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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998 10,643 10,998 10,998 10,64397 272 522

2

Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

Patinkin, L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

An analysis of energy expenditure in Goodwin Creek Peter Molnar and Jorge A. Ramirez  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis of energy expenditure in Goodwin Creek Peter Molna´r and Jorge A. Rami´rez Department with recent observations of channel change in Goodwin Creek. This energy expenditure analysis suggests of energy dissipation per unit channel area, Pa, is constant throughout the river network is explored

Ramírez, Jorge A.

4

Table 5.17. U.S. Number of Households by Vehicle Fuel Expenditures,  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2 10,037.24. U.S. Vehicle Fuel7. U.S.

5

ACCIDENT TOLERANT FUEL ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced RISMC toolkit that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional accident-tolerant (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and evaluate margin recovery strategies.

Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather [Idaho National Laboratory; Johns, Jesse [Texas A& M University; Teague, Melissa [Idaho National Laboratory; Tonks, Michael Idaho National Laboratory; Youngblood, Robert [Idaho National Laboratory

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Accident Tolerant Fuel Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about light water reactor design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management by improving economics and reliability, and sustaining safety, of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced RISMC toolkit that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. In order to carry out the R&D needed for the Pathway, the Idaho National Laboratory is performing a series of case studies that will explore methods- and tools-development issues, in addition to being of current interest in their own right. One such study is a comparative analysis of safety margins of plants using different fuel cladding types: specifically, a comparison between current-technology Zircaloy cladding and a notional accident-tolerant (e.g., SiC-based) cladding. The present report begins the process of applying capabilities that are still under development to the problem of assessing new fuel designs. The approach and lessons learned from this case study will be included in future Technical Basis Guides produced by the RISMC Pathway. These guides will be the mechanism for developing the specifications for RISMC tools and for defining how plant decision makers should propose and evaluate margin recovery strategies.

Curtis Smith; Heather Chichester; Jesse Johns; Melissa Teague; Michael Tonks; Robert Youngblood

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Analysis Models and Tools: Systems Analysis of Hydrogen and Fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Analysis Models and Tools: Systems Analysis of Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Analysis Models and Tools: Systems Analysis of Hydrogen and Fuel Cells The Fuel Cell Technologies Office's...

8

Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation on Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation) for the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Review held in Arlington, Virginia on May 23-26, 2005.

Pesaran, A.; Kim, G.; Markel, T.; Wipke, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

State energy price and expenditure report 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1994. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1994, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in October 1996. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources. Documentation is included describing the development of price estimates, data sources, and calculation methods. 316 tabs.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

State energy price and expenditure report, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The estimates developed in the State Energy Price and Expenditure Data System (SEPEDS) are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970 through 1995. Data for all years are available on a CD-ROM and via Internet. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures and the documentation for those estimates are taken from the State Energy Data Report 1995, Consumption Estimates (SEDR), published in December 1997. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, which are adjusted to remove process fuel; intermediate petroleum products; and other consumption that has no direct fuel costs, i.e., hydroelectric, geothermal, wind, solar, and photovoltaic energy sources.

NONE

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems Rangan Banerjee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems Rangan Banerjee Energy Systems Engineering IIT Bombay Lecture in CEP Course on `Fuel Cell' at IIT 14th November 2007 #12;Overview of Talk Energy Crisis Motivation for fuel biological Hydrogen Gasification Fermentation Cracking + Shift Reaction Fuel Cell #12;ENERGY FLOW DIAGRAM

Banerjee, Rangan

12

State energy price and expenditure report 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates for the 50 States, the District of Columbia, and the United States. The estimates are provided by energy source (e.g., petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity) and by major consuming or economic sector. This report is an update of the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1988 published in September 1990. Changes from the last report are summarized in a section of the documentation. Energy price and expenditure estimates are published for the years 1970, 1975, 1980, and 1985 through 1989. Documentation follows the tables and describes how the price estimates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. Consumption estimates used to calculate expenditures, and the documentation for those estimates, are from the State Energy Data Report, Consumption Estimates, 1960--1989 (SEDR), published in May 1991. Expenditures are calculated by multiplying the price estimates by the consumption estimates, adjusted to remove process fuel and intermediate product consumption. All expenditures are consumer expenditures, that is, they represent estimates of money directly spent by consumers to purchase energy, generally including taxes. 11 figs., 43 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Sensitivity Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fuel cycle economic analysis was performed on four fuel cycles to provide a baseline for initial cost comparison using the Gen IV Economic Modeling Work Group G4 ECON spreadsheet model, Decision Programming Language software, the 2006 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis report, industry cost data, international papers, the nuclear power related cost study from MIT, Harvard, and the University of Chicago. The analysis developed and compared the fuel cycle cost component of the total cost of energy for a wide range of fuel cycles including: once through, thermal with fast recycle, continuous fast recycle, and thermal recycle.

David Shropshire; Kent Williams; J.D. Smith; Brent Boore

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Capital and revenue expenditures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T and Charaoteristios of Various Expenditures ~ ~ 7 III. Bases for Expenditure Classifioationi ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ r ~ ' ~ IV ~ Methods of kooountiag for Capital and Revenue Expenditure( ~ ~ I CkPITLL ERE RKVRRUm bXPLM)ITURkiS ISTRORUGTIOR kn ?ttonpt will be made... not tahe tho plass of asy asset or part of aa asset already onistiag Ln a business, but give tho already sainting fined asset ealues an a44ed physioal value whioh they did not previously possess ~ Additions rosoable original oost in that both...

Owens, Jack Bailey

1948-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Nationwide Used Fuel Inventory Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the impact of variations in AR for curium and for BWR classes. Moreover, future work should incorporate the used fuel from all the shutdown reactors into the database. Even in its current form, though, the SFD is a useful reference tool....

Yancey, Kristina

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

16

Comparative analysis of selected fuel cell vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vehicles powered by fuel cells operate more efficiently, more quietly, and more cleanly than internal combustion engines (ICEs). Furthermore, methanol-fueled fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can utilize major elements of the existing fueling infrastructure of present-day liquid-fueled ICE vehicles (ICEVs). DOE has maintained an active program to stimulate the development and demonstration o fuel cell technologies in conjunction with rechargeable batteries in road vehicles. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the availability of data on FCVs, and to develop a vehicle subsystem structure that can be used to compare both FCVs and ICEV, from a number of perspectives--environmental impacts, energy utilization, materials usage, and life cycle costs. This report focuses on methanol-fueled FCVs fueled by gasoline, methanol, and diesel fuel that are likely to be demonstratable by the year 2000. The comparative analysis presented covers four vehicles--two passenger vehicles and two urban transit buses. The passenger vehicles include an ICEV using either gasoline or methanol and an FCV using methanol. The FCV uses a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an on-board methanol reformer, mid-term batteries, and an AC motor. The transit bus ICEV was evaluated for both diesel and methanol fuels. The transit bus FCV runs on methanol and uses a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) fuel cell, near-term batteries, a DC motor, and an on-board methanol reformer. 75 refs.

NONE

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model This presentation by...

18

Fuel Cycle System Analysis Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Handbook aims to improve understanding and communication regarding nuclear fuel cycle options. It is intended to assist DOE, Campaign Managers, and other presenters prepare presentations and reports. When looking for information, check here. The Handbook generally includes few details of how calculations were performed, which can be found by consulting references provided to the reader. The Handbook emphasizes results in the form of graphics and diagrams, with only enough text to explain the graphic, to ensure that the messages associated with the graphic is clear, and to explain key assumptions and methods that cause the graphed results. Some of the material is new and is not found in previous reports, for example: (1) Section 3 has system-level mass flow diagrams for 0-tier (once-through), 1-tier (UOX to CR=0.50 fast reactor), and 2-tier (UOX to MOX-Pu to CR=0.50 fast reactor) scenarios - at both static and dynamic equilibrium. (2) To help inform fast reactor transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio and uranium supply behavior, section 5 provides the sustainable fast reactor growth rate as a function of TRU conversion ratio. (3) To help clarify the difference in recycling Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, and all-TRU, section 5 provides mass fraction, gamma, and neutron emission for those four cases for MOX, heterogeneous LWR IMF (assemblies mixing IMF and UOX pins), and a CR=0.50 fast reactor. There are data for the first 10 LWR recycle passes and equilibrium. (4) Section 6 provides information on the cycle length, planned and unplanned outages, and TRU enrichment as a function of fast reactor TRU conversion ratio, as well as the dilution of TRU feedstock by uranium in making fast reactor fuel. (The recovered uranium is considered to be more pure than recovered TRU.) The latter parameter impacts the required TRU impurity limits specified by the Fuels Campaign. (5) Section 7 provides flows for an 800-tonne UOX separation plant. (6) To complement 'tornado' economic uncertainty diagrams, which show at a glance combined uncertainty information, section 9.2 has a new set of simpler graphs that show the impact on fuel cycle costs for once through, 1-tier, and 2-tier scenarios as a function of key input parameters.

Steven J. Piet; Brent W. Dixon; Dirk Gombert; Edward A. Hoffman; Gretchen E. Matthern; Kent A. Williams

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

State energy price and expenditure report 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 states and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the US. The five economic sectors used in SEPER correspond to those used in SEDR and are residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility. Documentation in appendices describe how the price estimates are developed, provide conversion factors for measures used in the energy analysis, and include a glossary. 65 tabs.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Fuel loading and homogeneity analysis of HFIR design fuel plates loaded with uranium silicide fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twelve nuclear reactor fuel plates were analyzed for fuel loading and fuel loading homogeneity by measuring the attenuation of a collimated X-ray beam as it passed through the plates. The plates were identical to those used by the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) but were loaded with uranium silicide rather than with HFIR`s uranium oxide fuel. Systematic deviations from nominal fuel loading were observed as higher loading near the center of the plates and underloading near the radial edges. These deviations were within those allowed by HFIR specifications. The report begins with a brief background on the thermal-hydraulic uncertainty analysis for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Reactor that motivated a statistical description of fuel loading and homogeneity. The body of the report addresses the homogeneity measurement techniques employed, the numerical correction required to account for a difference in fuel types, and the statistical analysis of the resulting data. This statistical analysis pertains to local variation in fuel loading, as well as to ``hot segment`` analysis of narrow axial regions along the plate and ``hot streak`` analysis, the cumulative effect of hot segment loading variation. The data for all twelve plates were compiled and divided into 20 regions for analysis, with each region represented by a mean and a standard deviation to report percent deviation from nominal fuel loading. The central regions of the plates showed mean values of about +3% deviation, while the edge regions showed mean values of about {minus}7% deviation. The data within these regions roughly approximated random samplings from normal distributions, although the chi-square ({chi}{sup 2}) test for goodness of fit to normal distributions was not satisfied.

Blumenfeld, P.E.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses research conducted to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) four-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin burnup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system availability, and main coolant pump trip on these times. The analysis was performed using the following codes: FRAPCON-2, for the calculation of steady-state fuel behavior; SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACPF1/MOD1, for the calculation of the transient thermal-hydraulic conditions in the reactor system; and FRAP-T6, for the calculation of transient fuel behavior. In addition to the calculation of fuel pin failure timing, this analysis provides a comparison of the predicted results of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRAC-PF1/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic data, the shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure are 10.4 seconds and 19.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. Using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1, the shortest intervals are 10.3 seconds and 29.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. These intervals are for a double-ended, offset-shear, cold leg break, using the technical specification maximum peaking factor and applied to fuel with maximum design burnup. Using peaking factors commensurate with actual burnups would result in longer intervals for both reactor designs. This document provides appendices K and L of this report which provide plots for the timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures for Oconee and Seabrook respectively.

Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Katsma, K.R.; Siefken, L.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Straka, M. (Halliburton NUS, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

23

Dynamic Analysis of Fuel Cycle Transitioning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle to a closed fuel cycle. The once-through system involves only Light Water Reactors (LWRs) operating on uranium oxide fuel UOX), while the closed cycle includes both LWRs and fast spectrum reactors (FRs) in either a single-tier system or two-tier fuel system. The single-tier system includes full transuranic recycle in FRs while the two-tier system adds one pass of mixed oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX U-Pu) fuel in the LWR. While the analysis primarily focuses on burner fast reactors, transuranic conversion ratios up to 1.0 are assessed and many of the findings apply to any fuel cycle transitioning from a thermal once-through system to a synergistic thermal-fast recycle system. These findings include uranium requirements for a range of nuclear electricity growth rates, the importance of back end fuel cycle facility timing and magnitude, the impact of employing a range of fast reactor conversion ratios, system sensitivity to used fuel cooling time prior to recycle, impacts on a range of waste management indicators, and projected electricity cost ranges for once-through, single-tier and two-tier systems. The study confirmed that significant waste management benefits can be realized as soon as recycling is initiated, but natural uranium savings are minimal in this century. The use of MOX in LWRs decouples the development of recycle facilities from fast reactor fielding, but also significantly delays and limits fast reactor deployment. In all cases, fast reactor deployment was significantly below than predicted by static equilibrium analyses.

Brent Dixon; Steve Piet; David Shropshire; Gretchen Matthern

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

BODY COMPOSITION -ENERGY EXPENDITURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BODY COMPOSITION - ENERGY EXPENDITURE Validation of dual, X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) for body for BW, BMC and FC were significantly correlated with scale BW (r== 0.999), chemical calcium (r=0.992) and chemical fat (r= 0.971).Regression analy- sis showed that BW was accurately mea- sured, but FC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

25

Energy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and against the SenseWear, a dedicated commercial product for energy expenditure estimation. Keywords: humanEnergy Expenditure Estimation DEMO Application Bozidara Cvetkovic1,2 , Simon Kozina1,2 , Bostjan://www.mps.si Abstract. The paper presents two prototypes for the estimation of hu- man energy expenditure during normal

Lu?trek, Mitja

26

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005 Baseline Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle...

27

SEDS CSV File Documentation: Price and Expenditure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# , onLightThePrices and Expenditures

28

Hydrogen Fueling Station in Honolulu, Hawaii Feasibility Analysis...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Station in Honolulu, Hawaii Feasibility Analysis Hydrogen Fueling Station in Honolulu, Hawaii Feasibility Analysis This feasibility report assesses the technical and economic...

29

ANALYSIS OF POWER BALANCING WITH FUEL CELLS & HYDROGEN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF POWER BALANCING WITH FUEL CELLS & HYDROGEN PRODUCTION PLANTS IN DENMARK Support program;"Analysis of power balancing with fuel cells & hydrogen production plants in Denmark" ­ March 2009 ­ Project ........................................................................................................................104 #12;"Analysis of power balancing with fuel cells & hydrogen production plants in Denmark" ­ March

30

Fuel Cell System Improvement for Model-Based Diagnosis Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Cell System Improvement for Model-Based Diagnosis Analysis Philippe Fiani & Michel Batteux of a model of a fuel cell system, in order to make it usable for model- based diagnosis methods. A fuel cell for the fuel cell stack but also for the system environment. In this paper, we present an adapted library which

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

31

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System Discussion Fuel Cell Tech Team FreedomCar Detroit. MI October 20, 2004 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge Presentation 3 A fuel cell vehicle would contain the PEMFC system modeled in this project along with additional

32

Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project: Partnership Opportunities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project. NREL is seeking fuel cell industry partners from the United States and abroad to participate in an objective and credible analysis of commercially available fuel cell products to benchmark the current state of the technology and support industry growth.

Not Available

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

increase in fuel consumers and ethanol producers surplusof cane ethanol, higher emissions, lower expenditure on fuelthe sum of fuel consumer, oil producer, and ethanol producer

Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Analysis of multi-recycle thorium fuel cycles in comparison with once-through fuel cycles.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this research is to develop a methodology for a thorium fuel recycling analysis that provides results for isotopics and radio-toxicity evaluation and (more)

Huang, Lloyd Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Data Analysis for ARRA Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation about ARRA Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations, including an overview of the ARRE Fuel Cell Project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's data analysis objectives, deployment composite data products, and planned analyses.

Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions AgencyCompany Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: GHG inventory, Background...

37

Webinar: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis, originally presented on April 16, 2013.

38

Finite time analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell A. Vaudrey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finite time analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell A. Vaudrey , P. Baucour, F. Lanzetta, R of this paper consists in a detailed thermodynamical description of a fuel cell, using finite time thermodynamics (FTT). Starting from the comparison beetween a reversible fuel cell and a Carnot heat engine

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

39

Analysis of Real World Fuel Cell Degradation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation about the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Hydrogen Secure Data Center and its work with fuel cell vehicles, fuel cell early market demonstrations, and fuel cell bus demonstrations. This presentation includes results of composite data products and a summary of the analysis objectives and data flow for the projects.

Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

40

A comparative analysis of two PEM fuel cell modeling tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparative analysis of two PEM fuel cell modeling tools M.L. Sarmiento-Carnevali*1 , S. Strahl1-electrolyte- membrane (PEM) fuel cells, Energy, 33(9): 1331-1352, 2008. [2] M. Mangold, A. Bück, and R. Hanke-Rauschenbach, Passivity based control of a distributed PEM fuel cell model, Journal of Process Control, 20(3): 292

Batlle, Carles

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project: Partnership Opportunities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes opportunities for leading fuel cell industry partners from the United States and abroad to participate in an objective and credible fuel cell technology performance and durability analysis by sharing their raw fuel cell test data related to operations, maintenance, safety, and cost with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory via the Hydrogen Secure Data Center.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Data Collection & Analysis for ARRA Fuel Cell Projects (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The data analysis objectives are: (1) Independent assessment of technology, focused on fuel cell system and hydrogen infrastructure:performance, operation, and safety; (2) Leverage data processing and analysis capabilities from the fuel cell vehicle Learning Demonstration project and DoD Forklift Demo; (3) Establish a baseline of real-world fuel cell operation and maintenance data and identify technical/market barriers; (4) Support market growth of fuel cell technologies by reporting on technology features relevant to the business case; and (5) Report on technology to fuel cell and hydrogen communities and stakeholders.

Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

43

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on previous fuel cell cost analysis studies that we've done for the Department of Energy, beginning with a market analysis, and then completing a system design. The system...

44

Image analysis for remote examination of fuel pins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An image analysis system operating in the Wing 9 Hot Cell Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory provides quantitative microstructural analyses of irradiated fuels and materials. With this system, fewer photomicrographs are required during postirradiation microstructural examination and data are available for analysis much faster. The system has been used successfully to examine Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division experimental fuel pins.

Cook, J.H.; Nayak, U.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

RADIATION ANALYSIS OF A SPENT-FUEL STORAGE CASK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION ANALYSIS OF A SPENT-FUEL STORAGE CASK by J.K. Shultis Department of Mechanical;Radiation Analysis of a Spect-Fuel Storage Cask by J.K.Shultis Dept. Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering compositions for the air, soil, berm and concrete were taken from the references indicated in Table 1. 1.3 Cask

Shultis, J. Kenneth

46

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergyQuality Challenges AnDepartment ofAnalysis of

47

An analysis of distributed solar fuel systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While solar fuel systems offer tremendous potential to address global clean energy needs, most existing analyses have focused on the feasibility of large centralized systems and applications. Not much research exists on ...

Thomas, Alex, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Primate energy expenditure and life history Herman Pontzera,b,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Primate energy expenditure and life history Herman Pontzera,b,1 , David A. Raichlenc , Adam D life histories reflect low total energy expenditure (TEE) (kilocalo- ries per day) relative to other), or allocation within the energy budget could change over evolutionary time to fuel changes in life history

Pontzer, Herman

49

Spent Nuclear Fuel Alternative Technology Decision Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) made a FY98 commitment to the Department of Energy (DOE) to recommend a technology for the disposal of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (SNF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The two technologies being considered, direct co-disposal and melt and dilute, had been previously selected from a group of eleven potential SNF management technologies by the Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team chartered by the DOE''s Office of Spent Fuel Management. To meet this commitment, WSRC organized the SNF Alternative Technology Program to further develop the direct co-disposal and melt and dilute technologies and ultimately provide a WSRC recommendation to DOE on a preferred SNF alternative management technology.

Shedrow, C.B.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

50

Life-cycle analysis of alternative aviation fuels in GREET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, has been expanded to include well-to-wake (WTWa) analysis of aviation fuels and aircraft. This report documents the key WTWa stages and assumptions for fuels that represent alternatives to petroleum jet fuel. The aviation module in GREET consists of three spreadsheets that present detailed characterizations of well-to-pump and pump-to-wake parameters and WTWa results. By using the expanded GREET version (GREET1{_}2011), we estimate WTWa results for energy use (total, fossil, and petroleum energy) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide) for (1) each unit of energy (lower heating value) consumed by the aircraft or (2) each unit of distance traveled/ payload carried by the aircraft. The fuel pathways considered in this analysis include petroleum-based jet fuel from conventional and unconventional sources (i.e., oil sands); Fisher-Tropsch (FT) jet fuel from natural gas, coal, and biomass; bio-jet fuel from fast pyrolysis of cellulosic biomass; and bio-jet fuel from vegetable and algal oils, which falls under the American Society for Testing and Materials category of hydroprocessed esters and fatty acids. For aircraft operation, we considered six passenger aircraft classes and four freight aircraft classes in this analysis. Our analysis revealed that, depending on the feedstock source, the fuel conversion technology, and the allocation or displacement credit methodology applied to co-products, alternative bio-jet fuel pathways have the potential to reduce life-cycle GHG emissions by 55-85 percent compared with conventional (petroleum-based) jet fuel. Although producing FT jet fuel from fossil feedstock sources - such as natural gas and coal - could greatly reduce dependence on crude oil, production from such sources (especially coal) produces greater WTWa GHG emissions compared with petroleum jet fuel production unless carbon management practices, such as carbon capture and storage, are used.

Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Carter, N.; Stratton, R.; Hileman, J.; Malwitz, A.; Balasubramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

51

FUEL SUPPLY SYSTEM ANALYSIS FOR ESF PACKAGE 1E  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this analysis is to capture new inputs relative to the design of the Fuel Supply System (FSS) at the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF). The new inputs are analyzed and changes to the Fuel Supply System are made as necessary.

D.F. Vanica

1995-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

52

Fuel Cell Power Systems Analysis Patrick DavisPatrick Davis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Systems · Balance-of-plant (compressors, humidifiers, heat exchangers, sensors, controls) · Cost hydrogen 500020001000HoursDurability 45125325$/kWCost 325250140W/LPower density Operating on Tier 2 · Fuel Cell Vehicle Systems Analysis · Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/ Systems · DFMA Cost Estimates

53

Used Nuclear Fuels Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Analysis...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Used Nuclear Fuels Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Analysis Resource and Data System (UNF-ST&DARDS) Apr 08 2014 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM John M. Scaglione, ORNL staff, Oak Ridge...

54

Data Analysis of Early Fuel Cell Market Demonstrations (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation about early fuel cell markets, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Hydrogen Secure Data Center and its role in data analysis and demonstrations, and composite data products, and results reported to multiple stakeholders.

Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

55

Statistical analysis of correlated fossil fuel securities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecasting the future prices or returns of a security is extraordinarily difficult if not impossible. However, statistical analysis of a basket of highly correlated securities offering a cross-sectional representation of ...

Li, Derek Z

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fuel cycle analysis in a thorium fueled reactor using bidirectional fuel movement : correction to report MIT-2073-1, MITNE-51  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report corrects an error discovered in the code used in the study "Fuel Cycle Analysis in a Thorium Fueled Reactor Using Bidirectional Fuel Movement," MIT-2073-1, MITNE-51. The results of the correction show considerable ...

Stephen, James D.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Characterization of Nuclear Fuel using Multivariate Statistical Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various combinations of reactor type and fuel composition have been characterized using principle components analysis (PCA) of the concentrations of 9 U and Pu isotopes in the 10 fuel as a function of burnup. The use of PCA allows the reduction of the 9-dimensional data (isotopic concentrations) into a 3-dimensional approximation, giving a visual representation of the changes in nuclear fuel composition with burnup. Real-world variation in the concentrations of {sup 234}U and {sup 236}U in the fresh (unirradiated) fuel was accounted for. The effects of reprocessing were also simulated. The results suggest that, 15 even after reprocessing, Pu isotopes can be used to determine both the type of reactor and the initial fuel composition with good discrimination. Finally, partial least squares discriminant analysis (PSLDA) was investigated as a substitute for PCA. Our results suggest that PLSDA is a better tool for this application where separation between known classes is most important.

Robel, M; Robel, M; Robel, M; Kristo, M J; Kristo, M J

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

58

NREL: Energy Analysis - Vehicles and Fuels Research Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and Achievements ofLiz Torres Photo ofTravis Lowder Photo

59

Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project: Partnership Opportunities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Fuel Cell Technology Status Analysis Project. NREL is seeking fuel cell industry partners from the United States and abroad to participate in an objective and credible analysis of commercially available fuel cell products to benchmark the current state of the technology and support industry growth. Participating fuel cell developers share price information about their fuel cell products and/or raw fuel cell test data related to operations, maintenance, and safety with NREL via the Hydrogen Secure Data Center (HSDC). The limited-access, off-network HSDC houses the data and analysis tools to protect proprietary information. NREL shares individualized data analysis results as detailed data products (DDPs) with the partners who supplied the data. Aggregated results are published as composite data products (CDPs), which show the technology status without identifying individual companies. The CDPs are a primary benchmarking tool for the U.S. Department of Energy and other stakeholders interested in tracking the status of fuel cell technologies. They highlight durability advancements, identify areas for continued development, and help set realistic price expectations at small-volume production.

Not Available

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Essays on pharmaceuticals and health care expenditures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

health care expenditures. This dissertation also explores the relations between FDA Therapeutic Drug Classification and total health care expenditures. It offers a better methodology by incorporating both the quality and the age of the drugs to capture...

Karaca, Zeynal

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Analysis of IFR driver fuel hot channel factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal-hydraulic uncertainty factors for Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) driver fuels have been determined based primarily on the database obtained from the predecessor fuels used in the IFR prototype, Experimental Breeder Reactor II. The uncertainty factors were applied to the channel factors (HCFs) analyses to obtain separate overall HCFs for fuel and cladding for steady-state analyses. A ``semistatistical horizontal method`` was used in the HCFs analyses. The uncertainty factor of the fuel thermal conductivity dominates the effects considered in the HCFs analysis; the uncertainty in fuel thermal conductivity will be reduced as more data are obtained to expand the currently limited database for the IFR ternary metal fuel (U-20Pu-10Zr). A set of uncertainty factors to be used for transient analyses has also been derived.

Ku, J.Y.; Chang, L.K.; Mohr, D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Nuclear fuel cycle facility accident analysis handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Handbook is to provide guidance on how to calculate the characteristics of releases of radioactive materials and/or hazardous chemicals from nonreactor nuclear facilities. In addition, the Handbook provides guidance on how to calculate the consequences of those releases. There are four major chapters: Hazard Evaluation and Scenario Development; Source Term Determination; Transport Within Containment/Confinement; and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequences Modeling. These chapters are supported by Appendices, including: a summary of chemical and nuclear information that contains descriptions of various fuel cycle facilities; details on how to calculate the characteristics of source terms for releases of hazardous chemicals; a comparison of NRC, EPA, and OSHA programs that address chemical safety; a summary of the performance of HEPA and other filters; and a discussion of uncertainties. Several sample problems are presented: a free-fall spill of powder, an explosion with radioactive release; a fire with radioactive release; filter failure; hydrogen fluoride release from a tankcar; a uranium hexafluoride cylinder rupture; a liquid spill in a vitrification plant; and a criticality incident. Finally, this Handbook includes a computer model, LPF No.1B, that is intended for use in calculating Leak Path Factors. A list of contributors to the Handbook is presented in Chapter 6. 39 figs., 35 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Sensitivity analysis and optimization of the nuclear fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sensitivity study has been conducted to assess the robustness of the conclusions presented in the MIT Fuel Cycle Study. The Once Through Cycle (OTC) is considered as the base-line case, while advanced technologies with fuel recycling characterize the alternative fuel cycles. The options include limited recycling in LWRs and full recycling in fast reactors and in high conversion LWRs. Fast reactor technologies studied include both oxide and metal fueled reactors. The analysis allowed optimization of the fast reactor conversion ratio with respect to desired fuel cycle performance characteristics. The following parameters were found to significantly affect the performance of recycling technologies and their penetration over time: Capacity Factors of the fuel cycle facilities, Spent Fuel Cooling Time, Thermal Reprocessing Introduction Date, and in core and Out-of-core TRU Inventory Requirements for recycling technology. An optimization scheme of the nuclear fuel cycle is proposed. Optimization criteria and metrics of interest for different stakeholders in the fuel cycle (economics, waste management, environmental impact, etc.) are utilized for two different optimization techniques (linear and stochastic). Preliminary results covering single and multi-variable and single and multi-objective optimization demonstrate the viability of the optimization scheme. (authors)

Passerini, S.; Kazimi, M. S.; Shwageraus, E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fire hazard analysis for the fuel supply shutdown storage buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of a fire hazards analysis (FHA) is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire and other perils within individual fire areas in a DOE facility in relation to proposed fire protection so as to ascertain whether the objectives of DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection, are met. This Fire Hazards Analysis was prepared as required by HNF-PRO-350, Fire Hazards Analysis Requirements, (Reference 7) for a portion of the 300 Area N Reactor Fuel Fabrication and Storage Facility.

REMAIZE, J.A.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

65

2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Introducing hydrogen...

66

SNF fuel retrieval sub project safety analysis document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This safety analysis is for the SNF Fuel Retrieval (FRS) Sub Project. The FRS equipment will be added to K West and K East Basins to facilitate retrieval, cleaning and repackaging the spent nuclear fuel into Multi-Canister Overpack baskets. The document includes a hazard evaluation, identifies bounding accidents, documents analyses of the accidents and establishes safety class or safety significant equipment to mitigate accidents as needed.

BERGMANN, D.W.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

67

Fuel Storage Facility Final Safety Analysis Report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) is an integral part of the Fast Flux Test Facility. Its purpose is to provide long-term storage (20-year design life) for spent fuel core elements used to provide the fast flux environment in FFTF, and for test fuel pins, components and subassemblies that have been irradiated in the fast flux environment. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) and its supporting documentation provides a complete description and safety evaluation of the site, the plant design, operations, and potential accidents.

Linderoth, C.E.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Spent nuclear fuel project - criteria document spent nuclear fuel final safety analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The criteria document provides the criteria and planning guidance for developing the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). This FSAR will support the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office decision to authorize the procurement, installation, installation acceptance testing, startup, and operation of the SNF Project facilities (K Basins, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, and Canister Storage Building).

MORGAN, R.G.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

69

Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels for LWRS - A Preliminary Systems Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The severe accident at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plants illustrates the need for continuous improvements through developing and implementing technologies that contribute to safe, reliable and cost-effective operation of the nuclear fleet. Development of enhanced accident tolerant fuel contributes to this effort. These fuels, in comparison with the standard zircaloy UO2 system currently used by the LWR industry, should be designed such that they tolerate loss of active cooling in the core for a longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, and design-basis events. This report presents a preliminary systems analysis related to most of these concepts. The potential impacts of these innovative LWR fuels on the front-end of the fuel cycle, on the reactor operation and on the back-end of the fuel cycle are succinctly described without having the pretension of being exhaustive. Since the design of these various concepts is still a work in progress, this analysis can only be preliminary and could be updated as the designs converge on their respective final version.

Gilles Youinou; R. Sonat Sen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

22.351 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Spring 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, thorium and other fuel types, ...

Kazimi, Mujid S.

71

Analysis of tru-fueled vhtr prismatic core performance domains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory Commission ORNL Oak Ridge National Laboratory P&T Partitioning and Transmutation PUREX Plutonium Uranium Reduction and Oxidation PWR Pressurized Water Reactor RGPu Reactor Grade Plutonium SCWCR Super-critical Water Cooled Reactor SFR Sodium.... The neutronics analysis using the 3D, whole-core VHTR model was performed using the ORNL SCALE (Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation) code system. The standard SCALE 5.1 TRITON sequence has been upgraded to allow fuel cycle modeling...

Lewis, Tom Goslee

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Fuel Cell Power Model for CHP and CHHP Economics and Performance Analysis (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes the fuel cell power model for CHP and CHHP economics and performance analysis.

Steward, D.; Penev, M.

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

State energy price and expenditure report 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1980, and 1985 through 1992. Data for all years, 1970 through 1992, are available on personal computer diskettes.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES Foundation FOUNDATION EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES are used primarily by Accounting Services for Foundation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES ­ Foundation 2-J page 1 FOUNDATION EXPENDITURE OBJECT CODES are used primarily by Accounting Services for Foundation transactions. 3080 Foundation Service Fee: Allocation of administrative costs to Foundation beneficiary departmental accounts. 3120 LSU Magazine Costs - Foundation

Harms, Kyle E.

75

State energy price and expenditure report 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The State Energy Price and Expenditure Report (SEPER) presents energy price and expenditure estimates individually for the 50 States and the District of Columbia and in aggregate for the United States. The price and expenditure estimates are provided by energy source and economic sector and are published for the years 1970, 1975, 1980, and 1985 through 1991. Data for all years, 1970 through 1991, are available on personal computer diskettes. Documentation in Appendix A describes how the price estimates are developed, including sources of data, methods of estimation, and conversion factors applied. This report is an update of the State Energy Price and Expenditure Report 1990, published in September 1992.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Selection of Isotopes and Elements for Fuel Cycle Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cycle system analysis simulations examine how the selection among fuel cycle options for reactors, fuel, separation, and waste management impact uranium ore utilization, waste masses and volumes, radiotoxicity, heat to geologic repositories, isotope-dependent proliferation resistance measures, and so forth. Previously, such simulations have tended to track only a few actinide and fission product isotopes, those that have been identified as important to a few criteria from the standpoint of recycled material or waste, taken as a whole. After accounting for such isotopes, the residual mass is often characterized as fission product other or actinide other. However, detailed assessment of separation and waste management options now require identification of key isotopes and residual mass for Group 1A/2A elements (Rb, Cs, Sr, Ba), inert gases (Kr, Xe), halogens (Br, I), lanthanides, transition metals, transuranic (TRU), uranium, actinide decay products. The paper explains the rationale for a list of 81 isotopes and chemical elements to better support separation and waste management assessment in dynamic system analysis models such as Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation (VISION)

Steven J. Piet

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Package Misload Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the probability of misloading a commercial spent nuclear fuel waste package with a fuel assembly(s) that has a reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) outside the waste package design. The waste package designs are based on the expected commercial spent nuclear fuel assemblies and previous analyses (Macheret, P. 2001, Section 4.1 and Table 1). For this calculation, a misloaded waste package is defined as a waste package that has a fuel assembly(s) loaded into it with an enrichment and/or burnup outside the waste package design. An example of this type of misload is a fuel assembly designated for the 21-PWR Control Rod waste package being incorrectly loaded into a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. This constitutes a misloaded 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package, because the reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) of a 21-PWR Control Rod waste package fuel assembly is outside the design of a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. These types of misloads (i.e., fuel assembly with enrichment and/or burnup outside waste package design) are the only types that are evaluated in this calculation. This calculation utilizes information from ''Frequency of SNF Misload for Uncanistered Fuel Waste Package'' (CRWMS M&O 1998) as the starting point. The scope of this calculation is limited to the information available. The information is based on the whole population of fuel assemblies and the whole population of waste packages, because there is no information about the arrival of the waste stream at this time. The scope of this calculation deviates from that specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Risk and Criticality Department'' (BSC 2002a, Section 2.1.30) in that only waste package misload is evaluated. The remaining issues identified (i.e., flooding and geometry reconfiguration) will be addressed elsewhere. The intended use of the calculation is to provide information and inputs to the Preclosure Safety Analysis Department. Before using the results of this calculation, the reader is cautioned to verify that the assumptions made in this calculation regarding the waste stream, the loading process, and the staging of the spent nuclear fuel assemblies are applicable.

A. Alsaed

2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Waste Package Misload Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to estimate the probability of misloading a commercial spent nuclear fuel waste package with a fuel assembly(s) that has a reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) outside the waste package design. The waste package designs are based on the expected commercial spent nuclear fuel assemblies and previous analyses (Macheret, P. 2001, Section 4.1 and Table 1). For this calculation, a misloaded waste package is defined as a waste package that has a fuel assembly(s) loaded into it with an enrichment and/or burnup outside the waste package design. An example of this type of misload is a fuel assembly designated for the 21-PWR Control Rod waste package being incorrectly loaded into a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. This constitutes a misloaded 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package, because the reactivity (i.e., enrichment and/or burnup) of a 21-PWR Control Rod waste package fuel assembly is outside the design of a 21-PWR Absorber Plate waste package. These types of misloads (i.e., fuel assembly with enrichment and/or burnup outside waste package design) are the only types that are evaluated in this calculation. This calculation utilizes information from ''Frequency of SNF Misload for Uncanistered Fuel Waste Package'' (CRWMS M&O 1998) as the starting point. The scope of this calculation is limited to the information available. The information is based on the whole population of fuel assemblies and the whole population of waste packages, because there is no information about the arrival of the waste stream at this time. The scope of this calculation deviates from that specified in ''Technical Work Plan for: Risk and Criticality Department'' (BSC 2002a, Section 2.1.30) in that only waste package misload is evaluated. The remaining issues identified (i.e., flooding and geometry reconfiguration) will be addressed elsewhere. The intended use of the calculation is to provide information and inputs to the Preclosure Safety Analysis Department. Before using the results of this calculation, the reader is cautioned to verify that the assumptions made in this calculation regarding the waste stream, the loading process, and the staging of the spent nuclear fuel assemblies are applicable.

J.K. Knudson

2003-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

79

Thermal analysis for fuel handling system for sodium cooled reactor considering minor actinide-bearing metal fuel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) is one of the components of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) used to close the fuel cycle. ABR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor that is used to consume transuranic elements resulting from the reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel. ABR-1000 [1000 MW(thermal)] is a fast reactor concept created at Argonne National Laboratory to be used as a reference concept for various future trade-offs. ABR-1000 meets the GNEP goals although it uses what is considered base sodium fast reactor technology for its systems and components. One of the considerations of any fast reactor plant concept is the ability to perform fuel-handling operations with new and spent fast reactor fuel. The transmutation fuel proposed as the ABR fuel has a very little experience base, and thus, this paper investigates a fuel-handling concept and potential issues of handling fast reactor fuel containing minor actinides. In this study, two thermal analyses supporting a conceptual design study on the ABR-1000 fuel-handling system were carried out. One analysis investigated passive dry spent fuel storage, and the other analysis investigated a fresh fuel shipping cask. Passive dry storage can be made suitable for the ABR-1000 spent fuel storage with sodium-bonded metal fuel. The thermal analysis shows that spent fast reactor fuel with a decay heat of 2 kW or less can be stored passively in a helium atmosphere. The 2-kW value seems to be a reasonable and practical level, and a combination of reasonably-sized in-sodium storage followed by passive dry storage could be a candidate for spent fuel storage for the next-generation sodium-cooled reactor with sodium-bonded metal fuel. Requirements for the shipping casks for minor actinide-bearing fuel with a high decay heat level are also discussed in this paper. The shipping cask for fresh sodium-cooled-reactor fuel should be a dry type to reduce the reaction between residual moisture on fresh fuel and the sodium coolant. The cladding temperature requirement is maintained below the creep temperature limit to avoid any damage before core installation. The thermal analysis shows that a helium gas-filled cask can accommodate ABR-1000 fresh minor actinide-bearing fuel with 700-W decay heat. The above analysis results revealed the overall requirement for minor actinide-bearing metal fuel handling. The information is thought to be helpful in the design of the ABR-1000 and future sodium-cooled-reactor fuel-handling system.

Chikazawa, Y.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

22.251 / 22.351 Systems Analysis of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This course provides an in-depth technical and policy analysis of various options for the nuclear fuel cycle. Topics include uranium supply, enrichment fuel fabrication, in-core physics and fuel management of uranium, ...

Kazimi, Mujid S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview and Gap Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the technical and cost gap analysis performed to identify pathways for reducing the costs of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stationary fuel cell power plants.

Remick, R.; Wheeler, D.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Advanced Neutron Source Reactor thermal analysis of fuel plate defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) is a research reactor designed to provide the highest continuous neutron beam intensity of any reactor in the world. The present technology for determining safe operations were developed for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). These techniques are conservative and provide confidence in the safe operation of HFIR. However, the more intense requirements of ANSR necessitate the development of more accurate, but still conservative, techniques. This report details the development of a Local Analysis Technique (LAT) that provides an appropriate approach. Application of the LAT to two ANSR core designs are presented. New theories of the thermal and nuclear behavior of the U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel are utilized. The implications of lower fuel enrichment and of modifying the inspection procedures are also discussed. Development of the computer codes that enable the automate execution of the LAT is included.

Giles, G.E.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NMR apparatus for in situ analysis of fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The subject apparatus is a fuel cell toroid cavity detector for in situ analysis of samples through the use of nuclear magnetic resonance. The toroid cavity detector comprises a gas-tight housing forming a toroid cavity where the housing is exposed to an externally applied magnetic field B.sub.0 and contains fuel cell component samples to be analyzed. An NMR spectrometer is electrically coupled and applies a radiofrequency excitation signal pulse to the detector to produce a radiofrequency magnetic field B.sub.1 in the samples and in the toroid cavity. Embedded coils modulate the static external magnetic field to provide a means for spatial selection of the recorded NMR signals.

Gerald, II, Rex E; Rathke, Jerome W

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

84

Prototype spent-fuel canister design, analysis, and test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories was asked by the US Energy Research and Development Administration (now US Department of Energy) to design the spent fuel shipping cask system for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). As a part of this task, a canister which holds liquid sodium and the spent fuel assembly was designed, analyzed, and tested. The canister body survived the regulatory Type-B 9.1-m (30-ft) drop test with no apparent leakage. However, the commercially available metal seal used in this design leaked after the tests. This report describes the design approach, analysis, and prototype canister testing. Recommended work for completing the design, when funding is available, is included.

Leisher, W.B.; Eakes, R.G.; Duffey, T.A.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PEM Fuel Cell Additional Equipment Installation CostsFuel Cell_PAFC Fuel Cell_PEM Power (units/ yr) Total Cost Ccosts of generating power with stationary and motor vehicle PEM fuel cell

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PEM Fuel Cell Additional Equipment Installation CostsFuel Cell_PAFC Fuel Cell_PEM Power (units/ yr) Total Cost Ccosts of generating power with stationary and motor vehicle PEM fuel cell

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Neutronics Design and Fuel Cycle Analysis of a High Conversion BWR with Pu-Th Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI), a 'Generation IV' high conversion Boiling Water Reactor design is being investigated at Purdue University and Brookhaven National Laboratory. One of the primary innovative design features of the core proposed here is the use of Thorium as fertile material. In addition to the advantageous nonproliferation and waste characteristics of thorium fuel cycles, the use of thorium is particularly important in a tight pitch, high conversion lattice in order to insure a negative void coefficient throughout the operating life of the reactor. The principal design objective of a high conversion light water reactor is to substantially increase the conversion ratio (fissile atoms produced per fissile atoms consumed) of the reactor without compromising the safety performance of the plant. Since existing LWRs have a relatively low conversion ratio they require relatively frequent refueling which limits the economic efficiency of the plant. Also, the high volume of spent fuel can pose a burden for waste storage and the accumulation of plutonium in the uranium fuel cycle can become a materials proliferation issue. The development of Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) as an alternative technology to alleviate some of these concerns has been delayed for various reasons. An intermediate solution has been to examine tight pitch light water reactors which can provide significant improvements in the fuel cycle performance of the existing LWRs by taking advantage of the increased conversion ratios from the harder neutron spectrum in the tight pitch lattice, as well as the by taking advantage of the waste and nonproliferation benefits of the thorium fuel cycle. Several High Conversion BWR designs have been proposed by researchers in Japan and elsewhere during the past several years. One of the more promising HCR designs is the Reduced Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) proposed by JAERI [1]. Their design was based on a uranium fuel cycle and showed significant improvements in the fuel cycle performance compared to conventional BWRs. However, one of the drawbacks of their design was the potential for a positive void coefficient. In order to insure a negative void coefficient, the JAERI researchers designed a 'flat core' and introduced void tube assemblies in order to enhance neutron leakage in the event of core voiding. The use of thorium in the Purdue/BNL HCBWR design proposed here obviates the need for void tubes and makes it possible to increase the core height and improve neutron economy without the risk of a positive void coefficient. The principal reason for the improvement in the void coefficient is because Th-232 has a smaller fast fission cross section and resonance integral than U-238. In the design proposed here, it is possible to eliminate the void tubes in the RMWR design and replace the axial blanket with active fuel to increase the core height and further improve neutron economy. The core analyses in the work here was performed with the Purdue Fuel Management Code System [2] which is based on the Studsvik/Scandpower lattice physics code HELIOS, and the U.S. NRC core neutronics simulator, PARCS, which is coupled to the thermal-hydraulics code RELAP5. All these codes have been well assessed and benchmarked for analysis of light water reactor systems. (authors)

Xu, Yunlin; Downar, T.J. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906-1290 (United States); Takahashi, H.; Rohatgi, U.S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

A Monte Carlo based spent fuel analysis safeguards strategy assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safeguarding nuclear material involves the detection of diversions of significant quantities of nuclear materials, and the deterrence of such diversions by the risk of early detection. There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium in spent fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthening the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies ability to safeguards nuclear facilities, shipper/receiver difference, input accountability at reprocessing facilities and burnup credit at repositories. Many NDA techniques exist for measuring signatures from spent fuel; however, no single NDA technique can, in isolation, quantify elemental plutonium and other actinides of interest in spent fuel. A study has been undertaken to determine the best integrated combination of cost effective techniques for quantifying plutonium mass in spent fuel for nuclear safeguards. A standardized assessment process was developed to compare the effective merits and faults of 12 different detection techniques in order to integrate a few techniques and to down-select among the techniques in preparation for experiments. The process involves generating a basis burnup/enrichment/cooling time dependent spent fuel assembly library, creating diversion scenarios, developing detector models and quantifying the capability of each NDA technique. Because hundreds of input and output files must be managed in the couplings of data transitions for the different facets of the assessment process, a graphical user interface (GUI) was development that automates the process. This GUI allows users to visually create diversion scenarios with varied replacement materials, and generate a MCNPX fixed source detector assessment input file. The end result of the assembly library assessment is to select a set of common source terms and diversion scenarios for quantifying the capability of each of the 12 NDA techniques. We present here the generalized assessment process, the techniques employed to automate the coupled facets of the assessment process, and the standard burnup/enrichment/cooling time dependent spent fuel assembly library. We also clearly define the diversion scenarios that will be analyzed during the standardized assessments. Though this study is currently limited to generic PWR assemblies, it is expected that the results of the assessment will yield an adequate spent fuel analysis strategy knowledge that will help the down-select process for other reactor types.

Fensin, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Nathan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Final List of Attendees 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Final List of Attendees 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell...

90

Agenda for the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Agenda for the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting Agenda for the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...

91

Manufacturing Cost Analysis of 1 kW and 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Cost Analysis of 1 kW and 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) for Auxiliary Power Applications Manufacturing Cost Analysis of 1 kW and 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC)...

92

2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting Discussion Group 2 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Senario Analysis...

93

2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Infrastructure Meeting Discussion Group 1 Summary Presentation 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis...

94

USED FUEL RAIL SHOCK AND VIBRATION TESTING OPTIONS ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the rail shock and vibration tests is to complete the framework needed to quantify loads of fuel assembly components that are necessary to guide materials research and establish a technical basis for review organizations such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A significant body of experimental and numerical modeling data exists to quantify loads and failure limits applicable to normal conditions of transport (NCT) rail transport, but the data are based on assumptions that can only be verified through experimental testing. The test options presented in this report represent possible paths for acquiring the data that are needed to confirm the assumptions of previous work, validate modeling methods that will be needed for evaluating transported fuel on a case-by-case basis, and inform material test campaigns on the anticipated range of fuel loading. The ultimate goal of this testing is to close all of the existing knowledge gaps related to the loading of used fuel under NCT conditions and inform the experiments and analysis program on specific endpoints for their research. The options include tests that would use an actual railcar, surrogate assemblies, and real or simulated rail transportation casks. The railcar carrying the cradle, cask, and surrogate fuel assembly payload would be moved in a train operating over rail track modified or selected to impart shock and vibration forces that occur during normal rail transportation. Computer modeling would be used to help design surrogates that may be needed for a rail cask, a casks internal basket, and a transport cradle. The objective of the design of surrogate components would be to provide a test platform that effectively simulates responses to rail shock and vibration loads that would be exhibited by state-of-the-art rail cask, basket, and/or cradle structures. The computer models would also be used to help determine the placement of instrumentation (accelerometers and strain gauges) on the surrogate fuel assemblies, cask and cradle structures, and the railcar so that forces and deflections that would result in the greatest potential for damage to high burnup and long-cooled UNF can be determined. For purposes of this report we consider testing on controlled track when we have control of the track and speed to facilitate modeling.

Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Maheras, Steven J.

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

95

GCtool for fuel cell systems design and analysis : user documentation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GCtool is a comprehensive system design and analysis tool for fuel cell and other power systems. A user can analyze any configuration of component modules and flows under steady-state or dynamic conditions. Component models can be arbitrarily complex in modeling sophistication and new models can be added easily by the user. GCtool also treats arbitrary system constraints over part or all of the system, including the specification of nonlinear objective functions to be minimized subject to nonlinear, equality or inequality constraints. This document describes the essential features of the interpreted language and the window-based GCtool environment. The system components incorporated into GCtool include a gas flow mixer, splitier, heater, compressor, gas turbine, heat exchanger, pump, pipe, diffuser, nozzle, steam drum, feed water heater, combustor, chemical reactor, condenser, fuel cells (proton exchange membrane, solid oxide, phosphoric acid, and molten carbonate), shaft, generator, motor, and methanol steam reformer. Several examples of system analysis at various levels of complexity are presented. Also given are instructions for generating two- and three-dimensional plots of data and the details of interfacing new models to GCtool.

Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost Savings |Safety, Codes and07-01-3994 Fuel EconomyFuel

97

A Cost Benefit Analysis of California's Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks (LUFTs). Submitted to theCalifornias Underground Storage Tank Program. Submitted tos Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks by Samantha Carrington

Carrington-Crouch, Robert

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Qualitative human reliability analysis for spent fuel handling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human reliability analysis (HRA) methods have been developed primarily to provide information for use in probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) that analyze nuclear power plant (NPP) operations. Given the original emphasis of these methods, it is understandable that many HRAs have not ventured far from NPP control room applications. Despite this historical focus on the control room, there has been growing interest and discussion regarding the application of HRA methods to other NPP activities such as spent fuel handling (SFH) or operations in different types of facilities. One recently developed HRA method, 'A Technique for Human Event Analysis' (ATHEANA) has been proposed as a promising candidate for diverse applications due to its particular approach for systematically uncovering the dynamic, contextual conditions influencing human performance. This paper describes one successful test of this proposition by presenting portions of a recently completed project in which a scoping study was performed to accomplish the following goals: (1) investigate what should be included in a qualitative HRA for spent fuel and cask handling operations; and (2) demonstrate that the ATHEANA HRA technique can be usefully applied to these operations. The preliminary, scoping qualitative HRA examined, in a generic manner, how human performance of SFH and dry cask storage operations (DCSOs) can plausibly lead to radiological consequences that impact the public and the environment. The study involved the performance of typical, qualitative HRA tasks such as collecting relevant information and the preliminary identification of human failure events or unsafe actions, relevant influences (e.g., performance shaping factors, other contextual factors), event scenario development and categorization of human failure event (HFE) scenario groupings. Information from relevant literature sources was augmented with subject matter expert interviews and analysis of an edited video of selected operations. Elements of NUREG-1792, Good Practices for Implementing Human Reliability Analyses (HRA) and NUREG-1624, Rev. 1, Technical Basis and Implementation Guidelines for A Technique for Human Event Analysis (ATHEANA) formed critical parts of the technical basis for the preliminary analysis. Mis-loading of spent fuel into a cask and dropping of a loaded cask were the two human failure event groupings of primary interest, although all human performance aspects of DCSOs were considered to some extent. Of important note is that HRA is typically performed in the context of a plant-specific PRA study. This analysis was performed without the benefit of the context provided by a larger PRA study, nor was it plant specific, and so it investigated only generic HRA issues relevant to SFH. However, the improved understanding of human performance issues provided by the study will likely enhance the ability to carry out a detailed qualitative HRA for a specific NPP at some point in the future. Furthermore, support was obtained regarding the potential for applying ATHEANA beyond NPP settings. This paper provides a description of the process followed during the analysis, a description of the HFE scenario groupings, discussion regarding general human performance vulnerabilities, and a detailed examination of one HFE scenario developed in the study. (authors)

Brewer, J. D. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185-0748 (United States); Amico, P. [Science Applications International Corporation (United States); Cooper, S. E. [United Stated Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Design optimization and analysis of coated particle fuel using advanced fuel performance modeling techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modifying material properties provides another approach to optimize coated particle fuel used in pebble bed reactors. In this study, the MIT fuel performance model (TIMCOAT) was applied after benchmarking against the ...

Soontrapa, Chaiyod

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

CONTROL-ORIENTED MODELING AND ANALYSIS FOR AUTOMOTIVE FUEL CELL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the success of fuel cell vehicles. Efficient fuel cell system power production depends on proper airCONTROL-ORIENTED MODELING AND ANALYSIS FOR AUTOMOTIVE FUEL CELL SYSTEMS Jay T. Pukrushpan Huei Peng of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2125 Email: pukrushp@umich.edu Abstract Fuel Cells are electrochemical

Peng, Huei

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Control-relevant Modelling and Linear Analysis of Instabilities in Oxy-fuel Combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control-relevant Modelling and Linear Analysis of Instabilities in Oxy-fuel Combustion Dagfinn at suppressing thermoacoustic instabilities. As a first step towards achieving the same for oxy-fuel combustion, we develop a control relevant model of oxy-fuel combustion. In oxy-fuel combustion CO2 is used

Foss, Bjarne A.

102

Palmetto Fuel Cell Analysis and Design | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County,PPP EquipmentPartnersPalisadesPalmco PowerPalmetto

103

Job Creation Analysis in the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Industry  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington, DC 20585 April 2006JenniferJob Creation

104

A Techno-Economic Analysis of Decentralized Electrolytic Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Techno-Economic Analysis of Decentralized Electrolytic Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cell Vehicles-Economic Analysis of Decentralized Electrolytic Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cell Vehicles by Sébastien Prince options considered for future fuel cell vehicles. In this thesis, a model is developed to determine

Victoria, University of

105

Section 1 (For Expenditure Adjustments) EXPENDITURES FOR BUSINESS BUDGET BUDGET BUDGET BUDGET OFFICE USE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DATE Section 1 (For Expenditure Adjustments) EXPENDITURES FOR BUSINESS BUDGET BUDGET BUDGET BUDGET AMOUNT AMOUNT AMOUNT CODE TOTAL FOR BUSINESS Section 2 (For Revenue and Other Adjustments) BUDGET BUDGET/Chief Administrative Officer Department Head Chief Business Officer Dean or Director Vice President for Budget

Tennessee, University of

106

Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the time-dependent dynamics of transitioning from the current United States (U.S.) nuclear fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is disposed in a repository to a closed fuel cycle where the used fuel is recycled and only fission products and waste are disposed. The report is intended to help inform policy developers, decision makers, and program managers of system-level options and constraints as they guide the formulation and implementation of advanced fuel cycle development and demonstration efforts and move toward deployment of nuclear fuel recycling infrastructure.

Brent Dixon; Sonny Kim; David Shropshire; Steven Piet; Gretchen Matthern; Bill Halsey

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Hydrogen Fueling Station in Honolulu, Hawaii Feasibility Analysis |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Groundto ApplyRoadmap HydrogenHydrogen FuelDepartment of

108

Renewable Fuel Vehicle Modeling and Analysis | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes OfficeTexasEnergyFuel Vehicle Modeling and

109

Manufacturing Cost Analysis of 1 kW and 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

kW and 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) for Auxiliary Power Applications Manufacturing Cost Analysis of 1 kW and 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) for Auxiliary Power...

110

Analysis of the Impact of Fuel Cell Vehicles on Energy Systems...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Fuel Cell Vehicles on Energy Systems in the Transportation Sector in Japan Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Analysis of the Impact of Fuel Cell...

111

Thermal hydraulic analysis of hydride fuels in BWR's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis contributes to the hydride nuclear fuel project being completed by UC Berkeley and MIT to assess the possible benefits of using hydride fuel in light water nuclear reactors (LWR's). More specifically, this ...

Creighton, John Everett

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Thermomechanical analysis of innovative nuclear fuel pin designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One way to increase the power of a nuclear reactor is to change the solid cylindrical fuel to Internally and Externally Cooled (I&EC) annular fuel, and adjust the flow and the core inlet coolant temperature. The switch to ...

Lerch Andrew (Andrew J.)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak compact-average burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3 x 105 total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Six compacts have been examined, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose from 36 to 79 individual particles near midplane on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, bufferIPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, 981 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel protrusion into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. BufferIPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only four classified particles, all in conjunction with IPyCSiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures and IPyCSiC debonds.

Scott A. Ploger; Paul A. Demkowicz; John D. Hunn; Jay S. Kehn

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Microscopic analysis of irradiated AGR-1 coated particle fuel compacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The AGR-1 experiment involved irradiation of 72 TRISO-coated particle fuel compacts to a peak burnup of 19.5% FIMA with no in-pile failures observed out of 3105 total particles. Irradiated AGR-1 fuel compacts have been cross-sectioned and analyzed with optical microscopy to characterize kernel, buffer, and coating behavior. Five compacts have been examined so far, spanning a range of irradiation conditions (burnup, fast fluence, and irradiation temperature) and including all four TRISO coating variations irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment. The cylindrical specimens were sectioned both transversely and longitudinally, then polished to expose between approximately 40-80 individual particles on each mount. The analysis focused primarily on kernel swelling and porosity, buffer densification and fracturing, buffer-IPyC debonding, and fractures in the IPyC and SiC layers. Characteristic morphologies have been identified, over 800 particles have been classified, and spatial distributions of particle types have been mapped. No significant spatial patterns were discovered in these cross sections. However, some trends were found between morphological types and certain behavioral aspects. Buffer fractures were found in approximately 23% of the particles, and these fractures often resulted in unconstrained kernel swelling into the open cavities. Fractured buffers and buffers that stayed bonded to IPyC layers appear related to larger pore size in kernels. Buffer-IPyC interface integrity evidently factored into initiation of rare IPyC fractures. Fractures through part of the SiC layer were found in only three particles, all in conjunction with IPyC-SiC debonding. Compiled results suggest that the deliberate coating fabrication variations influenced the frequencies of IPyC fractures, IPyC-SiC debonds, and SiC fractures.

Scott Ploger; Paul Demkowicz; John Hunn; Robert Morris

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

N-Reactor (U-metal) Fuel Characteristics for Disposal Criticality Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE-owned spent nuclear fuels encompass many fuel types. In an effort to facilitate criticality analysis for these various fuel types, they were categorized into nine characteristic fuel groups with emphasis on fuel matrix composition. Out of each fuel group, a representative fuel type was chosen for analysis as a bounding case within that fuel group. Generally, burnup data, fissile enrichments, and total fuel and fissile mass govern the selection of the representative or candidate fuel within that group. Additionally, the criticality analysis will also require data to support design of the canister internals, thermal, and radiation shielding. The purpose of this report is to consolidate and provide in a concise format, material and information/data needed to perform supporting analyses to qualify N-Reactor fuels for acceptance into the designated repository. The N Reactor fuels incorporate zirconium cladding and uranium metal with unique fabrication details in terms of physical size, and method of construction. The fuel construction and post-irradiation handling have created attendant issues relative to cladding failure in the underwater storage environment. These fuels were comprised of low-enriched metal (0.947 to 1.25 wt% 235U) that were originally intended to generate weapons-grade plutonium for national defense. Modifications in subsequent fuel design and changes in the mode of reactor operation in later years were focused more toward power production.

Taylor, Larry Lorin

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06 AuditAugust 5,ReDevelopments |1 DOE0

117

Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines Research Diesel Fuels: Analysis of Physical and Chemical Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CRC Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines working group has worked to identify a matrix of research diesel fuels for use in advanced combustion research applications. Nine fuels were specified and formulated to investigate the effects of cetane number aromatic content and 90% distillation fraction. Standard ASTM analyses were performed on the fuels as well as GC/MS and /u1H//u1/u3C NMR analyses and thermodynamic characterizations. Details of the actual results of the fuel formulations compared with the design values are presented, as well as results from standard analyses, such as heating value, viscosity and density. Cetane number characterizations were accomplished by using both the engine method and the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT/sT) apparatus.

Gallant, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Franz, Jim [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Alnajjar, Mikhail [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Cannella, William C [Chevron, USA; Fairbridge, Craig [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Canada; Hager, Darcy [National Centre for Upgrading Technology, Canada; Dettman, Heather [CANMET Energy; Luecke, Jon [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Ratcliff, Matthew A. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Zigler, Brad [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Comparative analysis of LWR and FBR spent fuels for nuclear forensics evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some interesting issues are attributed to nuclide compositions of spent fuels from thermal reactors as well as fast reactors such as a potential to reuse as recycled fuel, and a possible capability to be manage as a fuel for destructive devices. In addition, analysis on nuclear forensics which is related to spent fuel compositions becomes one of the interesting topics to evaluate the origin and the composition of spent fuels from the spent fuel foot-prints. Spent fuel compositions of different fuel types give some typical spent fuel foot prints and can be estimated the origin of source of those spent fuel compositions. Some technics or methods have been developing based on some science and technological capability including experimental and modeling or theoretical aspects of analyses. Some foot-print of nuclear forensics will identify the typical information of spent fuel compositions such as enrichment information, burnup or irradiation time, reactor types as well as the cooling time which is related to the age of spent fuels. This paper intends to evaluate the typical spent fuel compositions of light water (LWR) and fast breeder reactors (FBR) from the view point of some foot prints of nuclear forensics. An established depletion code of ORIGEN is adopted to analyze LWR spent fuel (SF) for several burnup constants and decay times. For analyzing some spent fuel compositions of FBR, some coupling codes such as SLAROM code, JOINT and CITATION codes including JFS-3-J-3.2R as nuclear data library have been adopted. Enriched U-235 fuel composition of oxide type is used for fresh fuel of LWR and a mixed oxide fuel (MOX) for FBR fresh fuel. Those MOX fuels of FBR come from the spent fuels of LWR. Some typical spent fuels from both LWR and FBR will be compared to distinguish some typical foot-prints of SF based on nuclear forensic analysis.

Permana, Sidik; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Su'ud, Zaki [Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 Nuclear Physics and Bio (Indonesia); Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirane, Shirakata, Tokai Mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nuclear Physics and Bio Physics Research Group, Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

A dynamic fuel cycle analysis for a heterogeneous thorium-DUPIC recycle in CANDU reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A heterogeneous thorium fuel recycle scenario in a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor has been analyzed by the dynamic analysis method. The thorium recycling is performed through a dry process which has a strong proliferation resistance. In the fuel cycle model, the existing nuclear power plant construction plan was considered up to 2016, while the nuclear demand growth rate from the year 2016 was assumed to be 0%. In this analysis, the spent fuel inventory as well as the amount of plutonium, minor actinides, and fission products of a multiple thorium recycling fuel cycle were estimated and compared to those of the once-through fuel cycle. The analysis results have shown that the heterogeneous thorium fuel cycle can be constructed through the dry process technology. It is also shown that the heterogeneous thorium fuel cycle can reduce the spent fuel inventory and save on the natural uranium resources when compared with the once-through cycle. (authors)

Jeong, C. J.; Park, C. J.; Choi, H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., P.O. Box 150, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Manufacturing Cost Analysis of 1 kW and 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

MANUFACTURING COST ANALYSIS OF 1 KW AND 5 KW SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL (SOFC) FOR AUXILLIARY POWER APPLICATIONS Prepared by: BATTELLE Battelle Memorial Institute 505 King Avenue...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Webinar: DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, DOE Launches JOBS and Economic Impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) Analysis Model, originally presented on May 22, 2012.

122

DOE and FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Analysis Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Trade-Offs - T. P. Chen, Nexant 8. Hydrogen Delivery Demonstrations - Ed Kiczek, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. 9. Pathway Cost Distributions: Fuel Pathway Integration...

123

Analysis of fuel shares in the industrial sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These studies describe how fuel shares have changed over time; determine what factors are important in promoting fuel share changes; and project fuel shares to the year 1995 in the industrial sector. A general characterization of changes in fuel shares of four fuel types - coal, natural gas, oil and electricity - for the industrial sector is as follows. Coal as a major fuel source declined rapidly from 1958 to the early 1970s, with oil and natural gas substituting for coal. Coal's share of total fuels stabilized after the oil price shock of 1972-1973, and increased after the 1979 price shock. In the period since 1973, most industries and the industrial sector as a whole appear to freely substitute natural gas for oil, and vice versa. Throughout the period 1958-1981, the share of electricity as a fuel increased. These observations are derived from analyzing the fuel share patterns of more than 20 industries over the 24-year period 1958 to 1981.

Roop, J.M.; Belzer, D.B.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Used Nuclear Fuels Storage, Transportation, and Disposal Analysis Resource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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125

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Energy Analysis and Tools  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and Achievements ofLiz TorresSolectria Photo ofResearchHydrogenEnergy

126

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Systems Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and Achievements ofLiz TorresSolectriaProjects Photo ofSafety,Systems

127

NREL: Transportation Research - Emissions and Fuel Economy Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andData and ResourcesOtherForecastingAlternativeVehicle

128

Three-Dimensional Computational Analysis of Transport Phenomena in a PEM Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three-Dimensional Computational Analysis of Transport Phenomena in a PEM Fuel Cell by Torsten or other means, without permission of the author. #12;Supervisor: Dr. N. Djilali Abstract Fuel cells-isothermal computational model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The model was developed to improve

Victoria, University of

129

Analysis of Pt/C electrode performance in a flowing-electrolyte alkaline fuel cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of Pt/C electrode performance in a flowing- electrolyte alkaline fuel cell Fikile R 17 October 2011 Accepted 18 October 2011 Available online 12 November 2011 Keywords: Alkaline fuel cell Electrode characterization X-ray micro-computed tomography Microfluidic fuel cell Carbonates a b

Kenis, Paul J. A.

130

Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators Cornelis F. de Hoop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest Fuel Reduction Survey Analysis: Forest Administrators by Cornelis F. de Hoop Amith Hanumappa to seriously investigate and execute the methods required to carry out a successful fuel reduction project operations wherein fuel reduction is a primary management objective. Literature on this wave of activity

Wu, Qinglin

131

Transient Analysis of Proton Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) at Start-Up  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Transient Analysis of Proton Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) at Start-Up and Failure M. F perfor- mance of the fuel cell has already been reported, when inter- digitated flow fields are used [1 with experiments to study the effect of temperature, humidity, and pressure on fuel cell performance

Yanikoglu, Berrin

132

Stability and error analysis of the polarization estimation inverse problem for solid oxide fuel cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

describe the performance of a solid oxide fuel cell requires the solution of an inverse problem. Two at the electrodeelectrolyte interfaces of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) is investigated physically using ElectrochemicalStability and error analysis of the polarization estimation inverse problem for solid oxide fuel

Renaut, Rosemary

133

Risk analysis of shipping plutonium pits and mixed oxide fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, one possible option that has been identified for disposition of excess U.S. weapons plutonium is the transformation into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, that then would be used as fuel in a commercial nuclear power plant. Any such process will involve...

Caldwell, Amy Baker

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

The Renewable Fuel Standard and Ethanol Pricing: A Sensitivity Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biofuel. The current Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) requires 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel use by 2022. A large proportion of the mandate is to consist of corn-based ethanol. Most ethanol is consumed in the U.S. as a 10 percent blend of ethanol...

McNair, Robert

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

135

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems - A...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced FuelVehicle Systems - A North American Study of Energy Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, and Criteria Pollutant Emissions Well-to-Wheels Analysis...

136

Consumer Expenditure Patterns for Fish and Shellfish  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on/ish and shellfish. March )WJ2. 44(.7) Table 1. - Price, per capita consumption, and share of fish Service. 1981). Per capita Consumer price Per capita total Consumer price index Fish/shellfish fish/shellfish index for red meat/poultry/ for tofal red meat/ expenditure consumption fish/sheIIIish seafood

137

2011 Expenditures Report Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity from 31 federal hydropower dams and one non-federal nuclear power plant in the Pacific Northwest (debt-funded) in facilities and some land purchases 2. Reimbursements to other federal agencies tO thE NORthWESt GOvERNORS > FIsh & WIlDlIFE ExPEnDItuREs Background The Pacific Northwest Electric Power

138

Towards Human Energy Expenditure Estimation Using Smart Phone Inertial Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to reliably estimate energy expenditure (EE). Direct calorimetry [5] measures the heat produced by human bodyTowards Human Energy Expenditure Estimation Using Smart Phone Inertial Sensors Bozidara Cvetkovi´c1 human energy expenditure during sport and normal daily ac- tivities. The paper presents technical

Lu?trek, Mitja

139

Hydrogen Fueling Station in Honolulu, Hawaii Feasibility Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Plan (September 2011) identifies the use of hydrogen for government and fleet electric vehicles as a key step for achieving reduced greenhouse gas emissions; reduced oil consumption; expanded use of renewable power ; highly efficient energy conversion; fuel flexibility ; reduced air pollution; and highly reliable grid-support. This report synthesizes several pieces of existing information that can inform a decision regarding the viability of deploying a hydrogen (H2) fueling station at the Fort Armstrong site in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Porter Hill; Michael Penev

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Analysis Results for ARRA Projects: Enabling Fuel Cell Market Transformation (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses analysis results for American Recovery and Reinvestment Act early market fuel cell deployments and describes the objective of the project and its relevance to the Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program; NREL's analysis approach; technical accomplishments including publication of a fourth set of composite data products; and collaborations and future work.

Kurtz, J.; Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Spent fuel management fee methodology and computer code user's manual.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methodology and computer model described here were developed to analyze the cash flows for the federal government taking title to and managing spent nuclear fuel. The methodology has been used by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate the spent fuel disposal fee that will provide full cost recovery. Although the methodology was designed to analyze interim storage followed by spent fuel disposal, it could be used to calculate a fee for reprocessing spent fuel and disposing of the waste. The methodology consists of two phases. The first phase estimates government expenditures for spent fuel management. The second phase determines the fees that will result in revenues such that the government attains full cost recovery assuming various revenue collection philosophies. These two phases are discussed in detail in subsequent sections of this report. Each of the two phases constitute a computer module, called SPADE (SPent fuel Analysis and Disposal Economics) and FEAN (FEe ANalysis), respectively.

Engel, R.L.; White, M.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Transient analysis of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis contributes to the hydride nuclear fuel project led by U. C. Berkeley for which MIT is to perform the thermal hydraulic and economic analyses. A parametric study has been performed to determine the optimum ...

Trant, Jarrod Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A Near-term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Diaphragm Hydrogen Compressor Costs (Industry) Capacity (Hydrogen Fueling Systems A nalysis The report examines reformer, storage and compressor costsHydrogen Equipment Storage System Compressor Dispenser Delivery and Installation Cost

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Near-Term Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Diaphragm Hydrogen Compressor Costs (Industry) Capacity (Hydrogen Fueling Systems A nalysis The report examines reformer, storage and compressor costsHydrogen Equipment Storage System Compressor Dispenser Delivery and Installation Cost

Weinert, Jonathan X.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuels (petroleum, NG and coal) Petroleum Coal NG · GREET and its documents are available at http Coal/biomass co-feeding for FT diesel production Various corn ethanol plant types with different and electric forklifts FC distributed power generation vs. conventional distributed power generation

146

Fuel Cycle System Analysis Implications of Sodium-Cooled Metal-Fueled Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If advanced fuel cycles are to include a large number of fast reactors (FRs), what should be the transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR)? The nuclear energy era started with the assumption that they should be breeder reactors (CR > 1), but the full range of possible CRs eventually received attention. For example, during the recent U.S. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, the proposal was burner reactors (CR < 1). Yet, more recently, Massachusetts Institute of Technology's "Future of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle" proposed CR [approximately] 1. Meanwhile, the French company EDF remains focused on breeders. At least one of the reasons for the differences of approach is different fuel cycle objectives. To clarify matters, this paper analyzes the impact of TRU CR on many parameters relevant to fuel cycle systems and therefore spans a broad range of topic areas. The analyses are based on a FR physics parameter scan of TRU CR from 0 to [approximately]1.8 in a sodium-cooled metal-fueled FR (SMFR), in which the fuel from uranium-oxide-fueled light water reactors (LWRs) is recycled directly to FRs and FRs displace LWRs in the fleet. In this instance, the FRs are sodium cooled and metal fueled. Generally, it is assumed that all TRU elements are recycled, which maximizes uranium ore utilization for a given TRU CR and waste radiotoxicity reduction and is consistent with the assumption of used metal fuel separated by electrochemical means. In these analyses, the fuel burnup was constrained by imposing a neutron fluence limit to fuel cladding to the same constant value. This paper first presents static, time-independent measures of performance for the LWR [right arrow] FR fuel cycle, including mass, heat, gamma emission, radiotoxicity, and the two figures of merit for materials for weapon attractiveness developed by C. Bathke et al. No new fuel cycle will achieve a static equilibrium in the foreseeable future. Therefore, additional analyses are shown with dynamic, time-dependent measures of performance including uranium usage, TRU inventory, and radiotoxicity to evaluate the complex impacts of transition from the current uranium-fueled LWR system, and other more realistic impacts that may not be intuited from the time-independent steady-state conditions of the end-state fuel cycle. These analyses were performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model VISION. Compared with static calculations, dynamic results paint a different picture of option space and the urgency of starting a FR fleet. For example, in a static analysis, there is a sharp increase in uranium utilization as CR exceeds 1.0 (burner versus breeder). However, in dynamic analyses that examine uranium use over the next 1 to 2 centuries, behavior as CR crosses the 1.0 threshold is smooth, and other parameters such as the time required outside of reactors to recycle fuel become important. Overall, we find that there is no unambiguously superior value of TRU CR; preferences depend on the relative importance of different fuel cycle system objectives.

Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ryan Clement; David W. Gerts

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Shippingport LWBR (Th/U Oxide) Fuel Characteristics for Disposal Criticality Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Department of Energy (DOE)-owned spent nuclear fuels encompass many fuel types. In an effort to facilitate criticality analysis for these various fuel types, they were categorized into eight characteristic fuel groups with emphasis on fuel matrix composition. Out of each fuel group, a representative fuel type was chosen for analysis as a bounding case within that fuel group. Generally, burnup data, fissile enrichments, and total fuel and fissile mass govern the selection of the representative or candidate fuel within that group. The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) fuels incorporate more of the conventional materials (zirconium cladding/heavy metal oxides) and fabrication details (rods and spacers) that make them comparable to a typical commercial fuel assembly. The LWBR seed/blanket configuration tested a light-water breeder concept with Th-232/U-233 binary fuel matrix. Reactor design used several assembly configurations at different locations within the same core . The seed assemblies contain the greatest fissile mass per (displaced) unit volume, but the blanket assemblies actually contain more fissile mass in a larger volume; the atom-densities are comparable.

L. L. Taylor; H. H. Loo

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fort Saint Vrain HTGR (Th/U carbide) Fuel Characteristics for Disposal Criticality Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE-owned spent nuclear fuels encompass many fuel types. In an effort to facilitate criticality analysis for these various fuel types, they were categorized into eight characteristic fuel groups with emphasis on fuel matrix composition. Out of each fuel group, a representative fuel type was chosen for analysis as a bounding case within that fuel group. Generally, burnup data, fissile enrichments and total fuel mass govern the selection of the representative or candidate fuel within that group. For the HTGR group, the Fort Saint Vrain (FSV) reactor fuel has been chosen for the evaluation of viability for waste co-disposal. The FSV reactor was operated by Public Service of Colorado as a licensed power reactor. The FSV fuel employs a U/Th carbide matrix in individually pyrolytic carbon-coated particles. These individual particles are in turn coated with silicon carbide (SiC) and contained within fuel compacts, that are in turn embedded in graphite blocks that comprised the structural core of the reactor.

Taylor, Larry Lorin

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Table E9. Total End-Use Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9. Total End-Use Energy Expenditure

150

WWER Expert System for Fuel Failure Analysis Using Data on Primary Coolant Activity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The computer expert system for fuel failure analysis of WWER during operation is presented. The diagnostics is based on the measurement of specific activity of reference nuclides in reactor primary coolant and application of a computer code for the data interpretation. The data analysis includes an evaluation of tramp uranium mass in reactor core, detection of failures by iodine and caesium spikes, evaluation of burnup of defective fuel. Evaluation of defective fuel burnup was carried out by applying the relation of caesium nuclides activity in spikes and relations of activities of gaseous fission products for steady state operational conditions. The method of burnup evaluation of defective fuel by use of fission gas activity is presented in detail. The neural-network analysis is performed for determination of failed fuel rod number and defect size. Results of the expert system application are illustrated for several fuel campaigns on operating WWER NPPs. (authors)

Likhanskii, V.V.; Evdokimov, I.A.; Sorokin, A.A.; Khromov, A.G.; Kanukova, V.D.; Apollonova, O.V. [SRC RF TRINITI, 142190, Troitsk, Moscow Reg. (Russian Federation); Ugryumov, A.V. [JSC TVEL, 119017, 24/26 Bolshaya Ordynka st., Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Sustainable Harvest for Food and Fuel Preliminary Food & Fuel Gap Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To promote economic growth and energy security, and to protect the environment, the U.S. is pursuing a national strategy of energy independence and climatic protection in which domestic renewable carbon-neutral biofuels displace 30 percent of U.S. oil consumption by the mid-21st century. Such fuels, including ethanol and biodiesel, will be produced from biological feed stocks (biomass). The availability of this billion-ton biomass will hinge on the application of modern scientific and engineering tools to create a highly-integrated biofuel production system. Efforts are underway to identify and develop energy crops, ranging from agricultural residues to genetically engineered perennials; to develop biology-based processing methods; and, to develop large-scale biorefineries to economically convert biomass into fuels. In addition to advancing the biomass-to-biofuel research and development agenda, policy makers are concurrently defining the correct mix of governmental supports and regulations. Given the volumes of biomass and fuels that must flow to successfully enact a national biomass strategy, policies must encourage large-scale markets to form and expand around a tightly integrated system of farmers, fuel producers and transporters, and markets over the course of decades. In formulating such policies, policy makers must address the complex interactions of social, technical, economic, and environmental factors that bound energy production and use. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a science-based, applied engineering national laboratory dedicated to supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The INL Bioenergy Program supports the DOE and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Key multidisciplinary INL capabilities are being leveraged to address major science and technology needs associated with the cost-effective utilization of biomass. INLs whole crop utilization (WCU) vision is focused on the use of the entire crop, including both the grain and traditionally discarded plant biomass to produce food, feed, fiber, energy, and value-added products.

Ray Grosshans; Kevin M. Kostelnik; Jake Jacobson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFD) For Fuel Assembly Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron sensors capable of real-time measurement of thermal flux, fast flux, and temperature in a single miniaturized probe are needed in irradiation tests required to demonstrate the performance of candidate new fuels, and cladding materials. In-core ceramic-based miniature neutron detectors or Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs) have been studied at Kansas State University (KSU). The first MPFD prototypes were tested in various neutron fields at the KSU TRIGA research reactor with successful results. Currently, a United States Department of Energy-sponsored joint KSU/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) effort is underway to develop a high-temperature, high-pressure version of the MPFD using radiation-resistant, high temperature materials, which would be capable of withstanding irradiation test conditions in high performance material and test reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, this more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, existing and advanced reactor designs, high performance MTRs, and transient test reactors has the potential to lead to higher accuracy and resolution data from irradiation testing, more detailed core flux measurements and enhanced fuel assembly processing. Prior evaluations by KSU indicate that these sensors could also be used to monitor burn-up of nuclear fuel. If integrated into nuclear fuel assemblies, MPFDs offer several advantages to current spent fuel management systems.

Troy Unruh; Michael Reichenberger; Phillip Ugorowski

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Fuel cycle analysis of once-through nuclear systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Once-through fuel cycle systems are commercially used for the generation of nuclear power, with little exception. The bulk of these once-through systems have been water-cooled reactors (light-water and heavy water reactors, LWRs and HWRs). Some gas-cooled reactors are used in the United Kingdom. The commercial power systems that are exceptions use limited recycle (currently one recycle) of transuranic elements, primarily plutonium, as done in Europe and nearing deployment in Japan. For most of these once-through fuel cycles, the ultimate storage of the used (spent) nuclear fuel (UNF, SNF) will be in a geologic repository. Besides the commercial nuclear plants, new once-through concepts are being proposed for various objectives under international advanced nuclear fuel cycle studies and by industrial and venture capital groups. Some of the objectives for these systems include: (1) Long life core for remote use or foreign export and to support proliferation risk reduction goals - In these systems the intent is to achieve very long core-life with no refueling and limited or no access to the fuel. Most of these systems are fast spectrum systems and have been designed with the intent to improve plant economics, minimize nuclear waste, enhance system safety, and reduce proliferation risk. Some of these designs are being developed under Generation IV International Forum activities and have generally not used fuel blankets and have limited the fissile content of the fuel to less than 20% for the purpose on meeting international nonproliferation objectives. In general, the systems attempt to use transuranic elements (TRU) produced in current commercial nuclear power plants as this is seen as a way to minimize the amount of the problematic radio-nuclides that have to be stored in a repository. In this case, however, the reprocessing of the commercial LWR UNF to produce the initial fuel will be necessary. For this reason, some of the systems plan to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels. Examples of systems in this class include the small modular reactors being considered internationally; e.g. 4S [Tsuboi 2009], Hyperion Power Module [Deal 2010], ARC-100 [Wade 2010], and SSTAR [Smith 2008]. (2) Systems for Resource Utilization - In recent years, interest has developed in the use of advanced nuclear designs for the effective utilization of fuel resources. Systems under this class have generally utilized the breed and burn concept in which fissile material is bred and used in situ in the reactor core. Due to the favorable breeding that is possible with fast neutrons, these systems have tended to be fast spectrum systems. In the once-through concepts (as opposed to the traditional multirecycle approach typically considered for fast reactors), an ignition (or starter) zone contains driver fuel which is fissile material. This zone is designed to last a long time period to allow the breeding of sufficient fissile material in the adjoining blanket zone. The blanket zone is initially made of fertile depleted uranium fuel. This zone could also be made of fertile thorium fuel or recovered uranium from fuel reprocessing or natural uranium. However, given the bulk of depleted uranium and the potentially large inventory of recovered uranium, it is unlikely that the use of thorium is required in the near term in the U.S. Following the breeding of plutonium or fissile U-233 in the blanket, this zone or assembly then carries a larger fraction of the power generation in the reactor. These systems tend to also have a long cycle length (or core life) and they could be with or without fuel shuffling. When fuel is shuffled, the incoming fuel is generally depleted uranium (or thorium) fuel. In any case, fuel is burned once and then discharged. Examples of systems in this class include the CANDLE concept [Sekimoto 2001], the traveling wave reactor (TWR) concept of TerraPower [Ellis 2010], the ultra-long life fast reactor (ULFR) by ANL [Kim 2010], and the BNL fast mixed spectrum reactor (FMSR) concept [Fisher 1979]. (3) Thermal systems for resource extensio

Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergyQuality Challenges AnDepartment ofAnalysis

155

Thermodynamic analysis and comparison on oxy-fuel power generation process - article no. 053001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, pressurized oxy-fuel combustion power generation processes are modeled and analyzed based on a 350 MW subcritical reheat boiler associated with a condensing steam turbine. The performance results are obtained. Furthermore, the influences of slurry concentration and coal properties on power plant performance are investigated. An oxy-fuel configuration operating at ambient pressure is studied to compare the performance with pressurized oxy-fuel configuration. Thermodynamic analysis reveals the true potentials of the pressurized oxy-fuel process. Based on the system integration, an improved configuration is proposed in which plant efficiency of pressurized oxy-fuel process is increased by 1.36%.

Deng, S.M.; Hynes, R. [Hatch Energy, Oakville, ON (Canada)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PEMFC technology for transportation must be competitive with internal combustion engine powertrains in a number of key metrics, including performance, life, reliability, and cost. Demonstration of PEMFC cost competitiveness has its own challenges because the technology has not been applied to high volume automotive markets. The key stack materials including membranes, electrodes, bipolar plates, and gas diffusion layers have not been produced in automotive volumes to the exacting quality requirements that will be needed for high stack yields and to the evolving property specifications of high performance automotive stacks. Additionally, balance-of-plant components for air, water, and thermal management are being developed to meet the unique requirements of fuel cell systems. To address the question of whether fuel cells will be cost competitive in automotive markets, the DOE has funded this project to assess the high volume production cost of PEM fuel cell systems. In this report a historical perspective of our efforts in assessment of PEMFC cost for DOE is provided along with a more in-depth assessment of the cost of compressed hydrogen storage is provided. Additionally, the hydrogen storage costs were incorporated into a system cost update for 2004. Assessment of cost involves understanding not only material and production costs, but also critical performance metrics, i.e., stack power density and associated catalyst loadings that scale the system components. We will discuss the factors influencing the selection of the system specification (i.e., efficiency, reformate versus direct hydrogen, and power output) and how these have evolved over time. The reported costs reflect internal estimates and feedback from component developers and the car companies. Uncertainty in the cost projection was addressed through sensitivity analyses.

Eric J. Carlson

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

157

A NMR-Based Carbon-Type Analysis of Diesel Fuel Blends From Various Sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In collaboration with participants of the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) Advanced Vehicle/Fuels/Lubricants (AVFL) Committee, and project AVFL-19, the characteristics of fuels from advanced and renewable sources were compared to commercial diesel fuels. The main objective of this study was to highlight similarities and differences among the fuel types, i.e. ULSD, renewables, and alternative fuels, and among fuels within the different fuel types. This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of 14 diesel fuel samples. The diesel fuel samples come from diverse sources and include four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels (ULSD), one gas-to-liquid diesel fuel (GTL), six renewable diesel fuels (RD), two shale oil-derived diesel fuels, and one oil sands-derived diesel fuel. Overall, the fuels examined fall into two groups. The two shale oil-derived samples and the oil-sand-derived sample closely resemble the four commercial ultra-low sulfur diesels, with SO1 and SO2 most closely matched with ULSD1, ULSD2, and ULSD4, and OS1 most closely matched with ULSD3. As might be expected, the renewable diesel fuels, with the exception of RD3, do not resemble the ULSD fuels because of their very low aromatic content, but more closely resemble the gas-to-liquid sample (GTL) in this respect. RD3 is significantly different from the other renewable diesel fuels in that the aromatic content more closely resembles the ULSD fuels. Fused-ring aromatics are readily observable in the ULSD, SO, and OS samples, as well as RD3, and are noticeably absent in the remaining RD and GTL fuels. Finally, ULSD3 differs from the other ULSD fuels by having a significantly lower aromatic carbon content and higher cycloparaffinic carbon content. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information regarding the various diesel fuels, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of NMR spectroscopy for the detailed characterization and comparison of fuels and fuel blends.

Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

158

An analysis of heating fuel market behavior, 1989--1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to fully assess the heating fuel crisis from a broader and longer-term perspective. Using EIA final, monthly data, in conjunction with credible information from non-government sources, the pricing phenomena exhibited by heating fuels in late December 1989 and early January 1990 are described and evaluated in more detail and more accurately than in the interim report. Additionally, data through February 1990 (and, in some cases, preliminary figures for March) make it possible to assess the market impact of movements in prices and supplies over the heating season as a whole. Finally, the longer time frame and the availability of quarterly reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission make it possible to weigh the impact of revenue gains in December and January on overall profits over the two winter quarters. Some of the major, related issues raised during the House and Senate hearings in January concerned the structure of heating fuel markets and the degree to which changes in this structure over the last decade may have influenced the behavior and financial performance of market participants. Have these markets become more concentrated Was collusion or market manipulation behind December's rising prices Did these, or other, factors permit suppliers to realize excessive profits What additional costs were incurred by consumers as a result of such forces These questions, and others, are addressed in the course of this report.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

MCWO - Linking MCNP And ORIGEN2 For Fuel Burnup Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UNIX BASH (Bourne Again Shell) script MCWO has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environment Laboratory (INEEL) to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the depletion and buildup code ORIGEN2. MCWO is a fully automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. MCWO can handle a large number of fuel burnup and material loading specifications, Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) powers, and irradiation time intervals. The program processes input from the user that specifies the system geometry, initial material compositions, feed/removal specifications, and other code-specific parameters. Calculated results from MCNP, ORIGEN2, and data process module calculations are then output successively as the code runs. The principal function of MCWO is to transfer one-group cross-section and flux values from MCNP to ORIGEN2, and then transfer the resulting material compositions (after irradiation and/or decay) from ORIGEN2 back to MCNP in a repeated, cyclic fashion. The basic requirement of the code is that the user have a working MCNP input file and other input parameters; all interaction with ORIGEN2 and other calculations are performed by UNIX BASH script MCWO. This paper presents the MCWO-calculated results of the RERTR-1 and -2 , and the Weapons-Grade Mixed Oxiide fuel (Wg-MOX) fuel experiments in ATR and compares the MCWO-calculated results with the measured data.

Gray S Chang

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Fuel Cell Systems AnalysisFuel Cell Systems Analysis R. K. Ahluwalia, X. Wang, and R. Kumar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Tamb = 42 o C. 0 to 60 mph in 10 s with battery assist. Defines the size of energy storage system. 50. H2 Purification/CO Cleanup M. Fuel Processor System Integration and Efficiency R. Thermal and Water systems for hybrid vehicles. Build models for components and systems. Support setting of H2 storage

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Analysis of fuel shares in the residential sector: 1960 to 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical and future energy use by fuel type in the residential sector of the United States are examined. Of interest is the likely relative demand for fuels as they affect national policy issues such as the potential shortfall of electric generating capacity in the mid to late 1990's and the ability of the residential sector to switch rapdily among fuels in response to fuel shortages, price increases and other factors. Factors affecting the share of a fuel used rather than the aggregate level of energy use are studied. However, the share of a fuel used is not independent of the level of energy consumption. In the analysis, the level of consumption of each fuel is computed as an intermediate result and is reported for completeness.

Reilly, J.M.; Shankle, S.A.; Pomykala, J.S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Preliminary analysis of fission gas behavior and fuel response during an LMFBR operational transient  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary presents results obtained from a preliminary analysis of gas behavior and oxide fuel response during an LMFBR operational transient. The DiMelfi and Deitrich model is extrapolated to operational transient regimes to delineate brittle versus ductile fuel response modes. All pertinent parameters necessary for application of the DiMelfi and Deitrich model were obtained from the LIFE-3 code.

Liu, Y.Y.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Data Collection for Class-8 Long-Haul Operations and Fuel Economy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Collection for Class-8 Long-Haul Operations and Fuel Economy Analysis A s part of a long Research Company Michelin), have collected data and information related to Class-8 heavy truck long-haul-world data for the heavy-truck research community. An initial fuel efficiency study was conducted with regard

164

Analysis of Ammonia Loss Mechanisms in Microbial Fuel Cells Treating Animal Wastewater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Analysis of Ammonia Loss Mechanisms in Microbial Fuel Cells Treating Animal Wastewater Jung.interscience.wiley.com). DOI 10.1002/bit.21687 ABSTRACT: Ammonia losses during swine wastewater treatment were examined using manure; electricity; power generation Introduction Wastewater treatment using microbial fuel cells (MFCs

165

Thermal-hydraulic analysis of cross-shaped spiral fuel in high power density BWRs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Preliminary analysis of the cross-shaped spiral (CSS) fuel assembly suggests great thermal-hydraulic upside. According to computational models, the increase in rod surface area, combined with an increase in coolant turbulence ...

Conboy, Thomas M

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Steady state thermal hydraulic analysis of hydride fueled BWRs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) Since the results obtained in the main body of the analysis account only for thermal-hydraulic constraints, an estimate of the power reduction due to the application of neutronic constraints is also performed. This ...

Ferroni, Paolo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Programs understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear powers cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Radiolysis Model Sensitivity Analysis for a Used Fuel Storage Canister  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report fulfills the M3 milestone (M3FT-13PN0810027) to report on a radiolysis computer model analysis that estimates the generation of radiolytic products for a storage canister. The analysis considers radiolysis outside storage canister walls and within the canister fill gas over a possible 300-year lifetime. Previous work relied on estimates based directly on a water radiolysis G-value. This work also includes that effect with the addition of coupled kinetics for 111 reactions for 40 gas species to account for radiolytic-induced chemistry, which includes water recombination and reactions with air.

Wittman, Richard S.

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

169

Analysis of liquid natural gas as a truck fuel: a system dynamics approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate the potential for growth in use of liquid natural gas (LNG) fueled trucks. . A system dynamics model was constructed for the analysis and a variety of scenarios were investigated. The analysis considers the economics of LNG fuel in the context of the trucking industry to identify barriers to the increased use of LNG trucks and potential interventions or leverage points which may overcome these barriers. The study showed that today, LNG use in trucks is not yet economically viable. A large change in the savings from fuel cost or capital cost is needed for the technology to take off. Fleet owners have no way now to benefit from the environmental benefits of LNG fuel nor do they benefit from the clean burning nature of the fuel. Changes in the fuel cost differential between diesel and LNG are not a research issue. However, quantifying the improvements in reliability and wear from the use of clean fuel could support increased maintenance and warranty periods. Many people involved in the use of LNG for trucks believe that LNG has the potential to occupy a niche within the larger diesel truck business. But if LNG in trucks can become economic, the spread of fuel stations and technology improvements could lead to LNG trucks becoming the dominant technology. An assumption in our simulation work is that LNG trucks will be purchased when economically attractive. None of the simulation results show LNG becoming economic but then only to the level of a niche market.

Bray, M.A.; Sebo, D.E.; Mason, T.L.; Mills, J.I.; Rice, R.E.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Microstructural Analysis of Irradiated U-Mo Fuel Plates: Recent Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructural characterization of irradiated dispersion and monolithic RERTR fuel plates using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is being performed in the Electron Microscopy Laboratory at the Idaho National Laboratory. The SEM analysis of samples from U-Mo dispersion fuel plates focuses primarily on the behavior of the Si that has been added to the Al matrix to improve the irradiation performance of the fuel plate and on the overall behavior of fission gases (e.g., Xe and Kr) that develop as bubbles in the fuel microstructure. For monolithic fuel plates, microstructural features of interest, include those found in the U-Mo foil and at the U-Mo/Zr and Zr/6061 Al cladding interfaces. For both dispersion and monolithic fuel plates, samples have been produced using an SEM equipped with a Focused Ion Beam (FIB). These samples are of very high quality and can be used to uncover some very unique microstructural features that are typically not observed when characterizing samples produced using more conventional techniques. Overall, for the dispersion fuel plates with matrices that contained Si, narrower fuel/matrix interaction layers are typically observed compared to the fuel plates with pure Al matrix, and for the monolithic fuel plates microstructural features have been observed in the U-10Mo foil that are similar to what have been observed in the fuel particles found in U-Mo dispersion fuels. Most recently, more prototypic monolithic fuel samples have been characterized and this paper describes the microstructures that have been observed in these samples.

D. D. Keiser, Jr.; J. Jue; B. D. Miller; J. Gan; A. B. Robinson; P. V. Medvedev

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Probabilistic Analysis of a Monod-type equation by use of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probabilistic Analysis of a Monod-type equation by use of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Eric for our society. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a new form of renewable energy by converting of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell affect the power density produced in the Microbial Fuel Cell

172

Dose Rate Analysis Capability for Actual Spent Fuel Transportation Cask Contents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The approved contents for a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensed spent nuclear fuel casks are typically based on bounding used nuclear fuel (UNF) characteristics. However, the contents of the UNF canisters currently in storage at independent spent fuel storage installations are considerably heterogeneous in terms of fuel assembly burnup, initial enrichment, decay time, cladding integrity, etc. Used Nuclear Fuel Storage, Transportation & Disposal Analysis Resource and Data System (UNF ST&DARDS) is an integrated data and analysis system that facilitates automated cask-specific safety analyses based on actual characteristics of the as-loaded UNF. The UNF-ST&DARDS analysis capabilities have been recently expanded to include dose rate analysis of as-loaded transportation packages. Realistic dose rate values based on actual canister contents may be used in place of bounding dose rate values to support development of repackaging operations procedures, evaluation of radiation-related transportation risks, and communication with stakeholders. This paper describes the UNF-ST&DARDS dose rate analysis methodology based on actual UNF canister contents and presents sample dose rate calculation results.

Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL] [ORNL; Lefebvre, Robert A [ORNL] [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Techno-economic Analysis for the Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass to Liquid Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

). This study is part of an ongoing effort within the Department of Energy to meet the renewable energy goals for liquid transportation fuels. The objective of this report is to present a techno-economic evaluation of the performance and cost of various biomass based thermochemical fuel production. This report also documents the economics that were originally developed for the report entitled Biofuels in Oregon and Washington: A Business Case Analysis of Opportunities and Challenges (Stiles et al. 2008). Although the resource assessments were specific to the Pacific Northwest, the production economics presented in this report are not regionally limited. This study uses a consistent technical and economic analysis approach and assumptions to gasification and liquefaction based fuel production technologies. The end fuels studied are methanol, ethanol, DME, SNG, gasoline and diesel.

Zhu, Yunhua; Tjokro Rahardjo, Sandra A.; Valkenburt, Corinne; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Machinal, Michelle A.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Analysis on fuel breeding capability of FBR core region based on minor actinide recycling doping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear fuel breeding based on the capability of fuel conversion capability can be achieved by conversion ratio of some fertile materials into fissile materials during nuclear reaction processes such as main fissile materials of U-233, U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 and for fertile materials of Th-232, U-238, and Pu-240 as well as Pu-238. Minor actinide (MA) loading option which consists of neptunium, americium and curium will gives some additional contribution from converted MA into plutonium such as conversion Np-237 into Pu-238 and it's produced Pu-238 converts to Pu-239 via neutron capture. Increasing composition of Pu-238 can be used to produce fissile material of Pu-239 as additional contribution. Trans-uranium (TRU) fuel (Mixed fuel loading of MOX (U-Pu) and MA composition) and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel compositions are analyzed for comparative analysis in order to show the effect of MA to the plutonium productions in core in term of reactor criticality condition and fuel breeding capability. In the present study, neptunium (Np) nuclide is used as a representative of MAin trans-uranium (TRU) fuel composition as Np-MOX fuel type. It was loaded into the core region gives significant contribution to reduce the excess reactivity in comparing to mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and in the same time it contributes to increase nuclear fuel breeding capability of the reactor. Neptunium fuel loading scheme in FBR core region gives significant production of Pu-238 as fertile material to absorp neutrons for reducing excess reactivity and additional contribution for fuel breeding.

Permana, Sidik; Novitrian,; Waris, Abdul [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Ismail [Center for Technical Assessment of Nuclear Installation and Materials, Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory (Indonesia); Suzuki, Mitsutoshi [Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) (Japan); Saito, Masaki [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Analysis Models and Tools: Systems Analysis of Hydrogen and Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EERE Blog Posts1-034 Advance|atp3.orgOfficeOctober 2010 |Department

176

Identification and Analysis of Critical Gaps in Nuclear Fuel Cycle Codes Required by the SINEMA Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current state of the art in nuclear fuel cycle (NFC) modeling is an eclectic mixture of codes with various levels of applicability, flexibility, and availability. In support of the advanced fuel cycle systems analyses, especially those by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), Unviery of Cincinnati in collaboration with Idaho State University carried out a detailed review of the existing codes describing various aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and identified the research and development needs required for a comprehensive model of the global nuclear energy infrastructure and the associated nuclear fuel cycles. Relevant information obtained on the NFC codes was compiled into a relational database that allows easy access to various codes' properties. Additionally, the research analyzed the gaps in the NFC computer codes with respect to their potential integration into programs that perform comprehensive NFC analysis.

Adrian Miron; Joshua Valentine; John Christenson; Majd Hawwari; Santosh Bhatt; Mary Lou Dunzik-Gougar: Michael Lineberry

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels and the Resin Regeneration Facility Safety Analysis Report, Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safety Analysis Report documents the safety authorization basis for the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) and the Resin Regeneration Facility (RRF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The present mission of the RBOF and RRF is to continue in providing a facility for the safe receipt, storage, handling, and shipping of spent nuclear fuel assemblies from power and research reactors in the United States, fuel from SRS and other Department of Energy (DOE) reactors, and foreign research reactors fuel, in support of the nonproliferation policy. The RBOF and RRF provide the capability to handle, separate, and transfer wastes generated from nuclear fuel element storage. The DOE and Westinghouse Savannah River Company, the prime operating contractor, are committed to managing these activities in such a manner that the health and safety of the offsite general public, the site worker, the facility worker, and the environment are protected.

Shedrow, C.B.

1999-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

Submersion Criticality Safety Analysis of Tungsten-Based Fuel for Nuclear Power and Propulsion Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) is developing tungsten-encapsulated fuels for space nuclear applications. Aims to develop NTP fuels that are; Affordable Low impact on production and testing environment Producible on a large scale over suitable time period Higher-performance compared to previous graphite NTP fuel elements Space nuclear reactors remain subcritical before and during launch, and do not go critical until required by its mission. A properly designed reactor will remain subcritical in any launch abort scenario, where the reactor falls back to Earth and becomes submerged in terrestrial material. Submersion increases neutron reflection and thermalizes the neutrons, which typically increases the reactivity of the core. This effect is usually very significant for fast-spectrum reactors. This research provided a submersion criticality safety analysis for a representative tungsten/uranium oxide fueled reactor. Determine the submersion behavior of a reactor fueled by tungsten-based fuel. Considered fuel compositions with varying: Rhenium content (wt% rhenium in tungsten) Fuel loading fractions (UO2 vol%)

A.E. Craft; R. C. O'Brien; S. D. Howe; J. C. King

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

E-Print Network 3.0 - alterarions energy expenditure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

causes greater energy expenditure... but also weighted to match the mass of the walking boots. We estimated metabolic energy expenditure, joint... fixation with walking boots...

180

E-Print Network 3.0 - activity energy expenditure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

causes greater energy expenditure... but also weighted to match the mass of the walking boots. We estimated metabolic energy expenditure, joint... fixation with walking boots...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Analysis Models and Tools: Systems Analysis of Hydrogen and Fuel Cells |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 Documentation andEnergy|thermoelectricDepartment of

182

Accident Analysis for the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Postulated accidents have been analyzed for the 20 MW D2O-moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analysis has been carried out for the present core, which contains high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and for a proposed equilibrium core with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations were performed with the MCNPX code to determine homogenized fuel compositions in the lower and upper halves of each fuel element and to determine the resulting neutronic properties of the core. The accident analysis employed a model of the primary loop with the RELAP5 code. The model includes the primary pumps, shutdown pumps outlet valves, heat exchanger, fuel elements, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow accident resulting from loss of electrical power with an assumption of failure of shutdown cooling pumps, (4) loss-of-flow accident resulting from a primary pump seizure, and (5) loss-of-flow accident resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve. In addition, natural circulation cooling at low power operation was analyzed. The analysis shows that the conversion will not lead to significant changes in the safety analysis and the calculated minimum critical heat flux ratio and maximum clad temperature assure that there is adequate margin to fuel failure.

Baek J.; Diamond D.; Cuadra, A.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.R.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

ASAP progress and expenditure report for the month of February 1--29, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the ASAP progress and expenditure report for the month of February, 1996. The individual projects` report includes the sponsoring organization, the project identification, the principal investigator, long term objectives, short term objectives, accomplishments this reporting period, identification of issues or concerns, project budget estimate for the fiscal year, and monthly actual and year to date expenditures. The research project concerns a joint US/UK program to develop a high-priority radar system based on real aperture and synthetic aperature radar. Topics being researched include airborne RAR/SAR; radar data processor; ground-based SAR signal processing workstation; static airborne radar; radar field experiments; data analysis and detection theory; program management; modeling and analysis; UCSB wave tank; stratified wave tank; and experiments in a thermo-stratified tank at the Institute of Applied Physics, Russia.

Twogood, R.E.; Brase, J.M.; Chambers, D.H.; Mantrom, D.M.; Miller, M.G.; Newman, M.J.; Robey, H.F.; Vigars, M.

1996-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

184

Analysis of Smoke of Diesel Engine by Using Biodiesel as Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract- This study represents the analysis of smoke of biodiesel by using smoke tester. In this article biodiesel is taken as a fuel instead of diesel and quantity of emitted pollutants HC and CO is evaluated by taking different quantity of biodiesel at different load. This work shows how use of biodiesel will affect the emission of pollutants. Diesel Engine is compression ignition engine and use diesel as fuel, in this engine alternative fuel can be used. One alternate fuel is biodiesel. Biodiesel can be used in pure form or may be blended with petroleum diesel at any concentration in most injection pump diesel engines and also can be used in Vehicle, Railway, and Aircraft as heating oil.

Gayatri Kushwah; Methanol

185

Parametric Analysis of PWR Spent Fuel Depletion Parameters for Long-Term-Disposal Criticality Safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilization of burnup credit in criticality safety analysis for long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel allows improved design efficiency and reduced cost due to the large mass of fissile material that will be present in the repository. Burnup-credit calculations are based on depletion calculations that provide a conservative estimate of spent fuel contents (in terms of criticality potential), followed by criticality calculations to assess the value of the effective neutron multiplication factor (k(sub)eff) for the a spent fuel cask or a fuel configuration under a variety of probabilistically derived events. In order to ensure that the depletion calculation is conservative, it is necessary to both qualify and quantify assumptions that can be made in depletion models.

DeHart, M.D.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Table ET1. Primary Energy, Electricity, and Total Energy Price and Expenditure Estimates, Selected Years, 1970-2012, United States  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR TableE9. Total End-Use Energy ExpenditureET1.

187

Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of todays confirmatory methods. This document is a progress report for FY2012 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2012 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel assemblies. PNNL further refined the semi-empirical model developed in FY2011 based on singular value decomposition (SVD) to numerically account for the effects of self-shielding. The average uncertainty in the Pu mass across the NGSI-64 fuel assemblies was shown to be less than 3% using only six calibration assemblies with a 2% uncertainty in the isotopic masses. When calibrated against the six NGSI-64 fuel assemblies, the algorithm was able to determine the total Pu mass within <2% uncertainty for the 27 diversion cases also developed under NGSI. Two purely empirical algorithms were developed that do not require the use of Pu isotopic fission chambers. The semi-empirical and purely empirical algorithms were successfully tested using MCNPX simulations as well applied to experimental data measured by RPI using their LSDS. The algorithms were able to describe the 235U masses of the RPI measurements with an average uncertainty of 2.3%. Analyses were conducted that provided valuable insight with regard to design requirements (e.g. Pb stack size, neutron source location) of an LSDS for the purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Sensitivity studies were conducted that provide insight as to how the LSDS instrument can be improved by making it more sensitive to the center of the fuel assemblies. In FY2013, PNNL will continue efforts to develop and refine design requirements of an LSDS for the ultimate purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Future efforts will be directed toward more extensive experimental benchmarking of currently implemented time-spectra analysis algorithms.

Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Warren, Glen A.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

188

CONTAINMENT ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY FOR TRANSPORT OF BREACHED CLAD ALUMINUM SPENT FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (Al-SNF) from foreign and domestic research reactors (FRR/DRR) is being shipped to the Savannah River Site and placed in interim storage in a water basin. To enter the United States, a cask with loaded fuel must be certified to comply with the requirements in the Title 10 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The requirements include demonstration of containment of the cask with its contents under normal and accident conditions. Many Al-SNF assemblies have suffered corrosion degradation in storage in poor quality water, and many of the fuel assemblies are 'failed' or have through-clad damage. A methodology was developed to evaluate containment of Al-SNF even with severe cladding breaches for transport in standard casks. The containment analysis methodology for Al-SNF is in accordance with the methodology provided in ANSI N14.5 and adopted by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in NUREG/CR-6487 to meet the requirements of 10CFR71. The technical bases for the inputs and assumptions are specific to the attributes and characteristics of Al-SNF received from basin and dry storage systems and its subsequent performance under normal and postulated accident shipping conditions. The results of the calculations for a specific case of a cask loaded with breached fuel show that the fuel can be transported in standard shipping casks and maintained within the allowable release rates under normal and accident conditions. A sensitivity analysis has been conducted to evaluate the effects of modifying assumptions and to assess options for fuel at conditions that are not bounded by the present analysis. These options would include one or more of the following: reduce the fuel loading; increase fuel cooling time; reduce the degree of conservatism in the bounding assumptions; or measure the actual leak rate of the cask system. That is, containment analysis for alternative inputs at fuel-specific conditions and at cask-loading-specific conditions could be performed to demonstrate that release is within the allowable leak rates of the cask.

Vinson, D.

2010-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

189

Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY11 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today's confirmatory assay methods. This document is a progress report for FY2011 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2011 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel. PNNL developed an empirical model based on calibration of the LSDS to responses generated from well-characterized used fuel. The empirical model, which accounts for self-shielding effects using empirical basis vectors calculated from the singular value decomposition (SVD) of a matrix containing the true self-shielding functions of the used fuel assembly models. The potential for the direct and independent assay of the sum of the masses of 239Pu and 241Pu to within approximately 3% over a wide used fuel parameter space was demonstrated. Also, in FY2011, PNNL continued to develop an analytical model. Such efforts included the addition of six more non-fissile absorbers in the analytical shielding function and the non-uniformity of the neutron flux across the LSDS assay chamber. A hybrid analytical-empirical approach was developed to determine the mass of total Pu (sum of the masses of 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Pu), which is an important quantity in safeguards. Results using this hybrid method were of approximately the same accuracy as the pure empirical approach. In addition, total Pu with much better accuracy with the hybrid approach than the pure analytical approach. In FY2012, PNNL will continue efforts to optimize its empirical model and minimize its reliance on calibration data. In addition, PNNL will continue to develop an analytical model, considering effects such as neutron-scattering in the fuel and cladding, as well as neutrons streaming through gaps between fuel pins in the fuel assembly.

Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Warren, Glen A.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Analysis of fission gas release in LWR fuel using the BISON code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent advances in the development of the finite-element based, multidimensional fuel performance code BISON of Idaho National Laboratory are presented. Specifically, the development, implementation and testing of a new model for the analysis of fission gas behavior in LWR-UO2 fuel during irradiation are summarized. While retaining a physics-based description of the relevant mechanisms, the model is characterized by a level of complexity suitable for application to engineering-scale nuclear fuel analysis and consistent with the uncertainties pertaining to some parameters. The treatment includes the fundamental features of fission gas behavior, among which are gas diffusion and precipitation in fuel grains, growth and coalescence of gas bubbles at grain faces, grain growth and grain boundary sweeping effects, thermal, athermal, and transient gas release. The BISON code incorporating the new model is applied to the simulation of irradiation experiments from the OECD/NEA International Fuel Performance Experiments database, also included in the IAEA coordinated research projects FUMEX-II and FUMEX-III. The comparison of the results with the available experimental data at moderate burn-up is presented, pointing out an encouraging predictive accuracy, without any fitting applied to the model parameters.

G. Pastore; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; D.M. Perez; B.W. Spencer; R.L. Williamson

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Coupling the core analysis program DeCART to the fuel performance application BISON  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 3D neutron transport and core analysis program DeCART was coupled to the fuels performance application BISON to provide a higher fidelity tool for fuel performance simulation. This project is motivated by the desire to couple a high fidelity core analysis program (based on the method of characteristics) to a high fidelity fuel performance program, both of which can simulate 3D problems. DeCART provides sub-pin level resolution of the multigroup neutron flux, with resonance treatment, during burnup or a fast transient. BISON implicitly solves coupled thermomechanical equations for the fuel on a sub-millimeter level finite element mesh. A method was developed for mapping the fission rate density and fast neutron flux from DeCART to BISON. Multiple depletion cases were run with one-way data transfer from DeCART to BISON. The one-way data transfer of fission rate density is shown to agree with the fission rate density obtained from an internal Lassman-style model in BISON. One-way data transfer was also demonstrated in a 3D case in which azimuthal asymmetry was induced in the fission rate density profile of a fuel rod modeled in DeCART. Two-way data transfer was established by mapping the temperature distribution from BISON to DeCART. A Picard iterative algorithm was developed for the loose coupling with two-way data transfer. (authors)

Gleicher, F. N.; Spencer, B.; Novascone, S.; Williamson, R.; Martineau, R. C. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 N. Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Rose, M.; Downar, T. J.; Collins, B. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A calorimetric analysis of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell and the production of H2O2 at the cathode  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel cell that is operated on hydrogen and oxygen at 50 °C and 1 bar. The cell had a SolviCore Catalyst31.08.2009 1 A calorimetric analysis of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell and the production of H2O2 1. INTRODUCTION The energy that is dissipated as heat in fuel cells is interesting for several

Kjelstrup, Signe

193

CERCA LEU fuel assemblies testing in Maria Reactor - safety analysis summary and testing program scope.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presented paper contains neutronic and thermal-hydraulic (for steady and unsteady states) calculation results prepared to support annex to Safety Analysis Report for MARIA reactor in order to obtain approval for program of testing low-enriched uranium (LEU) lead test fuel assemblies (LTFA) manufactured by CERCA. This includes presentation of the limits and operational constraints to be in effect during the fuel testing investigations. Also, the scope of testing program (which began in August 2009), including additional measurements and monitoring procedures, is described.

Pytel, K.; Mieleszczenko, W.; Lechniak, J.; Moldysz, A.; Andrzejewski, K.; Kulikowska, T.; Marcinkowska, A.; Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Institute of Atomic Energy (Poland)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Safety Analysis Report for Packaging: The unirradiated fuel shipping container USA/9853/AF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HFBR Unirradiated Fuel Shipping Container was designed and fabricated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1978 for the transport of fuel for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) for Brookhaven National Laboratory. The package has been evaluated analytically, as well as the comparison to tests on similar packages, to demonstrate compliance with the applicable regulations governing packages in which radioactive and fissile materials are transported. The contents of this Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) are based on Regulatory Guide 7.9 (proposed Revision 2 - May 1986), 10 CFR Part 71, DOE Order 1540.2, DOE Order 5480.3, and 49 CFR Part 173.

Not Available

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

195

Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

in 2009 at 15.5%. In the early to mid-1980s when oil prices were high, gasoline and motor oil made up a larger share of transportation expenditures but then declined until...

196

Characterization of Used Nuclear Fuel with Multivariate Analysis for Process Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor combines gamma spectroscopy and multivariate analysis to detect anomalies in various process streams in a nuclear fuel reprocessing system. Measured spectra are compared to models of nominal behavior at each measurement location to detect unexpected changes in system behavior. In order to improve the accuracy and specificity of process monitoring, fuel characterization may be used to more accurately train subsequent models in a full analysis scheme. This paper presents initial development of a reactor-type classifier that is used to select a reactor-specific partial least squares model to predict fuel burnup. Nuclide activities for prototypic used fuel samples were generated in ORIGEN-ARP and used to investigate techniques to characterize used nuclear fuel in terms of reactor type (pressurized or boiling water reactor) and burnup. A variety of reactor type classification algorithms, including k-nearest neighbors, linear and quadratic discriminant analyses, and support vector machines, were evaluated to differentiate used fuel from pressurized and boiling water reactors. Then, reactor type-specific partial least squares models were developed to predict the burnup of the fuel. Using these reactor type-specific models instead of a model trained for all light water reactors improved the accuracy of burnup predictions. The developed classification and prediction models were combined and applied to a large dataset that included eight fuel assembly designs, two of which were not used in training the models, and spanned the range of the initial 235U enrichment, cooling time, and burnup values expected of future commercial used fuel for reprocessing. Error rates were consistent across the range of considered enrichment, cooling time, and burnup values. Average absolute relative errors in burnup predictions for validation data both within and outside the training space were 0.0574% and 0.0597%, respectively. The errors seen in this work are artificially low, because the models were trained, optimized, and tested on simulated, noise-free data. However, these results indicate that the developed models may generalize well to new data and that the proposed approach constitutes a viable first step in developing a fuel characterization algorithm based on gamma spectra.

Dayman, Kenneth J. [Univ. of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Coble, Jamie B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orton, Christopher R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schwantes, Jon M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy. Alternative Fuels Data Center (HomeMotor Fuels: the Alternative Fuels Trade Model. Oak Ridge,Challenges for Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Transportation

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy. Alternative Fuels Data Center (HomeMotor Fuels: the Alternative Fuels Trade Model. Oak Ridge,Challenges for Alternative Fuel Vehicle and Transportation

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

North Portal Fuel Storage System Fire Hazard Analysis-ESF Surface Design Package ID  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the fire hazard analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within the individual fire areas. This document will only assess the fire hazard analysis within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package ID, which includes the fuel storage system area of the North Portal facility, and evaluate whether the following objectives are met: 1.1.1--This analysis, performed in accordance with the requirements of this document, will satisfy the requirements for a fire hazard analysis in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A. 1.1.2--Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. 1.1.3--Provide input to the ESF Basis For Design (BFD) Document. 1.1.4 Provide input to the facility Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (Paragraph 3.8).

N.M. Ruonavaara

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

200

Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

A. Vaudrey; P. Baucour; F. Lanzetta; R. Glises

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

Vaudrey, A; Lanzetta, F; Glises, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

wf01 - Energy_Expenditures.xlsx  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquids Reserve Class3a.86,77,1996 N| Short-Term

203

CBECS 1992 - Consumption & Expenditures, Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS98,,,1999,0,0,1e+15,1469,6,01179,"WAT","HY"Tables andA 6 J (MillionCubic35775 84

204

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87CBECS Public Use Data CBECS Public Use Data

205

The Relationships of Diesel Fuel Properties, Chemistry, and HCCI Engine Performance as Determined by Principal Component Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to meet common fuel specifications such as cetane number and volatility, a refinery must blend a number of refinery stocks derived from various process units in the refinery. Fuel chemistry can be significantly altered in meeting fuel specifications. Additionally, fuel specifications are seldom changed in isolation, and the drive to meet one specification may significantly alter other specifications or fuel chemistry. Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines depend on the kinetic behavior of a fuel to achieve reliable ignition and are expected to be more dependent on fuel specifications and chemistry than today's conventional engines. Regression analysis can help in determining the underlying relationships between fuel specifications, chemistry, and engine performance. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used in this work, because of its ability to deal with co-linear variables and to uncover 'hidden' relationships in the data. In this paper, a set of 11 diesel fuels with widely varying properties were run in a simple HCCI engine. Fuel properties and engine performance are examined to identify underlying fuel relationships and to determine the interplay between engine behavior and fuels. Results indicate that fuel efficiency is mainly controlled by a collection of specifications related to density and energy content and ignition characteristics are controlled mainly by cetane number.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Crawford, Robert W [Rincon Ranch Consulting

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

PWR core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for thorium-uranium breeding recycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper was focused on core design, neutronics evaluation and fuel cycle analysis for Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle in current PWRs, without any major change to the fuel lattice and the core internals, but substituting the UOX pellet with Thorium-based pellet. The fuel cycle analysis indicates that Thorium-Uranium Breeding Recycle is technically feasible in current PWRs. A 4-loop, 193-assembly PWR core utilizing 17 x 17 fuel assemblies (FAs) was taken as the model core. Two mixed cores were investigated respectively loaded with mixed reactor grade Plutonium-Thorium (PuThOX) FAs and mixed reactor grade {sup 233}U-Thorium (U{sub 3}ThOX) FAs on the basis of reference full Uranium oxide (UOX) equilibrium-cycle core. The UOX/PuThOX mixed core consists of 121 UOX FAs and 72 PuThOX FAs. The reactor grade {sup 233}U extracted from burnt PuThOX fuel was used to fabrication of U{sub 3}ThOX for starting Thorium-. Uranium breeding recycle. In UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core, the well designed U{sub 3}ThOX FAs with 1.94 w/o fissile uranium (mainly {sup 233}U) were located on the periphery of core as a blanket region. U{sub 3}ThOX FAs remained in-core for 6 cycles with the discharged burnup achieving 28 GWD/tHM. Compared with initially loading, the fissile material inventory in U{sub 3}ThOX fuel has increased by 7% via 1-year cooling after discharge. 157 UOX fuel assemblies were located in the inner of UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core refueling with 64 FAs at each cycle. The designed UOX/PuThOX and UOX/U{sub 3}ThOX mixed core satisfied related nuclear design criteria. The full core performance analyses have shown that mixed core with PuThOX loading has similar impacts as MOX on several neutronic characteristic parameters, such as reduced differential boron worth, higher critical boron concentration, more negative moderator temperature coefficient, reduced control rod worth, reduced shutdown margin, etc.; while mixed core with U{sub 3}ThOX loading on the periphery of core has no visible impacts on neutronic characteristics compared with reference full UOX core. The fuel cycle analysis has shown that {sup 233}U mono-recycling with U{sub 3}ThOX fuel could save 13% of natural uranium resource compared with UOX once through fuel cycle, slightly more than that of Plutonium single-recycling with MOX fuel. If {sup 233}U multi-recycling with U{sub 3}ThOX fuel is implemented, more natural uranium resource would be saved. (authors)

Bi, G.; Liu, C.; Si, S. [Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Inst., No. 29, Hongcao Road, Shanghai, 200233 (China)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Full-length high-temperature severe fuel damage test No. 2. Final safety analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hazardous conditions associated with performing the Full-Length High- Temperature (FLHT). Severe Fuel Damage Test No. 2 experiment have been analyzed. Major hazards that could cause harm or damage are (1) radioactive fission products, (2) radiation fields, (3) reactivity changes, (4) hydrogen generation, (5) materials at high temperature, (6) steam explosion, and (7) steam pressure pulse. As a result of this analysis, it is concluded that with proper precautions the FLHT- 2 test can be safely conducted.

Hesson, G.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Pilger, J.P.; Rausch, W.N.; King, L.L.; Hurley, D.E.; Parchen, L.J.; Panisko, F.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel energy exceeds ethanol fuel energy on a GGE basis.the production of ethanol and other fuels. Both grain foral. (1999). Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel energy exceeds ethanol fuel energy on a GGE basis.production of ethanol and other fuels. Cereals are generallyal. (1999). Effects of Fuel Ethanol Use on Fuel-Cycle Energy

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Analysis on burnup step effect for evaluating reactor criticality and fuel breeding ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Criticality condition of the reactors is one of the important factors for evaluating reactor operation and nuclear fuel breeding ratio is another factor to show nuclear fuel sustainability. This study analyzes the effect of burnup steps and cycle operation step for evaluating the criticality condition of the reactor as well as the performance of nuclear fuel breeding or breeding ratio (BR). Burnup step is performed based on a day step analysis which is varied from 10 days up to 800 days and for cycle operation from 1 cycle up to 8 cycles reactor operations. In addition, calculation efficiency based on the variation of computer processors to run the analysis in term of time (time efficiency in the calculation) have been also investigated. Optimization method for reactor design analysis which is used a large fast breeder reactor type as a reference case was performed by adopting an established reactor design code of JOINT-FR. The results show a criticality condition becomes higher for smaller burnup step (day) and for breeding ratio becomes less for smaller burnup step (day). Some nuclides contribute to make better criticality when smaller burnup step due to individul nuclide half-live. Calculation time for different burnup step shows a correlation with the time consuming requirement for more details step calculation, although the consuming time is not directly equivalent with the how many time the burnup time step is divided.

Saputra, Geby; Purnama, Aditya Rizki; Permana, Sidik [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Physics Department, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Suzuki, Mitsutoshi [Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management (STNM), Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) (Japan)

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

Synthetic fuels and the environment: an environmental and regulatory impacts analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since July 1979 when DOE/EV-0044 report Environmental Analysis of Synthetic Liquid fuels was published the synthetic fuels program proposals of the Administration have undergone significant modifications. The program year for which the development goal of 1.5 million barrels per day is to be reached has been changed from 1990 to 1995. The program plan is now proposed to have two stages to ensure, among other things, better environmental protection: an initial stage emphasizing applied research and development (R and D), including environmental research, followed by a second stage that would accelerate deployment of those synthetic fuel technologies then judged most ready for rapid deployment and economic operation within the environmental protection requirements. These program changes have significantly expanded the scope of technologies to be considered in this environmental analysis and have increased the likelihood that accelerated environmental R and D efforts will be successful in solving principal environmental and worker safety concerns for most technologies prior to the initiation of the second stage of the accelerated deployment plan. Information is presented under the following section headings: summary; study description; the technologies and their environmental concerns (including, coal liquefaction and gasification, oil shale production, biomass and urban waste conversion); regulatory and institutional analyses; and environmental impacts analysis (including air and water quaility analyses, impacts of carbon dioxide and acid rain, water availability, solid and hazardous wastes, coal mining environmental impacts, transportation issues, community growth and change, and regional impacts). Additional information is presented in seventeen appendixes. (JGB)

None

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 4.0 Systems Analysis  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost Savings | DepartmentCase StudyMulti-YearSystems Analysis

213

Neutronic Analysis of an Advanced Fuel Design Concept for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study presents the neutronic analysis of an advanced fuel design concept for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that could significantly extend the current fuel cycle length under the existing design and safety criteria. A key advantage of the fuel design herein proposed is that it would not require structural changes to the present HFIR core, in other words, maintaining the same rated power and fuel geometry (i.e., fuel plate thickness and coolant channel dimensions). Of particular practical importance, as well, is the fact that the proposed change could be justified within the bounds of the existing nuclear safety basis. The simulations herein reported employed transport theory-based and exposure-dependent eigenvalue characterization to help improve the prediction of key fuel cycle parameters. These parameters were estimated by coupling a benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP5 model of the HFIR core to the depletion code ORIGEN via the MONTEBURNS interface. The design of an advanced HFIR core with an improved fuel loading is an idea that evolved from early studies by R. D. Cheverton, formerly of ORNL. This study contrasts a modified and increased core loading of 12 kg of 235U against the current core loading of 9.4 kg. The simulations performed predict a cycle length of 39 days for the proposed fuel design, which represents a 50% increase in the cycle length in response to a 25% increase in fissile loading, with an average fuel burnup increase of {approx}23%. The results suggest that the excess reactivity can be controlled with the present design and arrangement of control elements throughout the core's life. Also, the new power distribution is comparable or even improved relative to the current power distribution, displaying lower peak to average fission rate densities across the inner fuel element's centerline and bottom cells. In fact, the fission rate density in the outer fuel element also decreased at these key locations for the proposed design. Overall, it is estimated that the advanced core design could increase the availability of the HFIR facility by {approx}50% and generate {approx}33% more neutrons annually, which is expected to yield sizeable savings during the remaining life of HFIR, currently expected to operate through 2014. This study emphasizes the neutronics evaluation of a new fuel design. Although a number of other performance parameters of the proposed design check favorably against the current design, and most of the core design features remain identical to the reference, it is acknowledged that additional evaluations would be required to fully justify the thermal-hydraulic and thermal-mechanical performance of a new fuel design, including checks for cladding corrosion performance as well as for industrial and economic feasibility.

Xoubi, Ned [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Maldonado, G. Ivan [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Life Cycle Analysis of the Production of Aviation Fuels Using the CE-CERT Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Jet fuel and crude oil price history. From IATA website:oil discovery and fuel production. ..4 Figure.2: Jet fuel and crude oil price history.

Hu, Sangran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of hydrogen, methanol and gasoline as fuels for fuel cellon Environmental Quality (TCEQ). Gasoline Vapor Recovery (Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel

Wang, Guihua

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prospects for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, Organization forquiet and powerful. .Hydrogen and fuel cells also offer thevehicles (PHEVs), hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) are

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of fission gas behavior in engineering-scale fuel modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The role of uncertainties in fission gas behavior calculations as part of engineering-scale nuclear fuel modeling is investigated using the BISON fuel performance code and a recently implemented physics-based model for the coupled fission gas release and swelling. Through the integration of BISON with the DAKOTA software, a sensitivity analysis of the results to selected model parameters is carried out based on UO2 single-pellet simulations covering different power regimes. The parameters are varied within ranges representative of the relative uncertainties and consistent with the information from the open literature. The study leads to an initial quantitative assessment of the uncertainty in fission gas behavior modeling with the parameter characterization presently available. Also, the relative importance of the single parameters is evaluated. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis is carried out based on simulations of a fuel rod irradiation experiment, pointing out a significant impact of the considered uncertainties on the calculated fission gas release and cladding diametral strain. The results of the study indicate that the commonly accepted deviation between calculated and measured fission gas release by a factor of 2 approximately corresponds to the inherent modeling uncertainty at high fission gas release. Nevertheless, higher deviations may be expected for values around 10% and lower. Implications are discussed in terms of directions of research for the improved modeling of fission gas behavior for engineering purposes.

G. Pastore; L.P. Swiler; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; D.M. Perez; B.W. Spencer; L. Luzzi; P. Van Uffelen; R.L. Williamson

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Investigation of chemical looping combustion by solid fuels. 1. Process analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is the first in a series of two, where we present the concept of a CLC process of solid fuels using a circulating fluidized bed with three loop seals. The riser of this circulating fluidized bed was used as the oxidizer of the oxygen carrier; one of the loop seals was used as the reducer of the oxygen carrier and the separator for ash and oxygen carrier, and the other two loop seals were used for pressure balance in the solid recycle process. Pressure profiles of recycled solids using this process are presented in detail. For the development of an oxygen carrier, we focused on the establishment of a theoretical frame of oxygen transfer capability, reaction enthalpy, a chemical equilibrium, and kinetics. Analysis results indicated that Cu-, Ni-, and Co-based oxygen carriers may be the optimum oxygen carriers for the CLC of solid fuels. Thermodynamic analysis indicated that CO{sub 2} can be concentrated and purified to at least 99% purity for the gas-solid reaction mode or even higher for the solid-solid reaction mode on the basis of the selected oxygen carriers. A Cu-based oxygen carrier is the choice that has the potential to make the reducer self-sustaining or autothermal because of its exothermic nature during reduction. This would be beneficial for simplifying the operation of the reducer. The tendency of the Cu-based oxygen carriers to agglomerate can be eliminated by decreasing the operating temperature in the CLC system. In the second part of the series, we will evaluate the reduction kinetics of selected Cu-based oxygen carriers by coal and other 'opportunity solid fuels' using a simultaneous differential scanning calorimetry-thermogravimetric analysis to simulate a microreactor, using an X-ray diffractometer and a scanning electron microscope to characterize the solid residues, and a thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectra to characterize the evolved gas compositions. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Yan Cao; Wei-Ping Pan [Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY (United States). Institute for Combustion Science and Environmental Technology

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

A computer model for the transient analysis of compact research reactors with plate type fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coupled neutronics and core thermal-hydraulic performance model has been developed for the analysis of plate type U-Al fueled high-flux research reactor transients. The model includes point neutron kinetics, one-dimensional, non-homogeneous, equilibrium two-phase flow and beat transfer with provision for subcooled boiling, and spatially averaged one-dimensional beat conduction. The feedback from core regions other than the fuel elements is included by employing a lumped parameter approach. Partial differential equations are discretized in space and the combined equation set representing the model is converted to an initial value problem. A variable-order, variable-time-step time advancement scheme is used to solve these ordinary differential equations. The model is verified through comparisons with two other computer code results and partially validated against SPERT-II tests. It is also used to analyze a series of HFIR reactivity transients.

Sofu, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Dodds, H.L. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Synthesis and Analysis of Alpha Silicon Carbide Components for Encapsulation of Fuel Rods and Pellets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical, mechanical and thermal properties of silicon carbide (SiC) along with its low neutron activation and stability in a radiation field make it an attractive material for encapsulating fuel rods and fuel pellets. The alpha phase (6H) is particularly stable. Unfortunately, it requires very high temperature processing and is not readily available in fibers or near-net shapes. This paper describes an investigation to fabricate a-SiC as thin films, fibers and near-net-shape products by direct conversion of carbon using silicon monoxide vapor at temperatures less than 1700 C. In addition, experiments to nucleate the alpha phase during pyrolysis of polysilazane, are also described. Structure and composition were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Preliminary tensile property analysis of fibers was also performed.

Kevin M. McHugh; John E. Garnier; George W. Griffith

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DIESEL FUEL TANK FOUNDATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to design structural foundations for the Diesel Fuel Tank and Fuel Pumps.

M. Gomez

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

222

Lifecycle Analysis of Air Quality Impacts of Hydrogen and Gasoline Transportation Fuel Pathways  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2004. Fuel economy of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles. JournalSwitching to a U.S. hydrogen fuel cell vehicle fleet: TheImproving Health with Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles. SCIENCE

Wang, Guihua

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Further Evaluation of the Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) Technique for Assaying Plutonium in Spent Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an end-of-year report (Fiscal Year (FY) 2011) for the second year of effort on a project funded by the National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Nuclear Safeguards (NA-241). The goal of this project is to investigate the feasibility of using Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis (NRTA) to assay plutonium in commercial light-water-reactor spent fuel. This project is part of a larger research effort within the Next-Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) to evaluate methods for assaying plutonium in spent fuel, the Plutonium Assay Challenge. The second-year goals for this project included: (1) assessing the neutron source strength needed for the NRTA technique, (2) estimating count times, (3) assessing the effect of temperature on the transmitted signal, (4) estimating plutonium content in a spent fuel assembly, (5) providing a preliminary assessment of the neutron detectors, and (6) documenting this work in an end of the year report (this report). Research teams at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and at several universities are also working to investigate plutonium assay methods for spent-fuel safeguards. While the NRTA technique is well proven in the scientific literature for assaying individual spent fuel pins, it is a newcomer to the current NGSI efforts studying Pu assay method techniques having just started in March 2010; several analytical techniques have been under investigation within this program for two to three years or more. This report summarizes work performed over a nine month period from January-September 2011 and is to be considered a follow-on or add-on report to our previous published summary report from December 2010 (INL/EXT-10-20620).

J. W. Sterbentz; D. L. Chichester

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Analysis of the Reactor Physics of Low-Enrichment Fuel for the INL Advanced Test Reactor in support of RERTR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of the performance of the ATR with a LEU fuel design shows promise in terms of a core design that will yield the same neutron sources in target locations. A proposed integral cladding burnable absorber design appears to meet power profile requirements that will satisfy power distributions for safety limits. Performance of this fuel design is ongoing; the current work is the initial evaluation of the core performance of this fuel design with increasing burnup. Results show that LEU fuel may have a longer lifetime that HEU fuel however, such limits may be set by mechanical performance of the fuel rather that available reactivity. Changes seen in the radial fuel power distribution with burnup in LEU fuel will require further study to ascertain the impact on neutron fluxes in target locations. Source terms for discharged fuel have also been studied. By its very nature, LEU fuel produces much more plutonium than is present in HEU fuel at discharge. However, the effect of the plutonium inventory appears to have little affect on radiotoxicity or decay heat in the fuel.

Mark DeHart; William Skerjanc; Sean Morrell

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Fuel channel analysis for a large-break loss-of-coolant accident in a Canada deuterium uranium reactor loaded with CANFLEX fuel bundles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CATHENA ``slave`` channel model is used for fuel channel analysis of a 30% reactor inlet header break in a Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU)-6 reactor loaded with 43-element bundles of advanced CANDU [CANDU flexible fueling (CANFLEX)] fuel. The predicted results are compared with those for the reactor loaded with standard 37-element bundles. The maximum fuel centerline and sheath temperatures for the CANFLEX bundle are lower by 388 and 128C, respectively, than those for the standard bundle because of the lower maximum linear power of the CANFLEX bundle. The pressure tube (PT)/calandria tube (CT) contact for the CANFLEX bundle occurs 2 s later than that for the standard bundle. The PT/CT contact temperature for the CANFLEX bundle is 7C lower than that for the standard bundle. These provide the CANFLEX bundle with a slightly enhanced safety margin for fuel channel integrity in the CANDU-6 reactor, compared with the standard bundle. The effect of bearing pad (BP)/PT contact on the PT temperature predictions is assessed. A BP/PT contact conductance of 3 kW/m{sup 2} {center_dot} K after PT ballooning does not create any hot spot because it gives the contacted PT sector approximately the same heat transfer as convective heating by the hot coolant for the adjacent sector. The assumed BP/PT contact conductance does not threaten the fuel channel integrity.

Oh, D.J.; Lim, H.S.; Ohn, M.Y.; Lee, K.M.; Suk, H.C. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 4.0 Systems Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Systems Analysis section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated October 2014. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

227

Report Title: The Fossil Fuel Industry in New Mexico: A Comprehensive Impact Analysis Type of Report: Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuels 33 Summary Impacts 40 Works Cited 45 #12;3 List of Tables Table Title Page 1 Tax and Income Data0 Report Title: The Fossil Fuel Industry in New Mexico: A Comprehensive Impact Analysis Type AWARD Number: DE-NT0004397 Name and Address of Submitting Organization: Arrowhead Center New Mexico

Johnson, Eric E.

228

Expert System analysis of non-fuel assembly hardware and spent fuel disassembly hardware: Its generation and recommended disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Almost all of the effort being expended on radioactive waste disposal in the United States is being focused on the disposal of spent Nuclear Fuel, with little consideration for other areas that will have to be disposed of in the same facilities. one area of radioactive waste that has not been addressed adequately because it is considered a secondary part of the waste issue is the disposal of the various Non-Fuel Bearing Components of the reactor core. These hardware components fall somewhat arbitrarily into two categories: Non-Fuel Assembly (NFA) hardware and Spent Fuel Disassembly (SFD) hardware. This work provides a detailed examination of the generation and disposal of NFA hardware and SFD hardware by the nuclear utilities of the United States as it relates to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. All available sources of data on NFA and SFD hardware are analyzed with particular emphasis given to the Characteristics Data Base developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the characterization work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratories and Rochester Gas & Electric. An Expert System developed as a portion of this work is used to assist in the prediction of quantities of NFA hardware and SFD hardware that will be generated by the United States` utilities. Finally, the hardware waste management practices of the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Sweden, and Japan are studied for possible application to the disposal of domestic hardware wastes. As a result of this work, a general classification scheme for NFA and SFD hardware was developed. Only NFA and SFD hardware constructed of zircaloy and experiencing a burnup of less than 70,000 MWD/MTIHM and PWR control rods constructed of stainless steel are considered Low-Level Waste. All other hardware is classified as Greater-ThanClass-C waste.

Williamson, D.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Analysis of ignition behavior in a turbocharged direct injection dual fuel engine using propane and methane as primary fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents experimental analyses of the ignition delay (ID) behavior for diesel-ignited propane and diesel-ignited methane dual fuel combustion. Two sets of experiments were performed at a constant speed (1800 rev/min) using a 4-cylinder direct injection diesel engine with the stock ECU and a wastegated turbocharger. First, the effects of fuel-air equivalence ratios (???© pilot ?¢???¼ 0.2-0.6 and ???© overall ?¢???¼ 0.2-0.9) on IDs were quantified. Second, the effects of gaseous fuel percent energy substitution (PES) and brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) (from 2.5 to 10 bar) on IDs were investigated. With constant ???© pilot (> 0.5), increasing ???© overall with propane initially decreased ID but eventually led to premature propane autoignition; however, the corresponding effects with methane were relatively minor. Cyclic variations in the start of combustion (SOC) increased with increasing ???© overall (at constant ???© pilot), more significantly for propane than for methane. With increasing PES at constant BMEP, the ID showed a nonlinear (initially increasing and later decreasing) trend at low BMEPs for propane but a linearly decreasing trend at high BMEPs. For methane, increasing PES only increased IDs at all BMEPs. At low BMEPs, increasing PES led to significantly higher cyclic SOC variations and SOC advancement for both propane and methane. Finally, the engine ignition delay (EID) was also shown to be a useful metric to understand the influence of ID on dual fuel combustion.

Polk, A. C.; Gibson, C. M.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

230

Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles - 12477  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Used Fuel Disposition campaign. Reference concepts are identified for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. These were analyzed for waste inventory cases representing a range of waste types that could be produced by advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress. All of these disposal concepts are enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. Enclosed modes have less capacity to dissipate heat than open modes such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain. Thermal analysis has identified important relationships between waste package size and capacity, and the duration of surface decay storage needed to meet temperature limits for different disposal concepts. For the crystalline rock and clay/shale repository concepts, a waste package surface temperature limit of 100 deg. C was assumed to prevent changes in clay-based buffer material or clay-rich host rock. Surface decay storage of 50 to 100 years is needed for disposal of high-burnup LWR SNF in 4-PWR packages, or disposal of HLW glass from reprocessing LWR uranium oxide (UOX) fuel. High-level waste (HLW) from reprocessing of metal fuel used in a fast reactor could be disposed after decay storage of 50 years or less. For disposal in salt the rock thermal conductivity is significantly greater, and higher temperatures (200 deg. C) can be tolerated at the waste package surface. Decay storage of 10 years or less is needed for high-burnup LWR SNF in 4-PWR packages, while 12-PWR packages could be emplaced after 40 years or less. HLW from reprocessing LWR UOX fuel or metal fuel from fast reactors, could be disposed of in salt after 10 to 50 years of decay storage depending on the specific composition and other factors. For the deep borehole disposal concept no near-field temperature limits are recognized because no performance credit is taken for waste form or waste package integrity, or containment by the near-field host rock. These results show the key differences in thermal management strategies available to the U.S. repository program, given the range of disposal concepts. A host medium such as salt with greater thermal conductivity and peak temperature tolerance could shorten decay storage by 50 years, or facilitate the use of larger waste packages. The LWR UOX SNF evaluated in this study represents that which could be produced in the coming decades. The existing, lower burnup used fuel that is presently in storage at many LWR locations across the U.S. is significantly cooler, and analyses of this type could be used to show that disposal is possible with less decay storage or larger waste packages. We note that while the temperature limits and waste package capacities used in this study are similar to those used internationally and in past U.S. studies, they might be increased as the result of ongoing research and development activities. This study selected enclosed emplacement modes to conform with disposal concepts developed internationally and previously in the U.S. Open modes (such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain) afford additional flexibility in waste management and the necessary investment, because the same facility serves both storage and disposal functions. Use of open modes, and combined analysis of storage, transportation, and disposal functions, are appropriate to consider in future studies of this type. (authors)

Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800 MS 0736, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Blink, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551-0808 (United States); Carter, Joe [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Fratoni, Massimiliano; Greenberg, Harris; Sutton, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Howard, Robert [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Analysis of Coconut-Derived Biodiesel and Conventional Diesel Fuel Samples from the Philippines: Task 2 Final Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site| Department ofAn|OilAnalysis of

232

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Flexibility Retrofits for Coal and Gas Fueled Power Plants: August 2012 - December 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. |ID#: 19834 Title:CostCost-Benefit Analysis

233

Fuel Cycle Analysis Framework Base Cases for the IAEA/INPRO GAINS Collaborative Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirteen countries participated in the Collaborative Project GAINS Global Architecture of Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems Based on Thermal and Fast Reactors Including a Closed Fuel Cycle, which was the primary activity within the IAEA/INPRO Program Area B: Global Vision on Sustainable Nuclear Energy for the last three years. The overall objective of GAINS was to develop a standard framework for assessing future nuclear energy systems taking into account sustainable development, and to validate results through sample analyses. This paper details the eight scenarios that constitute the GAINS framework base cases for analysis of the transition to future innovative nuclear energy systems. The framework base cases provide a reference for users of the framework to start from in developing and assessing their own alternate systems. Each base case is described along with performance results against the GAINS sustainability evaluation metrics. The eight cases include four using a moderate growth projection and four using a high growth projection for global nuclear electricity generation through 2100. The cases are divided into two sets, addressing homogeneous and heterogeneous scenarios developed by GAINS to model global fuel cycle strategies. The heterogeneous world scenario considers three separate nuclear groups based on their fuel cycle strategies, with non-synergistic and synergistic cases. The framework base case analyses results show the impact of these different fuel cycle strategies while providing references for future users of the GAINS framework. A large number of scenario alterations are possible and can be used to assess different strategies, different technologies, and different assumptions about possible futures of nuclear power. Results can be compared to the framework base cases to assess where these alternate cases perform differently versus the sustainability indicators.

Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

MicroShield analysis to calculate external radiation dose rates for several spent fuel casks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this MicroShield analysis is to calculate the external radiation, primarily gamma, dose rate for spent fuel casks. The reason for making this calculation is that currently all analyses of transportation risk assume that this external dose rate is the maximum allowed by regulation, 10 mrem/hr at 2 m from the casks, and the risks of incident-free transportation are thus always overestimated to an unknown extent. In order to do this, the program by Grove Software, MicroShield 7.01, was used to model three Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved casks: HI-STAR 100, GA-4, and NAC-STC, loaded with specific source material. Dimensions were obtained from NUREG/CR-6672 and the Certificates of Compliance for each respective cask. Detectors were placed at the axial point at 1 m and 2 m from the outer gamma shielding of the casks. In the April 8, 2004 publication of the Federal Register, a notice of intent to prepare a Supplemental Yucca Mountain Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0250F-S1) was published by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) in order to consider design, construction, operation, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel to the Yucca Mountain repository [1]. These more accurate estimates of the external dose rates could be used in order to provide a more risk-informed analysis. (authors)

Marincel, M.K. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States); Weiner, R.F.; Osborn, D.M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

COBRA-SFS: A thermal-hydraulic analysis code for spent fuel storage and transportation casks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COBRA-SFS is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code for prediction of material temperatures and fluid conditions in a wide variety of systems. The code has been validated for analysis of spent fuel storage systems, as part of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program of the US Department of Energy. The code solves finite volume equations representing the conservation equations for mass, moment, and energy for an incompressible single-phase heat transfer fluid. The fluid solution is coupled to a finite volume solution of the conduction equation in the solid structure of the system. This document presents a complete description of Cycle 2 of COBRA-SFS, and consists of three main parts. Part 1 describes the conservation equations, constitutive models, and solution methods used in the code. Part 2 presents the User Manual, with guidance on code applications, and complete input instructions. This part also includes a detailed description of the auxiliary code RADGEN, used to generate grey body view factors required as input for radiative heat transfer modeling in the code. Part 3 describes the code structure, platform dependent coding, and program hierarchy. Installation instructions are also given for the various platform versions of the code that are available.

Michener, T.E.; Rector, D.R.; Cuta, J.M.; Dodge, R.E.; Enderlin, C.W.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Fourth Annual Report to the Northwest Governors on Expenditures of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Administration to Implement the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power, the Bonneville Power Ad- ministration reported total costs of $506.8 million for its Columbia River Basin fish not reflect $1.02 billion Bonneville has received since 1995 for a portion of its expenditures to improve fish

237

CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CREEL CENSUS AND EXPENDITURE STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological STUDY, NORTH FORK SUN RIVER, MONTANA, 1951 Marine Biological Laboratory JUN16 1954 WOODS HOLE, MASS MAP CREEL CENSUS SUN RIVER MONTANA DRAWN i*^ ^ TRACED- _2£jLt:l SUBMITTED . 1 V N 01 1 VN ei

238

On downstream hydraulic geometry and optimal energy expenditure: case study of the Ashley and Taieri Rivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On downstream hydraulic geometry and optimal energy expenditure: case study of the Ashley Abstract The downstream distribution of channel geometry and of the rate of energy expenditure per unit the network. We look at energy expenditure from two perspectives. (1) In the context of downstream hydraulic

Ramrez, Jorge A.

239

Accurate Caloric Expenditure of Bicyclists using Cellphones Andong Zhan, Marcus Chang, Yin Chen, Andreas Terzis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate Caloric Expenditure of Bicyclists using Cellphones Andong Zhan, Marcus Chang, Yin Chen to control weight and commute. To precisely estimate caloric expenditure, bikers have to install a bike method estimates caloric expenditure through a model that takes as inputs GPS traces, the USGS elevation

Amir, Yair

240

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the production and use of fuel ethanol in Brazil. Sao Paulo,and mandates, ethanol tariffs, vehicle and fuel testingthe decision over which fuel and ethanol they should buy and

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the production and use of fuel ethanol in Brazil. Sao Paulo,and mandates, ethanol tariffs, vehicle and fuel testingthe decision over which fuel and ethanol they should buy and

Sperling, Daniel; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Molten Carbonate and Phosphoric Acid Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview and Gap Analysis  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report details technical and cost gap analyses of molten carbonate fuel cell and phosphoric acid fuel cell stationary fuel cell power plants and identifies pathways for reducing costs.

243

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: TechnicalEnergy Air Quality, and Fuels 2000. Schwarzenegger, Arnold.Order S-01-07: Low Carbon Fuel Standard. Sacramento, CA.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ITSRR0707 A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California PartEnergy Commission. A Low Carbon Fuel Standard For CaliforniaPont, et al. (2007). Full Fuel Cycle Assessment Well To Tank

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biofuel) and bio-based and FT diesel fuels are indicated,Diesel Bio-Diesel Hydrogen Electric Figure 5-6: Fuel energyDiesel Bio-Diesel Hydrogen Electric Figure 5-16: Fuel energy

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biofuel) and bio-based and FT diesel fuels are indicated,Diesel Bio-Diesel Hydrogen Electric Figure 5-6: Fuel energyDiesel Bio-Diesel Hydrogen Electric Figure 5-19: Fuel energy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Life Cycle Analysis of the Production of Aviation Fuels Using the CE-CERT Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

comes from char and fuel gas combustion. Over 89% of the GHGparts (kg CO 2 e) Fuel gas combustion (kg CO 2 e) Productoutput (MJ) Fuel gas combustion (MJ) Char combustion (MJ)

Hu, Sangran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Best Practices for Finite Element Analysis of Spent Nuclear Fuel Transfer, Storage, and Transportation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Storage casks and transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) are designed to confine SNF in sealed canisters or casks, provide structural integrity during accidents, and remove decay through a storage or transportation overpack. The transfer, storage, and transportation of SNF in dry storage casks and transport packages is regulated under 10 CFR Part 72 and 10 CFR Part 71, respectively. Finite Element Analysis (FEA) is used with increasing frequency in Safety Analysis Reports and other regulatory technical evaluations related to SNF casks and packages and their associated systems. Advances in computing power have made increasingly sophisticated FEA models more feasible, and as a result, the need for careful review of such models has also increased. This paper identifies best practice recommendations that stem from recent NRC review experience. The scope covers issues common to all commercially available FEA software, and the recommendations are applicable to any FEA software package. Three specific topics are addressed: general FEA practices, issues specific to thermal analyses, and issues specific to structural analyses. General FEA practices covers appropriate documentation of the model and results, which is important for an efficient review process. The thermal analysis best practices are related to cask analysis for steady state conditions and transient scenarios. The structural analysis best practices are related to the analysis of casks and associated payload during standard handling and drop scenarios. The best practices described in this paper are intended to identify FEA modeling issues and provide insights that can help minimize associated uncertainties and errors, in order to facilitate the NRC licensing review process.

Bajwa, Christopher S.; Piotter, Jason; Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Fort, James A.; Suffield, Sarah R.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

249

2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombinedDepartment ofCareersWind Vision:#EnergyFaceoff100%Infrastructure |

250

Overview of An Analysis Project for Renewable Biogas / Fuel Cell Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation on renewable biogas: as an opportunity for commercialization of fuel cells presented as part of a panel discussion at the 2009 Fuel Cell Seminar, Palm Springs, CA.

Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

Francesco Venneri; Chang-Keun Jo; Jae-Man Noh; Yonghee Kim; Claudio Filippone; Jonghwa Chang; Chris Hamilton; Young-Min Kim; Ji-Su Jun; Moon-Sung Cho; Hong-Sik Lim; MIchael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Vincent Descotes; Brian Boer

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Fuel-Coolant-Interaction modeling and analysis work for the High Flux Isotope Reactor Safety Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief historical background and a description of short- and long-term task plan development for effective closure of this important safety issue for the HFIR are given. Short-term aspects deal with Fuel-Coolant-Interaction (FCI) issues experimentation, modeling, and analysis for the flow-blockage-induced steam explosion events in direct support of the SAR. Long-term aspects deal with addressing FCI issues resulting from other accidents in conjunction with issues dealing with aluminum ignition, which can result in an order of magnitude increase in overall energetics. Problem formulation, modeling, and computer code simulation for the various phases of steam explosions are described. The evaluation of core melt initiation propagation, and melt superheat are described. Core melt initiation and propagation have been studied using simple conservative models as well as from modeling and analysis using RELAP5. Core debris coolability, heatup, and melting/freezing aspects have been studied by use of the two-dimensional melting/freezing analysis code 2DKO, which was also benchmarked with MELCOR code predictions. Descriptions are provided for the HM, BH, FCIMOD, and CTH computer codes that have been implemented for studying steam explosion energetics from the standpoint of evaluating bounding loads by thermodynamic models or best-estimate loads from one- and two-dimensional simulations of steam explosion energetics. Vessel failure modeling and analysis was conducted using the principles of probabilistic fracture mechanics in conjunction with ADINA code calculations. Top head bolts failure modeling has also been conducted where the failure criterion was based upon stresses in the bolts exceeding the material yield stress for a given time duration. Missile transport modeling and analysis was conducted by setting up a one-dimensional mathematical model that accounts for viscous dissipation, virtual mass effects, and material inertia.

Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Nestor, C.W.; Chang, S.J.; Freels, J.; Gat, U.; Lepard, B.L.; Gwaltney, R.C.; Luttrell, C.; Kirkpatrick, J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Monte Carlo analysis of burnup-dependent plutonium concentration profiles in UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel pins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to accurately predict fuel performance is an essential requirement for fuel design studies. Prediction of plutonium concentration profiles in an irradiated fuel pin is important for fuel performance analysis and spent-fuel storage. The MCNP coupling with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) burnup calculation code as demonstrated in this paper can analyze the rim effect in UO{sub 2} and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel pins. Acceptance of a code such as MCWO depends very strongly on its validation. Validation involves the benchmark of the code predictions to the in-pile experimental data and results of post-irradiation examinations (PIEs). In this paper, a validation was made by comparing the MCWO calculated results with the VIM-BURN code, which has been validated against PIE data. The validated MCWO can provide the best-estimate neutronic characteristics of fuel burnup performance analysis. In this paper, Pu concentration (wt%) and fission power profiles versus burnup of UO{sub 2} and reactor-grade (RG)-MOX fuel pins were calculated with MCWO, and results are discussed.

Chang, G.S. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Issues in Three-Dimensional Depletion Analysis of Measured Data Near the End of a Fuel Rod  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dynamics of reactor operation result in nonuniform axial-burnup profiles in fuel with any significant burnup. At the beginning of life in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), a near-cosine axial-shaped flux will begin depleting fuel near the axial center of a fuel assembly at a greater rate than at the ends. As the reactor continues to operate, the cosine flux shape will flatten because of the fuel depletion and fission-product buildup that occur near the center. However, because of the high leakage near the end of the fuel assembly, burnup will drop off rapidly near the ends. Partial-length absorbers or nonuniform axial fuel loadings can further complicate the burnup profile. In a boiling water reactor, the same phenomena come into play, but the burnup profile is complicated by the significant variation of axial moderator density and by nonuniform axial loadings of burnable poison rods. Numerous studies of axial burnup effects have been published. However, most analyses performed in estimation of isotopic distributions due to axial burnup have been based on a set of two-dimensional (2-D) calculations performed for burnups that represent the axial burnup distribution in a fuel assembly. In general, this approach works quite well because the in-core axial gradient of the neutron flux is small over most of the length of the fuel rod, and the 2-D approximation is appropriate. Conversely, because the axial gradient becomes significant as one approaches either end of the fuel assembly, the 2-D approximation begins to break down at that point. It has been theorized that axial leakage will lead to a reduced fast flux relative to the thermal flux, softening the spectrum near the ends of the fuel, and that a 2-D approximation is conservative in that it provides more plutonium production. This has not been put the test, however, for two reasons--a lack of good three-dimensional (3-D) analysis methods acceptable for away-from-reactor applications and, more importantly, a scarcity of experimental measurements for fuel taken from the end regions of a fuel rod. A number of 3-D depletion approaches based on Monte Carlo methods have been introduced in the past decade including, but not limited to, those listed in Refs. 5-7. A full listing would be quite extensive. Recent fuel-sample measurements from two discharged assemblies of the Takahama Unit 3 PWR provide data for fuel samples taken very close to the top of the active region of the fuel rod. This paper discusses results of TRITON-based 3-D depletion calculations completed in the analysis of the Takahama fuel samples.

DeHart, Mark D [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Suyama, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

A regulatory analysis on emergency preparedness for fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The question this Regulatory Analysis sought to answer is: should the NRC impose additional emergency preparedness requirements on certain fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees for dealing with accidents that might have offsite releases of radioactive material. To answer the question, we analyzed potential accidents for 15 types of fuel cycle and other radioactive material licensees. An appropriate plan would: (1) identify accidents for which protective actions should be taken by people offsite; (2) list the licensee's responsibilities for each type of accident, including notification of local authorities (fire and police generally); and (3) give sample messages for local authorities including protective action recommendations. This approach more closely follows the approach used for research reactors than for power reactors. The low potential offsite doses (acute fatalities and injuries not possible except possibly for UF/sub 6/ releases), the small areas where actions would be warranted, the small number of people involved, and the fact that the local police and fire departments would be doing essentially the same things they normally do, are all factors that tend to make a simple plan adequate. This report discusses the potentially hazardous accidents, and the likely effects of these accidents in terms of personnel danger.

McGuire, S.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Analysis: Lessons Learned from Stationary Power Generation Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study considered opportunities for hydrogen in stationary applications in order to make recommendations related to RD&D strategies that incorporate lessons learned and best practices from relevant national and international stationary power efforts, as well as cost and environmental modeling of pathways. The study analyzed the different strategies utilized in power generation systems and identified the different challenges and opportunities for producing and using hydrogen as an energy carrier. Specific objectives included both a synopsis/critical analysis of lessons learned from previous stationary power programs and recommendations for a strategy for hydrogen infrastructure deployment. This strategy incorporates all hydrogen pathways and a combination of distributed power generating stations, and provides an overview of stationary power markets, benefits of hydrogen-based stationary power systems, and competitive and technological challenges. The motivation for this project was to identify the lessons learned from prior stationary power programs, including the most significant obstacles, how these obstacles have been approached, outcomes of the programs, and how this information can be used by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program to meet program objectives primarily related to hydrogen pathway technologies (production, storage, and delivery) and implementation of fuel cell technologies for distributed stationary power. In addition, the lessons learned address environmental and safety concerns, including codes and standards, and education of key stakeholders.

Scott E. Grasman; John W. Sheffield; Fatih Dogan; Sunggyu Lee; Umit O. Koylu; Angie Rolufs

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalysis Dimethyl Ether Flash Pyrolysis Fischer Tropschpure hydrogen fuel product. Flash pyrolysis Pyrolysis is the

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalysis Dimethyl Ether Flash Pyrolysis Fischer Tropschpure hydrogen fuel product. Flash pyrolysis Pyrolysis is the

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

An Econometric Analysis of the Elasticity of Vehicle Travel with Respect to Fuel Cost per Mile Using RTEC Survey Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of econometric estimation of the ''rebound effect'' for household vehicle travel in the United States based on a comprehensive analysis of survey data collected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) at approximately three-year intervals over a 15-year period. The rebound effect is defined as the percent change in vehicle travel for a percent change in fuel economy. It summarizes the tendency to ''take back'' potential energy savings due to fuel economy improvements in the form of increased vehicle travel. Separate vehicles use models were estimated for one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-vehicle households. The results are consistent with the consensus of recently published estimates based on national or state-level data, which show a long-run rebound effect of about +0.2 (a ten percent increase in fuel economy, all else equal, would produce roughly a two percent increase in vehicle travel and an eight percent reduction in fuel use). The hypothesis that vehicle travel responds equally to changes in fuel cost-per-mile whether caused by changes in fuel economy or fuel price per gallon could not be rejected. Recognizing the interdependency in survey data among miles of travel, fuel economy and price paid for fuel for a particular vehicle turns out to be crucial to obtaining meaningful results.

Greene, D.L.; Kahn, J.; Gibson, R.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Depletion Analysis of Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Loaded with LEU/Thorium Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thorium based fuel has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (Thorium is more widely available when compared to Uranium). The fertile isotope of Thorium (Th-232) can be converted to fissile isotope U-233 by neutron capture during the operation of a suitable nuclear reactor such as High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). However, the fertile Thorium needs a fissile supporter to start and maintain the conversion process such as U-235 or Pu-239. This report presents the results of a study that analyzed the thorium utilization in a prismatic HTGR, namely Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) that was designed by General Atomics (GA). The collected for the modeling of this design come from Chapter 4 of MHTGR Preliminary Safety Information Document that GA sent to Department of Energy (DOE) on 1995. Both full core and unit cell models were used to perform this analysis using SCALE 6.1 and Serpent 1.1.18. Because of the long mean free paths (and migration lengths) of neutrons in HTRs, using a unit cell to represent a whole core can be non-trivial. The sizes of these cells were set to match the spectral index between unit cell and full core domains. It was found that for the purposes of this study an adjusted unit cell model is adequate. Discharge isotopics and one-group cross-sections were delivered to the transmutation analysis team. This report provides documentation for these calculations

Sonat Sen; Gilles Youinou

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of Vehicle/Fuel Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for natural gas as aGEAGNEPGREET Development

262

2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment( Sample of ShipmentSimulation,Emissions

263

2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment( Sample of ShipmentSimulation,EmissionsInfrastructure Meeting

264

2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment( Sample of ShipmentSimulation,EmissionsInfrastructure

265

NETL - Petroleum-Based Fuels Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis 2005  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte3 ClimateSpurrInformation NAMA-Programme forBMP

266

FINITE-ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF ROCK FALL ON UNCANISTERED FUEL WASTE PACKAGE DESIGNS (SCPB: N/A)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this analysis is to explore the Uncanistered Fuel (UCF) Tube Design waste package (WP) resistance to rock falls. This analysis will also be used to determine the size of rock that can strike the WP without causing failure in the containment barriers from a height based on the starter tunnel dimensions. The purpose of this analysis is to document the models and methods used in the calculations.

Z. Ceylan

1996-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

267

Relation of park types and visitors' expenditure patterns: an analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Alderdice, 1979) . Increased awareness of national parks has developed two contrasting views (Nelson, 1973, as cited by Smith and Alderdice, 1979). According to the first view preservation of natural and historical features should be the main mandate... and texts will be discussed in the framework of this study. 15 Park Classification In 1951, Charles Sauers prepared a paper "The Order of Parks" at the National Conference on State Parks. In this paper he noted that in defining park types...

Currie, Russell Roger

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

An economic analysis of rural community service expenditures in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the most important is that of economies of size or scale in the production of such services. Many services are characterized by a very high initial cost and relatively small marginal costs thereafter. This is a monopoly situa- tion and is, therefore... to provide police, fire, water. , sanitation, and other community services for the increasing number of residences and industries. If marginal costs exceed average costs, pricing services at current average cost vill not provide adequate funds for...

Lansford, Notie H.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fuel-Cycle Energy and Emissions Analysis with the GREET Model | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost Savings |Safety, Codes and07-01-3994 Fuel EconomyFuelof

270

DOE and FreedomCAR and Fuels Partnership: Analysis Workshop | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment ofCaldwell andPalo DuroEnergy Fuels

271

Change in consumer expenditure patterns from 1929 to 1952  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- itures for all goods and services. Total disyosable income (equals income minus personal taxes) gives the amount available for consumer spending while total consumption expenditure represents the amount actually spent. The unspent portion of the total...?nt interest, vhile it excludes both sss- ployee aud employer contributions for social insurance, corporate profit tax liability and inventory valuation adJustmsrrt arrd umlistributed corporate profits. A micr difference also appears in the vage and salary...

Sheikh, Mohammed Hafiz

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Life Cycle Analysis of the Production of Aviation Fuels Using the CE-CERT Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jet fuel and crude oil price history. 6Figure 2 Jet fuel and crude oil price history. From IATAa sharp decrease in crude oil price occurred in the 1950s.

Hu, Sangran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ROBUST CONTROL ANALYSIS USING REAL-TIME IMPLEMENTATION OF A HYBRID FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is performed for a hybrid Fuel Cell/Supercapacitor generation system with power management, realized through converters interfacing the Fuel Cell (FC) and the Supercapacitor (SC) with the system electrical load

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

274

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biofuel-based compliance strategy with no significant advancesthese low-GHG biofuel blends. Significant advances in fuel

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biofuel-based compliance strategy with no significant advancesthese low-GHG biofuel blends. Significant advances in fuel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for calculating the carbon intensity of biofuels. London:the carbon intensity of fuels 47carbon intensity..

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for calculating the carbon intensity of biofuels. London:the carbon intensity of fuels 47carbon intensity..

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis phwr fuel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Biomaterials Waste Cooking Oil Crops Intermediate Products Conversion... Technologies Bioenergy Products Ethanol Biodiesel Electricity & Heat Other Fuels, Chemicals, & ......

279

Analysis of a proposed fuel freezing mechanism in a rod bundle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Erdman A proposed fuel freezing mechanism for molten U02 fuel penetrating a steel channel was investigated in the course of liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor hypothetical core disruptive accident safety studies. The fuel crust... the developing length for an undeveloped flow, the crust is not stable and under these conditions, the melted wall material can be entrained. Zn fast reactor safety studies, a relatively high temperature molten fuel (about 3400 K) is considered to flow...

Nguyen-Wayne, David Loc

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Analysis of the Hydrogen Infrastructure Needed to Enable Commercial Introduction of Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicles: Preprint  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmes Laboratory Site| Department

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Geospatial Analysis and Optimization of Fleet Logistics to Exploit Alternative Fuels and Advanced Transportation Technologies: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes how the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is developing geographical information system (GIS) tools to evaluate alternative fuel availability in relation to garage locations and to perform automated fleet-wide optimization to determine where to deploy alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles and fueling infrastructure.

Sparks, W.; Singer, M.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Technical Analysis of Installed Micro-Combined Heat and Power Fuel-Cell System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combined heat and power fuel cell systems (CHP-FCSs) provide consistent electrical power and hot water with greater efficiency and lower emissions than alternative sources. These systems can be used either as baseload, grid-connected, or as off-the-grid power sources. This report presents a technical analysis of 5 kWe CHP-FCSs installed in different locations in the U.S. At some sites as many as five 5 kWe system is used to provide up to 25kWe of power. Systems in this power range are considered micro-CHP-FCS. To better assess performance of micro-CHP-FCS and understand their benefits, the U.S. Department of Energy worked with ClearEdge Power to install fifteen 5-kWe PBI high temperature PEM fuel cells (CE5 models) in the commercial markets of California and Oregon. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated these systems in terms of their economics, operations, and technical performance. These units were monitored from September 2011 until June 2013. During this time, about 190,000 hours of data were collected and more than 17 billion data points were analyzed. Beginning in July 2013, ten of these systems were gradually replaced with ungraded systems (M5 models) containing phosphoric acid fuel cell technology. The new units were monitored until June 2014 until they went offline because ClearEdge was bought by Doosan at the time and the new manufacturer did not continue to support data collection and maintenance of these units. During these two phases, data was collected at once per second and data analysis techniques were applied to understand behavior of these systems. The results of this analysis indicate that systems installed in the second phase of this demonstration performed much better in terms of availability, consistency in generation, and reliability. The average net electrical power output increased from 4.1 to 4.9 kWe, net heat recovery from 4.7 to 5.4 kWth, and system availability improved from 94% to 95%. The average net system electric efficiency, average net heat recovery efficiency, and overall net efficiency of the system increased respectively from 33% to 36%, from 38% to 41%, and from 71% to 76%. The temperature of water sent to sit however reduced by about 16% from 51?C to 43 ?C. This was a control strategy and the temperature can be controlled depending on building heat demands. More importantly, the number of shutdowns and maintenance events required to keep the systems running at the manufacturers rated performance specifications were substantially reduced by about 76% (for 8 to 10 units running over a one-year period). From July 2012 to June 2013, there were eight CE5 units in operation and a total of 134 scheduled and unscheduled shutdowns took place. From July 2013 to June 2014, between two to ten units were in operation and only 32 shutdowns were reported (all unscheduled). In summary, the number of shutdowns reduced from 10 shutdowns per month on average for eight CE5units to an average of 2.7 shutdowns per month for M5 units (between two to ten units).

Brooks, Kriston P.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Analysis of fuel options for the breakeven core configuration of the Advanced Recycling Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A trade-off study is performed to determine the impacts of various fuel forms on the core design and core physics characteristics of the sodium-cooled Toshiba- Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR). The fuel forms include oxide, nitride, and metallic forms of U and Th. The ARR core configuration is redesigned with driver and blanket regions in order to achieve breakeven fissile breeding performance with the various fuel types. State-of-the-art core physics tools are used for the analyses. In addition, a quasi-static reactivity balance approach is used for a preliminary comparison of the inherent safety performances of the various fuel options. Thorium-fueled cores exhibit lower breeding ratios and require larger blankets compared to the U-fueled cores, which is detrimental to core compactness and increases reprocessing and manufacturing requirements. The Th cores also exhibit higher reactivity swings through each cycle, which penalizes reactivity control and increases the number of control rods required. On the other hand, using Th leads to drastic reductions in void and coolant expansion coefficients of reactivity, with the potential for enhancing inherent core safety. Among the U-fueled ARR cores, metallic and nitride fuels result in higher breeding ratios due to their higher heavy metal densities. On the other hand, oxide fuels provide a softer spectrum, which increases the Doppler effect and reduces the positive sodium void worth. A lower fuel temperature is obtained with the metallic and nitride fuels due to their higher thermal conductivities and compatibility with sodium bonds. This is especially beneficial from an inherent safety point of view since it facilitates the reactor cool-down during loss of power removal transients. The advantages in terms of inherent safety of nitride and metallic fuels are maintained when using Th fuel. However, there is a lower relative increase in heavy metal density and in breeding ratio going from oxide to metallic or nitride Th fuels relative to the U counterpart fuels. (authors)

Stauff, N.E.; Klim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Fiorina, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Franceschini, F. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC., Cranberry Township, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance Analysis |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy Frozen Telescope Looks4KickoffDepartment of

285

Gap Analysis to Support Extended Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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286

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EERE BlogAttachmentFlash2011-21 AuditInsulated Claddingofof

287

Participant List for the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652 Srivastava,Pacific1ofDepartmentb. Part BDOE

288

Job Creation Analysis in the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Industry | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andofIanJennifer Somers About Us Jennifer Somers - TrainingJimJimof

289

Agenda for the 2010-2025 Scenario Analysis for Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2|DepartmentDOE |DepartmentAgencyAgenda r

290

GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of Vehicle/Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost SavingsEnergy GETEMGolden Field Office 1617 Cole-

291

DOE and FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Analysis Workshop | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment ofCaldwell andPalo Duro HomesAbhaiEnergy

292

DOE and FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Analysis Workshop | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models | Department ofDepartment ofCaldwell andPalo Duro

293

Analysis of the Impact of Fuel Cell Vehicles on Energy Systems in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300Algoil JumpAltergyExperiments | OpenThe Tomoves Active

294

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuo FengBoulder,Research JumpEnergyEnergyOpenStorageSources

295

An Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Burnup in the AGR 1 TRISO Fuel Experiment Using Gamma Spectrometry, Mass Spectrometry, and Computational Simulation Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AGR 1 was the first in a series of experiments designed to test US TRISO fuel under high temperature gas-cooled reactor irradiation conditions. This experiment was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is currently undergoing post irradiation examination (PIE) at INL and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. One component of the AGR 1 PIE is the experimental evaluation of the burnup of the fuel by two separate techniques. Gamma spectrometry was used to non destructively evaluate the burnup of all 72 of the TRISO fuel compacts that comprised the AGR 1 experiment. Two methods for evaluating burnup by gamma spectrometry were developed, one based on the Cs 137 activity and the other based on the ratio of Cs 134 and Cs 137 activities. Burnup values determined from both methods compared well with the values predicted from simulations. The highest measured burnup was 20.1 %FIMA for the direct method and 20.0 %FIMA for the ratio method (compared to 19.56% FIMA from simulations). An advantage of the ratio method is that the burnup of the cylindrical fuel compacts can determined in small (2.5 mm) axial increments and an axial burnup profile can be produced. Destructive chemical analysis by inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP MS) was then performed on selected compacts that were representative of the expected range of fuel burnups in the experiment to compare with the burnup values determined by gamma spectrometry. The compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry had a burnup range of 19.3 % FIMA to 10.7 % FIMA. The mass spectrometry evaluation of burnup for the four compacts agreed well with the gamma spectrometry burnup evaluations and the expected burnup from simulation. For all four compacts analyzed by mass spectrometry, the maximum range in the three experimentally determined values and the predicted value was 6% or less. The results confirm the accuracy of the nondestructive burnup evaluation from gamma spectrometry for TRISO fuel compacts across a burnup range of approximately 10 to 20 % FIMA and also validate the approach used in the physics simulation of the AGR 1 experiment.

Jason M. Harp; Paul A. Demkowicz; Phillip L. Winston; James W. Sterbentz

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A decision analysis framework to support long-term planning for nuclear fuel cycle technology research, development, demonstration and deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address challenges and gaps in nuclear fuel cycle option assessment and to support research, develop and demonstration programs oriented toward commercial deployment, EPRI (Electric Power Research Institute) is seeking to develop and maintain an independent analysis and assessment capability by building a suite of assessment tools based on a platform of software, simplified relationships, and explicit decision-making and evaluation guidelines. As a demonstration of the decision-support framework, EPRI examines a relatively near-term fuel cycle option, i.e., use of reactor-grade mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) in U.S. light water reactors. The results appear as a list of significant concerns (like cooling of spent fuels, criticality risk...) that have to be taken into account for the final decision.

Sowder, A.G.; Machiels, A.J. [Electric Power Research Institute, 1300 West. W.T Harris Boulevard, Charlotte, NC 28262 (United States); Dykes, A.A.; Johnson, D.H. [ABSG Consulting Inc., 300 Commerce, Suite 200, Irvine, CA 92602 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Critical analysis of the Hanford spent nuclear fuel project activity based cost estimate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1997, the SNFP developed a baseline change request (BCR) and submitted it to DOE-RL for approval. The schedule was formally evaluated to have a 19% probability of success [Williams, 1998]. In December 1997, DOE-RL Manager John Wagoner approved the BCR contingent upon a subsequent independent review of the new baseline. The SNFP took several actions during the first quarter of 1998 to prepare for the independent review. The project developed the Estimating Requirements and Implementation Guide [DESH, 1998] and trained cost account managers (CAMS) and other personnel involved in the estimating process in activity-based cost (ABC) estimating techniques. The SNFP then applied ABC estimating techniques to develop the basis for the December Baseline (DB) and documented that basis in Basis of Estimate (BOE) books. These BOEs were provided to DOE in April 1998. DOE commissioned Professional Analysis, Inc. (PAI) to perform a critical analysis (CA) of the DB. PAI`s review formally began on April 13. PAI performed the CA, provided three sets of findings to the SNFP contractor, and initiated reconciliation meetings. During the course of PAI`s review, DOE directed the SNFP to develop a new baseline with a higher probability of success. The contractor transmitted the new baseline, which is referred to as the High Probability Baseline (HPB), to DOE on April 15, 1998 [Williams, 1998]. The HPB was estimated to approach a 90% confidence level on the start of fuel movement [Williams, 1998]. This high probability resulted in an increased cost and a schedule extension. To implement the new baseline, the contractor initiated 26 BCRs with supporting BOES. PAI`s scope was revised on April 28 to add reviewing the HPB and the associated BCRs and BOES.

Warren, R.N.

1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

298

EVALUATION OF CORE PHYSICS ANALYSIS METHODS FOR CONVERSION OF THE INL ADVANCED TEST REACTOR TO LOW-ENRICHMENT FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational neutronics studies to support the possible conversion of the ATR to LEU are underway. Simultaneously, INL is engaged in a physics methods upgrade project to put into place modern computational neutronics tools for future support of ATR fuel cycle and experiment analysis. A number of experimental measurements have been performed in the ATRC in support of the methods upgrade project, and are being used to validate the new core physics methods. The current computational neutronics work is focused on performance of scoping calculations for the ATR core loaded with a candidate LEU fuel design. This will serve as independent confirmation of analyses that have been performed previously, and will evaluate some of the new computational methods for analysis of a candidate LEU fuel for ATR.

Mark DeHart; Gray S. Chang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Evaluation of core physics analysis methods for conversion of the INL advanced test reactor to low-enrichment fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational neutronics studies to support the possible conversion of the ATR to LEU are underway. Simultaneously, INL is engaged in a physics methods upgrade project to put into place modern computational neutronics tools for future support of ATR fuel cycle and experiment analysis. A number of experimental measurements have been performed in the ATRC in support of the methods upgrade project, and are being used to validate the new core physics methods. The current computational neutronics work is focused on performance of scoping calculations for the ATR core loaded with a candidate LEU fuel design. This will serve as independent confirmation of analyses that have been performed previously, and will evaluate some of the new computational methods for analysis of a candidate LEU fuel for ATR. (authors)

DeHart, M. D.; Chang, G. S. [Idaho National Laboratory, 2525 Fremont Street, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3870 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Combined Theoretical and Experimental Analysis of Processes Determining Cathode Performance in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are under intensive investigation since the 1980s as these devices open the way for ecologically clean direct conversion of the chemical energy into electricity, avoiding the efficiency limitation by Carnots cycle for thermochemical conversion. However, the practical development of SOFC faces a number of unresolved fundamental problems, in particular concerning the kinetics of the electrode reactions, especially oxygen reduction reaction. We review recent experimental and theoretical achievements in the current understanding of the cathode performance by exploring and comparing mostly three materials: (La,Sr)MnO3 (LSM), (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3 (LSCF) and (Ba,Sr)(Co,Fe)O3 (BSCF). Special attention is paid to a critical evaluation of advantages and disadvantages of BSCF, which shows the best cathode kinetics known so far for oxides. We demonstrate that it is the combined experimental and theoretical analysis of all major elementary steps of the oxygen reduction reaction which allows us to predict the rate determining steps for a given material under specific operational conditions and thus control and improve SOFC performance.

Kukla, Maija M.; Kotomin, Eugene Alexej; Merkle, R.; Mastrikov, Yuri; Maier, J.

2013-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis FreedomCAR and Fuels Partnership Hydrogen Delivery, Storage and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ­ The current capital costs for the hydrogen pipelines in the model are based on 1.1X the price of steel naturalJoint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis FreedomCAR and Fuels Partnership Hydrogen be prioritized) by mid-2008 H2A Delivery Model: Discussion Items, Comments, and Follow-up Actions 1. Pipeline

302

Strategic backdrop analysis for fossil fuel planning. Task 1. Default Case. Report 468-117-07/03  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data describing a default case analysis performed using the strategic backdrop analytical framework developed to facilitate fossil fuel planning within the DOE. Target years are 1985, 2000, and 2025. Residential, commercial, and industrial energy demands and impacts of energy technology implementation and market penetration are forecast using a set of energy technology assumptions.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Comparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life-Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from Coal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal and Natural Gas Figure S1 shows a graphical description of the life cycle of coal-to-liquids (CTL) and gas-to-liquids (GTL). Figure S1: Life Cycle of Coal-Based and Natural Gas-Based Fischer-Tropsch LiquidComparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life- Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from

Jaramillo, Paulina

304

Strategic backdrop analysis for fossil fuel planning. Task 1. Default Case. Report 468-117-07/01  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data describing a default case analysis performed using the strategic backdrop analytical framework developed to facilitate fossil fuel planning within the DOE. Target years are 1985 and 2025. Residential, commercial, and industrial energy demands are forecast as well as the impacts of energy technology implementation and market penetration using a set of energy technology assumptions. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Strategic backdrop analysis for fossil fuel planning. Task 1. Default Case. Report 468-117-07/02  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data describing a default case analysis performed using the strategic backdrop analytical framework developed to facilitate fossil fuel planning within the DOE. Target years are 1985, 2000, and 2025. Residential, commercial, and industrial energy demands and impacts of energy technology implementation and market penetration are forecast using a set of energy technology assumptions. (DMC)

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Techno-Economic Analysis of Scalable Coal-based Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at The University of Akron (UA) have demonstrated the technical feasibility of a laboratory coal fuel cell that can economically convert high sulfur coal into electricity with near zero negative environmental impact. Scaling up this coal fuel cell technology to the megawatt scale for the nations electric power supply requires two key elements: (i) developing the manufacturing technology for the components of the coal-based fuel cell, and (ii) long term testing of a kW scale fuel cell pilot plant. This project was expected to develop a scalable coal fuel cell manufacturing process through testing, demonstrating the feasibility of building a large-scale coal fuel cell power plant. We have developed a reproducible tape casting technique for the mass production of the planner fuel cells. Low cost interconnect and cathode current collector material was identified and current collection was improved. In addition, this study has demonstrated that electrochemical oxidation of carbon can take place on the Ni anode surface and the CO and CO2 product produced can further react with carbon to initiate the secondary reactions. One important secondary reaction is the reaction of carbon with CO2 to produce CO. We found CO and carbon can be electrochemically oxidized simultaneously inside of the anode porous structure and on the surface of anode for producing electricity. Since CH4 produced from coal during high temperature injection of coal into the anode chamber can cause severe deactivation of Ni-anode, we have studied how CH4 can interact with CO2 to produce in the anode chamber. CO produced was found able to inhibit coking and allow the rate of anode deactivation to be decreased. An injection system was developed to inject the solid carbon and coal fuels without bringing air into the anode chamber. Five planner fuel cells connected in a series configuration and tested. Extensive studies on the planner fuels and stack revealed that the planner fuel cell stack is not suitable for operation with carbon and coal fuels due to lack of mechanical strength and difficulty in sealing. We have developed scalable processes for manufacturing of process for planner and tubular cells. Our studies suggested that tubular cell stack could be the only option for scaling up the coal-based fuel cell. Although the direct feeding of coal into fuel cell can significantly simplify the fuel cell system, the durability of the fuel cell needs to be further improved before scaling up. We are developing a tubular fuel cell stack with a coal injection and a CO2 recycling unit.

Chuang, Steven

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Modeling and Analysis of FCM UN TRISO Fuel Using the PARFUME Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PARFUME (PARticle Fuel ModEl) modeling code was used to assess the overall fuel performance of uranium nitride (UN) tri-structural isotropic (TRISO) ceramic fuel in the frame of the design and development of Fully Ceramic Matrix (FCM) fuel. A specific modeling of a TRISO particle with UN kernel was developed with PARFUME, and its behavior was assessed in irradiation conditions typical of a Light Water Reactor (LWR). The calculations were used to access the dimensional changes of the fuel particle layers and kernel, including the formation of an internal gap. The survivability of the UN TRISO particle was estimated depending on the strain behavior of the constituent materials at high fast fluence and burn-up. For nominal cases, internal gas pressure and representative thermal profiles across the kernel and layers were determined along with stress levels in the pyrolytic carbon (PyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers. These parameters were then used to evaluate fuel particle failure probabilities. Results of the study show that the survivability of UN TRISO fuel under LWR irradiation conditions might only be guaranteed if the kernel and PyC swelling rates are limited at high fast fluence and burn-up. These material properties are unknown at the irradiation levels expected to be reached by UN TRISO fuel in LWRs. Therefore, more effort is needed to determine them and positively conclude on the applicability of FCM fuel to LWRs.

Blaise Collin

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model for Heavy Duty Diesel Vehicles. TransportationAir Contaminant Emissions from Diesel- fueled Engines. Factfor Measuring Emissions from Diesel Engines. 1. Regulated

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Analysis of spent, highly enriched reactor fuel by delayed neutron interrogation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design aspects are given of a neutron shuffler designed to measure fissile material content of spent, highly enriched reactor fuel. The mode of operation used, results of analyzing 176 fuel packages and recommended system improvements are also discussed. Four measurements were made on each of the fuel packages with the mean of the 176 standard deviations being 1.7 percent of value. The maximum individual standard deviation was 6.3%. Use of a stronger neutron source, an improved neutron source shuffler, an improved fuel package motion system and modernized computer system should permit significant improvement of present performance. 2 refs.

Piper, T.C.; Kirkham, R.J. (Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Eccleston, G.W.; Menlove, H.O. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1989-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fuel Cell Power Model for CHHP System Economics and Performance Analysis (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation about Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model used to analyze the economics and performance of combined heat, hydrogen, and power (CHHP) systems.

Steward, D.

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

311

Overview of Vehicle Test and Analysis Results from NREL's A/C Fuel Use Reduction Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes results of air-conditioning fuel use reduction technologies and techniques for light-duty vehicles evaluated over the last 10 years.

Bharathan, D.; Chaney, L.; Farrington, R. B.; Lustbader, J.; Keyser, M.; Rugh, J. P.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Stationary Fuel Cell Application Codes and Standards: Overview and Gap Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of codes and standards related to stationary fuel cell applications and identifies gaps and resolutions associated with relative codes and standards.

Blake, C. W.; Rivkin, C. H.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Hydro-mechanical analysis of low enriched uranium fuel plates for University of Missouri Research Reactor .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As part of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion program, work is underway to analyze and validate a new fuel assembly for the (more)

Kennedy, John C.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus: Preprint  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocationDiurnalCommittee Draft Advice9DrillingDrive Cycle

315

Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Advanced Fuel/Vehicle Systems - A North American  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012NuclearBradleyBudgetFurnacesLES' URENCO-USAFederal5 |Study

316

Survey Results and Analysis of the Cost and Efficiency of Various Operating Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing Hydrogen Fueling Stations were surveyed to determine capital and operational costs. Recommendations for cost reduction in future stations and for research were developed.

Cornish, John

2011-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

317

L. Placca, R. Kouta, D. Candusso, J-F. Blachot, W. Charon (mai 2010). Analysis of PEM fuel cell experimental data using Principal Component Analysis and multi-linear regression.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· L. Placca, R. Kouta, D. Candusso, J-F. Blachot, W. Charon (mai 2010). Analysis of PEM fuel cell of Hydrogen Energy. Vol. 35, n°10, pp. 4582-4591. Ed. Elsevier. Analysis of PEM fuel cell experimental data Laboratory (FC LAB) at Belfort on a PEM fuel cell stack using a homemade fully instrumented test bench led

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

318

Feasibility of fissile mass assay of spent nuclear fuel using {sup 252}Cf-source-driven frequency-analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility was evaluated using MCNP-DSP, an analog Monte Carlo transport cod to simulate source-driven measurements. Models of an isolated Westinghouse 17x17 PWR fuel assembly in a 1500-ppM borated water storage pool were used. In the models, the fuel burnup profile was represented using seven axial burnup zones, each with isotopics estimated by the PDQ code. Four different fuel assemblies with average burnups from fresh to 32 GWd/MTU were modeled and analyzed. Analysis of the fuel assemblies was simulated by inducing fission in the fuel using a {sup 252}Cf source adjacent to the assembly and correlating source fissions with the response of a bank of {sup 3}He detectors adjacent to the assembly opposite the source. This analysis was performed at 7 different axial positions on each of the 4 assemblies, and the source-detector cross-spectrum signature was calculated for each of these 28 simulated measurements. The magnitude of the cross-spectrum signature follows a smooth upward trend with increasing fissile material ({sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu) content, and the signature is independent of the concentration of spontaneously fissioning isotopes (e.g., {sup 244}Cm) and ({alpha},n) sources. Furthermore, the cross-spectrum signature is highly sensitive to changes in fissile material content. This feasibility study indicated that the signature would increase {similar_to}100% in response to an increase of only 0.1 g/cm{sup 3} of fissile material.

Mattingly, J.K.; Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Systems Analysis of an Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Based on a Modified UREX+3c Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research described in this report was performed under a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe and compare the merits of two advanced alternative nuclear fuel cycles -- named by this study as the UREX+3c fuel cycle and the Alternative Fuel Cycle (AFC). Both fuel cycles were assumed to support 100 1,000 MWe light water reactor (LWR) nuclear power plants operating over the period 2020 through 2100, and the fast reactors (FRs) necessary to burn the plutonium and minor actinides generated by the LWRs. Reprocessing in both fuel cycles is assumed to be based on the UREX+3c process reported in earlier work by the DOE. Conceptually, the UREX+3c process provides nearly complete separation of the various components of spent nuclear fuel in order to enable recycle of reusable nuclear materials, and the storage, conversion, transmutation and/or disposal of other recovered components. Output of the process contains substantially all of the plutonium, which is recovered as a 5:1 uranium/plutonium mixture, in order to discourage plutonium diversion. Mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for recycle in LWRs is made using this 5:1 U/Pu mixture plus appropriate makeup uranium. A second process output contains all of the recovered uranium except the uranium in the 5:1 U/Pu mixture. The several other process outputs are various waste streams, including a stream of minor actinides that are stored until they are consumed in future FRs. For this study, the UREX+3c fuel cycle is assumed to recycle only the 5:1 U/Pu mixture to be used in LWR MOX fuel and to use depleted uranium (tails) for the makeup uranium. This fuel cycle is assumed not to use the recovered uranium output stream but to discard it instead. On the other hand, the AFC is assumed to recycle both the 5:1 U/Pu mixture and all of the recovered uranium. In this case, the recovered uranium is reenriched with the level of enrichment being determined by the amount of recovered plutonium and the combined amount of the resulting MOX. The study considered two sub-cases within each of the two fuel cycles in which the uranium and plutonium from the first generation of MOX spent fuel (i) would not be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX for use in LWRs or (ii) would be recycled to produce a second generation of MOX fuel for use in LWRs. The study also investigated the effects of recycling MOX spent fuel multiple times in LWRs. The study assumed that both fuel cycles would store and then reprocess spent MOX fuel that is not recycled to produce a next generation of LWR MOX fuel and would use the recovered products to produce FR fuel. The study further assumed that FRs would begin to be brought on-line in 2043, eleven years after recycle begins in LWRs, when products from 5-year cooled spent MOX fuel would be available. Fuel for the FRs would be made using the uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides recovered from MOX. For the cases where LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled one time, the 1st generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. For the cases where the LWR fuel was assumed to be recycled two times, the 2nd generation of MOX spent fuel was used to provide nuclear materials for production of FR fuel. The number of FRs in operation was assumed to increase in successive years until the rate that actinides were recovered from permanently discharged spent MOX fuel equaled the rate the actinides were consumed by the operating fleet of FRs. To compare the two fuel cycles, the study analyzed recycle of nuclear fuel in LWRs and FRs and determined the radiological characteristics of irradiated nuclear fuel, nuclear waste products, and recycle nuclear fuels. It also developed a model to simulate the flows of nuclear materials that could occur in the two advanced nuclear fuel cycles over 81 years beginning in 2020 and ending in 2100. Simulations projected the flows of uranium, plutonium, and minor actinides as these nuclear fuel materials were produced and consumed in a fleet of 100 1,000 MWe LWRs and in FRs. The model als

E. R. Johnson; R. E. Best

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

320

COBRA-SFS thermal analysis of a sealed storage cask for the Monitored Retrievable Storage of spent fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) computer code was used to predict temperature distributions in a concrete Sealed Storage Cask (SSC). This cask was designed for the Department of Energy in the Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) program for storage of spent fuel from commercial power operations. Analytical results were obtained for nominal operation of the SSC with spent fuel from 36 PWR fuel assemblies consolidated in 12 cylindrical canisters. Each canister generates 1650 W of thermal power. A parametric study was performed to assess the effects on cask thermal performance of thermal conductivity of the concrete, the fin material, and the amount of radial reinforcing steel bars (rebar). Seven different cases were modeled. The results of the COBRA-SFS analysis of the current cask design predict that the peak fuel cladding temperature in the SSC will not exceed the 37/sup 0/C design limit for the maximum spent fuel load of 19.8 kW and a maximum expected ambient temperature of 37.8/sup 0/C (100/sup 0/F). The results of the parametric analyses illustrate the importance of material selection and design optimization with regard to the SSC thermal performance.

Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

E-Print Network 3.0 - adolescent energy expenditure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: adolescent energy expenditure Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Patterns of daily activity and time spent...

322

Modeling and Analysis of UN TRISO Fuel for LWR Application Using the PARFUME Code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboraroty (INL) PARFUME (particle fuel model) code was used to assess the overall fuel performance of uranium nitride (UN) tristructural isotropic (TRISO) ceramic fuel under irradiation conditions typical of a Light Water Reactor (LWR). The dimensional changes of the fuel particle layers and kernel were calculated, including the formation of an internal gap. The survivability of the UN TRISO particle was estimated depending on the strain behavior of the constituent materials at high fast fluence and burn up. For nominal cases, internal gas pressure and representative thermal profiles across the kernel and layers were determined along with stress levels in the inner and outer pyrolytic carbon (IPyC/OPyC) and silicon carbide (SiC) layers. These parameters were then used to evaluate fuel particle failure probabilities. Results of the study show that the survivability of UN TRISO fuel under LWR irradiation conditions might only be guaranteed if the kernel and PyC swelling rates are limited at high fast fluence and burn up. These material properties have large uncertainties at the irradiation levels expected to be reached by UN TRISO fuel in LWRs. Therefore, a large experimental effort would be needed to establish material properties, including kernel and PyC swelling rates, under these conditions before definitive conclusions can be drawn on the behavior of UN TRISO fuel in LWRs.

Blaise Collin

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Monthly Expenditures Report for October 2013 University of North Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,837 $4,633 Other $451,725 $164,658 $714,660 $380,972 Grand Total: $2,688,513 $2,016,410 $4,871,230 $4,794 $10,285 Grand Total: $2,688,513 $2,016,410 $4,871,230 $4,586,007 Expenditures Total by Source,645 State $144,823 $121,481 $313,984 $181,575 Grand Total: $2,688,513 $2,016,410 $4,871,230 $4,586,007 Note

Mohanty, Saraju P.

324

Analysis of high-burnup fuel performance during load-follow operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Japan, an objective of the burnup extension of nuclear fuel is to raise the licensing limit of burnup from 39 to 48 GWd/t for pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in the near future. Because of an increasing ratio of nuclear power generation, the necessity of the load-follow operation, which responds flexibly to changing power demands, is more apparent. To evaluate accurately the mechanical integrity of PWR fuel at high burnup during a load-follow operation, the FEMAXI-III code, originally developed for analyses of fuel experiments, was modified, improving submodels to evaluate PWR fuel; the new code was named IRON. The results of verification work on the code using data on PWR fuel covering wide ranges of burnup and linear heat rate show that it has good predictability and, therefore, that the improvement was confirmed as effective.

Matsui, T.; Fukuya, K.; Kinoshita, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

Jean Ragusa; Karen Vierow

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Supplemental Reactor Physics Calculations and Analysis of ELF Mk 1A Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These calculations supplement previous the reactor physics work evaluating the Enhanced Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel (ELF) Mk 1A element. This includes various additional comparisons between the current Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) and LEU along with further characterization of the performance of the ELF fuel. The excess reactivity to be held down at BOC for ELF Mk 1A fuel is estimated to be approximately $2.75 greater than with HEU for a typical cycle. This is a combined effect of the absence of burnable poison in the ELF fuel and the reduced neck shim worth in LEU fuel compared to HEU. Burnable poison rods were conceptualized for use in the small B positions containing Gd2O3 absorber. These were shown to provide $2.37 of negative reactivity at BOC and to burn out in less than half of a cycle. The worth of OSCCs is approximately the same between HEU and ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. This was evaluated by rotating all banks simultaneously. The safety rod worth is relatively unchanged between HEU and ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. However, this should be reevaluated with different loadings. Neutron flux, both total and fast (>1 MeV), is either the same or reduced upon changing from HEU to ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuels in the representative loading evaluated. This is consistent with the well-established trend of lower neutron fluxes for a given power in LEU than HEU.The IPT loop void reactivity is approximately the same or less positive with ELF Mk 1A (LEU) fuel than HEU in the representative loading evaluated.

Michael A. Pope

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 2, User's manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations; however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume contains the input instructions for COBRA-SFS and an auxiliary radiation exchange factor code, RADX-1. It is intended to aid the user in becoming familiar with the capabilities and modeling conventions of the code.

Rector, D.R.; Cuta, J.M.; Lombardo, N.J.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 1, Mathematical models and solution method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) is a general thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code used to predict temperatures and velocities in a wide variety of systems. The code was refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses for the US Department of Energy's Commercial Spent Fuel Management Program. The finite-volume equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation are written for an incompressible, single-phase fluid. The flow equations model a wide range of conditions including natural circulation. The energy equations include the effects of solid and fluid conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. The COBRA-SFS code is structured to perform both steady-state and transient calculations: however, the transient capability has not yet been validated. This volume describes the finite-volume equations and the method used to solve these equations. It is directed toward the user who is interested in gaining a more complete understanding of these methods.

Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

General analysis of breed-and-burn reactors and limited-separations fuel cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new theoretical framework is introduced, the "neutron excess" concept, which is useful for analyzing breed-and-burn (B&B) reactors and their fuel cycles. Based on this concept, a set of methods has been developed which ...

Petroski, Robert C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A. Miller (1980). "Oil Shales and Carbon Dioxide." Sciencefor CO2 evolved from oil shale." Fuel Processing TechnologyCTLs, or CTL synfuels), and oil shale-based synthetic crude

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Design of a microfluidic device for the analysis of biofilm behavior in a microbial fuel cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents design, manufacturing, testing, and modeling of a laminar-flow microbial fuel cell. Novel means were developed to use graphite and other bulk-scale materials in a microscale device without loosing any ...

Jones, A-Andrew D., III (Akhenaton-Andrew Dhafir)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation: September 30, 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of sensitivity and Monte Carlo analyses on PEM fuel cell components and the overall system are presented including the most important cost factors and the effects of selected scenarios.

Carlson, E. J.; Kopf, P.; Sinha, J.; Sriramulu, S.; Yang, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Cost-benefit analysis of ultra-low sulfur jet fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The growth of aviation has spurred increased study of its environmental impacts and the possible mitigation thereof. One emissions reduction option is the introduction of an Ultra Low Sulfur (ULS) jet fuel standard for ...

Kuhn, Stephen (Stephen Richard)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Sensitivity analysis and optimization of the nuclear fuel cycle : a systematic approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For decades, nuclear energy development was based on the expectation that recycling of the fissionable materials in the used fuel from today's light water reactors into advanced (fast) reactors would be implemented as soon ...

Passerini, Stefano

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study, such as diesel hybrid electric vehicles (D HEVs). Thefuel vehicle Yes Diesel hybrid electric vehicle No SparkF-T Diesel Bio-Diesel Hydrogen Electric Figure 5-6: Fuel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study, such as diesel hybrid electric vehicles (D HEVs). Thefuel vehicle Yes Diesel hybrid electric vehicle No SparkF-T Diesel Bio-Diesel Hydrogen Electric Figure 5-6: Fuel

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel economies for diesel vehicles, electric vehicles, and10%, /85%) Low-GHG FT diesel blends Electric charging & H2study, such as diesel hybrid electric vehicles (D HEVs). The

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

CO? abatement by multi-fueled electric utilities: an analysis based on Japanese data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-fueled electric utilities are commonly seen as offering relatively greater opportunities for reasonably priced carbon abatement through changes in the dispatch of generating units from capacity using high emission ...

Ellerman, A. Denny.; Tsukada, Natsuki.

339

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Greenhouse Gases of NExBTL. Heidelberg, IFEU - InstituteR. Linnaila, et al. (2005). NExBTL - Biodiesel fuel of therenewable diesel, such as the NexBTL process, are in active

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Greenhouse Gases of NExBTL. Heidelberg, IFEU - InstituteR. Linnaila, et al. (2005). NExBTL - Biodiesel fuel of therenewable diesel, such as the NexBTL process, are in active

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Transportation Center Seminar... Life-Cycle Analysis of Transportation Fuels and Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to evaluation of hydrogen production pathways, biofuel production pathways, and advanced vehicle technologies more than 22,000 registered users worldwide. LCA results of vehicle/fuel systems are determined

Bustamante, Fabián E.

342

Environmental Aspects of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles: Parametric Modeling and Preliminary Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear power has the potential to help reduce rising carbon emissions, but to be considered sustainable, it must also demonstrate the availability of an indefinite fuel supply as well as not produce any significant negative environmental effects...

Yancey, Kristina D.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

343

Life Cycle Analysis of the Production of Aviation Fuels Using the CE-CERT Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Municipal Sewage Sludge to Produce Synthetic Fuels,5.4 million dry metric tons of sludge annually or 47pounds of sewage sludge (dry weight basis) for every

Hu, Sangran

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Sensitivity Analysis of Reprocessing Cooling Times on Light Water Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of variations of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fast reactor reprocessing cooling time on a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) assuming a single-tier fuel cycle scenario. The results from this study show the effects of different cooling times on the SFRs transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) and transuranic fuel enrichment. Also, the decay heat, gamma heat and neutron emission of the SFRs fresh fuel charge were evaluated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale SFR design was selected as the baseline in this study. Both metal and oxide CR=0.50 SFR designs are investigated.

R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Analysis and design of high frequency link power conversion systems for fuel cell power conditioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this dissertation, new high frequency link power conversion systems for the fuel cell power conditioning are proposed to improve the performance and optimize the cost, size, and weight of the power conversion systems. The first study proposes a...

Song, Yu Jin

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for CO2 evolved from oil shale." Fuel Processing TechnologyT. and G. A. Miller (1980). "Oil Shales and Carbon Dioxide."oil, coal, tar sands, oil shale Natural gas, biomass Natural

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for CO2 evolved from oil shale." Fuel Processing TechnologyT. and G. A. Miller (1980). "Oil Shales and Carbon Dioxide."oil, coal, tar sands, oil shale Natural gas, biomass Natural

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Advanced Mixed-Oxide Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

depletion and core reshuffling, and fuel material thermal-physical properties. Additionally, a text-based coupling method is developed to facilitate the exchange of information between the neutronic code DRAGON and thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-01. The new...

Bingham, Adam R.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

349

Techno-economic analysis of pressurized oxy-fuel combustion power cycle for CO? capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growing concerns over greenhouse gas emissions have driven extensive research into new power generation cycles that enable carbon dioxide capture and sequestration. In this regard, oxy-fuel combustion is a promising new ...

Hong, Jongsup

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Seed-Blanket Unit Duplex Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nucleate boiling ratio EFIT European Facility for Industrial Transmutation EMT Effective Medium Theory EOL end-of-life EURO-TRANS EUROpean research program for the TRANSmutation of high level nuclear waste in ADS EPRI Electric Power Research... MA minor actinides ME Maxwell-Eucken viii MDNBR minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio MNFI modified Nuclear Fuels Industries Mo molybdenum MOX mixed-oxide M-R multi-recycling NFI Nuclear Fuels Industries Np neptunium NPP nuclear...

McDermott, Patrick 1987-

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Comparative analysis of thorium and uranium fuel for transuranic recycle in a sodium cooled Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present paper compares the reactor physics and transmutation performance of sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (FRs) for TRansUranic (TRU) burning with thorium (Th) or uranium (U) as fertile materials. The 1000 MWt Toshiba-Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) conceptual core has been used as benchmark for the comparison. Both burner and breakeven configurations sustained or started with a TRU supply, and assuming full actinide homogeneous recycle strategy, have been developed. State-of-the-art core physics tools have been employed to establish fuel inventory and reactor physics performances for equilibrium and transition cycles. Results show that Th fosters large improvements in the reactivity coefficients associated with coolant expansion and voiding, which enhances safety margins and, for a burner design, can be traded for maximizing the TRU burning rate. A trade-off of Th compared to U is the significantly larger fuel inventory required to achieve a breakeven design, which entails additional blankets at the detriment of core compactness as well as fuel manufacturing and separation requirements. The gamma field generated by the progeny of U-232 in the U bred from Th challenges fuel handling and manufacturing, but in case of full recycle, the high contents of Am and Cm in the transmutation fuel impose remote fuel operations regardless of the presence of U-232.

C. Fiorina; N. E. Stauff; F. Franceschini; M. T. Wenner; A. Stanculescu; T. K. Kim; A. Cammi; M. E. Ricotti; R. N. Hill; T. A. Taiwo; M. Salvatores

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage): A thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code: Volume 3, Validation assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) computer code validation effort. COBRA-SFS, while refined and specialized for spent fuel storage system analyses, is a lumped-volume thermal-hydraulic analysis computer code that predicts temperature and velocity distributions in a wide variety of systems. Through comparisons of code predictions with spent fuel storage system test data, the code's mathematical, physical, and mechanistic models are assessed, and empirical relations defined. The six test cases used to validate the code and code models include single-assembly and multiassembly storage systems under a variety of fill media and system orientations and include unconsolidated and consolidated spent fuel. In its entirety, the test matrix investigates the contributions of convection, conduction, and radiation heat transfer in spent fuel storage systems. To demonstrate the code's performance for a wide variety of storage systems and conditions, comparisons of code predictions with data are made for 14 runs from the experimental data base. The cases selected exercise the important code models and code logic pathways and are representative of the types of simulations required for spent fuel storage system design and licensing safety analyses. For each test, a test description, a summary of the COBRA-SFS computational model, assumptions, and correlations employed are presented. For the cases selected, axial and radial temperature profile comparisons of code predictions with test data are provided, and conclusions drawn concerning the code models and the ability to predict the data and data trends. Comparisons of code predictions with test data demonstrate the ability of COBRA-SFS to successfully predict temperature distributions in unconsolidated or consolidated single and multiassembly spent fuel storage systems.

Lombardo, N.J.; Cuta, J.M.; Michener, T.E.; Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Linear regression analysis of emissions factors when firing fossil fuels and biofuels in a commercial water-tube boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper compares the emissions factors for a suite of liquid biofuels (three animal fats, waste restaurant grease, pressed soybean oil, and a biodiesel produced from soybean oil) and four fossil fuels (i.e., natural gas, No. 2 fuel oil, No. 6 fuel oil, and pulverized coal) in Penn State's commercial water-tube boiler to assess their viability as fuels for green heat applications. The data were broken into two subsets, i.e., fossil fuels and biofuels. The regression model for the liquid biofuels (as a subset) did not perform well for all of the gases. In addition, the coefficient in the models showed the EPA method underestimating CO and NOx emissions. No relation could be studied for SO{sub 2} for the liquid biofuels as they contain no sulfur; however, the model showed a good relationship between the two methods for SO{sub 2} in the fossil fuels. AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels were also compared to the mass balance emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Overall, the AP-42 emissions factors for the fossil fuels did not compare well with the mass balance emissions factors or the EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors. Regression analysis of the AP-42, EPA, and mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels showed a significant relationship only for CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}. However, the regression models underestimate the SO{sub 2} emissions by 33%. These tests illustrate the importance in performing material balances around boilers to obtain the most accurate emissions levels, especially when dealing with biofuels. The EPA emissions factors were very good at predicting the mass balance emissions factors for the fossil fuels and to a lesser degree the biofuels. While the AP-42 emissions factors and EPA CFR Title 40 emissions factors are easier to perform, especially in large, full-scale systems, this study illustrated the shortcomings of estimation techniques. 23 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

Sharon Falcone Miller; Bruce G. Miller [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Energy Institute

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Comparison and Analysis of Regulatory and Derived Requirements for Certain DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments; Lessons Learned for Future Spent Fuel Transportation Campaigns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive materials transportation is stringently regulated by the Department of Transportation and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to protect the public and the environment. As a Federal agency, however, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must seek State, Tribal and local input on safety issues for certain transportation activities. This interaction has invariably resulted in the imposition of extra-regulatory requirements, greatly increasing transportation costs and delaying schedules while not significantly enhancing the level of safety. This paper discusses the results an analysis of the regulatory and negotiated requirements established for a July 1998 shipment of spent nuclear fuel from foreign countries through the west coast to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Staff from the INEEL Nuclear Materials Engineering and Disposition Department undertook the analysis in partnership with HMTC, to discover if there were instances where requirements derived from stakeholder interactions duplicate, contradict, or otherwise overlap with regulatory requirements. The study exhaustively lists and classifies applicable Department of Transportation (DOT) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. These are then compared with a similarly classified list of requirements from the Environmental Impact Statements (EIS) and those developed during stakeholder negotiations. Comparison and analysis reveals numerous attempts to reduce transportation risk by imposing more stringent safety measures than those required by DOT and NRC. These usually took the form of additional inspection, notification and planning requirements. There are also many instances of overlap with, and duplication of regulations. Participants will gain a greater appreciation for the need to understand the risk-oriented basis of the radioactive materials regulations and their effectiveness in ensuring safety when negotiating extra-regulatory requirements.

Kramer, George L., Ph.D.; Fawcett, Rick L.; Rieke, Philip C.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

355

Analysis and Development of A Robust Fuel for Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this effort was on the development of an advanced fuel for gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) applications. This composite design is based on carbide fuel kernels dispersed in a ZrC matrix. The choice of ZrC is based on its high temperature properties and good thermal conductivity and improved retention of fission products to temperatures beyond that of traditional SiC based coated particle fuels. A key component of this study was the development and understanding of advanced fabrication techniques for GFR fuels that have potential to reduce minor actinide (MA) losses during fabrication owing to their higher vapor pressures and greater volatility. The major accomplishments of this work were the study of combustion synthesis methods for fabrication of the ZrC matrix, fabrication of high density UC electrodes for use in the rotating electrode process, production of UC particles by rotating electrode method, integration of UC kernels in the ZrC matrix, and the full characterization of each component. Major accomplishments in the near-term have been the greater characterization of the UC kernels produced by the rotating electrode method and their condition following the integration in the composite (ZrC matrix) following the short time but high temperature combustion synthesis process. This work has generated four journal publications, one conference proceeding paper, and one additional journal paper submitted for publication (under review). The greater significance of the work can be understood in that it achieved an objective of the DOE Generation IV (GenIV) roadmap for GFR Fuelnamely the demonstration of a composite carbide fuel with 30% volume fuel. This near-term accomplishment is even more significant given the expected or possible time frame for implementation of the GFR in the years 2030 -2050 or beyond.

Knight, Travis W

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Widow Poverty and Out-of-Pocket Medical Expenditures at the End of Life  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Widow Poverty and Out-of-Pocket Medical Expenditures at the End of Life Kathleen McGarry University support. #12;Widow Poverty and Out-of-Pocket Medical Expenditures at the End of Life Abstract: Elderly widows are three times as likely to live in poverty as older married people. This study investigates

Shyy, Wei

357

Aerobic Capacity, Activity Levels and Daily Energy Expenditure in Male and Female Adolescents of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The highly active and energy-demanding lifestyle of rural Kenyan adolescents may accountAerobic Capacity, Activity Levels and Daily Energy Expenditure in Male and Female Adolescents travelled to school and daily energy expenditure in 15 habitually active male (13.961.6 years) and 15

Lieberman, Daniel E.

358

Mixed-oxide fuel decay heat analysis for BWR LOCA safety evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel decay heat behavior is analyzed for Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) safety evaluation. The physical reasoning on why the decay heat power fractions of MOX fuel fission product (FP) are significantly lower than the corresponding decay heat power fractions of uranium-oxide (UOX) fuel FP is illustrated. This is primarily due to the following physical phenomena. -The recoverable energies per fission of plutonium (Pu)-239 and Pu-241 are significantly higher than those of uranium (U)-235 and U-238. Consequently, the fission rate required to produce the same amount of power in MOX fuel is significantly lower than that in UOX fuel, which leads to lower subsequent FP generation rate and associated decay heat power in MOX fuel than those in UOX fuel. - The effective FP decay energy per fission of Pu-239 is significantly lower than the corresponding effective FP decay energy per fission of U-235, e.g., Pu-239's 10.63 Mega-electron-Volt (MeV) vs. U-235's 12.81 MeV at the cooling time 0.2 second. This also leads to lower decay heat power in MOX fuel than that in UOX fuel. The FP decay heat is shown to account for more than 90% of the total decay heat immediately after shutdown. The FP decay heat results based on the American National Standard Institute (ANSI)/American Nuclear Society (ANS)-5.1-1979 standard method are shown very close to the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method are shown very close to but mostly slightly lower than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method. The FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 simplified method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1971 method are shown significantly larger than the corresponding FP decay heat results based on the ANSI/ANS-5.1-1979 standard method or the ANSI/ANS-5.1-2005 standard method. (authors)

Chiang, R. T. [AREVA Inc., 303 Ravendale Drive, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : technical review and analysis supplement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project seeks to provide vital data required to assess the consequences of a terrorist attack on a spent fuel transportation cask. One such attack scenario involves the use of conical shaped charges (CSC), which are capable of damaging a spent fuel transportation cask. In the event of such an attack, the amount of radioactivity that may be released as respirable aerosols is not known with great certainty. Research to date has focused on measuring the aerosol release from single short surrogate fuel rodlets subjected to attack by a small CSC device in various aerosol chamber designs. The last series of three experiments tested surrogate fuel rodlets made with depleted uranium oxide ceramic pellets in a specially designed double chamber aerosol containment apparatus. This robust testing apparatus was designed to prevent any radioactive release and allow high level radioactive waste disposal of the entire apparatus following testing of actual spent fuel rodlets as proposed. DOE and Sandia reviews of the project to date identified a number of issues. The purpose of this supplemental report is to address and document the DOE review comments and to resolve the issues identified in the Sandia technical review.

Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric Richard

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Analysis of Actual Operating Conditions of an Off-grid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cells have been proposed as ideal replacements for other technologies in remote locations such as Rural Alaska. A number of suppliers have developed systems that might be applicable in these locations, but there are several requirements that must be met before they can be deployed: they must be able to operate on portable fuels, and be able to operate with little operator assistance for long periods of time. This project was intended to demonstrate the operation of a 5 kW fuel cell on propane at a remote site (defined as one without access to grid power, internet, or cell phone, but on the road system). A fuel cell was purchased by the National Park Service for installation in their newly constructed visitor center at Exit Glacier in the Kenai Fjords National Park. The DOE participation in this project as initially scoped was for independent verification of the operation of this demonstration. This project met with mixed success. The fuel cell has operated over 6 seasons at the facility with varying degrees of success, with one very good run of about 1049 hours late in the summer of 2006, but in general the operation has been below expectations. There have been numerous stack failures, the efficiency of electrical generation has been lower than expected, and the field support effort required has been far higher than expected. Based on the results to date, it appears that this technology has not developed to the point where demonstrations in off road sites are justified.

Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson; Jack Schmid

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Comparative Fuel Cycle Analysis of Critical and Subcritical Fast Reactor Transmutation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cycle analyses are performed to evaluate the impacts of further transmutation of spent nuclear fuel on high-level and low-level waste mass flows into repositories, on the composition and toxicity of the high-level waste, on the capacity of high-level waste repositories, and on the proliferation resistance of the high-level waste. Storage intact of light water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel, a single recycle in a LWR of the plutonium as mixed-oxide fuel, and the repeated recycle of the transuranics in critical and subcritical fast reactors are compared with the focus on the waste management performance of these systems. Other considerations such as cost and technological challenges were beyond the scope of this study. The overall conclusion of the studies is that repeated recycling of the transuranics from spent nuclear fuel would significantly increase the capacity of high-level waste repositories per unit of nuclear energy produced, significantly increase the nuclear energy production per unit mass of uranium ore mined, significantly reduce the radiotoxicity of the waste streams per unit of nuclear energy produced, and significantly enhance the proliferation resistance of the material stored in high-level waste repositories.

Hoffman, Edward A.; Stacey, Weston M. [Georgia Institute of Technology (United States)

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Steam gasification of tyre waste, poplar, and refuse-derived fuel: A comparative analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the field of waste management, thermal disposal is a treatment option able to recover resources from 'end of life' products. Pyrolysis and gasification are emerging thermal treatments that work under less drastic conditions in comparison with classic direct combustion, providing for reduced gaseous emissions of heavy metals. Moreover, they allow better recovery efficiency since the process by-products can be used as fuels (gas, oils), for both conventional (classic engines and heaters) and high efficiency apparatus (gas turbines and fuel cells), or alternatively as chemical sources or as raw materials for other processes. This paper presents a comparative study of a steam gasification process applied to three different waste types (refuse-derived fuel, poplar wood and scrap tyres), with the aim of comparing the corresponding yields and product compositions and exploring the most valuable uses of the by-products.

Galvagno, S. [Department of Environment, Global Change and Sustainable Development, C.R. ENEA Portici, via Vecchio Macello loc. Granatello, 80055 Portici (Italy)], E-mail: sergio.galvagno@portici.enea.it; Casciaro, G. [Department of Physical Technologies and New Materials, C.R. ENEA Brindisi, SS. 7 Appia-km 706, 72100 Brindisi (Italy); Casu, S. [Department of Environment, Global Change and Sustainable Development, C.R. ENEA Bologna, via Martiri di Monte Sole 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Martino, M. [Department of Environment, Global Change and Sustainable Development, C.R. ENEA Trisaia, SS 106 Jonica km 419-500, 75026 Rotondella (Italy); Mingazzini, C. [Department of Physical Technologies and New Materials, C.R. ENEA Faenza, via Ravegnana 186, 48018 Faenza (Italy); Russo, A. [Department of Environment, Global Change and Sustainable Development, C.R. ENEA Trisaia, SS 106 Jonica km 419-500, 75026 Rotondella (Italy); Portofino, S. [Department of Environment, Global Change and Sustainable Development, C.R. ENEA Portici, via Vecchio Macello loc. Granatello, 80055 Portici (Italy)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Analysis of Underground Storage Tanks System Materials to Increased Leak Potential Associated with E15 Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 was enacted by Congress to move the nation toward increased energy independence by increasing the production of renewable fuels to meet its transportation energy needs. The law establishes a new renewable fuel standard (RFS) that requires the nation to use 36 billion gallons annually (2.3 million barrels per day) of renewable fuel in its vehicles by 2022. Ethanol is the most widely used renewable fuel in the US, and its production has grown dramatically over the past decade. According to EISA and RFS, ethanol (produced from corn as well as cellulosic feedstocks) will make up the vast majority of the new renewable fuel requirements. However, ethanol use limited to E10 and E85 (in the case of flex fuel vehicles or FFVs) will not meet this target. Even if all of the E0 gasoline dispensers in the country were converted to E10, such sales would represent only about 15 billion gallons per year. If 15% ethanol, rather than 10% were used, the potential would be up to 22 billion gallons. The vast majority of ethanol used in the United States is blended with gasoline to create E10, that is, gasoline with up to 10% ethanol. The remaining ethanol is sold in the form of E85, a gasoline blend with as much as 85% ethanol that can only be used in FFVs. Although DOE remains committed to expanding the E85 infrastructure, that market will not be able to absorb projected volumes of ethanol in the near term. Given this reality, DOE and others have begun assessing the viability of using intermediate ethanol blends as one way to transition to higher volumes of ethanol. In October of 2010, the EPA granted a partial waiver to the Clean Air Act allowing the use of fuel that contains up to 15% ethanol for the model year 2007 and newer light-duty motor vehicles. This waiver represents the first of a number of actions that are needed to move toward the commercialization of E15 gasoline blends. On January 2011, this waiver was expanded to include model year 2001 light-duty vehicles, but specifically prohibited use in motorcycles and off-road vehicles and equipment. UST stakeholders generally consider fueling infrastructure materials designed for use with E0 to be adequate for use with E10, and there are no known instances of major leaks or failures directly attributable to ethanol use. It is conceivable that many compatibility issues, including accelerated corrosion, do arise and are corrected onsite and, therefore do not lead to a release. However, there is some concern that higher ethanol concentrations, such as E15 or E20, may be incompatible with current materials used in standard gasoline fueling hardware. In the summer of 2008, DOE recognized the need to assess the impact of intermediate blends of ethanol on the fueling infrastructure, specifically located at the fueling station. This includes the dispenser and hanging hardware, the underground storage tank, and associated piping. The DOE program has been co-led and funded by the Office of the Biomass Program and Vehicle Technologies Program with technical expertise from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The infrastructure material compatibility work has been supported through strong collaborations and testing at Underwriters Laboratories (UL). ORNL performed a compatibility study investigating the compatibility of fuel infrastructure materials to gasoline containing intermediate levels of ethanol. These results can be found in the ORNL report entitled Intermediate Ethanol Blends Infrastructure Materials Compatibility Study: Elastomers, Metals and Sealants (hereafter referred to as the ORNL intermediate blends material compatibility study). These materials included elastomers, plastics, metals and sealants typically found in fuel dispenser infrastructure. The test fuels evaluated in the ORNL study were SAE standard test fuel formulations used to assess material-fuel compatibility within a relatively short timeframe. Initially, these material studies included test fuels of Fuel C,

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Multidimensional shielding analysis of the JASPER in-vessel fuel storage experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The In-Vessel Fuel Storage (IVFS) experiments analyzed in this report were conducted at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR) as part of the Japanese-American Shielding Program for Experimental Research (JASPER). These IVFS experiments were designed to study source multiplication and three-dimensional effects related to in-vessel storage of spent fuel elements in liquid metal reactor (LMR) systems. The present report describes the 2-D and 3-D models, analyses, and calculated results corresponding to a limited subset of those IVFS experiments in which the US LMR program has a particular interest.

Bucholz, J.A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed real-world school bus drive cycle data and selected similar standard drive cycles for testing on a chassis dynamometer. NREL tested a first-generation plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) school bus equipped with a 6.4L engine and an Enova PHEV drive system comprising a 25-kW/80 kW (continuous/peak) motor and a 370-volt lithium ion battery pack. A Bluebird 7.2L conventional school bus was also tested. Both vehicles were tested over three different drive cycles to capture a range of driving activity. PHEV fuel savings in charge-depleting (CD) mode ranged from slightly more than 30% to a little over 50%. However, the larger fuel savings lasted over a shorter driving distance, as the fully charged PHEV school bus would initially operate in CD mode for some distance, then in a transitional mode, and finally in a charge-sustaining (CS) mode for continued driving. The test results indicate that a PHEV school bus can achieve significant fuel savings during CD operation relative to a conventional bus. In CS mode, the tested bus showed small fuel savings and somewhat higher nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions than the baseline comparison bus.

Barnitt, R.; Gonder, J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Gas-bubble growth mechanisms in the analysis of metal fuel swelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During steady-state irradiation, swelling rates associated with growth of fission-gas bubbles in metallic fast reactor fuels may be expected to remain small. As a consequence, bubble-growth mechanisms are not a major consideration in modeling the steady-state fuel behavior, and it is usually adequate to consider the gas pressure to be in equilibrium with the external pressure and surface tension restraint. On transient time scales, however, various bubble-growth mechanisms become important components of the swelling rate. These mechanisms include growth by diffusion, for bubbles within grains and on grain boundaries; dislocation nucleation at the bubble surface, or ''punchout''; and bubble growth by creep. Analyses of these mechanisms are presented and applied to provide information on the conditions and the relative time scales for which the various processes should dominate fuel swelling. The results are compared to a series of experiments in which the swelling of irradiated metal fuel was determined after annealing at various temperatures and pressures. The diffusive growth of bubbles on grain boundaries is concluded to be dominant in these experiments.

Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Analysis of Technology Options to Reduce the Fuel Consumption of Idling Trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-haul trucks idling overnight consume more than 838 million gallons (20 million barrels) of fuel annually. Idling also emits pollutants. Truck drivers idle their engines primarily to (1) heat or cool the cab and/or sleeper, (2) keep the fuel warm in winter, and (3) keep the engine warm in the winter so that the engine is easier to start. Alternatives to overnight idling could save much of this fuel, reduce emissions, and cut operating costs. Several fuel-efficient alternatives to idling are available to provide heating and cooling: (1) direct-fired heater for cab/sleeper heating, with or without storage cooling; (2) auxiliary power units; and (3) truck stop electrification. Many of these technologies have drawbacks that limit market acceptance. Options that supply electricity are economically viable for trucks that are idled for 1,000-3,000 or more hours a year, while heater units could be used across the board. Payback times for fleets, which would receive quantity discounts on the prices, would be somewhat shorter.

F. Stodolsky; L. Gaines; A. Vyas

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Analysis of technology options to reduce the fuel consumption of idling trucks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Long-haul trucks idling overnight consume more than 838 million gallons (20 million barrels) of fuel annually. Idling also emits pollutants. Truck drivers idle their engines primarily to (1) heat or cool the cab and/or sleeper, (2) keep the fuel warm in winter, and (3) keep the engine warm in the winter so that the engine is easier to start. Alternatives to overnight idling could save much of this fuel, reduce emissions, and cut operating costs. Several fuel-efficient alternatives to idling are available to provide heating and cooling: (1) direct-fired heater for cab/sleeper heating, with or without storage cooling; (2) auxiliary power units; and (3) truck stop electrification. Many of these technologies have drawbacks that limit market acceptance. Options that supply electricity are economically viable for trucks that are idled for 1,000--3,000 or more hours a year, while heater units could be used across the board. Payback times for fleets, which would receive quantity discounts on the prices, would be somewhat shorter.

Stodolsky, F.; Gaines, L.; Vyas, A.

2000-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

369

Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) for the Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel in an Underground Geologic Repository - Volume 3: Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's (DOE/EM's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), through a collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is conducting a systematic Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) of the disposal of SNFs in an underground geologic repository sited in unsaturated tuff. This analysis is intended to provide interim guidance to the DOE for the management of the SNF while they prepare for final compliance evaluation. This report presents results from a Nuclear Dynamics Consequence Analysis (NDCA) that examined the potential consequences and risks of criticality during the long-term disposal of spent nuclear fuel owned by DOE-EM. This analysis investigated the potential of post-closure criticality, the consequences of a criticality excursion, and the probability frequency for post-closure criticality. The results of the NDCA are intended to provide the DOE-EM with a technical basis for measuring risk which can be used for screening arguments to eliminate post-closure criticality FEPs (features, events and processes) from consideration in the compliance assessment because of either low probability or low consequences. This report is composed of an executive summary (Volume 1), the methodology and results of the NDCA (Volume 2), and the applicable appendices (Volume 3).

Taylor, L.L.; Wilson, J.R. (INEEL); Sanchez, L.C.; Aguilar, R.; Trellue, H.R.; Cochrane, K. (SNL); Rath, J.S. (New Mexico Engineering Research Institute)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Analysis of Pu-Only Partitioning Strategies in LMFBR Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) have been under consideration for production of electricity, fissile material production, and for destruction of transuranics for decades. The neutron economy of a SFR can be operated in one of two ways. One possibility is to operate the reactor in a transuranic burner mode which has been the focus of active R&D in the last 15 years. However, prior to that the focus was on breeding transuranics. This later mode of managing the neutron economy relies on ensuring the maximum fuel utilization possible in such a way as to maximize the amount of plutonium produced per unit of fission energy in the reactor core. The goal of maximizing plutonium production in this study is as fissile feed stock for the production of MOX fuel to be used in Light Water Reactors (LWR). Throughout the l970s, this fuel cycle scenario was the focus of much research by the Atomic Energy Commission in the event that uranium supplies would be scarce. To date, there has been sufficient uranium to supply the once through nuclear fuel cycle. However, interest in a synergistic relationship Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBR) and a consumer LWR fleet persists, prompting this study. This study considered LMFBR concepts with varying additions of axial and radial reflectors. Three scenarios were considered in collaboration with a companion study on the LWR-MOX designs based on plutonium nuclide vectors produced by this study. The first scenario is a LMFBR providing fissile material to make MOX fuel where the MOX part of the fuel cycle is operated in a once-through-then-out mode. The second scenario is the same as the first but with the MOX part of the fuel cycle multi-recycling its own plutonium with LMFBR being used for the make-up feed. In these first two scenarios, plutonium partitioning from the minor actinides (MA) was assumed. Also, the plutonium management strategy of the LMFBR ensured that only the high fissile purity plutonium bred from blankets was sold to the MOX LWRs. The third scenario considered a LMFBR fuel cycle in an expansionary mode where excess bred transuranic material is accumulated for spinning off additional LMFBR cores. In this latter scenario, no plutonium partitioning was considered. After every cycle, transuranic from both driver and blankets is sold to the MOX LWRs. The MA production from LMFBR operated in a Pu-only fuel cycle is roughly only 1% that of the transuranic production rate. This is in contrast to LWR fuel cycles where the MA content in TRU is closer to 10% or more. If such a LMFBR were operated to provide fissile material to a fleet of MOX reactors, then 1 GWe of LMFBR could support between approximately 0.11 and 0.43 GWe of LWR-MOX reactors for a LMFBR conversion ratio between 1.1 and 1.5, if the MOX reactors were operated in a once-through-then out mode. If the plutonium is continuously recycled in the MOX reactors then the support ratio is approximately 1 GWe of LMFBR for between 0.13 and 0.65 GWe of LWR-MOX reactors depending on the LMFBR conversion ratio. Also, it was found that if the LMFBR fleet were operated in a purely expansionary mode, the smallest doubling time achievable would be seven years.

Samuel Bays; Gilles Youinou

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Analysis of reactor material experiments investigating oxide fuel crust stability and heat transfer in jet impingement flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analysis is presented of the crust stability and heat transfer behavior in the CSTI-1, CSTI-3, and CWTI-11 reactor material experiments in which a jet of molten oxide fuel at approx. 160/sup 0/K above its freezing temperature was impinged normally upon stainless steel plates initially at 300 and 385 K. The major issue is the existence of nonexistence of a stable solidified layer of fuel, or crust, interstitial to the flowing hot fuel and the steel substrate, tending to insulate the steel from the hot molten fuel. A computer model was developed to predict the heatup of thermocouples imbedded immediately beneath the surface of the plate for both of the cases in which a stable crust is assumed to be either present or absent during the impingement phase. Comparison of the model calculations with the measured thermocouple temperatures indicates that a protective crust was present over nearly all of the plate surface area throughout the impingement process precluding major melting of the plate steel. However, the experiments also show evidence for very localized and isolated steel melting as revealed by localized and isolated pitting of the steel surface and the response of thermocouples located within the pitted region.

Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Criticality Analysis for Proposed Maximum Fuel Loading in a Standardized SNF Canister with Type 1a Baskets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document represents a summary version of the criticality analysis done to support loading SNF in a Type 1a basket/standard canister combination. Specifically, this engineering design file (EDF) captures the information pertinent to the intact condition of four fuel types with different fissile loads and their calculated reactivities. These fuels are then degraded into various configurations inside a canister without the presence of significant moderation. The important aspect of this study is the portrayal of the fuel degradation and its effect on the reactivity of a single canister given the supposition there will be continued moderation exclusion from the canister. Subsequent analyses also investigate the most reactive dry canister in a nine canister array inside a hypothetical transport cask, both dry and partial to complete flooding inside the transport cask. The analyses also includes a comparison of the most reactive configuration to other benchmarked fuels using a software package called TSUNAMI, which is part of the SCALE 5.0 suite of software.

Chad Pope; Larry L. Taylor; Soon Sam Kim

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

An empirical analysis on the adoption of alternative fuel vehicles:The case of natural gas vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lessons learned from alternative fuel vehicle programs inShirk, C. , 2000. Alternative Fuel Vehicles Made Available,for sustained adoption of alternative fuel vehicles and

Yeh, Sonia

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Analysis of the Relationship Between Vehicle Weight/Size and Safety, and Implications for Federal Fuel Economy Regulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Federal Fuel Economy Regulation Final Report preparedand have higher fuel economy, and safer than conventionaland have higher fuel economy, without sacrificing safety. 1.

Wenzel, Thomas P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Behavioral Response to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and Refueling: A Comparative Analysis of Short- and Long-Term Exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the attitude towards hydrogen fuel cell buses in the CUTEBEHAVIORAL RESPONSE TO HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLES ANDBEHAVIORAL RESPONSE TO HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLES AND

Martin, Elliot; Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy; Lidicker, Jeffery

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Chart of Total Expenditures compared to budget | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orA BRIEFAprilBudgetAbout5CarmichaelandCharles

377

Company Template (Expenditure-Based) | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless orAChief MedicalDepartment of Energy Company

378

Table A39. Total Expenditures for Purchased Electricity and Steam  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative FuelsTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History71.7 588.5

379

Thermal Analysis of Surrogate Simulated Molten Salts with Metal Chloride Impurities for Electrorefining Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a fundamental study to measure thermal properties (liquidus, solidus, phase transformation, and enthalpy) of molten salt systems of interest to electrorefining operations, which are used in both the fuel cycle research & development mission and the spent fuel treatment mission of the Department of Energy. During electrorefining operations the electrolyte accumulates elements more active than uranium (transuranics, fission products and bond sodium). The accumulation needs to be closely monitored because the thermal properties of the electrolyte will change as the concentration of the impurities increases. During electrorefining (processing techniques used at the Idaho National Laboratory to separate uranium from spent nuclear fuel) it is important for the electrolyte to remain in a homogeneous liquid phase for operational safeguard and criticality reasons. The phase stability of molten salts in an electrorefiner may be adversely affected by the buildup of fission products in the electrolyte. Potential situations that need to be avoided are: (i) build up of fissile elements in the salt approaching the criticality limits specified for the vessel (ii) freezing of the salts due to change in the liquidus temperature and (iii) phase separation (non-homogenous solution) of elements. The stability (and homogeneity) of the phases can potentially be monitored through the thermal characterization of the salts, which can be a function of impurity concentration. This work describes the experimental results of typical salts compositions, consisting of chlorides of strontium, samarium, praseodymium, lanthanum, barium, cerium, cesium, neodymium, sodium and gadolinium (as a surrogate for both uranium and plutonium), used in the processing of used nuclear fuels. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to analyze numerous salt samples providing results on the thermal properties. The property of most interest to pyroprocessing is the liquidus temperature. It was previously known the liquidus temperature of the molten salt would change as spent fuel is processed through the Mk-IV electrorefiner. However, the extent of the increase in liquidus temperature was not known. This work is first of its kind in determining thermodynamic properties of a molten salt electrolyte containing transuranics, fission products and bond sodium. Experimental data concluded that the melting temperature of the electrolyte will become greater than the operating temperature of the Mk-IV ER during current fuel processing campaigns. Collected data also helps predict when the molten salt electrolyte will no longer be able to support electrorefining operations.

Toni Y. Gutknecht; Guy L. Fredrickson; Vivek Utgikar

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61 4.3 Carbon capture andPart II: Policy Analysis Page 5 R12: Carbon capture andstorage If carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies

Sperling, Daniel; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61 4.3 Carbon capture andPart II: Policy Analysis Page 5 R12: Carbon capture andstorage If carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Analysis of H2 storage needs for early market non-motive fuel cell applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen fuel cells can potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the United States dependence on foreign oil, but issues with hydrogen storage are impeding their widespread use. To help overcome these challenges, this study analyzes opportunities for their near-term deployment in five categories of non-motive equipment: portable power, construction equipment, airport ground support equipment, telecom backup power, and man-portable power and personal electronics. To this end, researchers engaged end users, equipment manufacturers, and technical experts via workshops, interviews, and electronic means, and then compiled these data into meaningful and realistic requirements for hydrogen storage in specific target applications. In addition to developing these requirements, end-user benefits (e.g., low noise and emissions, high efficiency, potentially lower maintenance costs) and concerns (e.g., capital cost, hydrogen availability) of hydrogen fuel cells in these applications were identified. Market data show potential deployments vary with application from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of units.

Johnson, Terry Alan; Moreno, Marcina; Arienti, Marco; Pratt, Joseph William; Shaw, Leo; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

IMPACT ANALYSIS OF SPENT FUEL DRY CASKS UNDER ACCIDENTAL DROP SCENARIOS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of analyses were performed to assess the structural response of spent nuclear fuel dry casks subjected to various handling and on-site transfer events. The results of these analyses are being used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to perform a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Although the PRA study is being performed for a specific nuclear plant, the PRA study is also intended to provide a framework for a general methodology that could also be applied to other dry cask systems at other nuclear plants. The dry cask system consists of a transfer cask, used for handling and moving the multi-purpose canister (MPC) that contains the fuel, and a storage cask, used to store the MPC and fuel on a concrete pad at the site. This paper describes the analyses of the casks for two loading events. The first loading consists of dropping the transfer cask while it is lowered by a crane to a concrete floor at ground elevation. The second loading consists of dropping the storage cask while it is being transferred to the concrete storage pad outdoors. Three dimensional finite element models of the transfer cask and storage cask, containing the MPC and fuel, were utilized to perform the drop analyses. These models were combined with finite element models of the target structures being impacted. The transfer cask drop analyses considered various drop heights for the cask impacting the reinforced concrete floor at ground level. The finite element model of the target included a section of the concrete floor and concrete wall supporting the floor. The storage cask drop analyses evaluated a 30.5 cm (12 in.) drop of the cask impacting three different surfaces: reinforced concrete, asphalt, and gravel.

BRAVERMAN,J.I.; MORANTE,R.J.; XU,J.; HOFMAYER,C.H.; SHAUKAT,S.K.

2003-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

384

Development of Thermal Analysis Capability of Dry Storage Cask for Spend Fuel Interim Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As most of the nuclear power plants, on-site spent fuel pools (SFP) of Taiwan's plants were not originally designed with a storage capacity for all the spent fuel generated over the operating life by their reactors. For interim spent fuel storage, dry casks are one of the most reliable measures to on-site store over-filled assemblies from SFPs. The NUHOMS{sup R}-52B System consisting of a canister stored horizontally in a concrete module is selected for thermal evaluation in this paper. The performance of each cask in criticality, radioactive, material and thermal needs to be carefully addressed to ensure its enduring safety. Regarding the thermal features of dry storage casks, three different kinds of heat transfer mechanisms are involved, which include natural convection heat transfer outside and/or inside the canister, radiation heat transfer inside and outside the canister, and conduction heat transfer inside the canister. To analyze the thermal performance of dry storage casks, RELAP5-3D is adopted to calculate the natural air convection and radiation heat transfer outside the canister to the ambient environment, and ANSYS is applied to calculate the internal conduction and radiation heat transfer. During coupling iteration between codes, the heat energy across the canister wall needs to be conserved, and the inner wall temperature of the canister needs to be converged. By the coupling of RELAP5-3D and ANSYS, the temperature distribution within each fuel assembly inside canisters can be calculated and the peaking cladding temperature can be identified. (authors)

Fu-Kuang Ko; Liang, Thomas K.S.; Chung-Yu Yang [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research P.O. Box 3-3, Longtan, 32500, Taiwan (China)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

IMPACT ANALYSIS OF SPENT FUEL DRY CASKS UNDER ACCIDENTAL DROP SCENARIOS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of analyses were performed to assess the structural response of spent nuclear fuel dry casks subjected to various handling and on-site transfer events. The results of these analyses are being used by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to perform a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Although the PRA study is being performed for a specific nuclear plant, the PRA study is also intended to provide a framework for a general methodology that could also be applied to other dry cask systems at other nuclear plants. The dry cask system consists of a transfer cask, used for handling and moving the multi-purpose canister OLIIpC that contains the fuel, and a storage cask, used to store the MPC and fuel on a concrete pad at the site. This paper describes the analyses of the casks for two loading events. The first loading consists of dropping the transfer cask while it is lowered by a crane to a concrete floor at ground elevation. The second loading consists of dropping the storage cask while it is being transferred to the concrete storage pad outdoors. Three dimensional finite element models of the transfer cask and storage cask, containing the MPC and fuel, were utilized to perform the drop analyses. These models were combined with finite element models of the target structures being impacted. The transfer cask drop analyses considered various drop heights for the cask impacting the reinforced concrete floor at ground level. The finite element model of the target included a section of the concrete floor and concrete wall supporting the floor. The storage cask drop analyses evaluated a 30.5 cm (12 in.) drop of the cask impacting three different surfaces: reinforced concrete, asphalt, and gravel.

BRAVERMAN,J.I.; MORANTE,R.J.; XU,J.; HOFMAYER,C.H.; SHAUKAT,S.K.

2003-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

386

Analysis of Advanced Actinide-Fueled Energy Systems for Deep Space Propulsion Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[2]. Specific impulses on the order of 103 seconds are theoretically possible. Unfortunately, nuclear fusion ignition, confinement of hot dense plasma and extreme heat management continue to be enormous obstacles for even mid-term fusion.... In order to produce FF particles, a given fuel must fission with a high rate of probability, which is dependent on the energy of incident neutrons and target nuclei. The Java-based Nuclear Information Software (JANIS) program was used to prepare fission...

Guy, Troy Lamar

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

387

Analysis of dose consequences arising from the release of spent nuclear fuel from dry storage casks.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The resulting dose consequences from releases of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) residing in a dry storage casks are examined parametrically. The dose consequences are characterized by developing dose versus distance curves using simplified bounding assumptions. The dispersion calculations are performed using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS2) code. Constant weather and generic system parameters were chosen to ensure that the results in this report are comparable with each other and to determine the relative impact on dose of each variable. Actual analyses of site releases would need to accommodate local weather and geographic data. These calculations assume a range of fuel burnups, release fractions (RFs), three exposure scenarios (2 hrs and evacuate, 2 hrs and shelter, and 24 hrs exposure), two meteorological conditions (D-4 and F-2), and three release heights (ground level - 1 meter (m), 10 m, and 100 m). This information was developed to support a policy paper being developed by U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff on an independent spent fuel storage installation (ISFSI) and monitored retrievable storage installation (MRS) security rulemaking.

Durbin, Samuel G.; Morrow, Charles W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Carbon-Type Analysis and Comparison of Original and Reblended FACE Diesel Fuels (FACE 2, FACE 4, and FACE 7)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the carbon-type analysis from 1H and 13C{1H} nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) of Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE) diesel blends, FD-2B, FD 4B, and FD-7B, and makes comparison of the new blends with the original FACE diesel blends, FD 2A, FD 4A, and FD-7A, respectively. Generally, FD-2A and FD-2B are more similar than the A and B blends of FD-4 and FD-7. The aromatic carbon content is roughly equivalent, although the new FACE blends have decreased monoaromatic content and increased di- and tri-cycloaromatic content, as well as a higher overall aromatic content, than the original FACE blends. The aromatic components of the new FACE blends generally have a higher alkyl substitution with longer alkyl substituents. The naphthenic and paraffinic contents remained relatively consistent. Based on aliphatic methyl and methylene carbon ratios, cetane numbers for FD-2A and -2B, and FD-7A and -7B are predicted to be consistent, while the cetane number for FD-4B is predicted to be higher than FD-4A. Overall, the new FACE fuel blends are fairly consistent with the original FACE fuel blends, but there are observable differences. In addition to providing important comparative compositional information on reformulated FACE diesel blends, this report also provides important information about the capabilities of the team at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in the use of NMR spectroscopy for the detailed characterization and comparison of fuels and fuel blends.

Bays, J. Timothy; King, David L.; O'Hagan, Molly J.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural12 Building4 Case

390

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4 2010 U.S.51

391

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4 2010 U.S.512

392

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4 2010 U.S.5123

393

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4 2010 U.S.51234 FY

394

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4 2010 U.S.51234 FY5

395

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4 2010 U.S.51234

396

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4 2010 U.S.512347

397

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.2 Building Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.4 2010 U.S.5123478

398

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type13 Share78

399

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type13 Share780

400

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type13 Share7801

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type13 Share78012

402

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type13

403

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type134 2005

404

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type134 20055

405

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type134 200552

406

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type134 2005523

407

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type134 20055234

408

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type134 200552345

409

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type134

410

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type1347 2025

411

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type1347 20258

412

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.3 Residential Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.41 Type1347 202589

413

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.414 200781378 2003

414

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.414 200781378 20030

415

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.414 200781378 200301

416

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.414 200781378

417

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.414 2007813784 2010

418

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.414 2007813784 20105

419

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.414 2007813784

420

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.414 20078137847 2035

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.414 20078137847

422

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.3 Commercial Sector Expenditures  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyAuthorization for(EV) Road UserNatural U.S.414 200781378479

423

Performance testing and Bayesian Reliability Analysis of small diameter, high power electric heaters for the simulation of nuclear fuel rod temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

proposed full test using prototypic mixed-oxide fuel (MOX) containing plutonium from converted nuclear weapons. Bayesian reliability analysis methods were used to determine the expected heater failure rate because of the expected short test duration...

O'Kelly, David Sean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

424

Analysis of the Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be subcritical is indeed subcritical. KENO-VI and CENTRM have validation reports noting that the codes were validated using the 238-group ENDF/B-V library against critical experiments. A wide range of experiments were selected, which include high... fuel, the neutron steaming effects in a pebble-bed type HTR, and the effects of accidental water ingress (since HTR systems generally tend to be under moderated, an accident of this type can lead to large positive reactivity changes, in particular...

Pritchard, Megan; Tsvetkov, Pavel

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

425

Analysis of Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of validation is to establish an acceptance criteria such that there is a high degree of confidence that a system is calculated to be subcritical is indeed subcritical. KENO-VI and CENTRM have validation reports noting that the codes were...-heterogeneity in LEU fuel, the neutron steaming effects in a pebble-bed type HTR, and the effects of accidental water ingress (since HTR systems generally tend to be under moderated, an accident of this type can lead to large positive reactivity changes...

Pritchard, Megan

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

426

Polymers for hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems : applications, properties, and gap analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document addresses polymer materials for use in hydrogen service. Section 1 summarizes the applications of polymers in hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle fuel systems and identifies polymers used in these applications. Section 2 reviews the properties of polymer materials exposed to hydrogen and/or high-pressure environments, using information obtained from published, peer-reviewed literature. The effect of high pressure on physical and mechanical properties of polymers is emphasized in this section along with a summary of hydrogen transport through polymers. Section 3 identifies areas in which fuller characterization is needed in order to assess material suitability for hydrogen service.

Barth, Rachel Reina; Simmons, Kevin L. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA; San Marchi, Christopher W.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Analysis of mixing data relevant to wire wrapped fuel assembly thermal-hydraulic design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this report analysis of recent experimental data is presented using the ENERGY code. A comparison of the accuracy of three types of experiments is also presented along with a discussion of uncertainties in utilizing ...

????, Ahs?null?h

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Awareness Program Fuels Energy Savings Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AWARENESS PROGRAM FUELS ENERGY SAVINGS PROJECTS ALEKS M. KLIDZEJS Senior Mechanical Engineer 3M Company Saint Paul, Minnesota ABSTRACT Energy awareness concepts were incorporated as part of a plant energy survey and played a major part... in the followup program. Plant manager support was received and multi-disciplinary task group was established to review and recommend energy saving potentials. Beyond instilling traditional benefits of an awareness program, capital expenditure energy savings...

Klidzejs, A. M.

429

Measurement and Analysis Plan for Investigation of Spent-Fuel Assay Using Lead Slowing-Down Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under funding from the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energys Materials, Protection, Accounting, and Control for Transmutation (MPACT) program (formerly the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative Safeguards Campaign), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are collaborating to study the viability of lead slowing-down spectroscopy (LSDS) for spent-fuel assay. Based on the results of previous simulation studies conducted by PNNL and LANL to estimate potential LSDS performance, a more comprehensive study of LSDS viability has been defined. That study includes benchmarking measurements, development and testing of key enabling instrumentation, and continued study of time-spectra analysis methods. This report satisfies the requirements for a PNNL/LANL deliverable that describes the objectives, plans and contributing organizations for a comprehensive three-year study of LSDS for spent-fuel assay. This deliverable was generated largely during the LSDS workshop held on August 25-26, 2009 at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI). The workshop itself was a prominent milestone in the FY09 MPACT project and is also described within this report.

Smith, Leon E.; Haas, Derek A.; Gavron, Victor A.; Imel, G. R.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Danon, Y.; Beller, D.

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

430

Fission matrix-based Monte Carlo criticality analysis of fuel storage pools  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Standard Monte Carlo transport procedures experience difficulties in solving criticality problems in fuel storage pools. Because of the strong neutron absorption between fuel assemblies, source convergence can be very slow, leading to incorrect estimates of the eigenvalue and the eigenfunction. This study examines an alternative fission matrix-based Monte Carlo transport method that takes advantage of the geometry of a storage pool to overcome this difficulty. The method uses Monte Carlo transport to build (essentially) a fission matrix, which is then used to calculate the criticality and the critical flux. This method was tested using a test code on a simple problem containing 8 assemblies in a square pool. The standard Monte Carlo method gave the expected eigenfunction in 5 cases out of 10, while the fission matrix method gave the expected eigenfunction in all 10 cases. In addition, the fission matrix method provides an estimate of the error in the eigenvalue and the eigenfunction, and it allows the user to control this error by running an adequate number of cycles. Because of these advantages, the fission matrix method yields a higher confidence in the results than standard Monte Carlo. We also discuss potential improvements of the method, including the potential for variance reduction techniques. (authors)

Farlotti, M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau, F 91128 (France); Larsen, E. W. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Nonlinear analysis of hydraulic buckling instability of ANS involute fuel plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydraulic buckling instability of the involute fuel plates and hydraulic coolant channels in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) uranium fission reactor is analyzed nonlinearly using the commercial ABAQUS finite element computer program for the fuel plates in conjunction with a user-written element for the two-dimensional fluid flow in the coolant channels. This methodology has been used for several purposes, including determination of the effect of the aluminum-clad plate plastic behavior and the effect of three-dimensional plate temperature distributions on hydraulic buckling. The present report concentrates on a study of the effect of hydraulic channel imperfections on buckling. The specific form of imperfection considered is an error in fluid channel thickness that is uniform within any one channel but that varies from one channel to the next. The calculated bifurcation (linear buckling) coolant velocity is about 45 m/s, whereas the present design coolant velocity is 25 m/s. At the design velocity, the calculated fluid-induced plate deflection due to the imperfection is somewhat less in magnitude and opposite in direction from the imperfection itself.

Sartory, W.K.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fact #565: April 6, 2009 Household Gasoline Expenditures by Income |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFY 2011 Report1: March 9, 2009 All3:

433

Fact #748: October 8, 2012 Components of Household Expenditures on  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFY 20112: July|RiseDepartment

434

Consortium Template (Expenditure-Based) | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccessCO2 InjectionDepartmentServicesImporter Q&AsSupport

435

Table 7.9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative FuelsTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API Gravity Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History71.7 588.5 56,673.6 54,346.75.12024779

436

Transmutation Performance Analysis for Inert Matrix Fuels in Light Water Reactors and Computational Neutronics Methods Capabilities at INL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The urgency for addressing repository impacts has grown in the past few years as a result of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) accumulation from commercial nuclear power plants. One path that has been explored by many is to eliminate the transuranic (TRU) inventory from the SNF, thus reducing the need for additional long term repository storage sites. One strategy for achieving this is to burn the separated TRU elements in the currently operating U.S. Light Water Reactor (LWR) fleet. Many studies have explored the viability of this strategy by loading a percentage of LWR cores with TRU in the form of either Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels or Inert Matrix Fuels (IMF). A task was undertaken at INL to establish specific technical capabilities to perform neutronics analyses in order to further assess several key issues related to the viability of thermal recycling. The initial computational study reported here is focused on direct thermal recycling of IMF fuels in a heterogeneous Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) bundle design containing Plutonium, Neptunium, Americium, and Curium (IMF-PuNpAmCm) in a multi-pass strategy using legacy 5 year cooled LWR SNF. In addition to this initial high-priority analysis, three other alternate analyses with different TRU vectors in IMF pins were performed. These analyses provide comparison of direct thermal recycling of PuNpAmCmCf, PuNpAm, PuNp, and Pu. The results of this infinite lattice assembly-wise study using SCALE 5.1 indicate that it may be feasible to recycle TRU in this manner using an otherwise typical PWR assembly without violating peaking factor limits.

Michael A. Pope; Samuel E. Bays; S. Piet; R. Ferrer; Mehdi Asgari; Benoit Forget

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

EnvironmentalManagementExpenditures: AssessingtheFinancialReturnsfromStructuralandInfrastructuralInvestments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and inventory metrics. Key Words: sustainable development, environmental management practices, pollution;2 compliance within a region or industry (Hahn, 2000). In addition, the nature and form of environmentalEnvironmentalManagementExpenditures: Assessingthe

Edwards, Paul N.

438

University Reimbursement for Personal Expenditure Charged to a PCD (Procurement Card)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Reimbursement for Personal Expenditure Charged to a PCD (Procurement Card) Funds: TAD01, TAD02, TAD04, TCPM1, TCUCE, TCUOP, THD01, THEHC, THELS, THEOC, THERA, THEXT, THF00, THOPR, TSXXX

de Lijser, Peter

439

New York City- Property Tax Abatement for Photovoltaic (PV) Equipment Expenditures  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In August 2008 the State of New York enacted legislation allowing a property tax abatement for photovoltaic (PV) system expenditures made on buildings located in cities with a population of 1...

440

Occupational physical activity, energy expenditure and 11-year progression of carotid atherosclerosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

expenditure measurements. Ergonomics. 1985;28(1):3659.time and physical workload. Ergonomics. Lynch JW, Kaplan GA,arm and leg exercise. Ergonomics. 1998;41(1):109 Shvartz E,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel expenditure analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Microbial Community Analysis of a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Using Potato Wastewater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) convert chemical energy to electrical energy via bioelectrochemical reactions mediated by microorganisms. We investigated the diversity of the microbial community in an air cathode single chamber MFC that utilized potato-process wastewater as substrate. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) results indicated that the bacterial communities on the anode, cathode, control electrode, and MFC bulk fluid were similar, but differed dramatically from that of the anaerobic domestic sludge and potato wastewater inoculum. The 16S rDNA sequencing results showed that microbial species detected on the anode were predominantly within the phyla of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Fluorescent microscopy results indicated that there was a clear enhancement of biofilm formation on the anode. Results of this study could help improve understanding of the complexity of microbial communities and optimize the microbial composition for generating electricity by MFCs that utilize potato wastewater.

Zhen Li; Rishika Haynes; Eugene Sato; Malcolm Shields; Yoshiko Fujita; Chikashi Sato

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Development and Utilization of mathematical Optimization in Advanced Fuel Cycle Systems Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the past sixty years, a wide variety of nuclear power technologies have been theorized, investigated and tested to various degrees. These technologies, if properly applied, could provide a stable, long-term, economical source of CO2-free electric power. However, the recycling of nuclear fuel introduces a degree of coupling between reactor systems which must be accounted for when making long term strategic plans. This work investigates the use of a simulated annealing optimization algorithm coupled together with the VISION fuel cycle simulation model in order to identify attractive strategies from economic, evironmental, non-proliferation and waste-disposal perspectives, which each have associated an objective function. The simulated annealing optimization algorithm works by perturbing the fraction of new reactor capacity allocated to each available reactor type (using a set of heuristic rules) then evaluating the resulting deployment scenario outcomes using the VISION model and the chosen objective functions. These new scenarios, which are either accepted or rejected according the the Metropolis Criterion, are then used as the basis for further perturbations. By repeating this process several thousand times, a family of near-optimal solutions are obtained. Preliminary results from this work using a two-step, Once-through LWR to Full-recycle/FRburner deployment scenario with exponentially increasing electric demand indicate that the algorithm is capable of #12;nding reactor deployment pro#12;les that reduce the long-term-heat waste disposal burden relative to an initial reference scenario. Further work is under way to re#12;ne the current results and to extend them to include the other objective functions and to examine the optimization trade-o#11;s that exist between these di#11;erent objectives.

Turinsky, Paul; Hays, Ross

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

443

Engineering analysis of low enriched uranium fuel using improved zirconium hydride cross sections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................8 I.C.1. MCNP................................................................................................8 I.C.2. Monteburns......................................................................................10 I.C.3. PARET.....................................................118 A.3. Monteburns Input for Eight Radial Regions ...................................................122 APPENDIX B ADDITIONAL FLIP TO LEU COMPARISON FIGURES .................127 APPENDIX C THERMAL ANALYSIS...

Candalino, Robert Wilcox

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

444

Essays on Healthy Eating and Away from Home Food Expenditures of Adults and Children  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESSAYS ON HEALTHY EATING AND AWAY FROM HOME FOOD EXPENDITURES OF ADULTS AND CHILDREN A Dissertation by BENJAMIN LOUIS CAMPBELL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2009 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics ESSAYS ON HEALTHY EATING AND AWAY FROM HOME FOOD EXPENDITURES OF ADULTS AND CHILDREN A Dissertation by BENJAMIN LOUIS CAMPBELL...

Campbell, Benjamin Louis

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

445

Containment and Analysis Capability Insights Gained from Drop Testing Representative Spent Nuclear Fuel Containers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), operating from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), developed the standardized Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canister. This canister is designed to be loaded with DOE SNF (including other radioactive materials) and then be used during interim storage, during transportation to the nations repository, and for final disposal at the repository without having to be reopened. The canister has been fully designed and has completed significant testing that clearly demonstrates that it can safely achieve its intended design goals. During 1999, nine 457-mm diameter test canisters were fabricated at the INEEL to represent the standardized DOE SNF canister design. Various "worst case" internals were incorporated. Seven of the test canisters were 4.57 m long and weighed approximately 2721 kg, while two were 3.00 m long and weighed approximately 1360 kg and 1725 kg. Seven of the test canisters were dropped from 9 m onto an essentially unyielding flat surface and one of the test canisters was dropped from 1 m onto a 15-cm diameter puncture post. The final test canister was dropped from 61 cm onto a 50.8 mm thick vertically oriented steel plate, and then fell over to impact another 50.8 mm thick vertically oriented steel plate. This last test represented a canister dropping onto another larger container such as a repository disposal container or waste package. The 1999 drop testing was performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The nine test canisters experienced varying degrees of damage to their skirts, lifting rings, and pressure boundary components (heads and main body). However, all of the canisters were shown to have maintained their pressure boundary (through pressure testing). Four heavily damaged canisters were also shown to be leaktight via helium leak testing. Pre- and post-drop finite element (FE) analyses were also performed. The results clearly indicated that accurate predictions of canister responses to the drop tests were achieved. The results achieved for the standardized canister can also be applicable to other well-constructed containers (canisters, casks, cans, vessels, etc.) subjected to similar loads. Properly designed containers can maintain a containment system after being subjected to dynamically induced high strains and FE computer analyses can accurately predict the resulting responses.

Morton, Dana Keith; Snow, Spencer David; Rahl, Tommy Ervin; Ware, Arthur Gates

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Table E10. Residential Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR Table 1.NumberRefinerMotorSummary Topic:0.

447

Table E11. Commercial Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR Table 1.NumberRefinerMotorSummary Topic:0.1.

448

Table E13. Transportation Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR Table 1.NumberRefinerMotorSummary Topic:0.1.3.

449

Table E14. Electric Power Sector Energy Expenditure Estimates, 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystallineForeign ObjectOUR Table 1.NumberRefinerMotorSummary

450

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Executive  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623 42 180 208Summaary &

451

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Publication  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 4623 42 180 208Summaary &and

452

Table 7.9 Expenditures for Purchased Energy Sources, 2010;  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import Costs for Selected CountriesU.S.134 End Uses of:9

453

2009 Energy Expenditure Per Person | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Ownedof Energy ThePrivacy ActVeteranWindDay 12: Drive Your WayEnergy

454

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 - Index Page  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import96 4.87CBECS Public Use Data CBECS Public Use Data1992

455

Consortium Template (Expenditure-Based) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Ownedof EnergyAdvanced-30 QERDNA linkers allowMarch 31, 2015Consortium

456

Temperature modeling for analysis and design of the sintering furnance in HTR fuel type of ball  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the factors that determine the safety of the operation of the sintering furnace fuel HTR ball is the temperature distribution in the ceramic tube furnace. The temperature distribution must be determined at design stage. The tube has a temperature of 1600 C at one end and about 40 C at the other end. The outside of the tube was cooled by air through natural convection. The tube is a furnace ceramic tube which its geometry are 0.08, 0.09 and 0.5 m correspondingly for the inner tube diameter, outer tube diameter and tube length. The temperature distribution of the tube is determined by the natural convection coefficient (NCF), which is difficult to be calculated manually. The determination of NCF includes the Grasshoff, Prandtl, and Nusselt numbers which is a function of the temperature difference between the surrounding air with the ceramic tube. If the temperature vary along the tube, the complexity of the calculations increases. Thus the proposed modeling was performed to determine the temperature distribution along the tube and heat transfer coefficient using a self-developed software which permit the design process easier.

Saragi, Elfrida [Computational Division, Centre for Nuclear Informatic Development, National Nuclear Energy Agency, Serpong 15310 (Indonesia)] [Computational Division, Centre for Nuclear Informatic Development, National Nuclear Energy Agency, Serpong 15310 (Indonesia); Setiadji, Moch [PTAPB - National Nuclear Energy Agency, Yogyakarta 1008 (Indonesia)] [PTAPB - National Nuclear Energy Agency, Yogyakarta 1008 (Indonesia)

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

457

Scanning Electron Microscopy Analysis of Fuel/Matrix Interaction Layers in Highly-Irradiated UMo Dispersion Fuel Plates with Al and AlSi Alloy Matrices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to investigate how the microstructure of fuel/matrix-interaction (FMI) layers change during irradiation, different U7Mo dispersion fuel plates have been irradiated to high fission density and then characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Specifially, samples from irradiated U7Mo dispersion fuel elements with pure Al, Al2Si and AA4043 (~4.5 wt.%Si) matrices were SEM characterized using polished samples and samples that were prepared with a focused ion beam (FIB). Features not observable for the polished samples could be captured in SEM images taken of the FIB samples. For the Al matrix sample, a relatively large FMI layer develops, with enrichment of Xe at the FMI layer/Al matrix interface and evidence of debonding. Overall, a significant penetration of Si from the FMI layer into the U7Mo fuel was observed for samples with Si in the Al matrix, which resulted in a change of the size (larger) and shape (round) of the fission-gas bubbles. Additionally, solid-fission-product phases were observed to nucleate and grow within these bubbles. These changes in the localized regions of the microstructure of the U7Mo may contribute to changes observed in the macroscopic swelling of fuel plates with AlSi matrices.

Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Brandon D. Miller; Jian Gan; Adam B. Robinson; Pavel Medvedev; James Madden; Dan Wachs; Mitch Meyer

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor With Results from FY-2011 Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

Michael A. Pope

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Fossil fuels -- future fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Techno-Economic Analysis of Liquid Fuel Production from Woody Biomass via Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) and Upgrading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of experimental work was conducted to convert woody biomass to gasoline and diesel range products via hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and catalytic hydroprocessing. Based on the best available test data, a techno-economic analysis (TEA) was developed for a large scale woody biomass based HTL and upgrading system to evaluate the feasibility of this technology. In this system, 2000 dry metric ton per day woody biomass was assumed to be converted to bio-oil in hot compressed water and the bio-oil was hydrotreated and/or hydrocracked to produce gasoline and diesel range liquid fuel. Two cases were evaluated: a stage-of-technology (SOT) case based on the tests results, and a goal case considering potential improvements based on the SOT case. Process simulation models were developed and cost analysis was implemented based on the performance results. The major performance results included final products and co-products yields, raw materials consumption, carbon efficiency, and energy efficiency. The overall efficiency (higher heating value basis) was 52% for the SOT case and 66% for the goal case. The production cost, with a 10% internal rate of return and 2007 constant dollars, was estimated to be $1.29 /L for the SOT case and $0.74 /L for the goal case. The cost impacts of major improvements for moving from the SOT to the goal case were evaluated and the assumption of reducing the organics loss to the water phase lead to the biggest reduction in the production cost. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the final products yields had the largest impact on the production cost compared to other parameters. Plant size analysis demonstrated that the process was economically attractive if the woody biomass feed rate was over 1,500 dry tonne/day, the production cost was competitive with the then current petroleum-based gasoline price.

Zhu, Yunhua; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Analysis on the use of engineered barriers for geologic isolation of spent fuel in a reference salt site repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A perspective on the potential durability and effectiveness requirements for the waste form, container and other engineered barriers for geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel has been developed. This perspective is based on calculated potential doses to individuals who may be exposed to radioactivity released from a repository via a groundwater transport pathway. These potential dose commitments were calculated with an integrated geosphere transport and bioshpere transport model. A sensitivity analysis was accomplished by varying four important system parameters, namely the waste radionuclide release rate from the repository, the delay prior to groundwater contact with the waste (leach initiation), aquifer flow velocity and flow path length. The nuclide retarding capacity of the geologic media, a major determinant of the isolation effectiveness, was not varied as a parameter but was held constant for a particular reference site. This analysis is limited to looking only at engineered barriers whose net effect is either to delay groundwater contact with the waste form or to limit the rate of release of radionuclides into the groundwater once contact has occurred. The analysis considers only leach incident scenarios, including a water well intrusion into the groundwater near a repository, but does not consider other human intrusion events or catastrophic events. The analysis has so far been applied to a reference salt site repository system and conclusions are presented.Basically, in nearly all cases, the regional geology is the most effective barrier to release of radionuclides to the biosphere; however, for long-lived isotopes of carbon, technetium and iodine, which were poorly sorbed on the geologic media, the geology is not very effective once a leach incident is initiated.

Cloninger, M.O.; Cole, C.R.; Washburn, J.F.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Standard review plan for reviewing safety analysis reports for dry metallic spent fuel storage casks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cask Standard Review Plan (CSRP) has been prepared as guidance to be used in the review of Cask Safety Analysis Reports (CSARs) for storage packages. The principal purpose of the CSRP is to assure the quality and uniformity of storage cask reviews and to present a well-defined base from which to evaluate proposed changes in the scope and requirements of reviews. The CSRP also sets forth solutions and approaches determined to be acceptable in the past by the NRC staff in dealing with a specific safety issue or safety-related design area. These solutions and approaches are presented in this form so that reviewers can take consistent and well-u