Sample records for fuel development fund

  1. Pressure-Compensated Hydrogen Fuel Cell WiSys Prototype Development Fund

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    Pressure-Compensated Hydrogen Fuel Cell WiSys Prototype Development Fund Final Report Principal Description The purpose of this project was to reduce-to-practice the pressure-compensated hydrogen fuel cell was intended to provide a solution for making more reliable and efficient hydrogen fuel cells than the present

  2. Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Exploration of new markets and new uses for bioproducts, alternative renewable fuels and their co-products will contribute to the long term sustainability of Ontario's agri-food, energy and rural...

  3. Webinar: Overview of Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0001224: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Text version and video recording of the webinar titled "Overview of Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0001224: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations," originally presented on March 10, 2015.

  4. Renewable Development Fund (RDF)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Xcel Energy's Renewable Development Fund (RDF) was created in 1999 pursuant to the 1994 Radioactive Waste Management Facility Authorization Law (Minn. Stat. § 116C.779). Originally, Xcel Energy was...

  5. Community Development Fund (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Community Development Fund is a partnership between the Illinois Department of Commerce and Economic Opportunity (DCEO) and financial institutions. Up to $5 million in micro loans is available...

  6. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:GroundtoProductionEnergy9/9/2011Demonstrations

  7. Community Development Financial Institutions Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Treasury is accepting applications on the Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, which has opened the fiscal year 2015 funding round for the CDFI Program...

  8. Economic Development Fund (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Empire State Development operates the Economic Development Fund, which offers financial assistance to businesses that create or retain business activity and jobs. The program can provide financing...

  9. Spent Fuel Disposal Trust Fund (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any licensee operating a nuclear power plant in this State shall establish a segregated Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Trust Fund in accordance with this subchapter for the eventual disposal of spent...

  10. Xcel Energy - Renewable Development Fund Grants | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Xcel Energy - Renewable Development Fund Grants Xcel Energy - Renewable Development Fund Grants < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional...

  11. Clean Energy Development Fund (CEDF)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NOTE: The Vermont Clean Energy Development Fund has issued its [http://publicservicedept.vermont.gov/sites/psd/files/Topics/Renewable_En... Five Year Strategic Plan]. See the [http:/...

  12. Industrial Development Fund (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Industrial Development Fund provides financing grants and loans through designated municipalities and counties to assist in infrastructure improvements for targeted industrial projects. The...

  13. Draft Funding Opportunity Announcement for Research and Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Announcement for Research and Development of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells for the Hydrogen Economy Draft Funding Opportunity Announcement for Research and...

  14. Economic Development Loan Fund (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Development Loan Fund helps to fill the financing gap between private debt financing and private equity. Up to $1 million is available for each project and can be used for the...

  15. Nordic Development Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:Community Nominations open for $250,000Development Fund Jump

  16. Sustainable Development Fund Financing Program (PECO Territory)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission created the Sustainable Development Fund (SDF) in its final order of the PECO Energy electric utility restructuring proceeding. The Reinvestment Fund,...

  17. Program development fund: FY 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is the objective of the Fund to encourage innovative research to maintain the Laboratory's position at the forefront of science. Funds are used to explore new ideas and concepts that may potentially develop into new directions of research for the Laboratory and that are consistent with the major needs, overall goals, and mission of the Laboratory and the DOE. The types of projects eligible for support from PDF include: work in forefront areas of science and technology for the primary purpose of enriching Laboratory research and development capabilities; advanced study of new hypotheses, new experimental concepts, or innovative approaches to energy problems; experiments directed toward ''proof of principle'' or early determination of the utility of a new concept; and conception, design analyses, and development of experimental devices, instruments, or components. This report is a review of these research programs.

  18. Energy Department Announces Funding to Develop "Plug-and-Play...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Funding to Develop "Plug-and-Play" Solar Energy Systems for Homeowners Energy Department Announces Funding to Develop "Plug-and-Play" Solar Energy Systems for Homeowners April 24,...

  19. Job Maintenance and Capital Development Fund (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Job Maintenance and Capital Development Fund provides annual grants to businesses which are located in Development Tier I counties. The Fund is intended to encourage the retention of...

  20. More Than 1,000 Fuel Cell Units Deployed Through DOE ARRA Funding (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This NREL Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlight describes how early market end users are operating 1,111 fuel cell units at 301 sites in 20 states with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program and analysis by NREL. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funded the deployment of approximately 1,000 fuel cell systems in key early markets to accelerate the commercialization and deployment of fuel cells and fuel cell manufacturing, installation, maintenance, and support services. In support of the ARRA fuel cell deployment objectives, NREL analyzes and validates the technology in real-world applications, reports on the technology status, and facilitates the development of fuel cell technologies, manufacturing, and operations in strategic markets-including material handling equipment, backup power, and stationary power-where fuel cells can compete with conventional technologies. NREL is validating hydrogen and fuel cell systems in real-world settings through data collection, analysis, and reporting. The fuel cell and infrastructure analysis provides an independent, third-party assessment that focuses on fuel cell system and hydrogen infrastructure performance, operation, maintenance, use, and safety. An objective of the ARRA fuel cell project-to deploy approximately 1,000 fuel cell systems in key early markets - has been met in two years. By the end of 2011, 504 material handling equipment (MHE) fuel cell units were operating at 8 facilities and 607 backup power fuel cell units were operating at 293 sites. MHE and backup power are two markets where fuel cells are capable of meeting the operating demands, and deployments can be leveraged to accelerate fuel cell commercialization.

  1. NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - SBIR/STTR Funding Opportunity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SBIRSTTR Funding Opportunity Deadline December 15-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells December 9, 2014 The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued its FY 2015 Phase I Release 2 Funding...

  2. The Impact of Fuel Use Trends on the Highway Trust Fund's Present and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    1 The Impact of Fuel Use Trends on the Highway Trust Fund's Present and Future Devin;2 The Impact of Fuel Use Trends on the Highway Trust Fund's Present and Future Devin Braun Ryan Endorf Stephen.3. Historical and Projected Fuel Use and Vehicle Miles Traveled Trends Section 2. Methodology Section 2

  3. Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

  4. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 4, 2015 Funding Organization: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Funding Number: FOA DE-FOA-0001224 Summary The Fuel Cell...

  5. A Roadmap to Funding Infrastructure Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWater Rights, Substantive(Sichuan,Financial FrameworkandFunding

  6. BUILDING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUNDING IN ACTION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusAMarch-6,-2015BSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdfR I S

  7. University Venture Development Fund Transforming today's research and development into tomorrow's businesses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    University Venture Development Fund Transforming today's research and development into tomorrow: University Venture Development Fund P.O. Box 243 Portland, OR 97207 Phone (503) 725-4911 It is highly this process. Thank you for supporting the University Venture Development Fund! PDX_DOCS:401207.2 [33137

  8. Tribal Energy Development Grants (BIA)- Funding Opportunity Review Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Prosper Sustainably is hosting a free webinar on July 17, 2014 at 1pm PST that reviews the BIA’s Tribal Energy Development Grants funding opportunity. During the webinar Josh Simmons, Prosper...

  9. Funding Opportunity Webinar- Buildings University Innovators and Leaders Development (BUILD)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar provides an overview of the “Buildings University Innovators and Leaders Development (BUILD)” Funding Opportunity Announcement, DE-FOA-0001167. The webinar was originally presented on November 19, 2014.

  10. Hydrogen Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development & Hydrogen Fuel Quality Results Hydrogen Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development & Hydrogen Fuel Quality Results...

  11. Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated | Department of

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Fees as Transportation Funding

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mail Share Alternative FuelsFuelingStaples Delivers

  13. DOE funds Bio-Inspired Solar Fuel Center at ASU

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The goal of ASU's new center is to design and construct a synthetic system that uses sunlight to convert water cheaply and efficiently into hydrogen fuel and oxygen....

  14. USDA and DOE Fund Genomics Projects For Bioenergy Fuels Research |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research Petroleum ReserveDepartment of Energy AtNoticeMotorThis8,Production

  15. Funding Opportunity: Technology Advancement for Rapid Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an opportunity for potential applicants to begin developing partnerships and begin the process of gathering data to prepare their application. GTP's goal is to address the high...

  16. The Decline of Fuel Taxes and New Transportation Funding Options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Kevin M.

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of the tax. With no increase since 1993, the tax has lost over a third of its purchasing power over that time. Additionally, Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards are rising, meaning vehicles are more fuel efficient, which is positive in one regard...

  17. Plasmatron Fuel Reformer Development and Internal Combustion...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plasmatron Fuel Reformer Development and Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Applications Plasmatron Fuel Reformer Development and Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Applications...

  18. Draft Funding Opportunity Announcement for Research and Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Announcement Research and Development of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells for the Hydrogen Economy The Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to issue a...

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Infrastructure Development

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternative FuelInfrastructure Development to someone by

  20. Department of Energy Funds Six Companies to Develop Advanced Drivetrain

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealing WithDevelopment of New Hampshire'sGraniteFutureGen 2.0

  1. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; Horan, James L. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; Caire, Benjamin R. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; Ziegler, Zachary C. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; Herring, Andrew M. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; Yang, Yuan [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; Zuo, Xiaobing [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL; Robson, Michael H. [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Artyushkova, Kateryna [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Patterson, Wendy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  2. Adopted by Accounting Services, University Budgets, Office of Development Designated Fund 23 and 24 Transfer Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Doncker, Elise

    . For designated dollars in fund 23 or gifts in fund 24 received by the University for a specific purpose or giftsAdopted by Accounting Services, University Budgets, Office of Development 11/29/2010 Designated Fund 23 and 24 Transfer Policy: Funds with no Limitations, Stipulations, or Donor Restrictions

  3. International project finance : the case of Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Jassar, Sulaiman Ahmed

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the record of the Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development (KFAED) in light of changing fashions regarding the proper role and management of such funds in the development finance process. The key ...

  4. DOE, USDA Announce Funding for Biomass Research and Development Initiative

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA, GA - U.S. Departmentto DevelopMark Duff (LATA KY),| Department of

  5. Advanced Fuel Reformer Development: Putting the 'Fuel' in Fuel Cells |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2 DOE Hydrogen andEnzymeAdvancedDepartment

  6. Notice of Intent to Issue FOA DE-FOA-0001224: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) intends to issue, on behalf of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO), a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) entitled “Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and Demonstrations.”

  7. Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuvera Fuel Cells

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel processor subsystems (fuel reformer, CO cleanup, and exhaust cleanup) that were small enough to integrate on a vehicle and (2) evaluating the fuel processor system performance for hydrogen production, efficiency, thermal integration, startup, durability and ability to integrate with fuel cells. Nuvera carried out a three-part development program that created multi-fuel (gasoline, ethanol, natural gas) fuel processing systems and investigated integration of fuel cell / fuel processor systems. The targets for the various stages of development were initially based on the goals of the DOE's Partnership for New Generation Vehicles (PNGV) initiative and later on the Freedom Car goals. The three parts are summarized below with the names based on the topic numbers from the original Solicitation for Financial Assistance Award (SFAA).

  8. Status of Transuranic Bearing Metallic Fuel Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Hayes; Bruce Hilton; Heather MacLean; Debbie Utterbeck; Jon Carmack; Kemal Pasamehmetoglu

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the status of the metallic fuel development under the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The metallic fuel development program includes fuel fabrication, characterization, advanced cladding research, irradiation testing and post-irradiation examination (PIE). The focus of this paper is on the recent irradiation experiments conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor and some PIE results from these tests.

  9. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 5 Identify the governing phenomenology Identify the governing phenomenology Develop a first-principle based model of the...

  10. Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors. Therefore, the overriding motivation behind the FFC R&D program described in this plan is to foster closer integration between fuel design and fabrication to reduce programmatic risk. These motivating factors are all interrelated, and progress addressing one will aid understanding of the others. The FFC R&D needs fall into two principal categories, 1) baseline process optimization, to refine the existing fabrication technologies, and 2) manufacturing process alternatives, to evaluate new fabrication technologies that could provide improvements in quality, repeatability, material utilization, or cost. The FFC R&D Plan examines efforts currently under way in regard to coupon, foil, plate, and fuel element manufacturing, and provides recommendations for a number of R&D topics that are of high priority but not currently funded (i.e., knowledge gaps). The plan ties all FFC R&D efforts into a unified vision that supports the overall Convert Program schedule in general, and the fabrication schedule leading up to the MP-1 and FSP-1 irradiation experiments specifically. The fabrication technology decision gates and down-selection logic and schedules are tied to the schedule for fabricating the MP-1 fuel plates, which will provide the necessary data to make a final fuel fabrication process down-selection. Because of the short turnaround between MP-1 and the follow-on FSP-1 and MP-2 experiments, the suite of specimen types that will be available for MP-1 will be the same as those available for FSP-1 and MP-2. Therefore, the only opportunity to explore parameter space and alternative processing is between now and 2016 when the candidate processes are down-selected in preparation for the MP-1, FSP-1, and MP-2 plate manufacturing campaigns. A number of key risks identified by the FFC are discussed in this plan, with recommended mitigating actions for those activities within FFC, and identification of risks that are impacted by activities in other areas of the Convert Program. The R&D Plan does not include discussion of FFC initiatives related to production-scale manufacturing of fuel (e.g., establishment of the Pilot Line Production Facility), rather, the goal of this plan is to document the R&D activities needed ultimately to enable high-quality and cost-effective production of the fuel by the commercial fuel fabricator. The intent is for this R&D Plan to be a living document that will be reviewed and updated on a regular basis (e.g., annually) to ensure that FFC R&D activities remain properly aligned to the needs of the Convert Program. This version of the R&D Plan represents the first annual review and revision.

  11. Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels: Metrics Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Lori Braase; Rose Montgomery; Chris Stanek; Robert Montgomery; Lance Snead; Larry Ott; Mike Billone

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is conducting research and development on enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) for light water reactors (LWRs). This mission emphasizes the development of novel fuel and cladding concepts to replace the current zirconium alloy-uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The overall mission of the ATF research is to develop advanced fuels/cladding with improved performance, reliability and safety characteristics during normal operations and accident conditions, while minimizing waste generation. The initial effort will focus on implementation in operating reactors or reactors with design certifications. To initiate the development of quantitative metrics for ATR, a LWR Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Metrics Development Workshop was held in October 2012 in Germantown, MD. This paper summarizes the outcome of that workshop and the current status of metrics development for LWR ATF.

  12. The Rise of Federally Funded Research and Development Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DALE,BRUCE C.; MOY,TIMOTHY D.

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federally funded research and development centers (FFRDCS) area unique class of research and development (R and D) facilities that share aspects of private and public ownership. Some FFRDCS have been praised as national treasures, but FFRDCS have also been the focus of much criticism through the years. This paper traces the history of FFRDCS through four periods: (1) the World War II era, which saw the birth of federal R and D centers that would eventually become FFRDCS; (2) the early Cold War period, which exhibited a proliferation of FFRDCS despite their unclear legislative status and growing tension with an increasingly capable and assertive defense industry, (3) there-evaluation and retrenchment of FFRDCS in the 1960s and early 1970s, which resulted in a dramatic decline in the number of FFRDCS; and (4) the definition and codification of the FFRDC entity in the late 1970s and 1980s, when Congress and the executive branch worked together to formalize regulations to control FFRDCS. The paper concludes with observations on the status of FFRDCS at the end of the twentieth century.

  13. Funding Opportunity Webinar, Buildings University Innovators and Leaders Development-- BUILD (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text version of the Funding Opportunity Webinar, Buildings University Innovators and Leaders Development -- BUILD, presented in November 2014.

  14. Development Plan for the Fuel Cycle Simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Dixon

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fuel Cycle Simulator (FCS) project was initiated late in FY-10 as the activity to develop a next generation fuel cycle dynamic analysis tool for achieving the Systems Analysis Campaign 'Grand Challenge.' This challenge, as documented in the Campaign Implementation Plan, is to: 'Develop a fuel cycle simulator as part of a suite of tools to support decision-making, communication, and education, that synthesizes and visually explains the multiple attributes of potential fuel cycles.'

  15. Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar ""Fuel Cell Buses"" held...

  16. 2009-10 BUDGET DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES AND 2010-11 PRELIMINARY GENERAL FUND BUDGET GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-10 BUDGET DEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES AND 2010-11 PRELIMINARY GENERAL FUND BUDGET GUIDELINES in the future. The 2009-10 Budget Development Guidelines below identify projected revenues and expenditures fund, and the first component of a two-year 10 percent, or $50 million, budget reduction plan. Due

  17. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergyQualityAUGUSTPart 3 of 9

  18. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is on Track|Solar Decathlon | DepartmentSTEMUpcomingUniversity

  19. Upcoming Funding Opportunity to Develop Larger Wind Turbine Blades |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and1TeleworkAgricultureAbout Us » News » Upcoming

  20. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Radiation (Part I) - Alkali-AggregateSilica Reaction (Part II) - Creepcreep-fracture interaction (Roadmap to be developed) Part I- Irradiated Concrete Research results...

  1. DOE Funds 15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and Heat Transfer Projects For Up to 67.6 Million DOE Funds 15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and Heat Transfer...

  2. Funding Opportunity: Technology Advancement for Rapid Development of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergyQualityAUGUSTPart 3 of 910/2008

  3. Loan Loss Reserve Fund Program Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10IO1OP001 LetterLight-Duty11.2.1310 DOE LBNLProgram

  4. TRF's Sustainable Development Fund (SDF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump to: navigation,Open EnergyFacilityTEP Asia LtdTIAX

  5. International Fund for Agricultural Development | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place: EdenOverview Of The Data,

  6. Liquid fuel reformer development: Autothermal reforming of Diesel fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, C.; Bae, J-M.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.

    2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing a process to convert hydrocarbon fuels to clean hydrogen feeds for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. The process incorporates an autothermal reforming catalyst that can process hydrocarbon feeds at lower temperatures than existing commercial catalysts. The authors have tested the catalyst with three diesel-type fuels: hexadecane, certified low-sulfur grade 1 diesel, and a standard grade 2 diesel. Hexadecane yielded products containing 60% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis at 850 C, while maximum hydrogen product yields for the two diesel fuels were near 50%. Residual products in all cases included CO, CO{sub 2}, ethane, and methane. Further studies with grade 1 diesel showed improved conversion as the water:fuel ratio was increased from 1 to 2 at 850 C. Soot formation was reduced when the oxygen:carbon ratio was maintained at 1 at 850 C. There were no significant changes in hydrogen yield as the space velocity and the oxygen:fuel ratio were varied. Tests with a microchannel monolithic catalyst yielded similar or improved hydrogen levels at higher space velocities than with extruded pellets in a packed bed.

  7. Pellet Fueling Technology Development S. K. Combs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellet Fueling Technology Development S. K. Combs Fusion Energy Division, Oak Ridge National/10/00 Pellet Sizes Are Relevant for Fueling Applications on Any Present Experimental Fusion Device and Future pellet injector technology ÂĄ Hydrogen properties ÂĄ Ice/pellet formation techniques ÂĄ Acceleration

  8. Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

  9. New Funding Opportunity to Develop Larger Wind Turbine Blades | Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1,Department ofNewof NO2: Key RoleSCIENCEof

  10. Northern New Mexico companies benefit from economic development funds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNationalNewportBig Eddyof H-2 and O-2contractor awards LANL »

  11. Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe Office ofReporting (Connecticut)41AdamEnergyAdvancedDepartment||1

  12. Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South ValleyASGovLtr.pdfAboutSheet, April 2014 |EnergyTransmission Project

  13. Draft Funding Opportunity Announcement for Research and Development of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirements Matrix U.S.7685 Vol. 76, No. 29DoingSRS-WD-2010-001

  14. Energy Department Announces Funding to Develop Improved Next Generation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program -Department of EnergyStakeholdersEnergy Competition |AdvancedHVAC

  15. Hydrogen fueling station development and demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Daney, D.; Daugherty, M.; Hill, D.; Prenger, F.C.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop and demonstrate a hydrogen fueling station for vehicles. Such stations are an essential infrastructural element in the practical application of hydrogen as vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology that is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle.

  16. $6000 FUNDED INTERNSHIPS GCFSI sponsored internees are expected to work in developing countries on projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    $6000 FUNDED INTERNSHIPS GCFSI sponsored internees are expected to work in developing countries of food systems Areas of work include: population growth, climate change and pressure on the land, rapid

  17. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3.4 Fuel Cells Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - 3.4 Fuel Cells Fuel Cells technical plan section of the Fuel Cell...

  18. Energy Department Announces Funding to Develop Improved Next...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to support research and development of the next generation of heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) technologies. The R&D will focus on developing regionally...

  19. Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory may include: * Fuel cell and fuel cell component manufacturers * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other...

  20. Coal-fueled diesel technology development -- Fuel injection equipment for coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.N.; Hayden, H.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the abrasive and corrosive nature of coal water slurries, the development of coal-fueled diesel engine technology by GE-Transportation Systems (GE-TS) required special fuel injection equipment. GE-Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD) undertook the design and development of fuel injectors, piston pumps, and check valves for this project. Components were tested at GE-CRD on a simulated engine cylinder, which included a cam-actuated jerk pump, prior to delivery to GE-TS for engine testing.

  1. Apply: Funding Opportunity- Buildings University Innovators and Leaders Development (BUILD)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Full Application Deadline – February 11, 2015 This FOA makes available competitive, 2-year cooperative agreements for U.S.-based university teams to research and develop innovative building energy efficient technologies, manufacturing (for projects developing hardware), and commercialization.

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternativeConnecticut InformationEthanol

  3. Air Force Announces Funding for Alternative Energy Research & Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has released a Broad Area Announcement (BAA) for over $25 million for Alternative Energy Research & Development.

  4. RSAP Successful Grants 2011 Research development grants 2011 funding awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Students, Law, and Violence in Northern Thailand Howes, Stephen Crawford To develop a research scholars on coal mininginduced displacement and dispossession of indigenous peoples in Jharkhand, India

  5. Development of a Turnkey H2 Fueling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feedstocks Storage NG Compression PSAPSARef.Ref. PTI, CATA, Penn State H2 Generator #12;5 © Air ProductsDevelopment of a Turnkey H2 Fueling Station David E. Guro Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. Allentown, PA U.S. D.O.E. - Hydrogen Program Annual Review May 2003 #12;2 © Air Products & Chemicals, Inc

  6. DOE FY 2010 Budget Request and Recovery Act Funding for Energy Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment: Analysis and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anadon, Laura Diaz; Gallagher, Kelly Sims; Bunn, Matthew

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of the FY 2010 budget request for the Department of Energy (DOE) and the portion of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) funds likely to be available in 2010 would (assuming that they would be split evenly between FY 2010 and FY 2011) result in a doubling in funding available for energy research, development, and deployment (ERD and D) from $3.6 billion in FY 2009 to $7.2 billion in FY 2010. Without the stimulus funds, DOE ERD and D investments in FY 2010 would decrease very slightly when compared to FY 2009. Excluding the $7.5 billion for the Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loans in FY 2009, the FY 2010 budget request for deployment represents a 33 percent decrease from the FY 2009 levels from $520 million to $350 million. This decrease is largely due to the large amounts of funds appropriated in ARRA for DOE deployment programs, or $23.6 billion, which are three times greater than those appropriated in the FY 2009 budget. These very substantial funding amounts, coupled with the broad range of institutional innovations the administration is putting in place and movement toward putting a price on carbon emissions, will help accelerate innovation for a broad range of energy technologies. DOE's Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) and the Energy Innovation Hubs are important initiatives that could contribute to two weak points of the government's energy innovation effort, namely funding high-risk projects in transformational technologies and in companies that have not traditionally worked with the government and strengthening the integration of basic and applied research in priority areas. Increasing the funding for different types of energy storage research, providing some support for exploring opportunities in coal-to-liquids with carbon capture and storage (CCS) and coal-and-biomass-to-liquids with CCS, and reducing funding for fission RD and D are other actions that Congress could take in the short-term. Energy storage may play a crucial role in the future of the power and transportation systems, which together consume two thirds of primary energy in the United States. A recent National Academy of Science report recommended carrying out detailed scenario assessments of the penetration of unconventional fuels from coal and coal and biomass with CCS. And the research plan provided for nuclear fission does not justify spending as many funds as were requested. The proposed funding for FY 2010 and the resources from ARRA, however, do not guarantee that the United States will finally enjoy the predictable and consistent publicly-funded energy technology innovation effort that it needs. The Obama administration must put in place a comprehensive energy technology innovation strategy that will ensure that an expanded ERD3 effort is both sustainable and efficient. This commission would be charged with, inter alia, developing a strategy that optimizes the integration of the various stages of innovation (research, development, demonstration, early deployment), as well as integrates efforts across technology areas. The database upon which this analysis is based may be downloaded in Excel format at: http://belfercenter.ksg.harvard.edu/publication/19119/ .

  7. High-pressure coal fuel processor development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenhalgh, M.L. (Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

  8. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan The...

  9. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Appendix E: Acronyms Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and...

  10. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cover Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Cover Cover of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development,...

  11. 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update This report outlines the role...

  12. ARRA-funded Cloud Radar Development for the Department of Energy's ARM Climate Research Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARRA-funded Cloud Radar Development for the Department of Energy's ARM Climate Research Facility assembler jobs were saved because of this large order. ProSensing is also planning to engage a local defense for similar cloud radar contracts for customers in India, China and Korea. By developing these complex radar

  13. Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.T. (Skip) Robinson; James P. Meagher; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Siv Aasland; Charles Besecker; Jack Chen Bart A. van Hassel; Olga Polevaya; Rafey Khan; Piyush Pilaniwalla

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from November 1, 2001 to December 31, 2002 in the following task areas: Task 1: Materials Development; Task 2: Composite Development; Task 4: Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8: Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; 8.2 Nuvera Fuel Cell Program; and Task 10: Program Management. Major progress has been made towards developing high temperature, high performance, robust, oxygen transport elements. In addition, a novel reactor design has been proposed that co-produces hydrogen, lowers cost and improves system operability. Fuel and engine testing is progressing well, but was delayed somewhat due to the hiatus in program funding in 2002. The Nuvera fuel cell portion of the program was completed on schedule and delivered promising results regarding low emission fuels for transportation fuel cells. The evaluation of ultra-clean diesel fuels continues in single cylinder (SCTE) and multiple cylinder (MCTE) test rigs at International Truck and Engine. FT diesel and a BP oxygenate showed significant emissions reductions in comparison to baseline petroleum diesel fuels. Overall through the end of 2002 the program remains under budget, but behind schedule in some areas.

  14. High-pressure coal fuel processor development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenhalgh, M.L.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

  15. DOE Seeks to Invest up to $15 Million in Funding for Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgramof EnergyDepartmentTechnical ServicesTechnology

  16. Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Magee; Richard Gehman

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a market research technique called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD). A series of interviews were conducted with various users and system designers in their facilities. The interviewing team was trained in data taking and analysis per the MDPD process. The final result was a prioritized and weighted list of both requirements and desires for each sensor. Work proceeded on concept development for the 4 types of sensors. At the same time, users were developing the actual fuel cell systems and gaining knowledge and experience in the use of sensors and controls systems. This resulted in changes to requirements and desires that were not anticipated during the MDPD process. The concepts developed met all the predicted requirements. At the completion of concept development for the Pressure Sensor, it was determined that the Fuel Cell developers were happy with off-the-shelf automotive pressure sensors. Thus, there was no incentive to bring a new Fuel Cell Specific Pressure Sensor into production. Work was therefore suspended. After the experience with the Pressure Sensor, the requirements for a Temperature Sensor were reviewed and a similar situation applied. Commercially available temperature sensors were adequate and cost effective and so the program was not continued from the Concept into the Design Phase.

  17. Pre-Announcement Meeting Notice for Financial Assistance Funding...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the pre-announcement meeting for manufacturing research and development for hydrogen and fuel cell systems. frnmanufacture.pdf More Documents & Publications FA Funding...

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWayElectricity Fuel Basics toWithHybridHydrogen

  19. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Development in Columbia (SC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reifsnider, Kenneth [University of South Carolina; Chen, Fanglin [University of South Carolina; Popov, Branko [University of South Carolina; Chao, Yuh [University of South Carolina; Xue, Xingjian [University of South Carolina

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an update to the final report filed after the extension of this program to May of 2011. The activities of the present program contributed to the goals and objectives of the Fuel Cell element of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Department of Energy through five sub-projects. Three of these projects have focused on PEM cells, addressing the creation of carbon-based metal-free catalysts, the development of durable seals, and an effort to understand contaminant adsorption/reaction/transport/performance relationships at low contaminant levels in PEM cells. Two programs addressed barriers in SOFCs; an effort to create a new symmetrical and direct hydrocarbon fuel SOFC designs with greatly increased durability, efficiency, and ease of manufacturing, and an effort to create a multiphysics engineering durability model based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy interpretations that associate the micro-details of how a fuel cell is made and their history of (individual) use with specific prognosis for long term performance, resulting in attendant reductions in design, manufacturing, and maintenance costs and increases in reliability and durability.

  20. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Development in Columbia (SC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reifsnider, Kenneth

    2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an update to the final report filed after the extension of this program to May of 2011. The activities of the present program contributed to the goals and objectives of the Fuel Cell element of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program of the Department of Energy through five sub-projects. Three of these projects have focused on PEM cells, addressing the creation of carbon-based metal-free catalysts, the development of durable seals, and an effort to understand contaminant adsorption/reaction/transport/performance relationships at low contaminant levels in PEM cells. Two programs addressed barriers in SOFCs; an effort to create a new symmetrical and direct hydrocarbon fuel SOFC designs with greatly increased durability, efficiency, and ease of manufacturing, and an effort to create a multiphysics engineering durability model based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy interpretations that associate the micro-details of how a fuel cell is made and their history of (individual) use with specific prognosis for long term performance, resulting in attendant reductions in design, manufacturing, and maintenance costs and increases in reliability and durability.

  1. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Funding by State: FY 2013, FY 2014, and FY

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulie A.Energyfenske.pdfOctober 28,Department ofFuel Cell2015 |

  2. Development of Fuel-Flexible Combustion Systems Utilizing Opportunity Fuels

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirements Matrix U.S. Department of|ALDeterminationsDepartment ofEfficiency

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Infrastructure Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OFFuels inGoIndianaPennsylvania SchoolPropane

  4. Mapping cost-effective farmland preservation priorities A project funded the USDA NRI Rural Development Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    Mapping cost-effective farmland preservation priorities A project funded the USDA NRI Rural Development Program Project Director: Frank Davis, University of California Santa Barbara Project Staff: David Stoms, Jason Kreitler Project Advisors: Tim Duane, Julie Gustanski, Ralph Heimlich, Dan Press, Peter

  5. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.9 Market Transformation Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research,...

  6. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1.0 Introduction Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 1.0 Introduction Introduction section of the Fuel Cell...

  7. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.7 Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year...

  8. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.5 Manufacturing R&D Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research,...

  9. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Executive Summary Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Executive Summary Executive Summary section of the Fuel Cell Technologies...

  10. Fuel Cells for Transportation - Research and Development: Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research and Development: Program Abstracts Fuel Cells for Transportation - Research and Development: Program Abstracts Remarkable progress has been achieved in the development of...

  11. Development of a Natural Gas-to-Hydrogen Fueling System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    compressors Reliable & cost effective hydrogen fueling system #12;9 Accomplishments > Comprehensive subsystem> Development of a Natural Gas-to- Hydrogen Fueling System DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Merit Review integrator, fuel processing subsystem ­ FuelMaker Corporation > Maker of high-quality high

  12. Materials Development & Fuel Processing Research for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed

    tolerance/ catalyst deactivation Understanding reaction pathways Natural Gas Biofuel Diesel Jet Fuel

  13. Fuel Cell Development Status | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy Frozen Telescope Looks4 Fuel CycleFuel

  14. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Power System Development at PNNL

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Power Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Power S t D l t t PNNL S t D l t t PNNL System Development at PNNL System Development at PNNL Larry Chick Energy Materials...

  15. Ballard fuel cell development for the new energy environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunnison, D.; Smith, D. [Ballard Power Systems, Inc., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada); Torpey, J. [GPU International, Parsippany, NJ (United States)

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ballard Power Systems is the world leader in the development of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. PEM fuel cells use a solid polymer membrane as the electrolyte. These fuel cells are compact and produce powerful electric current relative to their size. PEM fuel cells can deliver higher power density than other types of fuel cells, resulting in reduced cost, weight and volume, and improved performance. The PEM fuel cell is the only fuel cell considered practical for both transportation and stationary applications. Ballard fuel cells are the heart of BGS`s products. The proprietary zero-emission engine converts natural gas, methanol or hydrogen fuel into electricity without combustion.

  16. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Presentation Title

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recent characterization test results - Oxidation kinetics - Irradiation studies - Fuel-clad interactions - Elastic property measurement - Thermal properties - Failure model...

  17. MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY_

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. A. Moore; F. J. Rice; N. E. Woolstenhulme; J-F. Jue; B. H. Park; S. E. Steffler; N. P. Hallinan; M. D. Chapple; M. C. Marshall; B. L. Mackowiak; C. R. Clark; B. H. Rabin

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Full-size/prototypic U10Mo monolithic fuel-foils and aluminum clad fuel plates are being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). These efforts are focused on realizing Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) high density monolithic fuel plates for use in High Performance Research and Test Reactors. The U10Mo fuel foils under development afford a fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort, including application of a zirconium barrier layer on fuel foils, fabrication scale-up efforts, and development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fuel plate clad bonding processes to be discussed include: Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB).

  18. Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Current projects include various catalyst development projects, a system contaminant project, and the manufacturing project. Testing capabilities include but are not limited to single cell fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

  19. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Presentation Title

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy FrozenNovember 10, 2014Energy CycleSiC

  20. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Presentation Title

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy FrozenNovember 10, 2014Energy

  1. Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department of Energy Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P.Fuel CellResearch &

  2. Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Enginesthewith2009Energy Friction and

  3. DOE Issues Request for Information on Fuel Cell Research and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the development of topics for a potential funding opportunity announcement in 2015 for fuel cells and fuel cell systems designed for transportation, as well as stationary and...

  4. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Appendix C: Hydrogen Quality Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan -...

  5. Update on US High Density Fuel Fabrication Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.R. Clark; G.A. Moore; J.F. Jue; B.H. Park; N.P. Hallinan; D.M. Wachs; D.E. Burkes

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Second generation uranium molybdenum fuel has shown excellent in-reactor irradiation performance. This metallic fuel type is capable of being fabricated at much higher loadings than any presently used research reactor fuel. Due to the broad range of fuel types this alloy system encompasses—fuel powder to monolithic foil and binary fuel systems to multiple element additions—significant amounts of research and development have been conducted on the fabrication of these fuels. This paper presents an update of the US RERTR effort to develop fabrication techniques and the fabrication methods used for the RERTR-9A miniplate test.

  6. Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles State of Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Light-Duty Fuel Cell Vehicles State of Development Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) An international race is under way to commercialize fuel cell vehicles (FCVs). The competition is characterized by rapid by taking full advantage of the characteristics and capabilities of fuel cells. But most of the vehicles

  7. CHALLENGES IN DEVELOPMENT AND OPERATION OF MEMS MICROBIAL FUEL CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steckl, Andrew J.

    CHALLENGES IN DEVELOPMENT AND OPERATION OF MEMS MICROBIAL FUEL CELLS A. Fraiwan1 , S. Sundermier1 Microbial Fuel Cells, Micro-sized, Power Density, Limiting Factors INTRODUCTION Microbial fuel cells (MFCs fuel cells (MFCs) have been a major focus for renewable energy production. With the successful

  8. MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION PROCESS DEVELOPMENT AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn A. Moore; Francine J. Rice; Nicolas E. Woolstenhulme; W. David SwanK; DeLon C. Haggard; Jan-Fong Jue; Blair H. Park; Steven E. Steffler; N. Pat Hallinan; Michael D. Chapple; Douglas E. Burkes

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program directed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), UMo fuel-foils are being developed in an effort to realize high density monolithic fuel plates for use in high-flux research and test reactors. Namely, targeted are reactors that are not amenable to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel conversion via utilization of high density dispersion-based fuels, i.e. 8-9 gU/cc. LEU conversion of reactors having a need for >8-9 gU/cc fuel density will only be possible by way of monolithic fuel forms. The UMo fuel foils under development afford fuel meat density of ~16 gU/cc and thus have the potential to facilitate LEU conversions without any significant reactor-performance penalty. Two primary challenges have been established with respect to UMo monolithic fuel development; namely, fuel element fabrication and in-reactor fuel element performance. Both issues are being addressed concurrently at the Idaho National Laboratory. An overview is provided of the ongoing monolithic UMo fuel development effort at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL); including development of complex/graded fuel foils. Fabrication processes to be discussed include: UMo alloying and casting, foil fabrication via hot rolling, fuel-clad interlayer application via co-rolling and thermal spray processes, clad bonding via Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) and Friction Bonding (FB), and fuel plate finishing.

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: fueling infrastructure development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmitted for USMaterialsthe Goal ofco-locating natural

  10. Coated Particle Fuel Development Lab (CPFDL) | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationClean Communities ofCellulosic Feedstock - EnergyCoal2 - MarchCoated

  11. Nitride Fuel Development at the INL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.E. Windes

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for fabricating nitride-based fuels for nuclear applications is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A primary objective of this research is the development of a process that could be operated as an automated or semi-automated technique reducing costs, worker doses, and eventually improving the final product form. To achieve these goals the fabrication process utilizes a new cryo-forming technique to produce microspheres formed from sub-micron oxide powder to improve material handling issues, yield rapid kinetics for conversion to nitrides, and reduced material impurity levels within the nitride compounds. The microspheres are converted to a nitride form within a high temperature particle fluidizing bed using a carbothermic process that utilizes a hydrocarbon – hydrogen - nitrogen gas mixture. A new monitor and control system using differential pressure changes in the fluidizing gas allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor during conversion. This monitor and control system can provide real-time data that is used to control the gas flow rates, temperatures, and gas composition to optimize the fluidization of the particle bed. The small size (0.5 µm) of the oxide powders in the microspheres dramatically increases the kinetics of the conversion process yielding reduced process times and temperatures. Initial studies using surrogate ZrO2 powder have yielded conversion efficiencies of 90 -95 % nitride formation with only small levels of oxide and carbide contaminants present. Further studies are being conducted to determine optimal gas mixture ratios, process time, and temperature range for providing complete conversion to a nitride form.

  12. Modelling and control strategy development for fuel cell electric vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Huei

    Modelling and control strategy development for fuel cell electric vehicles Andreas Schell b , Huei applicable to the development of fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs reserved. Keywords: Fuel cell electric vehicle; Hybrid vehicles; Modelling 1. Introduction Advanced

  13. Development of Sensors for Automotive PEM-based Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    organization #12;4 Sensors for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells - Motivation Sensor Performance and Cost ImprovementsDevelopment of Sensors for Automotive PEM-based Fuel Cells DOE Agreement DE-FC04-02AL67616 Brian FC Series 200 - 50 kW PEM #12;2 Development of Sensors for Automotive PEM-based Fuel Cells ­ Program

  14. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4.0 Systems Analysis Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 4.0 Systems Analysis Systems Analysis section of the Fuel Cell...

  15. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Section 3.0 Technical Plan Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.0 Technical Plan Technical Plan section of the Fuel...

  16. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2.0 Program Benefits Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 2.0 Program Benefits Program Benefits section of the Fuel Cell...

  17. Vision Statement Marketing at Kent State University should consist of centrally developed, well-managed, well-funded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    of centrally developed, well-managed, well-funded and strategically placed image, message support and involvement. The Kent State University "Brand" Marketing research requirements to building brand equity. While terms such as "brand," "branding

  18. Technology Readiness Levels for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Technology Readiness Level (TRL) process is used to quantitatively assess the maturity of a given technology. The TRL process has been developed and successfully used by the Department of Defense (DOD) for development and deployment of new technology and systems for defense applications. In addition, NASA has also successfully used the TRL process to develop and deploy new systems for space applications. Advanced nuclear fuels and materials development is a critical technology needed for closing the nuclear fuel cycle. Because the deployment of a new nuclear fuel forms requires a lengthy and expensive research, development, and demonstration program, applying the TRL concept to the advanced fuel development program is very useful as a management and tracking tool. This report provides definition of the technology readiness level assessment process as defined for use in assessing nuclear fuel technology development for the Advanced Fuel Campaign (AFC).

  19. Subtask 3.4 - Fischer - Tropsch Fuels Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshua Strege; Anthony Snyder; Jason Laumb; Joshua Stanislowski; Michael Swanson

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under Subtask 3.4, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) examined the opportunities and challenges facing Fischerâ??Tropsch (FT) technology in the United States today. Work was completed in two distinct budget periods (BPs). In BP1, the EERC examined the technical feasibility of using modern warm-gas cleanup techniques for FT synthesis. FT synthesis is typically done using more expensive and complex cold-gas sweetening. Warm-gas cleanup could greatly reduce capital and operating costs, making FT synthesis more attractive for domestic fuel production. Syngas was generated from a variety of coal and biomass types; cleaned of sulfur, moisture, and condensables; and then passed over a pilot-scale FT catalyst bed. Laboratory and modeling work done in support of the pilot-scale effort suggested that the catalyst was performing suboptimally with warm-gas cleanup. Long-term trends showed that the catalyst was also quickly deactivating. In BP3, the EERC compared FT catalyst results using warm-gas cleanup to results using cold-gas sweetening. A gas-sweetening absorption system (GSAS) was designed, modeled, and constructed to sweeten syngas between the gasifier and the pilot-scale FT reactor. Results verified that the catalyst performed much better with gas sweetening than it had with warm-gas cleanup. The catalyst also showed no signs of rapid deactivation when the GSAS was running. Laboratory tests in support of this effort verified that the catalyst had deactivated quickly in BP1 because of exposure to syngas, not because of any design flaw with the pilot-scale FT reactor itself. Based on these results, the EERC concludes that the two biggest issues with using syngas treated with warm-gas cleanup for FT synthesis are high concentrations of CO{sub 2} and volatile organic matter. Other catalysts tested by the EERC may be more tolerant of CO{sub 2}, but volatile matter removal is critical to ensuring long-term FT catalyst operation. This subtask was funded through the EERCâ??U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding for BP1 was provided by the North Dakota Industrial Commissionâ??s (NDIC) Renewable Energy Council.

  20. Survey of Postdoctorates at FFRDCs: Final Report [Federally Funded Research and Development Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulrow, Jeri

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2009 FFRDC survey collected the total number of postdocs employed by FFRDCs in the United States—categorized by source of support, citizenship, sex, and field of research—as of October 1, 2009. The universe for the 2009 GSS-FFRDC survey was the Master Government List of Federally Funded Research and Development Centers. The 2009 survey also contacted the NIH’s Intramural Research Program because it employs the largest number of postdocs in the federal government. The FFRDC survey collected data via a web instrument. Topics included the type of support the postdocs received (federal and nonfederal), their sex, citizenship, race/ethnicity, and field of research.

  1. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Hydrogen Delivery Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.2 Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Delivery technical plan section...

  2. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3.6 Technology Validation Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.6 Technology Validation Technology Validation technical...

  3. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3.8 Education and Outreach Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.8 Education and Outreach Education and Outreach...

  4. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preface and Document Revision History Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Preface and Document Revision History Preface and...

  5. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Hydrogen Production Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.1 Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Production technical plan...

  6. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6.0 Program Management Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 6.0 Program Management Program Management section of the...

  7. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5.0 Systems Integration Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 5.0 Systems Integration Systems Integration section of the...

  8. Development of Advanced High Temperature Fuel Cell Membranes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation on Development of Advanced High Temperature Fuel Cell Membranes to the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting held in Arlington, Virginia, May 26,2005.

  9. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Appendix D: Project Evaluation Form Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Appendix D: Project Evaluation Form Appendix D: Project...

  10. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.3 Hydrogen Storage Hydrogen Storage technical plan section of...

  11. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A: Budgetary Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Appendix A: Budgetary Information Appendix A: Budgetary...

  12. Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Car...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace063smith2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel...

  13. Development of Fuel-Flexible Combustion Systems Utilizing Opportunity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    GE Global Research developed and tested new fuel-flexible gas turbine nozzle technology concepts that will enable end users to efficiently generate power and heat from industrial...

  14. Developments in U.S. Alternative Fuel Markets

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The alternative fueled vehicle (AFV)/alternative fuels industry experienced a number of market-related changes in the second half of the 1990s. This article describes each of the alternative transportation fuels and the AFVs in detail. It provides information on the development to date and looks at trends likely to occur in the future.

  15. Metallic Fuel Casting Development and Parameter Optimization Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.S. Fielding; J. Crapps; C. Unal; J.R. Kennedy

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the advantages of metallic fuel is the abilility to cast the fuel slugs to near net shape with little additional processing. However, the high aspect ratio of the fuel is not ideal for casting. EBR-II fuel was cast using counter gravity injection casting (CGIC) but, concerns have been raised concerning the feasibility of this process for americium bearing alloys. The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program has begun developing gravity casting techniques suitable for fuel production. Compared to CGIC gravity casting does not require a large heel that then is recycled, does not require application of a vacuum during melting, and is conducive to re-usable molds. Development has included fabrication of two separate benchscale, approximately 300 grams, systems. To shorten development time computer simulations have been used to ensure mold and crucible designs are feasible and to identify which fluid properties most affect casting behavior and therefore require more characterization.

  16. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development at Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S and Ris National Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    catalyst. The range of fuels has further been extended to include ethanol and coal syn-gas by development of a new coke resistant catalyst suitable for future SOFC technology. CELL DEVELOPMENT AND PRODUCTION

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-COST MANUFACTURING PROCESSES FOR PLANAR, MULTILAYER SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELEMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Harlan Anderson; Tim Armstrong; Michael Cobb; Kirby Meacham; James Stephan; Russell Bennett; Bob Remick; Chuck Sishtla; Scott Barnett; John Lannutti

    2004-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a four-year project, entitled, ''Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'', jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the State of Ohio, and by project participants. The project was led by NexTech Materials, Ltd., with subcontracting support provided by University of Missouri-Rolla, Michael A. Cobb & Co., Advanced Materials Technologies, Inc., Edison Materials Technology Center, Gas Technology Institute, Northwestern University, and The Ohio State University. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, though not formally a subcontractor on the program, supported the effort with separate DOE funding. The objective of the program was to develop advanced manufacturing technologies for making solid oxide fuel cell components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. The program was carried out in three phases. In the Phase I effort, several manufacturing approaches were considered and subjected to detailed assessments of manufacturability and development risk. Estimated manufacturing costs for 5-kW stacks were in the range of $139/kW to $179/kW. The risk assessment identified a number of technical issues that would need to be considered during development. Phase II development work focused on development of planar solid oxide fuel cell elements, using a number of ceramic manufacturing methods, including tape casting, colloidal-spray deposition, screen printing, spin-coating, and sintering. Several processes were successfully established for fabrication of anode-supported, thin-film electrolyte cells, with performance levels at or near the state-of-the-art. The work in Phase III involved scale-up of cell manufacturing methods, development of non-destructive evaluation methods, and comprehensive electrical and electrochemical testing of solid oxide fuel cell materials and components.

  18. Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600 C than conventional manganite or cobaltite cathodes.

  19. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel Development for LWR Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Voit, Stewart L [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept, fabrication, and key feasibility issues of a new fuel form based on the microencapsulated (TRISO-type) fuel which has been specifically engineered for LWR application and compacted within a SiC matrix will be presented. This fuel, the so-called fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel is currently undergoing development as an accident tolerant fuel for potential UO2 replacement in commercial LWRs. While the ability of this fuel to facilitate normal LWR cycle performance is an ongoing effort within the program, this will not be a focus of this paper. Rather, key feasibility and performance aspects of the fuel will be presented including the ability to fabricate a LWR-specific TRISO, the need for and route to a high thermal conductivity and fully dense matrix that contains neutron poisons, and the performance of that matrix under irradiation and the interaction of the fuel with commercial zircaloy clad.

  20. Fuel Cycle Research & Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember U.S.FinancialofFuel Cycle Research & Development

  1. UChicagoTech, the University of Chicago Center for Technology Development & Ventures, launched the Innovation Fund in 2010 to accelerate the commercialization of promising,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    at the University of Chicago. Since 2010, the fund has invested $1.5 millionin a total of 23 projectsacross the University. These projects have received more than $7 millionso far in follow-on funding. Innovation FundUChicagoTech, the University of Chicago Center for Technology Development & Ventures, launched

  2. Development of Fuel Shuffling Module for PHISICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allan Mabe; Andrea Alfonsi; Cristian Rabiti; Aaron Epiney; Michael Lineberry

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PHISICS (Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for the INL Code System) [4] code toolkit has been in development at the Idaho National Laboratory. This package is intended to provide a modern analysis tool for reactor physics investigation. It is designed with the mindset to maximize accuracy for a given availability of computational resources and to give state of the art tools to the modern nuclear engineer. This is obtained by implementing several different algorithms and meshing approaches among which the user will be able to choose, in order to optimize his computational resources and accuracy needs. The software is completely modular in order to simplify the independent development of modules by different teams and future maintenance. The package is coupled with the thermo-hydraulic code RELAP5-3D [3]. In the following the structure of the different PHISICS modules is briefly recalled, focusing on the new shuffling module (SHUFFLE), object of this paper.

  3. Deep-Burn Modular Helium Reactor Fuel Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEachern, D

    2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the workscope, schedule and cost for the technology development tasks needed to satisfy the fuel and fission product transport Design Data Needs (DDNs) for the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), operating in its role of transmuting transuranic (TRU) nuclides in spent fuel discharged from commercial light-water reactors (LWRs). In its application for transmutation, the GT-MHR is referred to as the Deep-Burn MHR (DB-MHR). This Fuel Development Plan (FDP) describes part of the overall program being undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), utilities, and industry to evaluate the use of the GT-MHR to transmute transuranic nuclides from spent nuclear fuel. The Fuel Development Plan (FDP) includes the work on fuel necessary to support the design and licensing of the DB-MHR. The FDP is organized into ten sections. Section 1 provides a summary of the most important features of the plan, including cost and schedule information. Section 2 describes the DB-MHR concept, the features of its fuel and the plan to develop coated particle fuel for transmutation. Section 3 describes the knowledge base for fabrication of coated particles, the experience with irradiation performance of coated particle fuels, the database for fission product transport in HTGR cores, and describes test data and calculations for the performance of coated particle fuel while in a repository. Section 4 presents the fuel performance requirements in terms of as-manufactured quality and performance of the fuel coatings under irradiation and accident conditions. These requirements are provisional because the design of the DB-MHR is in an early stage. However, the requirements are presented in this preliminary form to guide the initial work on the fuel development. Section 4 also presents limits on the irradiation conditions to which the coated particle fuel can be subjected for the core design. These limits are based on past irradiation experience. Section 5 describes the Design Data Needs to: (1) fabricate the coated particle fuel, (2) predict its performance in the reactor core, (3) predict the radionuclide release rates from the reactor core, and (4) predict the performance of spent fuel in a geological repository. The heart of this fuel development plan is Section 6, which describes the development activities proposed to satisfy the DDNs presented in Section 5. The development scope is divided into Fuel Process Development, Fuel Materials Development, Fission Product Transport, and Spent Fuel Disposal. Section 7 describes the facilities to be used. Generally, this program will utilize existing facilities. While some facilities will need to be modified, there is no requirement for major new facilities. Section 8 states the Quality Assurance requirements that will be applied to the development activities. Section 9 presents detailed costs organized by WBS and spread over time. Section 10 presents a list of the types of deliverables that will be prepared in each of the WBS elements. Four Appendices contain supplementary information on: (a) design data needs, (b) the interface with the separations plant, (c) the detailed development schedule, and (d) the detailed cost estimate.

  4. NONDESTRUCTIVE EXAMINATION OF FUEL PLATES FOR THE RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.E. Woolstenhulme; S.C. Taylor; G.A. Moore; D.M. Sterbentz

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fuel is the core component of reactors that is used to produce the neutron flux required for irradiation research purposes as well as commercial power generation. The development of nuclear fuels with low enrichments of uranium is a major endeavor of the RERTR program. In the development of these fuels, the RERTR program uses nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for the purpose of determining the properties of nuclear fuel plate experiments without imparting damage or altering the fuel specimens before they are irradiated in a reactor. The vast range of properties and information about the fuel plates that can be characterized using NDE makes them highly useful for quality assurance and for analyses used in modeling the behavior of the fuel while undergoing irradiation. NDE is also particularly useful for creating a control group for post-irradiation examination comparison. The two major categories of NDE discussed in this paper are X-ray radiography and ultrasonic testing (UT) inspection/evaluation. The radiographic scans are used for the characterization of fuel meat density and homogeneity as well as the determination of fuel location within the cladding. The UT scans are able to characterize indications such as voids, delaminations, inclusions, and other abnormalities in the fuel plates which are generally referred to as debonds as well as to determine the thickness of the cladding using ultrasonic acoustic microscopy methods. Additionally, the UT techniques are now also being applied to in-canal interim examination of fuel experiments undergoing irradiation and the mapping of the fuel plate surface profile to determine fuel swelling. The methods used to carry out these NDE techniques, as well as how they operate and function, are described along with a description of which properties are characterized.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A TURNKEY COMMERCIAL HYDROGEN FUELING STATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the hydrogen fuel economy for buses, fleet vehicles, and ultimately personal vehicles. In order to demonstrate to the reforming of natural gas to produce a reformate stream; · Develop an efficient, cost-effective means the basis for future commercial Fueling Stations. 1 Proceedings of the 2002 U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Review

  6. Technology Commercialization Fund - EERE Commercialization Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fund The Technology Commercialization Fund (TCF) is designed to complement angel investment or early stage corporate product development. The fund totaled nearly 14.3 million in...

  7. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Appendix B: InputOutput Matrix Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Appendix B: InputOutput Matrix Appendix B: InputOutput...

  8. Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Car...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Small Car Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Car Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine...

  9. 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report offers examples of real-world applications and technical progress of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies, including policies adopted by countries to increase technology development and com

  10. Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (R&D) Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D) Programs Focus Area: Hydrogen...

  11. FULL SIZE U-10MO MONOLITHIC FUEL FOIL AND FUEL PLATE FABRICATION-TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. A. Moore; J-F Jue; B. H. Rabin; M. J. Nilles

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Full-size U10Mo foils are being developed for use in high density LEU monolithic fuel plates. The application of a zirconium barrier layer too the foil is applied using a hot co-rolling process. Aluminum clad fuel plates are fabricated using Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) or a Friction Bonding (FB) process. An overview is provided of ongoing technology development activities, including: the co-rolling process, foil shearing/slitting and polishing, cladding bonding processes, plate forming, plate-assembly swaging, and fuel plate characterization. Characterization techniques being employed include, Ultrasonic Testing (UT), radiography, and microscopy.

  12. Dual fuel development for an LNG marine engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acker, G.H.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dual-fuel conversion for the 3406-B Caterpillar marine diesel engine has been developed. The purpose of this conversion is to use lower priced natural gas as a fuel, thus providing substantial cost savings for large fuel consumers. Details of the conversion system are given. Data is presented showing fuel consumption, conditions leading to engine knock, conditions promoting methane flame propagation, and air-fuel ratios required for efficient combustion. The system resulting from this study will use Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) to power a dual-fuel conversion of a shrimp boat's main engine and generator set. The cold temperatures of the LNG will also be used as a heat sink to refrigerate the fish-hold area of the boat.

  13. A review of nuclear fuel cycle options for developing nations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, R.K.; Scopatz, A.M.; Ernesti, M. [The University of Texas at Austin, Pickle Research Campus, Building 159, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of several nuclear reactor and fuel cycle options for developing nations was performed. All reactor choices were considered under a GNEP framework. Two advanced alternative reactor types, a nuclear battery-type reactor and a fuel reprocessing fast reactor were examined and compared with a conventional Generation III+ LWR reactor. The burn of nuclear fuel was simulated using ORIGEN 2.2 for each reactor type and the resulting information was used to compare the options in terms of waste produced, waste quality and repository impact. The ORIGEN data was also used to evaluate the economics of the fuel cycles using unit costs, discount rates and present value functions with the material balances. The comparison of the fuel cycles and reactors developed in this work provides a basis for the evaluation of subsidy programs and cost-benefit comparisons for various reactor parameters such as repository impact and proliferation risk versus economic considerations. (authors)

  14. Enterprise Fund (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Kentucky Enterprise Fund (KEF) is a state-sponsored, venture capital-like fund that invests in Kentucky-based seed and early stage technology companies. KEF supports the development of...

  15. LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haberman, Ben; Martinez-Baca, Carlos; Rush, Greg

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of the work performed by LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. during the project LG Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Model Development (DOE Award Number: DE-FE0000773) which commenced on October 1, 2009 and was completed on March 31, 2013. The aim of this project is for LG Fuel Cell Systems Inc. (formerly known as Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc.) (?LGFCS?) to develop a multi-physics solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) computer code (MPC) for performance calculations of the LGFCS fuel cell structure to support fuel cell product design and development. A summary of the initial stages of the project is provided which describes the MPC requirements that were developed and the selection of a candidate code, STAR-CCM+ (CD-adapco). This is followed by a detailed description of the subsequent work program including code enhancement and model verification and validation activities. Details of the code enhancements that were implemented to facilitate MPC SOFC simulations are provided along with a description of the models that were built using the MPC and validated against experimental data. The modeling work described in this report represents a level of calculation detail that has not been previously available within LGFCS.

  16. Development of an External Fuel Processor for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel Birmingham; Crispin Debellis; Mark Perna; Anant Upadhyayula

    2008-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A 250 kW External Fuel Processor was developed and tested that will supply the gases needed by a pipeline natural gas fueled, solid oxide fuel cell during all modes of operation. The fuel processor consists of three major subsystems--a desulfurizer to remove fuel sulfur to an acceptable level, a synthesis gas generator to support plant heat-up and low load fuel cell operations, and a start gas generator to supply a non-flammable, reducing gas to the fuel cell during startup and shutdown operations. The desulfurization subsystem uses a selective catalytic sulfur oxidation process that was developed for operation at elevated pressure and removes the fuel sulfur to a total sulfur content of less than 80 ppbv. The synthesis gas generation subsystem uses a waterless, catalytic partial oxidation reactor to produce a hydrogen-rich mixture from the natural gas and air. An operating window was defined that allows carbon-free operation while maintaining catalyst temperatures that will ensure long-life of the reactor. The start gas subsystem generates an oxygen-free, reducing gas from the pipeline natural gas using a low-temperature combustion technique. These physically and thermally integrated subsystems comprise the 250 kW External Fuel Processor. The 250 kW External Fuel Processor was tested at the Rolls-Royce facility in North Canton, Ohio to verify process performance and for comparison with design specifications. A step wise operation of the automatic controls through the startup, normal operation and shutdown sequences allowed the control system to be tuned and verified. A fully automated system was achieved that brings the fuel processor through its startup procedure, and then await commands from the fuel cell generator module for fuel supply and shutdown. The fuel processor performance met all design specifications. The 250 kW External Fuel Processor was shipped to an American Electric Power site where it will be tested with a Rolls-Royce solid oxide fuel cell generator module.

  17. Coal-fueled diesel technology development: Nozzle development for coal-fueled diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.N.; Lee, M.; White, R.A.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct injection of a micronized coal water mixture fuel into the combustion chambers of a diesel engine requires atomizing an abrasive slurry fuel with accurately sized orifices. Five injector orifice materials were evaluated: diamond compacts, chemical vapor deposited diamond tubes, thermally stabilized diamond, tungsten carbide with cobalt binder, and tungsten carbide with nickel binder with brazed and mechanically mounted orifice inserts. Nozzle bodies were fabricated of Armco 17-4 precipitation hardening stainless steel and Stellite 6B in order to withstand cyclic injection pressures and elevated temperatures. Based on a total of approximately 200 cylinder hours of engine operation with coal water mixture fuel diamond compacts were chosen for the orifice material.

  18. U.S. Department of Energy-Funded Performance Validation of Fuel Cell Material Handling Equipment (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This webinar presentation to the UK Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association summarizes how the U.S. Department of Energy is enabling early fuel cell markets; describes objectives of the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center; and presents performance status of fuel cell material handling equipment.

  19. Pellet Fueling Technology Development Leading to Efficient Fueling of ITER Burning Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Jernigan, Thomas C [ORNL; Houlberg, Wayne A [ORNL; Maruyama, S. [ITER International Team, Garching, Germany; Owen, Larry W [ORNL; Parks, P. B. [General Atomics; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pellet injection is the primary fueling technique planned for central fueling of the ITER burning plasma, which is a requirement for achieving high fusion gain. Injection of pellets from the inner wall has been shown on present day tokamaks to provide efficient fueling and is planned for use on ITER [1,2]. Significant development of pellet fueling technology has occurred as a result of the ITER R&D process. Extrusion rates with batch extruders have reached more than 1/2 of the ITER design specification of 1.3 cm3/s [3] and the ability to fuel efficiently from the inner wall by injecting through curved guide tubes has been demonstrated on several fusion devices. Modeling of the fueling deposition from inner wall pellet injection has been done using the Parks et al. ExB drift model [4] shows that inside launched pellets of 3mm size and speeds of 300 m/s have the capability to fuel well inside the separatrix. Gas fueling on the other hand is calculated to have very poor fueling efficiency due to the high density and wide scrape off layer compared to current machines. Isotopically mixed D/T pellets can provide efficient tritium fueling that will minimize tritium wall loading when compared to gas puffing of tritium. In addition, the use of pellets as an ELM trigger has been demonstrated and continues to be investigated as an ELM mitigation technique. During the ITER CDA and EDA the U.S. was responsible for ITER fueling system design and R&D and is in good position to resume this role for the ITER pellet fueling system. Currently the performance of the ITER guide tube design is under investigation. A mockup is being built that will allow tests with different pellet sizes and repetition rates. The results of these tests and their implication for fueling efficiency and central fueling will be discussed. The ITER pellet injection technology developments to date, specified requirements, and remaining development issues will be presented along with a plan to reach the design goal in time for employment on ITER.

  20. Oklahoma Opportunity Fund (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oklahoma Opportunity Fund was established to promote economic development and related infrastructure development. Eligible applicants are for-profit entities; non-profit entities; and state and...

  1. Development of Green Fuels From Algae - The University of Tulsa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crunkleton, Daniel; Price, Geoffrey; Johannes, Tyler; Cremaschi, Selen

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The general public has become increasingly aware of the pitfalls encountered with the continued reliance on fossil fuels in the industrialized world. In response, the scientific community is in the process of developing non-fossil fuel technologies that can supply adequate energy while also being environmentally friendly. In this project, we concentrate on â??green fuelsâ?ť which we define as those capable of being produced from renewable and sustainable resources in a way that is compatible with the current transportation fuel infrastructure. One route to green fuels that has received relatively little attention begins with algae as a feedstock. Algae are a diverse group of aquatic, photosynthetic organisms, generally categorized as either macroalgae (i.e. seaweed) or microalgae. Microalgae constitute a spectacularly diverse group of prokaryotic and eukaryotic unicellular organisms and account for approximately 50% of global organic carbon fixation. The PIâ??s have subdivided the proposed research program into three main research areas, all of which are essential to the development of commercially viable algae fuels compatible with current energy infrastructure. In the fuel development focus, catalytic cracking reactions of algae oils is optimized. In the species development project, genetic engineering is used to create microalgae strains that are capable of high-level hydrocarbon production. For the modeling effort, the construction of multi-scaled models of algae production was prioritized, including integrating small-scale hydrodynamic models of algae production and reactor design and large-scale design optimization models.

  2. Recent Developments in Mems-Based Micro Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pichonat, T

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Micro fuel cells ($\\mu$-FC) represent promising power sources for portable applications. Today, one of the technological ways to make $\\mu$-FC is to have recourse to standard microfabrication techniques used in the fabrication of micro electromechanical systems (MEMS). This paper shows an overview on the applications of MEMS techniques on miniature FC by presenting several solutions developed throughout the world. It also describes the latest developments of a new porous silicon-based miniature fuel cell. Using a silane grafted on an inorganic porous media as the proton-exchange membrane instead of a common ionomer such as Nafion, the fuel cell achieved a maximum power density of 58 mW cm-2 at room temperature with hydrogen as fuel.

  3. DOE Funds 21 Research, Development and Demonstration Projects for up to $78

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgram |DOE Exercises Option for5 DOE3AofFuelMillion

  4. Energy Secretary Bodman Announces $119 Million in Funding and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    119 Million in Funding and Roadmap to Advance Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles Energy Secretary Bodman Announces 119 Million in Funding and Roadmap to Advance Hydrogen Fuel Cell...

  5. AVAILABLE NOW! Biomass Funding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AVAILABLE NOW! Biomass Funding Guide 2010 The Forestry Commission and the Humber Rural Partnership (co-ordinated by East Riding of Yorkshire Council) have jointly produced a biomass funding guide fuel prices continue to rise, and the emerging biomass sector is well-placed to make a significant

  6. Energy Department Announces Funding to Develop "Plug-and-Play" Solar

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTanklessDOJ TitleDr. StevenSolar Power |

  7. Secretary Chu Announces Up To $55 Million in Funding to Develop Advanced

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolvingPerformanceIndustrial| Department

  8. DOE Funds Advanced Magnet Lab and NREL to Develop Next-Generation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgram |DOE Exercises Option for5

  9. Upcoming Funding Opportunity to Develop and Field Test Wind Energy Bat

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: AlternativeEnvironment,Institutes and1TeleworkAgricultureAbout Us » News » UpcomingImpact

  10. Development of an engine fuel and spark controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suter, William Gregory

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was to develop an engine control unit (ECU) for a four cylinder engine to be used in a Formula SAE racers. The ECU must provide effective fuel injection and spark ignition control and provide for easy adjustment...

  11. RECENT DEVELOPMENT IN TEM CHARACTERIZATION OF IRRADIATED RERTR FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Gan; B.D. Miller; D.D. Keiser Jr.; A.B. Robinson; J.W. Madden; P.G. Medvedev; D.M. Wachs

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent development on TEM work of irradiated RERTR fuels includes microstructural characterization of the irradiated U-10Mo/alloy-6061 monolithic fuel plate, the RERTR-7 U-7Mo/Al-2Si and U-7Mo/Al-5Si dispersion fuel plates. It is the first time that a TEM sample of an irradiated nuclear fuel was prepared using the focused-ion-beam (FIB) lift-out technical at the Idaho National Laboratory. Multiple FIB TEM samples were prepared from the areas of interest in a SEM sample. The characterization was carried out using a 200kV TEM with a LaB6 filament. The three dimensional orderings of nanometer-sized fission gas bubbles are observed in the crystalline region of the U-Mo fuel. The co-existence of bubble superlattice and dislocations is evident. Detailed microstructural information along with composition analysis is obtained. The results and their implication on the performance of these fuels are discussed.

  12. High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenhalgh, M.L. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Caterpillar shares DOE/METC interest in demonstrating the technology required to displace petroleum-based engine fuels with various forms of low cost coal. Current DOE/METC programs on mild gasification and coal-water-slurries are addressing two approaches to this end. Engine and fuel processor system concept studies by Caterpillar have identified a third, potentially promising, option. This option includes high-pressure fuel processing of run-of-the-mine coal and direct injection of the resulting low-Btu gas stream into an ignition assisted, high compression ratio diesel engine. The compactness and predicted efficiency of the system make it suitable for application to line-haul railroad locomotives. Two overall conclusions resulted from Task 1. First direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risk associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept. The significant conclusions from Task 2 were: An engine concept, derived from a Caterpillar 3600 series engine, and a fuel processor concept, based on scaling up a removable-canister configuration from the test rig, appear feasible; and although the results of this concept study are encouraging, further, full-scale component research and development are required before attempting a full-scale integrated system demonstration effort.

  13. 160 C PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE (PEM) FUEL CELL SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.G. Marianowski

    2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this program were: (a) to develop and demonstrate a new polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system that operates up to 160 C temperatures and at ambient pressures for stationary power applications, and (b) to determine if the GTI-molded composite graphite bipolar separator plate could provide long term operational stability at 160 C or higher. There are many reasons that fuel cell research has been receiving much attention. Fuel cells represent environmentally friendly and efficient sources of electrical power generation that could use a variety of fuel sources. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI), formerly Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), is focused on distributed energy stationary power generation systems. Currently the preferred method for hydrogen production for stationary power systems is conversion of natural gas, which has a vast distribution system in place. However, in the conversion of natural gas into a hydrogen-rich fuel, traces of carbon monoxide are produced. Carbon monoxide present in the fuel gas will in time cumulatively poison, or passivate the active platinum catalysts used in the anodes of PEMFC's operating at temperatures of 60 to 80 C. Various fuel processors have incorporated systems to reduce the carbon monoxide to levels below 10 ppm, but these require additional catalytic section(s) with sensors and controls for effective carbon monoxide control. These CO cleanup systems must also function especially well during transient load operation where CO can spike 300% or more. One way to circumvent the carbon monoxide problem is to operate the fuel cell at a higher temperature where carbon monoxide cannot easily adsorb onto the catalyst and poison it. Commercially available polymer membranes such as Nafion{trademark} are not capable of operation at temperatures sufficiently high to prevent this. Hence this project investigated a new polymer membrane alternative to Nafion{trademark} that is capable of operation at temperatures up to 160 C.

  14. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development at Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S and Ris N. Christiansen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development at Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S and Risř N. Christiansen1 , J. Hansen2 , H. Holm-Larsen1 , S. Linderoth3 , P. Larsen3 , P. Hendriksen3 , M. Mogensen3 1 Topsře Fuel Cell A Background Topsoe Fuel Cell A/S (TOFC) and Risř National Laboratory (Risř) are jointly carrying out

  15. Development of an SI DI Ethanol Optimized Flex Fuel Engine Using...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Development of an SI DI Ethanol Optimized Flex Fuel Engine Using Advanced Valvetrain Development of an SI DI Ethanol Optimized Flex Fuel Engine Using Advanced Valvetrain...

  16. Coal-fueled diesel: Technology development: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, G.; Hsu, B.; Flynn, P.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project consisted of four tasks: (1) to determine if CWM could be ignited and burned rapidly enough for operation in a 1000-rpm diesel engine, (2) to demonstrate that a durable CWM-fueled engine could in principle be developed, (3) to assess current emissions control technology to determine the feasibility of cleaning the exhaust of a CWM-fueled diesel locomotive, and (4) to conduct an economic analysis to determine the attractiveness of powering US locomotives with CWM. 34 refs., 125 figs., 28 tabs.

  17. Draft Funding Opportunity Announcement Research and Development of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are a critical component of the fuel cell stack and must be durable and tolerate a wide range of operating's humidity requirements add complexity to the fuel cell system that impacts the system cost and durability Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells for the Hydrogen Economy The Department of Energy (DOE) is planning to issue

  18. DOE Funds 15 New Projects to Develop Solar Power Storage and Heat Transfer

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe HouseStudents2.2at Multipleorder supplies or Department2013 |Projects For Up

  19. DOE Funds 21 Research, Development and Demonstration Projects for up to $78

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe HouseStudents2.2at Multipleorder supplies or Department2013 |Projects For

  20. Secretary Chu Announces Up to $55 Million in Funding to Develop Advanced

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September2-SCORECARD-01-24-13 PageUraniumDepartment ofofFederalCarbon Capture

  1. Obama Administration Announces $14.2 Million in New Funding to Develop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJaredOakscience-based,OHA FOIA

  2. Ohio State Develops Game-Changing CO2 Capture Membranes in DOE-Funded

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergy General Law (GC-56)The U.S. Department of

  3. Development of a Fuel Containing Material Removal and Waste Management Strategy for the Chernobyl Unit 4 Shelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokarevsky, V. V.; Shibetsky, Y. A.; Leister, P.; Davison, W. R.; Follin, J. F.; McNair, J.; Lins, W.; Edler, G.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was performed to develop a strategy for the removal of fuel-containing material (FCM) from the Chernobyl Unit 4 Shelter and for the related waste management. This study was performed during Phase 1 of the Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP) and was funded by the Chernobyl Shelter Fund. The main objective for Phase 2 of the SIP is to stabilize the Shelter and to construct a New Confinement (NC) by the year 2007. In addition, the SIP includes studies on the strategy and on the conceptual design implications of the removal of FCM from the Shelter. This is considered essential for the ultimate goal, the transformation of the Shelter into an environmentally safe system.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for space and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. The carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electrocatalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decrease the cell performance. This irreversible poisoning of the anode can happen even in CO concentrations as low as few ppm, and therefore, require expensive scrubbing of the H{sub 2}-fuel to reduce the contaminant concentration to acceptable level. In order to commercialize this environmentally sound source of energy/power system, development of suitable CO-tolerant catalyst is needed. In this work, we have synthesized several novel electrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell. The concentration of CO in the H{sub 2} fuel varied from 10 ppm to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effect of temperature, catalyst compositions, and electrode film preparation methods on the performance of PEM fuel cell has also been studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalysts (10 wt % Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt % Pt/Mo/C) were more CO-tolerant than 20 wt % Pt catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method is better for the preparation of electrode film than the brushing technique. Some of these results are summarized in this report.

  5. City of Columbus- Green Columbus Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Green Columbus Fund incentivizes sustainable development and redevelopment in Columbus, Ohio. The Fund reimburses private and non-profit developers the application fee for the Green Building...

  6. Development of alternate extractant systems for fast reactor fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasudeva Rao, P.R.; Suresh, A.; Venkatesan, K.A.; Srinivasan, T.G.; Raj, Baldev [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam - 603 102 (India)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the limitations of TBP in processing of high burn-up, Pu-rich fast reactor fuels, there is a need to develop alternate extractants for fast reactor fuel processing. In this context, our Centre has been examining the suitability of alternate tri-alkyl phosphates. Third phase formation in the extraction of Th(IV) by TBP, tri-n-amyl phosphate (TAP) and tri-2-methyl-butyl phosphate (T2MBP) from nitric acid media has been investigated under various conditions to derive conclusions on their application for extraction of Pu at macro levels. The chemical and radiolytic degradation of tri-n-amyl-phosphate (TAP) diluted in normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) in the presence of nitric acid has been investigated by the measurement of plutonium retention in organic phase. The potential application of room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) for reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been explored. Extraction of uranium (VI) and palladium (II) from nitric acid medium by commercially available RTIL and tri-n-butyl phosphate solution in RTIL have been studied and the feasibility of electrodeposition of uranium as uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) and palladium (II) as metallic palladium from the loaded organic phase have been demonstrated. This paper describes results of the above studies and discusses the suitability of the systems for fast reactor fuel reprocessing. (authors)

  7. Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Cars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The General Motors and DOE cooperative agreement program DE-EE0003379 is completed. The program has integrated and demonstrated a lean-stratified gasoline engine, a lean aftertreatment system, a 12V Stop/Start system and an Active Thermal Management system along with the necessary controls that significantly improves fuel efficiency for small cars. The fuel economy objective of an increase of 25% over a 2010 Chevrolet Malibu and the emission objective of EPA T2B2 compliance have been accomplished. A brief review of the program, summarized from the narrative is: The program accelerates development and synergistic integration of four cost competitive technologies to improve fuel economy of a light-duty vehicle by at least 25% while meeting Tier 2 Bin 2 emissions standards. These technologies can be broadly implemented across the U.S. light-duty vehicle product line between 2015 and 2025 and are compatible with future and renewable biofuels. The technologies in this program are: lean combustion, innovative passive selective catalyst reduction lean aftertreatment, 12V stop/start and active thermal management. The technologies will be calibrated in a 2010 Chevrolet Malibu mid-size sedan for final fuel economy demonstration.

  8. Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

  9. Development of Metric for Measuring the Impact of RD&D Funding on GTO's Geothermal Exploration Goals (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenne, S.; Young, K. R.; Thorsteinsson, H.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. In 2012, NREL was tasked with developing a metric to measure the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration and cost and time improvements could be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway:Geothermal). The conference paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open EI website for public access (http://en.openei.org).

  10. Development of 50 kW Fuel Processor for Stationary Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James F. Stevens; Balaji Krishnamurthy; Paolina Atanassova; Kerry Spilker

    2007-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the project was to develop and test a fuel processor capable of producing high hydrogen concentration (>98%) with less than ppm quantities of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide at lower capital cost and higher efficiency, compared to conventional natural gas reformers. It was intended that we achieve our objective by developing simple reactor/process design, and high durability CO2 absorbents, to replace pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or membrane separators. Cost analysis indicated that we would not meet DOE cost goals so the project was terminated before construction of the full scale fuel processor. The work on adsorbent development was focused on the development of calcium oxide-based reversible CO2 absorbents with various microstructures and morphologies to determine the optimum microstructure for long-term reversible CO2 absorption. The effect of powder production process variables was systematically studied including: the final target compositions, the reagents from which the final products were derived, the pore forming additives, the processing time and temperature. The sorbent materials were characterized in terms of their performance in the reversible reaction with CO2 and correlation made to their microstructure.

  11. Development of biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamrick, J T [Aerospace Research Corp., Roanoke, VA (USA)

    1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program to develop biomass as an alternative fuel for gas turbines was started at Aerospace Research Corporation in 1980. The research culminated in construction and installation of a power generation system using an Allison T-56 gas turbine at Red Boiling Springs, Tennessee. The system has been successfully operated with delivery of power to the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). Emissions from the system meet or exceed EPA requirements. No erosion of the turbine has been detected in over 760 hours of operation, 106 of which were on line generating power for the TVA. It was necessary to limit the turbine inlet temperature to 1450{degrees}F to control the rate of ash deposition on the turbine blades and stators and facilitate periodic cleaning of these components. Results of tests by researchers at Battelle Memorial Institute -- Columbus Division, give promise that deposits on the turbine blades, which must be periodically removed with milled walnut hulls, can be eliminated with addition of lime to the fuel. Operational problems, which are centered primarily around the feed system and engine configuration, have been adequately identified and can be corrected in an upgraded design. The system is now ready for development of a commercial version. The US Department of Energy (DOE) provided support only for the evaluation of wood as an alternative fuel for gas turbines. However, the system appears to have high potential for integration into a hybrid system for the production of ethanol from sorghum or sugar cane. 7 refs., 23 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- 3.4 Fuel Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fuel Cells technical plan section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated November 2014. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  13. Development of a co-firing fuel from biomass-derived binder and crushed coal.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friend, Andrew

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The focus of this work was the development of a co-firing boiler fuel for use in the coal power plant industry. This fuel, known as… (more)

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - agr fuel development Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FUEL CELL Summary: Close this window print this page MATSUSHITA BATTERY DEVELOPS NEW MICRO FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGY... ), a subsidiary of Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd....

  15. Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J

    2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and do-decane which are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For the cycloalkanes, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multidimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real diesel, the inclusion of higher molecular weight components is needed in models and experimental investigations.

  16. Recent Progress in the Development of Diesel Surrogate Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Mueller, C J

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been much recent progress in the area of surrogate fuels for diesel. In the last few years, experiments and modeling have been performed on higher molecular weight components of relevance to diesel fuel such as n-hexadecane (n-cetane) and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (iso-cetane). Chemical kinetic models have been developed for all the n-alkanes up to 16 carbon atoms. Also, there has been much experimental and modeling work on lower molecular weight surrogate components such as n-decane and n-dodecane that are most relevant to jet fuel surrogates, but are also relevant to diesel surrogates where simulation of the full boiling point range is desired. For two-ring compounds, experimental work on decalin and tetralin recently has been published. For multi-component surrogate fuel mixtures, recent work on modeling of these mixtures and comparisons to real diesel fuel is reviewed. Detailed chemical kinetic models for surrogate fuels are very large in size. Significant progress also has been made in improving the mechanism reduction tools that are needed to make these large models practicable in multi-dimensional reacting flow simulations of diesel combustion. Nevertheless, major research gaps remain. In the case of iso-alkanes, there are experiments and modeling work on only one of relevance to diesel: iso-cetane. Also, the iso-alkanes in diesel are lightly branched and no detailed chemical kinetic models or experimental investigations are available for such compounds. More components are needed to fill out the iso-alkane boiling point range. For the aromatic class of compounds, there has been no new work for compounds in the boiling point range of diesel. Most of the new work has been on alkyl aromatics that are of the range C7 to C8, below the C10 to C20 range that is needed. For the chemical class of cycloalkanes, experiments and modeling on higher molecular weight components are warranted. Finally for multi-component surrogates needed to treat real diesel, the inclusion of higher molecular weight components is needed in models and experimental investigations.

  17. Nuclear fuel cycles for mid-century development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parent, Etienne, 1977-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative analysis of nuclear fuel cycles was carried out. Fuel cycles reviewed include: once-through fuel cycles in LWRs, PHWRs, HTGRs, and fast gas cooled breed and burn reactors; single-pass recycle schemes: plutonium ...

  18. Catalysts and materials development for fuel cell power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiss, Steven E

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic processing of fuels was explored in this thesis for both low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell as well as high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Novel catalysts were ...

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onAlternativeConnecticut Information toDist.Electricity

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter J. Tijrn

    2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report for Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-95PC93052, the ''Development of Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas,'' was prepared by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products), and covers activities from 29 December 1994 through 31 July 2002. The overall objectives of this program were to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture primarily of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at the LaPorte, Texas Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). Laboratory work was performed by Air Products and a variety of subcontractors, and focused on the study of the kinetics of production of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, the production of DME using the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) Process, the conversion of DME to fuels and chemicals, and the production of other higher value products from syngas. Four operating campaigns were performed at the AFDU during the performance period. Tests of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process and the LPDME{trademark} Process were made to confirm results from the laboratory program and to allow for the study of the hydrodynamics of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) at a significant engineering scale. Two campaigns demonstrated the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon products via the slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. Other topics that were studied within this program include the economics of production of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), the identification of trace components in coal-derived syngas and the means to economically remove these species, and the study of systems for separation of wax from catalyst in the F-T process. The work performed under this Cooperative Agreement has continued to promote the development of technologies that use clean syngas produced from any one of a variety of sources (including coal) for the production of a spectrum of alternative fuels (hydrocarbons and oxygenate fuels), octane enhancers, and chemicals and chemical intermediates. In particular, the data from the 1995 LPMEOH{trademark} campaign provided confirmation of assumptions used in the design of the catalyst reduction system at the Kingsport LPMEOH{trademark} Commercial Demonstration Project, and the alternate methanol catalyst has been in use there since late 1998. The kinetic model was also expanded to allow for more accurate prediction of methanol production and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) conversion, and more accurate modeling of by-product formation for the alternate methanol catalyst. The outstanding performance results of the LPMEOH{trademark} Process at Kingsport can be attributed in large part to the body of work performed since 1981 in collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products. In addition, a pilot-plant-tested LPDME{trademark} Process has been demonstrated, and the product cost of DME from coal-derived syngas can be competitive in certain locations and applications. The need for liquid fuels will continue to be a critical concern for this nation in the 21st century. Efforts are needed to ensure the development and demonstration of economically competitive, efficient, environmentally responsible technologies that produce clean fuels and chemicals from coal under DOE's Vision 21 concept. These liquids will be a component of the fuel mix that will provide the transition from the current reliance on carbon-based fuels to the ultimate use of H{sub 2} as a means of energy transport. Indirect liquefaction, which converts the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) produced by the gasification of coal to sulfur- and nitrogen-free liquid products, is a key component of the Vision 21 initiative. The results from this current program provide continued support to the objectives for the conversion of domestic coal to electric power and co-produced clean liquid fuels and chemicals in an environmentally superior manner.

  1. Development of fission gas swelling and release models for metallic nuclear fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Nathan Christopher

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel swelling and fission gas generation for fast reactor fuels are of high importance since they are among the main limiting factors in the development of metallic fast reactor fuel. Five new fission gas and swelling ...

  2. Used fuel disposition research and development roadmap - FY10 status.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, W. M. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1987 the U.S. has focused research and development activities relevant to the disposal of commercial used nuclear fuel and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel and high level waste on the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. At the same time, the U.S. successfully deployed a deep geologic disposal facility for defense-related transuranic waste in bedded salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In 2009 the DOE established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the Office of Nuclear Energy. The Mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. national laboratories have participated on these programs and has conducted research and development related to these issues to a limited extent. However, a comprehensive research and development (R&D) program investigating a variety of geologic media has not been a part of the U.S. waste management program since the mid 1980s. Such a comprehensive R&D program is being developed in the UFDC with a goal of meeting the UFDC Grand Challenge to provide a sound technical basis for absolute confidence in the safety and security of long-term storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes from the nuclear energy enterprise. The DOE has decided to no longer pursue the development of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since a repository site will ultimately have to be selected, sited, characterized, designed, and licensed, other disposal options must now be considered. In addition to the unsaturated volcanic tuff evaluated at Yucca Mountain, several different geologic media are under investigation internationally and preliminary assessments indicate that disposal of used nuclear fuel and high level waste in these media is feasible. Considerable progress has been made in the U.S. and other nations in understanding disposal concepts in different geologic media, but gaps in knowledge still exist. A principal aspect of concern to the UFDC as it considers the broad issues of siting a repository in different geologic media are the marked differences in the regulatory bases for assessing suitability and safety of a repository between the U.S. and other nations. Because the probability based - risked informed nature of the current U.S. regulations for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel is sufficiently different from other regulations, information gained in previous studies, while useful, likely need to be supplemented to enable more convincing communication with the public, better defense of the numerical models, and stronger safety cases. Thus, it was recognized when the UFDC was established that there were readily identified disposal-related R&D opportunities to address knowledge gaps. An effort to document these research opportunities was a key component of Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 engineered system, natural system, and system-level modeling activities for a range of disposal environments. A principal contribution to identifying these gaps was a workshop held to gather perspectives from experts both within and external to the UFDC regarding R&D opportunities. In the planning for FY2010 it was expected that these activities would culminate with a UFDC research and development roadmap that would identify the knowledge gaps, discuss the R&D needed to fill these gaps, and prioritize the proposed R&D over both the near- and long-term. A number of knowledge gaps and needed R&D were identified and are discussed in this report. However, these preliminary R&D topics have not been evaluated in detail nor have they been prioritized to support future planning efforts. This will be completed in FY11 and the final UFDC Research and Development Roadmap will be completed. This report discusses proposed R&D topics in three areas related to repository siting, design, and performance: natural systems

  3. Development of Nano-crystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hai Xiao; Junhang Dong; Jerry Lin; Van Romero

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a final technical report for the first project year from July 1, 2005 to Jan 31, 2012 for DoE/NETL funded project â??DE-FC26-05NT42439: Development of Nanocrystalline Doped-Ceramic Enabled Fiber Sensors for High Temperature In-Situ Monitoring of Fossil Fuel Gases.â?ť This report summarizes the technical progresses and achievements towards the development of novel nanocrystalline doped ceramic material-enabled optical fiber sensors for in situ and real time monitoring the gas composition of flue or hot gas streams involved in fossil-fuel based power generation and hydrogen production.

  4. International symposium on fuel rod simulators: development and application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCulloch, R.W. (comp.)

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning fuel rod simulator operation and performance; simulator design and evaluation; clad heated fuel rod simulators and fuel rod simulators for cladding investigations; fuel rod simulator components and inspection; and simulator analytical modeling. Ten papers have previously been input to the Energy Data Base.

  5. Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /DOE Reversible Fuel Cell Workshop 5 Proton OnSite · Manufacturer of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen Fuel Cell Workshop PEM Cell Stacks Complete Systems 6 Proton Capabilities · Complete product/DOE Reversible Fuel Cell Workshop 9 PEM Fuel Cell & Electrolysis · Humidified gas streams vs. liquid water

  6. Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vermont Sustainable Job Fund offers grants, loans, and technical assistance. VSJF's grant-making depends on the funds it raised and its strategic market development focus. Grant proposals are...

  7. Hydrogen Fuel Quality - Focus: Analytical Methods Development & Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Groundto ApplyRoadmap HydrogenHydrogen Fuel CellFuel

  8. Financing alternative development through double bottom line private equity funds & a real estate social investment framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Jeffrey Elliot

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The post-WWII period has seen a radical change in the growth patterns and composition of American cities, as a decentralized form of real estate development, conventional development, has become the dominant real estate ...

  9. Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Car

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington,LM-04-XXXXLocated and Methane

  10. Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent CompanyaUSAMP AMDHeavy Duty Trucks | Department ofof

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A RENEWABLE HYDROGEN PRODUCITON AND FUEL CELL EDUCATION

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebratePartners withof Energy NONEXCLUSIVEDEPARTMENT

  12. Fuel Cell Economic Development Plan Hydrogen Roadmap | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URIFrontier, North Dakota: EnergyInformation

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWayElectricity Fuel BasicsProduction and Distribution

  14. Funding for IGPPS Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note:Computing |FuelsFunding available for

  15. SBIR/STTR Release 2 Funding Opportunity Deadline December 15...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SBIRSTTR Release 2 Funding Opportunity Deadline December 15-Includes Hydrogen and Fuel Cells SBIRSTTR Release 2 Funding Opportunity Deadline December 15-Includes Hydrogen and...

  16. Ambient Laboratory Coater for Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane D. Bruns; Robert M. Counce; Irma D. Lima Rojas

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    this research is targeted at developing improved experimentally-based scaling relationships for the hydrodynamics of shallow, gas-spouted beds of dense particles. The work is motivated by the need to more effctively scale up shallow spouted beds used in processes such as in the coating of nuclear fuel particles where precise control of solids and gas circulation is critically important. Experimental results reported here are for a 50 mm diameter spouted bed containing two different types of bed solids (alumina and zirconia) at different static bed depths and fluidized by air and helium. Measurements of multiple local average pressures, inlet gas pressure fluctuations, and spout height were used to characterize the bed hydrodynamics for each operating condition. Follow-on studies are planned that include additional variations in bed size, particle properties, and fluidizing gas. The ultimate objective is to identify the most important non-dimensional hydrodynamic scaling groups and possible spouted-bed design correlations based on these groups.

  17. 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment( Sample of ShipmentSimulation,Emissions from anFUEL

  18. 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development Update |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EERE Blog Posts of 2014 Year inDepartmentReview09Fuel CellDepartment of

  19. Advanced Automotive Fuels Research, Development, and Commercialization Cluster (OH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linkous, Clovis; Hripko, Michael; Abraham, Martin; Balendiran, Ganesaratnam; Hunter, Allen; Lovelace-Cameron, Sherri; Mette, Howard; Price, Douglas; Walker, Gary; Wang, Ruigang

    2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical aspects of producing alternative fuels that may eventually supplement or replace conventional the petroleum-derived fuels that are presently used in vehicular transportation have been investigated. The work was centered around three projects: 1) deriving butanol as a fuel additive from bacterial action on sugars produced from decomposition of aqueous suspensions of wood cellulose under elevated temperature and pressure; 2) using highly ordered, openly structured molecules known as metal-organic framework (MOF) compounds as adsorbents for gas separations in fuel processing operations; and 3) developing a photocatalytic membrane for solar-driven water decomposition to generate pure hydrogen fuel. Several departments within the STEM College at YSU contributed to the effort: Chemistry, Biology, and Chemical Engineering. In the butanol project, sawdust was blended with water at variable pH and temperature (150 – 250{degrees}C), and heated inside a pressure vessel for specified periods of time. Analysis of the extracts showed a wide variety of compounds, including simple sugars that bacteria are known to thrive upon. Samples of the cellulose hydrolysate were fed to colonies of Clostridium beijerinckii, which are known to convert sugars to a mixture of compounds, principally butanol. While the bacteria were active toward additions of pure sugar solutions, the cellulose extract appeared to inhibit butanol production, and furthermore encouraged the Clostridium to become dormant. Proteomic analysis showed that the bacteria had changed their genetic code to where it was becoming sporulated, i.e., the bacteria were trying to go dormant. This finding may be an opportunity, as it may be possible to genetically engineer bacteria that resist the butanol-driven triggering mechanism to stop further fuel production. Another way of handling the cellulosic hydrolysates was to simply add the enzymes responsible for butanol synthesis to the hydrolytic extract ex-vivo. These enzymes are generally not available commercially, however, and those that are can be quite expensive. Accordingly, the genes responsible for enzyme synthesis were inserted into other microorganisms in order to accelerate enzyme production. This was demonstrated for two of the required enzymes in the overall series. In the MOF project, a number of new MOF compounds were synthesized and characterized, as well as some common MOFs well-known for their adsorption properties. Selectivity for specific gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} was demonstrated, although it was seen that water vapor would frequently act as an interferent. This work underscored the need to test MOF compounds under real world conditions, i.e., room temperature and above instead of liquid N{sub 2} temperature, and testing adsorption using blends of gases instead of pure components. In the solar membrane project, thin films of CdTe and WO{sub 3} were applied to steel substrates and used as p-type and n-type semiconductors, respectively, in the production of H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. Testing with {sup 2}H and {sup 18}O isotopically labeled water enabled substantiation of net water-splitting.

  20. Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    hydrogen systems (TIR) 01-2009 Safety Being revised SAE J2594 Design for recycling PEM fuel cell system 09-2003 Perf. Static SAE J2600 Compressed hydrogen fueling receptacles...

  1. Development of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    H 2 N i C d P b a c i d Energy Storage System Source: Mitlitsky, et al, "Regenerative Fuel Cells", Energy and Fuels, 1998. Packaged specific energy of up to 1,000 Whrkg...

  2. Fuel Cells for Transportation - Research and Development: Program Abstracts

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy FrozenNovember 10, 2014 2014for| Department

  3. Used Fuel Disposition Research & Development | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field Emission SEMUsed Fuel Disposition Research &

  4. Fuel Cycle Research & Development Documents | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department of Energy Freeport LNG Expansion, L.P.Fuel CellResearch &

  5. Plasmatron Fuel Reformer Development and Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652GrowE-mail onThe2 DOE11.4 Planning

  6. Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Car | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdfGeorgeDoesn't Happen to HighJosephNOx Traps forLM2LarryLawsHaroldLeading

  7. Baylor University - Renewable Aviation Fuels Development Center | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 EastMaine:Barbers Point Housing,Illinois:CountyNew York: EnergyTexas ASHRAEEnergy

  8. Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Car | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington,LM-04-XXXXLocated and Methaneof Energy 1

  9. Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Car | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe10 DOEWashington,LM-04-XXXXLocated and Methaneof Energy 1of

  10. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy Health andof Energy EmbrittlementFactEducation »Clean|

  11. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:GroundtoProductionEnergy9/9/2011Demonstrations |

  12. Automotive Fuel Cell Research and Development Needs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06 AuditAugust 5,Re evised June

  13. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New12.'6/0.2 ......Uranium LeaseThrough theSingle LegRev.

  14. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyTheTwo New12.'6/0.2 ......Uranium LeaseThrough theSingle

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWayElectricity Fuel BasicsProduction andConserveIdle

  16. Development of advanced mixed oxide fuels for plutonium management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, S.; Beard, C.; Buksa, J.; Butt, D.; Chidester, K.; Havrilla, G.; Ramsey, K.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of advanced Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel forms are currently being investigated at Los Alamos National Laboratory that have the potential to be effective plutonium management tools. Evolutionary Mixed Oxide (EMOX) fuel is a slight perturbation on standard MOX fuel, but achieves greater plutonium destruction rates by employing a fractional nonfertile component. A pure nonfertile fuel is also being studied. Initial calculations show that the fuel can be utilized in existing light water reactors and tailored to address different plutonium management goals (i.e., stabilization or reduction of plutonium inventories residing in spent nuclear fuel). In parallel, experiments are being performed to determine the feasibility of fabrication of such fuels. Initial EMOX pellets have successfully been fabricated using weapons-grade plutonium.

  17. Current status of the development of high density LEU fuel for Russian research reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vatulin, A.; Dobrikova, I.; Suprun, V.; Trifonov, Y. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise, A.A. Bochvar All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials (VNIINM), 123060 Rogov 5a, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kartashev, E.; Lukichev, V. [Federal State Unitary Enterprise RDIPE, 101000 P.O. Box 788, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the main directions of the Russian RERTR program is to develop U-Mo fuel and fuel elements/FA with this fuel. The development is carried out both for existing reactors, and for new advanced designs of reactors. Many organizations in Russia, i.e. 'TVEL', RDIPE, RIAR, IRM, NPCC participate in the work. Two fuels are under development: dispersion and monolithic U-Mo fuel, as well two types of FA to use the dispersion U-Mo fuel: with tubular type fuel elements and with pin type fuel elements. The first stage of works was successfully completed. This stage included out-pile, in-pile and post irradiation examinations of U-Mo dispersion fuel in experimental tubular and pin fuel elements under parameters similar to operation conditions of Russian design pool-type research reactors. The results received both in Russia and abroad enabled to go on to the next stage of development which includes irradiation tests both of full-scale IRT pin-type and tube-type fuel assemblies with U-Mo dispersion fuel and of mini-fuel elements with modified U-Mo dispersion fuel and monolithic fuel. The paper gives a generalized review of the results of U-Mo fuel development accomplished by now. (author)

  18. Recent Funding | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1PrincipalRareRequirementsRecent Funding

  19. ARM - Funded Research Proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News]JanuarygovCampaignsYeargovScienceFunded

  20. Funded Collaborators | JCESR

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area. TheEPSCI HomeTours,FrequentlyFunded Collaborators In

  1. Development of remote disassembly technology for liquid-metal reactor (LMR) fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, E.C.; Evans, J.H.; Metz, C.F. III; Weil, B.S.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major objective of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) is to develop equipment and demonstrate technology to reprocess fast breeder reactor fuel. Experimental work on fuel disassembly cutting methods began in the 1970s. High-power laser cutting was selected as the preferred cutting method for fuel disassembly. Remotely operated development equipment was designed, fabricated, installed, and tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Development testing included remote automatic operation, remote maintenance testing, and laser cutting process development. This paper summarizes the development work performed at ORNL on remote fuel disassembly. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Close this window print this page MATSUSHITA BATTERY DEVELOPS NEW MICRO FUEL CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to miniaturize the system, improve the reliability and reduce the cost. Notes and Technology Details 1. Fuel cellClose this window print this page MATSUSHITA BATTERY DEVELOPS NEW MICRO FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGY for fuel cells powering portable devices that makes it possible to reduce the size of the fuel cell to one

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A RENEWABLE HYDROGEN PRODUCITON AND FUEL CELL...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications GATE Center for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems at Virginia Tech Education and Outreach Fact Sheet Hydrogen Education Curriculum Path at Michigan Technological University...

  4. Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    fuels, an important post Fukushima issue, and on issues related to the report of the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC) as related to the responsibility...

  5. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The disposal of SNF and HLW in a range of geologic media has been investigated internationally. Considerable progress has...

  6. Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient HD Engine ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Discusses engine efficiency contributions of enhanced fuel injection rematched to new piston geometry, improved charge air system, revised base engine components reduce friction...

  7. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdf Flash2010-57.pdfDepartment(Fact6:21Education

  8. DOE Publishes Roadmap for Developing Cleaner Fuels | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomenthe HouseStudents2.2at MultipleorderNuclearThisProgramDepartment

  9. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Research, Development, and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013DepartmentAgenda for theTrucks

  10. DOE Expands International Effort to Develop Fuel-Efficient Trucks |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmartDepartment of1WIPP | Department of Energy Exercises

  11. Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietipDepartmentJune 20, 2012 The12,1,TrakLokToIntegrated

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: More Efficient Fuel Cells under Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducationStation TechnologyWindInternationalby Engineers

  13. Lean Gasoline System Development for Fuel Efficient Small Car

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NOx after-treatment systems have functional implementation limitations (i.e. performance, cost, packaging, etc.) * Significant fuel economy improvement requires integration of...

  14. THE SUPPLY OF ENERGY TO fuel economic development remains a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad CatĂłlica de Chile)

    relationship with the environment. Three articles provide background on how China, Latin America, and Europe energy efficiency, renewable energy, cleaner fossil fuels, and new technolo- gies arise throughout

  15. Development and validation of a combustion model for a fuel cell off-gas burner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, William Tristan

    2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Development and Validation of a Combustion Model for a Fuel Cell Off-Gas Burner W. Tristan Collins A low-emissions power generator comprising a solid oxide fuel cell coupled to a gas turbine has been developed by Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems. As part... of chemical energy in the fuel to electricity. A prototype commer- cial system developed by Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems Limited (RRFCS), consisting of a combined solid oxide fuel cell and gas turbine (SOFC hybrid) cycle, has the goal of high cycle ef#2...

  16. Funding | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note:Computing |FuelsFunding available forFunding

  17. Fuel Cycle Research & Development Technical Monthly-March 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Several MPACT BCPs were executed in February, reflecting the shift in MPACT priorities directed late last year. Work continued on the FY2014 IPL, also bringing it in line with the new priorities. Preparations were made for the March MPACT Working Group meeting, in conjunction with Savannah River which is hosting the meeting. Steps were taken to initiate a new project with the World Institute for Nuclear Security, including discussions with WINS staff and preliminary work on the required procurement documentation. Several hardware issues were worked through. The newest detector array is working at LANL. A thorough analysis of previously collected Pu sample data using recently developed analysis code with improved spectral energy calibrations was completed. We now have a significantly better understanding of measurement uncertainties. Post-test analyses of the salt and sensor material for the first sensor test are almost complete. Sensor testing with different arrangements will continue and will be oriented based on post-test analysis of the first sensor test. Sensor materials for the next couple of tests are being fabricated. Materials with different annealing temperatures are being prepared for analysis. Fast Neutron Imaging to Quantify Nuclear Materials - The imager detectors repairs are complete and work with the imager is under way. The milestone requiring a report on LANSCE experiments was completed and submitted. Analysis of previous experiments and comparisons to simulations is near complete. Results are being compared with previous LANSCE-LSDS and RPI results. Additional data library (TENDL) is also being checked to see whether there are differences in the simulation results. The mid-year MIP Monitor project accomplishments and progress was presented at the MPACT meeting held in March at SRNL. Discussions around the meeting included inquiries into the feasibility of collecting process measurement data at H-Canyon, and it was explored further after the meeting. Kenneth Dayman, the graduate student from University of Texas, completed an initial draft of his master's thesis. His research will contribute to the multivariate classifier currently under development. Sarah Bender, the graduate student from Pennsylvania State University, presented her work on a poster and in a conference paper at the MARC IX meeting. A mass balance flowsheet for the fast reactor fuel was completed and a model simulation is scheduled to begin construction next month. The development of a mass balance flowsheet for light water reactor fuel will predict the behavior of the separation process using mathematical functions. The completed flowsheet will be utilized as the basis for constructing the model simulation for the electrochemical separations. Comments and review of the model from the MPACT Working Group meeting have been used to evaluate updates to the EChem model. A preliminary physical security layout has been developed in ATLAS. Thermal stability tests for high temperature microfluidic interconnections were completed on all compounds tested for bonding strength. An interconnection strategy was determined based on these results that we expect will allow for operation at 400C in the first generation of sampling systems. Design of the sampling system using the chosen interconnections was initiated, with handoff to an external foundry for fabrication based on ANL specified process conditions expected by the middle of the month. Monte Carlo simulations of the sampling system were conducted under conditions of realistic sampling size distributions, electrorefiner inhomogeneity distributions, and detector efficiencies. These simulations were used to establish a baseline limit of detection for system operation, assuming an on-line separation step is conducted before detection. Sensor for measuring density and depth of molten electrolyte - The procurement effort continued. 80% of the components ordered to assemble the double bubbler have arrived at the INL. Pratap Sadasivan, and his team have been working on the new metrics for proliferation a

  18. Funds For You: Exciting Employee Development Program Housing*Dining* Hospitality is here to support the growth and development of all

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Division. The coordinator for the Funds for You program is Merima Heric, she can be contacted by email

  19. Development of ultrafast computed tomography of highly transient fuel sprays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    , such as automotive fuel injection systems. As the worldwide demand for energy grows rapidly, the technologies capable , Sol M. Grunera, b a Department of Physics and b Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Cornell-intake port. Due to the ability to precisely control the injection rate, timing, and combustion of the fuel

  20. Algorithm Development for Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Diagnostics in PEM Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Algorithm Development for Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy Diagnostics in PEM Fuel Cells Abstract The purpose of this work is to develop algorithms to identify fuel cell faults using-board fuel cell diagnostic hardware. Impedance can identify faults that cannot be identified solely by a drop

  1. ELECTRODE DEVELOPMENT FOR REVERSIBLE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marina, Olga A.; Coffey, Greg W.; Pederson, Larry R.; Rieke, Peter C.; Thomsen, Ed C.; Williams, Mark C.

    2004-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The reversibility of the electrodes for a solid oxide fuel cell with an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte was examined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and current interrupt methods. The fuel electrodes were nickel/zirconia cermet and lanthanum-doped strontium titanate/doped ceria composites. The air electrodes were lanthanum strontium ferrite (LSF) and lanthanum strontium copper ferrite (LSCuF). Under the experimental conditions studied all four electrodes were able to operate in both the fuel cell and electrolyzer modes. The titanate/ceria fuel electrode performed substantially better in the electrolyzer mode than state-of-art Ni-YSZ. Moreover, it showed slightly higher activity for water electrolysis as compared to hydrogen oxidation. Air electrodes were less active in the electrolyzer than fuel cell modes. LSF typically provided higher overpotential losses in both modes than copper-substituted LSF. Changes in the defect chemistry of electrode materials under cathodic and anodic polarization are discussed.

  2. Fuel Efficient Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) Modeling and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Mark L.; Gallant, Thomas R.; Kim, Do Heui; Maupin, Gary D.; Zelenyuk, Alla

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project described in this report seeks to promote effective diesel particulate filter technology with minimum fuel penalty by enhancing fundamental understanding of filtration mechanisms through targeted experiments and computer simulations. The overall backpressure of a filtration system depends upon complex interactions of particulate matter and ash with the microscopic pores in filter media. Better characterization of these phenomena is essential for exhaust system optimization. The acicular mullite (ACM) diesel particulate filter substrate is under continuing development by Dow Automotive. ACM is made up of long mullite crystals which intersect to form filter wall framework and protrude from the wall surface into the DPF channels. ACM filters have been demonstrated to effectively remove diesel exhaust particles while maintaining relatively low backpressure. Modeling approaches developed for more conventional ceramic filter materials, such as silicon carbide and cordierite, have been difficult to apply to ACM because of properties arising from its unique microstructure. Penetration of soot into the high-porosity region of projecting crystal structures leads to a somewhat extended depth filtration mode, but with less dramatic increases in pressure drop than are normally observed during depth filtration in cordierite or silicon carbide filters. Another consequence is greater contact between the soot and solid surfaces, which may enhance the action of some catalyst coatings in filter regeneration. The projecting crystals appear to provide a two-fold benefit for maintaining low backpressures during filter loading: they help prevent soot from being forced into the throats of pores in the lower porosity region of the filter wall, and they also tend to support the forming filter cake, resulting in lower average cake density and higher permeability. Other simulations suggest that soot deposits may also tend to form at the tips of projecting crystals due to the axial velocity component of exhaust moving down the filter inlet channel. Soot mass collected in this way would have a smaller impact on backpressure than soot forced into the flow restrictions deeper in the porous wall structure. This project has focused on the development of computational, analytical, and experimental techniques that are generally applicable to a wide variety of exhaust aftertreatment technologies. By helping to develop improved fundamental understanding pore-scale phenomena affecting filtration, soot oxidation, and NOX abatement, this cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) has also assisted Dow Automotive in continuing development and commercialization of the ACM filter substrate. Over the course of this research project, ACM filters were successfully deployed on the Audi R10 TDI racecar which won the 24 Hours of LeMans endurance race in 2006, 2007, and 2008; and the 12 Hours of Sebring endurance race in 2006 and 2007. It would not have been possible for the R10 to compete in these traditionally gasoline-dominated events without reliable and effective exhaust particulate filtration. These successes demonstrated not only the performance of automotive diesel engines, but the efficacy of DPF technology as it was being deployed around the world to meet new emissions standards on consumer vehicles. During the course of this CRADA project, Dow Automotive commercialized their ACM DPF technology under the AERIFYTM DPF brand.

  3. State Agency Recovery Act Funding

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartmentScopingOverview *Agency Recovery Act Funding .Alabama

  4. Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM Flash2011-55 OPAMFugitive Emissions Fugitive910186Funding

  5. Development of pyro-processing technology at CRIEPI for carving out the future of nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iizuka, M.; Koyama, T.; Sakamura, Y.; Uozumi, K.; Fujihata, K.; Kato, T.; Murakami, T.; Tsukada, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Komae-shi, Tokyo 201-8511 (Japan); Glatz, J.P. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyro-processing has been attracting increasing attention as a promising candidate as an advanced nuclear fuel cycle technology. It provides economic advantage as well as reduction in proliferation risk and burden of long live radioactive waste, especially when it is combined with advanced fuels such as metallic or nitride fuel which gives excellent burning efficiency of minor actinides (MA). CRIEPI has been developing pyro-processing technology since late eighties with both domestic and international collaborations. In the early stage, electrochemical and thermodynamic properties in LiCl-KCl eutectic melt, and fundamental feasibility of core technology like electrorefining were chiefly investigated. Currently, stress in the process chemistry development is also placed on supporting technologies, such as treatment of anode residue and high temperature distillation for cathode product from electrorefining, and so on. Waste treatment process development, such as studies on adsorption behavior of various FP elements into zeolite and conditions for the fabrication of glass-bonded sodalite waste form, are steadily improved as well. In parallel, dedicated pyro-processing equipment such as zeolite column for treatment of spent electro-refiner salt is currently in progress. Recently, an integrated engineering-scale fuel cycle tests were performed funded by Japanese government (MEXT) as an important step before proceeding to large scale hot demonstration of pyro-processing. Oxide fuels can be readily introduced into the pyro-processing by reducing them to metals by adoption of electrochemical reduction technique. Making use of this advantage, the pyro-processing is currently under preliminary evaluation for its applicability to the treatment of the corium, mainly consisting of (U,Zr)O{sub 2}, formed in different composition during the accident of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. (authors)

  6. GREET Development and Applications for Life-Cycle Analysis of Vehicle/Fuel Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance for natural gas as aGEAGNEPGREET Development

  7. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

  8. Status and progress in the U.S. RERTR fuel development program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachs, Daniel M

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2004, U.S. Energy Secretary Abraham established the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). This program set goals for the conversion of many of the world's research and test reactors to low-enriched fuels, including those for which suitable fuels are currently not available. Development of fuels for reactors that cannot currently be converted requires an aggressive program of fuel fabrication development, out-of-pile testing and characterization, irradiation testing, post-irradiation examination, and fuel performance modeling. Both dispersion and monolithic versions of a uranium-molybdenum based fuel are being developed in conjunction with strong international partnerships. The development is being carried out with the intent to qualify a low-enrichment, high- density fuel suitable for utilization in these reactors by the end of 2011, allowing conversion of the U.S. reactors by 2014. An overview of program progress and plans leading to fuel qualification will be presented. (author)

  9. Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kakwani, R. M.; Winsor, R. E.; Ryan, III, T. W.; Schwalb, J. A.; Wahiduzzaman, S.; Wilson, Jr., R. P.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this program are to study combustion feasibility by running Series 149 engine tests at high speeds with a fuel injection and combustion system designed for coal-water-slurry (CWS). The following criteria will be used to judge feasibility: (1) engine operation for sustained periods over the load range at speeds from 600 to 1900 rpm. The 149 engine for mine-haul trucks has a rated speed of 1900 rpm; (2) reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate; (3) reasonable cost of the engine design concept and CWS fuel compared to future oil prices.

  10. Development and Demonstration of Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (F-T) Fuels in the U.S. -- An Overview APBF-DEC Heavy Duty NOx AdsorberDPF Project: Heavy Duty Linehaul Platform Project Update Coal-Derived Liquids to Enable HCCI Technology...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the available chemical free energy directly into electrical energy, without going through heat exchange process. Of all different types of fuel cells, the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for stand-alone utility and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) Catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. However, carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electro catalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decreases cell performance. The irreversible poisoning of the anode can occur even in CO concentrations as low as few parts per million (ppm). In this work, we have synthesized several novel elctrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C, Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell, using CO concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel that varies from 10 to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effects of catalyst composition and electrode film preparation method on the performance of PEM fuel cell were also studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalyst (10 wt% Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt% Pt/Mo/C) were more CO tolerant than the 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method was better than the brushing technique for the preparation of electrode film.

  12. Fuel Cycle Research & Development Technical Monthly - June 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics are: (1) MPACT Campaign - (a) Management and Integration - Coordination meetings between NE and NA-22, NA-24, and NA-82 were conducted the week of June 11th. Preparations are being made for the next MPACT working group meeting, scheduled for Aug 28-30 at Idaho Falls. In addition to covering accomplishments and discussing future plans, a site tour of INL facilities (MFC, EBR, ATR, INTEC) is being organized. (2) Accounting and Control Technologies - (a) Microcalorimetry - Now operating 256-pixel array at LANL. We are in the process of tuning detector parameters to improve and optimize performance. Preliminary measurements show approximate number of live pixels is similar to that observed previously at NIST. Continuing to study contribution to systematic error from uncertainties in tabulated gamma-ray energies. (b) Electrochemical Sensor - Testing of sensors fashioned from different precursor materials continued. SEM analysis of all used sensors has been or will be performed. (c) Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer - Ongoing perturbation calculations are providing information on the fundamental systematic error limits of LSDS. In order to achieve separating the contribution of Pu and 235U to the signal, there will need to be tight controls on systematic errors. Continuing to look into a He4 detector. Research into local construction of a He4 detector continued. We have started to apply the algorithm to test the LSDS using experimental data from previous RPI measurements. PNNL also developed a plan to address the lack of statistics in the MCNP modeling of the NGSI 64 assemblies. The ISU graduate student built and tested a fission chamber to gain experience with them. (d) Fast Neutron Imaging to Quantify Nuclear Materials - The imaging detector design was modified for each pixel to have an 8 x 8 pixel array. Quotations and purchasing process for components, including the new PSD scintillator are in progress. (e) Fast Neutron Multiplicity Analysis - The team submitted two papers to the upcoming INMM meeting that are related to the fast neutron multiplicity R&D effort. Progress was made on the project's main goal of designing a concept for a prototype fast-neutron multiplicity counter. We started laying out the outline for the final report. We have been working with our ORNL collaborators to develop a new digitizer system to support our experimental campaign planned for next year. (3) MPACT Analysis Tools - (a) Multi-isotope Process Monitor - Fuel characterization framework development continued during June. A report describing the methodologies is being completed. Kenneth Dayman, from University of Texas, spent a week at PNNL wrapping up his master's research and working on a journal submission covering that work. The target journal is the IEEE transactions on Nuclear Science; submission is planned for the end of July. A proposal to instrument H-Canyon is being prepared in conjunction with SRNL and the NNSA's NGSI program. The impact of gamma-ray spectrum counting statistics on the precision of relative radioisotope component intensities as reconstructed via Principal Component Regression (PCR) continued in June with Monte Carlo simulations of a two-component (i.e., two radioisotope) system. This work generalizes earlier studies in FY12 in which Poisson counting variations of only a single spectrum component were simulated. (b) Modeling and Simulation for Analysis of Safeguards Performance (Electrochemical) - Preliminary insights into safeguards challenges and the initial design for an electrochemical plant have been written up into an INMM paper and will be presented at the INMM Summer Meeting. Work is currently adding a new visualization capability for integrating materials accountancy with physical protection. (c) Material Control including Process Monitoring (Pattern Recognition, Sensors) - Fabrication of quartz chips continued at an external foundry. Awaiting delivery of the heat exchange manifold and chip holder. (d) MPACT System Integration and Technical Support - The initial report on cost-basis metrics for nucle

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2002-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for stand-alone utility and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) Catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. However, carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electro catalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decreases cell performance. The irreversible poisoning of the anode can occur even in CO concentrations as low as few parts per million (ppm). In this work, we have synthesized several novel elctrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C, Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell, using CO concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel that varies from 10 to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effects of catalyst composition and electrode film preparation method on the performance of PEM fuel cell were also studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalyst (10 wt% Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt% Pt/Mo/C) were more CO tolerant than the 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method was better than the brushing technique for the preparation of electrode film.

  14. Revolving Loan Funds | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of Energy fromCommentsRevolving Loan Funds Revolving Loan Funds Revolving loan

  15. Climate Investment Funds | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhioOglesby,Sullivan, MissouriWebsterElectricEnergyProgramme, WorldFundsFunds

  16. An Update in the Development of Alternate Liquid Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, M. J.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . It is classified by the U.S. Department of Energy as a non-critical or preferred fuel. 2. It is a cost effective high yield BTU fuel that can be produced with readily available feedstocks utilizing standard hardware and processing equipment. j 3. It has a low... for the disposal of spent industrial (flammable) liquids. 5. Certified laboratory analyses indicate that ALF feedstocks are free of all known carcinogens, and hazardous elements. 6. Utilization of ALF can provide a 20% business energy tax credit, in addition...

  17. Requested Funding Categories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Tony R.

    Requested Funding Categories: Department's Funding Priority Request (in the event partial funding is granted): Committee recommends the following funding: Wages for adjunct or part- time faculty or admin Factors: Has unit received previous internship grant funding? _______ ifso

  18. Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass.

  19. Newsletters Researchers at Penn State announce breakthrough in microbial fuel cell development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Publishing Researchers at Penn State announce breakthrough in microbial fuel cell development A technological breakthrough has made it possible to use microbial fuel cells for large-scale electricity production has been devised. It is hoped that the combination of the two will allow microbial fuel cells

  20. Stresa, Italy, 26-28 April 2006 RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN MEMS-BASED MICRO FUEL CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    cell achieved a maximum power density of 58 mW cm-2 at room temperature with hydrogen as fuel. 1Stresa, Italy, 26-28 April 2006 RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN MEMS-BASED MICRO FUEL CELLS Tristan Pichonat ABSTRACT Micro fuel cells (µ-FC) represent promising power sources for portable applications. Today, one

  1. Methods and apparatuses for the development of microstructured nuclear fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarvinen, Gordon D. (Los Alamos, NM); Carroll, David W. (Los Alamos, NM); Devlin, David J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructured nuclear fuel adapted for nuclear power system use includes fissile material structures of micrometer-scale dimension dispersed in a matrix material. In one method of production, fissile material particles are processed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) fluidized-bed reactor including a gas inlet for providing controlled gas flow into a particle coating chamber, a lower bed hot zone region to contain powder, and an upper bed region to enable powder expansion. At least one pneumatic or electric vibrator is operationally coupled to the particle coating chamber for causing vibration of the particle coater to promote uniform powder coating within the particle coater during fuel processing. An exhaust associated with the particle coating chamber and can provide a port for placement and removal of particles and powder. During use of the fuel in a nuclear power reactor, fission products escape from the fissile material structures and come to rest in the matrix material. After a period of use in a nuclear power reactor and subsequent cooling, separation of the fissile material from the matrix containing the embedded fission products will provide an efficient partitioning of the bulk of the fissile material from the fission products. The fissile material can be reused by incorporating it into new microstructured fuel. The fission products and matrix material can be incorporated into a waste form for disposal or processed to separate valuable components from the fission products mixture.

  2. Carbonate fuel cell system development for industrial cogeneration. Final report Mar 80-Aug 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnacke, A.W.; Reinstrom, R.M.; Najewicz, D.J.; Dawes, M.H.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey of various industries was performed to investigate the feasibility of using natural gas-fueled carbonate fuel cell power plants as a cogeneration heat and power source. Two applications were selected: chlorine/caustic soda and aluminum. Three fuel processor technologies, conventional steam reforming, autothermal reforming and an advanced steam reformer concept were used to define three thermodynamic cycle concepts for each of the two applications. Performance and economic studies were conducted for the resulting systems. The advanced steam reformer was found among those studied to be most attractive and was evaluated further and compared to internally reforming the fuel within the fuel cell anodes. From the results of the studies it was concluded that the issues most affecting gas-fired carbonate fuel cell power plant commercial introduction are fuel cell and stack development, fuel reformer technology and the development of reliable, cost-effective heat transfer equipment.

  3. Science based integrated approach to advanced nuclear fuel development - vision, approach, and overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unal, Cetin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pasamehmetoglu, Kemal [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB; Carmack, Jon [IDAHO NATIONAL LAB

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancing the performance of Light Water Reactors, Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles, and Advanced Rcactors, such as the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plants, requires enhancing our fundamental understanding of fuel and materials behavior under irradiation. The capability to accurately model the nuclear fuel systems is critical. In order to understand specific aspects of the nuclear fuel, fully coupled fuel simulation codes are required to achieve licensing of specific nuclear fuel designs for operation. The backbone of these codes, models, and simulations is a fundamental understanding and predictive capability for simulating the phase and microstructural behavior of the nuclear fuel system materials and matrices. The purpose of this paper is to identify the modeling and simulation approach in order to deliver predictive tools for advanced fuels development. The coordination between experimental nuclear fuel design, development technical experts, and computational fuel modeling and simulation technical experts is a critical aspect of the approach and naturally leads to an integrated, goal-oriented science-based R & D approach and strengthens both the experimental and computational efforts. The Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) and Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Fuels Integrated Performance and Safety Code (IPSC) are working together to determine experimental data and modeling needs. The primary objective of the NEAMS fuels IPSC project is to deliver a coupled, three-dimensional, predictive computational platform for modeling the fabrication and both normal and abnormal operation of nuclear fuel pins and assemblies, applicable to both existing and future reactor fuel designs. The science based program is pursuing the development of an integrated multi-scale and multi-physics modeling and simulation platform for nuclear fuels. This overview paper discusses the vision, goals and approaches how to develop and implement the new approach.

  4. Funding Opportunities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Cell Vehicle Basics Fuel CellStandards Functional AreaPart

  5. Development of a liquid-fueled micro-combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peck, Jhongwoo, 1976-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) have made possible the development of shirtbutton-sized gas turbine engines for use as portable power sources. As part of an effort to develop a microscale gas turbine ...

  6. Funding Opportunity: Geothermal Technologies Program Seeks Technologie...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Technologies Program Seeks Technologies to Reduce Levelized Cost of Electricity for Hydrothermal Development and EGS Funding Opportunity: Geothermal Technologies...

  7. Acceleration Fund

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the Building Technologies Office AboutAccelerateAccelerating

  8. Coal-fueled diesel technology development Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Kleunen, W.; Kaldor, S.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GEESI Emissions Control program activity ranged from control concept testing of 10 CFM slipstream from a CWS fuel single cylinder research diesel engine to the design, installation, and operation of a full-size Emissions Control system for a full-size CWS fuel diesel engine designed for locomotive operation.Early 10 CFM slipstream testing program activity was performed to determine Emissions Characteristics and to evaluate Emissions Control concepts such a Barrier filtration, Granular bed filtration, and Cyclone particulate collection for reduction of particulate and gaseous emissions. Use of sorbent injection into the engine exhaust gas upstream of the barrier filter or use of sorbent media in the granular bed filter were found to provide reduction of exhaust gas SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in addition to collection of ash particulate. Emergence of the use of barrier filtration as a most practical Emissions Control concept disclosed a need to improve cleanability of the filter media in order to avoid reduction of turbocharger performance by excessive barrier filter pressure drop. The next progression of program activity, after the slipstream feasibility state, was 500 CFM cold flow testing of control system concepts. The successful completion of 500 CFM cold flow testing of the Envelope Filter led to a subsequent progression to a similar configuration Envelope Filter designed to operate at 500 CFM hot gas flow from the CWS fuel research diesel engine in the GETS engine test laboratory. This Envelope Filter included the design aspect proven by cold flow testing as well as optimization of the selection of the installed filter media.

  9. Development of monolithic nuclear fuels for RERTR by hot isostatic pressing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jue, J.-F.; Park, Blair; Chapple, Michael; Moore, Glenn; Keiser, Dennis [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The RERTR Program (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) is developing advanced nuclear fuels for high power test reactors. Monolithic fuel design provides a higher uranium loading than that of the traditional dispersion fuel design. In order to bond monolithic fuel meat to aluminum cladding, several bonding methods such as roll bonding, friction stir bonding and hot isostatic pressing, have been explored. Hot isostatic pressing is a promising process for low cost, batch fabrication of monolithic RERTR fuel plates. The progress on the development of this process at the Idaho National Laboratory will be presented. Due to the relatively high processing temperature used, the reaction between fuel meat and aluminum cladding to form brittle intermetallic phases may be a concern. The effect of processing temperature and time on the fuel/cladding reaction will be addressed. The influence of chemical composition on the reaction will also be discussed. (author)

  10. Development of a 400 W High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Power Pack : Fuel Cell S. Andreasen, M. Bang, A. Korsgaard, M. Nielsen, S. Kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    Development of a 400 W High Temperature PEM Fuel Cell Power Pack : Fuel Cell Stack Test S, containing about 8 times more energy by volume. Fuelling NaĂ?on based low temperature PEM (LTPEM) fuel cells]. PBI (polybenzoemidazole) based high temperature PEM (HTPEM) fuel cells can operate stable at much

  11. Developing a High Thermal Conductivity Fuel with Silicon Carbide Additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald baney; James Tulenko

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to increase the thermal conductivity of uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) without significantly impacting its neutronic properties. The concept is to incorporate another high thermal conductivity material, silicon carbide (SiC), in the form of whiskers or from nanoparticles of SiC and a SiC polymeric precursor into UO{sub 2}. This is expected to form a percolation pathway lattice for conductive heat transfer out of the fuel pellet. The thermal conductivity of SiC would control the overall fuel pellet thermal conductivity. The challenge is to show the effectiveness of a low temperature sintering process, because of a UO{sub 2}-SiC reaction at 1,377°C, a temperature far below the normal sintering temperature. Researchers will study three strategies to overcome the processing difficulties associated with pore clogging and the chemical reaction of SiC and UO{sub 2} at temperatures above 1,300°C:

  12. Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) on Mono-uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J; Ebbinghaus, B; Meiers, T; Ahn, J

    2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The US National Energy Policy of 2001 advocated the development of advanced fuel and fuel cycle technologies that are cleaner, more efficient, less waste-intensive, and more proliferation resistant. The need for advanced fuel development is emphasized in on-going DOE-supported programs, e.g., Global Nuclear Energy Initiative (GNEI), Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and GEN-IV Technology Development. The Directorates of Energy & Environment (E&E) and Chemistry & Material Sciences (C&MS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are interested in advanced fuel research and manufacturing using its multi-disciplinary capability and facilities to support a design concept of a small, secure, transportable, and autonomous reactor (SSTAR). The E&E and C&MS Directorates co-sponsored this Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) Project on Mono-Uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications. In fact, three out of the six GEN-IV reactor concepts consider using the nitride-based fuel, as shown in Table 1. SSTAR is a liquid-metal cooled, fast reactor. It uses nitride fuel in a sealed reactor vessel that could be shipped to the user and returned to the supplier having never been opened in its long operating lifetime. This sealed reactor concept envisions no fuel refueling nor on-site storage of spent fuel, and as a result, can greatly enhance proliferation resistance. However, the requirement for a sealed, long-life core imposes great challenges to research and development of the nitride fuel and its cladding. Cladding is an important interface between the fuel and coolant and a barrier to prevent fission gas release during normal and accidental conditions. In fabricating the nitride fuel rods and assemblies, the cladding material should be selected based on its the coolant-side corrosion properties, the chemical/physical interaction with the nitride fuel, as well as their thermal and neutronic properties. The US NASA space reactor, the SP-100 was designed to use mono-uranium nitride fuel. Although the SP-100 reactor was not commissioned, tens of thousand of nitride fuel pellets were manufactured and lots of them, cladded in Nb-1-Zr had been irradiated in fast test reactors (FFTF and EBR-II) with good irradiation results. The Russian Naval submarines also use nitride fuel with stainless steel cladding (HT-9) in Pb-Bi coolant. Although the operating experience of the Russian submarine is not readily available, such combination of fuel, cladding and coolant has been proposed for a commercial-size liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (BREST-300). Uranium mono-nitride fuel is studied in this LDRD Project due to its favorable properties such as its high actinide density and high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of mono-nitride is 10 times higher than that of oxide (23 W/m-K for UN vs. 2.3 W/m-K for UO{sub 2} at 1000 K) and its melting temperature is much higher than that of metal fuel (2630 C for UN vs. 1132 C for U metal). It also has relatively high actinide density, (13.51 gU/cm{sup 3} in UN vs. 9.66 gU/cm{sup 3} in UO{sub 2}) which is essential for a compact reactor core design. The objective of this LDRD Project is to: (1) Establish a manufacturing capability for uranium-based ceramic nuclear fuel, (2) Develop a computational capability to analyze nuclear fuel performance, (3) Develop a modified UN-based fuel that can support a compact long-life reactor core, and (4) Collaborate with the Nuclear Engineering Department of UC Berkeley on nitride fuel reprocessing and disposal in a geologic repository.

  13. Development of a Dimethyl Ether (DME)-Fueled Shuttle Bus | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent CompanyaUSAMP AMDHeavy Duty TrucksDevelopment of

  14. Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway Vehicle |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle Batteryof Energy Developing a New Primer

  15. Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ultra-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; John Hemmings

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes work accomplished in the Program from January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2004. Most of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved. A breakthrough material system has lead to the development of an OTM (oxygen transport membrane) compact planar reactor design capable of producing either syngas or hydrogen. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and a step change reduction in costs compared to either autothermal reforming or steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery. Syngas derived ultra-clean transportation fuels were tested in the Nuvera fuel cell modular pressurized reactor and in International Truck and Engine single cylinder test engines. The studies compared emission and engine performance of conventional base fuels to various formulations of ultra-clean gasoline or diesel fuels. A proprietary BP oxygenate showed significant advantage in both applications for reducing emissions with minimal impact on performance. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCI engine was completed.

  16. High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Generator Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Pierre

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of the tubular SOFC development program from August 22, 1997 to September 30, 2007 under the Siemens/U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement. The technical areas discussed include cell manufacturing development, cell power enhancement, SOFC module and system cost reduction and technology advancement, and our field unit test program. Whereas significant progress has been made toward commercialization, significant effort remains to achieve our cost, performance and reliability targets for successful commercialization.

  17. Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development; Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollis, Rebecca

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in 2005 to study and develop a competing technology for use in future fossil-fueled power generation facilities that could operate with near zero emissions. CES’s background in oxy-fuel (O-F) rocket technology lead to the award of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42645, “Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development,” where CES was to first evaluate the potential of these O-F power cycles, then develop the detailed design of a commercial-scale O-F combustor for use in these clean burning fossil-fueled plants. Throughout the studies, CES found that in order to operate at competitive cycle efficiencies a high-temperature intermediate pressure turbine was required. This led to an extension of the Agreement for, “Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications” where CES was to also develop an intermediate-pressure O-F turbine (OFT) that could be deployed in O-F industrial plants that capture and sequester >99% of produced CO2, at competitive cycle efficiencies using diverse fuels. The following report details CES’ activities from October 2005 through March 2013, to evaluate O-F power cycles, develop and validate detailed designs of O-F combustors (main and reheat), and to design, manufacture, and test a commercial-scale OFT, under the three-phase Cooperative Agreement.

  18. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Storage Project Fuel Basket Handling Grapple Design Development Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHENAULT, D.M.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Acceptance testing of the SNF Fuel Basket Lift Grapple was accomplished to verify the design adequacy. This report shows the results affirming the design. The test was successful in demonstrating the adequacy of the grapple assembly's inconel actuator shaft and engagement balls for in loads excess of design basis loads (3200 pounds), 3X design basis loads (9600 pounds), and 5X design basis loads (16,000 pounds). The test data showed that no appreciable yielding for the inconel actuator shaft and engagement balls at loads in excess of 5X Design Basis loads. The test data also showed the grapple assembly and components to be fully functional after loads in excess of 5X Design Basis were applied and maintained for over 10 minutes. Following testing, each actuator shaft (Item 7) was liquid penetrant inspected per ASME Section 111, Division 1 1989 and accepted per requirements of NF-5350. This examination was performed to insure that no cracking had occurred. The test indicated that no cracking had occurred. The examination reports are included as Appendix C to this document. From this test, it is concluded that the design configuration meets or exceeds the requirements specified in ANSI N 14 6 for Special Lifting Devices for Shipping Containers Weighing 10,000 Pounds (4500 kg) or More.

  19. The Department of Energy's Clean Cities Alternative Fuel Vehicle Grant Program Funded under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, OAS-RA-12-12

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesignOfficeThe 21stCELLSDepartment

  20. SUNY Technology Accelerator Fund PROGRAM: Complete Guidelines can be found at SUNY Technology Accelerator Fund 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    SUNY Technology Accelerator Fund PROGRAM: Complete Guidelines can be found at SUNY Technology Accelerator Fund 2014 OBJECTIVES: The SUNY Technology Accelerator Fund ("TAF") provides funding to support the advancement of SUNY technologies from the lab to the marketplace. In many cases, SUNY technology developed

  1. Conservation Trust Funds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerin-McManus, Marianne

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    than $50,000, such as Suriname's Forest People's Fund, "levels. 94 For example, the Suriname trust fund operates at

  2. Development of a techno-economic model to optimization DOE spent nuclear fuel disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramer, R.J.; Plum, M.M.; Adams, J.P.; Dahl, C.A.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the National Spent Nuclear Fuel (NSNF) Program conducted by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co. (LMITCO) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is to evaluate what to do with the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Final disposition of the SNF may require that the fuel be treated to minimize material concerns. The treatments may range from electrometallurgical treatment and chemical dissolution to engineering controls. Treatment options and treatment locations will depend on the fuel type and the current locations of the fuel. One of the first steps associated with selecting one or more sites for treating the SNF in the DOE complex is to determine the cost of each option. An economic analysis will assist in determining which fuel treatment alternative attains the optimum disposition of SNF at the lowest possible cost to the government and the public. For this study, a set of questions was developed for the electrometallurgical treatment process for fuels at several locations. The set of questions addresses all issues associated with the design, construction, and operation of a production facility. A matrix table was developed to determine questions applicable to various fuel treatment options. A work breakdown structure (WBS) was developed to identify a treatment process and costs from initial design to shipment of treatment products to final disposition. Costs will be applied to determine the life-cycle cost of each option. This technique can also be applied to other treatment techniques for treating spent nuclear fuel.

  3. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Appendix C: Hydrogen Quality

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appendix C: Hydrogen Quality section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated February 2012. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  4. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Appendix E: Acronyms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appendix E: Acronyms section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated April 2013. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  5. Virginia Tech Comprehensive Power-based Fuel Consumption Model: Model Development and Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rakha, Hesham A.

    The transportation sector consumes approximately 30% of the total energy in the United States, which is mostlyVirginia Tech Comprehensive Power-based Fuel Consumption Model: Model Development and Testing, Moran, Saerens, and Van den Bulck 2 ABSTRACT Existing fuel consumption and emission models suffer from

  6. Project Information Form Project Title The Development of Lifecycle Data for Hydrogen Fuel Production and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    fuel providers to meet annual carbon intensity targets. These targets are based on carbon intensityProject Information Form Project Title The Development of Lifecycle Data for Hydrogen Fuel or organization) ARB $250,000 Total Project Cost $250,000 Agency ID or Contract Number DTRT13-G-UTC29 Start

  7. Research and development of americium-containing mixed oxide fuel for fast reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Kosuke; Osaka, Masahiko; Sato, Isamu; Miwa, Shuhei; Koyama, Shin-ichi; Ishi, Yohei; Hirosawa, Takashi; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency: 4002 Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present status of the R and D program for americium-containing MOX fuel is reported. Successful achievements for development of fabrication technology with remote handling and evaluation of irradiation behavior together with evaluation of thermo-chemical properties based on the out-of-pile experiments are mentioned with emphasis on effects of Am addition on the MOX fuel properties. (authors)

  8. Overview of the U.S. DOE Accident Tolerant Fuel Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jon Carmack; Frank Goldner; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Lance L. Snead

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Fuel Cycle Research and Development Advanced Fuels Campaign has been given the responsibility to conduct research and development on enhanced accident tolerant fuels with the goal of performing a lead test assembly or lead test rod irradiation in a commercial reactor by 2022. The Advanced Fuels Campaign has defined fuels with enhanced accident tolerance as those that, in comparison with the standard UO2-Zircaloy system currently used by the nuclear industry, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations and operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. This paper provides an overview of the FCRD Accident Tolerant Fuel program. The ATF attributes will be presented and discussed. Attributes identified as potentially important to enhance accident tolerance include reduced hydrogen generation (resulting from cladding oxidation), enhanced fission product retention under severe accident conditions, reduced cladding reaction with high-temperature steam, and improved fuel-cladding interaction for enhanced performance under extreme conditions. To demonstrate the enhanced accident tolerance of candidate fuel designs, metrics must be developed and evaluated using a combination of design features for a given LWR design, potential improvements to that design, and the design of an advanced fuel/cladding system. The aforementioned attributes provide qualitative guidance for parameters that will be considered for fuels with enhanced accident tolerance. It may be unnecessary to improve in all attributes and it is likely that some attributes or combination of attributes provide meaningful gains in accident tolerance, while others may provide only marginal benefits. Thus, an initial step in program implementation will be the development of quantitative metrics. A companion paper in these proceedings provides an update on the status of establishing these quantitative metrics for accident tolerant LWR fuel.1 The United States FCRD Advanced Fuels Campaign has embarked on an aggressive schedule for development of enhanced accident tolerant LWR fuels. The goal of developing such a fuel system that can be deployed in the U.S. LWR fleet in the next 10 to 20 years supports the sustainability of clean nuclear power generation in the United States.

  9. Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProvedDecember 2005DepartmentDecember U.S.FinancialofFuel Cycle ResearchResourcesFunding

  10. Renewable Funding | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant of Access(California andEnergyRenewable Funding Place: Oakland,

  11. Amendment to Funding Opportunity Announcement, DE-FOA-0000522...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Amendment to Funding Opportunity Announcement, DE-FOA-0000522: Geothermal Technology Advancement for Rapid Development of Resources in the U.S. Amendment to Funding Opportunity...

  12. Development of biomass gasification to produce substitute fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R.J.; Knight, R.A.; Onischak, M.; Babu, S.P.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of an efficient pressurized, medium-Btu steam-oxygen-blown fluidized-bed biomass gasification process was conducted. The overall program included initial stages of design-support research before the 12-ton-per-day (TPD) process research unit (PRU) was built. These stages involved the characterization of test-specific biomass species and the characteristics and limits of fluidization control. Also obtained for the design of the adiabatic PRU was information from studies with bench-scale equipment on the rapid rates of biomass devolatilization and on kinetics of the rate-controlling step of biomass char and steam gasification. The development program culminated with the sucessful operation of the PRU through 19 parametric-variation tests and extended steady-state process-proving tests. the program investigated the effect of gasifier temperature, pressure, biomass throughput rate, steam-to-biomass ratio, type of feedstock, feedstock moisture, and fludized-bed height on gasification performance. A long-duration gasification test of 3 days steady-state operation was conducted with the whole tree chips to indentify long-term effects of fluidized process conditions; to establish gasifier material and energy balances; to determine the possible breakthrough of low concentration organic species; and to evaluate the mechanical performance of the system components. Results indicate that the pressurized fludizied-bed process, can achieve carbon conversions of about 95% with cold gas thermal efficiences about 75% and with low and tar production. New information was collected on the oil and tar fraction, which relate to the process operating conditions and feedstock type. The different feedstocks studied were very similar in elemental compositions, and produced similar product gas compositions, but each has a different distribution and character of the oil and tar fractions. 11 refs., 45 figs., 18 tabs.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN FUEL STATION William E. Liss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for compressed natural gas vehicles. The integrated natural gas-to-hydrogen system includes a high efficiency on leveraging of developments in the stationary PEM fuel cell and compressed natural gas vehicle market sectors

  14. PEM fuel cellstack development based on membrane-electrode assemblies of ultra-low platinum loadings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zawodzinski, C.; Wilson, M.S.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempt is made to scale-up single cell technology, based on ultra-low platinum loadings, to develop a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack for stationary power generation.

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF FUEL AND VALUE-ADDED CHEMICALS FROM PYROLYSIS OF WOOD/WASTE PLASTIC MIXTURE.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Priyanka

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Highly oxygenated compounds in bio-oil produce negative properties that have hampered fuel development. Copyrolysis with plastics has increased hydrogen content in past research. Py-GC/MS analyses… (more)

  16. Interim report on fuel cycle neutronics code development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabiti, C; Smith, M. A.; Kaushik, D.; Yang, W. S.

    2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), a fast reactor simulation program was launched in April 2007 to develop a suite of modern simulation tools specifically for the analysis and design of sodium cooled fast reactors. The general goal of the new suite of codes is to reduce the uncertainties and biases in the various areas of reactor design activities by enhanced prediction capabilities. Under this fast reactor simulation program, a high-fidelity deterministic neutron transport code named UNIC is being developed. The final objective is to produce an integrated, advanced neutronics code that allows the high fidelity description of a nuclear reactor and simplifies the multi-step design process by direct coupling with thermal-hydraulics and structural mechanics calculations. Currently there are three solvers for the neutron transport code incorporated in UNIC: PN2ND, SN2ND, and MOCFE. PN2ND is based on a second-order even-parity spherical harmonics discretization of the transport equation and its primary target area of use is the existing homogenization approaches that are prevalent in reactor physics. MOCFE is based upon the method of characteristics applied to an unstructured finite element mesh and its primary target area of use is the fine grained nature of the explicit geometrical problems which is the long term goal of this project. SN2ND is based on a second-order, even-parity discrete ordinates discretization of the transport equation and its primary target area is the modeling transition region between the PN2ND and MOCFE solvers. The major development goal in fiscal year 2008 for the MOCFE solver was to include a two-dimensional capability that is scalable to hundreds of processors. The short term goal of this solver is to solve two-dimensional representations of reactor systems such that the energy and spatial self-shielding are accounted for and reliable cross sections can be generated for the homogeneous calculations. In this report we present good results for an OECD benchmark obtained using the new two-dimensional capability of the MOCFE solver. Additional work on the MOCFE solver is focused on studying the current parallelization algorithms that can be applied to both the two- and three-dimensional implementations such that they are scalable to thousands of processors. The initial research into this topic indicates that, as expected, the current parallelization scheme is not sufficiently scalable for the detailed reactor geometry that it is intended for. As a consequence, we are starting the investigative research to determine the alternatives that are applicable for massively parallel machines. The major development goal in fiscal year 2008 for the PN2ND and SN2ND solvers was to introduce parallelism by angle and energy. The motivation for this is two-fold: (1) reduce the memory burden by picking a simpler preconditioner with reduced matrix storage and (2) improve parallel performance by solving the angular subsystems of the within group equation simultaneously. The solver development in FY2007 focused on using PETSc to solve the within group equation where only spatial parallelization was utilized. Because most homogeneous problems required relatively few spatial degrees of freedom (tens of thousands) the only way to improve the parallelism was to spread the angular moment subsystems across the parallel system. While the coding has been put into place for parallelization by space, angle, and group, we have not optimized any of the solvers and therefore do not give an assessment of the achievement of this work in this report. The immediate task to be completed is to implement and validate Tchebychev acceleration of the fission source iteration algorithm (inverse power method in this work) and optimize both the PN2ND and SN2ND solvers. We further intend to extend the applicability of the UNIC code by adding a first-order discrete ordinates solver termed SN1ST. Upon completion of this work, all memory usage problems are to be identified and studied in the solvers with the intent of making th

  17. Development of microprocessor control for a V-6 engine fueled by prevaporized methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Donald F.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DEVELOPMENT OF MICROPROCESSOR CONTROL FOR A V 6 ENGINE FUELED BY PREVAPORIZED METHANOL A Thesis by DONALD F. SCHNEIDER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 19SS Major Subject: Chemical Engineering DEVELOPMENT OF MICROPROCESSOR CONTROL FOR A V 6 ENGINE FUELED BY PREVAPORIZED METHANOL A Thesis by DONALD F. SCHNEIDER Approved as to style and content by: JP& r~ R. R. Davison...

  18. Fuel development activities of the US RERTR Program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the development and irradiation testing of high-density fuels for use with low-enriched uranium in research and test reactors is reported. Swelling and blister-threshold temperature data obtained from the examination of miniature fuel plates containing UAl/sub x/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, or U/sub 3/Si dispersed in an aluminum matrix are presented. Combined with the results of metallurgical examinations, these data show that these four fuel types will perform adequately to full burnup of the /sup 235/U contained in the low-enriched fuel. The exothermic reaction of the uranium-silicide fuels with aluminum has been found to occur at about the same temperature as the melting of the aluminum matrix and cladding and to be essentially quenched by the melting endotherm. A new series of miniature fuel plate irradiations is also discussed.

  19. Development of a Techno-Economic Model to Optimize DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramer, R. J.; Plum, M. M.; Adams, J. P.; Dahl, C. A.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel (NSNF) Program is evaluating final disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNE) in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Final disposition of SNF may require that the fuel be treated to minimize material concerns. The treatments may range from electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) and chemical dissolution to engineering controls. Treatment options and treatment locations will depend on fuel type and location of the fuel. One of the first steps associated with selecting one or more sites for treating SNF in the DOE complex is to determine the cost of each option. An economic analysis will assist in determining which fuel treatment alternative attains the optimum disposition of SNF at the lowest possible cost to the government and the public. For this study, a set of questions was developed for the EMT process for fuels at several locations. The set of questions addresses all issues associated with design, construction, and operation of a production facility. A matrix table was developed to determine questions applicable to various fuel treatment options. A work breakdown structure (WBS) was developed to identify a treatment process and costs from initial design to shipment of treatment products to final disposition. Costs can be applied to determine the life cycle cost of each option. This technique can also be applied to other treatment techniques for treating SNF.

  20. Fuels Performance Technologies: Milestone FY06 9.1 -- Using IQT measurements, develop simplified kinetic expressions for ignition of fuels that could be used in HCCI engine models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J. D.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discusses the development of a new fuel characterization, based on simplified kinetic expression, to quantify ignition quality for low-temperature combustion vehicle applications.

  1. Alternative-fueled truck demonstration natural gas program: Caterpillar G3406LE development and demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1990, the California Energy Commission, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and the Southern California Gas Company joined together to sponsor the development and demonstration of compressed natural gas engines for Class 8 heavy-duty line-haul trucking applications. This program became part of an overall Alternative-Fueled Truck Demonstration Program, with the goal of advancing the technological development of alternative-fueled engines. The demonstration showed natural gas to be a technically viable fuel for Class 8 truck engines.

  2. Development of a coal-fueled Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX reg sign ) molten carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a CGMCFC electric generation plant that will provide a cost of eletricity (COE) which is lower than that of current electric generation technologies and which is competitive with other long-range electric generating systems is presented. This effort is based upon the Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX) technology as developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT). The project was executed by selecting economic and performance objectives for alternative plant arrangements while considering process constraints identified during IMHEX fuel cell development activities at ICT. The four major subsystems of a coal-based MCFC power plant are coal gasification, gas purification, fuel cell power generation and the bottoming cycle. The design and method of operation of each subsystem can be varied, and, depending upon design choices, can have major impact on both the design of other subsystems and the resulting cost of electricity. The challenge of this project was to select, from a range of design parameters, those operating conditions that result in a preferred plant design. Computer modelling was thus used to perform sensitivity analyses of as many system variables as program resources and schedules would permit. In any systems analysis, it is imperative that the evaluation methodology be verifiable and comparable. The TAG Class I develops comparable (if imprecise) data on performance and costs for the alternative cases being studied. It identifies, from a range of options, those which merit more exacting scrutiny to be undertaken at the second level, TAG class II analysis.

  3. Fuel Cycle Research & Development Technical Monthly - May 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Management and Integration LANL - Initial coordination meetings with NE and NA-20 were held the first week of May. Additional meetings, to include NA-82 and the new Proliferation and Terrorism Risk Assessment task are scheduled for June. Work package planning as part of the NTD transition is ongoing. Microcalorimetry LANL - Some parts to attempt repair of a malfunctioning water chiller that has been holding up work on the current detector array have arrived. We will attempt to begin running the compressor/cryostat next week to resume work on commissioning the detector array. We have also been working on a backup plan to temporarily move our system to a different lab space. Completed data analysis and prepared a paper summarizing Pu measurements for peer-review journal. Two members of our team presented work at the SORMA West 2012 conference. Completed data analysis and prepared a milestone report summarizing the development of Monte Carlo tools to study systematic errors. Electrochemical Sensor INL - The second sensor test was stopped short due to the work stand-down. Some activities related to this work have resumed, but not all. The sensor used during the second test was removed from the furnace and it showed cracks and later crumbled when being rinsed for sample preparation. The sensor material will be submitted to SEM analysis once work is resumed in the facilities where analysis is performed. A third sensor test has started. Tests with different arrangements will continue and will be oriented based on post-test analysis of the first three sensor tests. Materials with different annealing temperatures will also be prepared for analysis. Lead slowing down spectrometer LANL - Continued work on perturbation method for LSDS analysis. We are running simulations to delineate issues and are checking additional data libraries to see whether there are differences in simulation results. Electrochemical sensor INL - The second sensor test was stopped short due to the work stand-down. Some activities related to this work have resumed, but not all. The sensor used during the second test was removed from the furnace and it showed cracks and later crumbled when being rinsed for sample preparation. The sensor material will be submitted to SEM analysis once work is resumed in the facilities where analysis is performed. A third sensor test has started. Tests with different arrangements will continue and will be oriented based on post-test analysis of the first three sensor tests. Materials with different annealing temperatures will also be prepared for analysis. Fast Neutron Multiplicity analysis INL - The University of Michigan team continues its work on the post-experiment analysis of the validation data from JRC ISPRA, as well as scoping studies using the simulation tool MCNPX-PoliMi. At INL, our new staff member working on this project is now working to model performance capabilities for the fast-neutrons scintillator design concepts. At INL our primary analysis approach is focused on the Feynman mean-to-variance approach. At the University of Michigan, the primary analysis approach is multiplicity coincidence analysis. Fast Neutron Imaging to Quantify Nuclear Materials ORNL - Completed additional measurements of the two 'trainer' configurations as well as calibration measurements with sources on an x-y stage. The imager was shipped to Pantex for an NA-22 obligation at the end of May. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer LANL - Continued to look into He4 detector. A Swiss company was located that makes He4 detectors and associated electronics. Had a teleconference with them to assess the possible help we can get from them. We are also looking in to constructing one locally. Ongoing perturbation calculations are providing information on the fundamental systematic error limits of LSDS. In order to achieve separating the contribution of Pu and 235U to the signal, there will need to be tight controls on systematic errors. Multi-isotope Process Monitor PNNL - Attended a training call in advanced multivariate classification and analysis method

  4. SOLVENT EXTRACTION RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE U.S. FUEL CYCLE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry A. Todd

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Treatment or processing of used nuclear fuel to recycle uranium and plutonium has historically been accomplished using the well known PUREX process. The PUREX process has been used on an industrial scale for over 60 years in the nuclear industry. Research is underway to develop advanced separation methods for the recovery of other used fuel components, such as the minor actinides (Np, Am, Cm) for possible transmutation in fast spectrum reactors, or other constituents (e.g. Cs, Sr, transition metals, lanthanides) to help facilitate effective waste management options. This paper will provide an overview of new solvent extraction processes developed for advanced nuclear fuel cycles, and summarize recent experimental results. This will include the utilization of new extractants for selective separation of target metals and new processes developed to selectively recover one or more elements from used fuel.

  5. US fuel cell research and applications, 1960--1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, B.R.; Sen, R.K.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the major fuel cell research and development (R and D) programs funded by the US government and the private sector, with a particular focus on terrestrial applications. Included in this overview is information on funding levels, project descriptions and goals, and selected accomplishments. Brief assessments as to the proximity of commercialization for each of the primary types of fuel cells are also furnished. 11 refs., 1 fig., 11 tabs.

  6. Funding Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department of Energy Freeport LNG Expansion,FunctionalFunding

  7. Series 50 propane-fueled Nova bus: Engine development, installation, and field trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, B.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes a project to develop the Detroit Diesel series 50 liquefied propane gas (LPG) heavy-duty engine and to conduct demonstrations of LPG-fuelled buses at selected sites (Halifax Regional Municipality and three sites in the United States). The project included five main elements: Engine development and certification, chassis re-engineering and engine installation, field demonstration, LPG fuel testing, and LPG fuel variability testing. Lessons learned with regard to engine design and other issues are discussed, and recommendations are made for further development and testing.

  8. Applying for and using CMAQ funds: Putting the pieces together. A Clean Cities guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide provides the basic concepts to aid in an alternative fuel vehicle market development program developing an application for Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program funding. The US Department of Energy`s Clean Cities Program is an aggressive, forward-thinking alternative fuel vehicle (AFV) market development program. The stakeholders in any Clean Cities Program subscribe to the common philosophy that, through participation in a team-oriented coalition, steady progress can be made toward achieving the critical mass necessary to propel the AFV market into the next century. An important component in the successful implementation of Clean Cities Program objectives is obtaining and directing funding to the capital-intensive AFV market development outside of the resources currently offered by the Department of Energy. Several state and local funding sources have been used over the past decade, including Petroleum Violation Escrow funds, vehicle registration fees, and state bond programs. However, federal funding is available and can be tapped to implement AFV market development programs across the nation. Historically, opportunities to use federal funding for AFV projects have been limited; however, the one remaining federal program that must be tapped into by Clean Cities Programs is the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality (CMAQ) Improvement Program. CMAQ is a 6-year, $6 billion federal program formed by the Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 (ISTEA).

  9. AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT RELATIVE TO FOSSIL FUEL POWER. Jarvis All Rights Reserved #12;AN EVALUATION OF THE WILDLIFE IMPACTS OF OFFSHORE WIND DEVELOPMENT in offshore wind energy. I would also like to thank my committee members, Dr. Jeremy Firestone

  10. Development and validation of a two-phase, three-dimensional model for PEM fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ken Shuang

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this presentation are: (1) To develop and validate a two-phase, three-dimensional transport modelfor simulating PEM fuel cell performance under a wide range of operating conditions; (2) To apply the validated PEM fuel cell model to improve fundamental understanding of key phenomena involved and to identify rate-limiting steps and develop recommendations for improvements so as to accelerate the commercialization of fuel cell technology; (3) The validated PEMFC model can be employed to improve and optimize PEM fuel cell operation. Consequently, the project helps: (i) address the technical barriers on performance, cost, and durability; and (ii) achieve DOE's near-term technical targets on performance, cost, and durability in automotive and stationary applications.

  11. Cyclone reburn using coal-water fuel: Pilot-scale development and testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckhart, C.F.; DeVault, R.F.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an ongoing effort to develop retrofit technologies capable of converting oil- and/or gas-fired boilers to coal combustion. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an improved portion of a previously developed retrofit system designed for the purpose of converting oil/gas boilers. This improvement would almost entirely eliminate the use of premium fuels, thereby significantly increasing the economical attractiveness of the system. Specifically, the goals in this program were to replace natural gas as a reburning fuel with coal-water fuel (CWF). The advantages of such a system include: (1) increased return on investment (ROI) for conversions; (2) nearly complete elimination of premium oil or gas fuel; (3) a more integrated approach to the conversion of oil- or gas-designed boilers to CWF.

  12. Cyclone reburn using coal-water fuel: Pilot-scale development and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckhart, C.F.; DeVault, R.F.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an ongoing effort to develop retrofit technologies capable of converting oil- and/or gas-fired boilers to coal combustion. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of an improved portion of a previously developed retrofit system designed for the purpose of converting oil/gas boilers. This improvement would almost entirely eliminate the use of premium fuels, thereby significantly increasing the economical attractiveness of the system. Specifically, the goals in this program were to replace natural gas as a reburning fuel with coal-water fuel (CWF). The advantages of such a system include: (1) increased return on investment (ROI) for conversions; (2) nearly complete elimination of premium oil or gas fuel; (3) a more integrated approach to the conversion of oil- or gas-designed boilers to CWF.

  13. Update 1983: energy funding for Latin America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Funding to Latin America from the three principal multinational financial institutions (the World Bank, the Interamerican Development Bank, and the Caribbean Development Bank) reflects a growing emphasis on energy. Economic and energy forecasters in these and other donor agencies, as well as in oil companies and private banks, warn of strong possibilities of a petroleum-supply shortfall, and higher prices, before the year 2000. If developing countries, with or without conventional energy resources, are to plan effectively for economic growth, external institutional and private energy funding won't be enough: conservation, more-efficient management, and higher prices for electricity and other energy will be necessary. There is marked hemispheric cooperation to promote Latin America's energy and economic advancement, when bilateral and international agreements are examined: US and Canadian loans are via bilateral and institutional channels. Mexico, Colombia, and Venezuela, all Third World countries but with substantial hydrocarbon resources, stand out both as energy aid donors, and as three of the five Latin American promoters (the Contadora Group) that are seeking to increase dialogue between warring factions among some of their Caribbean and Central American neighbors. This issue presents the Energy Detente fuel price/tax series and the principal industrial fuel prices for July 1983 for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere.

  14. Final Report: Development of a Thermal and Water Management System for PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zia Mirza, Program Manager

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This final program report is prepared to provide the status of program activities performed over the period of 9 years to develop a thermal and water management (TWM) system for an 80-kW PEM fuel cell power system. The technical information and data collected during this period are presented in chronological order by each calendar year. Balance of plant (BOP) components of a PEM fuel cell automotive system represents a significant portion of total cost based on the 2008 study by TIAX LLC, Cambridge, MA. The objectives of this TWM program were two-fold. The first objective was to develop an advanced cooling system (efficient radiator) to meet the fuel cell cooling requirements. The heat generated by the fuel cell stack is a low-quality heat (small difference between fuel cell stack operating temperature and ambient air temperature) that needs to be dissipated to the ambient air. To minimize size, weight, and cost of the radiator, advanced fin configurations were evaluated. The second objective was to evaluate air humidification systems which can meet the fuel cell stack inlet air humidity requirements. The moisture from the fuel cell outlet air is transferred to inlet air, thus eliminating the need for an outside water source. Two types of humidification devices were down-selected: one based on membrane and the other based on rotating enthalpy wheel. The sub-scale units for both of these devices have been successfully tested by the suppliers. This project addresses System Thermal and Water Management.

  15. CHEMICAL SENSOR AND FIELD SCREENING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT: FUELS IN SOILS FIELD SCREENING METHOD VALIDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan S. Sorini; John F. Schabron

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new screening method for fuel contamination in soils was recently developed as American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Method D-583 1-95, Standard Test Method for Screening Fuels in Soils. This method uses low-toxicity chemicals and can be used to screen organic-rich soils. In addition, it is fast, easy, and inexpensive to perform. The screening method calls for extracting a sample of soil with isopropyl alcohol following treatment with calcium oxide. The resulting extract is filtered, and the ultraviolet absorbance of the extract is measured at 254 nm. Depending on the available information concerning the contaminant fuel type and availability of the contaminant fuel for calibration, the method can be used to determine the approximate concentration of fuel contamination, an estimated value of fuel contamination, or an indication of the presence or absence of fuel contamination. Fuels containing aromatic compounds, such as diesel fuel and gasoline, as well as other aromatic-containing hydrocarbon materials, such as motor oil, crude oil, and coal oil, can be determined. The screening method for fuels in soils was evaluated by conducting a collaborative study on the method and by using the method to screen soil samples at an actual field site. In the collaborative study, a sand and an organic soil spiked with various concentrations of diesel fuel were tested. Data from the collaborative study were used to determine the reproducibility (between participants) and repeatability (within participant) precision of the method for screening the test materials. The collaborative study data also provide information on the performance of portable field equipment versus laboratory equipment for performing the screening method and a comparison of diesel concentration values determined using the screening method versus a laboratory method. Data generated using the method to screen soil samples in the field provide information on the performance of the method in atypical real-world application.

  16. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Development of a Stabilized Light Water Reactor Fuel Matrix for Extended Burnup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BD Hanson; J Abrefah; SC Marschman; SG Prussin

    2000-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project is to develop an advanced fuel matrix capable of achieving extended burnup while improving safety margins and reliability for present operations. In the course of this project, the authors improve understanding of the mechanism for high burnup structure (HBS) formation and attempt to design a fuel to minimize its formation. The use of soluble dopants in the UO{sub 2} matrix to stabilize the matrix and minimize fuel-side corrosion of the cladding is the main focus.

  17. Problems in developing bimodal space power and propulsion system fuel element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolaev, Yu. V.; Gontar, A. S.; Zaznoba, V. A.; Parshin, N. Ya.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N. N.; Usov, V. A. [Research Institute of SIA 'Lutch' Podolsk, Moscow Region, 142100 (Russian Federation); RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation)

    1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses design of a space nuclear power and propulsion system fuel element (PPFE) developed on the basis of an enhanced single-cell thermionic fuel element (TFE) of the 'TOPAZ-2' thermionic converter-reactor (TCR), and presents the PPFE performance for propulsion and power modes of operation. The choice of UC-TaC fuel composition is substantiated. Data on hydrogen effect on the PPFE output voltage are presented, design solutions are considered that allow to restrict hydrogen supply to an interelectrode gap (IEG). Long-term geometric stability of an emitter assembly is supported by calculated data.

  18. Coal-fueled diesel technology development. Final report, March 3, 1988--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1994-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1979, the US Department of Energy has been sponsoring Research and Development programs to use coal as a fuel for diesel engines. In 1984, under the partial sponsorship of the Burlington Northern and Norfolk Southern Railroads, GE completed a 30-month study on the economic viability of a coal-fueled locomotive. In response to a GE proposal to continue researching the economic and technical feasibility of a coal-fueled diesel engine for locomotives, DOE awarded a contract to GE Corporate Research and Development for a three-year program that began in March 1985 and was completed in 1988. That program was divided into two parts: an Economic Assessment Study and a Technical Feasibility Study. The Economic Assessment Study evaluated the benefits to be derived from development of a coal-fueled diesel engine. Seven areas and their economic impact on the use of coal-fueled diesels were examined; impact on railroad infrastructure, expected maintenance cost, environmental considerations, impact of higher capital costs, railroad training and crew costs, beneficiated coal costs for viable economics, and future cost of money. The Technical Feasibility Study used laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to investigate the combustion of coal. The major accomplishments of this study were the development of injection hardware for coal water slurry (CWS) fuel, successful testing of CWS fuel in a full-size, single-cylinder, medium-speed diesel engine, evaluation of full-scale engine wear rates with metal and ceramic components, and the characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions. Full combustion of CWS fuel was accomplished at full and part load with reasonable manifold conditions.

  19. International Source Book: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research and Development Vol 1 Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon,, K. M.; Lakey,, L. T.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document starts with an overview that summarizes nuclear power policies and waste management activities for nations with significant commercial nuclear fuel cycle activities either under way or planned. A more detailed program summary is then included for each country or international agency conducting nuclear fuel cycle and waste management research and development. This first volume includes the overview and the program summaries of those countries listed alphabetically from Argentina to Italy.

  20. Final Technical Report for the Martin County Hydrogen Fuel Cell Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eshraghi, Ray

    2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2008, the U.S. Department of Energy and Martin County Economic Development Corporation entered into an agreement to further the advancement of a microtubular PEM fuel cell developed by Microcell Corporation. The overall focus of this project was on research and development related to high volume manufacturing of fuel cells and cost reduction in the fuel cell manufacturing process. The extrusion process used for the microfiber fuel cells in this project is inherently a low cost, high volume, high speed manufacturing process. In order to take advantage of the capabilities that the extrusion process provides, all subsequent manufacturing processes must be enhanced to meet the extrusion line’s speed and output. Significant research and development was completed on these subsequent processes to ensure that power output and performance were not negatively impacted by the higher speeds, design changes and process improvements developed in this project. All tasks were successfully completed resulting in cost reductions, performance improvements and process enhancements in the areas of speed and quality. These results support the Department of Energy’s goal of fuel cell commercialization.

  1. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - 3.4 Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost Savings | DepartmentCase Study FuelInformationFuel Cells

  2. Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Tijrn

    2003-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

  3. New In-pile Instrumentation to Support Fuel Cycle Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Rempe; H. MacLean; R. Schley; D. Hurley; J. Daw; S. Taylor; J. Smith; J. Svoboda; D. Kotter; D. Knudson; M. Guers; S. C. Wilkins

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New and enhanced nuclear fuels are a key enabler for new and improved reactor technologies. For example, the goals of the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) will not be met without irradiations successfully demonstrating the safety and reliability of new fuels. Likewise, fuel reliability has become paramount in ensuring the competitiveness of nuclear power plants. Recently, the Office of Nuclear Energy in the Department of Energy (DOE-NE) launched a new direction in fuel research and development that emphasizes an approach relying on first principle models to develop optimized fuel designs that offer significant improvements over current fuels. To facilitate this approach, high fidelity, real-time, data are essential for characterizing the performance of new fuels during irradiation testing. A three-year strategic research program is proposed for developing the required test vehicles with sensors of unprecedented accuracy and resolution for obtaining the data needed to characterize three-dimensional changes in fuel microstructure during irradiation testing. When implemented, this strategy will yield test capsule designs that are instrumented with new sensor technologies for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and other irradiation locations for the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FC R&D) program. Prior laboratory testing, and as needed, irradiation testing, of these sensors will have been completed to give sufficient confidence that the irradiation tests will yield the required data. Obtaining these sensors must draw upon the expertise of a wide-range of organizations not currently supporting nuclear fuels research. This document defines this strategic program and provides the necessary background information related to fuel irradiation testing, desired parameters for detection, and an overview of currently available in-pile instrumentation. In addition, candidate sensor technologies are identified in this document, and a list of proposed criteria for ranking these technologies. A preliminary ranking of candidate technologies is performed to illustrate the path forward for developing real-time instrumentation that could provide the required data for the FC R&D program. This draft document is a starting point for discussion with instrumentation experts and organizations. It is anticipated that the document will be used to stimulate discussions on a wide-range of sensor technologies and to gain consensus with respect to the path forward for accomplishing the goals of this research program.

  4. Show me the money : promises and pitfalls of asset growth in community development credit unions and loan funds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, James (James Arthur Depew)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As private non-profit, locally based organizations, community development financial institutions (CDFIs) are increasingly important supporters of community development policies and programs designed to alleviate poverty. ...

  5. Flexible Capital Fund (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vermont Sustainable Jobs Fund's Flexible Capital Fund (the “Flex Fund”) is designed for companies in Vermont's rural areas that are smaller and work on a less-than global scale, offering a...

  6. Results from the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Petti

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modular HTGR designs were developed to provide natural safety, which prevents core damage under all design basis accidents and presently envisioned severe accidents. The principle that guides their design concepts is to passively maintain core temperatures below fission product release thresholds under all accident scenarios. This level of fuel performance and fission product retention reduces the radioactive source term by many orders of magnitude and allows potential elimination of the need for evacuation and sheltering beyond a small exclusion area. This level, however, is predicated on exceptionally high fuel fabrication quality and performance under normal operation and accident conditions. Germany produced and demonstrated high quality fuel for their pebble bed HTGRs in the 1980s, but no U.S. manufactured fuel had exhibited equivalent performance prior to the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The design goal of the modular HTGRs is to allow elimination of an exclusion zone and an emergency planning zone outside the plant boundary fence, typically interpreted as being about 400 meters from the reactor. To achieve this, the reactor design concepts require a level of fuel integrity that is better than that claimed for all prior US manufactured TRISO fuel, by a few orders of magnitude. The improved performance level is about a factor of three better than qualified for German TRISO fuel in the 1980’s. At the start of the AGR program, without a reactor design concept selected, the AGR fuel program selected to qualify fuel to an operating envelope that would bound both pebble bed and prismatic options. This resulted in needing a fuel form that could survive at peak fuel temperatures of 1250°C on a time-averaged basis and high burnups in the range of 150 to 200 GWd/MTHM (metric tons of heavy metal) or 16.4 to 21.8% fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). Although Germany has demonstrated excellent performance of TRISO-coated UO2 particle fuel up to about 10% FIMA and 1150°C, UO2 fuel is known to have limitations because of CO formation and kernel migration at the high burnups, power densities, temperatures, and temperature gradients that may be encountered in the prismatic modular HTGRs. With uranium oxycarbide (UCO) fuel, the kernel composition is engineered to prevent CO formation and kernel migration, which are key threats to fuel integrity at higher burnups, temperatures, and temperature gradients. Furthermore, the recent poor fuel performance of UO2 TRISO fuel pebbles measured in Chinese irradiation testing in Russia and in German pebbles irradiated at 1250°C, and historic data on poorer fuel performance in safety testing of German pebbles that experienced burnups in excess of 10% FIMA [1] have each raised concern about the use of UO2 TRISO above 10% FIMA and 1150°C and the degree of margin available in the fuel system. This continues to be an active area of study internationally.

  7. Florida Growth Fund (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Florida Growth Fund can provide investments in technology and growth-related companies through co-investments with other institutional investors. The Fund awards preference to companies...

  8. Core materials development for the fuel cycle R&D program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toloczko, M [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Maloy, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cole, James I. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of burning minor actinides in a transmutation fuel. One of the challenges of achieving this goal is to develop fuels capable of reaching extreme burnup levels (e.g. 40%). To achieve such high burnup levels fast reactor core materials (cladding and duct) must be able to withstand very high doses (>300 dpa design goal) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. Thus, these materials must withstand radiation effects that promote low temperature embrittlement, radiation induced segregation, high temperature helium embrittlement, swelling, accelerated creep, corrosion with the coolant, and chemical interaction with the fuel (FCCI). To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Test specimens of ferritic/martensitic alloys (T91/HT-9) previously irradiated in the FFTF reactor up to 210 dpa at a temperature range of 350 750 C are presently being tested. This includes analysis of a duct made of HT-9 after irradiation to a total dose of 155 dpa at temperatures from 370 to 510 C. Compact tension, charpy and tensile specimens have been machined from this duct and mechanical testing as well as SANS and Mossbauer spectroscopy are currently being performed. Initial results from compression testing and Charpy testing reveal a strong increase in yield stress (400 MPa) and a large increase in DBTT (up to 230 C) for specimens irradiated at 383 C to a dose of 28 dpa. Less hardening and a smaller increase in DBTT was observed for specimens irradiated at higher temperatures up to 500 C. Advanced radiation tolerant materials are also being developed to enable the desired extreme fuel burnup levels. Specifically, coatings are being developed to minimize FCCI, and research is underway to fabricate large heats of radiation tolerant oxide dispersion steels with homogeneous oxide dispersions.

  9. Core Materials Development for the Fuel Cycle R&D Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. A. Maloy; M. Toloczko; J. Cole; T. S. Byun

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of burning minor actinides in a transmutation fuel. One of the challenges of achieving this goal is to develop fuels capable of reaching extreme burnup levels (e.g. 40%). To achieve such high burnup levels fast reactor core materials (cladding and duct) must be able to withstand very high doses (greater than 300 dpa design goal) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. Thus, these materials must withstand radiation effects that promote low temperature embrittlement, radiation induced segregation, high temperature helium embrittlement, swelling, accelerated creep, corrosion with the coolant, and chemical interaction with the fuel (FCCI). To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Test specimens of ferritic/martensitic alloys (T91/HT-9) previously irradiated in the FFTF reactor up to 210 dpa at a temperature range of 350-750 C are presently being tested. This includes analysis of a duct made of HT-9 after irradiation to a total dose of 155 dpa at temperatures from 370 to 510 C. Compact tension, charpy and tensile specimens have been machined from this duct and mechanical testing as well as SANS and Mossbauer spectroscopy are currently being performed. Initial results from compression testing and Charpy testing reveal a strong increase in yield stress ({approx}400 MPa) and a large increase in DBTT (up to 230 C) for specimens irradiated at 383 C to a dose of 28 dpa. Less hardening and a smaller increase in DBTT was observed for specimens irradiated at higher temperatures up to 500 C. Advanced radiation tolerant materials are also being developed to enable the desired extreme fuel burnup levels. Specifically, coatings are being developed to minimize FCCI, and research is underway to fabricate large heats of radiation tolerant oxide dispersion steels with homogeneous oxide dispersions.

  10. Ormat Funding Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County, Vermont: Energy Resources JumpOrmat Funding Corp

  11. Developing the Fuels of the Future Road transport accounts for 21% of the CO2 emissions of the UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing the Fuels of the Future ·Road transport accounts for 21% of the CO2 emissions of the UK required to develop new fuels, reducing NOx, CO2, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates. All new secondary Where : ·One of the most important properties of a fuel. Affects many aspects of combustion. ·Defined

  12. Tools Developed to Prepare and Stabilize Reactor Spent Fuel for Retrieval from Tile Holes - 12251

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horne, Michael; Clough, Malcolm [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent fuel from the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) nuclear reactors is stored in the waste management areas on site. This fuel is contained within carbon steel spent fuel cans that are stored inside vertical carbon steel lined concrete pipes in the ground known as tile holes. The fuel cans have been stored in the tile holes for greater than 30 years. Some of the fuel cans have experienced corrosion which may have affected their structural integrity as well as the potential to form hydrogen gas. In addition to these potential hazards, there was a need to clean contaminated surfaces inside of and around the exposed upper surface of the tile holes. As part of the site waste management remediation plan spent fuel will be retrieved from degraded tile holes, dried, and relocated to a new purpose built above ground storage facility. There have been a number of tools that are required to be developed to ensure spent fuel cans are in a safe condition prior to retrieval and re-location. A series of special purpose tools have been designed and constructed to stabilize the contents of the tile holes, to determine the integrity of the fuel containers and to decontaminate inside and around the tile holes. Described herein are the methods and types of tools used. Tools that have been presented here have been used, or will be used in the near future, in the waste management areas of the CRL Site in preparation for storage of spent fuel in a new above ground facility. The stabilization tools have been demonstrated on mock-up facilities prior to successful use in the field to remove hydrogen gas and uranium hydrides from the fuel cans. A lifting tool has been developed and used successfully in the field to confirm the integrity of the fuel cans for future relocation. A tool using a commercial dry ice blaster has been developed and is ready to start mock-up trials and is scheduled to be used in the field during the summer of 2012. (authors)

  13. Concept of development of nuclear power based on LMFBR operation in open nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toshinsky, G.I. [Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The preliminary assessments performed show that it is reasonable to investigate in the future the possibilities of FBR efficient operation with the open NFC. To improve its safety it is expedient to use the lead-bismuth alloy as a coolant. In order to operate with depleted uranium make-up it is necessary to meet a number of requirements providing the reactor criticality due to plutonium build-up and BR > 1. These requirements are as follows: a large core (20--25 m{sup 3}); a high fuel volume fraction (> 60%); utilization of dense metallic fuel; a high fuel burn-up--at a level of 20% of h.a. Making use of these reactors should allow the NP fuel base to be extended more than 10 times without making NFC closed. It provides improving NP safety during a sufficiently long stage of its development.

  14. Development of High Fidelity, Fuel-Like Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 25812 (United States); Dixon, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Decision Applications Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Kapernick, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Decision Applications Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity thermal simulators that not only match the static power profile that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor, but also match the dynamic fuel pin performance during feasible transients. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being developed are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. Static and dynamic fuel pin performances for a proposed reactor design have been determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and initial comparison has been made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analysis, a conceptual high fidelity design will be developed, followed by engineering design, fabrication, and testing to validate the overall design process. Although the resulting thermal simulator will be designed for a specific reactor concept, establishing this rigorous design process will assist in streamlining the thermal simulator development for other reactor concepts. This paper presents the current status of high fidelity thermal simulator design relative to a SNAP derivative reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power.

  15. Department of Energy's Nuclear Waste Fund's Fiscal Year 2014 Financial Statement Audit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealing WithDevelopmentReport and7DepartmentNuclear Waste Fund's

  16. Missouri Agribusiness Revolving Loan Fund (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Missouri Agricultural and Small Business Development Authority’s (MASBDA) Missouri Agribusiness Revolving Loan Fund offers financing to value-added agriculture enterprises, agriculture support...

  17. Energy Revolving Loan Fund- Public Entities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    '''''Note: Michigan Economic Development Corporation is not currently accepting applications for this loan fund. Check the program web site for future solicitations. '''''

  18. Funding for Small Business Innovation Research in Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    advanced manufacturing, energy-efficient buildings, biomass, hydrogen and fuel cells, solar energy, and wind and water power technologies. The Energy Department will fund...

  19. Design and development of a DC-DC converter for a fuel cell inverter system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopinath, Rajesh

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis outlines the design and development of a DC-DC converter for a fuel cell inverter application. The proposed DC-DC converter was designed and tested at Texas A&M to meet the specifications laid down for the '2001 Future Energy Challenge...

  20. Molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) product development test. Annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the technical progress that has occurred in conjunction with Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC21-92MC28065, Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Development Test (PDT) during the period of October 1, 1994 through September 30, 1995. Information is presented on stack design, manufacturing, stack assembly, procurement, site preparation, and test plan.

  1. External Research Funding Agreements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    1 External Research Funding Agreements University Policy No: RH8200 Classification: Research and university employees under Research Funding Agreements. DEFINITIONS 2.00 Research Funding Agreement means funding provided through an agreement with the university to be used for research purposes, whether

  2. DEVELOPMENT AND SELECTION OF IONIC LIQUID ELECTROLYTES FOR HYDROXIDE CONDUCTING POLYBENZIMIDAZOLE MEMBRANES IN ALKALINE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, E.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alkaline fuel cell (AFC) operation is currently limited to specialty applications such as low temperatures and pure H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} due to the corrosive nature of the electrolyte and formation of carbonates. AFCs are the cheapest and potentially most efficient (approaching 70%) fuel cells. The fact that non-Pt catalysts can be used, makes them an ideal low cost alternative for power production. The anode and cathode are separated by and solid electrolyte or alkaline porous media saturated with KOH. However, CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere or fuel feed severely poisons the electrolyte by forming insoluble carbonates. The corrosivity of KOH (electrolyte) limits operating temperatures to no more than 80?C. This chapter examines the development of ionic liquids electrolytes that are less corrosive, have higher operating temperatures, do not chemically bond to CO{sub 2}, and enable alternative fuels. Work is detailed on the IL selection and characterization as well as casting methods within the polybenzimidazole based solid membrane. This approach is novel as it targets the root of the problem (the electrolyte) unlike other current work in alkaline fuel cells which focus on making the fuel cell components more durable.

  3. Recent developments in the production of liquid fuels via catalytic conversion of microalgae: experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi,Fan; Wang, Pin; Duan, Yuhua; Link, Dirk; Morreale, Bryan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to continuing high demand, depletion of non-renewable resources and increasing concerns about climate change, the use of fossil fuel-derived transportation fuels faces relentless challenges both from a world markets and an environmental perspective. The production of renewable transportation fuel from microalgae continues to attract much attention because of its potential for fast growth rates, high oil content, ability to grow in unconventional scenarios, and inherent carbon neutrality. Moreover, the use of microalgae would minimize ‘‘food versus fuel’’ concerns associated with several biomass strategies, as microalgae do not compete with food crops in the food chain. This paper reviews the progress of recent research on the production of transportation fuels via homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic conversions of microalgae. This review also describes the development of tools that may allow for a more fundamental understanding of catalyst selection and conversion processes using computational modelling. The catalytic conversion reaction pathways that have been investigated are fully discussed based on both experimental and theoretical approaches. Finally, this work makes several projections for the potential of various thermocatalytic pathways to produce alternative transportation fuels from algae, and identifies key areas where the authors feel that computational modelling should be directed to elucidate key information to optimize the process.

  4. Analysis and Development of A Robust Fuel for Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Travis W

    2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this effort was on the development of an advanced fuel for gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) applications. This composite design is based on carbide fuel kernels dispersed in a ZrC matrix. The choice of ZrC is based on its high temperature properties and good thermal conductivity and improved retention of fission products to temperatures beyond that of traditional SiC based coated particle fuels. A key component of this study was the development and understanding of advanced fabrication techniques for GFR fuels that have potential to reduce minor actinide (MA) losses during fabrication owing to their higher vapor pressures and greater volatility. The major accomplishments of this work were the study of combustion synthesis methods for fabrication of the ZrC matrix, fabrication of high density UC electrodes for use in the rotating electrode process, production of UC particles by rotating electrode method, integration of UC kernels in the ZrC matrix, and the full characterization of each component. Major accomplishments in the near-term have been the greater characterization of the UC kernels produced by the rotating electrode method and their condition following the integration in the composite (ZrC matrix) following the short time but high temperature combustion synthesis process. This work has generated four journal publications, one conference proceeding paper, and one additional journal paper submitted for publication (under review). The greater significance of the work can be understood in that it achieved an objective of the DOE Generation IV (GenIV) roadmap for GFR Fuel—namely the demonstration of a composite carbide fuel with 30% volume fuel. This near-term accomplishment is even more significant given the expected or possible time frame for implementation of the GFR in the years 2030 -2050 or beyond.

  5. MN Center for Renewable Energy: Cellulosic Ethanol, Optimization of Bio-fuels in Internal Combustion Engines, & Course Development for Technicians in These Areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Frey

    2009-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report for Grant #DE-FG02-06ER64241, MN Center for Renewable Energy, will address the shared institutional work done by Minnesota State University, Mankato and Minnesota West Community and Technical College during the time period of July 1, 2006 to December 30, 2008. There was a no-cost extension request approved for the purpose of finalizing some of the work. The grant objectives broadly stated were to 1) develop educational curriculum to train technicians in wind and ethanol renewable energy, 2) determine the value of cattails as a biomass crop for production of cellulosic ethanol, and 3) research in Optimization of Bio-Fuels in Internal Combustion Engines. The funding for the MN Center for Renewable Energy was spent on specific projects related to the work of the Center.

  6. Development and use of the GREET model to estimate fuel-cycle energy use and emissions of various transportation technologies and fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.Q.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the development and use of the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model. The model, developed in a spreadsheet format, estimates the full fuel- cycle emissions and energy use associated with various transportation fuels for light-duty vehicles. The model calculates fuel-cycle emissions of five criteria pollutants (volatile organic compounds, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulate matter measuring 10 microns or less) and three greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide). The model also calculates the total fuel-cycle energy consumption, fossil fuel consumption, and petroleum consumption using various transportation fuels. The GREET model includes 17 fuel cycles: petroleum to conventional gasoline, reformulated gasoline, clean diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, and electricity via residual oil; natural gas to compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, methanol, hydrogen, and electricity; coal to electricity; uranium to electricity; renewable energy (hydrogen, solar energy, and wind) to electricity; corn, woody biomass, and herbaceous biomass to ethanol; and landfill gases to methanol. This report presents fuel-cycle energy use and emissions for a 2000 model-year car powered by each of the fuels that are produced from the primary energy sources considered in the study.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Alternative Fuel Market Development Program- Forwarding Wisconsin’s Fuel Choice

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Wisconsin Department of Administration at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  8. Contribution of Clinch River Breeder Reactor plant design and development to the LMFBR fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, D.R.; Dickson, P.W.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes how the CRBRP development and CRBRP focus of the LMFBR base technology program have led to advances in the state of the art in physics, thermal-hydraulics, structural analysis, core restraint, seismic analysis, and analysis of hypothetical core-disruptive accident energetics, all of which have been incorporated through disciplined engineering into the final CRBRP design. The total development in the US of fuels and materials, the analytical advances made on CRBRP design, and the incorporation of the latest experimental results into that design have put the US technology in general and the CRBRP design in particular at the forefront of technology. This has placed the US in a position to develop the most favorable LMFBR fuel cycle.

  9. Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward F. Kiczek

    2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has teamed with Plug Power, Inc. of Latham, NY, and the City of Las Vegas, NV, to develop, design, procure, install and operate an on-site hydrogen generation system, an alternative vehicle refueling system, and a stationary hydrogen fuel cell power plant, located in Las Vegas. The facility will become the benchmark for validating new natural gas-based hydrogen systems, PEM fuel cell power generation systems, and numerous new technologies for the safe and reliable delivery of hydrogen as a fuel to vehicles. Most important, this facility will serve as a demonstration of hydrogen as a safe and clean energy alternative. Las Vegas provides an excellent real-world performance and durability testing environment.

  10. Development of a catalytic partial oxidation ethanol reformer for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, W.L.; Thijssen, J.H.J.; Bentley, J.M.; Marek, N.J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Arthur D. Little in conjunction with the Department of Energy and the Illinois Department of Commerce and Community Affairs are developing an ethanol fuel processor for fuel cell vehicles. Initial studies were carried out on a 25 kWe catalytic partial oxidation (POX) reformer to determine the effect of equivalence ratio, steam to carbon ratio, and residence time on ethanol conversion. Results of the POX experiments show near equilibrium yields of hydrogen and carbon monoxide for an equivalence ratio of 3.0 with a fuel processor efficiency of 80%. The size and weight of the prototype reformer yield power densities of 1.44 l/kW and 1.74 kg/kW at an estimated cost of $20/kW.

  11. Development of a hydrogen generator for fuel cells based on the partial oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recupero, V.; Torre, T.; Saija, G.; Fiordano, N. [Institute CNR-TAE, Lucia, Messina (Italy)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As well known, the most acknowledged process for generation of hydrogen for fuel cells is based upon the steam reforming of methane or natural gas (SRM). The reaction is endothermic ({Delta}H{sub 298}= 206 kJ/mole) and high H{sub 2}O/CH{sub 4} ratios are required in order to limit coke formation at T higher than 1000 K. Moreover, it is a common practice that the process`s fuel economy is highly sensitive to proper heat fluxes and reactor design (tubular type) and to operational conditions. Efficient heat recovery can be accomplished only on large scale units (> 40,000 Nm{sup 3}/h), far from the range of interest of {open_quotes}on-site{close_quotes} fuel cells. Even if, to fit the needs of the fuel cell technology, medium sized external reforming units (50-200 Nm{sup 3} H{sub 2}/h) have been developed and/or planned for integration with both the first and the second generation fuel cells, amelioration in their heat recovery and efficiency is at the expense of an increased sophistication and therefore at higher per unit costs. In all cases, SRM requires an extra {open_quotes}fuel{close_quotes} supply (to substain the endothermicity of the reaction) in addition to stoichiometric requirements ({open_quotes}feed{close_quotes} gas). A valid alternative could be a process based on catalytic partial oxidation of CH{sub 4} (CSPOM), since the process is mildly exothermic ({Delta}H{sub 298}= -35.6 kJ/mole) and therefore not energy intensive. Consequently, great interest is expected from conversion of methane into syngas, if an autothermal, low energy intensive, compact and reliable process could be developed.

  12. High-pressure coal fuel processor development. Task 1, Proof of principle testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenhalgh, M.L.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Subtask 1.1 Engine Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of ignition and stable combustion of directly injected, 3,000 psi, low-Btu gas with glow plug ignition assist at diesel engine compression ratios. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the combustion performance of synthesized low-Btu coal gas in a single-cylinder test engine combustion rig located at the Caterpillar Technical Center engine lab in Mossville, Illinois. The objective of Subtask 1.2 Fuel Processor Feasibility was to conduct research needed to establish the technical feasibility of air-blown, fixed-bed, high-pressure coal fuel processing at up to 3,000 psi operating pressure, incorporating in-bed sulfur and particulate capture. This objective was accomplished by designing, fabricating, testing and analyzing the performance of bench-scale processors located at Coal Technology Corporation (subcontractor) facilities in Bristol, Virginia. These two subtasks were carried out at widely separated locations and will be discussed in separate sections of this report. They were, however, independent in that the composition of the synthetic coal gas used to fuel the combustion rig was adjusted to reflect the range of exit gas compositions being produced on the fuel processor rig. Two major conclusions resulted from this task. First, direct injected, ignition assisted Diesel cycle engine combustion systems can be suitably modified to efficiently utilize these low-Btu gas fuels. Second, high pressure gasification of selected run-of-the-mine coals in batch-loaded fuel processors is feasible. These two findings, taken together, significantly reduce the perceived technical risks associated with the further development of the proposed coal gas fueled Diesel cycle power plant concept.

  13. Development of a portable fuel-cetane-quality monitor. Interim report, Nov 86-Nov 90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan, T.W.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a program sponsored by the U.S. Army Belvoir Research, Development and Engineering Center, researchers at Southwest Research Institute have been developing a new procedure for rating the ignition quality of fuels for diesel engines. The ultimate goal is to develop a new scale (to replace the current cetane scale) and procedure. The preliminary goal, however, is to develop an apparatus and procedure to determine cetane number using ignition delay time as determined in a small constant-volume combustion bomb. The development activities have involved experiments designed to determine the relationship between the various experimental variables, experiments designed to assess the quality of the cetane determinations, and development activities designed to improve or refine the calibration and test procedures. This report is a summary of the findings of these experiments and a discussion of the validity of the techniques for cetane determination.

  14. Development of gas turbine combustor fed with bio-fuel oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardy, P.L.; Barbucci, P.; Benelli, G. [ENEL SpA R& D Dept., Pisa (Italy)] [and others

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considering the increasing interest in the utilization of biofuels derived from biomass pyrolysis, ENEL/CRT carried out some experimental investigations on feasibility of biofuels utilization in the electricity production systems. The paper considers the experimental activity for the development and the design optimization of a gas turbine combustor suitable to be fed with biofuel oil, on the basis of the pressurized combustion performance obtained in a small gas turbine combustor fed with bio-fuel oil and ethanol/bio-fuel oil mixtures. Combustion tests were performed using the combustion chamber of a 40 kWe gas turbine. A small pressurized rig has been constructed including a nozzle for pressurization and a heat recovering combustion air preheating system, together with a proper injection system consisting of two dual fuel atomizers. Compressed air allowed a good spray quality and a satisfactory flame instability, without the need of a pilot frame, also when firing crude bio-fuel only. A parametric investigation on the combustion performance has been performed in order to evaluate the effect of fuel properties, operating conditions and injection system geometry, especially as regards CO and NO{sub x} emissions and smoke index.

  15. Development of Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading Technologies for Lipid-Extracted Algae Conversion to Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bench-scale tests were performed for lipid-extracted microalgae (LEA) conversion to liquid fuels via hydrotreating liquefaction (HTL) and upgrading processes. Process simulation and economic analysis for a large-scale LEA HTL and upgrading system were developed based on the best available test results. The system assumes an LEA feed rate of 608 dry metric ton/day and that the feedstock is converted to a crude HTL bio-oil and further upgraded via hydrotreating and hydrocracking to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels, mainly alkanes. Performance and cost results demonstrate that HTL would be an effective option to convert LEA to liquid fuel. The liquid fuels annual yield was estimated to be 26.9 million gallon gasoline-equivalent and the overall energy efficiency at higher heating value basis was estimated to be 69.5%. The minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) was estimated to be $0.75/L with LEA feedstock price at $33.1 metric ton at dry basis and 10% internal rate of return. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the largest effects to production cost would come from the final products yields and the upgrading equipments cost. The impact of plant scale on MFSP was also investigated.

  16. Research and development of Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Fuel cell infrastructure and commercialization study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper has been prepared in partial fulfillment of a subcontract from the Allison Division of General Motors under the terms of Allison`s contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DE-AC02-90CH10435). The objective of this task (The Fuel Cell Infrastructure and Commercialization Study) is to describe and prepare preliminary evaluations of the processes which will be required to develop fuel cell engines for commercial and private vehicles. This report summarizes the work undertaken on this study. It addresses the availability of the infrastructure (services, energy supplies) and the benefits of creating public/private alliances to accelerate their commercialization. The Allison prime contract includes other tasks related to the research and development of advanced solid polymer fuel cell engines and preparation of a demonstration automotive vehicle. The commercialization process starts when there is sufficient understanding of a fuel cell engine`s technology and markets to initiate preparation of a business plan. The business plan will identify each major step in the design of fuel cell (or electrochemical) engines, evaluation of the markets, acquisition of manufacturing facilities, and the technical and financial resources which will be required. The process will end when one or more companies have successfully developed and produced fuel cell engines at a profit. This study addressed the status of the information which will be required to prepare business plans, develop the economic and market acceptance data, and to identify the mobility, energy and environment benefits of electrochemical or fuel cell engines. It provides the reader with information on the status of fuel cell or electrochemical engine development and their relative advantages over competitive propulsion systems. Recommendations and descriptions of additional technical and business evaluations that are to be developed in more detail in Phase II, are included.

  17. Engineering Work Plan for Development of Sludge Pickup Adapter for Fuel Cleanliness Inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PITNER, A.L.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The plan for developing an adapter to suction up sludge into a calibrated tube for fuel cleanliness inspection activities is described. A primary assessment of fuel cleanliness to be performed after processing through the Primary Cleaning Machine is whether the volume of any remaining canister sludge in or on a fuel assembly exceeds the allowable 14 cm{sup 3} limit. It is anticipated that a general visual inspection of the sludge inventory after fuel assembly separation will usually suffice in making this assessment, but occasions may arise where there is some question as to whether or not the observed quantity of sludge exceeds this limit. Therefore a quantitative method of collecting and measuring the sludge volume is needed for these borderline situations. It is proposed to develop an adapter that fits on the end of the secondary cleaning station vacuum wand that will suction the material from the sludge collection tray into a chamber marked with the limiting volume to permit a direct go/no-go assessment of the sludge quantity.

  18. Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Advisory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , distribution, delivery, storage or use of hydrogen energy and fuel cells; and 3) the plan called for by section to funding a substantial portion of that investment, and numerous entrepreneurial companies have attracted falling behind in developing and implementing some renewable technologies such as solar, and is in danger

  19. US RERTR Program, its fuel development activities, and application in the KUHFR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travelli, A. (Argonne National Lab., IL); Stahl, D.; Shibata, T.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals, structure, and accomplishments to date of the Reduced-Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program are described in detail. Plans and schedules for future program activities are outlined with the effect these activities may potentially have on the research reactor community. The fuel development activities of the program are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on the new low-enrichment, high uranium density fuels the RERTR Program is developing for application in research reactors in the near future. The results of a joint study program between the RERTR Program and the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), aimed at converting the Kyoto University High-Flux reactor (KUHFR) to the use of reduced-enrichment uranium, are presented.

  20. US RERTR program, its fuel-development activities, and application in the KUHFR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travelli, A.; Stahl, D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals, structure, and accomplishments to date of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program are described in detail. Plans and schedules for future program activities are outlined with the effect which these activities may potentially have on the research-reactor community. The fuel-development activities of the program are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on the new low-enrichment, high-uranium-density fuels which the RERTR Program is developing for application in research reactors in the near future. The results of a joint study program between the RERTR Program and the Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI), aimed at converting the Kyoto University High-Flux Reactor (KUHFR) to the use of reduced-enrichment uranium, are presented. It is shown that the study has resulted in a positive decision and in a cooperative, well-structured plan for the KUHFR conversion.

  1. Development of Technologies for the Simultaneous Separation of Cesium and Strontium from Spent Nuclear Fuel as Part of an Advanced Fuel Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack D. Law; R. Scott HErbst; David H. Meikrantz; Dean R. Peterman; Catherine L. Riddle; Richard D. Tillotson; Terry A. Todd

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, two solvent extraction technologies are being developed to simultaneously separate cesium and strontium from dissolved spent nuclear fuel. The first process utilizes a solvent consisting of chlorinated cobalt dicarbollide and polyethylene glycol extractants in a phenyltrifluoromethyl sulfone diluent. Recent improvements to the process include development of a new, non-nitroaromatic diluent and development of new stripping reagents, including a regenerable strip reagent that can be recovered and recycled. Countercurrent flowsheets have been designed and tested on simulated and actual spent nuclear fuel feed streams with both cesium and strontium removal efficiencies of greater than 99 %. The second process developed to simultaneously separate cesium and strontium from spent nuclear fuel is based on two highly-specific extractants: 4,4',(5')-Di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) and Calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6). The DtBuCH18C6 extractant is selective for strontium and the BOBCalixC6 extractant is selective for cesium. A solvent composition has been developed that enables both elements to be removed together and, in fact, a synergistic effect was observed with strontium distributions in the combined solvent that are much higher that in the strontium extraction (SREX) process. Initial laboratory test results of the new combined cesium and strontium extraction process indicate good extraction and stripping performance. A flowsheet for treatment of spent nuclear fuel is currently being developed.

  2. Development of Test Methodology for Evaluation of Fuel Economy in Motorcycle Engines.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michlberger, Alexander

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Rising fuel costs and concerns over fossil fuel emissions have resulted in more stringent fuel economy and emissions standards globally. As a result, motor vehicle… (more)

  3. Dear Associate Deans for Research and Department Heads, December 29, 2010 Please see below for a partial list of funding information that may be of interest to members of your faculty.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    the cost, improve the durability, and increase the efficiency of fuel cell systems, thereby enabling Research and Development of Fuel Cells for Stationary and Transportation Applications (see attached) Deadline: 1/28/2011 ­ LOI; 3/3/2011 ­ Application. This program seeks to fund fuel cell R&D in the areas

  4. U.S. Department of Energy Accident Resistant SiC Clad Nuclear Fuel Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George W. Griffith

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant effort is being placed on silicon carbide ceramic matrix composite (SiC CMC) nuclear fuel cladding by Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. The intent of this work is to invest in a high-risk, high-reward technology that can be introduced in a relatively short time. The LWRS goal is to demonstrate successful advanced fuels technology that suitable for commercial development to support nuclear relicensing. Ceramic matrix composites are an established non-nuclear technology that utilizes ceramic fibers embedded in a ceramic matrix. A thin interfacial layer between the fibers and the matrix allows for ductile behavior. The SiC CMC has relatively high strength at high reactor accident temperatures when compared to metallic cladding. SiC also has a very low chemical reactivity and doesn't react exothermically with the reactor cooling water. The radiation behavior of SiC has also been studied extensively as structural fusion system components. The SiC CMC technology is in the early stages of development and will need to mature before confidence in the developed designs can created. The advanced SiC CMC materials do offer the potential for greatly improved safety because of their high temperature strength, chemical stability and reduced hydrogen generation.

  5. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate�¢����the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  6. Towards a sustainable future for Africa. Improved natural resources management under the development fund for Africa, 1987 to 1993. Technical paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1987. A.I.D.'s Development Fund for Africa (DFA) has provided over $300 million to programs supporting environmentally sound development in Africa. The programs have focused on three priority areas -- sustainable agriculture, tropical forestry, and biodiversity -- and have been directed not, as in the past, at helping individual farmers but at promoting the systemic institutional, technical, economic, and political changes needed to support improved natural resource management. The report outlines and exemplifies experiences and successes to date under the DFA and the Africa Bureau's Plan for Supporting Natural Resources in Sub-Saharan Africa. The programs support the work of PVO's at the community level, provide technical assistance to government agencies and others involved in managing the natural resource base, support host-country initiatives in natural resource planning and management, and provide incentives for changing underlying policies such as land tenure. A major initiative has been support for the National Environmental Action Plan (NEAP) process in Madagascar, Uganda, The Gambia, and Rwanda. The report also notes work underway to support other U.S. concerns such as the protection of elephant habitats and the mitigation of global climate change.

  7. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.; Phillips, D.I.; Yoon, R.H.

    1997-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. Its scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design and construction of a 2 t/h process development unit (PDU). Large lots of clean coal are to be produced in the PDU from three project coals. Investigation of the near-term applicability of the two advanced fine coal cleaning processes in an existing coal preparation plant is another goal of the project and is the subject of this report.

  8. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development for Auxiliary Power in Heavy Duty Vehicle Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel T. Hennessy

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing economic and environmental needs of the trucking industry is driving the use of auxiliary power unit (APU) technology for over the road haul trucks. The trucking industry in the United States remains the key to the economy of the nation and one of the major changes affecting the trucking industry is the reduction of engine idling. Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC (Delphi) teamed with heavy-duty truck Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) PACCAR Incorporated (PACCAR), and Volvo Trucks North America (VTNA) to define system level requirements and develop an SOFC based APU. The project defines system level requirements, and subsequently designs and implements an optimized system architecture using an SOFC APU to demonstrate and validate that the APU will meet system level goals. The primary focus is on APUs in the range of 3-5 kW for truck idling reduction. Fuels utilized were derived from low-sulfur diesel fuel. Key areas of study and development included sulfur remediation with reformer operation; stack sensitivity testing; testing of catalyst carbon plugging and combustion start plugging; system pre-combustion; and overall system and electrical integration. This development, once fully implemented and commercialized, has the potential to significantly reduce the fuel idling Class 7/8 trucks consume. In addition, the significant amounts of NOx, CO2 and PM that are produced under these engine idling conditions will be virtually eliminated, inclusive of the noise pollution. The environmental impact will be significant with the added benefit of fuel savings and payback for the vehicle operators / owners.

  9. White paper for Developing an Advanced Fueling System and for supporting Disruption Mitigation studies for ITER on NSTX-U

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White paper for Developing an Advanced Fueling System and for supporting 2012) 1/3 White Paper for Developing Advanced Fueling System-mails: raman@aa.washington.edu , Jarboe@aa.washington.edu , nelson@ee.washington.edu This white

  10. Renewing University Base Funding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewing University Base Funding The Priority Issues 29 February 2012 e conor funding to universities as an immediate goal. It has already put in place increases worth 3.5%. 2 undergraduate or postgraduate, be funded at the same rate. #12;3 Charles Darwin University Flinders University

  11. Scholarship Fund (National Forestry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    Forestry Scholarship Fund (National Forestry Master's Program (NFMP) The Forestry Scholarship Fund! 2014 Scholarship Offers A degree in forestry is a way of life. Trees, people, habitats, management that you will experience when you chose forestry as a career. #12;TRUSTEE FOR FORESTRY SCHOLARSHIP FUND ABN

  12. U.S. solid oxide fuel cell powerplant development and commercialization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M.C. [Fuel Cells Product Manager, USDOE Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SOFC powerplants have many potential attributes which make them suitable for distributed generation applications. Power densities for SOFCs are very promising. Power densities possibilities of 20 watts per square centimeter have been reported to be possible. Westinghouse Electric is the leader in tubular SOFC technology. Several completely packaged and self-contained generators, up to nominal 25-kW size, have been manufactured and tested by Westinghouse Electric. A manufacturing facility currently produces these generators. In the US, several planar designs are also under development. Organizations developing planar designs include IGT, Celamalec, Ztek, TMI, and Allied Signal Aerospace. One of the most promising developments in SOFC powerplants is the conceptual development of very high efficiency fuel cell gas turbine powerplants. Combination of SOFC and turbine has the potential for enormous synergies.

  13. Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaing for Premium Fuel Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank J. Smit; Gene L. Schields; Mehesh C. Jha; Nick Moro

    1997-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The ash in six common bituminous coals, Taggart, Winifrede, Elkhorn No. 3, Indiana VII, Sunnyside and Hiawatha, could be liberated by fine grinding to allow preparation of clean coal meeting premium fuel specifications (< 1- 2 lb/ MBtu ash and <0.6 lb/ MBtu sulfur) by laboratory and bench- scale column flotation or selective agglomeration. Over 2,100 tons of coal were cleaned in the PDU at feed rates between 2,500 and 6,000 lb/ h by Microcel? column flotation and by selective agglomeration using recycled heptane as the bridging liquid. Parametric testing of each process and 72- hr productions runs were completed on each of the three test coals. The following results were achieved after optimization of the operating parameters: The primary objective was to develop the design base for commercial fine coal cleaning facilities for producing ultra- clean coals which can be converted into coal-water slurry premium fuel. The coal cleaning technologies to be developed were advanced column flotation and selective agglomeration, and the goal was to produce fuel meeting the following specifications -- Less than 2 pounds of ash per million Btu (860 grams per gigajoule) and

  14. The Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) has awarded engineers at Case Western Reserve University $1,508,000 in a second round of funding to continue the development of their iron flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    efficiency and reliability with storage increases, while decreasing hazardous effects of energy generation University $1,508,000 in a second round of funding to continue the development of their iron flow battery which drives down costs and expands battery applications. ARPA-E is a division of the U.S. Department

  15. Characterization and development of a new ceramic electrolyte for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work consisted of research directed toward characterization and development of new solid electrolyte materials that are potentially superior to other solid electrolyte materials currently under development (such as yttria-stabilized zirconia). The solid electrolyte technology described herein is based on new ceramic materials generally described as Bismuth Oxide doped with Niobium or Yyyrium oxides that were exclusively licensed to Solid-State Fuel Cells, Inc. by CeramPhysics, Inc. The technology is also based on further material, cell and stack technology concepts and manufacturing methods that were earlier reduced to practice by Solid- State Fuel Cells, Inc., and which are therefore proprietary to the Company. In this report a presentation of the overall program background is provided in Section 2.0. This includes a technical discussion of the technology in the context of the current state of the art. The task work description for the applicable portion of Phase 1 is presented in Section 3.0. Specifically, Phase 1-A comprises the following elements: Electrolyte materials development; testing of electrolyte stability under a reducing environment; development of cell electrodes; test fixtures design and facility erection; and preliminary coupon cell tests. 24 figs., 6 tabs.

  16. Making Fuel Cells Cleaner, Better, and Cheaper(Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund Las ConchasTrail5,722,326 Site advances inFacilitieshelps

  17. Regional variations in US residential sector fuel prices: implications for development of building energy performance standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nieves, L.A.; Tawil, J.J.; Secrest, T.J.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Energy Performance Standards for New Buildings presented life-cycle-cost based energy budgets for single-family detached residences. These energy budgets varied with regional climatic conditions but were all based on projections of national average prices for gas, oil and electricity. The Notice of Proposed Rulemaking indicated that further analysis of the appropriateness of various price measures for use in setting the Standards was under way. This part of that ongoing analysis addresses the availability of fuel price projections, the variation in fuel prices and escalation rates across the US and the effects of aggregating city price data to the state, Region, or national level. The study only provides a portion of the information required to identify the best price aggregation level for developing of the standards. The research addresses some of the economic efficiency considerations necessary for design of a standard that affects heterogeneous regions. The first section discusses the effects of price variation among and within regions on the efficiency of resource allocation when a standard is imposed. Some evidence of the extreme variability in fuel prices across the US is presented. In the second section, time series, cross-sectional fuel price data are statistically analyzed to determine the similarity in mean fuel prices and price escalation rates when the data are treated at increasing levels of aggregation. The findings of this analysis are reported in the third section, while the appendices contain price distributions details. The last section reports the availability of price projections and discusses some EIA projections compared with actual prices.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF METHODOLOGY AND FIELD DEPLOYABLE SAMPLING TOOLS FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL INTERROGATION IN LIQUID STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berry, T.; Milliken, C.; Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Hathcock, D.; Heitkamp, M.

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed methodology and field deployable tools (test kits) to analyze the chemical and microbiological condition of the fuel storage medium and determine the oxide thickness on the spent fuel basin materials. The overall objective of this project was to determine the amount of time fuel has spent in a storage basin to determine if the operation of the reactor and storage basin is consistent with safeguard declarations or expectations. This project developed and validated forensic tools that can be used to predict the age and condition of spent nuclear fuels stored in liquid basins based on key physical, chemical and microbiological basin characteristics. Key parameters were identified based on a literature review, the parameters were used to design test cells for corrosion analyses, tools were purchased to analyze the key parameters, and these were used to characterize an active spent fuel basin, the Savannah River Site (SRS) L-Area basin. The key parameters identified in the literature review included chloride concentration, conductivity, and total organic carbon level. Focus was also placed on aluminum based cladding because of their application to weapons production. The literature review was helpful in identifying important parameters, but relationships between these parameters and corrosion rates were not available. Bench scale test systems were designed, operated, harvested, and analyzed to determine corrosion relationships between water parameters and water conditions, chemistry and microbiological conditions. The data from the bench scale system indicated that corrosion rates were dependent on total organic carbon levels and chloride concentrations. The highest corrosion rates were observed in test cells amended with sediment, a large microbial inoculum and an organic carbon source. A complete characterization test kit was field tested to characterize the SRS L-Area spent fuel basin. The sampling kit consisted of a TOC analyzer, a YSI multiprobe, and a thickness probe. The tools were field tested to determine their ease of use, reliability, and determine the quality of data that each tool could provide. Characterization was done over a two day period in June 2011, and confirmed that the L Area basin is a well operated facility with low corrosion potential.

  19. Development of Low-Cost Manufacturing Processes for Planar, Multilayer Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Tim Armstrong; Harlan Anderson; John Lannutti

    2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of Phase II of this program, 'Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'. The objective of the program is to develop advanced ceramic manufacturing technologies for making planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. Phase II development work focused on three distinct manufacturing approaches (or tracks) for planar solid oxide fuel cell elements. Two development tracks, led by NexTech Materials and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, involved co-sintering of planar SOFC elements of cathode-supported and anode-supported variations. A third development track, led by the University of Missouri-Rolla, focused on a revolutionary approach for reducing operating temperature of SOFCs by using spin-coating to deposit ultra-thin, nano-crystalline YSZ electrolyte films. The work in Phase II was supported by characterization work at Ohio State University. The primary technical accomplishments within each of the three development tracks are summarized. Track 1--NexTech's targeted manufacturing process for planar SOFC elements involves tape casting of porous electrode substrates, colloidal-spray deposition of YSZ electrolyte films, co-sintering of bi-layer elements, and screen printing of opposite electrode coatings. The bulk of NexTech's work focused on making cathode-supported elements, although the processes developed at NexTech also were applied to the fabrication of anode-supported cells. Primary accomplishments within this track are summarized below: (1) Scale up of lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode powder production process; (2) Development and scale-up of tape casting methods for cathode and anode substrates; (3) Development of automated ultrasonic-spray process for depositing YSZ films; (4) Successful co-sintering of flat bi-layer elements (both cathode and anode supported); (5) Development of anode and cathode screen-printing processes; and (6) Demonstration of novel processes for composite cathode and cermet anode materials. Track 2--ORNL's development work focused solely on making anode-supported planar cells by tape casting of a porous anode substrate, screen printing of a YSZ electrolyte film, co-sintering of the bi-layer element, and screen-printing of an opposite cathode coating. Primary accomplishments within this track are summarized below: (1) Development and scale-up of anode tape casting and lamination processes; (2) Development of proprietary ink vehicle for screen-printing processes; (3) Development of screen-printing process for depositing YSZ films; (4) Successful co-sintering of flat bi-layer anode-supported elements; and (5) Development of cathode screen-printing process. Track 3--UMR's process development work involved fabrication of a micro-porous cathode substrate, deposition of a nano-porous interlayer film, deposition of nano-crystalline YSZ electrolyte films from polymeric precursor solutions, and deposition of an anode coating. Primary accomplishments within this track are summarized below: (1) Development and scale up of tape casting and sintering methods for cathode substrates; (2) Deposition of nano-porous ceria interlayer films on cathode substrates; (3) Successful deposition of dense YSZ films on porous cathode substrates; and (4) Identification of several anode material options.

  20. Final Report for the H2Fuel Bus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, W.D.

    1998-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The H2Fuel Bus is the world's first hydrogen-fueled electric hybrid transit bus. It was a project developed through a public/private partnership involving several leading technological and industrial organizations, with primary funding by the Department of Energy (DOE). The primary goals of the project are to gain valuable information on the technical readiness and economic viability of hydrogen fueled buses and to enhance the public awareness and acceptance of emerging hydrogen technologies.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF OTM SYNGAS PROCESS AND TESTING OF SYNGAS-DERIVED ULTRA-CLEAN FUELS IN DIESEL ENGINES AND FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.T. (Skip) Robinson; James P. Meagher; Ravi Prasad

    2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1 through September 15, 2001 in the following task areas: Task 1--materials development; Task 2--composite element development; Task 3--tube fabrication; Task 4--reactor design and process optimization; Task 5--catalyst development; Task 6--P-1 operation; Task 8--fuels and engine testing; and Task 10--project management. OTM benchmark material, LCM1, exceeds the commercial oxygen flux target and was determined to be sufficiently robust to carry on process development activities. Work will continue on second-generation OTM materials that will satisfy commercial life targets. Three fabrication techniques for composite elements were determined to be technically feasible. These techniques will be studied and a lead manufacturing process for both small and large-scale elements will be selected in the next Budget Period. Experiments in six P-0 reactors, the long tube tester (LTT) and the P-1 pilot plant were conducted. Significant progress in process optimization was made through both the experimental program and modeling studies of alternate reactor designs and process configurations. Three tailored catalyst candidates for use in OTM process reactors were identified. Fuels for the International diesel engine and Nuvera fuel cell tests were ordered and delivered. Fuels testing and engine development work is now underway.

  2. FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES: Cooperation and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , materials and new production technologies · Energy · Environment (including climate change) · Transport and fisheries, and biotechnology · Information and communication technologies · Nanosciences, nanotechnologies

  3. Coal fueled diesel system for stationary power applications-technology development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of coal as a fuel for diesel engines dates back to the early days of the development of the engine. Dr. Diesel envisioned his concept as a multi-fuel engine, with coal a prime candidate due to the fact that it was Germany`s primary domestic energy resource. It is interesting that the focus on coal burning diesel engines appears to peak about every twenty years as shortages of other energy resources increase the economic attractiveness of using coal. This periodic interest in coal started in Germany with the work of Diesel in the timeframe 1898-1906. Pawlikowski carried on the work from 1916 to 1928. Two German companies commercialized the technology prior to and during World War II. The next flurry of activity occurred in the United States in the period from 1957-69, with work done at Southwest Research Institute, Virginia Polytechnical University, and Howard University. The current period of activity started in 1978 with work sponsored by the Conservation and Renewable Energy Branch of the US Department of Energy. This work was done at Southwest Research Institute and by ThermoElectron at Sulzer Engine in Switzerland. In 1982, the Fossil Energy Branch of the US Department of Energy, through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) initiated a concentrated effort to develop coal burning diesel and gas turbine engines. The diesel engine work in the METC sponsored program was performed at Arthur D. Little (Cooper-Bessemer as subcontractor), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (now NIPER), Caterpillar, Detroit Diesel Corporation, General Motor Corporation (Electromotive Division), General Electric, Southwest Research Institute, and various universities and other research and development organizations. This DOE-METC coal engine RD & D initiative which spanned the 1982-1993 timeframe is the topic of this review document. The combustion of a coal-water fuel slurry in a diesel engine is described. The engine modifications necessary are discussed.

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program The Hawaii DepartmentBiofuelsFunds for

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program The Hawaii DepartmentBiofuelsFunds

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergy Feedstock Program The Hawaii DepartmentBiofuelsFundsLow-Speed

  7. Development of Novel PEM Membrane and Multiphase CD Modeling of PEM Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. J. Berry; Susanta Das

    2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand heat and water management phenomena better within an operational proton exchange membrane fuel cell's (PEMFC) conditions, a three-dimensional, two-phase computational fluid dynamic (CFD) flow model has been developed and simulated for a complete PEMFC. Both liquid and gas phases are considered in the model by taking into account the gas flow, diffusion, charge transfer, change of phase, electro-osmosis, and electrochemical reactions to understand the overall dynamic behaviors of species within an operating PEMFC. The CFD model is solved numerically under different parametric conditions in terms of water management issues in order to improve cell performance. The results obtained from the CFD two-phase flow model simulations show improvement in cell performance as well as water management under PEMFCs operational conditions as compared to the results of a single phase flow model available in the literature. The quantitative information obtained from the two-phase model simulation results helped to develop a CFD control algorithm for low temperature PEM fuel cell stacks which opens up a route in designing improvement of PEMFC for better operational efficiency and performance. To understand heat and water management phenomena better within an operational proton exchange membrane fuel cell's (PEMFC) conditions, a three-dimensional, two-phase computational fluid dynamic (CFD) flow model has been developed and simulated for a complete PEMFC. Both liquid and gas phases are considered in the model by taking into account the gas flow, diffusion, charge transfer, change of phase, electro-osmosis, and electrochemical reactions to understand the overall dynamic behaviors of species within an operating PEMFC. The CFD model is solved numerically under different parametric conditions in terms of water management issues in order to improve cell performance. The results obtained from the CFD two-phase flow model simulations show improvement in cell performance as well as water management under PEMFCs operational conditions as compared to the results of a single phase flow model available in the literature. The quantitative information obtained from the two-phase model simulation results helped to develop a CFD control algorithm for low temperature PEM fuel cell stacks which opens up a route in designing improvement of PEMFC for better operational efficiency and performance.

  8. Quality Assurance Program Plan for AGR Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Ken Sowder

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quality Assurance Plan (QPP) is to document the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Management and Operating (M&O) Contractor’s quality assurance program for AGR Fuel Development and Qualification activities, which is under the control of the INEEL. The QPP is an integral part of the Gen IV Program Execution Plan (PEP) and establishes the set of management controls for those systems, structures and components (SSCs) and related quality affecting activities, necessary to provide adequate confidence that items will perform satisfactorily in service.

  9. Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications development phase. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The deployment and operation of clean power generation is becoming critical as the energy and transportation sectors seek ways to comply with clean air standards and the national deregulation of the utility industry. However, for strategic business decisions, considerable analysis is required over the next few years to evaluate the appropriate application and value added from this emerging technology. To this end the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC) is proposing a three-year industry-driven project that centers on the creation of ``The Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications.`` A collaborative laboratory housed at and managed by HARC, the Center will enable a core group of six diverse participating companies--industry participants--to investigate the economic and operational feasibility of proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells in a variety of applications (the core project). This document describes the unique benefits of a collaborative approach to PEM applied research, among them a shared laboratory concept leading to cost savings and shared risks as well as access to outstanding research talent and lab facilities. It also describes the benefits provided by implementing the project at HARC, with particular emphasis on HARC`s history of managing successful long-term research projects as well as its experience in dealing with industry consortia projects. The Center is also unique in that it will not duplicate the traditional university role of basic research or that of the fuel cell industry in developing commercial products. Instead, the Center will focus on applications, testing, and demonstration of fuel cell technology.

  10. Final Scientific Report : Development of Transition Metal/ Chalcogen Based Cathode Catalysts for PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, Stephen, A.

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this project was to investigate the potential for using base metal sulfides and selenides as low cost replacements for precious metal catalysts, such as platinum, currently being used in PEM fuel cells. The approach was to deposit thin films of the materials to be evaluated onto inert electrodes and evaluate their activity for the cathode reaction (oxygen reduction) as well as ex-situ structural and compositional characterization. The most active materials identified are CoS2 and the 50:50 solid solution (Co,Ni)S2. However, the OCP of these materials is still considered too low, at 0.83V and 0.89V vs. RHE respectively, for testing in fuel cells. The methods employed here were necessary to compare with the activity of platinum as, when nano-dispersed on carbon supports, the active surface area of these materials is difficult to measure, making comparisons inaccurate. This research adds to the knowledge of potential candidates for platinum replacement in order to reduce the cost of PEM fuel cell technology and promote commercialization. Although the fabrication methods employed here are strictly experimental, methods were also developed to produce nano-dispersed catalysts with similar compositions, structure and activity. Cycling of these catalysts to highly oxidizing potentials resulted in an increase of the open circuit voltage to approach that of platinum, however, it proved difficult to determine why using these dispersed materials. The potential for non-precious, non-metallic, low cost, compound catalysts for PEM fuel cells has been investigated and demonstrated.

  11. Completing the Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  12. Ceramic-based fuel technologies: scope and status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation is an overview of the approach, status and path forward for ongoing tasks under the ceramic fuel development part of the program. Experimental work is focused on fundamental studies employing depleted urania-based compositions and mixed oxide (MOX) and minor actinide-bearing MOX. Contributions are included from researchers at LANL, ORNL and BNL. The audience for this presentation consists of the various participants in the FCRD program. Those participants include representatives from: DOE-NE, other national laboratories, DOE funded university researchers, DOE funded industry teams, FCRD funded advisors, and occasionally NRC.

  13. Sun Fund 5 SL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACAOpenSummerside Wind Farm JumpVentures LLC JumpSun Fund

  14. Pivotal Investments Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/GeothermalOrangePeru:Job Corp Jump to:Pismo Beach,Fund Jump to:

  15. Funding Opportunity Announcement: Concentrating Solar Power: Advanced

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost Savings |Safety,of Energy Funding Opportunityin

  16. Property:FundingAgencies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProcedures Jump to:FirstWellTemp JumpFundingAgencies Jump to:

  17. Property:FundingAgency | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProcedures Jump to:FirstWellTemp JumpFundingAgencies Jump

  18. World Wildlife Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flats Geothermal AreaarticleWoodWildlife Fund Jump to:

  19. Funding available for New Mexico businesses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note:Computing |FuelsFunding available for New

  20. Climate Protection Action Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy ResourcesInformation is 045.Update JumpGroupFund

  1. The Clean Energy Fund | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump Jump to:Information 'Grand Paris' Project:BeamTheFund

  2. Alternative Fuels Implementation Team (AFIT) for North Carolina

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with new fuels and vehicle technologies * Total Project Funding - DOE: 500,000 - Cost Share: 69,000 * FY13 Funding: 290,000 * FY14 Funding: 210,000 * 44% Spent to Date...

  3. DOE's Hydrogen Fuel Cell Activities: Developing Technology and Validating it through Real-World Evaluation (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Garbak, J.

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation prepared for the May 12, 2008 Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Conference that describes DOE's current hydrogen fuel cell technology validation projects.

  4. Development of Novel Nanomaterials for High-Performance and Low-Cost Fuel Cell Applications.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Shuhui

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are promising energy converting technologies to generate electricity by mainly using hydrogen as a fuel, producing water as the… (more)

  5. SuperTruck ? Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Tractor & Trailer 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  6. Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway Vehicle 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  7. Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway Vehicle 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  8. Fuel Cell Applied Research Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Richardson

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since November 12, 2003, Northern Alberta Institute of Technology has been operating a 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cell to provide electrical and thermal energy to its campus. The project was made possible by funding from the U.S. Department of Energy as well as by a partnership with the provincial Alberta Energy Research Institute; a private-public partnership, Climate Change Central; the federal Ministry of Western Economic Development; and local natural gas supplier, ATCO Gas. Operation of the fuel cell has contributed to reducing NAIT's carbon dioxide emissions through its efficient use of natural gas.

  9. IN-PILE INSTRUMENTATION TO SUPPORT FUEL CYCLE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT - FY12 STATUS REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. . Rempe; J. Daw; D. Knudson; R. Schley

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the FCRD program objective to emphasize science-based, goal-oriented research, a strategic research program is underway to develop new sensors that can be used to obtain the high fidelity, real-time, data required for characterizing the performance of new fuels during irradiation testing. The overarching goal of this initiative is to develop new test vehicles with new sensors of unprecedented accuracy and resolution that can obtain the required data. Prior laboratory testing and, as needed, irradiation testing of sensors in these capsules will be completed as part of this initiative to give sufficient confidence that the irradiation tests will yield the required data. This report documents FY12 progress in this initiative.

  10. Development of a Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module for Automotive Fuel Cell Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McTaggart, Paul

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this program TIAX LLC conducted the development of an advanced technology compressor/expander for supplying compressed air to Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells in transportation applications. The overall objective of this program was to develop a hybrid compressor/expander module, based on both scroll and high-speed turbomachinery technologies, which will combine the strengths of each technology to create a concept with superior performance at minimal size and cost. The resulting system was expected to have efficiency and pressure delivery capability comparable to that of a scroll-only machine, at significantly reduced system size and weight when compared to scroll-only designs. Based on the results of detailed designs and analyses of the critical system elements, the Hybrid Compressor/Expander Module concept was projected to deliver significant improvements in weight, volume and manufacturing cost relative to previous generation systems.

  11. Development of the Cooper-Bessemer CleanBurn gas-diesel (dual-fuel) engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blizzard, D.T. (Cooper-Bessemer Reciprocating Products Div., Cooper Industries, Grove City, PA (United States)); Schaub, F.S.; Smith, J.G. (Cooper-Bessemer Reciprocating Products Div., Cooper Industries, Mount Vernon, OH (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NO[sub x] emission legislation requirements for large-bore internal combustion engines have required engine manufacturers to continue to develop and improve techniques for exhaust emission reduction. This paper describes the development of the Cooper-Bessemer Clean Burn gas-diesel (dual-fuel) engine that results in NO[sub x] reductions of up to 92 percent as compared with an uncontrolled gas-diesel engine. Historically, the gas-diesel and diesel engine combustion systems have not responded to similar techniques of NO[sub x] reduction that have been successful on straight spark-ignited natural gas burning engines. NO[sub x] levels of a nominal 1.0 g/BHP-h, equal to the spark-ignited natural gas fueled engine, have been achieved for the gas-diesel and are described. In addition, the higher opacity exhaust plume characteristic of gas-diesel combustion is significantly reduced or eliminated. This achievement is considered to be a major breakthrough, and the concept can be applied to both new and retrofit applications.

  12. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1997-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope included laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by the design, construction and operation of 2 t/hr process development unit (PDU). This report represents the findings of the PDU Advanced Column Flotation Testing and Evaluation phase of the program and includes a discussion of the design and construction of the PDU. Three compliance steam coals, Taggart, Indiana VII and Hiawatha, were processed in the PDU to determine performance and design parameters for commercial production of premium fuel by advanced flotation. Consistent, reliable performance of the PDU was demonstrated by 72-hr production runs on each of the test coals. Its capacity generally was limited by the dewatering capacity of the clean coal filters during the production runs rather than by the flotation capacity of the Microcel column. The residual concentrations of As, Pb, and Cl were reduced by at least 25% on a heating value basis from their concentrations in the test coals. The reduction in the concentrations of Be, Cd, Cr, Co, Mn, Hg, Ni and Se varied from coal to coal but the concentrations of most were greatly reduced from the concentrations in the ROM parent coals. The ash fusion temperatures of the Taggart and Indiana VII coals, and to a much lesser extent the Hiawatha coal, were decreased by the cleaning.

  13. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 1.0 Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Introduction section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated March 2013. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  14. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 3.9 Market Transformation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Market Transformation technical plan section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated July 2013. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  15. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 5.0 Systems Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Systems Integration section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated July 2013. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  16. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 3.6 Technology Validation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technology Validation technical plan section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated July 2013. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  17. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 3.1 Hydrogen Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Production technical plan section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated October 2014. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  18. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 3.5 Manufacturing R&D

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing R&D technical plan section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated October 2014. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  19. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 6.0 Program Management

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Program Management section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated August 2012. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  20. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 4.0 Systems Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Systems Analysis section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated October 2014. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  1. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 3.8 Education and Outreach

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Education and Outreach technical plan section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration (MYRD&D) Plan; updated July 2013. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  2. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 3.0 Technical Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technical Plan section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated May 2012. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  3. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 2.0 Program Benefits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Program Benefits section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated August 2012. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  4. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 3.2 Hydrogen Delivery

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Delivery technical plan section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated October 2014. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  5. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Section 3.3 Hydrogen Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Storage technical plan section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated October 2014. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  6. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan- Appendix B: Input/Output Matrix

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appendix B: Input/Output Matrix section of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan; updated July 2013. This plan includes goals, objectives, technical targets, tasks, and schedules for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's contribution to the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program.

  7. Development of Real-Time Fuel Management Capability at the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parham, Neil A.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center reactor a fuel depletion code was created to develop real-time fuel management capability. This code package links MCNP8 and ORIGEN26 and is interfaced through a Visual Basic code. Microsoft Visual...

  8. Energy Efficiency Fund

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Connecticut's original electric-industry restructuring legislation (Public Act 98-28), enacted in April 1998, created separate funds to support energy efficiency and renewable energy.* The...

  9. Development of OTM Syngas Process and Testing of Syngas Derived Ulta-clean Fuels in Diesel Engines and Fuel Cells Budget Period 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.T. Robinson; John Sirman; Prasad Apte; Xingun Gui; Tytus R. Bulicz; Dan Corgard; Siv Aasland; Kjersti Kleveland; Ann Hooper; Leo Bonnell; John Hemmings; Jack Chen; Bart A. Van Hassel

    2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This topical report summarizes work accomplished for the Program from January 1, 2003 through December 31,2004 in the following task areas: Task 1--Materials Development; Task 2--Composite Development; Task 4--Reactor Design and Process Optimization; Task 8--Fuels and Engine Testing; 8.1 International Diesel Engine Program; and Task IO: Program Management. Most of the key technical objectives for this budget period were achieved. Only partial success was achieved relative to cycle testing under pressure Major improvements in material performance and element reliability have been achieved. A breakthrough material system has driven the development of a compact planar reactor design capable of producing either hydrogen or syngas. The planar reactor shows significant advantages in thermal efficiency and costs compared to either steam methane reforming with CO{sub 2} recovery or autothermal reforming. The fuel and engine testing program is complete The single cylinder test engine evaluation of UCTF fuels begun in Budget Period 2 was finished this budget period. In addition, a study to evaluate new fuel formulations for an HCCl engine was completed.

  10. Development of Enriched Borated Aluminum Alloy for Basket Material of Cask for Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikio Sakai; Tadatsugu Sakaya; Hiroaki Fujiwara; Akira Sakai [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Company Ltd., 1 Shin-Nakaharacho, Isogoku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concrete cask system is focused as the candidate one for spent fuel dry storage facilities from economic potential in Japan. Concrete cask consists of a concrete storage cask and a steel canister. A canister containing nuclear spent fuel is shipped by a transportation cask from a nuclear power plant to an interim storage facility. The canister is transferred from the transportation cask to a storage cask by a transfer cask in the storage facility. IHI has developed a concrete cask horizontal transfer system. This transfer system indicates that a canister is transferred to a storage cask horizontally. This transfer system has a merit against canister drop accident in transfer operation, i.e. spent fuel assemblies can be kept safe during the transfer operation. There are guide rails inside of the concrete cask, and the canister is installed into the storage cask with sliding on the rails. To develop the horizontal transfer system, IHI carried out a heat load test and numerical analyses by CFD. Heat load experiment was carried out by using a full-scale prototype canister, storage cask and transfer vessel. The decay heat was simulated by an electric heater installed in the canister. Assuming high burn-up spent fuel storage, heat generation was set between 20.0 kW and 25.0 kW. This experiment was focused on the concrete temperature distribution. We confirmed that the maximum concrete temperature in transfer operation period was lower than 40 deg. C (Heat generation 22.5 kW). Moreover we confirmed the maximum concrete temperature passed 24 hours with horizontal orientation was below 90 deg. C (Heat generation 22.5 kW). We analyzed the thermal performance of the concrete cask with horizontal transfer condition and normal storage condition. Thermal analyses for horizontal transfer operation were carried out based on the experimental conditions. The tendency of the analytical results was in good agreement with experimental results. The purpose of vertical thermal analysis was to estimate the concrete temperature increase in the case a canister contacts with guide rails in normal storage. It has a possibility that a canister contacts with guide rails during storage period after concrete cask is upended from transfer operation. The temperature increase due to this contact was calculated 5 deg. C at small local area. This result implies that the affect of the contact is very small. This paper addresses that the storage cask concrete is kept its integrity in transfer operation period and normal storage period. (authors)

  11. AECL/US INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors -- Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Carmack; Randy D. Lee; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer; Michael Todosow; Holly B. Hamilton; Juan Nino; Simon Philpot; James Tulenko

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Program and the Atomic Energy Canada Ltd (AECL) seek to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to minimize the overall Pu and minor actinides present in the light water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel cycles. It is proposed to reuse the Pu from LWR spent fuel both for the energy it contains and to decrease the hazard and proliferation impact resulting from storage of the Pu and minor actinides. The use of fuel compositions with a combination of U and Pu oxide (MOX) has been proposed as a way to recycle Pu and/or minor actinides in LWRs. It has also been proposed to replace the fertile U{sup 238} matrix of MOX with a fertile-free matrix (IMF) to reduce the production of Pu{sup 239} in the fuel system. It is important to demonstrate the performance of these fuels with the appropriate mixture of isotopes and determine what impact there might be from trace elements or contaminants. Previous work has already been done to look at weapons-grade (WG) Pu in the MOX configuration [1][2] and the reactor-grade (RG) Pu in a MOX configuration including small (4000 ppm additions of Neptunium). This program will add to the existing database by developing a wide variety of MOX fuel compositions along with new fuel compositions called inert-matrix fuel (IMF). The goal of this program is to determine the general fabrication and irradiation behavior of the proposed IMF fuel compositions. Successful performance of these compositions will lead to further selection and development of IMF for use in LWRs. This experiment will also test various inert matrix material compositions with and without quantities of the minor actinides Americium and Neptunium to determine feasibility of incorporation into the fuel matrices for destruction. There is interest in the U.S. and world-wide in the investigation of IMF (inert matrix fuels) for scenarios involving stabilization or burn down of plutonium in the fleet of existing commercial power reactors. IMF offer the potential advantage for more efficient destruction of plutonium and minor actinides (MA) relative to MOX fuel. Greater efficiency in plutonium reduction results in greater flexibility in managing plutonium inventories and in developing strategies for disposition of MA, as well as a potential for fuel cycle cost savings. Because fabrication of plutonium-bearing (and MA-bearing) fuel is expensive relative to UO{sub 2} in terms of both capital and production, cost benefit can be realized through a reduction in the number of plutonium-bearing elements required for a given burn rate. In addition, the choice of matrix material may be manipulated either to facilitate fuel recycling or to make plutonium recovery extremely difficult. In addition to plutonium/actinide management, an inert matrix fuel having high thermal conductivity may have operational and safety benefits; lower fuel temperatures could be used to increase operating and safety margins, uprate reactor power, or a combination of both. The CANDU reactor offers flexibility in plutonium management and MA burning by virtue of online refueling, a simple bundle design, and good neutron economy. A full core of inert matrix fuel containing either plutonium or a plutonium-actinide mix can be utilized, with plutonium destruction efficiencies greater than 90%, and high (>60%) actinide destruction efficiencies. The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) could allow additional possibilities in the design of an IMF bundle, since the tighter lattice pitch and light-water coolant reduce or eliminate the need to suppress coolant void reactivity, allowing the center region of the bundle to include additional fissile material and to improve actinide burning. The ACR would provide flexibility for management of plutonium and MA from the existing LWR fleet, and would be complementary to the AFCI program in the U.S. Many of the fundamental principles concerning the use of IMF are nearly identical in LWRs and the ACR, including fuel/coolant compatibility, fuel fabrication, and fuel irradiation behavior. In addition, the U.S. and Canada both

  12. Process Modeling Phase I Summary Report for the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pannala, Sreekanth [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Boyalakuntla, Dhanunjay S [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of preliminary work at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate application of computational fluid dynamics modeling to the scale-up of a Fluidized Bed Chemical Vapor Deposition (FBCVD) process for nuclear fuels coating. Specifically, this work, referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase I, was conducted between January 1, 2006 and March 31, 2006 in support of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Program. The objective was to develop, demonstrate and "freeze" a version of ORNL's computational model of the TRI ISOtropic (TRISO) fuel-particle coating process that can be specifically used to assist coater scale-up activities as part of the production of AGR-2 fuel. The results in this report are intended to serve as input for making decisions about initiating additional FBCVD modeling work (referred to as Modeling Scale-Up Phase II) in support of AGR-2. The main computational tool used to implement the model is the general-purpose multiphase fluid-dynamics computer code known as MFIX (Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges), which is documented in detail on the DOE-sponsored website http://www.mfix.org. Additional computational tools are also being developed by ORNL for post-processing MFIX output to efficiently summarize the important information generated by the coater simulations. The summarized information includes quantitative spatial and temporal measures (referred to as discriminating characteristics, or DCs) by which different coater designs and operating conditions can be compared and correlated with trends in product quality. The ORNL FBCVD modeling work is being conducted in conjunction with experimental coater studies at ORNL with natural uranium CO (NUCO) and surrogate fuel kernels. Data are also being obtained from ambient-temperature, spouted-bed characterization experiments at the University of Tennessee and theoretical studies of carbon and silicon carbide chemical vapor deposition kinetics at Iowa State University. Prior to the current scale-up activity, considerable effort has gone in to adapting the MFIX code to incorporate the unique features of fuel coating reactors and also in validating the resulting simulation features with experimental observations. Much of this work is documented in previous AGR reports and publications (Pannala et al., 2004, Pannala et al., 2005, Boyalakuntla et al., 2005a, Boyalakuntla et al., 2005b and Finney et al., 2005). As a result of the previous work described above, the ORNL coater model now has the capability for simulating full spatio-temporal details of the gas-particle hydrodynamics and gas-particle heat and mass transfer in the TRISO coater. This capability provides a great deal of information about many of the processes believed to control quality, but the model is not yet sufficiently developed to fully predict coating quality for any given coater design and/or set of operating conditions because the detailed chemical reaction kinetics needed to make the model fully predictive are not yet available. Nevertheless, the model at its current stage of development already provides the most comprehensive and detailed quantitative information available about gas flows, solid flows, temperatures, and species inside the coater during operation. This level of information ought to be highly useful in expediting the scale-up process (e.g., in correlating observations and minimizing the number of pilot-scale tests required). However, previous work had not yet demonstrated that the typical design and/or operating changes known to affect product quality at the lab scale could be clearly discriminated by the existing model. The Modeling Scale-Up Phase I work was initiated to produce such a demonstration, and two detailed examples are discussed in this report.

  13. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Development of a Compact Liquid Fueled Pulsed Detonation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    automotive ignition system. Pre-heated liquid fuel is sprayed into a current of pre-heated air and thoroughly Hz. The PDE set up is water cooled allowing long duration testing. Diagnostics are performed using it necessary to preheat the fuel and/or air and to use nozzles to finely atomize the fuel spray. Liquid fueled

  14. Energy Conversion DevicesEnergy Conversion Devices Fuel Cell Electrocatalyst Development Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Conversion Devices Fuel cells are a critical component in the Ovonic total hydrogen system approach. #12 catalysts for air electrodes for the ORFC * Ovonic Regenerative Fuel Cell #12;Texaco Ovonic Fuel Cell Ovonic Fuel Cell Company, LLC non-precious metal catalysts regenerative braking energy absorption

  15. NREL Develops Technique to Measure Membrane Thickness and Defects in Polymer Electrode Membrane Fuel Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes NREL's accomplishments in fuel cell membrane electrode assembly research and development. Work was performed by the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center and the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  16. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan - Cover

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCost Savings | DepartmentCase Study FuelInformationFuel

  17. Development of Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent CompanyaUSAMP AMD 602 -Energy

  18. Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway Vehicle

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services AuditTransatlantic RelationsDepartment of EnergySuperTruck

  19. Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient Class 8 Highway Vehicle |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services AuditTransatlantic RelationsDepartment of

  20. Development of Ultra-low Platinum Alloy Cathode Catalyst for PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services AuditTransatlantic RelationsDepartmentJon T. Carter,NOTand||

  1. Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Company AgreesDesireeDepartmentLifeDepartment|

  2. Development and Demonstration of Fischer-Tropsch Fueled Heavy-Duty Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Companya new high capacity anodewith Control

  3. Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient HD Engine (DOE SuperTruck

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Companya new high capacity anodewithDepartment

  4. Development and Demonstration of a Fuel-Efficient HD Engine | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Companya new high capacity

  5. Development of Dual-Fuel Engine for Class 8 Applications | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Companya new highModelingDepartment

  6. Development of HC-SCR System Using Diesel Fuel as a Reductant | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent Companya newHomogeneous Charge Compressionof

  7. Developing Low-Cost, Highly Efficient Heat Recovery for Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle Battery PlantDetermineDetroitMicrochannel

  8. Fuel Tax Incidence in Developing Countries: The Case of Costa Rica | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URIFrontier, North Dakota:Coach Jump to:

  9. Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN RENEWABLE ENERGY FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTSandRefueling

  10. Articles about Wind Program Funding | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombinedDepartment2015Services »of(BENEFIT)Wind Program Funding Articles

  11. Forward Funding Why is Forward Funding useful for project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    and administrative risks to the University. Forward funding chartstrings ordinarily will be created when: · allForward Funding - 1 - Why is Forward Funding useful for project management? Forward funding. For continuing year budget segments, forward funding helps ensure (i) the timely management of payroll or other

  12. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  13. Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rod design and performance characteristics (LWBR Development Program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, W.R.; Giovengo, J.F.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) fuel rods were designed to provide a reliable fuel system utilizing thorium/uranium-233 mixed-oxide fuel while simultaneously minimizing structural material to enhance fuel breeding. The fuel system was designed to be capable of operating successfully under both load follow and base load conditions. The breeding objective required thin-walled, low hafnium content Zircaloy cladding, tightly spaced fuel rods with a minimum number of support grid levels, and movable fuel rod bundles to supplant control rods. Specific fuel rod design considerations and their effects on performance capability are described. Successful completion of power operations to over 160 percent of design lifetime including over 200 daily load follow cycles has proven the performance capability of the fuel system. 68 refs., 19 figs., 44 tabs.

  14. Now Accepting Applications: BUILD Funding Opportunity | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 14, 2014 5:00PM EST to December 19, 2014 5:00PM EST Through its annual Buildings University Innovators and Leaders Development (BUILD) funding opportunity, the Energy...

  15. Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Regional Revolving Loan Trust Fund Program, coordinated by the Empire State Development program, is operated in six regions by nonprofit organizations and provides working capital loans (up to ...

  16. The Ohio Enterprise Bond Fund (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio Enterprise Bond Fund (OEBF) was created in 1988 to promote economic development, create and retain quality jobs and assist governmental operations. The program enables non-profit and for...

  17. Agricultural Bio-Fueled Generation of Electricity and Development of Durable and Efficent NOx Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Rodney

    2007-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to define the scope and cost of a technology research and development program that will demonstrate the feasibility of using an off-the-shelf, unmodified, large bore diesel powered generator in a grid-connected application, utilizing various blends of BioDiesel as fuel. Furthermore, the objective of project was to develop an emissions control device that uses a catalytic process and BioDiesel (without the presence of Ammonia or Urea)to reduce NOx and other pollutants present in a reciprocating engine exhaust stream with the goal of redefining the highest emission reduction efficiencies possible for a diesel reciprocating generator. Process: Caterpillar Power Generation adapted an off-the-shelf Diesel Generator to run on BioDiesel and various Petroleum Diesel/BioDiesel blends. EmeraChem developed and installed an exhaust gas cleanup system to reduce NOx, SOx, volatile organics, and particulates. The system design and function was optimized for emissions reduction with results in the 90-95% range;

  18. Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Air Products and Chemicals

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

  19. INITIAL IRRADIATION OF THE FIRST ADVANCED GAS REACTOR FUEL DEVELOPMENT AND QUALIFICATION EXPERIMENT IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  20. Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Funding Agencies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising ScienceRecentRegional companies eyeRelationshipsFunding