication of how a whole core of similar fuel would behave, also provide information of how individual pins of TRU-only FCM fuel would influence the reactivity behavior of a heterogeneous assembly. If these FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly with LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance of the TRU-only FCM fuel pins may be preserved. A configuration such as this would be similar to CONFU assemblies analyzed in previous studies. Analogous to the plutonium content limits imposed on MOX fuel, some amount of TRU-only FCM pins in an otherwise-uranium fuel assembly may give acceptable reactivity

  1. Energy Department Announces Advanced Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Technologies Funding Opportunity, Includes Alternative Fuels Workplace Safety Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz announced more than $55 million in funding for vehicle technology advancements while touring the newest vehicle technologies at the Washington Auto Show last week. One specific topic is focused on the development of alternative fuel vehicle workplace safety programs.

  2. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 Table 7. Sales of fossil fuel production from federal and Indian lands by state/area, FY 2003-14 trillion Btu State 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Alabama 75 57 51 47 40 42 60 88 86 71 46 29 Alaska 61 66 68 52 32 28 27 23 21 19 18 21 Arizona 258 273 280 193 180 162 157 154 164 163 167 158 Arkansas 7 8 10 10 10 11 15 18 14 13 11 11 California 141 125 124 139 146 129 116 115 121 125 121 119 Colorado 785 842 960 906 905 931 846 868 917 952 875 877 Florida 0 - - - - -

  3. Worker Safety and Health Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal and Contractor Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-10-20

    This document was developed to assist the Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) Federal and contractor employees in effectively developing, managing, and implementing a worker safety and health program. Supersedes DOE G 440.1-1A and DOE G 440.1-8.

  4. Worker Safety and Health Program for DOE (Including the National Nuclear Security Administration) Federal and Contractor Employees

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-10-20

    This document was developed to assist the Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) Federal and contractor employees in effectively developing, managing, and implementing a worker safety and health program. Cancels DOE G 440.1-1A and DOE G 440.1-8. Adm Chg 1, dated 3-22-13.

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Definition and Specifications Alternative fuels include biofuel, ethanol, methanol, hydrogen, coal-derived liquid fuels, electricity, natural gas, propane gas, or a synthetic transportation fuel. Biofuel is defined as a renewable, biodegradable, combustible liquid or gaseous fuel derived from biomass or other renewable resources that can be used as transportation fuel, combustion fuel, or refinery feedstock and that meets ASTM specifications and federal quality requirements for

  6. SBIR/STTR Phase I Release 1 Award Winners Announced, Includes Four Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced the FY 2014 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I Release 1 award winners, including four hydrogen and fuel cell projects in Arizona, Massachusetts, and South Carolina.

  7. SBIR/STTR Phase II Release 1 Award Winners Announced, Includes Two Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) recently announced the FY 2014 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase II Release 1 award winners, including two hydrogen and fuel cell projects in Colorado and New Jersey.

  8. Planning, Preparation, and Transport of the High-Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from the Czech Republic to the Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Tyacke; I. Bolshinsky; Frantisek Svitak

    2007-10-01

    The United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have been working together on a program called the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program, which is part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative. The purpose of this program is to return Soviet or Russian-supplied high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel, currently stored at Russian-designed research reactors throughout the world, to Russia. In February 2003, the RRRFR Program began discussions with the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) in Rež, Czech Republic, about returning their HEU spent nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation for reprocessing. In March 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy signed a contract with NRI to perform all activities needed for transporting their HEU spent nuclear fuel to Russia. After 2 years of intense planning, preparations, and coordination at NRI and with three other countries, numerous organizations and agencies, and a Russian facility, this shipment is scheduled for completion before the end of 2007. This paper will provide a summary of activities completed for making this international shipment. This paper contains an introduction and background of the RRRFR Program and the NRI shipment project. It summarizes activities completed in preparation for the shipment, including facility preparations at NRI in Rež and FSUE “Mayak” in Ozyorsk, Russia; a new transportation cask system; regulatory approvals; transportation planning and preparation in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation though completion of the Unified Project and Special Ecological Programs. The paper also describes fuel loading and cask preparations at NRI and final preparations/approvals for transporting the shipment across the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation to FSUE Mayak where the HEU spent nuclear fuel will be processed, the uranium will be downblended and made into low-enriched uranium fuel for commercial reactor

  9. Integrated capture of fossil fuel gas pollutants including CO.sub.2 with energy recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ochs, Thomas L.; Summers, Cathy A.; Gerdemann, Steve; Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Turner, Paul; Patrick, Brian R.

    2011-10-18

    A method of reducing pollutants exhausted into the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. The disclosed process removes nitrogen from air for combustion, separates the solid combustion products from the gases and vapors and can capture the entire vapor/gas stream for sequestration leaving near-zero emissions. The invention produces up to three captured material streams. The first stream is contaminant-laden water containing SO.sub.x, residual NO.sub.x particulates and particulate-bound Hg and other trace contaminants. The second stream can be a low-volume flue gas stream containing N.sub.2 and O.sub.2 if CO2 purification is needed. The final product stream is a mixture comprising predominantly CO.sub.2 with smaller amounts of H.sub.2O, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, SO.sub.X, NO.sub.X, Hg, and other trace gases.

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Federal Fleets Under the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992, 75% of new light-duty vehicles acquired by covered federal fleets must be alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs). As amended in January 2008, Section 301 of EPAct 1992 defines AFVs to include hybrid electric vehicles, fuel cell vehicles, and advanced lean burn vehicles. Fleets that use fuel blends containing at least 20% biodiesel (B20) may earn credits toward their annual requirements. Federal fleets are also required to use alternative

  11. Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This step-by-step manual guides readers through the process of implementing a fuel cell stationary power project. The guide outlines the basics of fuel cell technology and describes how fuel cell projects can meet on-site energy service needs as well as support strategic agency objectives and sustainability requirements. This guide will help agencies decide whether a fuel cell project may be feasible and economically viable at their site. The guide then presents a four-part process for implementing a fuel cell project.

  12. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 Table 5. Sales of natural gas plant liquids production from federal and Indian lands, FY 2003-14 million barrels Fiscal Year Offshore Federal Onshore Federal Total Federal Indian Lands 2003 51 42 93 2 2004 62 41 104 2 2005 56 40 96 2 2006 46 39 85 2 2007 59 44 103 3 2008 53 50 103 3 2009 45 47 93 3 2010 58 73 131 3 2011 52 79 131 3 2012 45 85 130 4 2013 45 63 108 4 2014 48 69 117 4 Notes: Totals may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding. Onshore federal excludes volumes

  13. FY17 SBIR Phase I Release 1 FOA Released: Includes Fuel Cell Catalysts and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL OPENING GUIDANCE | Department of Energy 6 SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (SES) AND SENIOR PROFESSIONAL (SP) PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL OPENING GUIDANCE FY 2016 SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE (SES) AND SENIOR PROFESSIONAL (SP) PERFORMANCE APPRAISAL OPENING GUIDANCE FY 2016 performance appraisal cycle for both SES and SP members, which includes Senior Level (SL) and Scientific or Professional (ST) employees, concludes on December 15, 2015. These documents provide a detailed overview of

  14. Electrolytic/fuel cell bundles and systems including a current collector in communication with an electrode thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawkes, Grant L.; Herring, James S.; Stoots, Carl M.; O& #x27; Brien, James E.

    2013-03-05

    Electrolytic/fuel cell bundles and systems including such bundles include an electrically conductive current collector in communication with an anode or a cathode of each of a plurality of cells. A cross-sectional area of the current collector may vary in a direction generally parallel to a general direction of current flow through the current collector. The current collector may include a porous monolithic structure. At least one cell of the plurality of cells may include a current collector that surrounds an outer electrode of the cell and has at least six substantially planar exterior surfaces. The planar surfaces may extend along a length of the cell, and may abut against a substantially planar surface of a current collector of an adjacent cell. Methods for generating electricity and for performing electrolysis include flowing current through a conductive current collector having a varying cross-sectional area.

  15. Federal Alternative Motor Fuels Programs Fifth Annual Report to Congress - 1996

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Abstract This annual report to Congress presents the current status of the U.S. Department of Energy's alterna- tive fuel vehicle demonstration and performance tracking programs being conducted across the country in accordance with the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (42 U.S.C. 6374, et seq.). These programs, which comprise the most compre- hensive data collection effort ever undertaken on alternative transporta- tion fuels and alternative fuel vehi- cles, are beginning their sixth year. This

  16. Acceptance of spent nuclear fuel in multiple element sealed canisters by the Federal Waste Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    This report is one of a series of eight prepared by E.R. Johnson Associates, Inc. (JAI) under ORNL's contract with DOE's OCRWM Systems Integration Program and in support of the Annual Capacity Report (ACR) Issue Resolution Process. The report topics relate specifically to the list of high priority technical waste acceptance issues developed jointly by DOE and a utility-working group. JAI performed various analyses and studies on each topic to serve as starting points for further discussion and analysis leading eventually to finalizing the process by which DOE will accept spent fuel and waste into its waste management system. The eight reports are concerned with the conditions under which spent fuel and high level waste will be accepted in the following categories: (1) failed fuel; (2) consolidated fuel and associated structural parts; (3) non-fuel-assembly hardware; (4) fuel in metal storage casks; (5) fuel in multi-element sealed canisters; (6) inspection and testing requirements for wastes; (7) canister criteria; (8) spent fuel selection for delivery; and (9) defense and commercial high-level waste packages. 14 refs., 27 figs.

  17. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas

  18. Policy implications of a shift in Federal synthetic-fuel-demonstration responsibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeGassie, R W.A.

    1981-03-26

    The President's intention to shift the focus of synthetic fuels demonstration activities from DOE to the Synthetic Fuels Corporation (SFC) is discussed. The Demonstration Plant Program is described. The realignment will impact the organization, activities and mandate of the SFC. It will also impact the continuity of demonstration program efforts presently underway. Present contractual agreements between the government and industrial participants in synfuel development are described. Differences between DOE and SFC in project selection criteria, funding, priorities and restrictions is outlined. Legislative changes are not required to shift the demonstration responsibility to the Synthetic Fuels Corporation. (DMC)

  19. What Has the Federal Renewable Fuels Standard Accomplished - A National Perspective (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwab, A.

    2013-04-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the nation's biofuels industry accomplishments and a perspective on the challenges and implications of reaching goals set in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

  20. Federal Fuels Taxes and Tax Credits (Update) (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    The Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO) reference case incorporates current regulations that pertain to the energy industry. This section describes the handling of federal taxes and tax credits in AEO2008, focusing primarily on areas where regulations have changed or the handling of taxes or tax credits has been updated.

  1. Performance of Transuranic-Loaded Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel in LWRs Final Report, Including Void Reactivity Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou

    2011-09-01

    The current focus of the Deep Burn Project is on once-through burning of transuranics (TRU) in light-water reactors (LWRs). The fuel form is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle design from high-temperature reactor technology. In the Deep Burn LWR (DB-LWR) concept, these fuel particles are pressed into compacts using SiC matrix material and loaded into fuel pins for use in conventional LWRs. The TRU loading comes from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Unit cell and assembly calculations have been performed using the DRAGON-4 code to assess the physics attributes of TRU-only FCM fuel in an LWR lattice. Depletion calculations assuming an infinite lattice condition were performed with calculations of various reactivity coefficients performed at each step. Unit cells and assemblies containing typical UO2 and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel were analyzed in the same way to provide a baseline against which to compare the TRU-only FCM fuel. Then, assembly calculations were performed evaluating the performance of heterogeneous arrangements of TRU-only FCM fuel pins along with UO2 pins.

  2. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Table 2. Fossil fuel sales of production from Indian lands, FY 2003-14 Fiscal Year Crude Oil and Lease Condensate Natural Gas Plant Liquids 2 Natural Gas Coal Fossil Fuels Million Barrels 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Million Barrels 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Billion Cubic Feet 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Million Short Tons 1 Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total Trillion Btu Percent of U.S. Total 2003 10 59 0.5% 2 6 0.3% 283 291 1.5% 30 616 2.8% 972 1.7% 2004 10 58

  3. Refueling Behavior of Flexible Fuel Vehicle Drivers in the Federal Fleet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Refiners Switch to Reformulated Gasoline Complex Model Contents * Summary * Introduction o Table 1. Comparison of Simple Model and Complex Model RFG Per Gallon Requirements * Statutory, Individual Refinery, and Compliance Baselines o Table 2. Statutory Baseline Fuel Compositions * Simple Model * Complex Model o Table 3. Complex Model Variables * Endnotes Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * RFG Simple and Complex Model Spreadsheets * Areas Particpating in the Reformulated Gasoline

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Developing Kinetic Mechanisms for New Fuels and Biofuels, Including CFD Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and vehicle technologies office annual merit review and peer evaluation meeting about...

  5. Fuel cell system including a unit for electrical isolation of a fuel cell stack from a manifold assembly and method therefor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley; Dana A. , Farooque; Mohammad , Davis; Keith

    2007-10-02

    A fuel cell system with improved electrical isolation having a fuel cell stack with a positive potential end and a negative potential, a manifold for use in coupling gases to and from a face of the fuel cell stack, an electrical isolating assembly for electrically isolating the manifold from the stack, and a unit for adjusting an electrical potential of the manifold such as to impede the flow of electrolyte from the stack across the isolating assembly.

  6. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 Table 10. Sales of natural gas plant liquids production from federal and Indian lands by state/area, FY 2003-14 million barrels State 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Alabama 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - - 0 Arizona - - - - - - 0 0 0 0 - - Arkansas - - - - - - - - - - - - California 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Colorado 1 1 1 1 1 3 5 8 9 11 6 7 Florida - - - - - - - - - - - - Illinois - - - - - - - - - - - - Indiana - - - - - - - - - - - - Kansas 0 0

  7. Successful Completion of the Largest Shipment of Russian Research Reactor High-Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Czech Republic to Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Tyacke; Dr. Igor Bolshinsky; Jeff Chamberlin

    2008-07-01

    On December 8, 2007, the largest shipment of high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel was successfully made from a Russian-designed nuclear research reactor in the Czech Republic to the Russian Federation. This accomplishment is the culmination of years of planning, negotiations, and hard work. The United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have been working together on the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program in support of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative. In February 2003, RRRFR Program representatives met with the Nuclear Research Institute in Rež, Czech Republic, and discussed the return of their high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation for reprocessing. Nearly 5 years later, the shipment was made. This paper discusses the planning, preparations, coordination, and cooperation required to make this important international shipment.

  8. Fuel cell integral bundle assembly including ceramic open end seal and vertical and horizontal thermal expansion control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zafred, Paolo R.; Gillett, James E.

    2012-04-24

    A plurality of integral bundle assemblies contain a top portion with an inlet fuel plenum and a bottom portion containing a base support, the base supports a dense, ceramic air exhaust manifold having four supporting legs, the manifold is below and connects to air feed tubes located in a recuperator zone, the air feed tubes passing into the center of inverted, tubular, elongated, hollow electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells having an open end above a combustion zone into which the air feed tubes pass and a closed end near the inlet fuel plenum, where the open end of the fuel cells rest upon and within a separate combination ceramic seal and bundle support contained in a ceramic support casting, where at least one flexible cushion ceramic band seal located between the recuperator and fuel cells protects and controls horizontal thermal expansion, and where the fuel cells operate in the fuel cell mode and where the base support and bottom ceramic air exhaust manifolds carry from 85% to all of the weight of the generator.

  9. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 Table 11. Sales of coal production from federal and Indian lands by state/area, FY 2003-14 million short tons State 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Alabama 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 3 3 2 1 0 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Arizona 13 13 14 9 9 8 8 8 8 8 8 8 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 California 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Colorado 22 22 25 22 22 23 18 19 19 19 17 17 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Illinois 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Indiana 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Kansas 0 0 0 0

  10. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 Table 8. Sales of crude oil and lease condensate production from federal and Indian lands by state/area, FY 2003-14 million barrels State 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Alabama 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Alaska 4 5 5 3 0 0 0 1 1 0 1 1 Arizona 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 California 23 21 21 23 24 21 19 19 19 19 19 19 Colorado 4 4 5 6 5 5 5 4 4 5 4 5 Florida 0 - - - - - - - - - - - Illinois 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Indiana 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  11. Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2014

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 Table 9. Sales of natural gas production from federal and Indian lands by state/area, FY 2003-14 billion cubic feet State 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 Alabama 71 53 48 44 36 34 30 32 27 20 21 20 Alaska 35 37 40 35 28 25 24 20 16 16 13 13 Arizona 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 - - Arkansas 7 8 9 10 10 10 15 18 14 12 11 10 California 6 5 5 7 7 7 7 7 10 13 8 8 Colorado 290 348 406 404 412 424 431 425 461 487 469 465 Florida - - - - - - - - - - - - Illinois - - - - - - - - - -

  12. Fuel Cell Transit Bus Evaluations: Joint Evaluation Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy and the Federal Transit Administration (Report and Appendix)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2010-11-01

    This document describes the fuel cell transit bus evaluations performed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Transit Administration (FTA). This document provides a description of the demonstration sites, funding sources, and data collection activities for fuel cell transit bus evaluations currently planned from FY10 through FY12.

  13. EA-1977: Acceptance and Disposition of Used Nuclear Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin Highly Enriched Uranium from the Federal Republic of Germany

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental assessment (EA) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to accept used nuclear fuel from the Federal Republic of Germany at DOEs Savannah River Site (SRS) for processing and disposition. This used nuclear fuel is composed of kernels containing thorium and U.S.-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) embedded in small graphite spheres that were irradiated in nuclear reactors used for research and development purposes.

  14. EA-1977: Acceptance and Disposition of Spent Nuclear Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin Highly Enriched Uranium from the Federal Republic of Germany

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This environmental assessment (EA) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to accept spent nuclear fuel from the Federal Republic of Germany at DOE’s Savannah River Site (SRS) for processing and disposition. This spent nuclear fuel is composed of kernels containing thorium and U.S.-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) embedded in small graphite spheres that were irradiated in nuclear reactors used for research and development purposes.

  15. Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

    2014-05-13

    A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

  16. Table 1.14 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced on Federal and American...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    These latter quantities are included with natural gas. 6Sales volumes are reported for the fiscal year in which the sales occurred as opposed to the date of the royalty payment. ...

  17. Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Market Transformation » Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects Find information about federal and state financial incentives for hydrogen fuel cell projects. Federal Incentives The Emergency Economic Stabilization Act of 2008 includes tax incentives to help minimize the cost of hydrogen and fuel cell projects. It offers an investment tax credit of 30% for qualified fuel cell property or $3,000/kW of the fuel

  18. Preparation for Testing, Safe Packing and Shipping of Spent Nuclear Fuel from IFIN-HH, Bucharest-Magurele to Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragolici, C.A.; Zorliu, A.; Popa, V.; Copaciu, V.; Dragusin, M.

    2007-07-01

    The Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) program is promoted by IAEA and DOE in order to repatriate of irradiated research reactor fuel originally supplied by Russia to facilities outside the country. Developed under the framework of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) the take-back program [1] common goal is to reduce both proliferation and security risks by eliminating or consolidating inventories of high-risk material. The main objective of this program is to support the return to Russian Federation of fresh or irradiated HEU and LEU fuel. Being part of this project, Romania is fulfilling its tasks by examining transport and transfer cask options, assessment of transport routes, and providing cost estimates for required equipment and facility modifications. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) testing, handling, packing and shipping are the most common interests on which the National Institute of Research and Development for Physics and Nuclear Engineering 'Horia Hulubei' (IFIN-HH) is focusing at the moment. (authors)

  19. SBIR/STTR FY15 Phase 2 Release 2 Awards Announced—Includes Projects to Increase Fuel Cell Performance and Durability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase II Release 2 Awards, including projects focused on fuel cell durability, performance, and efficiency with the ultimate goal of lowering costs.

  20. SBIR/STTR FY15 Release 1 Awards Announced—Includes Fuel Cell Catalyst and Hydrogen Contamination Detection R&D

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy has announced the 2015 Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer (SBIR/STTR) Phase I Release 1 Awards, including projects focusing on non-platinum catalysts for fuel cells and detection of contaminants in hydrogen.

  1. Sustainable Acquisition, Federal and Department of Energy Acquisition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Regulation Amendments | Department of Energy Sustainable Acquisition, Federal and Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation Amendments Sustainable Acquisition, Federal and Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation Amendments Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy and Economic Performance was issued October 5, 2009. Among its purposes were the promotion of sustainable acquisition, including energy, fuel, and water efficiency PF2011-08 Sustainable Acquisition,

  2. Guide to Federal Funding,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... in the United States (foreign ownership or sponsorship ... petroleum gas (propane), natural gas, or diesel fuel blends ... and to ensure that investments of Federal-aid funds in ...

  3. H.R. 5299: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to phase out the tax subsidies for alcohol fuels involving alcohol produced from feedstocks eligible to receive Federal agricultural subsidies. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Third Congress, Second Session, November 29, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-31

    The report H.R. 5299 is a bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to phase out the tax subsidies of alcohol fuels involving alcohol produced from feedstocks eligible to receive Federal agriculture subsidies. The proposed legislative text is included.

  4. Fossil and synthetic fuels: miscellaneous. Part 1. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Fossil and Synthetic Fuels of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session on Extension of IEA antitrust defense authorities, February 26, 1981, H. R. 2166, Department of Transportation authorization request, April 8, 1981, Gasohol usage in federal vehicles, July 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Part I of the hearing record covers testimony relating to the extension of antitrust defense availability to the International Energy Agency (IEA); an authorization request by the Department of Transportation (DOT) to comply with pipeline safety regulations; and the administration's reluctance to promote gasohol use in federal vehicles. The first day's hearing included discussion of H.R. 2166, which extended the IEA authority by amending the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, and the testimony of four witnesses representing federal agencies involved in international affairs. On the second day, three DOT witnesses described pipeline-safety programs, enforcement, and procedures, with emphasis on the transport of liquefied natural gas. On the third day, nine witnesses representing gasohol-producing states, the US Army Equipment Research and Development Command, federal fleet services, and DOE examined the appropriateness and compliance record of Executive Order 12261 mandating gasohol for federally owned or leased vehicles. At issue was the need to convert Midwest grains to fuel at a time when oil is plentiful, the performance of alcohol fuels, and the administration's preference for working through the marketplace. Additional material submitted for the record follows each day's testimony. (DCK)

  5. fuel

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4%2A en Cheaper catalyst may lower fuel costs for hydrogen-powered cars http:www.nnsa.energy.govblogcheaper-catalyst-may-lower-fuel-costs-hydrogen-powered-cars

  6. fuel

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4%2A en Cheaper catalyst may lower fuel costs for hydrogen-powered cars http:nnsa.energy.govblogcheaper-catalyst-may-lower-fuel-costs-hydrogen-powered-cars

  7. Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing ... Heavy Duty Fuels DISI Combustion HCCISCCI Fundamentals Spray Combustion Modeling ...

  8. Bootstrapping a Sustainable North American PEM Fuel Cell Industry: Could a Federal Acquisition Program Make a Difference?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The North American Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell industry may be at a critical juncture. A large-scale market for automotive fuel cells appears to be several years away and in any case will require a long-term, coordinated commitment by government and industry to insure the co-evolution of hydrogen infrastructure and fuel cell vehicles (Greene et al., 2008). The market for non-automotive PEM fuel cells, on the other hand, may be much closer to commercial viability (Stone, 2006). Cost targets are less demanding and manufacturers appear to be close, perhaps within a factor of two, of meeting them. Hydrogen supply is a significant obstacle to market acceptance but may not be as great a barrier as it is for hydrogen-powered vehicles due to the smaller quantities of hydrogen required.

  9. Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells Matching Federal Government Energy Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells This presentation by Keith ...

  10. Frequently Asked Questions: About Federal Fleet Management (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-10-01

    Answers to frequently asked questions about Federal fleet management, Federal requirements, reporting, advanced vehicles, and alternative fuels.

  11. Federal Energy Subsidies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Federal Energy Subsidies Jump to: navigation, search Does wind energy receive federal subsidies, and if so how much? Do other forms of energy receive subsidies? Do fossil fuels...

  12. Transportation Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuels DOE would invest $52 million to fund a major fleet transformation at Idaho National Laboratory, along with the installation of nine fuel management systems, purchase of additional flex fuel cars and one E85 ethanol fueling station. Transportation projects, such as the acquisition of highly efficient and alternative-fuel vehicles, are not authorized by ESPC legislation. DOE has twice proportion of medium vehicles and three times as many heavy vehicles as compared to the Federal agency

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Federal Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Search Federal State Local Examples Summary

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Incentives » Federal Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Search Federal State Local

  15. Preparation of the Second Shipment of Spent Nuclear Fuel from the Ustav Jaderneho Vyzkumu Rez (UJV Rez), a.s., Czech Republic to the Russian Federation for Reprocessing - 13478

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trtilek, Radek; Podlaha, Josef [UJV Rez, a. s., Hlavni 130, 25068 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)] [UJV Rez, a. s., Hlavni 130, 25068 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-01

    After more than 50 years of operation of the LVR-15 research reactor operated by the UJV Rez, a. s. (formerly Nuclear Research Institute - NRI), a large amount of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of Russian origin has been accumulated. In 2005 UJV Rez, a. s. jointed the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) program under the United States (US) - Russian Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) and started the process of SNF shipment from the LVR-15 research reactor back to the Russian Federation (RF). In 2007 the first shipment of SNF was realized. In 2011, preparation of the second shipment of spent fuel from the Czech Republic started. The experience obtained from the first shipment will be widely used, but some differences must be taken into the account. The second shipment will be realized in 2013 and will conclude the return transport of all, both fresh and spent, high-enriched nuclear fuel from the Czech Republic to the Russian Federation. After the shipment is completed, there will be only low-enriched nuclear fuel on the territory of the Czech Republic, containing maximum of 20% of U-235, which is the conventionally recognized limit between the low- and high-enriched nuclear materials. The experience (technical, organizational, administrative, logistic) obtained from the each SNF shipment as from the Czech Republic as from other countries using the Russian type research reactors are evaluated and projected onto preparation of next shipment of high enriched nuclear fuel back to the Russian Federation. The results shown all shipments provided by the UJV Rez, a. s. in the frame of the GTRI Program have been performed successfully and safely. It is expected the experience and results will be applied to preparation and completing of the Chinese Miniature Neutron Source Reactors (MNSR) Spent Nuclear Fuel Repatriation in the near future. (authors)

  16. Study concerning the utilization of the ocean spreading center environment for the conversion of biomass to a liquid fuel. (Includes Appendix A: hydrothermal petroleum genesis). [Supercritical water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steverson, M.; Stormberg, G.

    1985-01-01

    This document contains a report on the feasibility of utilizing energy obtained from ocean spreading centers as process heat for the conversion of municipal solid wastes to liquid fuels. The appendix contains a paper describing hydrothermal petroleum genesis. Both have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  17. Alternatives to traditional transportation fuels: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report presents the first compilation by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of information on alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuel. The purpose of the report is: (1) to provide background information on alternative transportation fuels and replacement fuels compared with gasoline and diesel fuel, and (2) to furnish preliminary estimates of alternative transportation fuels and alternative fueled vehicles as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), Title V, Section 503, ``Replacement Fuel Demand Estimates and Supply Information.`` Specifically, Section 503 requires the EIA to report annually on: (1) the number and type of alternative fueled vehicles in existence the previous year and expected to be in use the following year, (2) the geographic distribution of these vehicles, (3) the amounts and types of replacement fuels consumed, and (4) the greenhouse gas emissions likely to result from replacement fuel use. Alternative fueled vehicles are defined in this report as motorized vehicles licensed for on-road use, which may consume alternative transportation fuels. (Alternative fueled vehicles may use either an alternative transportation fuel or a replacement fuel.) The intended audience for the first section of this report includes the Secretary of Energy, the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the automobile manufacturing industry, the transportation fuel manufacturing and distribution industries, and the general public. The second section is designed primarily for persons desiring a more technical explanation of and background for the issues surrounding alternative transportation fuels.

  18. Analysis of the Relationship Between Vehicle Weight/Size and Safety, and Implications for Federal Fuel Economy Regulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenzel, Thomas P.

    2010-03-02

    This report analyzes the relationship between vehicle weight, size (wheelbase, track width, and their product, footprint), and safety, for individual vehicle makes and models. Vehicle weight and footprint are correlated with a correlation coefficient (R{sup 2}) of about 0.62. The relationship is stronger for cars (0.69) than for light trucks (0.42); light trucks include minivans, fullsize vans, truck-based SUVs, crossover SUVs, and pickup trucks. The correlation between wheelbase and track width, the components of footprint, is about 0.61 for all light vehicles, 0.62 for cars and 0.48 for light trucks. However, the footprint data used in this analysis does not vary for different versions of the same vehicle model, as curb weight does; the analysis could be improved with more precise data on footprint for different versions of the same vehicle model. Although US fatality risk to drivers (driver fatalities per million registered vehicles) decreases as vehicle footprint increases, there is very little correlation either for all light vehicles (0.01), or cars (0.07) or trucks (0.11). The correlation between footprint and fatality risks cars impose on drivers of other vehicles is also very low (0.01); for trucks the correlation is higher (0.30), with risk to others increasing as truck footprint increases. Fatality risks reported here do not account for differences in annual miles driven, driver age or gender, or crash location by vehicle type or model. It is difficult to account for these factors using data on national fatal crashes because the number of vehicles registered to, for instance, young males in urban areas is not readily available by vehicle type or model. State data on all police-reported crashes can be used to estimate casualty risks that account for miles driven, driver age and gender, and crash location. The number of vehicles involved in a crash can act as a proxy of the number of miles a given vehicle type, or model, is driven per year, and is a

  19. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Leggett, Robert D.; Baker, Ronald B.

    1989-10-03

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  20. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  1. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA); Leggett, Robert D. (Richland, WA); Baker, Ronald B. (Richland, WA)

    1989-01-01

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Local Examples Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Search Federal State Local Examples

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Search Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Search Federal State Local Examples Summary

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    About the Data Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Search Federal State Local Examples

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    State Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Search Federal State Local Examples Summary

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Search Federal State Local Examples

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Summary Tables Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Search Federal State Local Examples

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    State Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Search Federal State Local Examples Summary

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Search Federal State Local Examples

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Search Federal State Local Examples

  11. Federal Financial Interventions and Subsidies in Energy Markets 2007

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Lamar Alexander of Tennessee that the Energy Information Administration update its 1999 to 2000 work on federal energy subsidies, including any additions or deletions of federal subsidies based on Administration or Congressional action since 2000, and providing an estimate of the size of each current subsidy. Subsidies directed to electricity production are estimated on the basis of generation by fuel.

  12. Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner 22nd Operations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    22nd Operations Group Fuel Efficiency Office Federal Energy and Water Management Award Winner 22nd Operations Group Fuel Efficiency Office PDF icon fewm13mcconnellafbhighres.pdf ...

  13. Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, Federal Register, 75 FR 63404...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and ... More Documents & Publications Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New ...

  14. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 8 - June 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-10

    June 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  15. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 12 - November 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-12

    November 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  16. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 23- December 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-12-08

    December 2009 update of monthly news from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  17. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 5 - March 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-02

    March 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  18. Federal Fleet Files: Vol. , No. 1 - October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-04

    October 2009 issue of monthly news from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  19. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 1, No. 3 - July 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-07-24

    July 2009 issue of the monthly newsletter for the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  20. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 4 - January 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-05

    January 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  1. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 11 - October 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-10-19

    October 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  2. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 10 - September 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-07

    September 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  3. Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings Final Rule Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction ...

  4. Creating an Energy Awareness Campaign: A Handbook for Federal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal Energy Management Program handbook describes how federal energy manager can start and manage an energy awareness campaign to reduce energy, water, and fuel consumption in ...

  5. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 9 - July 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-06

    July 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  6. Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Green Building Certification Systems Requirement for New Federal Buildings and Major Renovations of Federal Buildings OIRA Comparison Document Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy ...

  7. PACKAGE INCLUDES:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PACKAGE INCLUDES: Airfare from Seattle, 4 & 5 Star Hotels, Transfers, Select Meals, Guided Tours and Excursions DAY 01: BANGKOK - ARRIVAL DAY 02: BANGKOK - SIGHTSEEING DAY 03: BANGKOK - FLOATING MARKET DAY 04: BANGKOK - AT LEISURE DAY 05: BANGKOK - CHIANG MAI BY AIR DAY 06: CHIANG MAI - SIGHTSEEING DAY 07: CHIANG MAI - ELEPHANT CAMP DAY 08: CHIANG MAI - PHUKET BY AIR DAY 09: PHUKET - PHI PHI ISLAND BY FERRY DAY 10: PHUKET - AT LEISURE DAY 11: PHUKET - CORAL ISLAND BY SPEEDBOAT DAY 12: PHUKET

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Definition AFVs include vehicles propelled to a significant extent by electricity from a battery that has a capacity of at least four kilowatt-hours and can be recharged from an external source and vehicles propelled solely by compressed natural gas, hydrogen, or propane and that meet or exceed Tier 2, Bin 2 federal exhaust emissions standards. (Reference Nevada Revised Statutes 484A.196 through 484A.197

  9. Industrial Fuel Flexibility Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-09-01

    On September 28, 2006, in Washington, DC, ITP and Booz Allen Hamilton conducted a fuel flexibility workshop with attendance from various stakeholder groups. Workshop participants included representatives from the petrochemical, refining, food and beverage, steel and metals, pulp and paper, cement and glass manufacturing industries; as well as representatives from industrial boiler manufacturers, technology providers, energy and waste service providers, the federal government and national laboratories, and developers and financiers.

  10. Webinar: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Decision Makers Webinar: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Decision Makers Download ...

  11. Webinar: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers Webinar: Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision ...

  12. WIPP Documents - Federal Regulations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Federal Regulations 40 CFR Part 191 Environmental radiation protection standards for management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel, high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes. 40 CFR Part 194 Criteria for the certification and re-certification of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant's compliance with the 40 CFR Part 191 disposal regulations.

  13. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Consumption and Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels, Electricity, and Natural Gas in FBSS Buildings in Federal Region 3, 1993 Sum of Sum of Major Major Electricity Natural...

  14. Federal / State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ethanol blends Federal State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for Introduction of E15 (2.81 MB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Certification Test Fuel and Ethanol ...

  15. Applying Section 404(r) of the Clean Water Act to Federal Projects Which Involve the Discharge of Dredged or Fill Materials into Waters of the U.S., Including Wetlands (CEQ, 1980)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Council on Environmental Quality memorandum establishes procedures for coordinating agency views and formulating Administration policy prior to requesting Congressional action on projects that may be subject to Section 404(r) of the Clean Water Act (Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended).

  16. Sipping fuel and saving lives: increasing fuel economy withoutsacrificing safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Deborah; Greene, David L.; Ross, Marc H.; Wenzel, Tom P.

    2007-06-11

    The public, automakers, and policymakers have long worried about trade-offs between increased fuel economy in motor vehicles and reduced safety. The conclusion of a broad group of experts on safety and fuel economy in the auto sector is that no trade-off is required. There are a wide variety of technologies and approaches available to advance vehicle fuel economy that have no effect on vehicle safety. Conversely, there are many technologies and approaches available to advance vehicle safety that are not detrimental to vehicle fuel economy. Congress is considering new policies to increase the fuel economy of new automobiles in order to reduce oil dependence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The findings reported here offer reassurance on an important dimension of that work: It is possible to significantly increase the fuel economy of motor vehicles without compromising their safety. Automobiles on the road today demonstrate that higher fuel economy and greater safety can co-exist. Some of the safest vehicles have higher fuel economy, while some of the least safe vehicles driven today--heavy, large trucks and SUVs--have the lowest fuel economy. At an October 3, 2006 workshop, leading researchers from national laboratories, academia, auto manufacturers, insurance research industry, consumer and environmental groups, material supply industries, and the federal government agreed that vehicles could be designed to simultaneously improve safety and fuel economy. The real question is not whether we can realize this goal, but the best path to get there. The experts' studies reveal important new conclusions about fuel economy and safety, including: (1) Vehicle fuel economy can be increased without affecting safety, and vice versa; (2) Reducing the weight and height of the heaviest SUVs and pickup trucks will simultaneously increase both their fuel economy and overall safety; and (3) Advanced materials can decouple size from mass, creating important new possibilities for

  17. Matching Government Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Government Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells Matching Government Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells The Fuel Cell Technologies Office, Federal Energy Management Program, ...

  18. Matching National Laboratory Needs with Energy Efficient Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office, Federal Energy Management Program, and U.S. Fuel Cell Council hosted a fuel cell meeting on September 20–21, 2007.

  19. Federal Fleet Files: Vol. 1, No. 2 - June 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-06-12

    June 2009 issue of the FEMP Federal Fleet Files monthly newsletter for the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  20. Determining Price Reasonableness in Federal ESPCs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.

    2005-03-08

    This document reports the findings and implementation recommendations of the Price Reasonableness Working Group to the Federal ESPC Steering Committee. The working group was formed to address concerns of agencies and oversight organizations related to pricing and fair and reasonable price determination in federal energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs). This report comprises the working group's recommendations and is the proposed draft of a training curriculum on fair and reasonable price determination for users of federal ESPCs. The report includes: (1) A review of federal regulations applicable to determining price reasonableness of federal ESPCs (section 2), (2) Brief descriptions of the techniques described in Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) 15.404-1 and their applicability to ESPCs (section 3), and (3) Recommended strategies and procedures for cost-effectively completing price reasonableness determinations (sections 4). Agencies have struggled with fair and reasonable price determinations in their ESPCs primarily because this alternative financing vehicle is relatively new and relatively rare in the federal sector. The methods of determining price reasonableness most familiar to federal contracting officers (price competition based on the government's design and specifications, in particular) are generally not applicable to ESPCs. The regulatory requirements for determining price reasonableness in federal ESPCs have also been misunderstood, as federal procurement professionals who are inexperienced with ESPCs are further confused by multiple directives, including Executive Order 13123, which stresses life-cycle cost-effectiveness. Uncertainty about applicable regulations and inconsistent practice and documentation among agencies have fueled claims that price reasonableness determinations have not been sufficiently rigorous in federal ESPCs or that the prices paid in ESPCs are generally higher than the prices paid for similar goods and services

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Regulated Fleets All Categories Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Clean Cities Petroleum Use Reduction Vehicles Program Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Federal Fleets OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 7 results Federal Fleets -

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuels & Infrastructure All Categories Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Clean Cities Petroleum Use Reduction Vehicles Program Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Federal Fleets OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 55 results Fuel Trends -

  3. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The paper consists of viewgraphs from a conference presentation. A comparison is made of opportunity fuels, defined as fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels. Types of fuels for which some limited technical data is provided include petroleum coke, garbage, wood waste, and tires. Power plant economics and pollution concerns are listed for each fuel, and compared to coal and natural gas power plant costs. A detailed cost breakdown for different plant types is provided for use in base fuel pricing.

  4. Strengthening Federal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Office of the Federal Environ- mental Executive, which shall be maintained in the ... Council on, performance by agencies of functions assigned by sections 2 and 3 of this ...

  5. Federal Sector

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Commercial Industrial Federal Agriculture About five percent of BPA's total electric supply goes to power facilities around...

  6. Distributed Energy Resources at Federal Facilities. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Technical Assistance Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitchford, P.

    2001-07-16

    This two-page overview describes how the use of distributed energy resources at Federal facilities is being supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). Distributed energy resources include both existing and emerging energy technologies: advanced industrial turbines and microturbines; combined heat and power (CHP) systems; fuel cells; geothermal systems; natural gas reciprocating engines; photovoltaics and other solar systems; wind turbines; small, modular biopower; energy storage systems; and hybrid systems. DOE FEMP is investigating ways to use these alternative energy systems in government facilities to meet greater demand, to increase the reliability of the power-generation system, and to reduce the greenhouse gases associated with burning fossil fuels.

  7. Federal Register

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Federal Real Property Council Guidance for Improved Asset Management December 22, 2004 Federal Real Property Council Guidance for Improved Asset Management Table of Contents I. Overview............................................................................. 1 II. Guiding Principles .................................................................... 3 III. Asset Management Plan - Required Components............................... 4 IV. Asset Management Plan - "Shelf

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun ...

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Minnesota (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minnesota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Minnesota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun ...

  10. Outlook for alternative transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gushee, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    This presentation provides a brief review of regulatory issues and Federal programs regarding alternative fuel use in automobiles. A number of U.S. DOE initiatives and studies aimed at increasing alternative fuels are outlined, and tax incentives in effect at the state and Federal levels are discussed. Data on alternative fuel consumption and alternative fuel vehicle use are also presented. Despite mandates, tax incentives, and programs, it is concluded alternative fuels will have minimal market penetration. 7 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Renewable Fuel Distributor and Vehicle Manufacturer Liability Protection Renewable fuel refiners, suppliers, terminals, wholesalers, distributors, retailers, and motor vehicle manufacturers and dealers are not liable for property damages related to a customer's purchase of renewable fuel, including blends, if the consumer selected the fuel for use. Motor fuel blended with any amount of renewable fuel will not be considered a defective product provided the fuel compiles with motor fuel quality

  12. ANALYSIS OF CHP POTENTIAL AT FEDERAL SITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HADLEY, S.W.

    2002-03-11

    CHP when life-cycle costs indicate energy reduction goals will be met. FEMP can assist facilities to conduct this analysis. The model developed for this report estimates the magnitude of CHP that could be implemented under various performance and economic assumptions associated with different applications. This model may be useful for other energy technologies. It can be adapted to estimate the market potential in federal buildings for any energy system based on the cost and performance parameters that a user desires to assess. The model already incorporates a standard set of parameters based on available data for federal buildings including total building space, building type, energy use intensity, fuel costs, and the performance of many prime movers commonly used in CHP applications. These and other variables can be adjusted to meet user needs or updated in the future as new data become available.

  13. The role of the Federal Relighting Initiative in emission controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholls, A.K.; Purcell, C.W.; Friedman, J.R.

    1992-10-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Federal Relighting Initiative (FRI), under the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), has developed a comprehensive process to assist federal agencies in meeting the nation`s energy mandate. This mandate states that federal facilities must use 20% less energy by the year 2000, based on 1985 consumption levels. Because lighting accounts for about 40% of total federal electricity consumption, the FRI was conceived to help reduce energy use in this important area while improving lighting quality and increasing productivity through relighting. Selected federal rules and regulations provide guidance on the types of energy efficiency techniques required, life-cycle costing methods and lighting levels that should be employed to achieve the federal mandate. Although the central focus of this paper is on the environment, this paper takes the perspective that the energy efficiency gains achieved through the FRI would produce both environmental and economic benefits for the United States. For example, improvements in energy efficiency would reduce electricity demand, and would consequently reduce the emissions associated with fossil fuel combustion for power production. These reduced emissions include carbon dioxide, which is associated with the potential for global climate change, and heavy metals, which pose a potential health threat to humans and aquatic ecosystems. Economic benefits of the FRI would include reduced federal expenditures on energy or, possibly, avoiding new power plant construction.This paper begins with a brief overview of the FRI process. Next, current lighting energy use in federal buildings is evaluated and the potential future energy savings achievable through full implementation of the FRI are estimated. The paper then translates these energy savings into avoided emissions of carbon dioxide and heavy metals and into avoided fuel expenditures.

  14. The role of the Federal Relighting Initiative in emission controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholls, A.K.; Purcell, C.W.; Friedman, J.R.

    1992-10-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Relighting Initiative (FRI), under the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), has developed a comprehensive process to assist federal agencies in meeting the nation's energy mandate. This mandate states that federal facilities must use 20% less energy by the year 2000, based on 1985 consumption levels. Because lighting accounts for about 40% of total federal electricity consumption, the FRI was conceived to help reduce energy use in this important area while improving lighting quality and increasing productivity through relighting. Selected federal rules and regulations provide guidance on the types of energy efficiency techniques required, life-cycle costing methods and lighting levels that should be employed to achieve the federal mandate. Although the central focus of this paper is on the environment, this paper takes the perspective that the energy efficiency gains achieved through the FRI would produce both environmental and economic benefits for the United States. For example, improvements in energy efficiency would reduce electricity demand, and would consequently reduce the emissions associated with fossil fuel combustion for power production. These reduced emissions include carbon dioxide, which is associated with the potential for global climate change, and heavy metals, which pose a potential health threat to humans and aquatic ecosystems. Economic benefits of the FRI would include reduced federal expenditures on energy or, possibly, avoiding new power plant construction.This paper begins with a brief overview of the FRI process. Next, current lighting energy use in federal buildings is evaluated and the potential future energy savings achievable through full implementation of the FRI are estimated. The paper then translates these energy savings into avoided emissions of carbon dioxide and heavy metals and into avoided fuel expenditures.

  15. Federally Led Accident Investigation Reports | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federally Led Accident Investigation Reports Federally Led Accident Investigation Reports Includes Pre-March 2011 Type A Reports June 1, 1999 Type A Accident Investigation Board...

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    State & Alt Fuel Providers All Categories Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Clean Cities Petroleum Use Reduction Vehicles Program Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Federal Fleets OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 6 results

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    For the purpose of the credit, alternative fuels vehicles include dedicated or bi-fuel natural gas, propane, and hydrogen vehicles. Through December 31, 2016, purchased or leased ...

  18. Federal Utility Program Overview (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01

    Fact sheet overview of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Federal Utility Program, including common contracts and services available to Federal agencies through local serving utilities.

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Labeling Requirements Alternative fuel dispensers must be labeled with information to help consumers make informed decisions about fueling a vehicle, including the name of the fuel and the minimum percentage of the main component of the fuel. Labels may also list the percentage of other fuel components. This requirement applies to, but is not limited to, the following fuel types: methanol, denatured ethanol, and/or other alcohols; mixtures containing 85% or more by volume of

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Fuel Blend Tax Rate The tax rate on fuel containing ethanol is $0.06 per gallon less than the tax rate on other motor fuels in certain geographic areas. This reduced rate is in effect during months ethanol fuel blends must be sold, transferred, or used to operate motor vehicles to reduce carbon monoxide emissions and attain federal or state air quality standards. (Reference Alaska Statutes 43.40.01

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals The Wisconsin Legislature sets goals for minimum annual renewable fuel sales volumes based on annual renewable fuel volumes required under the federal Renewable Fuel Standard. On an annual basis, the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP), in cooperation with the Department of Commerce, the Department of Revenue, and the Energy Office, must determine whether the annual goals for the previous year were met. If the goals were

  2. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 8 - June 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01

    June 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  3. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 3 - December 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-12-01

    December 2009 update of monthly news from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  4. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 5 - March 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-03-01

    March 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  5. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 1 - October 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-10-01

    October 2009 issue of monthly news from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  6. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 1, No. 3 - July 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01

    July 2009 issue of the monthly newsletter for the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  7. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 10 - September 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01

    September 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  8. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 4 - January 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-01-01

    January 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  9. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 11 - October 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-10-01

    October 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  10. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 12 - November 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01

    November 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  11. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 7 - May 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01

    May 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  12. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 2, No. 9 - July 2010 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01

    July 2010 update from the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  13. Federal Interagency Geothermal Activities 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is the federal interagency geothermal activities document for 2011, which includes incoporation of public comments from the Draft National Geothermal Action Plan.

  14. Secretary Chu Announces Addition of Electric Vehicles to Federal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    with the first set of keys for one of the Federal fleet's 116 new electric cars. "This builds on efforts already underway to reduce fuel use in Federal fleets," said Secretary Chu. ...

  15. Combined Heat and Power: A Federal Manager's Resource Guide,...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This 2000 report identifies the short-, medium-, and long-term potential of internal combustion engines, combustion turbines, fuel cells, and micro-turbines for Federal facilities. ...

  16. Fuel cell generator with fuel electrodes that control on-cell fuel reformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Basel, Richard A.; Zhang, Gong

    2011-10-25

    A fuel cell for a fuel cell generator including a housing including a gas flow path for receiving a fuel from a fuel source and directing the fuel across the fuel cell. The fuel cell includes an elongate member including opposing first and second ends and defining an interior cathode portion and an exterior anode portion. The interior cathode portion includes an electrode in contact with an oxidant flow path. The exterior anode portion includes an electrode in contact with the fuel in the gas flow path. The anode portion includes a catalyst material for effecting fuel reformation along the fuel cell between the opposing ends. A fuel reformation control layer is applied over the catalyst material for reducing a rate of fuel reformation on the fuel cell. The control layer effects a variable reformation rate along the length of the fuel cell.

  17. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions The definition of alternative fuel includes liquefied petroleum gas (propane). Special fuel is defined as all combustible gases and liquids that are suitable for powering an internal combustion engine or motor or are used exclusively for heating, industrial, or farm purposes. Special fuels include biodiesel, blended biodiesel, and natural gas products, including liquefied and compressed natural gas. (Reference Indiana Code 6-6-2.5-1 and 6-6-2.5-22

  19. Federal Interagency Geothermal Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Arlene; Prencipe, Loretta; Todaro, Richard M.; Cuyler, David; Eide, Elizabeth

    2011-06-01

    This collaborative document describes the roles and responsibilities of key Federal agencies in the development of geothermal technologies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), including the U.S. Forest Service; the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI), including the United States Geological Survey (USGS) and Bureau of Land Management (BLM); the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); and the Department of Defense (DOD).

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Policy Act of 2005 Enacted August 8, 2005 The table below provides a summary of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005 (Public Law 109-58) provisions related to alternative fuels and vehicles, air quality, fuel efficiency, and other transportation topics. Note that although legislation authorizes funding for activities, the funds still must be appropriated through a separate federal budgeting process. For more information, visit the EPAct website. Reference Description Section 701 Federal Fleet

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Clean Cities All Categories Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Clean Cities Petroleum Use Reduction Vehicles Program Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Federal Fleets OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 9 results Petroleum Use Reduction -

  2. Bootstrapping a Sustainable North American PEM Fuel Cell Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Sustainable North American PEM Fuel Cell Industry: Could a Federal Acquisition ... for Fully Installed Fuel Cell Systems ......19 8 Logit ...

  3. Fuel Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and robust solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. Specific objectives include achieving an efficiency of greater than 60 percent, meeting a stack cost target of 175 per kW, and ...

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Renewable Fuel Retailer Tax Incentive A licensed retail motor fuel dealer may receive a quarterly incentive for selling and dispensing renewable fuels, including biodiesel. A qualified motor fuel dealer is eligible for up to $0.065 for every gallon of renewable fuel sold and up to $0.03 for every gallon of biodiesel sold, if the required threshold percentage is met. The threshold is determined by calculating the percent of total gasoline sales that is renewable fuel or biodiesel. For renewable

  5. THE MISSION AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS FROM DOE’S FUEL CYCLE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (FCRD) ADVANCED FUELS CAMPAIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Carmack; L. Braase; F. Goldner

    2015-09-01

    The mission of the Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is to perform Research, Development, and Demonstration (RD&D) activities for advanced fuel forms (including cladding) to enhance the performance and safety of the nation’s current and future reactors, enhance proliferation resistance of nuclear fuel, effectively utilize nuclear energy resources, and address the longer-term waste management challenges. This includes development of a state of the art Research and Development (R&D) infrastructure to support the use of a “goal oriented science based approach.” AFC uses a “goal oriented, science based approach” aimed at a fundamental understanding of fuel and cladding fabrication methods and performance under irradiation, enabling the pursuit of multiple fuel forms for future fuel cycle options. This approach includes fundamental experiments, theory, and advanced modeling and simulation. One of the most challenging aspects of AFC is the management, integration, and coordination of major R&D activities across multiple organizations. AFC interfaces and collaborates with Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) campaigns, universities, industry, various DOE programs and laboratories, federal agencies (e.g., Nuclear Regulatory Commission [NRC]), and international organizations. Key challenges are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Challenged with the research and development of fuels for two different reactor technology platforms, AFC targeted transmutation fuel development and focused ceramic fuel development for Advanced LWR Fuels.

  6. RERTR Fuel Developmemt and Qualification Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Wachs

    2007-01-01

    detailing very-high density fuel behavior will be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Assuming acceptable fuel behavior, it is anticipated that NRC will issue a Safety Evaluation Report granting generic approval of the developed fuels based on the qualification report. It is anticipated that Phase I of fuel qualification will be completed prior to the end of FY10. Phase II of the fuel qualification requires development of fuels with density greater than 8.5 g-U/cm3. This fuel is required to convert the remaining few reactors that have been identified for conversion. The second phase of the fuel qualification effort includes both dispersion fuels with fuel particle volume loading on the order of 65 percent, and monolithic fuels. Phase II presents a larger set of technical unknowns and schedule uncertainties than phase I. The final step in the fuel qualification process involves insertion of lead test elements into the converting reactors. Each reactor that plans to convert using the developed high-density fuels will develop a reactor specific conversion plan based upon the reactor safety basis and operating requirements. For some reactors (FRM-II, High-Flux Isotope Reactor [HFIR], and RHF) conversion will be a one-step process. In addition to the U.S. fuel development effort, a Russian fuel development strategy has been developed. Contracts with Russian Federation institutes in support of fuel development for Russian are in place.

  7. Federal Fleet Files, FEMP, Vol. 1, No. 2 - June 2009 (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-06-01

    June 2009 issue of the FEMP Federal Fleet Files monthly newsletter for the FEMP Federal Fleet Program that outlines vehicle, alternative fuel, infrastructure, and management strategy updates to Federal agencies.

  8. Federal Energy and Water Management Awards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet for the Federal Energy and Water Management Awards, including history, legislative drivers, goals and objectives, and event details.

  9. Federal Methanol Fleet Project final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, B.H.; McGill, R.N.; Hillis, S.L.; Hodgson, J.W.

    1993-03-01

    The Federal Methanol Fleet Project concluded with the termination of data collection from the three fleet sites in February 1991. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) completed five years of operation, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) completed its fourth year in the project, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) completed its third. Twenty of the thirty-nine vehicles in the fleet were powered by fuel methanol (typically M85, 85 % methanol, 15 % unleaded gasoline, although the LBL fleet used M88), and the remaining control vehicles were comparable gasoline vehicles. Over 2.2 million km (1.4 million miles) were accumulated on the fleet vehicles in routine government service. Data collected over the years have included vehicle mileage and fuel economy, engine oil analysis, emissions, vehicle maintenance, and driver acceptance. Fuel economies (on an energy basis) of the methanol and gasoline vehicles of the same type were comparable throughout the fleet testing. Engine oil analysis has revealed higher accumulation rates of iron and other metals in the oil of the methanol vehicles, although no significant engine damage has been attributed to the higher metal content. Vehicles of both fuel types have experienced degradation in their emission control systems, however, the methanol vehicles seem to have degraded their catalytic converters at a higher rate. The methanol vehicles have required more maintenance than their gasoline counterparts, in most cases, although the higher levels of maintenance cannot be attributed to ``fuel-related`` repairs. According to the daily driver logs and results from several surveys, drivers of the fleet vehicles at all three sites were generally satisfied with the methanol vehicles.

  10. Federal Methanol Fleet Project final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, B.H.; McGill, R.N. ); Hillis, S.L.; Hodgson, J.W. )

    1993-03-01

    The Federal Methanol Fleet Project concluded with the termination of data collection from the three fleet sites in February 1991. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) completed five years of operation, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) completed its fourth year in the project, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) completed its third. Twenty of the thirty-nine vehicles in the fleet were powered by fuel methanol (typically M85, 85 % methanol, 15 % unleaded gasoline, although the LBL fleet used M88), and the remaining control vehicles were comparable gasoline vehicles. Over 2.2 million km (1.4 million miles) were accumulated on the fleet vehicles in routine government service. Data collected over the years have included vehicle mileage and fuel economy, engine oil analysis, emissions, vehicle maintenance, and driver acceptance. Fuel economies (on an energy basis) of the methanol and gasoline vehicles of the same type were comparable throughout the fleet testing. Engine oil analysis has revealed higher accumulation rates of iron and other metals in the oil of the methanol vehicles, although no significant engine damage has been attributed to the higher metal content. Vehicles of both fuel types have experienced degradation in their emission control systems, however, the methanol vehicles seem to have degraded their catalytic converters at a higher rate. The methanol vehicles have required more maintenance than their gasoline counterparts, in most cases, although the higher levels of maintenance cannot be attributed to fuel-related'' repairs. According to the daily driver logs and results from several surveys, drivers of the fleet vehicles at all three sites were generally satisfied with the methanol vehicles.

  11. Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracting Steering Committee |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Contracting Steering Committee Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracting Steering Committee The Federal Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) Steering Committee shares experiences and lessons learned and coordinates process and procedural improvements among federal agency implementers to promote improved ESPCs throughout the federal government. This includes: Discussing practical application of the ESPC authority to identify problems, barriers to the

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions Biodiesel is defined as the monoalkyl esters of long chain fatty acids derived from plant or animals that meet the registration requirements for fuels and fuel additives established in Section 211 of the Clean Air Act, Title 42 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, section 7545, and the requirements of ASTM D6751. Renewable diesel is defined as diesel fuel derived from biomass using a thermal depolymerization process that meets the registration

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fleet Purchase and Pricing Agreement Requirements The Colorado state fleet and the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) must purchase natural gas vehicles (NGVs) where natural gas fueling is available or planned, whenever possible. Where NGVs are not viable options, other alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) such as plug-in electric, hybrid electric, and propane vehicles, must be considered. All new vehicles purchased must be either alternatively fueled or exceed federal Corporate Average

  14. Federal Financial Report

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    REPORT (Follow form instructions) 1. Federal Agency and Organizational Element 2. Federal Grant or Other Identifying Number Assigned by Federal Agency Page of to Which Report is ...

  15. Fuel Cells and Renewable Portfolio Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Natural Gas or Renewable fuel Smart Grid Integration Power, Fuel and ... energy desires * Fuel cells on Natural Gas (LNG) are included * Base market RPS rate plus a technology ...

  16. Federal Government Support for Fuel Cell Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market Transformation Key Challenges 4 The Program is an ... cost-target for H 2 from natural gas. *projected cost, assuming ... to address systems integration and prototype ...

  17. Liquid Fuels Taxes and Credits (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Provides a review of the treatment of federal fuels taxes and tax credits in Annual Energy Outlook 2010.

  18. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Mexico (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Mexico (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul ...

  20. Sets of Reports and Articles Regarding Cement Wastes Forms Containing Alpha Emitters that are Potentially Useful for Development of Russian Federation Waste Treatment Processes for Solidification of Weapons Plutonium MOX Fuel Fabrication Wastes for

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jardine, L J

    2003-06-12

    This is a set of nine reports and articles that were kindly provided by Dr. Christine A. Langton from the Savannah River Site (SRS) to L. J. Jardine LLNL in June 2003. The reports discuss cement waste forms and primarily focus on gas generation in cement waste forms from alpha particle decays. However other items such as various cement compositions, cement product performance test results and some cement process parameters are also included. This set of documents was put into this Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) releasable report for the sole purpose to provide a set of documents to Russian technical experts now beginning to study cement waste treatment processes for wastes from an excess weapons plutonium MOX fuel fabrication facility. The intent is to provide these reports for use at a US RF Experts Technical Meeting on: the Management of Wastes from MOX Fuel Fabrication Facilities, in Moscow July 9-11, 2003. The Russian experts should find these reports to be very useful for their technical and economic feasibility studies and the supporting R&D activities required to develop acceptable waste treatment processes for use in Russia as part of the ongoing Joint US RF Plutonium Disposition Activities.

  1. Fuel transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool.

  2. Fuel transfer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-03-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

  3. Fuel Cell Technologies Office American Energy and Manufacturing Competitiveness Parternship: Fuel Cell Manufacturing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2/19/2013 eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Office American Energy & Manufacturing Competitiveness Partnership http://www.aemcsummit.compete.org/ Fuel Cell Manufacturing Dr. Sunita Satyapal Director, Fuel Cell Technologies Office Dr. Nancy Garland Technology Development Manager, Manufacturing R&D, Fuel Cell Technologies Office 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 12/19/2013 eere.energy.gov The Future of Fuel Cell Manufacturing Panel Session * Federal program: DOE Fuel

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office: Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Transfer Awards | Department of Energy Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards Vehicle Technologies Office: Federal Laboratory Consortium Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards 2011 Laser-Induced Fluorescence Fiber-Optic Measurement of Fuel in Oil (Oak Ridge National Laboratory). Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Laser-Induced Fluorescence Fiber-Optic Measurement of Fuel in Oil technology received the Federal Laboratory Consortium Award for

  5. DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Jennifer Stefanik; Andre L. Boehman; David Klinikowski

    2003-04-01

    The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. The laboratory studies have included work with a Navistar V-8 turbodiesel engine, demonstration of engine operation on DME-diesel blends and instrumentation for evaluating fuel properties. The field studies have involved performance, efficiency and emissions measurements with the Champion Motorcoach ''Defender'' shuttle bus which will be converted to DME-fueling. The results include baseline emissions, performance and combustion measurements on the Navistar engine for operation on a federal low sulfur diesel fuel (300 ppm S). Most recently, they have completed engine combustion studies on DME-diesel blends up to 30 wt% DME addition.

  6. Federal Technology Transfer and the Federal Laboratory Consortium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Technology Transfer and the Federal Laboratory Consortium: Federal Technology Transfer and the Federal Laboratory Consortium: Identifying and accessing U.S. federal lab ...

  7. NREL: Transportation Research - Fuels Performance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuels Performance Photo of a man working with laboratory equipment. NREL fuel performance chemists evaluate a broad range of performance criteria, including storage stability. ...

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Definition - Internal Revenue Code The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) defines alternative fuels as liquefied petroleum gas (propane), compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, liquefied hydrogen, liquid fuel derived from coal through the Fischer-Tropsch process, liquid hydrocarbons derived from biomass, and P-Series fuels. Biodiesel, ethanol, and renewable diesel are not considered alternative fuels by the IRS. While the term "hydrocarbons" includes liquids that

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Independence and Security Act of 2007 Enacted December 19, 2007 The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 (Public Law 110-140) aims to improve vehicle fuel economy and reduce U.S. dependence on petroleum. EISA includes provisions to increase the supply of renewable alternative fuel sources by setting a mandatory Renewable Fuel Standard, which requires transportation fuel sold in the United States to contain a minimum of 36 billion gallons of renewable fuels annually by 2022. In

  10. Exploring Ways to Standardize Federal Energy Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Spring 2013 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers ways to standardize federal energy contracts and initial findings, including savings calculations, assurances and guarantees, equipment performance standards, pricing, and more.

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fueling Stations All Categories Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Clean Cities Petroleum Use Reduction Vehicles Program Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Federal Fleets OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 13 results Arra-thumb ARRA

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biofuels Production All Categories Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Clean Cities Petroleum Use Reduction Vehicles Program Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Federal Fleets OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 16 results Biofuelsatlas BioFuels Atlas

  13. Renewable Fuel Standards Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Fuel Standards Resources Renewable Fuel Standards Resources Federal agencies and certain state governments are required to acquire alternative fuel vehicles as part of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, though they are also entitled to choose a petroleum reduction path as an alternative to the mandate. Find renewable fuel standards resources. State Clean Energy Practices: Renewable Fuel Standards Understanding and Informing the Policy Environment: State-Level Renewable Fuel Standards.

  14. Fuel economizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwierzelewski, V.F.

    1984-06-26

    A fuel economizer device for use with an internal combustion engine fitted with a carburetor is disclosed. The fuel economizer includes a plate member which is mounted between the carburetor and the intake portion of the intake manifold. The plate member further has at least one aperture formed therein. One tube is inserted through the at least one aperture in the plate member. The one tube extends longitudinally in the passage of the intake manifold from the intake portion toward the exit portion thereof. The one tube concentrates the mixture of fuel and air from the carburetor and conveys the mixture of fuel and air to a point adjacent but spaced away from the inlet port of the internal combustion engine.

  15. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is mandated by Congress to be the agency that collects, analyzes, and disseminates impartial, comprehensive data about energy including the volume consumed, its customers, and the purposes for which it is used. The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey (FBSS) was conducted by EIA in conjunction with DOE`s Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (OFEMP) to gain a better understanding of how Federal buildings use energy. This report presents the data from 881 completed telephone interviews with Federal buildings in three Federal regions. These buildings were systematically selected using OFEMP`s specifications; therefore, these data do not statistically represent all Federal buildings in the country. The purpose of the FBSS was threefold: (1) to understand the characteristics of Federal buildings and their energy use; (2) to provide a baseline in these three Federal regions to measure future energy use in Federal buildings as required in EPACT; and (3) to compare building characteristics and energy use with the data collected in the CBECS.

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR ethanol-equipment-options Go Customthumb U.S. Ethanol Plants, Capacity, and ...

  17. Fuel cells and fuel cell catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I.; Rice, Cynthia A.; Waszczuk, Piotr; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2006-11-07

    A direct organic fuel cell includes a formic acid fuel solution having between about 10% and about 95% formic acid. The formic acid is oxidized at an anode. The anode may include a Pt/Pd catalyst that promotes the direct oxidation of the formic acid via a direct reaction path that does not include formation of a CO intermediate.

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    regardless of the number of passengers. Qualified AFVs may also use the HOT lanes toll-free. AFVs include plug-in electric vehicles and bi-fuel or dual-fuel vehicles that operate...

  19. DIMETHYL ETHER (DME)-FUELED SHUTTLE BUS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elana M. Chapman; Shirish Bhide; Andre L. Boehman; David Klinikowski

    2003-04-01

    The objectives of this research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In this project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. Within the Combustion Laboratory of the Penn State Energy Institute, they have installed and equipped a Navistar V-8 direct-injection turbodiesel engine for measurement of gaseous and particulate emissions and examination of the impact of fuel composition on diesel combustion. They have also reconfigured a high-pressure viscometer for studies of the viscosity, bulk modulus (compressibility) and miscibility of blends of diesel fuel, dimethyl ether and lubricity additives. The results include baseline emissions, performance and combustion measurements on the Navistar engine for operation on a federal low sulfur diesel fuel (300 ppm S). Most recently, they have examined blends of an oxygenated fuel additive (a liquid fuel called CETANER{trademark}) produced by Air Products, for comparison with dimethyl ether blended at the same weight of oxygen addition, 2 wt.%. While they have not operated the engine on DME yet, they are now preparing to do so. A fuel system for delivery of DME/Diesel blends has been configured

  20. Emissions from Buses with DDC 6V92 Engines Using Synthetic Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Mridul Gautam; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

    1999-05-03

    Synthetic diesel fuel can be made from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, synthetic diesel fuels may also economically competitive with California diesel fuel if .roduced in large volumes. Previous engine laboratory and field tests using a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer indicate that synthetic diesel fuel made using the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process is a promising alternative fuel, because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and can reduce exhaust emissions substantially. The objective of this study was a preliminary assessment of the emissions from older model transit operated on Mossgas synthetic diesel fuel. The study compared emissions from transit buses operating on Federal no. 2 Diesel fuel, Mossgas synthetic diesel (MGSD), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. The buses were equipped with unmodified Detroit Diesel 6V92 2-stroke diesel engines. Six 40-foot buses were tested. Three of the buses had recently rebuilt engines and were equipped with an oxidation catalytic converter. Vehicle emissions measurements were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The emissions were measured over the Central Business District (CBD) driving cycle. The buses performed well on both neat and blended MGSD fuel. Three buses without catalytic converters were tested. Compared to their emissions when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel, these buses emitted an average of 5% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 20% lower particulate matter (PM) when operating on neat MGSD fuel. Catalyst equipped buses emitted an average of 8% lower NOx and 31% lower PM when operating on MGSD than when operating on Federal no. 2 diesel fuel.

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit An income tax credit is available for 25% of the cost to purchase, construct, and install qualified alternative fueling infrastructure. Qualified property includes equipment used to distribute, dispense, or store alternative fuel. Eligible fuels include natural gas and propane. The entire credit must be taken in three equal annual installments beginning with the taxable year in which the facility is placed into service. Unused credits may be carried

  2. Fuel Cells Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cells Fuel cells are the most energy efficient devices for extracting power from fuels. Capable of running on a variety of fuels, including hydrogen, natural gas, and biogas, fuel cells can provide clean power for applications ranging from less than a watt to multiple megawatts. Our transportation-including personal vehicles, trucks, buses, marine vessels, and other specialty vehicles such as lift trucks and ground support equipment, as well as auxiliary power units for traditional

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    and Infrastructure Tax Credit for Businesses Business owners and others may be eligible for a tax credit of 35% of eligible costs for qualified alternative fuel infrastructure projects, or the incremental or conversion cost of two or more AFVs. Qualified infrastructure includes facilities for mixing, storing, compressing, or dispensing fuels for vehicles operating on alternative fuels. Qualified alternative fuels include electricity, natural gas, gasoline blended with at least 85% ethanol (E85),

  4. Fuel Economy and Emissions of a Vehicle Equipped with an Aftermarket Flexible-Fuel Conversion Kit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, John F; Huff, Shean P; West, Brian H

    2012-04-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grants Certificates of Conformity for alternative fuel conversion systems and also offers other forms of premarket registration of conversion kits for use in vehicles more than two model years old. Use of alternative fuels such as ethanol, natural gas, and propane are encouraged by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) produce emissions-certified vehicles capable of using alternative fuels, and several alternative fuel conversion system manufacturers produce EPA-approved conversion systems for a variety of alternative fuels and vehicle types. To date, only one manufacturer (Flex Fuel U.S.) has received EPA certifications for ethanol fuel (E85) conversion kits. This report details an independent evaluation of a vehicle with a legal installation of a Flex Fuel U.S. conversion kit. A 2006 Dodge Charger was baseline tested with ethanol-free certification gasoline (E0) and E20 (gasoline with 20 vol % ethanol), converted to flex-fuel operation via installation of a Flex Box Smart Kit from Flex Fuel U.S., and retested with E0, E20, E50, and E81. Test cycles included the Federal Test Procedure (FTP or city cycle), the highway fuel economy test (HFET), and the US06 test (aggressive driving test). Averaged test results show that the vehicle was emissions compliant on E0 in the OEM condition (before conversion) and compliant on all test fuels after conversion. Average nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions exceeded the Tier 2/Bin 5 intermediate life NO{sub X} standard with E20 fuel in the OEM condition due to two of three test results exceeding this standard [note that E20 is not a legal fuel for non-flexible-fuel vehicles (non-FFVs)]. In addition, one E0 test result before conversion and one E20 test result after conversion exceeded the NOX standard, although the average result in these two cases was below the standard. Emissions of ethanol and acetaldehyde increased with increasing ethanol

  5. UESC Energy Solutions for Federal Agencies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Solutions for Federal Agencies UESC Energy Solutions for Federal Agencies This presentation includes an overview of UESC strategies and services by Pepco Energy Services....

  6. Creating an Energy Awareness Campaign: A Handbook for Federal Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managers | Department of Energy Creating an Energy Awareness Campaign: A Handbook for Federal Energy Managers Creating an Energy Awareness Campaign: A Handbook for Federal Energy Managers Federal Energy Management Program handbook describes how federal energy manager can start and manage an energy awareness campaign to reduce energy, water, and fuel consumption in agencies. Download the handbook. (3.77 MB) More Documents & Publications 2001 FEMP Customer Survey Report (Appendices)

  7. Notices and Rules Related to Federal Energy Management | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Laws & Requirements » Notices and Rules Related to Federal Energy Management Notices and Rules Related to Federal Energy Management The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is required by law to establish and periodically update mandatory federal energy-efficiency requirements. DOE's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) issues notices and rules related to federal energy management, which include new federal commercial and residential buildings, federal procurement of

  8. Fuel axial relocation in ballooning fuel rods. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siefken, L.J.

    1983-01-01

    Fuel movement, in the longitudinal direction in ballooning fuel rods, shifts the position of heat generation and may cause an increase in cladding temperature in the ballooning region. This paper summarizes the axial fuel relocation data obtained in fuel rod tests conducted in the United States and the Federal Republic of Germany, describes a model for calculating fuel axial relocation, and gives a quantitative analysis of the impact of fuel relocation on cladding temperature. The amount of fuel relocation in 18 ballooned fuel rods was determined from neutron radiographs, niobium gamma decay counts, and photomicrographs. The fuel rods had burnups in the range of 0 to 35,000 MWd/t and cladding hoop strains varying from 0 to 72%.

  9. California and Connecticut: National Fuel Cell Bus Programs Drive Fuel Economy Higher

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In an EERE-supported study with the Federal Transit Administration, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has found the fuel economy of fuel cell powered buses to be up to 2.4 times higher than conventional buses.

  10. EERE Success Story—California and Connecticut: National Fuel Cell Bus Programs Drive Fuel Economy Higher

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In an EERE-supported study with the Federal Transit Administration, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has found the fuel economy of fuel cell powered buses to be up to 2.4 times higher than conventional buses.

  11. Fuel Production/Quality Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal agencies and certain state governments are required to acquire alternative fuel vehicles as part of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, though they are also entitled to choose a petroleum...

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Weight Exemption NGVs may exceed the federal maximum gross vehicle weight limit by an amount equal to the difference of the weight of the natural gas tank and fueling system and the weight of a comparable diesel tank and fueling system. The NGV must not exceed a maximum gross vehicle weight of 82,000 pounds. (Reference Public Law 114-94, 2015, and 23 U.S. Code 127(s)

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel Reduction Technology Tax Credit Fuel reduction technologies are eligible for a tax credit equal to a percentage of the actual cost paid for the technology. The actual cost paid must account for eligible federal credits, grants, or rebates; therefore taxpayers must subtract credits, grants, or rebates amounts before applying the percentage calculations listed below. Beginning January 1, 2017, hydraulic hybrid trailers are eligible for a fixed tax credit rather than a percentage. Category

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Inspection Requirements To pass the state vehicle inspection, an NGV owner must be able to provide proof that the fuel tank on the vehicle has met inspection requirements and falls within the manufacturer's recommended service life, as required by Title 49 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, section 571.304. Fleet operators must also be able to prove that a certified technician inspected the vehicle's fuel tank. (Reference Texas Statutes, Transportation Code

  15. Federal technology policy in transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnes, K.H.

    1995-12-31

    This paper discusses federal energy and environmental policies and their impact on the U.S. economy. A brief history of the federal government`s role in developing scientific and technological infrastructure is given. Current trends in technology are summarized, with an emphasis on global aspects, and their impact on the economy is discussed. The need for a national technology policy, including continued research and development funding, is discussed and key elements of such a policy are outlined.

  16. Effects of Climate Change on Federal Hydropower (Report to Congress)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the federal Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) and other federal agencies, including federal dam owners, has prepared a comprehensive assessment examining the effects of climate change on water available for hydropower at federal facilities and on the marketing of power from these federal facilities

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) must allocate the incremental cost of purchasing alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) across the entire fleet of vehicles distributed by GSA. This mandate also applies to other federal agencies that procure vehicles for federal fleets. For more information, see the GSA's AFV website. (Reference 42 U.S. Code 13212 (c)) Point of Contact U.S. General Services Administration Phone: (703) 605-5630

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel Signage The Ohio Turnpike Commission allows businesses to place their logos on directional signs within the right-of-way of state turnpikes. An alternative fuel retailer may include a marking or symbol within their logo indicating that it sells one or more types of alternative fuel. Alternative fuels are defined as E85, fuel blends containing at least 20% biodiesel (B20), natural gas, propane, hydrogen, or any fuel that the U.S. Department of Energy determines, by final rule, to be

  19. Federal Energy Management Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tools Federal Energy Management Tools logo_femp.png The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers links to tools that can help agencies reduce energy use and meet federal laws and requirements. Tools include software, calculators, data sets, and databases created by the U.S. Department of Energy and other federal organizations. To find a tool, browse by title, description, type, or category. Click a column heading to sort the table. Title Description Type Category Building Life Cycle Cost

  20. Commissioning for Federal Facilities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Federal Facilities Commissioning for Federal Facilities Guide describes building commissioning, recommissioning, retrocommissioning, and continuous commissioning for federal facilities. Download the Commissioning for Federal Facilities guide. (2.77 MB) More Documents & Publications Chapter 9: Commissioning the Building Guide to Operating and Maintaining EnergySmart Schools Example Retro-Commissioning Scope of Work to Include Services as Part of an ESPC Investment-Grade Audit

  1. Fuel injector system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Bertrand D.; Leonard, Gary L.

    1988-01-01

    A fuel injection system particularly adapted for injecting coal slurry fuels at high pressures includes an accumulator-type fuel injector which utilizes high-pressure pilot fuel as a purging fluid to prevent hard particles in the fuel from impeding the opening and closing movement of a needle valve, and as a hydraulic medium to hold the needle valve in its closed position. A fluid passage in the injector delivers an appropriately small amount of the ignition-aiding pilot fuel to an appropriate region of a chamber in the injector's nozzle so that at the beginning of each injection interval the first stratum of fuel to be discharged consists essentially of pilot fuel and thereafter mostly slurry fuel is injected.

  2. Dual Tank Fuel System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  3. Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Planning Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands (216(h)) On October 23, 2009, ...

  4. Electric power monthly, September 1990. [Glossary included

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-12-17

    The purpose of this report is to provide energy decision makers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues. The power plants considered include coal, petroleum, natural gas, hydroelectric, and nuclear power plants. Data are presented for power generation, fuel consumption, fuel receipts and cost, sales of electricity, and unusual occurrences at power plants. Data are compared at the national, Census division, and state levels. 4 figs., 52 tabs. (CK)

  5. DOE Updates JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC1...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar, "DOE ... a Sustainable North American PEM Fuel Cell Industry: Could a Federal ...

  6. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Includes Federal Offshore Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas. See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table. Release Date: 12...

  7. Federal, Contractor, or Subcontractor | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    142014 Listing of SuspectCounterfeit Coordinators by SiteProgram Secretarial Office (PSO) and title (Federal, Contractor, or Subcontractor). This listing includes email and...

  8. Fuel Options

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Production Market Transformation Fuel Cells Predictive Simulation of Engines ... Twitter Google + Vimeo Newsletter Signup SlideShare Fuel Options HomeCapabilitiesFuel ...

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel and Conversion Definitions Clean transportation fuels include liquefied petroleum gas (or propane), compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), electricity, and other transportation fuels determined to be comparable with respect to emissions. CNG is defined as pipeline-quality natural gas that is compressed and provided for sale or use as a motor vehicle fuel. LNG is defined as pipeline-quality natural gas treated to remove water, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, and other

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans The Nebraska Energy Office administers the Dollar and Energy Saving Loan Program, which makes low-cost loans available for a variety of alternative fuel projects, including the replacement of conventional vehicles with AFVs; the purchase of new AFVs; the conversion of conventional vehicles to operate on alternative fuels; and the construction or purchase of fueling stations or equipment. The maximum loan amount is $750,000 per borrower, and the

  11. Transportation fuels from wood

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.; Stevens, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    The various methods of producing transportation fuels from wood are evaluated in this paper. These methods include direct liquefaction schemes such as hydrolysis/fermentation, pyrolysis, and thermochemical liquefaction. Indirect liquefaction techniques involve gasification followed by liquid fuels synthesis such as methanol synthesis or the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The cost of transportation fuels produced by the various methods are compared. In addition, three ongoing programs at Pacific Northwest Laboratory dealing with liquid fuels from wood are described.

  12. Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Spent Nuclear Fuel Release date: December 7, 2015 Next release date: Late 2018 Spent nuclear fuel data are collected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the Department of Energy's Office of Standard Contract Management (Office of the General Counsel) on the Form GC-859, "Nuclear Fuel Data Survey." The data include detailed characteristics of spent nuclear fuel discharged from commercial U.S. nuclear power plants and currently stored at commercial sites in the United

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Grants The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) administers the Alternative Fueling Facilities Program (AFFP) as part of the Texas Emissions Reduction Plan. AFFP provides grants for 50% of eligible costs, up to $600,000, to construct, reconstruct, or acquire a facility to store, compress, or dispense alternative fuels in Texas air quality nonattainment areas. Qualified alternative fuels include biodiesel, electricity, natural gas, hydrogen, propane,

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit for Residents Through the Residential Energy Tax Credit program, qualified residents may receive a tax credit for 25% of alternative fuel infrastructure project costs, up to $750. Qualified residents may receive a tax credit for 50% of project costs, up to $750. Qualified alternative fuels include electricity, natural gas, gasoline blended with at least 85% ethanol (E85), propane, and other fuels that the Oregon Department of Energy approves. A

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards California's LEV II exhaust emissions standards apply to Model Year (MY) 2004 and subsequent model year passenger cars, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty passenger vehicles meeting specified exhaust standards. The LEV II standards represent the maximum exhaust emissions for LEVs, Ultra Low Emission Vehicles, and Super Ultra Low Emission Vehicles, including flexible fuel, bi-fuel, and dual-fuel vehicles when operating on an alternative fuel. MY 2009 and

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Use and Vehicle Acquisition Requirements State agency fleets with more than 15 vehicles, excluding emergency and law enforcement vehicles, may not purchase or lease a motor vehicle unless the vehicle uses compressed or liquefied natural gas, propane, ethanol or fuel blends of at least 85% ethanol (E85), methanol or fuel blends of at least 85% methanol (M85), biodiesel or fuel blends of at least 20% biodiesel (B20), or electricity (including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles).

  17. COMPOSITE FUEL ELEMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurford, W.J.; Gordon, R.B.; Johnson, W.A.

    1962-12-25

    A sandwich-type fuel element for a reactor is described. This fuel element has the shape of an elongated flat plate and includes a filler plate having a plurality of compartments therein in which the fuel material is located. The filler plate is clad on both sides with a thin cladding material which is secured to the filler plate only to completely enclose the fuel material in each compartment. (AEC)

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFVs and HEVs All Categories Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Clean Cities Petroleum Use Reduction Vehicles Program Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Federal Fleets OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 20 results Generated_thumb20160830-4976-kgi9ks AFV

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Emissions All Categories Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Clean Cities Petroleum Use Reduction Vehicles Program Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Federal Fleets OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 5 results Generated_thumb20130810-31804-53z5da Carbon

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Trends All Categories Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Clean Cities Petroleum Use Reduction Vehicles Program Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Federal Fleets OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 14 results Generated_thumb20160914-24960-10gn0o4 Annual

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Idle Reduction All Categories Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Clean Cities Petroleum Use Reduction Vehicles Program Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Federal Fleets OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 2 results Generated_thumb20150813-22546-19hiukh

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Laws & Incentives All Categories Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Clean Cities Petroleum Use Reduction Vehicles Program Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Federal Fleets OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 10 results - Biodiesel_li_by_state Biodiesel

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Transportation Infrastructure All Categories Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Clean Cities Petroleum Use Reduction Vehicles Program Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Federal Fleets OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 5 results Freight_tons_thumbnail

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Vehicle Market All Categories Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Clean Cities Petroleum Use Reduction Vehicles Program Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Federal Fleets OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 7 results Generated_thumb20160404-15442-1rr9crl AFV

  5. PRESERVATION OF FEDERAL RECORDS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PRESERVATION OF FEDERAL RECORDS The Federal Records Act requires the Department of Energy (DOE) Records Officer to remind departing Federal and contractor employees that Federal records may not be removed from Government custody nor may they be destroyed except in accordance with a records disposition schedule that has been approved by the Archivist of the United States. The creation of adequate documentation and the preservation of Federal records are required by law and regulation (contained

  6. DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

  7. Organic fuel cells and fuel cell conducting sheets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I.; Ha, Su; Adams, Brian

    2007-10-16

    A passive direct organic fuel cell includes an organic fuel solution and is operative to produce at least 15 mW/cm.sup.2 when operating at room temperature. In additional aspects of the invention, fuel cells can include a gas remover configured to promote circulation of an organic fuel solution when gas passes through the solution, a modified carbon cloth, one or more sealants, and a replaceable fuel cartridge.

  8. Fuel nozzle assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Lacey, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2011-08-30

    A fuel nozzle assembly is provided. The assembly includes an outer nozzle body having a first end and a second end and at least one inner nozzle tube having a first end and a second end. One of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel plenum and a fuel passage extending therefrom, while the other of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel injection hole slidably aligned with the fuel passage to form a fuel flow path therebetween at an interface between the body and the tube. The nozzle body and the nozzle tube are fixed against relative movement at the first ends of the nozzle body and nozzle tube, enabling the fuel flow path to close at the interface due to thermal growth after a flame enters the nozzle tube.

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which assigns a RIN to each gallon of renewable fuel. Entities regulated by RFS include oil refiners, blenders, and gasoline and diesel importers. The volumes required of each...

  10. Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masel, Richard I.; Zhu, Yimin; Kahn, Zakia; Man, Malcolm

    2009-11-17

    A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

  11. Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.

    2013-04-01

    This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

  12. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  13. California Fuel Cell Partnership: Alternative Fuels Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Partnership - Alternative Fuels Research TNS Automotive Chris White Communications Director cwhite@cafcp.org 2 TNS Automotive for California Fuel Cell Partnership Background CaFCP conducted annual public opinion surveys Administered by phone as part of an "omnibus" survey Asked only about H2 and FCVs Gauged knowledge 2008 survey to gauge opinions, attitudes and identify trends Important elements included: Larger, more diverse panel with defined demographics "With

  14. Fuel Cells | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cells Fuel Cells A fuel cell uses the chemical energy of hydrogen or another fuel to cleanly and efficiently produce electricity. If hydrogen is the fuel, electricity, water, and heat are the only products. Fuel cells are unique in terms of the variety of their potential applications; they can provide power for systems as large as a utility power station and as small as a laptop computer. Why Study Fuel Cells Fuel cells can be used in a wide range of applications, including transportation,

  15. 2009 Fuel Cell Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent, Bill; Gangi, Jennifer; Curtin, Sandra; Delmont, Elizabeth

    2010-11-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general.

  16. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2005-34 Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-34 PF2009-54.pdf (879.43 KB) PF2009-54a - Attachment-Summary of the Contents of Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-34 Published in the July 1, 2009 Issue of the Federal Register at Page 31556 (11.54 KB) More Documents & Publications Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-40 Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-47 Policy Flash Archive Search File

    Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-52 Item Subject FAR case I Sustainable Acquisition 2010-001 II Contract

  17. Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-10-02

    A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

  18. Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Restrictions on Federal Employees Acceptance of Gifts As the holiday season approaches, it is important to remember there are restrictions on Federal employees accepting gifts from outside sources and from other Federal employees. Just as there is no "working lunch" exception to the gift prohibition, there is no "holiday party" exception. A gift includes anything of monetary value, including a gratuity, favor, discount, entertainment, training, transportation, lodging, and

  19. Pump apparatus including deconsolidator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Saunders, Timothy; Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

    2014-10-07

    A pump apparatus includes a particulate pump that defines a passage that extends from an inlet to an outlet. A duct is in flow communication with the outlet. The duct includes a deconsolidator configured to fragment particle agglomerates received from the passage.

  20. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Opportunity fuels - fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels - are discussed in outline form. The type and source of fuels, types of fuels, combustability, methods of combustion, refinery wastes, petroleum coke, garbage fuels, wood wastes, tires, and economics are discussed.

  1. SBIR/STTR FY16 Phase 1 Release 1 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production and Fuel Cell Membrane Topics SBIRSTTR FY16 Phase 1 Release 1 Topics Announced-Includes Hydrogen Production and Fuel Cell Membrane Topics August 18, 2015 - ...

  2. SBIR/STTR FY16 Phase 1 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Four...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Four for Fuel Cell Membrane Development SBIRSTTR FY16 Phase 1 Release 1 Awards Announced-Includes Four for Fuel Cell Membrane Development January 28, 2016 - ...

  3. Technologies for Distributed Energy Resources. Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Technical Assistance Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitchford, P.; Brown, T.

    2001-07-16

    This four-page fact sheet describes distributed energy resources for Federal facilities, which are being supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). Distributed energy resources include both existing and emerging energy technologies: advanced industrial turbines and microturbines; combined heat and power (CHP) systems; fuel cells; geothermal systems; natural gas reciprocating engines; photovoltaics and other solar systems; wind turbines; small, modular biopower; energy storage systems; and hybrid systems. DOE FEMP is investigating ways to use these alternative energy systems in government facilities to meet greater demand, to increase the reliability of the power-generation system, and to reduce the greenhouse gases associated with burning fossil fuels.

  4. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-01-21

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into a fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  5. Water reactive hydrogen fuel cell power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, Andrew P; Melack, John M; Lefenfeld, Michael

    2014-11-25

    A water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes devices and methods to combine reactant fuel materials and aqueous solutions to generate hydrogen. The generated hydrogen is converted in a fuel cell to provide electricity. The water reactive hydrogen fueled power system includes a fuel cell, a water feed tray, and a fuel cartridge to generate power for portable power electronics. The removable fuel cartridge is encompassed by the water feed tray and fuel cell. The water feed tray is refillable with water by a user. The water is then transferred from the water feed tray into the fuel cartridge to generate hydrogen for the fuel cell which then produces power for the user.

  6. 2007 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    power, and transportation -- including data on the range of fuel cell technologies -- polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), alkaline...

  7. Optical modulator including grapene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in California (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun ...

  9. DOE Releases Request for Information on Critical Materials, Including...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    including fuel cell platinum group metal catalysts. ... on issues related to the demand, supply, opportunities for ... Announces Second RFI on Rare Earth Metals DOE Announces RFI ...

  10. Federal Agency NEPA Procedures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Each Federal agency is required to develop NEPA procedures that supplement the CEQ Regulations. Developed in consultation with CEQ, Federal agency NEPA procedures must meet the standards in the CEQ...

  11. Federal Acquisition Regulation Federal Acquisition Circular 2005...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Acquisition Regulation Federal Acquisition Circular 2005-86 Summary of Rules FAC 2005-86 Item Subject FAR Case I Definition of "Multiple-Award Contract" 2015-019 II Sole Source ...

  12. Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-05

    This report provides current statistical data on every fuel assembly irradiated in commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States. It also provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the nuclear and electric industries and the general public. It uses data from the mandatory, ``Nuclear Fuel Data`` survey, Form RW-859 for 1992 and historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on previous Form RW-859 surveys. The report was prepared by the EIA under a Memorandum of Understanding with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

  13. Federal Biomass Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    stewardship, environmental management systems stewardship, environmental management ... especially E85 pumps - - DOE GIS database identifying location of Federal fleets ...

  14. Federal Financial Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Financial Report, as posted on the U.S. Department of Energy's Better Buildings Neighborhood Program website.

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Conversion Rebate The Nebraska Energy Office (NEO) offers rebates for qualified AFV conversions completed after January 4, 2016. The rebate amount for vehicle conversions is 50% of the cost of the equipment and installation, up to $4,500 per vehicle. Qualified vehicle conversions include new equipment that is installed in Nebraska by a certified installer to convert a conventional fuel vehicle to operate using a qualified clean-burning motor fuel. These fuels include hydrogen, compressed natural

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Loans The Oregon Department of Energy administers the State Energy Loan Program (SELP) which offers low-interest loans for qualified projects. Eligible alternative fuel projects include fuel production facilities, dedicated feedstock production, fueling infrastructure, and fleet vehicles. Loan recipients must complete a loan application and pay a loan application fee. For more information, including application forms and interest rate and fee information, see the SELP website. (Reference Oregon

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit An income tax credit is available for 50% of the cost of alternative fueling infrastructure, up to $5,000. Qualifying infrastructure includes electric vehicle supply equipment and equipment to dispense fuel that is 85% or more natural gas, propane, or hydrogen. Unused credits may be carried over into future tax years. The credit expires December 31, 2017. For additional information, including information on how to claim the credit, please see the New

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuels Road Tax Alternative fuels including, but not limited to, natural gas or propane sold by a licensed alternative fuel dealer and used in on-road vehicles is subject to a $0.222 per gallon equivalent road tax. The New Hampshire Department of Safety will define rules for the applicable conversion rates for natural gas and propane based on nationally recognized standards for weights and measures. Certain exemptions apply, including sales to government entities, between duly licensed

  19. Federal Employee Training Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-10-11

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 360.1B, FEDERAL EMPLOYEE TRAINING. The information in this Manual is intended to assist in improving Federal workforce performance under Department of Energy (DOE) managed Federal employee training. Cancels DOE M 360.1A-1. Canceled by DOE O 360.1C.

  20. Federal Employee Training Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-09-21

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 360.1A, Federal Employee Training, dated 9-21-99. The information in this Manual is intended to assist in improving Federal workforce performance under Department of Energy (DOE) managed Federal employee training. Canceled by DOE M 360.1-1B.

  1. Direct Conversion of Biomass into Transportation Fuels - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portal Direct Conversion of Biomass into Transportation Fuels Los Alamos National Laboratory Contact LANL About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryLos Alamos National Laboratory is developing a portfolio of technologies related to catalytic processes for converting oligosaccharides into hydrocarbons under mild conditions.DescriptionWe are seeking a co-development partner interested in teaming to further develop the technology, including pursuit of Federal-funding opportunities, and

  2. Injector having multiple fuel pegs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hadley, Mark Allan; Felling, David Kenton

    2013-04-30

    A fuel injector is provided, including a fuel injector body, a plurality of fuel vanes, and a plurality of fuel pegs. The injector body includes a manifold and an inlet. The manifold is configured for receiving fuel, and the inlet is configured for receiving air. The fuel vanes are located within the injector body and are positioned in a direction that is generally parallel with a longitudinal axis of the injector body to orient the air flowing from the inlet. The plurality of fuel pegs are fluidly connected to the manifold and are arranged within the plurality of fuel vanes. The plurality of fuel pegs are each spaced at a distance that is about equal between each of the plurality of fuel pegs.

  3. Apparatus and method for grounding compressed fuel fueling operator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cohen, Joseph Perry; Farese, David John; Xu, Jianguo

    2002-06-11

    A safety system for grounding an operator at a fueling station prior to removing a fuel fill nozzle from a fuel tank upon completion of a fuel filling operation is provided which includes a fuel tank port in communication with the fuel tank for receiving and retaining the nozzle during the fuel filling operation and a grounding device adjacent to the fuel tank port which includes a grounding switch having a contact member that receives physical contact by the operator and where physical contact of the contact member activates the grounding switch. A releasable interlock is included that provides a lock position wherein the nozzle is locked into the port upon insertion of the nozzle into the port and a release position wherein the nozzle is releasable from the port upon completion of the fuel filling operation and after physical contact of the contact member is accomplished.

  4. Federal and Contractor Employee Roles in the Federal Workplace...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Contractor Employee Roles in the Federal Workplace: New DOE Acquisition Guide Chapter 37.114 Federal and Contractor Employee Roles in the Federal Workplace: New DOE Acquisition ...

  5. A REVIEW OF THORIUM FUEL REPROCESSING EX

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Other reactor programs involving thorium fuel include the Peach Bottom reactor (which was ... these reactors, even though the Peach Bottom spent fuel was sent to Italy for a ...

  6. Fuels Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuels Technologies Fuels Technologies Overview of DOE Fuels Technologies R&D activities, including fuels for advanced combustion engines, advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels, and biofuels. deer08_stork.pdf (644.47 KB) More Documents & Publications Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Mid-Level Ethanol Blends Test Program Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 … Updated Feb 2009

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Entities regulated by RFS include oil refiners and gasoline and diesel importers. The ... This may include sugarcane or sugar beet-based fuels; biodiesel made from vegetable oil or ...

  8. Gaseous-fuel engine technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-31

    This publication contains three distinct groups of papers covering gaseous-fuel injection and control, gaseous-fuel engine projects, and gaseous-fuel engine/vehicle applications. Contents include: ultra rapid natural gas port injection; a CNG specific fuel injector using latching solenoid technology; development of an electronically-controlled natural gas-fueled John Deere PowerTech 8.1L engine; adapting a Geo Metro to run on natural gas using fuel-injection technology; behavior of a closed loop controlled air valve type mixer on a natural gas fueled engine under transient operation; and a turbocharged lean-burn 4.3 liter natural gas engine.

  9. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Presentation-given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting-covers the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogen and fuel activities and technology applications. fupwg_fall11_devlin.pdf (3.34 MB) More Documents & Publications Expanding the Use of Biogas with Fuel Cell Technologies Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities: 2011 IPHE Stationary Fuel Cell Workshop Demonstration of Next

  10. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update - Energy Information Administration

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    U.S. On-Highway Diesel Fuel Prices* (dollars per gallon)full history Change from 032116 ... collected on a gallon of fuel that are paid to the federal, state, or local government. ...

  11. EA-1977: Acceptance and Disposition of Used Nuclear Fuel Containing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin Highly Enriched Uranium from the Federal Republic of Germany EA-1977: Acceptance and Disposition of Used Nuclear Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin...

  12. NREL: Transportation Research - Alternative Fuels Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alternative Fuels Characterization Find out about other biomass research projects at NREL. NREL alternative fuels projects help overcome technical barriers and expand markets for renewable, biodegradable vehicle fuels. These liquid fuels include higher-level ethanol blends, butanol, biodiesel, renewable diesel, other biomass-derived fuels, and natural gas. By studying the fuel chemistry as well as combustion and emissions impacts of alternative fuels, NREL helps improve engine efficiency, reduce

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Arkansas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 35,295 37,886 39,962 1970's 39,169 30,832 32,457 33,789 31,040 33,291 34,011 33,913 34,612 33,442 1980's 30,690 28,282 29,438 27,739 28,995 26,731 24,949 24,603 27,457 27,271 1990's 25,129 25,986 25,314 28,998 27,407 27,409 31,006 29,441 28,062 27,898 2000's 33,180 32,031 32,928 31,746 29,821 31,521 31,286 32,187 36,924 36,373 2010's 40,232 39,986 41,435 47,636

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in California (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 184,630 189,903 206,861 1970's 209,945 239,685 231,536 232,774 228,988 240,239 219,840 227,543 221,441 258,490 1980's 258,151 236,910 236,202 215,918 191,838 205,044 182,794 212,904 248,397 259,118 1990's 285,090 287,608 285,008 250,283 261,989 278,761 235,068 253,923 282,153 244,701 2000's 246,439 245,795 238,308 232,912 231,597 233,082 244,432 251,024 251,045

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Colorado (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 39,942 47,287 52,256 1970's 59,081 62,805 63,154 69,844 68,322 76,288 75,959 72,597 71,422 74,831 1980's 66,952 58,913 66,991 64,615 71,890 68,975 61,620 64,355 68,515 67,477 1990's 66,290 68,938 66,420 71,647 65,870 66,639 68,914 69,074 63,132 59,346 2000's 60,874 65,011 66,939 62,616 61,956 62,099 59,851 63,231 65,806 62,441 2010's 57,658 55,843 51,795 58,787

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Delaware (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,968 2,084 2,526 1970's 2,804 3,010 3,205 3,093 3,169 2,964 3,078 2,815 3,005 2,842 1980's 3,246 3,783 3,577 3,428 3,827 3,412 3,514 3,741 4,041 4,184 1990's 4,042 4,253 4,965 5,195 5,459 5,743 6,694 6,608 5,590 6,119 2000's 5,125 5,680 7,477 8,437 8,465 8,383 8,134 8,628 8,868 11,684 2010's 12,193 10,478 10,034 11,170 11,882 11,189

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Florida (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 22,501 21,890 24,721 1970's 26,914 25,478 23,243 24,315 22,527 31,745 39,681 41,236 35,386 36,638 1980's 30,182 33,702 29,788 29,228 30,481 30,674 35,829 37,492 37,834 35,105 1990's 36,306 39,264 41,727 41,151 39,935 40,383 41,810 36,700 37,659 36,269 2000's 47,904 49,286 55,803 54,283 56,321 57,690 50,625 51,097 50,901 50,371 2010's 54,065 53,532 54,659 59,971

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Georgia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 30,202 36,034 39,020 1970's 38,726 41,881 44,992 47,253 44,317 49,438 46,351 55,268 60,266 62,437 1980's 58,763 57,139 54,718 56,280 55,909 51,519 50,405 54,592 55,963 53,089 1990's 49,486 51,036 53,861 57,525 54,051 56,536 61,377 57,220 55,419 43,581 2000's 58,793 50,645 48,631 50,273 55,047 52,902 48,137 48,591 51,518 53,627 2010's 60,153 56,602 51,918 57,195

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Hawaii (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,715 1,610 1,607 1,548 1,328 1,858 1,883 2,019 2,049 2,129 1990's 2,223 2,148 2,144 2,123 2,200 2,199 2,132 1,751 1,747 1,749 2000's 1,771 1,749 1,720 1,751 1,803 1,838 1,813 1,836 1,769 1,752 2010's 1,777 1,768 1,850 1,873 1,931 1,908

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Idaho (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 4,972 6,374 6,613 1970's 5,851 8,232 10,712 9,387 8,040 12,177 8,742 8,405 5,503 6,923 1980's 5,756 5,422 5,729 5,758 8,493 8,999 8,543 7,618 8,252 9,024 1990's 8,535 9,582 8,932 10,675 10,088 10,360 11,506 11,433 11,676 12,618 2000's 13,414 13,623 13,592 12,019 12,995 13,231 13,573 14,274 16,333 15,740 2010's 15,033 16,855 15,838 18,485 16,963 16,171

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Illinois (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 175,281 174,565 189,006 1970's 193,434 210,424 224,488 218,530 216,114 215,718 246,659 243,686 251,895 237,199 1980's 228,178 223,427 218,751 204,834 232,170 213,528 204,979 191,047 215,257 196,171 1990's 200,267 193,844 196,964 203,157 197,558 203,802 218,054 202,850 174,687 188,520 2000's 201,768 189,160 204,570 211,710 204,039 201,882 196,361 203,368 222,382

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Kansas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 37,141 46,232 54,062 1970's 52,632 56,246 61,286 52,674 53,461 51,705 57,310 51,815 64,532 60,931 1980's 58,880 52,036 55,470 52,535 57,516 56,522 55,730 53,609 61,120 58,554 1990's 56,045 58,571 53,973 56,023 52,253 53,122 57,229 41,482 41,788 38,952 2000's 40,297 37,560 38,802 37,781 36,779 29,616 27,505 30,546 33,531 32,512 2010's 31,799 32,117 25,452 33,198

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Kentucky (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 32,313 36,089 41,934 1970's 42,461 42,352 42,843 45,797 42,320 38,497 57,203 50,170 46,647 40,509 1980's 39,359 36,379 35,260 34,111 36,138 33,758 32,666 33,298 35,718 36,148 1990's 31,806 33,700 35,419 37,817 36,744 38,610 40,972 38,627 32,464 35,798 2000's 38,669 35,255 35,942 38,212 36,989 36,894 32,590 34,386 37,167 35,438 2010's 36,818 34,592 30,771 37,422

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 51,062 56,937 54,010 1970's 70,321 67,515 66,331 59,518 58,097 50,662 43,567 44,563 65,300 115,743 1980's 39,996 39,507 33,729 34,906 33,088 30,228 27,985 27,845 27,475 27,156 1990's 24,937 25,452 28,445 25,157 24,184 23,833 25,746 25,613 24,042 24,559 2000's 25,687 24,604 25,540 25,161 24,700 25,085 22,240 23,863 22,869 23,672 2010's 27,009 25,925 26,294 28,875

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Maine (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,961 1,672 2,338 1970's 3,220 3,604 3,678 3,323 3,441 3,894 3,814 3,846 4,467 5,023 1980's 864 1,043 1,192 1,124 1,124 1,139 1,214 1,250 1,461 1,660 1990's 1,678 1,860 2,209 2,311 2,381 2,426 2,566 2,713 2,456 2,547 2000's 2,770 2,642 5,167 4,781 4,811 4,792 4,701 5,749 5,878 5,541 2010's 5,830 6,593 7,313 8,146 9,030 9,795

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Maryland (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 28,154 30,419 34,674 1970's 37,529 40,988 43,950 42,953 43,080 37,466 42,422 40,532 39,821 47,326 1980's 28,576 32,055 30,871 30,758 25,299 24,134 23,816 25,544 25,879 26,920 1990's 24,051 38,117 42,464 43,635 44,136 46,874 45,842 49,802 57,370 58,103 2000's 55,669 59,802 63,999 70,557 70,195 69,718 62,868 70,852 70,411 69,119 2010's 67,555 67,505 64,146 71,145

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Massachusetts (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 24,737 25,396 29,821 1970's 35,356 36,994 36,778 39,288 37,384 37,812 37,763 40,598 45,657 46,701 1980's 53,462 50,131 61,286 39,640 41,271 41,382 43,661 46,522 48,915 51,508 1990's 50,618 53,188 64,352 65,429 84,534 82,270 96,187 105,813 90,092 65,136 2000's 63,793 61,677 64,763 62,590 56,879 56,665 52,283 61,504 72,303 71,546 2010's 72,053 81,068 73,040

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 16,547 18,297 17,667 1970's 23,846 25,853 24,604 23,701 25,504 23,922 20,214 19,304 21,312 27,224 1980's 20,886 19,267 17,213 17,158 17,860 16,591 16,891 17,922 18,108 17,568 1990's 17,548 17,743 17,942 19,199 19,232 19,904 22,225 22,070 21,358 20,208 2000's 21,673 21,585 21,221 22,933 22,130 20,882 19,425 20,774 20,181 19,095 2010's 21,179 20,247 17,834

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Missouri (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 82,524 79,821 79,019 1970's 87,644 89,534 97,506 91,038 90,291 90,719 98,435 93,323 98,680 94,629 1980's 76,054 68,455 69,913 66,106 67,218 60,345 61,890 58,205 63,839 63,039 1990's 59,387 63,191 60,963 69,670 66,196 65,086 72,802 69,829 61,995 63,100 2000's 62,673 64,924 61,897 61,516 61,755 60,369 56,722 59,224 64,993 61,433 2010's 61,194 62,304 54,736 64,522

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Montana (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 15,516 13,651 16,593 1970's 18,564 18,109 19,151 19,143 16,602 18,654 17,831 16,706 17,766 17,396 1980's 14,265 13,725 15,987 13,534 14,256 14,820 12,536 10,989 12,041 13,141 1990's 12,164 12,846 11,557 13,880 12,981 13,489 14,823 13,911 12,952 12,088 2000's 13,533 13,245 14,704 15,119 13,407 13,136 13,181 13,223 14,340 23,575 2010's 20,459 22,336 19,205 20,971

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Nebraska (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 41,443 41,765 46,041 1970's 46,824 47,261 45,518 38,690 42,298 43,117 48,713 46,989 40,736 43,507 1980's 43,356 40,612 43,022 39,055 41,900 39,404 36,357 34,205 39,388 37,351 1990's 36,489 40,291 34,490 34,745 38,946 40,044 40,833 33,853 28,911 27,586 2000's 28,907 27,792 28,185 28,368 29,858 27,401 28,087 30,067 34,813 31,790 2010's 31,993 32,115 26,503 32,214

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Nevada (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,164 6,997 8,204 1970's 9,633 11,014 12,755 13,144 14,078 14,965 18,389 17,436 19,940 19,638 1980's 10,207 8,294 8,449 11,758 12,012 12,232 11,451 13,747 14,879 15,116 1990's 15,073 16,960 16,101 17,549 18,694 18,703 20,421 21,958 23,314 22,710 2000's 25,586 22,912 22,685 24,099 26,862 26,552 28,046 28,224 28,920 29,531 2010's 29,475 30,763 28,991 31,211 29,105

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in New Jersey (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 28,656 32,546 34,510 1970's 55,953 60,230 62,917 61,846 58,210 53,346 90,463 53,896 48,005 52,314 1980's 60,481 74,627 78,750 79,624 83,906 83,467 85,775 94,459 101,325 117,385 1990's 115,591 121,240 130,891 128,942 132,008 138,965 150,432 168,760 146,653 163,759 2000's 158,543 131,417 146,176 159,647 168,768 169,857 152,501 168,778 168,574 180,404 2010's

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in New Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 27,447 30,713 28,680 1970's 33,035 33,760 32,354 25,569 25,221 22,800 33,708 25,476 25,706 26,371 1980's 24,505 20,446 21,715 22,413 22,947 16,733 20,642 19,939 31,032 28,459 1990's 23,694 24,993 27,884 27,898 24,964 23,934 26,466 27,403 27,206 27,103 2000's 27,009 27,133 25,476 23,745 25,458 24,186 23,404 24,876 25,183 24,701 2010's 25,155 25,035 24,898 26,790

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in New York (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 122,050 122,885 128,282 1970's 139,498 145,458 147,326 142,736 136,332 128,273 143,530 130,898 142,988 143,512 1980's 161,813 167,253 164,784 161,770 170,365 165,498 167,503 167,178 188,037 196,380 1990's 194,990 199,598 217,214 220,729 223,256 231,352 253,075 320,862 335,343 360,188 2000's 365,879 347,253 362,247 339,371 359,070 275,721 259,972 285,030 290,150

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in North Carolina (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 17,100 20,624 24,524 1970's 21,532 26,331 24,200 23,044 21,002 21,615 20,042 18,303 20,366 23,916 1980's 26,172 26,367 24,891 24,705 26,174 25,029 25,474 30,010 32,464 33,145 1990's 31,277 34,313 36,418 37,370 38,940 37,362 40,467 38,021 36,427 38,019 2000's 43,113 38,583 40,198 44,262 45,383 47,696 46,321 45,434 48,567 51,303 2010's 56,225 49,898 48,951

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in North Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,059 7,072 7,444 1970's 8,315 9,059 9,874 9,875 11,528 12,425 12,202 11,234 11,845 12,044 1980's 11,026 9,419 11,361 9,828 9,961 10,118 9,084 7,908 9,827 10,609 1990's 10,236 10,732 9,759 10,642 10,783 11,644 12,150 10,870 10,082 10,023 2000's 11,060 10,456 11,675 10,952 10,473 9,903 9,355 10,296 11,101 10,987 2010's 10,302 10,973 10,364 13,236 13,999 12,334

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Ohio (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 153,376 165,414 175,372 1970's 183,412 189,791 208,068 196,663 192,497 169,357 179,392 149,011 172,429 158,117 1980's 166,210 161,110 157,664 143,568 155,350 143,311 139,119 146,983 158,790 161,516 1990's 143,503 150,339 160,645 164,044 166,798 175,160 189,966 183,838 156,630 167,573 2000's 177,917 172,555 163,274 179,611 170,240 166,693 146,930 160,580 167,070

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Oklahoma (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 38,459 42,751 41,151 1970's 43,921 41,978 43,852 40,403 41,074 41,806 44,862 48,253 45,729 52,036 1980's 47,135 40,833 45,664 44,177 44,423 40,791 36,517 32,428 47,870 38,509 1990's 37,208 39,588 35,190 40,766 36,504 39,639 46,152 45,086 43,800 39,565 2000's 43,125 40,558 40,229 37,472 37,103 39,359 35,492 40,846 40,772 41,421 2010's 41,822 40,393 36,106 44,238

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Oregon (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,961 7,874 9,965 1970's 11,360 13,563 14,530 13,722 13,401 15,896 13,995 10,861 12,124 13,820 1980's 15,171 14,922 16,330 15,143 17,012 19,043 16,843 16,718 18,406 20,249 1990's 20,449 22,328 19,570 24,047 22,960 22,419 25,597 25,465 25,986 28,510 2000's 28,589 27,884 27,714 26,110 26,214 27,631 27,844 29,007 30,444 29,744 2010's 27,246 30,359 28,805 30,566 28,377

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Pennsylvania (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 82,702 87,620 95,720 1970's 99,339 110,014 122,518 116,265 102,495 98,991 124,517 111,885 110,620 111,498 1980's 118,462 128,561 125,557 115,222 126,211 115,329 114,442 114,800 127,382 132,421 1990's 125,673 125,546 134,254 131,776 138,473 143,735 154,642 144,084 130,996 143,256 2000's 145,319 136,468 136,202 149,458 142,608 144,971 130,328 145,852 144,603

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Rhode Island (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 3,142 3,416 3,850 1970's 5,064 4,530 4,734 4,648 4,397 4,233 2,895 3,019 4,783 6,169 1980's 6,751 6,867 7,156 6,976 7,466 7,590 6,718 9,395 8,352 8,767 1990's 8,071 8,269 9,080 9,205 12,049 12,064 12,298 12,303 11,477 11,804 2000's 12,974 12,808 11,468 11,391 11,289 11,043 9,950 11,247 10,843 10,725 2010's 10,458 10,843 10,090 11,633 13,178 11,734

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in South Carolina (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 8,840 10,544 12,938 1970's 13,850 14,371 14,137 16,053 14,820 17,202 35,062 32,117 24,681 17,943 1980's 22,885 19,436 15,560 16,548 16,635 15,270 15,894 17,195 17,472 16,525 1990's 15,394 15,796 16,644 17,014 17,870 18,868 20,328 19,560 19,828 20,566 2000's 22,105 20,743 21,029 22,365 22,255 22,048 20,691 20,927 22,283 21,953 2010's 24,119 22,113 21,416

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,444 10,723 11,201 1970's 11,361 10,592 11,204 10,568 11,671 11,488 15,344 14,786 13,547 9,951 1980's 8,507 8,188 9,384 8,651 9,128 9,987 9,166 8,199 8,396 8,826 1990's 8,555 9,473 9,122 10,696 10,274 10,685 11,598 10,422 9,264 9,564 2000's 10,119 9,711 10,258 10,375 9,958 9,819 9,525 10,337 11,362 11,563 2010's 11,025 11,101 9,330 12,151 12,310 10,497

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Tennessee (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 34,380 38,325 41,069 1970's 42,720 44,062 45,704 45,974 44,651 42,488 38,244 35,127 30,917 42,714 1980's 44,048 42,686 38,697 42,903 46,544 43,399 42,589 44,144 45,852 47,513 1990's 43,552 45,953 46,532 50,754 50,760 51,235 58,497 55,117 52,394 52,572 2000's 53,365 53,010 53,710 56,576 54,201 54,264 51,537 51,056 54,094 51,879 2010's 56,194 52,156 44,928 53,888

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 139,727 139,442 140,854 1970's 146,090 142,423 141,128 155,070 134,418 116,749 135,452 158,683 168,946 233,758 1980's 168,513 157,199 189,447 157,481 165,700 151,774 146,972 156,509 175,368 182,670 1990's 172,333 180,973 184,673 175,988 180,232 209,584 178,549 216,333 169,610 171,714 2000's 190,453 171,847 226,274 218,565 192,901 159,972 147,366 161,255 167,129

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Utah (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 6,905 8,114 9,443 1970's 10,180 8,504 7,933 8,997 5,806 6,055 14,681 9,661 8,430 6 1980's 330 343 21,831 7,986 8,569 8,505 4,636 14,811 17,911 16,522 1990's 16,220 19,276 16,584 22,588 26,501 26,825 29,543 31,129 30,955 30,361 2000's 31,282 30,917 33,501 30,994 31,156 34,447 34,051 34,447 37,612 37,024 2010's 38,461 40,444 35,363 41,398 38,156 35,552

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Vermont (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 828 831 853 856 1,467 1,575 1,688 1,833 1,941 2,081 1990's 2,049 2,058 2,319 2,382 2,669 2,672 2,825 3,051 2,979 2,309 2000's 2,595 2,473 2,470 2,757 2,724 2,610 2,374 2,631 2,495 2,483 2010's 2,384 2,479 2,314 4,748 4,830 5,949

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 22,756 24,594 27,155 1970's 30,090 34,672 34,176 37,632 35,281 32,358 34,887 34,685 43,064 33,946 1980's 38,467 35,255 38,157 38,457 34,825 33,975 35,453 39,401 42,013 44,181 1990's 41,038 44,077 50,757 52,880 52,944 56,948 59,262 61,895 58,283 61,516 2000's 66,098 59,809 62,699 64,004 64,518 65,838 62,352 66,444 67,006 67,709 2010's 68,911 64,282 60,217 68,126

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Washington (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 15,133 16,244 17,166 1970's 18,490 20,612 23,254 32,333 33,221 31,988 31,652 29,946 25,330 33,369 1980's 30,754 28,629 30,559 28,728 32,371 35,459 32,022 32,366 36,674 38,502 1990's 38,671 41,738 37,800 43,620 42,982 42,568 48,139 46,686 45,561 50,735 2000's 50,462 57,160 46,455 47,845 48,455 49,745 51,292 53,689 56,205 55,697 2010's 51,335 56,487 53,420 55,805

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in West Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 18,511 20,402 21,534 1970's 21,678 23,106 26,654 25,854 24,586 24,776 20,462 19,556 22,501 22,337 1980's 21,980 22,191 20,548 18,771 18,780 17,224 15,995 16,792 22,416 23,258 1990's 21,391 21,043 24,419 24,381 24,979 25,872 28,025 25,913 24,986 27,301 2000's 26,167 27,737 24,729 26,681 25,177 25,084 23,477 22,633 25,299 23,761 2010's 24,907 24,094 22,634

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 33,610 36,067 52,315 1970's 54,555 47,662 43,753 55,012 65,705 67,485 57,702 61,280 77,890 80,756 1980's 77,107 68,075 69,694 68,020 70,230 72,803 55,275 57,750 66,939 70,090 1990's 66,339 71,516 71,314 77,079 78,609 84,888 93,816 88,729 81,316 81,689 2000's 81,139 76,095 85,811 87,131 82,187 86,086 86,342 89,016 97,137 91,459 2010's 82,204 87,040 76,949 99,434

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Wyoming (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,865 11,637 14,069 1970's 14,026 14,072 17,287 13,206 13,241 10,253 9,152 8,767 8,100 8,211 1980's 4,980 4,511 10,098 9,182 9,431 9,139 8,045 8,443 8,700 8,551 1990's 8,440 9,101 8,009 10,268 9,231 9,833 9,721 10,754 10,414 9,838 2000's 9,752 9,535 10,414 9,986 9,916 9,184 9,500 9,442 10,180 10,372 2010's 11,153 11,680 10,482 12,013 12,188 12,498

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in the District of Columbia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 13,752 14,993 15,881 15,945 11,680 11,921 11,934 13,999 15,012 15,741 1990's 13,473 15,550 16,103 16,229 14,742 17,035 16,347 18,012 16,862 17,837 2000's 17,728 16,546 18,332 17,098 17,384 17,683 17,107 19,297 18,411 18,705 2010's 18,547 16,892 15,363 17,234 17,498 15,79

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alabama (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 293,981 299,146 299,872 2000's 315,202 299,631 343,913 316,665 350,734 323,143 358,141 385,209 369,750 418,677 2010's 496,051 558,116 622,359 573,981 599,473 640,707

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 241,664 247,908 241,648 2000's 240,672 217,765 233,046 237,428 205,480 202,946 221,378 214,298 221,983 230,488 2010's 256,102 266,194 278,304 263,281 249,549 270,209

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,049,536 2,228,414 2,264,158 2000's 2,434,770 2,400,993 2,218,923 2,218,715 2,353,823 2,196,741 2,248,988 2,327,205 2,330,514 2,256,380 2010's 2,196,086 2,096,279 2,337,017 2,352,421 2,265,431 2,257,216

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 272,530 289,945 288,147 2000's 321,784 412,773 404,873 377,794 378,894 405,509 383,452 435,360 426,034 420,500 2010's 396,083 345,663 327,108 361,779 367,021 NA

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Delaware (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 46,499 40,794 55,968 2000's 48,325 50,090 52,167 46,143 48,019 46,863 43,172 48,139 48,144 50,126 2010's 54,685 79,251 100,630 95,008 99,736 99,543

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 363,402 360,973 328,730 2000's 408,209 343,698 375,567 372,492 388,751 406,852 414,377 435,919 419,057 456,082 2010's 521,557 512,466 605,262 617,310 645,253 683,796

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Hawaii (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,894 2,654 3,115 2000's 2,841 2,818 2,734 2,732 2,772 2,793 2,782 2,848 2,700 2,605 2010's 2,625 2,616 2,687 2,853 2,927 2,929

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 63,483 63,781 66,160 2000's 66,758 73,723 65,510 65,329 69,572 69,202 69,202 74,395 81,646 78,166 2010's 75,647 77,343 83,274 98,843 87,647 98,782

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Illinois (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,062,536 944,170 992,865 2000's 1,017,283 940,691 1,036,615 987,964 941,964 958,727 883,080 954,100 987,137 931,329 2010's 942,205 960,018 910,611 1,024,851 1,062,377 960,624

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Indiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 545,839 514,407 549,639 2000's 564,919 494,706 533,754 520,352 519,785 524,415 489,881 528,655 544,202 500,135 2010's 564,904 619,977 642,209 664,817 703,637 712,946

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Iowa (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 243,181 223,287 222,943 2000's 224,299 215,348 215,482 220,263 216,625 229,717 225,929 280,954 311,672 301,340 2010's 300,033 296,098 285,038 314,742 317,784 NA

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 252,275 259,783 240,248 2000's 253,037 224,367 239,449 227,436 213,122 206,537 217,981 246,094 244,181 243,199 2010's 235,316 241,473 223,188 241,292 246,547 NA

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maine (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 6,290 5,716 6,572 2000's 43,971 94,569 100,659 69,973 85,478 61,088 63,541 62,430 69,202 69,497 2010's 75,821 69,291 67,504 63,247 59,362

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maryland (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 208,890 185,583 193,142 2000's 208,894 175,611 193,766 194,280 192,242 200,336 179,949 198,715 193,613 193,988 2010's 205,688 187,921 201,550 193,232 201,199 205,407

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 958,506 846,478 919,922 2000's 926,633 874,578 926,299 888,584 881,257 875,492 767,509 762,502 748,655 703,346 2010's 713,533 745,769 761,544 787,603 824,527 NA

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Missouri (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 275,838 253,157 259,054 2000's 277,206 281,875 273,073 259,526 260,708 265,485 250,290 269,825 288,847 260,976 2010's 274,361 265,534 250,902 271,341 290,421 271,116

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Montana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 54,138 54,093 55,129 2000's 57,725 54,529 58,451 56,074 54,066 55,200 60,602 60,869 64,240 66,613 2010's 60,517 68,113 61,963 68,410 71,435

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nebraska (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 128,092 127,840 118,536 2000's 123,791 118,933 117,427 113,320 110,725 114,402 125,202 145,253 160,685 156,161 2010's 161,284 162,219 150,961 166,233 165,620 149,107

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oklahoma (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 459,508 490,070 456,573 2000's 450,596 400,740 429,152 443,139 444,514 487,723 528,236 563,474 590,997 566,176 2010's 582,389 559,215 587,287 539,056 508,363 539,439

  14. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oregon (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 172,588 216,058 224,767 2000's 213,063 218,632 193,006 205,415 225,263 225,277 214,346 242,371 261,105 240,765 2010's 232,900 194,336 211,232 236,276 216,365 233,523

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Pennsylvania (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 664,782 609,779 648,194 2000's 659,042 596,041 632,035 651,938 662,513 656,097 625,944 711,945 705,284 755,938 2010's 811,209 866,775 918,490 959,041 1,042,647 1,078,18

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 137,700 139,522 133,518 2000's 137,213 135,123 135,699 125,899 128,441 130,286 152,283 183,237 192,281 182,187 2010's 185,228 184,581 178,941 199,684 198,278 187,452

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 8,052 7,726 8,025 2000's 10,411 7,906 8,353 8,386 8,672 8,358 8,041 8,851 8,609 8,621 2010's 8,428 8,558 8,077 9,512 10,554 11,7

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Virginia (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 240,244 252,233 267,269 2000's 258,975 228,670 247,351 254,008 268,674 292,043 264,954 309,866 286,497 304,266 2010's 359,208 352,281 392,255 401,623 404,939

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Washington (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 247,530 281,143 279,656 2000's 280,617 303,060 227,360 243,072 253,663 256,580 256,842 265,211 291,535 302,930 2010's 278,139 257,945 255,356 308,148 298,088 296,056

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wyoming (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 70,792 77,652 60,593 2000's 63,384 60,385 69,633 67,627 65,639 64,753 65,487 67,693 66,472 61,774 2010's 67,736 70,862 73,690 74,597 73,096 72,979

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 30,401 34,749 37,275 1970's 36,254 36,657 37,389 33,126 35,349 33,439 34,450 34,303 29,649 36,717 1980's 28,525 26,860 25,876 26,665 27,567 25,836 25,128 22,384 25,562 26,469 1990's 24,287 23,711 25,232 25,723 25,526 26,228 29,000 32,360 25,705 27,581 2000's 25,580 26,391 25,011 25,356 26,456 25,046 24,396 23,420 25,217 24,293 2010's 27,071 25,144 21,551 25,324

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in the U.S. (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1973 392,315 394,281 310,799 231,943 174,258 135,165 107,728 105,681 103,831 126,540 216,762 297,734 1974 406,440 335,562 301,588 243,041 165,233 128,032 109,694 107,828 106,510 143,295 199,514 308,879 1975 346,998 345,520 312,362 289,341 164,629 119,960 107,077 104,332 106,655 133,055 179,518 298,845 1976 405,483 364,339 285,912 221,383 169,209 129,058 112,070 113,174 113,284 145,824 252,710

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alabama (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 36,984 28,384 27,217 23,714 21,027 21,010 22,537 23,488 21,619 24,186 23,647 25,742 2002 36,559 33,467 32,355 26,061 23,580 27,901 29,889 30,615 26,781 22,744 22,838 31,044 2003 39,779 34,222 26,412 23,422 20,310 22,858 27,147 32,162 21,482 18,885 20,502 29,389 2004 38,499 36,343 31,829 27,460 26,994 26,923 32,691 29,710 24,787 23,688 22,042 29,661 2005 32,785 29,012 29,689 22,622 22,525 26,381 30,759 31,841

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alaska (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 12,927 11,677 12,492 10,557 9,618 8,588 9,860 10,185 9,784 11,290 11,926 13,523 2002 12,414 11,258 11,090 10,310 10,076 11,260 10,510 9,907 9,717 10,827 10,291 11,621 2003 9,731 8,407 9,561 9,112 8,639 8,518 8,461 8,717 8,895 10,027 9,481 10,141 2004 12,414 10,221 10,996 9,967 9,462 9,831 9,829 8,537 9,512 9,377 9,374 11,436 2005 11,592 10,185 10,627 9,847 9,809 9,712 10,596 10,360 10,325 10,740 11,792 11,516 2006

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 26,139 20,654 21,940 16,528 13,819 12,558 14,779 16,061 15,014 18,239 19,675 22,233 2002 24,431 24,940 22,284 19,166 15,635 16,964 18,741 17,700 16,789 16,932 17,770 21,567 2003 27,116 27,256 22,904 18,625 17,603 17,849 18,208 18,467 15,282 16,402 16,960 20,603 2004 24,746 25,909 21,663 16,382 15,991 14,085 14,456 14,551 11,956 14,094 13,138 18,337 2005 22,386 19,719 19,170 15,597 14,643 15,315 16,703 17,392

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 57,089 50,447 49,042 41,157 30,506 23,904 22,403 22,033 19,905 22,672 30,231 42,797 2002 47,541 44,713 45,909 30,319 24,230 22,105 26,301 21,119 21,764 34,563 38,884 46,826 2003 44,971 47,164 38,292 25,380 24,811 18,484 23,772 23,529 20,981 22,248 39,408 48,023 2004 47,548 44,859 30,853 28,458 23,766 20,408 22,895 21,210 20,651 26,731 39,719 50,977 2005 50,356 41,495 39,617 33,501 25,108 20,725 26,350 23,387

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Florida (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 34,086 30,338 35,463 39,708 42,466 46,947 53,430 53,352 55,306 52,955 42,205 47,598 2002 50,177 41,302 50,453 55,845 56,767 62,343 67,197 70,144 65,136 64,259 47,600 45,144 2003 53,384 43,538 54,761 51,487 62,575 58,312 64,041 61,764 62,150 59,558 56,488 50,525 2004 50,877 49,866 51,687 53,442 62,663 69,628 72,443 70,540 70,259 66,961 50,122 53,169 2005 59,417 49,956 60,238 55,269 64,436 69,719 90,376 84,114

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 49,414 34,292 35,867 25,368 20,633 20,544 24,229 26,863 21,857 25,679 23,983 34,450 2002 44,041 37,992 33,260 23,775 22,612 24,924 30,113 29,701 24,899 23,785 32,829 47,106 2003 56,470 43,704 31,355 30,232 21,920 20,512 23,789 26,828 21,628 22,981 26,920 45,508 2004 52,486 48,806 31,529 28,718 26,610 24,562 26,132 26,093 22,927 22,025 29,012 49,125 2005 47,756 39,503 39,085 25,191 23,198 26,957 31,619 33,089

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Hawaii (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 253 237 247 243 237 244 242 227 226 220 217 225 2002 236 226 225 234 226 224 239 222 224 215 227 236 2003 251 236 234 229 226 218 224 218 223 218 216 239 2004 243 230 239 240 221 235 229 222 226 221 230 236 2005 242 225 240 240 245 238 224 225 226 218 229 240 2006 241 226 242 237 239 235 229 222 233 223 223 231 2007 259 226 229 232 234 244 241 218 223 244 256 244 2008 245 237 235 238 225 233 238 211 211 206 204

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9,061 8,656 6,890 5,799 4,539 3,728 4,106 4,145 4,609 5,611 7,528 8,984 2002 8,747 8,547 7,861 5,699 4,667 3,654 3,038 2,812 3,303 4,162 5,950 7,000 2003 7,519 7,632 7,150 5,498 4,487 3,443 4,268 3,399 3,902 3,977 6,312 7,657 2004 10,168 9,168 7,032 4,556 4,391 3,602 3,672 3,601 3,844 4,668 6,536 8,238 2005 9,355 8,465 6,757 6,168 3,946 3,381 3,511 3,614 3,733 4,635 6,142 9,403 2006 8,375 8,140 7,439 5,455 3,877

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Indiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 77,275 61,840 57,608 37,045 27,762 26,685 25,473 29,184 25,697 34,650 39,146 51,997 2002 65,893 58,962 58,569 44,882 32,659 27,696 30,899 30,668 28,357 37,204 49,556 68,056 2003 80,534 70,155 52,368 35,903 31,266 25,652 24,580 26,666 27,072 34,914 46,556 64,253 2004 80,680 70,341 53,056 37,842 30,840 25,006 25,592 27,498 26,658 33,102 43,630 65,054 2005 72,775 58,428 61,390 39,473 30,697 28,897 28,628 29,602

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Iowa (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 33,183 29,626 26,788 17,172 12,430 10,449 10,249 10,177 10,494 14,476 16,865 23,400 2002 28,527 25,072 25,693 18,706 13,413 10,076 9,731 9,815 10,403 14,561 22,219 27,225 2003 31,445 32,450 25,482 16,870 12,421 10,288 9,892 10,030 10,550 13,644 20,542 26,599 2004 32,639 30,955 23,081 15,569 11,543 10,481 9,546 10,080 10,193 14,132 20,759 27,591 2005 34,272 27,838 24,671 18,370 13,180 12,206 11,888 11,542 11,838

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kentucky (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 31,659 23,182 21,670 14,953 9,527 8,890 9,668 9,881 10,024 12,591 16,271 23,216 2002 26,131 24,533 23,241 14,879 12,317 11,623 13,804 10,869 11,129 14,628 21,069 27,646 2003 34,776 29,032 20,580 14,017 10,797 9,334 9,467 10,296 10,390 13,196 16,933 27,218 2004 32,640 27,566 21,630 15,771 12,331 11,249 10,810 11,428 10,883 13,355 17,689 27,203 2005 29,373 24,036 24,578 15,557 13,614 13,693 12,658 14,134 12,122

  14. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Louisiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 90,750 82,773 86,038 87,577 81,223 77,877 93,937 105,743 93,365 92,353 85,277 92,797 2002 102,807 96,945 102,315 94,281 91,511 97,058 107,870 109,348 97,986 94,054 96,857 102,289 2003 106,504 91,821 89,554 89,376 88,426 78,863 91,469 95,243 85,824 84,198 83,677 94,139 2004 101,114 98,005 96,851 86,763 89,143 89,075 96,344 98,583 93,156 94,397 89,577 99,046 2005 102,652 87,403 100,620 97,398 104,027 102,860 104,234

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maryland (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 28,398 21,618 21,408 13,900 9,252 8,342 9,046 11,007 9,109 12,662 13,558 17,125 2002 24,221 22,802 20,670 12,534 8,846 8,846 10,514 12,842 10,157 12,911 20,408 28,827 2003 31,739 28,530 21,240 15,685 9,809 8,723 8,128 7,986 7,131 11,863 16,167 27,049 2004 33,576 27,062 20,558 14,623 9,867 8,560 7,704 8,271 7,535 11,725 16,222 26,279 2005 29,469 25,497 24,272 13,414 10,273 10,104 9,641 11,634 8,302 12,060 16,807

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 133,140 112,047 111,301 76,191 48,707 41,686 43,845 44,577 40,142 59,283 71,352 92,053 2002 119,902 108,891 104,208 87,138 63,810 52,457 51,899 47,094 40,938 53,419 82,015 114,268 2003 140,545 133,702 114,085 80,651 53,258 37,279 35,261 42,115 32,744 49,901 69,659 99,067 2004 137,906 127,671 102,442 76,978 54,610 41,310 38,001 37,565 37,285 48,239 71,870 107,025 2005 133,079 112,812 108,608 72,884 50,886 47,768

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Mississippi (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 26,479 16,635 19,646 21,739 20,948 20,348 30,696 31,715 28,537 28,525 24,653 28,356 2002 29,331 28,518 28,650 25,702 23,117 27,335 33,509 29,104 24,492 19,663 18,433 24,444 2003 29,743 24,826 20,395 19,195 18,492 16,946 17,613 19,394 16,780 14,228 16,133 21,577 2004 23,187 23,828 21,311 19,087 24,565 21,821 24,034 23,064 18,228 18,641 15,628 21,305 2005 23,881 20,984 23,827 18,047 21,247 24,690 29,577 32,966

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Missouri (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 51,986 40,694 34,239 22,717 13,209 12,679 16,175 16,218 12,056 13,682 18,230 29,876 2002 39,936 35,157 34,198 24,362 15,624 13,116 15,351 13,593 11,804 14,038 22,945 32,834 2003 42,257 42,379 33,569 21,083 13,307 10,498 12,889 15,215 9,788 10,817 17,229 30,354 2004 41,477 43,268 30,344 20,642 15,737 12,404 12,556 11,676 12,399 11,977 16,704 31,367 2005 42,227 35,965 31,014 19,890 15,686 13,519 13,855 14,649 12,548

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Montana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,993 8,301 5,782 5,036 3,055 2,439 2,359 2,152 2,135 3,446 5,081 6,696 2002 7,738 6,859 7,247 5,853 4,084 2,965 2,265 2,298 2,711 4,300 5,929 6,147 2003 7,471 6,977 6,706 4,682 3,515 2,729 2,042 2,006 2,468 3,629 6,282 7,503 2004 8,787 6,926 5,508 3,906 3,279 2,725 2,154 2,098 2,533 3,912 5,268 6,895 2005 8,717 6,227 5,828 4,563 3,517 2,678 2,135 2,426 2,551 4,121 4,933 7,501 2006 7,064 7,060 7,344 4,972 3,562

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nebraska (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,481 15,747 13,983 11,129 7,094 5,429 8,556 6,368 5,506 5,854 10,730 11,012 2002 16,123 14,049 12,938 10,424 6,676 4,984 8,748 7,414 6,786 6,218 9,753 13,269 2003 15,675 15,319 13,354 8,644 6,232 4,472 7,653 7,469 5,904 6,758 8,775 13,011 2004 16,104 16,445 12,058 7,983 6,255 5,830 6,952 6,641 4,338 5,935 8,995 13,129 2005 17,242 14,641 11,440 8,360 6,579 5,853 7,874 8,028 6,345 6,081 8,200 13,733 2006 15,551

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nevada (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 19,952 19,433 17,795 12,312 12,723 11,650 12,329 14,023 12,067 12,854 12,525 17,842 2002 18,621 16,951 15,943 11,123 11,789 13,044 14,033 14,618 13,988 13,798 14,840 16,521 2003 17,053 15,548 15,238 12,410 12,410 13,355 17,113 17,666 15,088 14,301 14,598 18,798 2004 19,886 20,030 14,760 11,514 13,220 16,819 20,333 19,864 17,480 16,556 18,897 22,720 2005 23,220 21,494 17,907 16,239 13,790 15,823 20,156 20,490

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oregon (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 21,689 25,019 21,080 18,224 15,822 14,891 14,036 15,541 15,102 16,822 18,239 22,097 2002 25,687 22,100 21,179 14,501 12,612 11,363 9,336 12,198 12,978 14,195 16,780 20,005 2003 23,496 19,260 18,102 13,784 12,066 11,146 16,560 16,275 17,015 16,463 19,222 21,940 2004 26,773 24,112 19,699 16,486 14,346 12,752 16,235 16,733 16,179 17,146 21,137 23,569 2005 25,874 23,392 21,951 20,274 11,452 11,481 14,502 16,348 15,706

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Pennsylvania (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 96,012 79,547 77,363 52,992 33,092 26,098 25,208 27,662 29,499 38,457 46,614 63,083 2002 80,458 74,651 70,773 53,368 38,209 33,401 32,700 34,743 30,425 40,462 58,542 83,877 2003 101,975 96,176 79,246 53,759 36,015 29,095 30,298 32,640 26,799 39,895 47,467 78,054 2004 100,298 95,715 73,189 54,937 42,873 33,367 36,047 33,735 32,060 34,578 50,908 74,224 2005 90,958 84,388 85,058 50,137 38,196 34,547 36,133 37,648

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Tennessee (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 43,045 30,197 26,202 21,053 13,399 12,059 12,967 13,230 11,569 16,135 19,011 23,239 2002 37,019 31,272 27,242 19,932 14,058 12,918 12,293 12,439 11,103 13,432 20,337 31,833 2003 37,778 37,692 27,915 18,989 14,580 13,392 11,615 12,627 12,016 13,775 16,202 27,807 2004 34,375 33,788 24,928 18,001 14,262 11,211 10,988 11,553 11,041 11,874 13,718 24,756 2005 30,997 29,214 25,561 19,122 13,849 11,579 11,055 13,522

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 20,043 17,426 13,012 11,173 7,791 7,056 6,214 6,023 6,572 9,189 11,646 18,505 2002 19,727 17,659 15,165 8,453 7,113 5,260 5,915 6,481 7,591 11,589 13,814 16,447 2003 16,474 16,494 12,825 10,664 6,942 5,612 6,174 6,166 6,229 7,898 13,299 16,533 2004 21,414 17,627 10,247 9,033 6,775 5,344 6,398 5,617 6,456 8,714 13,097 17,058 2005 18,357 16,430 13,763 12,951 9,253 7,461 7,380 6,187 6,053 6,449 9,027 16,786 2006

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 1,164 1,003 1,084 834 544 381 304 307 361 438 658 827 2002 1,127 1,149 960 808 575 428 330 336 348 485 803 1,003 2003 1,153 1,191 1,062 906 539 367 293 312 325 502 708 1,029 2004 1,154 1,381 1,072 829 517 421 331 342 365 479 769 1,011 2005 1,211 1,280 1,199 776 558 404 310 298 295 418 666 943 2006 1,112 1,063 1,190 745 501 415 318 318 347 481 658 893 2007 1,104 1,375 1,250 915 536 382 340 331 342 423 696 1,158

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wisconsin (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 52,126 51,020 52,466 24,969 17,238 15,421 16,478 16,540 16,716 25,355 26,981 41,400 2002 49,850 43,815 48,646 31,946 24,278 16,100 16,531 15,795 16,659 28,429 39,330 49,912 2003 62,523 55,695 44,756 32,270 20,752 15,502 15,630 18,099 16,485 24,636 36,907 47,677 2004 65,038 48,498 41,599 27,544 21,106 15,420 15,949 14,951 16,063 23,268 33,602 56,693 2005 59,667 45,463 47,647 29,885 23,265 22,788 21,959 22,549

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wyoming (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,475 6,484 5,643 5,505 4,182 3,864 3,515 3,541 3,688 4,790 5,518 6,170 2002 6,844 5,846 6,319 5,737 5,034 4,070 4,980 4,124 4,599 6,126 7,421 8,523 2003 7,672 7,313 7,026 5,737 4,976 4,408 4,112 4,164 4,356 5,062 5,554 7,236 2004 7,555 7,180 6,077 5,400 4,775 4,216 4,064 4,187 4,024 5,032 6,153 6,963 2005 7,585 6,443 6,231 5,612 5,092 4,247 4,081 3,903 4,080 4,829 5,360 7,262 2006 7,304 6,824 6,957 5,389 4,762

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,434 3,514 3,395 2,369 1,720 1,215 1,673 1,117 1,189 1,382 1,955 3,507 1990 4,550 3,040 2,645 2,167 1,626 984 1,157 1,164 1,195 1,353 1,921 2,487 1991 3,334 3,576 2,761 1,886 1,332 1,149 1,128 1,052 1,093 1,311 2,120 2,968 1992 3,739 3,833 2,671 2,287 1,513 1,225 1,108 1,078 1,136 1,320 1,983 3,338 1993 3,532 3,599 3,655 2,569 1,551 1,179 1,084 1,070 1,111 1,259 2,073 3,041 1994 4,325

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Alaska (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,500 2,691 2,258 1,949 1,569 1,287 1,042 1,091 1,202 1,577 2,144 2,429 1990 2,447 2,584 2,429 1,809 1,456 1,134 1,061 1,077 1,148 1,554 2,106 2,818 1991 2,579 2,388 2,149 1,896 1,576 1,171 1,069 1,073 1,198 1,561 1,930 2,308 1992 2,414 2,372 2,319 1,935 1,597 1,206 1,084 1,013 1,252 1,790 1,928 2,390 1993 2,487 2,471 2,051 1,863 1,441 1,055 917 957 1,112 1,563 1,785 2,301 1994 2,367 2,156

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Arizona (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,945 3,572 2,845 2,275 1,994 1,951 1,805 1,579 1,597 1,634 2,296 3,108 1990 3,706 3,577 3,165 2,338 2,174 1,854 1,686 1,580 1,610 1,555 2,018 3,139 1991 3,716 3,091 2,935 2,785 2,039 1,637 1,669 1,722 1,375 1,609 1,941 3,077 1992 3,647 3,011 2,898 2,352 1,620 1,754 1,690 1,505 1,601 1,580 1,858 3,573 1993 3,422 2,954 3,056 2,408 1,851 2,035 1,654 1,601 1,521 1,551 2,100 3,416 1994 3,689

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Arkansas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,919 4,336 3,961 2,180 1,261 1,357 1,019 1,007 1,096 1,245 1,948 3,942 1990 4,957 3,368 2,807 2,223 1,398 1,065 1,030 1,043 1,081 1,260 1,948 2,949 1991 5,034 4,043 2,848 1,778 1,211 1,027 998 1,023 1,045 1,184 2,497 3,297 1992 4,159 3,861 2,708 2,114 1,358 1,108 1,062 1,022 1,029 1,219 2,078 3,596 1993 4,757 4,174 3,999 2,923 1,540 1,078 1,013 1,047 1,126 1,389 2,480 3,473 1994 5,101

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Colorado (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,522 10,845 9,208 6,135 4,160 3,082 2,328 2,119 2,303 3,232 5,441 8,102 1990 10,718 9,546 8,633 6,902 5,116 3,122 2,167 2,127 2,069 2,918 5,301 7,682 1991 12,120 9,991 7,910 6,328 4,849 2,826 2,180 2,040 2,087 3,017 6,096 9,494 1992 10,794 9,450 7,609 5,965 3,631 3,055 2,430 2,183 2,312 3,078 5,594 10,319 1993 11,775 10,132 9,435 6,499 4,292 3,119 2,445 2,357 3,012 3,108 6,080 9,396

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Connecticut (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,909 3,749 3,937 2,897 2,106 1,625 1,528 1,579 1,551 1,685 2,324 3,891 1990 4,318 3,869 3,369 3,009 1,743 1,483 1,358 1,315 1,352 1,603 2,456 3,534 1991 4,341 3,973 3,566 2,352 1,462 1,030 995 1,020 884 1,423 2,396 3,396 1992 4,417 4,374 3,940 2,941 1,779 1,149 1,046 1,061 1,075 1,562 2,623 3,871 1993 4,666 4,995 4,461 3,038 1,583 1,161 1,122 1,070 1,121 1,789 2,896 3,525 1994 5,882

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Delaware (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 632 605 624 398 249 166 128 133 144 182 294 630 1990 784 530 530 419 239 174 139 138 136 163 309 480 1991 677 653 579 414 237 161 146 142 145 203 354 541 1992 744 755 686 537 308 198 166 152 162 240 395 622 1993 739 818 858 574 284 140 165 155 155 229 412 666 1994 945 1,076 856 510 259 209 157 156 172 221 345 554 1995 829 935 854 527 341 223 182 168 205 209 417 851 1996 1,099 1,181 885

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Florida (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,493 3,435 3,545 3,083 2,670 2,570 2,525 2,369 2,484 2,444 2,868 3,620 1990 4,101 3,305 3,246 3,026 2,860 2,673 2,584 2,497 2,483 2,521 3,285 3,725 1991 3,875 3,770 3,782 3,363 2,978 2,674 2,845 2,708 2,998 2,798 3,519 3,954 1992 4,408 4,364 3,856 3,741 3,382 3,085 2,976 2,881 2,849 2,954 3,317 3,914 1993 3,951 4,078 4,088 3,871 3,362 3,085 2,919 2,830 2,887 2,983 3,336 3,760 1994 4,619

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Georgia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,127 7,499 5,163 3,921 2,982 2,340 2,411 2,360 2,589 3,475 4,834 8,389 1990 8,162 5,935 5,172 3,960 2,844 2,498 2,359 2,535 2,416 3,098 4,228 6,280 1991 7,680 6,782 5,905 3,348 2,820 2,387 2,381 2,482 2,346 3,082 5,153 6,670 1992 8,066 6,952 5,778 4,381 3,103 2,596 2,536 2,503 2,462 3,201 4,640 7,642 1993 7,627 7,915 7,796 4,837 3,069 2,544 2,570 2,481 2,440 3,312 5,214 7,719 1994 9,543

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Hawaii (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 187 178 174 175 181 175 182 173 175 179 172 177 1990 190 188 188 180 181 188 195 180 180 183 184 185 1991 192 177 169 187 173 173 187 172 179 177 178 185 1992 190 180 174 183 177 184 174 173 178 168 178 184 1993 185 190 179 177 168 183 174 170 168 173 183 172 1994 195 176 190 185 181 184 177 178 184 177 189 185 1995 200 180 185 183 185 188 186 178 179 179 178 177 1996 200 192 184 190 172

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Idaho (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,567 1,575 1,160 692 409 355 301 249 321 435 785 1,176 1990 1,313 1,283 1,000 610 479 389 293 280 292 459 822 1,315 1991 1,848 1,291 956 822 623 405 316 304 329 424 942 1,321 1992 1,543 1,167 834 643 447 343 345 330 369 465 889 1,557 1993 1,806 1,673 1,294 828 566 387 383 360 381 507 947 1,543 1994 1,510 1,457 1,121 771 480 377 374 306 357 571 1,098 1,667 1995 1,754 1,319 1,154 951 708 487

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Indiana (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 11,170 11,376 9,613 5,768 3,297 1,904 1,579 1,659 2,217 3,850 7,577 13,614 1990 11,991 9,374 7,958 6,087 3,191 1,963 1,658 1,860 1,991 4,087 6,640 10,462 1991 13,081 10,656 8,567 4,535 2,546 1,648 1,613 1,710 2,358 3,614 7,821 10,233 1992 12,060 10,265 8,437 6,172 3,400 2,004 1,811 1,955 2,131 4,253 8,135 12,097 1993 12,941 12,125 10,972 6,557 2,866 2,100 1,819 1,838 2,442 4,559 8,381

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Iowa (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,372 7,466 6,928 4,133 2,216 1,380 1,190 1,234 1,247 179 3,738 7,110 1990 8,087 6,374 5,719 4,261 2,409 1,602 1,226 1,204 1,302 2,087 3,726 5,955 1991 9,237 6,828 5,412 3,305 1,993 1,308 1,090 1,198 1,308 2,482 5,287 7,167 1992 7,145 6,709 4,949 3,883 1,877 1,427 1,100 1,257 1,433 2,645 5,843 7,827 1993 8,688 7,779 6,773 4,316 2,029 1,481 1,214 1,214 1,637 2,869 5,694 6,642 1994 9,353 8,260

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Kansas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,155 7,697 6,870 5,433 3,660 2,547 3,366 4,812 3,081 2,785 4,386 6,763 1990 8,061 6,230 5,114 4,800 3,112 2,848 4,906 4,462 3,836 2,893 3,877 5,907 1991 10,250 7,397 5,694 4,278 3,082 2,657 4,321 3,994 2,629 2,656 6,075 5,538 1992 6,844 5,862 4,372 4,571 3,736 2,814 3,609 3,462 3,132 3,162 4,867 7,543 1993 8,768 7,385 7,019 4,938 2,840 2,559 3,348 3,324 2,395 2,469 4,413 6,565 1994 8,139

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Kentucky (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5,139 5,507 4,546 2,840 1,766 1,167 1,099 991 1,147 954 3,327 6,648 1990 5,355 4,280 3,496 2,702 1,576 1,129 1,037 1,077 1,025 2,050 3,194 4,884 1991 6,313 5,098 3,647 1,925 1,198 1,029 941 991 1,338 1,862 4,197 5,161 1992 6,191 4,758 3,874 2,612 1,600 1,132 1,066 1,158 1,209 2,237 4,064 5,519 1993 5,878 5,863 5,207 2,934 1,330 1,449 1,029 1,060 1,220 2,417 3,997 5,433 1994 8,181 6,018

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,399 3,365 3,462 2,362 1,790 1,479 1,399 1,340 1,433 1,568 2,035 3,524 1990 4,528 2,757 2,490 2,135 1,628 1,499 1,361 1,238 1,275 1,487 2,082 2,491 1991 3,639 3,555 2,713 1,974 1,539 1,418 1,504 1,253 1,229 1,440 2,347 2,842 1992 4,060 4,003 2,743 2,367 1,769 1,564 1,556 1,431 1,508 1,577 2,295 3,574 1993 3,260 3,207 3,075 2,376 1,742 1,454 1,267 1,277 1,290 1,346 2,091 2,771 1994 3,925

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Maine (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 229 226 221 160 106 63 51 50 60 96 128 269 1990 268 227 211 175 108 70 52 47 62 83 157 219 1991 282 265 236 180 101 73 65 65 59 103 152 278 1992 322 318 315 229 157 80 79 52 67 116 188 285 1993 356 364 291 192 107 80 71 67 77 166 224 316 1994 458 364 302 181 128 79 63 71 84 135 207 309 1995 350 373 288 211 128 77 70 71 86 129 254 389 1996 413 386 356 208 132 82 74 75 78 172 280 310 1997 433

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Massachusetts (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,394 6,984 7,234 5,392 3,703 2,150 1,726 1,894 1,799 2,720 3,647 6,864 1990 8,247 6,548 6,367 5,235 3,381 2,491 2,009 2,040 1,906 2,416 4,275 5,704 1991 7,617 7,579 6,948 5,504 3,772 2,466 2,435 2,188 1,939 2,666 4,048 6,027 1992 8,184 8,736 8,217 7,049 4,450 2,768 3,072 2,884 2,753 3,776 5,530 6,933 1993 8,556 9,118 9,026 6,491 4,195 3,184 2,692 2,802 2,766 3,878 5,622 7,098 1994

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Michigan (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 26,553 25,448 24,717 16,375 10,150 5,954 4,570 4,467 5,047 8,855 15,776 28,269 1990 26,939 22,780 20,870 15,431 9,230 5,638 4,610 4,865 5,117 8,592 14,122 21,237 1991 29,054 24,902 21,321 14,617 9,583 5,601 4,916 4,508 5,510 9,450 12,966 23,131 1992 26,677 24,979 22,443 17,769 10,406 5,883 4,981 4,964 5,431 9,760 16,298 24,211 1993 28,122 27,427 25,623 18,238 9,009 5,968 5,035 4,140 5,767

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Minnesota (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 13,112 13,607 11,411 6,916 3,980 2,416 2,112 2,011 2,475 4,718 8,764 13,661 1990 12,696 11,412 9,846 6,734 4,032 2,369 2,100 2,060 2,342 4,865 7,491 12,066 1991 15,649 11,426 10,026 6,092 4,220 2,541 2,315 2,304 2,930 5,399 10,392 12,580 1992 13,000 11,075 10,134 7,517 3,602 2,467 2,244 2,296 2,631 5,092 9,526 12,795 1993 14,685 12,874 11,396 7,267 3,588 2,549 2,190 2,207 2,952 5,614

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,372 2,502 2,411 1,407 947 739 718 701 754 939 1,350 2,727 1990 3,199 2,007 1,675 1,541 1,070 884 819 818 841 1,137 1,508 2,050 1991 2,704 2,572 1,977 1,291 901 875 806 834 865 989 1,721 2,208 1992 2,817 2,595 1,758 1,473 994 888 885 867 847 942 1,489 2,387 1993 2,663 2,583 2,559 1,756 1,108 925 904 864 843 985 1,710 2,298 1994 3,417 2,993 2,136 1,456 1,012 942 992 973 1,000 1,050

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Missouri (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,118 10,280 9,192 5,246 2,799 2,359 1,829 1,780 2,021 2,798 4,716 9,903 1990 11,634 7,979 6,849 5,622 3,309 2,310 2,034 1,971 2,083 2,863 4,811 7,921 1991 12,748 9,932 7,479 4,261 2,760 2,181 1,853 1,896 2,056 2,689 6,471 8,864 1992 10,201 9,060 6,835 5,601 3,144 2,547 1,849 1,993 2,024 2,728 5,335 9,646 1993 12,062 10,467 10,336 6,750 3,580 2,266 2,066 1,959 2,222 2,864 5,974 9,124

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Montana (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,029 1,923 1,841 1,208 687 478 330 381 442 806 1,235 1,781 1990 1,912 1,705 1,402 998 766 487 323 348 347 782 1,206 1,889 1991 2,425 1,435 1,450 1,053 843 431 357 341 438 724 1,559 1,790 1992 1,726 1,464 1,099 930 568 377 365 331 523 810 1,271 2,095 1993 2,465 1,705 1,741 1,137 682 434 437 416 535 819 1,508 1,999 1994 1,844 1,936 1,465 1,100 699 452 362 348 423 860 1,447 2,043 1995 2,085

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Nebraska (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4,202 4,825 4,252 2,505 1,648 1,757 3,381 4,240 1,634 2,109 2,602 4,196 1990 4,765 4,019 3,355 2,799 1,480 1,325 4,837 2,596 2,333 2,334 2,552 4,094 1991 5,452 4,111 3,382 2,193 1,771 1,779 5,675 4,406 1,961 2,056 3,468 4,037 1992 4,332 3,760 2,970 2,411 1,781 1,330 2,366 2,393 1,710 2,508 3,988 4,941 1993 5,784 3,806 4,611 3,119 1,629 1,388 1,324 1,828 1,333 2,164 3,495 4,263 1994 5,469

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Nevada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,156 2,125 1,533 1,100 1,004 890 790 805 811 954 1,257 1,690 1990 1,959 1,963 1,740 1,185 1,006 970 879 782 701 1,157 1,026 1,705 1991 2,447 1,839 1,739 1,593 1,333 1,121 947 1,005 761 1,104 1,095 1,976 1992 2,327 1,873 1,725 1,335 1,012 945 1,015 824 872 982 1,022 2,170 1993 2,271 2,110 2,016 1,314 1,341 1,052 919 939 909 1,047 1,421 2,211 1994 2,334 2,277 1,995 1,456 1,300 1,136 995 909

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in New York (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 25,565 24,630 25,344 18,494 12,079 8,747 8,382 8,305 8,812 11,741 16,631 27,650 1990 24,659 23,697 22,939 17,706 11,586 10,272 9,602 9,683 10,261 12,661 17,210 24,715 1991 28,442 25,685 23,462 17,684 11,669 9,641 10,331 9,764 9,195 11,571 17,033 25,121 1992 29,246 29,912 27,748 23,039 13,518 9,915 9,327 9,456 9,582 12,860 16,804 25,808 1993 28,857 29,740 28,926 20,266 11,667 11,221 10,477

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in North Carolina (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4,784 4,016 4,367 3,046 2,022 1,568 1,475 1,454 1,534 1,843 2,639 4,396 1990 5,379 3,690 3,400 2,747 1,820 1,445 1,394 1,480 1,596 1,795 2,715 3,817 1991 4,947 4,647 3,990 2,629 1,928 1,677 1,613 1,679 1,789 2,052 3,200 4,162 1992 5,169 5,066 3,983 3,296 2,205 1,733 1,591 1,607 1,679 2,138 3,010 4,941 1993 5,866 5,566 5,426 3,602 1,988 1,532 1,437 1,539 1,674 2,067 3,379 3,292 1994

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in North Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,789 1,669 1,514 1,027 508 335 269 238 340 464 951 1,506 1990 1,666 1,457 1,243 1,048 616 383 315 298 370 561 916 1,363 1991 1,917 1,394 1,253 847 629 320 302 314 348 633 1,241 1,535 1992 1,489 1,380 1,082 937 529 298 279 262 363 576 1,015 1,549 1993 1,911 1,477 1,339 925 477 347 317 294 381 629 1,068 1,478 1994 2,016 1,812 1,339 932 526 302 284 288 315 530 1,241 1,198 1995 1,807

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Ohio (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 23,636 24,435 21,187 13,360 8,237 3,927 3,565 3,735 4,397 8,946 15,949 30,143 1990 25,317 19,642 20,361 13,373 7,446 4,838 3,975 4,165 4,240 7,272 13,757 19,190 1991 26,286 24,481 20,157 11,779 6,341 3,971 3,703 3,933 4,196 8,065 15,488 21,940 1992 26,321 24,820 20,215 15,893 7,455 5,016 4,291 4,260 4,418 9,092 15,094 23,770 1993 25,230 26,706 25,531 15,019 6,359 5,221 3,939 3,860 4,492 9,636

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Oklahoma (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,069 7,033 6,197 2,868 1,601 1,279 1,180 1,097 1,241 1,528 2,542 5,873 1990 7,587 5,618 4,176 3,424 2,281 1,519 1,312 1,355 1,235 1,613 2,520 4,567 1991 8,702 6,014 4,265 2,489 1,702 1,330 1,290 1,279 1,299 1,590 3,974 5,653 1992 6,180 5,310 3,653 2,956 1,785 1,540 1,407 1,292 1,240 1,449 2,608 5,771 1993 7,076 6,147 5,910 3,743 2,057 1,439 1,324 1,432 1,345 1,544 3,424 5,327 1994 6,644

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Oregon (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,884 3,283 2,761 1,724 1,140 989 823 804 882 972 1,624 2,363 1990 2,984 3,031 2,562 1,550 1,268 1,157 821 769 823 1,050 1,697 2,737 1991 4,074 2,764 2,407 2,048 1,610 1,274 902 812 855 927 1,898 2,758 1992 3,231 2,465 1,925 1,542 1,171 884 784 782 863 1,105 1,652 3,166 1993 4,148 3,370 2,880 1,927 1,448 1,010 915 840 934 1,099 1,918 3,557 1994 3,388 3,166 2,480 1,836 1,234 1,078 865 801

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Rhode Island (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,032 979 1,003 855 565 457 471 518 560 657 654 1,014 1990 1,195 903 893 857 577 244 413 365 508 587 763 774 1991 1,089 979 864 605 667 414 538 540 555 628 496 895 1992 1,076 1,128 1,103 1,047 676 498 448 479 411 609 654 951 1993 1,140 1,359 1,325 907 429 330 273 364 243 503 1,008 1,324 1994 1,919 1,974 1,626 1,092 653 542 343 599 384 569 1,010 1,338 1995 1,077 1,679 1,883 1,353 901

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in South Carolina (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,176 1,936 2,098 1,489 1,094 891 908 808 866 970 1,324 1,964 1990 2,455 1,649 1,576 1,262 1,040 846 836 830 872 965 1,315 1,749 1991 2,199 2,076 1,746 1,143 908 818 810 859 875 952 1,492 1,917 1992 2,276 2,158 1,745 1,436 1,068 944 820 882 875 1,006 1,345 2,089 1993 2,268 2,155 2,200 1,507 1,007 877 832 840 846 947 1,463 2,070 1994 2,845 2,472 1,910 1,174 1,027 1,342 913 949 947

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,339 1,454 1,253 776 413 276 203 197 255 434 851 1,374 1990 1,398 1,234 1,064 769 537 306 230 223 239 459 825 1,269 1991 1,723 1,243 1,076 713 543 303 263 251 309 588 1,176 1,286 1992 1,314 1,174 1,007 828 460 303 291 284 324 558 1,104 1,476 1993 1,847 1,496 1,344 995 531 342 315 291 392 632 1,083 1,429 1994 1,738 1,695 1,285 846 524 347 239 322 329 531 946 1,472 1995 1,619 1,491

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Tennessee (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,960 6,840 6,382 4,054 2,529 1,916 1,802 1,659 1,843 2,355 3,769 7,404 1990 8,672 5,800 4,578 3,811 2,474 1,988 1,652 1,791 1,597 2,276 3,426 5,490 1991 7,499 7,400 5,761 3,131 2,231 1,829 1,640 1,708 1,837 2,454 4,304 6,158 1992 7,343 6,834 5,069 4,205 2,436 2,016 1,838 1,681 1,933 2,368 3,963 6,846 1993 7,296 7,526 7,354 4,605 2,613 1,992 1,884 1,811 1,992 2,565 4,648 6,470 1994 9,690

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 21,163 22,930 20,215 15,779 11,310 10,731 12,786 11,350 9,367 10,345 12,823 23,871 1990 21,376 16,323 17,118 14,054 12,299 14,204 14,184 11,592 9,448 9,571 12,192 19,981 1991 26,377 18,723 16,796 15,181 11,439 10,763 12,769 11,125 8,843 11,156 17,192 20,608 1992 22,907 19,049 15,866 14,174 12,557 10,879 13,768 12,966 11,356 11,672 17,386 22,093 1993 21,489 18,444 16,162 14,455 12,175 12,943

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Utah (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,283 3,376 2,280 1,227 653 472 357 346 390 522 1,313 2,304 1990 2,864 2,779 2,272 1,203 860 581 373 364 374 629 1,382 2,540 1991 4,055 3,108 2,282 1,771 1,316 668 405 375 407 551 1,634 2,704 1992 3,330 2,952 1,866 1,155 642 457 410 372 405 545 1,329 3,120 1993 3,922 3,682 2,988 1,839 1,248 707 597 594 606 946 2,023 3,436 1994 3,929 3,846 2,665 2,037 962 814 820 787 882 1,883 3,542 4,335 1995

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Vermont (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 315 300 283 199 105 66 57 57 73 130 189 307 1990 338 288 269 196 116 68 46 62 84 127 195 261 1991 335 311 259 187 105 61 55 58 82 133 188 284 1992 366 354 320 231 118 75 79 75 77 144 211 269 1993 347 368 350 199 124 80 62 67 83 143 235 324 1994 476 455 341 269 150 90 65 69 88 144 187 334 1995 388 406 352 277 140 89 70 72 95 130 242 410 1996 458 445 381 279 153 97 67 69 90 162 276 348 1997

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,164 6,056 5,721 4,051 2,446 2,129 1,866 1,485 1,985 2,192 3,612 6,474 1990 6,162 5,181 5,100 4,541 2,412 1,831 1,802 1,772 1,671 2,233 3,251 5,081 1991 6,667 5,956 5,270 3,581 2,481 2,159 1,867 2,057 1,860 2,625 3,855 5,701 1992 7,072 6,690 5,985 4,523 3,289 2,271 2,085 2,055 1,903 3,275 4,714 6,895 1993 7,432 7,800 7,347 4,850 2,842 2,177 1,987 2,033 2,106 3,073 4,355 6,877 1994 8,677

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Washington (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5,343 5,561 5,424 3,672 2,194 1,851 1,671 1,548 1,357 2,083 3,366 4,433 1990 5,136 5,666 4,496 3,289 2,728 1,951 1,639 1,476 1,575 2,249 3,444 5,071 1991 6,279 5,277 4,597 4,047 3,025 2,400 1,831 1,635 1,689 2,099 3,802 5,057 1992 5,564 4,840 3,855 3,179 2,343 1,830 1,575 1,514 1,734 2,240 3,418 5,709 1993 7,058 5,670 5,157 3,785 2,774 1,905 1,801 1,750 1,829 2,236 3,639 6,016 1994

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in West Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,177 3,265 2,807 2,041 1,476 881 785 853 859 1,373 2,036 3,704 1990 3,701 2,707 2,391 2,064 1,224 924 889 845 862 1,237 1,963 2,585 1991 3,061 2,971 2,522 1,725 1,068 810 848 823 915 1,365 2,169 2,767 1992 3,659 3,565 2,986 2,322 1,341 999 812 855 910 1,482 2,092 3,396 1993 3,123 3,522 3,444 2,169 1,218 992 818 914 983 1,510 2,404 3,286 1994 4,653 3,681 3,246 2,031 1,437 982 812 973

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,596 10,988 10,169 6,662 3,882 2,012 1,562 1,499 1,718 3,437 6,386 11,183 1990 11,878 9,411 8,746 5,436 3,701 2,130 1,686 1,617 1,786 3,865 6,030 10,074 1991 13,062 10,137 8,785 5,471 3,084 1,643 1,853 1,415 2,229 4,335 8,565 10,938 1992 11,235 10,037 9,113 6,870 3,632 1,986 1,759 1,615 1,954 4,108 7,918 11,087 1993 12,658 11,647 10,442 7,011 3,438 2,418 1,843 1,719 2,326 4,637 7,976

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in the District of Columbia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,133 2,021 2,066 1,635 999 803 692 763 712 775 1,090 2,052 1990 1,986 1,857 1,789 1,384 951 699 514 572 721 574 836 1,589 1991 2,204 2,308 2,131 1,381 1,063 784 705 794 689 658 1,071 1,764 1992 2,300 2,256 2,132 1,774 1,056 764 718 673 653 753 1,103 1,921 1993 2,352 2,438 2,166 1,550 1,150 731 664 703 684 841 1,040 1,909 1994 2,303 1,865 1,483 1,588 979 815 753 692 740

  12. Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development Leslie Eudy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory September 12, 2013 2 Why Fuel Cells for Transit Buses? * Reduce transit bus emissions * Improve fuel efficiency * Improve vehicle performance * Consumer Acceptance * Transit industry is excellent test-bed for new technologies o Centrally fueled and maintained o Fixed routes with urban stop-go duty cycle o Professional operators and mechanics o Federal Capital Funding Support o High Visibility &

  13. Compositions and methods for treating nuclear fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soderquist, Chuck Z; Johnsen, Amanda M; McNamara, Bruce K; Hanson, Brady D; Smith, Steven C; Peper, Shane M

    2013-08-13

    Compositions are provided that include nuclear fuel. Methods for treating nuclear fuel are provided which can include exposing the fuel to a carbonate-peroxide solution. Methods can also include exposing the fuel to an ammonium solution. Methods for acquiring molybdenum from a uranium comprising material are provided.

  14. Compositions and methods for treating nuclear fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soderquist, Chuck Z; Johnsen, Amanda M; McNamara, Bruce K; Hanson, Brady D; Smith, Steven C; Peper, Shane M

    2014-01-28

    Compositions are provided that include nuclear fuel. Methods for treating nuclear fuel are provided which can include exposing the fuel to a carbonate-peroxide solution. Methods can also include exposing the fuel to an ammonium solution. Methods for acquiring molybdenum from a uranium comprising material are provided.

  15. Determination of alternative fuels combustion products: Phase 3 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, K.A.

    1997-12-01

    This report describes the laboratory efforts to characterize particulate and gaseous exhaust emissions from a passenger vehicle operating on alternative fuels. Tests were conducted at room temperature (nominally 72 F) and 20 F utilizing the chassis dynamometer portion of the FTP for light-duty vehicles. Fuels evaluated include Federal RFG, LPG meeting HD-5 specifications, a national average blend of CNG, E85, and M85. Exhaust particulate generated at room temperature was further characterized to determine polynuclear aromatic content, trace element content, and trace organic constituents. For all fuels except M85, the room temperature particulate emission rate from this vehicle was about 2 to 3 mg/mile. On M85, the particulate emission rate was more than 6 mg/mile. In addition, elemental analysis of particulate revealed an order of magnitude more sulfur and calcium from M85 than any other fuel. The sulfur and calcium indicate that these higher emissions might be due to engine lubricating oil in the exhaust. For RFG, particulate emissions at 20 F were more than six times higher than at room temperature. For alcohol fuels, particulate emissions at 20 F were two to three times higher than at room temperature. For CNG and LPG, particulate emissions were virtually the same at 72 F and 20 F. However, PAH emissions from CNG and LPG were higher than expected. Both gaseous fuels had larger amounts of pyrene, 1-nitropyrene, and benzo(g,h,i)perylene in their emissions than the other fuels.

  16. Proceedings of the 1999 Review Conference on Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None Available

    2000-06-05

    The 1999 Review Conference on Fuel Cell Technology was jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), the Gas Research Institute (GRI), and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). It was held August 3 to 5 in Chicago, Illinois. The goal of this conference was to provide a forum for reviewing fuel cell research and development (R&D) programs, assist in strategic R&D planning, promote awareness of sponsor activities, and enhance interactions between manufacturers, researchers, and stakeholders. This conference was attended by over 250 representatives from industry, academia, national laboratories, gas and electric utilities, DOE, and other Government agencies. The conference agenda included a keynote session, five presentation sessions, a poster presentation reception, and three breakout sessions. The presentation session topics were DOD Fuel Cell Applications, Low-Temperature Fuel Cell Manufacturers, Low-Temperature Component Research, High-Temperature Fuel Cell Manufacturers, and High-Temperature Component Research; the breakout session topics were Future R&D Directions for Low-Temperature Fuel Cells, Future R&D Directions for High-Temperature Fuel Cells, and a plenary summary session. All sessions were well attended.

  17. Proceedings of the Fuel Cells `97 Review Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    The Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) sponsored the Fuel Cells '97 Review Meeting on August 26-28, 1997, in Morgantown, West Virginia. The purpose of the meeting was to provide an annual forum for the exchange of ideas and discussion of results and plans related to the research on fuel cell power systems. The total of almost 250 conference participants included engineers and scientists representing utilities, academia, and government from the U.S. and eleven other countries: Canada, China, India, Iran, Italy, Japan, Korea, Netherlands, Russia, Taiwan, and the United Kingdom. On first day, the conference covered the perspectives of sponsors and end users, and the progress reports of fuel-cell developers. Papers covered phosphoric, carbonate, and solid oxide fuel cells for stationary power applications. On the second day, the conference covered advanced research in solid oxide and other fuel cell developments. On the third day, the conference sponsored a workshop on advanced research and technology development. A panel presentation was given on fuel cell opportunities. Breakout sessions with group discussions followed this with fuel cell developers, gas turbine vendors, and consultants.

  18. Connecticut Fuel Cell Activities: Markets, Programs, and Models

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Fuel Cell Activities: Markets, Programs, & Models DOE State's Call - December ... Local, State and Federal Tax Revenue 16 16 Reducing Production Cost Economic Stimulus Plan ...

  19. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Transit Bus Evaluations: Joint Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Administration; Appendix Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Transit Bus Evaluations: Joint Evaluation Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy and the Federal Transit Administration; Appendix ...

  20. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Transit Bus Evaluations: Joint Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Administration Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Transit Bus Evaluations: Joint Evaluation Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy and the Federal Transit Administration This document ...