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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Performance of a low-cost iron ore as an oxygen carrier for Chemical Looping Combustion of gaseous fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work evaluates the performance of an iron ore, mainly composed of Fe2O3, as an oxygen carrier (OC) for Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) with gaseous fuels. The OC was characterized by TGA and evaluated in a continuous 500 Wth CLC unit, using CH4, syngas and a PSA off-gas as fuels. The OC was able to fully convert syngas at 880 °C. However, lower conversion rates were observed with methane-containing fuels. The addition of a Ni-based OC was evaluated in order to increase the reactivity of the OC with methane. In spite of this, an absence of catalytic effect was observed for the Ni-based OC. A deep analysis was carried out into the reasons for the absence of catalytic effect of the Ni-based OC. The performance of the iron ore with regard to attrition and fluidization behaviour was satisfactory throughout 50 h of hot operation in the continuous CLC plant. Thus, this low cost material is a suitable OC for gaseous fuels mainly composed of H2 and CO.

Miguel A. Pans; Pilar Gayán; Luis F. de Diego; Francisco García-Labiano; Alberto Abad; Juan Adánez.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling &...

3

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Advanced High Efficiency Clean Diesel Combustion with Low Cost...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency Clean Diesel Combustion with Low Cost for Hybrid Engines Advanced High Efficiency Clean Diesel Combustion with Low Cost for Hybrid Engines Clean, in-cylinder combustion...

5

Development of Fuel-Flexible Combustion Systems Utilizing Opportunity...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fuel-Flexible Combustion Systems Utilizing Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines - Fact Sheet, May 2014 Development of Fuel-Flexible Combustion Systems Utilizing Opportunity Fuels in...

6

Fuel Effects on Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Effects on Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High-Efficiency Clean-Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High-Efficiency...

7

Method of combustion for dual fuel engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and a method of introducing a primary fuel, which may be a coal water slurry, and a high combustion auxiliary fuel, which may be a conventional diesel oil, into an internal combustion diesel engine comprises detecting the load conditions of the engine, determining the amount of time prior to the top dead center position of the piston to inject the main fuel into the combustion chamber, and determining the relationship of the timing of the injection of the auxiliary fuel into the combustion chamber to achieve a predetermined specific fuel consumption, a predetermined combustion efficiency, and a predetermined peak cylinder firing pressure. 19 figures.

Hsu, B.D.; Confer, G.L.; Zujing Shen; Hapeman, M.J.; Flynn, P.L.

1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

8

Method of combustion for dual fuel engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and a method of introducing a primary fuel, which may be a coal water slutty, and a high combustion auxiliary fuel, which may be a conventional diesel oil, into an internal combustion diesel engine comprises detecting the load conditions of the engine, determining the amount of time prior to the top dead center position of the piston to inject the main fuel into the combustion chamber, and determining the relationship of the timing of the injection of the auxiliary fuel into the combustion chamber to achieve a predetermined specific fuel consumption, a predetermined combustion efficiency, and a predetermined peak cylinder firing pressure.

Hsu, Bertrand D. (Erie, PA); Confer, Gregory L. (Erie, PA); Shen, Zujing (Erie, PA); Hapeman, Martin J. (Edinboro, PA); Flynn, Paul L. (Fairview, PA)

1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

9

Complete Fuel Combustion for Diesel Engines Resulting in Greatly...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Complete Fuel Combustion for Diesel Engines Resulting in Greatly Reduced Emissions and Improved Fuel Efficiency Complete Fuel Combustion for Diesel Engines Resulting in Greatly...

10

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fuel Combustion Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Combustion Lab Fuel Combustion Lab NREL's Fuel Combustion Laboratory focuses on characterizing fuels at the molecular level. This information can then be used to understand and predict the fuel's effect on engine performance and emissions. By understanding the effects of fuel chemistry on ignition we can develop fuels that enable more efficient engine designs, using both today's technology and future advanced combustion concepts. This lab supports the distributed Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory, and the Biofuels activity. Photo of assembled IQT. Ignition Quality Tester The central piece of equipment in the Fuel Combustion Laboratory is the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT(tm)). The IQT(tm) is a constant volume combustion vessel that is used to study ignition properties of liquid

11

Combustion of Solid Biomass: Classification of Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion of solid biomass and the classification of these fuels are considered. Firstly the different methods of combustion appliances and plants are outlined from a ... view. The forms and types of solid biomass

Jenny M. Jones; Amanda R. Lea-Langton…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Effect of fuel injection strategies on the combustion process in a PFI boosted SI engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A low-cost solution based on fuel injection strategies was investigated to optimize the combustion process in a boosted port fuel injection spark ignition (PFI SI) engine. The goal was to reduce the fuel consumption

S. S. Merola; P. Sementa; C. Tornatore…

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Pulse Combustion Characteristics of Various Gaseous Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pulse combustion performance of fuels with low and high heating values is also compared. ... Selected gaseous fuels such as low molecular weight hydrocarbons, high molecular weight hydrocarbons, biofuels, and mixed fuels are tested for pulse combustion, and their operational properties are presented and compared. ... Heat transfer data for several exptl. ...

Wu Zhonghua; Arun S. Mujumdar

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

14

Sewage sludge ash as an alternative low-cost oxygen carrier for chemical looping combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, novel low-cost oxygen carriers containing Fe2O3 are evaluated for use in chemical looping combustion. Sewage sludge ashes and reference samples were...2...) fuel and a solid fuel (hard coal) were t...

Ewelina Ksepko

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Fuel Modification t Facilitate Future Combustion Regimes? | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Modification t Facilitate Future Combustion Regimes? Fuel Modification t Facilitate Future Combustion Regimes? 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference...

16

Prediction of the Effects of Ethanol-Diesel Fuel Blends on Diesel Engine Performance Characteristics, Combustion, Exhaust Emissions, and Cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bilgin et al.’s and ?ahin’s experimental studies which have been used in comparisons with numerical results of the present model have been performed in a single cylinder diesel engine at Karadeniz Technical University, Engineering Faculty Mechanical Engineering Department Internal Combustion Engines Laboratory. ... Durgun, O. A practical method for calculation engine cycles Union of Chambers of Turkish Engineers and Architects, Chamber of Mech. ... Dieselhols (blends of diesels, biodiesels, and alcohols) have received considerable attention because of their low emission of CO2. ...

Z. ?ahin; O. Durgun

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

17

Gas turbine alternative fuels combustion characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was conducted to obtain combustion performance and exhaust pollutant concentrations for specific synthetic hydrocarbon fuels. Baseline comparison fuels used were gasoline and diesel fuel number two. Testing was done over a range of fuel to air mass ratios, total mass flow rates, and input combustion air temperatures in a flame-tube-type gas turbine combustor. Test results were obtained in terms of released heat and combustion gas emission values. The results were comparable to those obtained with the base fuels with variations being obtained with changing operating conditions. The release of carbon particles during the tests was minimal. 22 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Rollbuhler, R.J.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion Non-Petroleum-Based Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit...

19

Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry Factors Affecting HCCI Combustion Phasing for Fuels with Single- and Dual-Stage Chemistry 2004...

20

Accurate Predictions of Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

on Combustion and Emissions in Engines Using CFD Simulations With Detailed Fuel Chemistry Accurate Predictions of Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions in Engines Using...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fuels Performance: Navigating the Intersection of Fuels and Combustion...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemistry, ignition kinetics, combustion, and emissions, with innovative approaches to engines and fuels that meet drivers' expectations, while minimizing petroleum use and GHGs....

22

Estimation of Fuel Savings by Recuperation of Furnace Exhausts to Preheat Combustion Air  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recovery of waste energy in furnace exhaust gases is gaining in importance as fuel costs continue to escalate. Installation of a recuperator in the furnace exhaust stream to preheat the combustion air can result in considerable savings in fuel...

Rebello, W. J.; Kohnken, K. H.; Phipps, H. R., Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Coal fuel slurry for internal combustion engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A technoeconomic study of the production of coal-water fuel slurry for internal combustion engines and thermal power plants was performed. Based on the accumulated experimental data, it was found that, in the ...

N. I. Red’kina; G. S. Khodakov; E. G. Gorlov

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Societal lifecycle costs of cars with alternative fuels/engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effectively addressing concerns about air pollution (especially health impacts of small-particle air pollution), climate change, and oil supply insecurity will probably require radical changes in automotive engine/fuel technologies in directions that offer both the potential for achieving near-zero emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases and a diversification of the transport fuel system away from its present exclusive dependence on petroleum. The basis for comparing alternative automotive engine/fuel options in evolving toward these goals in the present analysis is the “societal lifecycle cost” of transportation, including the vehicle first cost (assuming large-scale mass production), fuel costs (assuming a fully developed fuel infrastructure), externality costs for oil supply security, and damage costs for emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases calculated over the full fuel cycle. Several engine/fuel options are considered—including current gasoline internal combustion engines and a variety of advanced lightweight vehicles: internal combustion engine vehicles fueled with gasoline or hydrogen; internal combustion engine/hybrid electric vehicles fueled with gasoline, compressed natural gas, Diesel, Fischer–Tropsch liquids or hydrogen; and fuel cell vehicles fueled with gasoline, methanol or hydrogen (from natural gas, coal or wind power). To account for large uncertainties inherent in the analysis (for example in environmental damage costs, in oil supply security costs and in projected mass-produced costs of future vehicles), lifecycle costs are estimated for a range of possible future conditions. Under base-case conditions, several advanced options have roughly comparable lifecycle costs that are lower than for today's conventional gasoline internal combustion engine cars, when environmental and oil supply insecurity externalities are counted—including advanced gasoline internal combustion engine cars, internal combustion engine/hybrid electric cars fueled with gasoline, Diesel, Fischer–Tropsch liquids or compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fuel cell cars. The hydrogen fuel cell car stands out as having the lowest externality costs of any option and, when mass produced and with high valuations of externalities, the least projected lifecycle cost. Particular attention is given to strategies that would enhance the prospects that the hydrogen fuel cell car would eventually become the Car of the Future, while pursuing innovations relating to options based on internal combustion engines that would both assist a transition to hydrogen fuel cell cars and provide significant reductions of externality costs in the near term.

Joan M Ogden; Robert H Williams; Eric D Larson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Carbonation of Fly Ash in Oxy-fuel CFB Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxy-fuel combustion of fossil fuel is one of the most promising methods to produce a stream of concentrated CO2 ready for sequestration. Oxy-fuel FBC (fluidized bed combustion) can use limestone as a sorbent for

Chunbo Wang; Lufei Jia; Yewen Tan…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A Comparison of Combustion and Emissions of Diesel Fuels and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A Comparison of Combustion and Emissions of Diesel Fuels and Oxygenated Fuels in a Modern DI Diesel Engine A Comparison of Combustion and Emissions of Diesel Fuels and Oxygenated...

27

State Grid Biomass Fuel and Combustion Technology Laboratory...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Combustion Technology Laboratory Jump to: navigation, search Name: State Grid Biomass Fuel and Combustion Technology Laboratory Place: Beijing Municipality, China Sector: Biomass...

28

Fuel Effects on Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion Engines Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

29

Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion Engines | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion: Heavy-Duty Optical-Engine Research Greenpower Trap Mufflerl System Low-Temperature Diesel Combustion...

30

Fuel reforming for scramjet thermal management and combustion optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel reforming for scramjet thermal management and combustion optimization E. DANIAU* , M. BOUCHEZ in a Scramjet combustion chamber. Another critical point is that mixing and combustion should be sufficiently

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

32

Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

33

Non-Petroleum Based Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion (Agreement...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-Petroleum Based Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion (Agreement 13425) Non-Petroleum Based Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion (Agreement 13425) Presentation from the U.S. DOE...

34

The train fueling cost minimization problem with fuzzy fuel prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The train fueling cost minimization problem is to find a scheduling and fueling strategy such that the fueling cost is minimized and no train runs out of fuel. Since fuel prices vary by location and time from mon...

Xiang Li; Chen-Fu Chien; Lixing Yang…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Combustion and Fuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by NREL at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced combustion and fuels.

36

NREL: Transportation Research - Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Combustion and Engine Performance Photo of a gasoline direct injection piston with injector. NREL studies the effects of new fuel properties on performance and emissions in...

37

Gasoline-Like Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion Regimes | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Regimes Gasoline-Like Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion Regimes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

38

Gasoline-like fuel effects on advanced combustion regimes | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

regimes Gasoline-like fuel effects on advanced combustion regimes 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

39

Fuels Performance: Navigating the Intersection of Fuels and Combustion (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the only national laboratory dedicated 100% to renewable energy and energy efficiency, recognize that engine and infrastructure compatibility can make or break the impact of even the most promising fuel. NREL and its industry partners navigate the intersection of fuel chemistry, ignition kinetics, combustion, and emissions, with innovative approaches to engines and fuels that meet drivers' expectations, while minimizing petroleum use and GHGs.

Not Available

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion: Heavy-Duty Optical-Engine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion: Heavy-Duty Optical-Engine Research Fuels and Combustion Strategies for High-Efficiency Clean-Combustion...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Fuel Chemistry and Cetane Effects on HCCI Performance, Combustion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Statistical Overview of 5 Years of HCCI Fuel and Engine Data from ORNL Response of Oil Sands Derived Fuels in Diesel HCCI Operation Combustion, Efficiency, and Fuel Effects in a...

42

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Reynolds Logistics Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on AddThis.com... July 23, 2011 Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs F ind out how Reynolds Logistics uses electric vehicles to offset petroleum

43

FOSSIL-FUEL COSTS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

FOSSIL-FUEL-BASED energy production, mostly from coal and oil, causes $120 billion worth of health and other non-climate-related damages in the U.S. each year that are not figured into the price of energy, says a National Research Council report ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

44

A fundamental study of biomass oxy-fuel combustion and co-combustion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??While oxy-fuel combustion research is developing and large scale projects are proceeding, little information is available on oxy-biomass combustion and cocombustion with coal. To address… (more)

Farrow, Timipere Salome

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

46

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.iea.org/co2highlights/co2highlights.pdf CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Screenshot References: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion[1] Overview "This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2008 selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information" Excel Spreadsheet References ↑ "CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion"

47

Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Alternative Fuels -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Emissions Characterization from Advanced Combustion & Alternative Fuels Exhaust emissions from engines operating in advanced combustion modes such as PCCI (Premixed Charge Compression Ignition) and HCCI (Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition) are analyzed with an array of analytical tools. Furthermore, emissions from a variety of alternative fuels and mixtures thereof with conventional gasoline and diesel fuels are also measured. In addition to measuring the criteria pollutants nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HCs) are also measured and categorized based on chemistry. These chemical details of the emissions provide important information for optimizing combustion processes to maximize fuel efficiency while minimizing emissions

48

Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oxygen Carriers for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Process Regenerable Mixed Copper-Iron-Inert Support Oxygen Carriers National Energy Technology Laboratory Contact NETL...

49

Advancement in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling for Compression...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Spray, Combustion, & Emission Modeling using KH-ACT Primary Breakup Model & Detailed Chemistry Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advancement in Fuel Spray and...

50

Fuel Chemistry and Cetane Effects on HCCI Performance, Combustion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Coal-Derived Liquids to Enable HCCI Technology Fuel Chemistry and Cetane Effects on HCCI Performance, Combustion, and Emissions Cetane Performance and Chemistry Comparing...

51

Energy Tips: Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Type (sales unit) Type (sales unit) Energy Content Combustion (Btu/sales unit) Efficiency (%) Natural Gas (therm) 100,000 81.7 Natural Gas (cubic foot) 1,030 81.7 Distillate/No. 2 Oil (gallon) 138,700 84.6 Residual/No. 6 Oil (gallon) 149,700 86.1 Coal (ton) 27,000,000 87.6 Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation Benchmarking the fuel cost of steam generation ($/1000 lbs of steam) is an effective way to assess the efficiency of your steam system. This cost is dependent upon fuel type, unit fuel cost, boiler efficiency, feedwater temperature, and steam pressure. This calculation provides a good first approximation for the cost of generating steam and serves as a tracking device to allow for boiler performance monitoring. Table 1 shows the heat input required to produce one pound of saturated

52

Novel New Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping Combustion of Solid Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel New Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping Combustion of Solid Fuels ... A loop of chem. ... Energy Combust. ...

Yueying Fan; Ranjani Siriwardane

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

53

Combustion and fuel characterization of coal-water fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities conducted under this contract include studies on the combustion and fireside behavior of numerous coal-water fuels (CWFs). The work has been broken down into the following areas: Task 1 -- Selection of Candidate Fuels; Task 2 -- Bench Scale Tests; Task 3 -- CWF Preparation and Supply; Task 4 -- Combustion Characterization; Task 5 -- Ash Deposition and Performance Testing; Task 6 -- Commercial Applications. This report covers Task 6, the study of commercial applications of CWFs as related to the technical and economic aspects of the conversion of existing boilers and heaters to CWF firing. This work involves the analysis of seven units of various sizes and configurations firing several selected CWFs. Three utility boilers, two industrial boilers, and two process heater designs are included. Each of the units was considered with four primary selected CWFs. A fifth fuel was considered for one of the utility units. A sixth fuel, a microfine grind CWF, was evaluated on two utility units and one industrial unit. The particular fuels were chosen with the objective of examining the effects of coal source, ash level, ash properties, and beneficiation on the CWF performance and economics of the seven units. 10 refs., 81 figs., 80 tabs.

Beal, H.R.; Gralton, G.W.; Gronauer, T.W.; Liljedahl, G.N.; Love, B.F.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Vehicle Cost Vehicle Cost Calculator to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on AddThis.com... Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Also

55

Evaluation of Stationary Fuel Cell Deployments, Costs, and Fuels (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes NREL's technology validation of stationary fuel cell systems and presents data on number of deployments, system costs, and fuel types.

Ainscough, C.; Kurtz, J.; Peters, M.; Saur, G.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

57

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop May 8 th , 2011, Arlington, VA Shimshon Gottesfeld, CTO The Fuel Cell Cost Challenge 2 CellEra's goal - achieve price parity with...

58

Costs Associated With Propane Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with propane vehicle fueling infrastructure. It provides an overview of the equipment and processes necessary to develop a propane fueling station and offers estimated cost ranges.

Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehiclesthe societal cost of hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles with modelsand running costs) than hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles in 2030.

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

GRH 12-01 Fireside Corrosion in Oxy-fuel Combustion Poster 0108  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals are to: (1) Achieve 90% CO{sub 2} capture at no more than a 35% increase in levelized cost of electricity of post-combustion capture for new and existing conventional coal-fired power plants; (2) Provide high-temperature corrosion information to aid in materials development and selection for oxy-fuel combustion; and (3) Identify corrosion mechanism and behavior differences between air- and oxy-firing.

G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; G. H. Meier; B. Lutz; K. Jung; N. Mu; N. M. Yanar; F. S. Pettit; J. Zhu; A. Wise; D. Laughlin; S. Sridhar

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

62

Hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and benefits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrogen fuel and vehicles are assessed and compared to other alternative fuels and vehicles. The cost, efficiency, and emissions of hydrogen storage, delivery, and use in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are estimated. Hydrogen made thermochemically from natural gas and electrolytically from a range of electricity mixes is examined. Hydrogen produced at central plants and delivered by truck is compared to hydrogen produced on-site at filling stations, fleet refueling centers, and residences. The impacts of hydrogen HEVs, fueled using these pathways, are compared to ultra-low emissions gasoline internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs), advanced battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and HEVs using gasoline or natural gas.

Berry, G.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Fluidized bed combustion of alternative solid fuels: Status, successes and problems of the technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper surveys the literature on some of the more important alternative fuels for fluidized bed combustion (FBC) and also makes specific recommendations about problems or major issues with those fuels. Particular attention is given to the use of FBC for coal wastes, wood pulp sludges, petroleum coke and biomass residues. These fuels are emphasized because of their current economic importance, particularly in North America. Such fuels, which are often described as {open_quotes}alternative{close_quotes}, or {open_quotes}opportunity{close_quotes} fuels, also lend themselves to FBC applications if they are to be combusted in an environmentally benign way. Further, waste or low grade fuels are normally available at low or even negative costs. This factor is particularly important in North America, where an essentially flat energy market exists, and low electricity prices mean that considerations other than energy sales must often drive the project economics. 57 refs., 2 tabs.

Anthony, E.J. [CETC, Natural Resources (Canada)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop May 8 th , 2011, Arlington, VA Shimshon Gottesfeld, CTO The Fuel Cell Cost Challenge 2 CellEra's goal - achieve price parity with incumbents earlier on in market entry process ! Mainstream Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell ( PEM) Cost Barriers 3 Graphite / stainless steel hardware Acidic membrane Platinum based electrodes Cost barriers deeply embedded in core tech materials BOM-based cost barriers - 90% of stack cost Cost volatility - Platinum $500/Oz - $2,500/Oz The possibility of an OH - ion conducting membrane 4 Non-acidic membrane CellEra Took Advantage of this Opportunity A new type of membrane component with potential for strong fuel cell cost cuts was revealed in 2006, but was accompanied by general industry skepticism

65

Engine combustion control at low loads via fuel reactivity stratification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compression ignition (diesel) engine uses two or more fuel charges during a combustion cycle, with the fuel charges having two or more reactivities (e.g., different cetane numbers), in order to control the timing and duration of combustion. By appropriately choosing the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot). At low load and no load (idling) conditions, the aforementioned results are attained by restricting airflow to the combustion chamber during the intake stroke (as by throttling the incoming air at or prior to the combustion chamber's intake port) so that the cylinder air pressure is below ambient pressure at the start of the compression stroke.

Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

66

Development of Cost Effective Oxy-Combustion Technology for Retrofitting Coal-Fired Boilers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cost effeCtive Cost effeCtive oxy-Combustion teChnology for retrofitting Coal-fireD boilers Background Electric power generation from fossil fuels represents one of the largest contributors to greenhouse gas emissions, not just in the United States, but throughout the world. Various technologies and concepts are being investigated as means to mitigate carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. The concept of pulverized coal (PC) oxy-combustion is one potential economical solution, whereby coal is combusted in an enriched oxygen environment using pure oxygen diluted with recycled flue gas. In this manner, the flue gas is composed primarily of CO 2 and H 2 O, so that a concentrated stream of CO 2 is produced by simply condensing the water in the exhaust stream. An advantage of

67

Heat-Release Behavior of Fuel Combustion Additives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heat-Release Behavior of Fuel Combustion Additives ... Heats of combustion were determined in a constant-volume calorimeter by an independent test laboratory using ASTM procedure D 240.14 ... We probed for a solvent effect using several hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon mixtures. ...

Jimmie C. Oxley; James L. Smith; Evan Rogers; Wen Ye; Allen A. Aradi; Timothy J. Henly

2001-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

68

Synthetic and Jet Fuels Pyrolysis for Cooling and Combustion Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phenomenon (heat and mass transfers, pyrolysis, combustion) in a cooling channel surrounding a SCRamjet regeneratively cooled SCRamjet is provided to get a large vision of the fuel nature impact on the system of supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRamjet) [1]. For such high velocity, the total temperature of external air

Boyer, Edmond

69

Fuel-NOx Formation during Low-Grade Fuel Combustion in a Swirling-Flow Burner.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Insufficient knowledge of fireside behavior in the near-burner region during biomass combustion is one of major factors preventing widespread use of this renewable fuel… (more)

Wu, Chunyang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fuel-NOx Formation during Low-Grade Fuel Combustion in a Swirling-Flow Burner.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Insufficient knowledge of fireside behavior in the near-burner region during biomass combustion is one of major factors preventing widespread use of this renewable fuel in… (more)

Wu, Chunyang 1975-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Fuel Properties to Enable Lifted-Flame Combustion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Page 1 E.Kurtz File Name.pptx Fuel Properties to Enable Lifted Flame Combustion Eric Kurtz Ford Motor Company June 19, 2014 FT017 This presentation does not contain any...

72

Chapter 7 - Chemical-looping processes for fuel-flexible combustion and fuel production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical-Looping Combustion (CLC) is a rapidly emerging technology for clean combustion of fossil and renewable fuels. In CLC, the combustion of a fuel is broken down into two, spatially separated steps: The oxidation of fuel in contact with an ‘oxygen carrier’ (typically a metal oxide), and the subsequent reoxidation of the carrier with air. CLC thus produces sequestration-ready CO2 streams with only minor efficiency penalties for CO2 capture. While recent interest in chemical looping was almost exclusively focused on combustion, the underlying reaction engineering principle forms a flexible platform for fuel conversion with a long history in chemical engineering. This chapter gives a brief review of the status of chemical-looping processes for fuel conversion, focused predominantly on reforming and partial oxidation of fossil and renewable fuels and on the impact of fuel composition on combustion.

Saurabh Bhavsar; Michelle Najera; Amey More; Götz Veser

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Solid fuel combustion system for gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion system for a gas turbine engine includes a carbonizer outside of the engine for gasifying coal to a low Btu fuel gas in a first fraction of compressor discharge, a pressurized fluidized bed outside of the engine for combusting the char residue from the carbonizer in a second fraction of compressor discharge to produce low temperature vitiated air, and a fuel-rich, fuel-lean staged topping combustor inside the engine in a compressed air plenum thereof. Diversion of less than 100% of compressor discharge outside the engine minimizes the expense of fabricating and maintaining conduits for transferring high pressure and high temperature gas and incorporation of the topping combustor in the compressed air plenum of the engine minimizes the expense of modifying otherwise conventional gas turbine engines for solid fuel, pressurized fluidized bed combustion.

Wilkes, Colin (Lebanon, IN); Mongia, Hukam C. (Carmel, IN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Method for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview The removal of CO2 from power plants is challenging because existing methods to separate CO2 from the gas mixture requires a significant fraction of the power plant output. Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel technology that utilizes a metal oxide oxygen carrier to transport oxygen to the fuel thereby avoiding direct contact between fuel and air. The use of CLC has the advantages of reducing the energy penalty while

75

Dynamic stability, blowoff, and flame characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxy-fuel combustion is a promising technology to implement carbon capture and sequestration for energy conversion to electricity in power plants that burn fossil fuels. In oxy-fuel combustion, air separation is used to ...

Shroll, Andrew Philip

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation covers the topic of the cost of fuel to general electricity for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

77

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

78

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This revised ITP tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Pollutant Emissions from Gasoline Combustion. 1. Dependence on Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pollutant Emissions from Gasoline Combustion. 1. Dependence on Fuel Structural Functionalities H O fractions of gasoline fuels, the Utah Surrogate Mechanisms is extended to include submecha- nisms of gasoline surrogate compounds using a set of mechanism generation techniques. The mechanism yields very good

Utah, University of

80

Functionalized Graphene Sheet Colloids for Enhanced Fuel/Propellant Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(7) Colloids containing various nanostructured ignition agents may allow for the distributed ignition (or heating) of fuels using light sources; distributed ignition, as opposed to single-point ignition, could greatly improve combustion efficiencies. ... (23, 24) FGSs are also readily dispersible in many hydrocarbon fuels and propellants without the need of surfactants and may provide significantly higher surface area (>1800 m2/g)(24) than their oxide counterparts, with heats of combustion close to that of aluminum (31.1 kJ/g of aluminum versus 32.8 kJ/g of carbon). ... The fuel colloids studied, particularly ones containing FGSs, enhance the reaction rates through several mechanisms including enhanced heat transfer (radiation and conduction) and chemical reactivity (catalysis and carbon oxidation), a result we believe can be replicated in liquid fuels/air combustion problems involving petroleum derived and synthetic hydrocarbons. ...

Justin L. Sabourin; Daniel M. Dabbs; Richard A. Yetter; Frederick L. Dryer; Ilhan A. Aksay

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Superheated fuel injection for combustion of liquid-solid slurries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device are claimed for obtaining, upon injection, flash evaporation of a liquid in a slurry fuel to aid in ignition and combustion. The device is particularly beneficial for use of coal-water slurry fuels in internal combustion engines such as diesel engines and gas turbines, and in external combustion devices such as boilers and furnaces. The slurry fuel is heated under pressure to near critical temperature in an injector accumulator, where the pressure is sufficiently high to prevent boiling. After injection into a combustion chamber, the water temperature will be well above boiling point at a reduced pressure in the combustion chamber, and flash boiling will preferentially take place at solid-liquid surfaces, resulting in the shattering of water droplets and the subsequent separation of the water from coal particles. This prevents the agglomeration of the coal particles during the subsequent ignition and combustion process, and reduces the energy required to evaporate the water and to heat the coal particles to ignition temperature. The overall effect will be to accelerate the ignition and combustion rates, and to reduce the size of the ash particles formed from the coal. 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Robben, F.A.

1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

82

DOE cost-shared in situ combustion projects revisited  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its enhanced oil recovery (EOR) program, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations sponsored several cost-shared in situ combustion projects in the 1960s and 1970s. The goal of these projects was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of in situ combustion as a thermal oil recovery technique and provide information in the public domain as a means of reducing the risks associated with these high cost ventures. This study reviewed specific features of the cost-shared demonstration and experimental projects, and examined the causes that led to their success or failure. The failed projects were compared with the successful projects under similar settings to further document why these projects failed. The lessons learned were detailed.

Sarathi, P.S.; Olsen, D.K. [NIPER/BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering database, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical database will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical database to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology, will be provided during field testing. Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFs, and two conventionally cleaned coals for the field test. Approximately nine BCFs will be in dry ultra fine coal (DUC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Up to 25 additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements. 9 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.'' The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE's laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Alarming Oxygen Depletion Caused by Hydrogen Combustion and Fuel Cells and their Resolution by Magnegas$^{TM}$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We recall that hydrogen combustion does resolve the environmental problems of fossil fuels due to excessive emission of carcinogenic substances and carbon dioxide. However, hydrogen combustion implies the permanent removal from our atmosphere of directly usable oxygen, a serious environmental problem called oxygen depletion, since the combustion turns oxygen into water whose separation to restore the original oxygen is prohibitive due to cost. We then show that a conceivable global use of hydrogen in complete replacement of fossil fuels would imply the permanent removal from our atmosphere of 2.8875x10^7 metric tons O_2/day. Fuel cells are briefly discussed to point out similarly serious environmental problems, again, for large uses. We propose the possibility of resolving these problems by upgrading hydrogen to the new combustible fuel called magnegas^TM, whose chemical structure is composed by the new chemical species of magnecules, whose energy content and other features are beyond the descriptive capaciti...

Santilli, R M

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Ethanol diesel dual fuel clean combustion with FPGA enabled control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sophisticated engine controls have progressively become vital enablers for implementing clean and efficient combustion. The low temperature combustion in diesel engines is a viable combustion mode that offers ultra-low nitrogen oxides and dry soot emissions, yet only feasible under tightly controlled operating conditions. In this work, the dual fuel application of ethanol and diesel is studied for clean and efficient combustion. A set of real-time controllers has been configured to control the common-rail pressure and injection events, in concert with the use of two fuels in a high compression ratio diesel engine. An improved control algorithm has been implemented into the field programmable gate array devices to promptly execute the injection commands of the port and direct injection events. Such reliable and prompt control of fuel injection has been identified as critical to safely enable simultaneously low nitrogen oxides and soot combustion, especially when excessive or inadequate rate of exhaust gas recirculation is imminent. High load clean combustion was achieved with the improved control system.

Xiaoye Han; Jimi Tjong; Graham T. Reader; Ming Zheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

AMO Fuel and Feedstock Flexibility: Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fact sheet summarizing a project to develop and demonstrate a full-scale fuel handling and combustion system

88

Combustion characteristics of coal fuels in adiabatic diesel engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the combustion characteristics of coal fuels in adiabatic diesel engines. For this purpose engine testing was carried out by the fumigation of fine coal powder to the intake of an insulated and uncooled single cylinder diesel engine. The engine tests conducted include three types of fuels - Diesel fuel No. 2 (DF-2), Dual fuel (DF-2 + Coal), and Coal fuel. Excellent combustion characteristics of coal fuels were obtained in the present work in an adiabatic engine operating at high temperatures. The ''thermal ignition'' concept uncovered in this investigation led to a hot ''ignition chamber'' which provided ignition of the coal fuel. The high temperature engine with the ''ignition chamber'' permitted engine operation on 100% coal fuel without any external ignition aids or compression ignition. With the addition of a glow plug, the coal fueled engine was successfully cold started. For the coal fueled engine tests, analysis of cylinder pressure data showed rapid heat release rates, shorter combustion duration and very fast burning of coal powder fuel. Preliminary results of the apparent indicated cycle efficiency calculated from the heat release data, indicate that 100% coal powder fueled engine has higher cycle efficiency than DF-2 fueled engine in an adiabatic configuration. The problems encountered during the engine tests include: variation in the engine speed and load due to non-uniform coal flow rate by the coal feed system, contamination of the lubricating oil with fine coal powder, and wear of conventional piston rings. However, these problems can be solved with an improved coal feed system and wear resistant ceramic materials for the piston rings. 33 refs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Woods, M.E.; Valdmanis, E.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Method and system for low-NO.sub.x dual-fuel combustion of liquid and/or gaseous fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for combustion in which a pressurized preheated liquid fuel is atomized and a portion thereof flash vaporized, creating a mixture of fuel vapor and liquid droplets. The mixture is mixed with primary combustion oxidant, producing a fuel/primary oxidant mixture which is then injected into a primary combustion chamber in which the fuel/primary oxidant mixture is partially combusted, producing a secondary gaseous fuel containing hydrogen and carbon oxides. The secondary gaseous fuel is mixed with a secondary combustion oxidant and injected into the second combustion chamber wherein complete combustion of the secondary gaseous fuel is carried out. The resulting second stage flue gas containing very low amounts of NO.sub.x is then vented from the second combustion chamber.

Gard, Vincent; Chojnacki, Dennis A; Rabovitser, Ioseph K

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE), will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering data base, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical data base will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical data base to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology, will be provided during field testing.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

upon fuel cell stack performance, catalyst cost, stackin 2025, the fuel cell system cost (stack and BOP) is aboutaffect the cost of fuel cell stack. In a recent report by

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Advanced Combustion Concepts - Enabling Systems and Solutions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuel efficiency as key market driver Stringent emission requirements System cost of advanced combustion Targets 30% fuel efficiency improvement SULEV emissions...

93

Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant Process Heaters- Fact Sheet 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fact sheet summarizing a project to develop and demonstrate a full-scale fuel handling and combustion system

94

Kinetic Modeling of Combustion Characteristics of Real Biodiesel Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biodiesel fuels are of much interest today either for replacing or blending with conventional fuels for automotive applications. Predicting engine effects of using biodiesel fuel requires accurate understanding of the combustion characteristics of the fuel, which can be acquired through analysis using reliable detailed reaction mechanisms. Unlike gasoline or diesel that consists of hundreds of chemical compounds, biodiesel fuels contain only a limited number of compounds. Over 90% of the biodiesel fraction is composed of 5 unique long-chain C{sub 18} and C{sub 16} saturated and unsaturated methyl esters. This makes modeling of real biodiesel fuel possible without the need for a fuel surrogate. To this end, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed for determining the combustion characteristics of a pure biodiesel (B100) fuel, applicable from low- to high-temperature oxidation regimes. This model has been built based on reaction rate rules established in previous studies at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Computed results are compared with the few fundamental experimental data that exist for biodiesel fuel and its components. In addition, computed results have been compared with experimental data for other long-chain hydrocarbons that are similar in structure to the biodiesel components.

Naik, C V; Westbrook, C K

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

95

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2012 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel...

96

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel CellCost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation - Compressed Hydrogen and PEM

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier Presentation at the AMFC Workshop, May 8, Arlington, VA amfc050811gottesfeldcellera.pdf More Documents &...

98

Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Workshop Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop This is the agenda from the November 27, 2012, Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop, held at the National Renewable...

99

Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels AgencyCompany...

100

Environmental impact of fossil fuel combustion in power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All the recent developments in the combustion systems employed for power generation have been based on environmental considerations. Combustion modifications have been developed and utilised in order to control NO{sub x} emissions and improvements continue to be made as the legislative requirements tighten. Chemical processes and fuel switching are used to control SO{sub x} emissions. After nitrogen, carbon dioxide is the major gas emitted from the combustion process and its potential potency as a greenhouse gas is well documented. Increased efficiency cycles, mainly based on natural gas as the prime fuel, can minimise the amount of CO{sub x} produced per unit of power generated. As the economics of natural gas utilisation become less favourable a return to clean coal technology based power generation processes may be required.

Allen, J.W.; Beal, P.R. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Emission Control Cost-Effectiveness of Alternative-Fuel Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1990. "l’he Economicsof Alternative Fuel Use: Subsfitt~/ingMcOartland. 1990. "Alternative Fuels for Pollution Control:Policy Levers for Alternative Fuels: Costs, Energy Security,

Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel; Olmstead, Janis

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this program was to develop low-emissions, efficient fuel-flexible combustion technology which enables operation of a given gas turbine on a wider range of opportunity fuels that lie outside of current natural gas-centered fuel specifications. The program encompasses a selection of important, representative fuels of opportunity for gas turbines with widely varying fundamental properties of combustion. The research program covers conceptual and detailed combustor design, fabrication, and testing of retrofitable and/or novel fuel-flexible gas turbine combustor hardware, specifically advanced fuel nozzle technology, at full-scale gas turbine combustor conditions. This project was performed over the period of October 2008 through September 2011 under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-08NT05868 for the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled "Fuel Flexible Combustion Systems for High-Efficiency Utilization of Opportunity Fuels in Gas Turbines". The overall objective of this program was met with great success. GE was able to successfully demonstrate the operability of two fuel-flexible combustion nozzles over a wide range of opportunity fuels at heavy-duty gas turbine conditions while meeting emissions goals. The GE MS6000B ("6B") gas turbine engine was chosen as the target platform for new fuel-flexible premixer development. Comprehensive conceptual design and analysis of new fuel-flexible premixing nozzles were undertaken. Gas turbine cycle models and detailed flow network models of the combustor provide the premixer conditions (temperature, pressure, pressure drops, velocities, and air flow splits) and illustrate the impact of widely varying fuel flow rates on the combustor. Detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms were employed to compare some fundamental combustion characteristics of the target fuels, including flame speeds and lean blow-out behavior. Perfectly premixed combustion experiments were conducted to provide experimental combustion data of our target fuels at gas turbine conditions. Based on an initial assessment of premixer design requirements and challenges, the most promising sub-scale premixer concepts were evaluated both experimentally and computationally. After comprehensive screening tests, two best performing concepts were scaled up for further development. High pressure single nozzle tests were performed with the scaled premixer concepts at target gas turbine conditions with opportunity fuels. Single-digit NOx emissions were demonstrated for syngas fuels. Plasma-assisted pilot technology was demonstrated to enhance ignition capability and provide additional flame stability margin to a standard premixing fuel nozzle. However, the impact of plasma on NOx emissions was observed to be unacceptable given the goals of this program and difficult to avoid.

Venkatesan, Krishna

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

FE's Advanced Combustion R&D Seeks Innovative Ways to Lower Cost...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

FE's Advanced Combustion R&D Seeks Innovative Ways to Lower Cost of Capturing Carbon Emissions from Coal Fired Power Plants FE's Advanced Combustion R&D Seeks Innovative Ways to...

104

Chemical Looping Combustion System-Fuel Reactor Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a process in which an oxygen carrier is used for fuel combustion instead of air or pure oxygen as shown in the figure below. The combustion is split into air and fuel reactors where the oxidation of the oxygen carrier and the reduction of the oxidized metal occur respectively. The CLC system provides a sequestration-ready CO2 stream with no additional energy required for separation. This major advantage places combustion looping at the leading edge of a possible shift in strict control of CO2 emissions from power plants. Research in this novel technology has been focused in three distinct areas: techno-economic evaluations, integration of the system into power plant concepts, and experimental development of oxygen carrier metals such as Fe, Ni, Mn, Cu, and Ca. Our recent thorough literature review shows that multiphase fluid dynamics modeling for CLC is not available in the open literature. Here, we have modified the MFIX code to model fluid dynamic in the fuel reactor. A computer generated movie of our simulation shows bubble behavior consistent with experimental observations.

Gamwo, I.K.; Jung, J. (ANL); Anderson, R.R.; Soong, Y.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PEMFC technology for transportation must be competitive with internal combustion engine powertrains in a number of key metrics, including performance, life, reliability, and cost. Demonstration of PEMFC cost competitiveness has its own challenges because the technology has not been applied to high volume automotive markets. The key stack materials including membranes, electrodes, bipolar plates, and gas diffusion layers have not been produced in automotive volumes to the exacting quality requirements that will be needed for high stack yields and to the evolving property specifications of high performance automotive stacks. Additionally, balance-of-plant components for air, water, and thermal management are being developed to meet the unique requirements of fuel cell systems. To address the question of whether fuel cells will be cost competitive in automotive markets, the DOE has funded this project to assess the high volume production cost of PEM fuel cell systems. In this report a historical perspective of our efforts in assessment of PEMFC cost for DOE is provided along with a more in-depth assessment of the cost of compressed hydrogen storage is provided. Additionally, the hydrogen storage costs were incorporated into a system cost update for 2004. Assessment of cost involves understanding not only material and production costs, but also critical performance metrics, i.e., stack power density and associated catalyst loadings that scale the system components. We will discuss the factors influencing the selection of the system specification (i.e., efficiency, reformate versus direct hydrogen, and power output) and how these have evolved over time. The reported costs reflect internal estimates and feedback from component developers and the car companies. Uncertainty in the cost projection was addressed through sensitivity analyses.

Eric J. Carlson

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

Alarming Oxygen Depletion Caused by Hydrogen Combustion and Fuel Cells and their Resolution by Magnegas$^{TM}$  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We recall that hydrogen combustion does resolve the environmental problems of fossil fuels due to excessive emission of carcinogenic substances and carbon dioxide. However, hydrogen combustion implies the permanent removal from our atmosphere of directly usable oxygen, a serious environmental problem called oxygen depletion, since the combustion turns oxygen into water whose separation to restore the original oxygen is prohibitive due to cost. We then show that a conceivable global use of hydrogen in complete replacement of fossil fuels would imply the permanent removal from our atmosphere of 2.8875x10^7 metric tons O_2/day. Fuel cells are briefly discussed to point out similarly serious environmental problems, again, for large uses. We propose the possibility of resolving these problems by upgrading hydrogen to the new combustible fuel called magnegas^TM, whose chemical structure is composed by the new chemical species of magnecules, whose energy content and other features are beyond the descriptive capacities of quantum chemistry. In fact, magnegas contains up to 50% hydrogen, while having combustion exhaust with: 1) a positive oxygen balance (releasing more oxygen in the exhaust than that used in the combustion); 2) no appreciable carcinogenic or toxic substances; 3) considerably reduced carbon dioxide as compared to fossil fuels; 4) considerably reduced nitrogen oxides; and 5) general reduction of pollutants in the exhaust up to 96% of current EPA standards.

R. M. Santilli

2000-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

107

Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop Roster of Participants  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is the list of attendees from the November 27, 2012, Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop.

108

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Tools Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on AddThis.com...

109

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vehicle -$1,612 No engine Vehicle retail cost to consumercosts, for hydrogen FCVs and conventional gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles (

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

HEFA and Fischer-Tropsch Jet Fuel Cost Analyses | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

HEFA and Fischer-Tropsch Jet Fuel Cost Analyses HEFA and Fischer-Tropsch Jet Fuel Cost Analyses This is a presentation from the November 27, 2012, Sustainable Alternative Fuels...

111

Pilot scale production and combustion of liquid fuels from refuse derived fuel (RDF): Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EnerTech is developing a process for producing pumpable slurry fuels, comparable to Coal-Water-Fuels (CWF), from solid Refuse Derived Fuels (RDF). Previous reports have described the characteristics of the enhanced carbonized RDF slurry fuels. This paper summarizes those fuel characteristics and reports on the latest combustion tests performed with the final product fuel. The objective of this research was to determine the boiler and emission performance from the carbonized RDF slurry fuel using statistical screening experiments. Eight combustion tests were performed with a pilot scale pulverized coal/oil boiler simulator, with CO, SO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x} emissions determined on-line. The combustion tests produced simultaneous CO and NO{sub x} emissions well below and SO{sub 2} emissions comparable to the promulgated New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). This research will form the basis for later combustion experiments to be performed with the carbonized RDF slurry fuel, in which dioxin/furan and trace metal emissions will be determined.

Klosky, M.K. [EnerTech Environmental, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Plasma-Enhanced Combustion of Hydrocarbon Fuels and Fuel Blends Using Nanosecond Pulsed Discharges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project had as its goals the study of fundamental physical and chemical processes relevant to the sustained premixed and non-premixed jet ignition/combustion of low grade fuels or fuels under adverse flow conditions using non-equilibrium pulsed nanosecond discharges.

Cappelli, Mark; Mungal, M Godfrey

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fuel Cell System Cost for Transporationa--2008 Cost Estimate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell System Cost for Fuel Cell System Cost for Transportation-2008 Cost Estimate National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program NREL/BK-6A1-45457 May 2009 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

114

Pulverizer performance upgrades lower fuel costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 2002 and 2005, combustion equipment modifications were carried out at St. Johns River Power Plant in Jacksonville, FL. The effort succeeded in obtaining the desired emission reductions and to increase petroleum coke consumption. Since 2005 the boilers typically fired a blend of 70% Colombia coal and 30% delayed petroleum coke. To realize significant fuel savings, the pulverizer capacity was increased by 14% to allow a lower grade coal to be used. The article describes the changes made to the pulverizer to allow 11,800 Btu/pound coal to be burnt, with annual savings of $6.3 m beginning in 2006. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Hansen, T.

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

Durable, Low Cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Durable, Low-cost, Improved Durable, Low-cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes US Department of Energy Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Kickoff Meeting, Washington DC, February 13, 2007 Michel Fouré Project Objectives z To develop a low cost (vs. perfluorosulfonated ionomers), durable membrane. z To develop a membrane capable at 80°C at low relative humidity (25-50%). z To develop a membrane capable of operating at 120°C for brief periods of time. z To elucidate membrane degradation and failure mechanisms. U:jen/slides/pres.07/FC kickoff Washington DC 2-13-07 2 Technical Barriers Addressed z Membrane Cost z Membrane Durability z Membrane capability to operate at low relative humidity. z Membrane capability to operate at 120ºC for brief period of times.

116

Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost Advancing the science of fuel...

117

Formulation and Combustion of Glycerol–Diesel Fuel Emulsions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Formulation and Combustion of Glycerol–Diesel Fuel Emulsions ... (4) In most large-scale biodiesel operations, the glycerol is purified and released to market as any number of purified products ranging from crude (50–85% purity) to United States Pharmacopeia (USP) (96–99.8% ... Therefore, purification of glycerol remains an active field of industrial research, and producers continue to seek high-volume markets to unload their products. ...

Scott J. Eaton; George N. Harakas; Richard W. Kimball; Jennifer A. Smith; Kira A. Pilot; Mitch T. Kuflik; Jeremy M. Bullard

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

118

Co-Combustion of Refuse Derived Fuel with Anthracites in a CFB Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combustion of Refuse derived fuel (RDF) is considered as a priority solution to energy recovery from municipal solid waste (MSW). The co-combustion characteristics of anthracite coals with RDF were determined in ...

Dong-Won Kim; Jong-Min Lee; Jae-Sung Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Investigation of Coal Fueled Chemical Looping Combustion Using Fe3O4 as Oxygen Carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel combustion technique with CO2 separation. Magnetite (Fe3O4) was selected as the oxygen carrier and Shenhua coal (Inner Mongolia, China) as the fuel for this study. The...

Wenguo Xlang; Xiaoyan Sun; Sha Wangt…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis, held April 16, 2013.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fuel Displacement & Cost Potential of CNG, LNG, and LPG Vehicles...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

LPG Vehicles Fuel Displacement & Cost Potential of CNG, LNG, and LPG Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

122

Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost Technology available for licensing: Two alternative strategies for detecting impurities in the hydrogen used in fuel...

123

FUEL FORMULATION EFFECTS ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION, COMBUSTION, EMISSIONS AND EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes work under a U.S. DOE sponsored Ultra Clean Fuels project entitled ''Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas,'' Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41098. In this study we have examined the incremental benefits of moving from low sulfur diesel fuel and ultra low sulfur diesel fuel to an ultra clean fuel, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel produced from natural gas. Blending with biodiesel, B100, was also considered. The impact of fuel formulation on fuel injection timing, bulk modulus of compressibility, in-cylinder combustion processes, gaseous and particulate emissions, DPF regeneration temperature and urea-SCR NOx control has been examined. The primary test engine is a 5.9L Cummins ISB, which has been instrumented for in-cylinder combustion analysis and in-cylinder visualization with an engine videoscope. A single-cylinder engine has also been used to examine in detail the impacts of fuel formulation on injection timing in a pump-line-nozzle fueling system, to assist in the interpretation of results from the ISB engine.

Boehman, A; Alam, M; Song, J; Acharya, R; Szybist, J; Zello, V; Miller, K

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

Parametric examination of the destruction of availability due to combustion for a range of conditions and fuels.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A comprehensive second law analysis of combustion for a range of conditions and fuels was completed. Constant pressure, constant volume and constant temperature combustion processes… (more)

Chavannavar, Praveen Shivshankar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

CNG Shuttles Save Fuel CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus on AddThis.com... June 1, 2013

126

The Impact of Alternative Fuels on Combustion Kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research targets the development of detailed kinetic models to quantitatively characterize the impact of alternative fuels on the performance of Navy turbines and diesel engines. Such impacts include kinetic properties such as cetane number, flame speed, and emissions as well as physical properties such as the impact of boiling point distributions on fuel vaporization and mixing. The primary focus will be Fischer-Tropsch liquids made from natural gas, coal or biomass. The models will include both the effects of operation with these alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional petroleum-based fuels. The team will develop the requisite kinetic rules for specific reaction types and incorporate these into detailed kinetic mechanisms to predict the combustion performance of neat alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional fuels. Reduced kinetic models will be then developed to allow solution of the coupled kinetics/transport problems. This is a collaboration between the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CSM/LLNL team plans to build on the substantial progress made in recent years in developing accurate detailed chemical mechanisms for the oxidation and pyrolysis of conventional fuels. Particular emphasis will be placed upon reactions of the isoalkanes and the daughter radicals, especially tertiary radicals, formed by abstraction from the isoalkanes. The various components of the program are described. We have been developing the kinetic models for two iso-dodecane molecules, using the same kinetic modeling formalisms that were developed for the gasoline and diesel primary reference fuels. These mechanisms, and the thermochemical and transport coefficient submodels for them, are very close to completion at the time of this report, and we expect them to be available for kinetic simulations early in the coming year. They will provide a basis for prediction and selection of desirable F-T molecules for use in jet engine simulations, where we should be able to predict the ignition, combustion and emissions characteristics of proposed fuel components. These mechanisms include the reactions and chemical species needed to describe high temperature phenomena such as shock tube ignition and flammability behavior, and they will also include low temperature kinetics to describe other ignition phenomena such as compression ignition and knocking. During the past years, our hydrocarbon kinetics modeling group at LLNL has focused a great deal on fuels typical of gasoline and diesel fuel. About 10 years ago, we developed kinetic models for the fuel octane primary reference fuels, n-heptane [1] and iso-octane [2], which have 7 and 8 carbon atoms and are therefore representative of typical gasoline fuels. N-heptane represents the low limit of knock resistance with an octane number of 0, while iso-octane is very knock resistant with an octane number of 100. High knock resistance in iso-octane was attributed largely to the large fraction of primary C-H bonds in the molecule, including 15 of the 18 C-H bonds, and the high bond energy of these primary bonds plays a large role in this knock resistance. In contrast, in the much more ignitable n-heptane, 10 of its 16 C-H bonds are much less strongly bound secondary C-H bonds, leading to its very low octane number. All of these factors, as well as a similarly complex kinetic description of the equally important role of the transition state rings that transfer H atoms within the reacting fuel molecules, were quantified and collected into large kinetic reaction mechanisms that are used by many researchers in the fuel chemistry world.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Performance of Gasoline Fuels and Surrogates in Gasoline HCCI Combustion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Almost 2 dozen gasoline fuels, blending components, and surrogates were evaluated in a single-cylinder HCCI gasoline engine for combustion, emissions, and efficiency performance.

128

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative fuels combustion Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alternative fuels combustion Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 14th North American Waste to...

129

The Impact of Biomass Fuels on Flame Structure and Pollutant Formation during Biomass Cofiring Combustion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Cofiring of biomass in pulverized coal boilers for large-scale power generation requires that current combustion standards of stability, reliability, emission and fuel conversion efficiency are… (more)

Holtmeyer, Melissa Lauren

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Automotive and MHE Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on AddThis.com...

131

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants - Energy Information...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants Report This report has been discontinued. Cost and quality of fuels for electric plant information can now be found in the detailed...

132

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar titled...

133

Formation of fuel NO[sub x] during black-liquor combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel NOx and thermal NOx were measured in combustion gases from black liquors in two laboratory furnaces. Combustion at 950 C in air (8% O[sub 2]) produced NOx concentrations of 40-80ppm. Combustion at 950 C in synthetic air containing no nitrogen (21% 0[sub 2] in Ar) produced the same result, demonstrating that all of the NOx produced during combustion at 950 C was fuel NOx. Formation of fuel NOx increased moderately with increasing temperature in the range of 800-1,000 C, but temperature sensitivity of fuel NOx was much less than that of thermal NOx. The results imply that the major source of NOx in recovery furnace emissions is the fuel NOx in recovery furnace formed by conversion of liquor-bound nitrogen during combustion. This is consistent with thermal NOx theory, which postulates that black-liquor combustion temperatures are too low to generate significant amounts of thermal NOx.

Nichols, K.M. (Weyerhaeuser Paper Co., Tacoma, WA (United States)); Lien, S.J. (Inst. of Paper Science and Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

PEM fuel cell cost minimization using ``Design For Manufacture and Assembly`` techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells fueled with direct hydrogen have demonstrated substantial technical potential to replace Internal Combustion Engines (ICE`s) in light duty vehicles. Such a transition to a hydrogen economy offers the potential of substantial benefits from reduced criteria and greenhouse emissions as well as reduced foreign fuel dependence. Research conducted for the Ford Motor Co. under a US Department of Energy contract suggests that hydrogen fuel, when used in a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), can achieve a cost per vehicle mile less than or equal to the gasoline cost per mile when used in an ICE vehicle. However, fuel cost parity is not sufficient to ensure overall economic success: the PEM fuel cell power system itself must be of comparable cost to the ICE. To ascertain if low cost production of PEM fuel cells is feasible, a powerful set of mechanical engineering tools collectively referred to as Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) has been applied to several representative PEM fuel cell designs. The preliminary results of this work are encouraging, as presented.

Lomax, F.D. Jr.; James, B.D. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Mooradian, R.P. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

Oxy-fuel Combustion of Ethanol in Premixed Flames  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(11-14) First, measurements using a heat flux setup for liquid fuels were studied on ethanol + air combustion. ... The heat flux method builds on the principle that heat is transferred to the unburnt gas, cooling the plate, while heat transfer from the flame heats the plate. ... A detailed kinetic scheme was compiled using known data on EtOH kinetics and is self-consistent in that it closely predicts laminar flame speed of EtOH, CH4, MeOH, and C2-hydrocarbons. ...

Jenny D. Nauclér; Moah Christensen; Elna J. K. Nilsson; Alexander A. Konnov

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

136

Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/Systems DE-FC02-99EE50587 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge in the development of fuel cell system technologies by providing cost and manufacturing analysis. · To develop ­ Presented results to the fuel cell industry for feedback and incorporated this into a revised baseline cost

137

Coal-water slurry fuel internal combustion engine and method for operating same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An internal combustion engine fueled with a coal-water slurry is described. About 90 percent of the coal-water slurry charge utilized in the power cycle of the engine is directly injected into the main combustion chamber where it is ignited by a hot stream of combustion gases discharged from a pilot combustion chamber of a size less than about 10 percent of the total clearance volume of main combustion chamber with the piston at top dead center. The stream of hot combustion gases is provided by injecting less than about 10 percent of the total coal-water slurry charge into the pilot combustion chamber and using a portion of the air from the main combustion chamber that has been heated by the walls defining the pilot combustion chamber as the ignition source for the coal-water slurry injected into the pilot combustion chamber.

McMillian, Michael H. (Fairmont, WV)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Effect of fuel gas composition in chemical-looping combustion with Ni-based oxygen carriers. 1. Fate of sulfur  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has been suggested among the best alternatives to reduce the economic cost of CO{sub 2} capture using fuel gas because CO{sub 2} is inherently separated in the process. For gaseous fuels, natural gas, refinery gas, or syngas from coal gasification can be used. These fuels may contain different amounts of sulfur compounds, such as H{sub 2}S and COS. An experimental investigation of the fate of sulfur during CH{sub 4} combustion in a 500 W{sub th} CLC prototype using a Ni-based oxygen carrier has been carried out. The effect on the oxygen carrier behavior and combustion efficiency of several operating conditions such as temperature and H{sub 2}S concentration has been analyzed. Nickel sulfide, Ni3S{sub 2}, was formed at all operating conditions in the fuel reactor, which produced an oxygen carrier deactivation and lower combustion efficiencies. However, the oxygen carrier recovered their initial reactivity after certain time without sulfur addition. The sulfides were transported to the air reactor where SO{sub 2} was produced as final gas product. Agglomeration problems derived from the sulfides formation were never detected during continuous operation. Considering both operational and environmental aspects, fuels with sulfur contents below 100 vppm H{sub 2}S seem to be adequate to be used in an industrial CLC plant.

Garcia-Labiano, F.; de Diego, L.F.; Gayan, P.; Adanez, J.; Abad, A.; Dueso, C. [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Fuel Effects on Low Temperature Combustion in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Six different fuels were investigated to study the influence of fuel properties on engine out emissions and performance of low temperature premixed compression ignition combustion light-duty HSDI engines

140

Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion: Heavy-Duty Optical-Engine...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

R&D Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008-2009 Fuels Technologies R&D Progress Report Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion: Heavy-Duty Optical-Engine Research...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fuel cycle cost uncertainty from nuclear fuel cycle comparison  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examined the uncertainty in fuel cycle cost (FCC) calculation by considering both model and parameter uncertainty. Four different fuel cycle options were compared in the analysis including the once-through cycle (OT), the DUPIC cycle, the MOX cycle and a closed fuel cycle with fast reactors (FR). The model uncertainty was addressed by using three different FCC modeling approaches with and without the time value of money consideration. The relative ratios of FCC in comparison to OT did not change much by using different modeling approaches. This observation was consistent with the results of the sensitivity study for the discount rate. Two different sets of data with uncertainty range of unit costs were used to address the parameter uncertainty of the FCC calculation. The sensitivity study showed that the dominating contributor to the total variance of FCC is the uranium price. In general, the FCC of OT was found to be the lowest followed by FR, MOX, and DUPIC. But depending on the uranium price, the FR cycle was found to have lower FCC over OT. The reprocessing cost was also found to have a major impact on FCC.

Li, J.; McNelis, D. [Institute for the Environment, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Yim, M.S. [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Liquid fuel vaporizer and combustion chamber having an adjustable thermal conductor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The efficiency and effectiveness of apparatuses for vaporizing and combusting liquid fuel can be improved using thermal conductors. For example, an apparatus having a liquid fuel vaporizer and a combustion chamber can be characterized by a thermal conductor that conducts heat from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The thermal conductor can be a movable member positioned at an insertion depth within the combustion chamber that corresponds to a rate of heat conduction from the combustion chamber to the vaporizer. The rate of heat conduction can, therefore, be adjusted by positioning the movable member at a different insertion depth.

Powell, Michael R; Whyatt, Greg A; Howe, Daniel T; Fountain, Matthew S

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

143

Mach 2 combustion characteristics of hydrogen/hydrocarbon fuel mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The combustion of H/sub 2//CH/sub 4/ and H/sub 2//C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ mixtures containing 10 to 70 vol pct hydrocarbon at combustor inlet Mach number 2 and temperatures 2000 to 4000 R is investigated experimentally, applying direct-connect test hardware and techniques similar to those described by Diskin and Northam (1987) in the facilities of the NASA Langley Hypersonic Propulsion Branch. The experimental setup, procedures, and data-reduction methods are described; and the results are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. Fuel type and mixture are found to have little effect on the wall heating rate measured near the combustor exit, but H/sub 2//C/sub 2/H/sub 4/ is shown to burn much more efficiently than H/sub 2//CH/sub 4/, with no pilot-off blowout equivalence ratios greater than 0.5. It is suggested that H/sub 2//hydrocarbon mixtures are feasible fuels (at least in terms of combustion efficiency) for scramjet SSTO vehicles operating at freestream Mach numbers above 4.

Diskin, G.S.; Jachimowski, C.J.; Northam, G.B.; Bell, R.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electrostatic Precipitator Collection Efficiency and Trace Element Emissions from Co-Combustion of Biomass and Recovered Fuel in Fluidized-Bed Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electrostatic Precipitator Collection Efficiency and Trace Element Emissions from Co-Combustion of Biomass and Recovered Fuel in Fluidized-Bed Combustion ... In this investigation, electrostatic precipitator fractional collection efficiency and trace metal emissions were determined experimentally at a 66 MW biomass-fueled bubbling fluidized-bed combustion plant. ... The solid fuel combustion-generated particle emissions typically consist of two types of particles:? fine particles approximately 0.1?1 ?m in diameter that are formed from the ash-forming species that are volatilized during combustion and residual ash particles larger than 1 ?m in diameter that are formed from mineral impurities in the fuels (4). ...

Terttaliisa Lind; Jouni Hokkinen; Jorma K. Jokiniemi; Sanna Saarikoski; Risto Hillamo

2003-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

145

The influence of fuel composition on the combustion and emission characteristics of natural gas fueled engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As global energy demand rises, natural gas (NG) plays an important strategic role in energy supply. Natural gas is the cleanest fossil fuel that has been investigated extensively for use in spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines. This paper reviews the research on the effects of natural gas composition on combustion and emission characteristics of natural gas fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) and reports the most achievements obtained by researchers in this field. It has been reported that the engine performance and emission are greatly affected by varying compositions of natural gas. The most important NG fuel property is the Wobbe number (WN). Generally, it was agreed by researchers that the fuels with higher hydrocarbons, higher WN, and higher energy content exhibited better fuel economy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions were also increased for gases with higher levels of higher WN, while total hydrocarbons (THCs), carbon monoxide (CO), showed some reductions for these gases. On the other hand, particulate matter (PM) emissions did not show any fuel effects. Moreover, adding of small fractions of higher alkanes, such as ethane and propane, significantly improved ignition qualities of natural gas engines. The results presented provide a good insight for researchers to pursue their future research on natural gas fueled ICEs.

Amir-Hasan Kakaee; Amin Paykani; Mostafa Ghajar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

DFMA Cost Estimates of Fuel-Cell/Reformer Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Car Technical Barriers Addressed: Fuel Flexible Processors Technical Barriers N: Cost Component designs of complete automotive FC power systems: · Onboard gasoline fuel processor and PEM fuel cell ·Fuel cell stacks ·Air supply and humidification ·Thermal management ·Water management ·Fuel Supply

147

Fuel combustion exhibiting low NO{sub x} and CO levels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus are disclosed for safely combusting a fuel in such a manner that very low levels of NO{sub x} and CO are produced. The apparatus comprises an inlet line containing a fuel and an inlet line containing an oxidant. Coupled to the fuel line and to the oxidant line is a mixing means for thoroughly mixing the fuel and the oxidant without combusting them. Coupled to the mixing means is a means for injecting the mixed fuel and oxidant, in the form of a large-scale fluid dynamic structure, into a combustion region. Coupled to the combustion region is a means for producing a periodic flow field within the combustion region to mix the fuel and the oxidant with ambient gases in order to lower the temperature of combustion. The means for producing a periodic flow field can be a pulse combustor, a rotating band, or a rotating cylinder within an acoustic chamber positioned upstream or downstream of the region of combustion. The mixing means can be a one-way flapper valve; a rotating cylinder; a rotating band having slots that expose open ends of said fuel inlet line and said oxidant inlet line simultaneously; or a set of coaxial fuel annuli and oxidizer annuli. The means for producing a periodic flow field may or may not be in communication with an acoustic resonance. When employed, the acoustic resonance may be upstream or downstream of the region of combustion. 14 figs.

Keller, J.O.; Bramlette, T.T.; Barr, P.K.

1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Chemical-Looping Combustion with Fuel Oil in a 10 kW Pilot Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical-Looping Combustion with Fuel Oil in a 10 kW Pilot Plant ... The unit is based on interconnected fluidized beds and is similar to the design originally presented by Lyngfelt et al.(12) In the riser section there is a fast-fluidized regime, whereas in the loop-seals and the fuel reactor there is a bubbling regime. ... Energy Combust. ...

Patrick Moldenhauer; Magnus Rydén; Tobias Mattisson; Ali Hoteit; Aqil Jamal; Anders Lyngfelt

2014-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

149

Modeling of Air-Fuel Ratio Dynamics of Gasoline Combustion Engine with ARX Network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DS-06-1351 Modeling of Air-Fuel Ratio Dynamics of Gasoline Combustion Engine with ARX Network Tomás dynamics of gasoline engines during transient operation. With a collection of input-output data measured;Modeling of Air-Fuel Ratio Dynamics of Gasoline Combustion Engine with ARX Network I. INTRODUCTION

Johansen, Tor Arne

150

(Coordinated research on fuel cycle cost)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) have been exploring the possibility of parallel studies on the externals costs of employing fuel cycles to deliver energy services. These studies are of particular importance following the activities of the US National Energy Strategy (NES), where the potential discrepancies between market prices and the social costs of energy services were raised as significant policy concerns. To respond to these concerns, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Resources for the Future (RFF) have begun a collaborative effort for the DOE to investigate the external costs, or externalities, generated by cradle to grave fuel cycle activities. Upon initiating this project, the CEC expressed an interest to the DOE that Europe should conduct a parallel study and that the two studies should be highly coordinated for consistency in the results. This series of meetings with members of the CEC was undertaken to resolve some issues implied by pursuing parallel, coordinated studies; issues that were previously defined by the August meetings. In addition, it was an opportunity for some members of the US research team and the DOE sponsor to meet with their European counterparts for the study, as well as persons in charge of research areas that ultimately would play a key role in the European study.

Cantor, R.A.; Shelton, R.B.; Krupnick, A.J.

1990-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Vehicle Incremental Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) must allocate the

152

Fuel-Induced System Responses The Role Unconventional Fuels May Play in Altering Exhaust Conditions from Conventional and Low Temperature Modes of Combustion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fuel properties and low temperature combustion e alters conditions thereby affecting exhaust-based thermoelectric device performance

153

Modeling the Effects of Steam-Fuel Reforming Products on Low Temperature Combustion of n-Heptane  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The effects of blends of base fuel (n-heptane) and fuel-reformed products on the low-temperature combustion process were investigated.

154

Calculating and reporting changes in net heat of combustion of wood fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is often confusion when reporting net heat of combustion changes in wood fuel due to changes in moisture content (MC) of the fuel. This paper was written to identify and clarify the bases on which changes in net heat of combustion can be calculated. Formulae for calculating changes in net heat of combustion of wood fuel due to MC changes are given both on a per unit weight of fuel basis and on an actual gain basis. Examples which illustrate the difference in the two reporting approaches, as well as the importance of both approaches, are presented. (Refs. 7).

Harris, R.A.; McMinn, J.W.; Payne, F.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Spent Isopropanol Solution as Possible Liquid Fuel for Moving Bed Reactor in Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spent Isopropanol Solution as Possible Liquid Fuel for Moving Bed Reactor in Chemical Looping Combustion ... The fuels, such as natural gas, coal, petroleum coke, and biomass combusted by CLC are frequently studied by various researchers(17, 26-31) and compared in the previous studies;(20, 33) however, only few studies on liquid fuel combustion are reported. ... Ishida, M.; Takeshita, K.; Susuki, K.; Ohba, T..Application of Fe2O3-Al2O3 composite particles as solid looping material of the chemical loop combustor Energy Fuels 2005, 19, 2514– 2518 ...

Ping-Chin Chiu; Young Ku; Hsuan-Chih Wu; Yu-Lin Kuo; Yao-Hsuan Tseng

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

Oscillatory Flame Response in Acoustically Coupled Fuel Droplet Combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and volumetric heats of combustion in biofuels render themVaporization [kJ/kg] Heat of Combustion [kJ/kg] †Estimated

Sevilla Esparza, Cristhian Israel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Global partitioning of NOx sources using satellite observations: Relative roles of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion, biomass burning and soil emissions Lyatt Jaegle´ ,a Linda Steinberger,a Randall V. Martinbc anthropogenic emissions, mostly resulting from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, are superimposed-CHEM chemical transport model. Top-down NOx sources are partitioned among fuel combustion (fossil fuel

Lyatt Jaeglé

158

Novel Water-Neutral Diesel Fuel Processor and Sulfur Trap„Precision Combustion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Water-Neutral Diesel Fuel Novel Water-Neutral Diesel Fuel Processor and Sulfur Trap-Precision Combustion Background Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology for auxiliary power units (APUs) offers the potential for major contributions toward Department of Energy (DOE) objectives such as clean energy deployment and improved efficiency. Reforming of conventional liquid fuels to produce synthesis gas (syngas) fuel for SOFC stacks is a practical approach for operating fuel cell APUs

159

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Natural Gas Rate and Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

160

Effects of Fuel Injection Timing on Combustion and Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Fueled with Diesel?Propane Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effects of Fuel Injection Timing on Combustion and Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Fueled with Diesel?Propane Blends ... State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, China, and College of Vehicle & Motive Power Engineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, 471003, China ... It is the third most widely used vehicle fuel behind the gasoline and diesel fuels.1 Diesel fuel has been widely used in internal combustion engines due to its high thermal efficiency and low CO2 emission. ...

Zhihao Ma; Zuohua Huang; Chongxiao Li; Xinbin Wang; Haiyan Miao

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance Project Summary Full Title: H2 Production Infrastructure Analysis - Task 2: Cost and Performance of H2 Fueling Appliances Project ID: 80 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Costs; steam methane reforming (SMR); autothermal reforming (ATR); hydrogen fueling Purpose The purpose of the analysis was to estimate the capital cost and the resulting cost of hydrogen of several types of methane-fueled hydrogen production systems. A bottoms-up cost analysis was conducted of each system to generate a system design and detailed bill-of-materials. Estimates of the overall capital cost of the hydrogen production appliance were generated. This work supports Systems Analysis Milestone A1. ("Complete techno-economic analysis on production and delivery technologies currently

162

High-bandwidth Modulation of H2/Syngas Fuel to Control Combustion Dynamics in Micro-Mixing Lean Premix Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this program was to develop and demonstrate fuel injection technologies that will facilitate the development of cost-effective turbine engines for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, while improving efficiency and reducing emissions. The program involved developing a next-generation multi-point injector with enhanced stability performance for lean premix turbine systems that burn hydrogen (H2) or synthesis gas (syngas) fuels. A previously developed injector that demonstrated superior emissions performance was improved to enhance static flame stability through zone staging and pilot sheltering. In addition, piezo valve technology was implemented to investigate the potential for enhanced dynamic stability through high-bandwidth modulation of the fuel supply. Prototype injector and valve hardware were tested in an atmospheric combustion facility. The program was successful in meeting its objectives. Specifically, the following was accomplished: Demonstrated improvement of lean operability of the Parker multi-point injector through staging of fuel flow and primary zone sheltering; Developed a piezo valve capable of proportional and high-bandwidth modulation of gaseous fuel flow at frequencies as high as 500 Hz; The valve was shown to be capable of effecting changes to flame dynamics, heat release, and acoustic signature of an atmospheric combustor. The latter achievement indicates the viability of the Parker piezo valve technology for use in future adaptively controlled systems for the mitigation of combustion instabilities, particularly for attenuating combustion dynamics under ultra-lean conditions.

Jeff Melzak; Tim Lieuwen; Adel Mansour

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System Discussion Fuel Cell Tech Team FreedomCar Detroit. MI October 20, 2004 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge Presentation 3 A fuel cell vehicle would contain the PEMFC system modeled in this project along with additional

164

Oscillatory Flame Response in Acoustically Coupled Fuel Droplet Combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alternative Fuels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18] R. Bechtold. Alternative Fuels Guidebook. SAE, 1997. [and R. Walther. Alternative fuels and their potential impact

Sevilla Esparza, Cristhian Israel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement Damodara Poojary, Jacques Nicole,...

166

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement Improved System Performance and...

167

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel-cell vehicles in 2030. This comparative analysis, based on costfuel cell or hydrogen ICE) and all-electric vehicles. According to the analysis, the societal cost

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop Roster of Participants...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Workshop Roster of Participants Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop Roster of Participants This is the list of attendees from the November 27, 2012, Sustainable Alternative...

169

Webinar: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis, originally presented on April 16, 2013.

170

Effects of Fuel Physical Properties on Diesel Engine Combustion Using Diesel and Bio-Diesel Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computational study is performed to investigate the effects of physical property on diesel engine combustion characteristics using bio-diesel fuels. Properties of typical bio-diesel fuels that were either calculated or measured are used in the study and the simulation results are compared with those of conventional diesel fuels. Sensitivity of the computational results to individual physical properties is also investigated, and the results can provide information for desirable characteristics of the blended fuels. The properties considered in this study include liquid density, vapor pressure, surface tension, liquid viscosity, liquid thermal conductivity, liquid specific heat, latent heat, vapor specific heat, vapor diffusion coefficient, vapor viscosity and vapor thermal conductivity. The results show significant effects of the fuel physical properties on ignition delay and burning rates at various engine operating conditions. It is seen that there is no single physical property that dominates differences of ignition delay between diesel and bio-diesel fuels. However, among the 11 properties considered in the study, the simulation results were found to be most sensitive to the liquid fuel density, vapor pressure and surface tension through their effects on the mixture preparation processes.

Ra, Youngchul [ORNL; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Combustion engine with fuel injection system, and a spray valve for such an engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a fuel system for a combustion engine have a cylinder with an air inlet passage. It comprises: a fuel spray valve having a fuel injection nozzle for spraying fuel into the cylinder air inlet passage and having a fuel spray valve passage leading to the nozzle, means for mounting the fuel spray valve to position the nozzle to open into the cylinder air inlet passage adjacent the cylinder, a fuel pump for providing fuel under pressure to the fuel spray valve passage to be sprayed from the fuel spray valve nozzle, and a fuel heating device connectable to an electrical power supply and disposed adjacent to the valve to be energized for heating the fuel to enhance finer spraying thereof by the fuel spray valve nozzle, the fuel heating device comprising means defining a spiral fuel flow path of selected length connected to and coaxial with the fuel spray valve passage to dispose the selected length of fuel flow path closely adjacent to the fuel spray valve passage, and a fuel heating element comprising a thermistor of a ceramic material of positive temperature coefficient of resistivity arranged to heat the selected length of the spiral fuel flow path to transfer heat to the fuel flowing in the spiral fuel flow path throughout the selected length of the spiral fuel flow path to substantially heat the fuel at a location closely adjacent to the fuel spray valve passage to enhance vaporizing of fuel being sprayed from the valve nozzle.

Wechem, G.V.; Beunk, G.; Van Den Elst, F.; Gerson, P.M.

1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

172

Co-combustion of pulverized coal and solid recovered fuel in an entrained flow reactor – General combustion and ash behaviour  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-combustion of a bituminous coal and a solid recovered fuel (SRF) was carried out in an entrained flow reactor, and the influence of additives such as NaCl, PVC, ammonium sulphate, and kaolinite on co-combustion was investigated. The co-combustion experiments were carried out with SRF shares of 7.9 wt.%, 14.8 wt.% and 25 wt.%, respectively. The effect of additives was evaluated by maintaining the share of secondary fuel (mixture of SRF and additive) at 14.8 wt.%. The experimental results showed that the fuel burnout, NO and SO2 emission in co-combustion of coal and SRF were decreased with increasing share of SRF. The majority of the additives inhibited the burnout, except for NaCl which seemed to have a promoting effect. The impact of additives on NO emission was mostly insignificant, except for ammonium sulphate which greatly reduced the NO emission. For SO2 emission, it was found that all of the additives increased the S-retention in ash. Analysis of the bulk composition of fly ash from different experiments indicated that the majority of S and Cl in the fuels were released to gas phase during combustion, whereas the K and Na in the fuels were mainly retained in ash. When co-firing coal and SRF, approximately 99 wt.% of the K and Na in fly ash was present in water insoluble form such as aluminosilicates or silicates. The addition of NaCl, PVC, and ammonium sulphate generally promoted the vaporization of Na and K, resulting in an increased formation of water soluble alkalis such as alkali chlorides or sulphates. The vaporization degree of Na and K was found to be correlated during the experiments, suggesting an interaction between the vaporization of Na and K during pulverized fuel combustion. By collecting deposits on an air-cooled probe during the experiments, it was found that the ash deposition propensity in co-combustion was decreased with increasing share of SRF. The addition of NaCl and PVC significantly increased the ash deposition propensity, whereas the addition of ammonium sulphate or kaolinite showed a slight reducing effect. The chlorine content in the deposits generally implied a low corrosion potential during co-combustion of coal and SRF, except for the experiments with NaCl or PVC addition.

Hao Wu; Peter Glarborg; Flemming Jappe Frandsen; Kim Dam-Johansen; Peter Arendt Jensen; Bo Sander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles. Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles. Abstract: Low-cost...

174

Emission control cost-effectiveness of alternative-fuel vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although various legislation and regulations have been adopted to promote the use of alternative-fuel vehicles for curbing urban air pollution problems, there is a lack of systematic comparisons of emission control cost-effectiveness among various alternative-fuel vehicle types. In this paper, life-cycle emission reductions and life-cycle costs were estimated for passenger cars fueled with methanol, ethanol, liquefied petroleum gas, compressed natural gas, and electricity. Vehicle emission estimates included both exhaust and evaporative emissions for air pollutants of hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and air-toxic pollutants of benzene, formaldehyde, 1,3-butadiene, and acetaldehyde. Vehicle life-cycle cost estimates accounted for vehicle purchase prices, vehicle life, fuel costs, and vehicle maintenance costs. Emission control cost-effectiveness presented in dollars per ton of emission reduction was calculated for each alternative-fuel vehicle types from the estimated vehicle life-cycle emission reductions and costs. Among various alternative-fuel vehicle types, compressed natural gas vehicles are the most cost-effective vehicle type in controlling vehicle emissions. Dedicated methanol vehicles are the next most cost-effective vehicle type. The cost-effectiveness of electric vehicles depends on improvements in electric vehicle battery technology. With low-cost, high-performance batteries, electric vehicles are more cost-effective than methanol, ethanol, and liquified petroleum gas vehicles.

Wang, Q. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sperling, D.; Olmstead, J. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

175

Durable, Low Cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, which focuses on fuel cell membranes, was given by Michel Foure of Arkema at a meeting on new fuel cell projects in February 2007.

176

Reaction-Diffusion Model for Combustion with Fuel Consumption: I. Dirichlet Boundary Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......9JT, UK Department of Chemistry, University of Leeds...Reaction-Diffusion Model for Combustion with Fuel Consumption...SCOTT Department of Chemistry, University of Leeds...runaway in stockpiles of coal, wool, cellulose...smouldering or fully fledged combustion and their attendant......

G. ZHANG; J. H. MERKIN; S. K. SCOTT

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

An Integrated Approach for Oxy-fuel Combustion with CO2 Capture and Compression  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vent Stream Vent Stream (out) CO 2 Product Stream (out) Flue Gas Stream (in) CO 2 CCU Skid Government of Canada Gouvernement du Canada An Integrated Approach for Oxy An Integrated Approach for Oxy- -fuel Combustion with CO fuel Combustion with CO 2 2 Capture and Capture and Compression Compression Kourosh Zanganeh, Ahmed Shafeen, and Carlos Salvador Zero-Emission Technologies Group, Clean Electric Power Generation CANMET CO 2 R&D Consortium CANMET Energy Technology Centre - Ottawa The capture and storage or reuse of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the combustion of fossil fuels as well as industrial off gases represents an opportunity to achieve a significant reduction in anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Fossil fuel combustion is expected to dominate the energy structure in at least the next few decades.

178

Separation of carbon dioxide with the use of chemical-looping combustion and gasification of fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Matters regarding using new technology for chemical-looping combustion of fuels for solving the problem of...2 (CO2 sequestration) are discussed. The primary results of investigations and possible schemes for imp...

G. A. Ryabov; O. M. Folomeev; D. S. Litun; D. A. Sankin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

ORIGINAL PAPER Fireside Corrosion in Oxy-fuel Combustion of Coal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Fireside Corrosion in Oxy-fuel Combustion of Coal Gordon R. Holcomb · Joseph Tylczak the nature of coal ash deposits. Wigley and Goh [1] reported that particles in oxy-fired deposits, compared

Laughlin, David E.

180

Thermochemical conversion of fuels into hydrogen-containing gas using recuperative heat of internal combustion engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of the thermochemical recuperation of heat from the exhaust gases of internal combustion engines (ICEs) as a method of ... the steam conversion of oxygen-containing fuels into syngas were developed, a...

V. A. Kirillov; A. B. Shigarov; N. A. Kuzin…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ith fossil-fuel combustion and land-use activities threatening to double  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W ith fossil-fuel combustion and land- use activities threatening to double atmospheric carbon and now use this model to explore the response of the central Amazonian forest to an increase in biomass

Chambers, Jeff

182

Pressurised Combustion of Biomass-Derived, Low Calorific Value, Fuel Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During a 3 year (1996 – 1998) project, partly funded by the EU as part of their JOULE 3 programme, experimental and theoretical research will be done on the pressurised combustion of biomass-derived, LCV, fuel ga...

J. Andries; P. D. J. Hoppesteyn…

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hydrocarbon-fueled internal combustion engines: "the worst form of vehicle propulsion... except for all the other forms"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrocarbon-fueled internal combustion engines: "the worst form of vehicle propulsion... except of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453 Introduction Hydrocarbon-fueled internal combustion engines. For the purposes of this paper: An internal combustion engine is a heat engine (a device in which thermal energy

184

The potential for clean energy production using oxy-fuel combustion and integrated pollutant removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effective remediation of flue gas produced by an oxy-fuel coal combustion process has been proven at bench scale in the course of cooperative research between USDOE’s Albany Research Center (ARC) and Jupiter Oxygen Corporation. All combustion gas pollutants were captured, including CO2 which was compressed to a liquefied state suitable for sequestration. Current laboratory-scale research and the future of combined oxy-fuel/IPR systems are discussed.

Ochs, Thomas L.; Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Weber, Thomas (Jupiter Oxygen Corporation, Schiller Park, IL 60176).; Summers, Cathy A.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Effect of a homogeneous combustion catalyst on the combustion characteristics and fuel efficiency in a diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of a ferrous picrate based homogeneous combustion catalyst on the combustion characteristics and fuel efficiency was studied using a fully instrumented diesel engine. A naturally aspirated four stroke, single cylinder, air cooled, direct injection diesel engine was tested at engine speeds of 2800 rpm, 3200 rpm and 3600 rpm under variable load conditions, with different dosing ratio of the catalyst in a commercial diesel fuel. The results indicated that the brake specific fuel consumption decreased and the brake thermal efficiency increased with the addition of the catalyst. At the catalyst dosing ratio of 1:10,000, the brake specific fuel consumption was reduced by 3.3–4.2% at light engine load of 0.12 MPa and 2.0–2.4% at heavy engine load of 0.4 MPa due to the application of the catalyst. From the in-cylinder pressure and heat release rate analysis, it was found that the catalyst reduced ignition delay and combustion duration of fuel in the engine, resulting in slightly higher peak cylinder pressure and faster heat release rate.

Mingming Zhu; Yu Ma; Dongke Zhang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Exergy analysis of combustion characteristics and NOx emissions of a dual-fuel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion characteristics and NOx emissions of compression ignition engines working on a dual fuel mode are investigated numerically and their exergetic efficiencies are determined. The model has been validated with available experimental results. The simulation results show that dual fuel engine combustion and trend of NOx emissions are well predicted by the present model. Parametric study showed improvements in engine performance and an increase in NOx emissions with decreased advanced injection timing of the pilot fuel as well as with increased intake temperature and pilot fuel quantity. The maximum values for energy and exergy are found to be comparable.

Mohamed H. Morsy; Abdelrahman El-Leathy; Arif Hepbasli

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems: Subscale combustion testing. Topical report, Task 3.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report on the Subscale Combustor Testing performed at Textron Defense Systems` (TDS) Haverhill Combustion Laboratories for the Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program of the Westinghouse Electric Corp. This program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 1986 as an R&D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular staged, rich-lean-quench, Toroidal Vortex Slogging Combustor (TVC) concept. Fuel-rich conditions in the first stage inhibit NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen; molten coal ash and sulfated sorbent are removed, tapped and quenched from the combustion gases by inertial separation in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases, and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage, which is maintained sufficiently lean so that here, too, NO{sub x} formation is inhibited. The primary objective of this work was to verify the feasibility of a direct coal-fueled combustion system for combustion turbine applications. This has been accomplished by the design, fabrication, testing and operation of a subscale development-type coal-fired combustor. Because this was a complete departure from present-day turbine combustors and fuels, it was considered necessary to make a thorough evaluation of this design, and its operation in subscale, before applying it in commercial combustion turbine power systems.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Flexible Fuel vehicle cost calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flexible Fuel vehicle cost calculator Flexible Fuel vehicle cost calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Flexible Fuel Vehicle Cost Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Phase: "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property. User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/progs/cost_anal.php?0/E85 Calculate the cost to drive a flex-fueled vehicle (one that can run on either E85 Ethanol or gasoline) on each fuel type.

189

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about the cost of hydrogen production using low-cost natural gas.

190

Chemical Looping for Pre-combustion CO2 Capture — Performance and Cost Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The objective of this paper is to compare the two technologies chemical looping combustion (CLC) for inherent CO2-capture, and Calcium looping-based (CaL) CO2-capture when applied to a coal-based IGCC power plant, in terms of system efficiency, overall plant efficiency, CO2-capture percentage and cost. It was found that a CLC-based CO2 capture system is more efficient than a CaL-based CO2 capture system. However, both the chemical looping processes lead to higher efficiencies than a conventional solvent-based pre-combustion CO2 capture. The capital cost and cost of electricity of the CLC-based CO2- capture power plant were also found to be lower than a conventional pre-combustion CO2-capture for an IGCC power plant.

Hari C. Mantripragada; Edward S. Rubin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A low emission technology -- low cost coal water mixture fired fluidized bed combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, low cost coal water mixture (CWM) FBC technology is described. Low cost CWM may be coal washery sludge or the mixture of water and coal crashed easily. This technology is featured by agglomerate combustion of low cost MM. Experimental results in 0.5MW FBC test rig are reported. lie effects of bed temperate excess air, staged combustion on combustion and emission performance has been studied. The comparison combustion tests by using dry coal and CWM we made ha 0.5MW FBC test rig. Also coal washery sludge of different origins are also tested in the test rig. Based on the test rig comments a demonstration AFBC boiler with capacity of 35 T/H steam for utility application (6 MW) is designed. The design features will be presented in this paper Both the operation experience of test rig and demonstration unit show the developed low cost CWM FBC technology is of high combustion efficiency and low emission. This technology is being commercialized and applied in China in top priority by Chinese government.

Jianhua Yan; Xuguang Jiang; Yong Chi [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System Discussion Fuel Cell Tech Team FreedomCar Detroit. MI October 20, 2004 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140-2390 Ref D0006 SFAA No. DE-SCO2- 98EE50526 Topic 1 Subtopic 1C Agenda EC_2004 10 20 FC Tech Team Presentation 1 1 Project Overview 2 Compressed Hydrogen Storage Cost 3 2004 System Cost Update 4 Appendix Project Overview Approach EC_2004 10 20 FC Tech Team Presentation 2 In our final year of the project, we assessed the cost of compressed hydrogen storage and updated the overall system cost projection. Task 1: PEMFC System Technology Synopsis Task 2: Develop Cost Model and Baseline Estimates Task 3: Identify Opportunities for System Cost Reduction Tasks 4, 5, 6 & 7: Annual Updates

193

Enabling High Efficiency Clean Combustion with Micro-Variable Circular-Orifice (MVCO) Fuel Injector and Adaptive PCCI  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Key characteristics of variable orifice fuel injector are described that will extend the operation maps of early PCCI combustion and enable dual-mode combustion over full operating maps.

194

Costs Associated With Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with fueling infrastructure for compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles. It provides estimated cost ranges for various sizes and types of CNG fueling stations and an overview of factors that contribute to the total cost of an installed station. The information presented is based on input from professionals in the natural gas industry who design, sell equipment for, and/or own and operate CNG stations.

Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Cost Savings of Nuclear Power with Total Fuel Reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cost of fast reactor (FR) generated electricity with pyro-processing is estimated in this article. It compares favorably with other forms of energy and is shown to be less than that produced by light water reactors (LWR's). FR's use all the energy in natural uranium whereas LWR's utilize only 0.7% of it. Because of high radioactivity, pyro-processing is not open to weapon material diversion. This technology is ready now. Nuclear power has the same advantage as coal power in that it is not dependent upon a scarce foreign fuel and has the significant additional advantage of not contributing to global warming or air pollution. A jump start on new nuclear plants could rapidly allow electric furnaces to replace home heating oil furnaces and utilize high capacity batteries for hybrid automobiles: both would reduce US reliance on oil. If these were fast reactors fueled by reprocessed fuel, the spent fuel storage problem could also be solved. Costs are derived from assumptions on the LWR's and FR's five cost components: 1) Capital costs: LWR plants cost $106/MWe. FR's cost 25% more. Forty year amortization is used. 2) The annual O and M costs for both plants are 9% of the Capital Costs. 3) LWR fuel costs about 0.0035 $/kWh. Producing FR fuel from spent fuel by pyro-processing must be done in highly shielded hot cells which is costly. However, the five foot thick concrete walls have the advantage of prohibiting diversion. LWR spent fuel must be used as feedstock for the FR initial core load and first two reloads so this FR fuel costs more than LWR fuel. FR fuel costs much less for subsequent core reloads (< LWR fuel) if all spent fuel feedstock is from the fast reactor (i.e., Breeding Ratio =1). 4) Yucca Mountain storage of unprocessed LWR spent fuel is estimated as $360,000/MTHM. But this fuel can be processed to remove TRU for use as fast reactor fuel. The remaining fission products repository costs are only one fifth that of the original fuel. Storage of short half life fission products alone requires less storage time and long term integrity than LWR spent fuel (300 years storage versus 100,000 years.) 5) LWR decommissioning costs are estimated to be $0.3 x 10{sup 6}/MWe. The annual cost for a 40 year licensed plant would be 2.5 % of this or less if interest is taken into account. All plants will eventually have to replace those components which become radiation damaged. FR's should be designed to replace parts rather than decommission. The LWR costs are estimated to be 2.65 cents/kWh. FR costs are 2.99 cents/kWh for the first 7.5 years and 2.39 cents/kWh for the next 32.5 years. The average cost over forty years is 2.50 cents/kWh which is less than the LWR costs. These power costs are similar to coal power, are lower than gas, oil, and much lower than renewable power.(authors)

Solbrig, Charles W.; Benedict, Robert W. [Fuel Cycle Programs Division, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fuel Effects on Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ignition and Their Impact on Advanced Combustion Engines Joshua D. Taylor - National Renewable Energy Laboratory Stuart Neill, Hailin Li - National Research Council Canada...

197

Advancement in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling for Compression...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

chemical kinetics into fluid dynamics simulations" "Development of High-Performance Computing (HPC) tools to provide unique insights into the spray and combustion...

198

Chemical-Looping Combustion With Gaseous Fuels: Thermodynamic Parametric Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This communication reports the thermodynamic equilibrium analysis of the reactions involved in a chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process using methane, ethane and ... energy minimization technique determining t...

Mohammad M. Hossain

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Investigation of Fuel Quality Impact on the Combustion and Exhaust...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

SI Engine Operated on Low BTU Gases Research results validate an engine simulation model and provide guidelines for the improved control of combustion stability of SI...

200

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tech materials BOM-based cost barriers ­ 90% of stack cost Cost volatility - Platinum $500/Oz - $2 * present CCM has 265 cm2 active area Work initiated on scalable AMFC stack design & development Lab status #12;Processes in PEM and AEM Membrane Fuel Cells Anode: H2 +2OH- = 2H2O +2e Cathode: 2e + 0.5O2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

MJG:TTM, 3/01 Plasma Fueling Program FIRE Fueling and Pumping Cost and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1887 WBS 2.1.3 Gas Fueling Includes: · Multiple gas injection stations (4) · D-T 200 torr-L/s for 20 ­ Pellet Fueling ­ Gas Fueling ­ Disruption Control · Pumping System Cost Estimate ­ High Vacuum Pumping Contingency 20% 1429 GRAND TOTAL 8574 WBS 2.1 Fueling Sys tem Gas Injection Pellet Injection Disrup- tion

202

Energy Department Announces New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs Energy Department Announces New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs August 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis In support of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to develop clean, domestic energy sources, the Energy Department today announced a $4.5 million investment in two projects-led by Minnesota-based 3M and the Colorado School of Mines-to lower the cost, improve the durability, and increase the efficiency of next-generation fuel cell systems. This investment is a part of the Energy Department's commitment to maintain American leadership in innovative clean energy technologies, give American businesses more options to cut energy costs, and reduce our reliance on imported oil. "Fuel cell technologies have an important role to play in diversifying

203

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vince Contini, Kathya Mahadevan, Fritz Eubanks, Vince Contini, Kathya Mahadevan, Fritz Eubanks, Jennifer Smith, Gabe Stout and Mike Jansen Battelle April 16, 2013 Manufacturing Cost Analysis of Fuel Cells for Material Handling Applications 2 Presentation Outline * Background * Approach * System Design * Fuel Cell Stack Design * Stack, BOP and System Cost Models * System Cost Summary * Results Summary 3 * 10 and 25 kW PEM Fuel Cells for Material Handling Equipment (MHE) applications Background 5-year program to provide feedback to DOE on evaluating fuel cell systems for stationary and emerging markets by developing independent models and cost estimates * Applications - Primary (including CHP) power, backup power, APU, and material handling * Fuel Cell Types - 80°C PEM, 180°C PEM, SOFC technologies

204

Fact #594: October 26, 2009 Fuel Economy and Annual Fuel Cost Ranges for Vehicle Classes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The graph below shows the range of the lowest and highest fuel economy for each vehicle class, along with the lowest and highest annual fuel cost (in parentheses). For example, the two-seater model...

205

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System Cost – 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about the cost of automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems.

206

Experimental study of combustion of hydrogen–syngas/methane fuel mixtures in a porous burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lean premixed combustion of hydrogen–syngas/methane fuel mixtures was investigated experimentally to demonstrate fuel flexibility of a two-section porous burner. The un-insulated burner was operated at atmospheric pressure. Combustion was stabilized at the interface of silicon-carbide coated carbon foam of 26 pores per centimeter (ppcm) and 4 ppcm. Methane (CH4) content in the fuel was decreased from 100% to 0% (by volume), with the remaining amount split equally between carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2), the two reactive components of the syngas. Experiments for different fuel mixtures were conducted at a fixed air flow rate, while the fuel flow rate was varied to obtain a range of adiabatic flame temperatures. The CO and nitric oxide ( NO x ) emissions were measured downstream of the porous burner, in the axial direction to identify the post-combustion zone and in the transverse direction to quantify combustion uniformity. For a given adiabatic flame temperature, increasing H2/CO content in the fuel mixture decreased both the CO and NO x emissions. Presence of H2/CO in the fuel mixture also decreased temperature near the lean blow-off limit, especially for higher percentages of CO and H2 in the fuel.

S.K. Alavandi; A.K. Agrawal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Combustion characteristics of fuel droplets with addition of nano and micron-sized aluminum particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combustion characteristics of fuel droplets with addition of nano and micron-sized aluminum Aluminum nanoparticles Microexplosion Particle aggregation a b s t r a c t The burning characteristics of fuel droplets containing nano and micron-sized aluminum particles were investigated. Particle size

Qiao, Li

208

Use of biodiesel in marine fuel formulation: A study of combustion quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The quality of ignition and combustion of blends of soy biodiesel and marine fuels was evaluated. Faced with the increasing implementation of processes for converting heavier oil fractions, the availability of streams to formulate marine fuels has been reduced. In this context, the use of biodiesel is important to minimize problems caused by the retraction in production of these streams and improve marine fuel quality. Since composition and stability properties are of great importance and influence directly the combustion quality, the composition was determined using the SARA analysis by thin layer chromatography and a flame ionization detector and the mixtures' stability evaluation was made by optical scanning. Using the equipment Fuel Combustion Analyzer, mixtures of marine fuels and soy biodiesel were tested, varying the biodiesel content by volume in the mixture at levels up to 10% v/v. The results show that the addition of biofuel to marine fuels, in the evaluated conditions, does not compromise the combustion quality of the bunker oil and, in some cases, had even increased the estimated cetane number, indicating increased quality of ignition and combustion.

Elisia dos Santos Prucole; Ricardo Rodrigues da Cunha Pinto; Maria Letícia Murta Valle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Numerical investigation of the heterogeneous combustion processes of solid fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Two-phase computational modelling based on the Euler–Euler was developed to investigate the heterogeneous combustion processes of biomass, in the solid carbon phase, inside a newly designed combustion chamber (Model 1). A transient simulation was carried out for a small amount of carbon powder situated in a cup which was located at the centre of the combustion chamber. A heat source was provided to initiate the combustion with the air supplied by three injection nozzles. The results show that the combustion is sustained in the chamber, as evidenced by the flame temperature. An axisymmetric combustion model (Model 2) based on the Euler–Lagrange approach was formulated to model the combustion of pulverized coal. Three cases with three different char oxidation models are presented. The predicted results have good agreement with the available experimental data and showed that the combustion inside the reactor was affected by the particulate size. A number of simulations were carried out to find the best values of parameters suitable for predicting \\{NOx\\} pollutants.

Blaid Alganash; Manosh C. Paul; Ian A. Watson

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A study on the dynamic combustion behavior of a biomass fuel bed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The main objective of this research was to study fuel bed combustion dynamics of a BioGrate boiler with a mechanistic model. First, the fuel specific pyrolysis reaction rates were experimentally determined for the model. Second, the model was validated and finally, it was used to investigate the effects of the primary air flows on drying, pyrolysis and char consumption rates occurring inside the fuel bed. The research results are presented and the role of the dynamic behavior of the reactions on the biomass combustion process discussed.

Alexandre Boriouchkine; Vida Sharifi; Jim Swithenbank; Sirkka-Liisa Jämsä-Jounela

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Investigation of the effects of renewable diesel fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A study was undertaken to investigate renewable fuels in a compression-ignition internal combustion engine. The focus of this study was the effect of newly developed renewable fuels on engine performance, combustion, and emissions. Eight fuels were investigated, and they include diesel, jet fuel, a traditional biodiesel (fatty acid methyl ester: FAME), and five next generation biofuels. These five fuels were derived using a two-step process: hydrolysis of the oil into fatty acids (if necessary) and then a thermo-catalytic process to remove the oxygen via a decarboxylation reaction. The fuels included a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (DCFA), a fed batch deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids with varying amounts of H2 used during the deoxygenation process (DCFAH), a continuous deoxygenation of canola derived fatty acids (CDCFA), fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid (DLA), and a third reaction to isomerize the products of the deoxygenated canola derived fatty acid alkanes (IPCF). Diesel, jet fuel, and biodiesel (FAME) have been used as benchmarks for comparing with the newer renewable fuels. The results of the experiments show slightly lower mechanical efficiency but better brake specific fuel consumption for the new renewable fuels. Results from combustion show shorter ignition delays for most of the renewable (deoxygenated) fuels with the exception of fed batch deoxygenation of lauric acid. Combustion results also show lower peak in-cylinder pressures, reduced rate of increase in cylinder pressure, and lower heat release rates for the renewable fuels. Emission results show an increase in hydrocarbon emissions for renewable deoxygenated fuels, but a general decrease in all other emissions including NOx, greenhouse gases, and soot. Results also demonstrate that isomers of the alkanes resulting from the deoxygenation of the canola derived fatty acids could be a potential replacement to conventional fossil diesel and biodiesel based on the experiments in this work.

Dolanimi Ogunkoya; William L. Roberts; Tiegang Fang; Nirajan Thapaliya

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Forecasting the Costs of Automotive PEM Fuel Cell Systems: Using Bounded Manufacturing Progress Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s pilot-scale PEM fuel cell manufactunng cost, and theproductaon, PEM fuel cell systems could cost $35 - 90/kW,is how PEM fuel cell system manufactunng costs might evolve

Lipman, Timonthy E.; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Breakdown and Combustion of JP-10 Fuel Catalyzed by Nanoparticulate CeO2 and Fe2O3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is critical. Its heat of combustion (39.4 MJ/L) is substantially higher than petroleum-based fuels such as JP

Anderson, Scott L.

214

Chemical-looping combustion -- Efficient conversion of chemical energy in fuels into work  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In thermal power plants, a large amount of the useful energy in the fuel is destroyed during the combustion process. This paper presents theoretical thermodynamic studies of a new system to increase the energy conversion efficiency of chemical energy in fuels into work. The system includes a gas turbine system with chemical-looping combustion where a metal oxide is used as an oxygen carrier. Instead of conventional combustion, the oxidation of the fuel is carried out in a two-step reaction. The first reaction step is an exothermic oxidation of a metal with air and the second reaction step an endothermic oxidation of the fuel with the metal oxide from the first step. The low grade heat in the exhaust gas is used to drive the endothermic reaction. This two-step reaction has proven to be one way to increase the energy utilization compared to conventional combustion. Results for a gas turbine reheat cycle with methane as a fuel and NiO as an oxygen carrier show that the gain in net power efficiency for the chemical-looping combustion system is as high as 5 percentage points compared to a similar conventional gas turbine system. An exergy analysis of the reactions shows that less irreversibilities are generated with chemical looping combustion than with conventional combustion. Another advantage with chemical-looping combustion is that the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} is separated from the other exhaust gases without decreasing the overall-system thermal efficiency. This is an important feature since future regulations of CO{sub 2} emission are likely to be strict. Today, most of the suggested CO{sub 2} separation methods are considered to reduce the thermal efficiency at least 5--10 percentage points and to require expensive equipment.

Anheden, M.; Naesholm, A.S.; Svedberg, G. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Apparatus and method for operating internal combustion engines from variable mixtures of gaseous fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for utilizing any arbitrary mixture ratio of multiple fuel gases having differing combustion characteristics, such as natural gas and hydrogen gas, within an internal combustion engine. The gaseous fuel composition ratio is first sensed, such as by thermal conductivity, infrared signature, sound propagation speed, or equivalent mixture differentiation mechanisms and combinations thereof which are utilized as input(s) to a "multiple map" engine control module which modulates selected operating parameters of the engine, such as fuel injection and ignition timing, in response to the proportions of fuel gases available so that the engine operates correctly and at high efficiency irrespective of the gas mixture ratio being utilized. As a result, an engine configured according to the teachings of the present invention may be fueled from at least two different fuel sources without admixing constraints.

Heffel, James W. (Lake Matthews, CA); Scott, Paul B. (Northridge, CA); Park, Chan Seung (Yorba Linda, CA)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fuel-Flexible Combustion System for Refinery and Chemical Plant...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

low-emission operation across a broad range of fuel compositions, including syngas, biogas, natural gas, and refinery fuel gas. Displacing Natural Gas Consumption and Lowering...

217

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 6, July 1990--September 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of the US Department of Energy has contracted with Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE) to perform a three-year project on ``Combustion Characterization of Beneficiated Coal-Based Fuels.`` The beneficiated coals are produced by other contractors under the DOE Coal Preparation Program. Several contractor-developed advanced coal cleaning processes are being run at the cleaning facility in Homer City, Pennsylvania, to produce 20-ton batches of fuels for shipment to CE`s laboratory in Windsor, Connecticut. CE then processes the products into either a coal-water fuel (CVVT) or a dry microfine pulverized coal (DMPC) form for combustion testing. The objectives of this project include: (1) the development of an engineering data base which will provide detailed information on the properties of BCFs influencing combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and emissions; and (2) the application of this technical data base to predict the performance and economic impacts of firing the BCFs in various commercial boiler designs. The technical approach used to develop the technical data includes: bench-scale fuel property, combustion, and ash deposition tests; pilot-scale combustion and ash effects tests; and full-scale combustion tests. Subcontractors to CE to perform parts of the test work are the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Physical Science, Inc. Technology Company (PSIT) and the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (UNDEERC). Twenty fuels will be characterized during the three-year base program: three feed coals, fifteen BCFS, and two conventionally cleaned coals for full-scale tests. Approximately, nine BCFs will be in dry microfine coal (DMPC) form, and six BCFs will be in coal-water fuel (CWF) form. Additional BCFs would be characterized during optional project supplements.

Chow, O.K.; Nsakala, N.Y.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5005: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2002 versus 2005  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 Date: March 20, 2005 5 Date: March 20, 2005 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2002 vs 2005 Originator: Patrick Davis Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: May 22, 2006 Item: "Reduced the high-volume cost of automotive fuel cells from $275/kW (50kW system) in 2002 to $110/kW (80kW system) in 2005." Supporting Information: In 2002, TIAX reported a cost of $324/kW for a 50-kW automotive PEM fuel cell system operating on gasoline reformate, based on their modeling of projected cost for 500,000 units per year. See Eric Carlson et al., "Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stack/System." U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Progress Report. (2002) at http://www.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/pdfs/33098_sec4-1.pdf. Also see "Cost Modeling of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automobiles," Eric Carlson et al., SAE

219

Prediction of formation of gas-phase bubbles correlated by vortices in the fuel reactor of chemical looping combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical looping combustion (CLC) as a potential CO2 capture technology has been considered as a promising and likely alternative to traditional combustion technology to mitigate the CO2 emission due to its prosecution of CO2 sequestration at a low cost. Although a number of studies on the hydrodynamic behaviours of the CLC process in fuel reactor have been documented in the open literature, there have been rare studies on the correlation between the bubble formation and the local particulate volume fraction. This paper aims to investigate the CLC process in a fuel reactor using the CFD modelling, coupled with the heterogeneous reactions, the hydrodynamics and reaction kinetics occurring in the fuel reactor. A parameter correlating the occurrence of bubble and dynamic properties is proposed. The parameter may be acted as an indicator of time-dependent bubble evolution with a potential to be adopted in the CLC for controlling the bubbling phenomena since the occurrence of the bubbles at specific positions is highly correlated with the local large eddies embedded in the flow. The results obtained clearly indicate that the CFD model developed in the current study reasonably forecasts the hydrodynamic behaviours and important phenomena observed in the fuel reactor.

Luming Chen; Xiaogang Yang; Xia Li; Guang Li; Colin Snape

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

07 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Application Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the...

222

Combustion characteristics of dry coal-powder-fueled adiabatic diesel engine: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at investigating the combustion characteristics of dry coal powder fueled diesel engine. During this program, significant achievements were made in overcoming many problems facing the coal-powder-fueled engine. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept was used to enhance the combustion of coal powder fuel. The major coal-fueled engine test results and accomplishments are as follows: design, fabrication and engine testing of improved coal feed system for fumigation of coal powder to the intake air; design, fabrication and engine testing of the TICS chamber made from a superalloy material (Hastelloy X); design, fabrication and engine testing of wear resistant chrome oxide ceramic coated piston rings and cylinder liner; lubrication system was improved to separate coal particles from the contaminated lubricating oil; control of the ignition timing of fumigated coal powder by utilizing exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and variable TICS chamber temperature; coal-fueled engine testing was conducted in two configurations: dual fuel (with diesel pilot) and 100% coal-fueled engine without diesel pilot or heated intake air; cold starting of the 100% coal-powder-fueled engine with a glow plug; and coal-fueled-engine was operated from 800 to 1800 rpm speed and idle to full load engine conditions.

Kakwani, R.M.; Kamo, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Multiphase CFD-based models for chemical looping combustion process: Fuel reactor modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is a flameless two-step fuel combustion that produces a pure CO2 stream, ready for compression and sequestration. The process is composed of two interconnected fluidized bed reactors. The air reactor which is a conventional circulating fluidized bed and the fuel reactor which is a bubbling fluidized bed. The basic principle is to avoid the direct contact of air and fuel during the combustion by introducing a highly-reactive metal particle, referred to as oxygen carrier, to transport oxygen from the air to the fuel. In the process, the products from combustion are kept separated from the rest of the flue gases namely nitrogen and excess oxygen. This process eliminates the energy intensive step to separate the CO2 from nitrogen-rich flue gas that reduce the thermal efficiency. Fundamental knowledge of multiphase reactive fluid dynamic behavior of the gas–solid flow is essential for the optimization and operation of a chemical looping combustor. Our recent thorough literature review shows that multiphase CFD-based models have not been adapted to chemical looping combustion processes in the open literature. In this study, we have developed the reaction kinetics model of the fuel reactor and implemented the kinetic model into a multiphase hydrodynamic model, MFIX, developed earlier at the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Simulated fuel reactor flows revealed high weight fraction of unburned methane fuel in the flue gas along with CO2 and H2O. This behavior implies high fuel loss at the exit of the reactor and indicates the necessity to increase the residence time, say by decreasing the fuel flow rate, or to recirculate the unburned methane after condensing and removing CO2.

Jung, Jonghwun (ANL); Gamwo, I.K.

2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

Initiation Mechanisms and Kinetics of Pyrolysis and Combustion of JP-10 Hydrocarbon Jet Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Initiation Mechanisms and Kinetics of Pyrolysis and Combustion of JP-10 Hydrocarbon Jet Fuel ... We found that the primary decomposition reactions involve either (1) dissociation of ethylene from JP-10, resulting in the formation of a C8 hydrocarbon intermediate, or (2) the production of two C5 hydrocarbons. ... Heats of combustion (kcal/mole) were measured via O bomb calorimetry; adamantane (I) (c), -1441.95 ...

Kimberly Chenoweth; Adri C. T. van Duin; Siddharth Dasgupta; William A. Goddard III

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

225

Cost-effective fuel cycle closure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. government is moving toward meeting its obligation to accept spent fuel from commercial light water reactors (LWRs) in 1998 by providing an interim storage facility. Site work and analysis of the deep, geologic repository at Yucca Mountain will continue at a reduced level of effort. This provides the time required to reevaluate the use of spent-fuel recycling instead of direct disposal. A preliminary assessment of this option is presented in this paper.

Ehrman, C.S. [Burns & Roe, Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States); Boardman, C.E. [General Electric Company, San Jose, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nitrogen Oxides, Sulphur Trioxide and Mercury Emissions during Oxy-Fuel Fluidized Bed Combustion of Victorian Brown Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates, for the first time, the NOX, N2O, SO3 and Hg emissions from combustion of a Victorian brown coal in a 10 kWth fluidized bed unit under oxy-fuel combustion conditions. Compared to air combustion, lower NOX emissions and higher N2O ...

Bithi Roy; Luguang Chen; Sankar Bhattacharya

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

227

Effect of Operating Conditions on SO2 and NOx Emissions in Oxy-Fuel Mini-CFB Combustion Tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anthropogenic CO2 production is caused primarily by fossil fuel combustion. In consequence, it is increasingly necessary to find ways to reduce these emissions when fossil fuel is used. CO2 capture and storage (C...

L. Jia; Y. Tan; E. J. Anthony

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Combustion Instability and Blowout Characteristics of Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Combustion Instability and Blowout Combustion Instability and Blowout Characteristics of Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Characteristics of Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustors Combustors Georgia Institute of Technology Georgia Institute of Technology Tim Lieuwen, Ben Zinn Bobby Noble, Qingguo Zhang DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES SCIES Project 03-01-SR111 Project Awarded (07/01/03, 36 Month Duration) Total Contract Value $376,722 . CLEMSON presentation, T.L., B.Z., B.N., Q.Z. Gas Turbine Need Gas Turbine Need * Need: Gas turbines with sufficient flexibility to cleanly and efficiently combust a wide range of fuels, particularly coal-derived gases - Problem: Inherent variability in composition and heating

229

LowerLower--Cost Fuel CellsCost Fuel Cells Allen J. Bard, Arumugam Manthiram,Allen J. Bard, Arumugam Manthiram,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density 4 Hydrogen polymer electrolyteHydrogen polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)membrane fuel1 LowerLower--Cost Fuel CellsCost Fuel Cells Allen J. Bard, Arumugam Manthiram,Allen J. BardMaterials Science and Engineering Program 2 CONVENTIONAL POWER PLANT DIRECT FUEL CELL POWER PLANT Heat

Lightsey, Glenn

230

On the evaluation of synthetic and natural ilmenite using syngas as fuel in chemical-looping combustion (CLC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a combustion technique where the CO2 produced is inherently separated from the rest of the flue gases with a considerably low energy penalty. For this reason, CLC has emerged as one of the more attractive options to capture CO2 from fossil fuel combustion. When applying CLC with solid fuels, the use of a low cost oxygen carrier is highly important, and one such low cost oxygen carrier is the mineral ilmenite. The current work investigates the reactivity of several ilmenites, some which are synthetically produced by freeze granulation and two natural minerals, one Norwegian ilmenite and one South African ilmenite. A laboratory fluidized bed reactor made of quartz was used to simulate a two reactor CLC system by alternating the reduction and oxidation phase. The fuel was syngas containing 50% CO and 50% H2. A mixture of 6 g of ilmenite with 9 g inert quartz of diameter 125–180 ?m was exposed to a flow of 900 mLn/min syngas in the reduction phase. During the oxidation phase, a 900 mLn/min flow of 10% O2 diluted in N2 was used. The experimental results showed that all ilmenites give higher conversion of H2 than of CO. Generally, synthetic ilmenites have better CO and H2 conversion than natural ilmenites and synthetic ilmenites prepared with an excess of Fe generally showed higher total conversion of CO than synthetic ilmenites with an excess of Ti. Most synthetic ilmenites and the Norwegian ilmenite showed good fluidization properties during the experiments. However, for two of the synthetically produced materials, and for the South African ilmenite, particle agglomerations were visible at the end of the experiment.

Muhammad Mufti Azis; Erik Jerndal; Henrik Leion; Tobias Mattisson; Anders Lyngfelt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Further investigation of the impact of the co-combustion of tire-derived fuel and petroleum coke on the petrology and chemistry of coal combustion products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Kentucky cyclone-fired unit burns coal and tire-derived fuel, sometimes in combination with petroleum coke. A parallel pulverized combustion (pc) unit at the same plant burns the same coal, without the added fuels. The petrology, chemistry, and sulfur isotope distribution in the fuel and resulting combustion products was investigated for several configurations of the fuel blend. Zinc and Cd in the combustion products are primarily contributed from the tire-derived fuel, the V and Ni are primarily from the petroleum coke, and the As and Hg are probably largely from the coal. The sulfur isotope distribution in the cyclone unit is complicated due to the varying fuel sources. The electrostatic precipitator (ESP) array in the pc unit shows a subtle trend towards heavier S isotopic ratios in the cooler end of the ESP.

Hower, J.C.; Robertson, J.D.; Elswick, E.R.; Roberts, J.M.; Brandsteder, K.; Trimble, A.S.; Mardon, S.M. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Center for Applied Energy Research

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Stretch Efficiency for Combustion Engines: Exploiting New Combustion...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Stretch Efficiency for Combustion Engines: Exploiting New Combustion Regimes Stretch Efficiency for Combustion Engines: Exploiting New Combustion Regimes 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

233

Gasoline-Like Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion Regimes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

234

GEI 41040G - Specification for Fuel Gases for COmbustion in Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Turbine Gas Turbine Revised, January 2002 GEI 41040G These instructions do not purport to cover all details or variations in equipment nor to provide for every possible contingency to be met in connection with installation, operation or maintenance. Should further information be desired or should particular problems arise which are not covered sufficiently for the purchaser's purposes the matter should be referred to the GE Company. © 1999 GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY Specification for Fuel Gases for Combustion in Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines GEI 41040G Specification for Fuel Gases for Combustion in Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

235

Fuel Effects on Mixing-Controlled Combustion Strategies for High-Efficiency Clean-Combustion Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

236

External Costs of Fossil Fuel Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of energy causes damage to a wide range of receptors, including human health, natural ecosystems, and the built environment. Such damages are referred to as external costs, as they are not reflected in...

W. Krewitt; P. Mayerhofer; R. Friedrich; A. Trukenmüller…

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Sulfur Release from Cement Raw Materials during Solid Fuel Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fuels were tire rubber, pine wood, petcoke, sewage sludge, and polypropylene. ... The sequence of SO2 release for fuel particles in the size interval 1–2 mm was found to be tire rubber granulate > sewage sludge > pine wood sawdust > petcoke > polypropylene flakes. ... Five different solid fuels have been tested: tire rubber, pine wood, polypropylene, petcoke, and sewage sludge. ...

Anders R. Nielsen; Morten B. Larsen; Peter Glarborg; Kim Dam-Johansen

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

DOE Hydrogen Program Record 10004, Fuel Cell System Cost - 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Record Program Record Record #: 10004 Date: September 16, 2010 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2010 Update to: Record 9012 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 16, 2010 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2010 technology and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $51/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: In fiscal year 2010, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2009 cost analyses of 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2010 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2]. Both cost estimates are based on performance at beginning of life.

239

Development of high temperature air combustion technology in pulverized fossil fuel fired boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature air combustion (HTAC) is a promising technology for energy saving, flame stability enhancement and NOx emission reduction. In a conventional HTAC system, the combustion air is highly preheated by using the recuperative or regenerative heat exchangers. However, such a preheating process is difficult to implement for pulverized fossil fuel fired boilers. In this paper, an alternative approach is proposed. In the proposed HTAC system, a special burner, named PRP burner is introduced to fulfill the preheating process. The PRP burner has a preheating chamber with one end connected with the primary air and the other end opened to the furnace. Inside the chamber, gas recirculation is effectively established such that hot flue gases in the furnace can be introduced. Combustible mixture instead of combustion air is highly preheated by the PRP burner. A series of experiments have been conducted in an industrial scale test facility, burning low volatile petroleum coke and an anthracite coal. Stable combustion was established for burning pure petroleum coke and anthracite coal, respectively. Inside the preheating chamber, the combustible mixture was rapidly heated up to a high temperature level close to that of the hot secondary air used in the conventional HTAC system. The rapid heating of the combustible mixture in the chamber facilitates pyrolysis, volatile matter release processes for the fuel particles, suppressing ignition delay and enhancing combustion stability. Moreover, compared with the results measured in the same facility but with a conventional low NOx burner, NOx concentration at the furnace exit was at the same level when petroleum coke was burnt and 50% less when anthracite was burnt. Practicability of the HTAC technology using the proposed approach was confirmed for efficiently and cleanly burning fossil fuels. 16 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Hai Zhang; Guangxi Yue; Junfu Lu; Zhen Jia; Jiangxiong Mao; Toshiro Fujimori; Toshiyuki Suko; Takashi Kiga [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Department of Thermal Engineering

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Prediction of Combustion Stability and Flashback in Turbines with High-Hydrogen Fuel - Georgia Institute of Technology  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prediction of Combustion Stability Prediction of Combustion Stability and Flashback in Turbines with High- Hydrogen Fuel-Georgia Institute of Technology Background Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), in collaboration with Pennsylvania State University and gas turbine manufacturers, is conducting research to improve the state-of-the-art in understanding and modeling combustion instabilities, one of the most critical problems associated with burning high-hydrogen content (HHC) fuels in

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241

Combustion characterization of beneficiated coal-based fuels. Quarterly report No. 3, November 1989--January 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This three-year research project at Combustion Engineering, Inc. (CE), will assess the potential economic and environmental benefits derived from coal beneficiation by various advanced cleaning processes. The objectives of this program include the development of a detailed generic engineering data base, comprised of fuel combustion and ash performance data on beneficiated coal-based fuels (BCFs), which is needed to permit broad application. This technical data base will provide detailed information on fundamental fuel properties influencing combustion and mineral matter behavior as well as quantitative performance data on combustion, ash deposition, ash erosion, particulate collection, and gaseous and particulate emissions. Program objectives also address the application of this technical data base to predict performance impacts associated with firing BCFs in various commercial boiler designs as well as assessment of the economic implications of BCF utilization. Additionally, demonstration of this technology, with respect to large-scale fuel preparation, firing equipment operation, fuel performance, environmental impacts, and verification of prediction methodology, will be provided during field testing.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Air and oxy-fuel combustion behaviour of petcoke/lignite blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pyrolysis and combustion behaviour of a petroleum coke (petcoke), an indigenous lignite and their 70/30 wt.% blend in air and oxy-fuel conditions were investigated by using non-isothermal thermo-gravimetric method (TGA) coupled with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Blend samples were prepared by mixing lignite, which has low calorific value, high ash and moisture contents with petcoke that has high calorific value, low ash and moisture content, in the proportion of 70:30. Pyrolysis tests were carried out in nitrogen and carbon dioxide environments which are the main diluting gases of air and oxy-fuel environments, respectively. Pyrolysis curves of parent fuels and their blend reveal close resemblance up to 700 °C in both N2 and CO2 environments. At higher temperatures, further weight loss taking place in N2 and CO2 atmospheres is attributed to calcite decomposition and CO2-char gasification reaction, respectively. Gasification reaction leads to significant increase in CO and COS formation as observed in FTIR evolution profiles. Almost identical experimental and theoretical pyrolysis profiles of the blend samples show that there is no synergy between the parent fuels of the blend in both pyrolysis environments. Combustion experiments were carried out in four different atmospheres; air, oxygen-enriched air environment (30% O2–70% N2), oxy-fuel environment (21% O2–79% CO2) and oxygen-enriched oxy-fuel environment (30% O2–70% CO2). Combustion experiments show that replacing nitrogen in the gas mixture by the same concentration of CO2 leads to delay in combustion (lower maximum rate of weight loss and higher burnout temperatures). Overall comparison of derivative thermogravimetry (DTG) profiles shows that effect of oxygen content on combustion characteristics is more significant than that of diluting gas in the combustion environment. At elevated oxygen levels, profiles shift through lower temperature zone, peak and burnout temperatures decrease, weight loss rate increases significantly and complete combustion is achieved at lower temperatures and shorter times. Theoretical and experimental combustion profiles of the blend mainly display different trends, which indicate synergistic interactions between lignite and petcoke during their combustion in different environments.

Nur Sena Yuzbasi; Nevin Selçuk

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

New fuel injector design lowers cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes the Bendix Deka injector series. Bendix engineers have been striving to lessen costs of all portions of the injection equipment, especially single and multipoint injectors. Results of these efforts are advanced, thin-edged orifice and floating unitized armature designs. External configurations of both multipoint and single point Bendix Deka injectors are such that they can directly replace existing products. Both injector types are designed to be able to deliver any calibration within the currently-known requirements. Flow tolerances for Deka injectors match all known requirements, representing a good economic balance between performance and cost. Materials were carefully chosen for wear and corrosion resistance.

De Grace, L.G.; Bata, G.T.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record 12020: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2012  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Record Record Record #: 12020 Date: August 21, 2012 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2012 Update to: Record 11012 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 14, 2012 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2012 technology 1 and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $47/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: The DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program supports analysis projects that perform detailed analysis to estimate cost status of fuel cell systems, updated on an annual basis [1]. In fiscal year 2012, Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) updated their 2011 cost analysis of an 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell system, based on 2012 technology and projected to a

245

A predictive model for the combustion process in dual fuel engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-zone model has been developed for the prediction of the combustion processes in dual fuel engines and some of their performance features. The consequences of the interaction between the gaseous and the diesel fuels and the resulting modification to the combustion processes are considered. A reacting zone has been incorporated in the model to describe the partial oxidation of the gaseous fuel-air mixture while detailed kinetic schemes are employed to describe the oxidation of the gaseous fuel, right from the start of compression to the end of the expansion process. The associated formation and concentrations of exhaust emissions are correspondingly established. The model can predict the onset of knock as well as the operating features and emissions for the more demanding case of light load performance. Predicted values for methane operation show good agreement with corresponding experimental values.

Liu, Z.; Karim, G.A. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

COMBUSTION RESEARCH - FY-1979  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

deposition due to the heat of combustion. The problem wedimensionless heat of combustion, QpYoxoolhw t transferredfraction of specie i heat of combustion per gram of fuel

,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bipolar plate is an important component in fuel cell stacks and accounts for more than 75% of stack weight and volume. The technology development of metal bipolar plates can effectively reduce the fuel cells stack weight and volume over 50%. The challenge is the metal plate corrosion protection at low cost for the broad commercial applications. This project is aimed to develop innovative technological solutions to overcome the corrosion barrier of low cost metal plates. The feasibility of has been demonstrated and patented (US Patent 7,309,540). The plan is to further reduce the cost, and scale up the technology. The project is built on three pillars: 1) robust experimental evidence demonstrating the feasibility of our technology, 2) a team that consists of industrial leaders in fuel cell stack application, design, and manufactures; 3) a low-risk, significant-milestone driven program that proves the feasibility of meeting program objectives The implementation of this project will reduce the fuel cell stack metal bipolar separator plate cost which accounts 15-21% of the overall stack cost. It will contribute to the market adoption of fuel cell technologies. In addition, this corrosion protection technology can be used similar energy devices, such as batteries and electrolyzers. Therefore, the success of the project will be benefit in broad markets.

Wang, Conghua [TreadStone Technologies, Inc.

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

248

Ethanol Steam Reforming Thermally Coupled with Fuel Combustion in a Parallel Plate Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental Conditions for Measuring the Isothermal Kinetics of the Pd-Based Catalytic Spacers for Ethanol Steam Reforming ... (9) On the basis of previous experience,(23) a mixture of hydrogen with CO2 (about 1:2 in molar ratio) is used as fuel in order to reduce the danger of homogeneous combustion of the fuel in the mixing zones. ... 0.09 (after mixing with air) were necessary to prevent ignition of the homogeneous reaction. ...

Eduardo Lopez; Vanessa Gepert; Achim Gritsch; Ulrich Nieken; Gerhart Eigenberger

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

A cycle simulation of coal particle fueled reciprocating internal-combustion engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- Summary of Experimental Diesel Engine Operation on Solid Coal Fuels Page Table 2 - Property Data for Coal (Char) Particles . . 23 Table 3 - Summary of the Combustion Model and Reaction Constants 40 Table 4 ? Specifications of the Base Case Engine... Efforts The first attempt to operate a solid particle fueled piston engine was performed nearly a century ago by Rudolf Diesel, inventor of the compression-ignition engine. Since then, at least a dozen separate attempts to oper- ate diesel engines...

Rosegay, Kenneth Harold

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

250

Developments in integrated pollutant removal for low-emission oxy-fuel combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A complete coal combustion and flue gas treatment scheme was designed, constructed, and operated at bench scale as a product of cooperative research between US DOE’s Albany Research Center (ARC) and Jupiter Oxygen Corporation. The combustion gas generated using this oxy-fuel coal combustion process was effectively captured using an integrated pollutant removal (IPR) process. Supporting laboratory-scale research focuses on elements of IPR such as extraction of particulates, SO2, and mercury, and on the character of the liquid and vapor phase compositions for the CO2 - N2 - O2 mixture at the temperature and pressure conditions found at the end of the process. Future pilot-scale work will be necessary to generate economic and engineering data that will apply to full-scale oxy-fuel/IPR systems.

Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Summers, Cathy A.; Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Patrick, Brian (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.); Ochs, Thomas L.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Sulphur impacts during pulverised coal combustion in oxy-fuel technology for carbon capture and storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The oxy-fuel process is one of three carbon capture technologies which supply CO2 ready for sequestration – the others being post-combustion capture and IGCC with carbon capture. As yet no technology has emerged as a clear winner in the race to commercial deployment. The oxy-fuel process relies on recycled flue gas as the main heat carrier through the boiler and results in significantly different flue gas compositions. Sulphur has been shown in the study to have impacts in the furnace, during ash collection, CO2 compression and transport as well as storage, with many options for its removal or impact control. In particular, the effect of sulphur containing species can pose a risk for corrosion throughout the plant and transport pipelines. This paper presents a technical review of all laboratory and pilot work to identify impacts of sulphur impurities from throughout the oxy-fuel process, from combustion, gas cleaning, compression to sequestration with removal and remedial options. An economic assessment of the optimum removal is not considered. Recent oxy-fuel pilot trials performed in support of the Callide Oxy-fuel Project and other pilot scale data are interpreted and combined with thermodynamic simulations to develop a greater fundamental understanding of the changes incurred by recycling the flue gas. The simulations include a sensitivity analysis of process variables and comparisons between air fired and oxy-fuel fired conditions - such as combustion products, SO3 conversion and limestone addition.

Rohan Stanger; Terry Wall

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Cogeneration system with low NO sub x combustion of fuel gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a cogeneration system for the production of electricity and refrigeration with low NO{sub x} combustion of fuel gas supplied at a high pressure. It comprises a heat exchanger to heat the fuel gas at high pressure; a turbo-expander connected to receive and expand the heated fuel gas from the heat exchanger; a centrifugal compressor driven by the turbo-expander the compressor being the refrigerant compressor of a refrigeration system; a porous fiber burner connected to receive the expanded fuel gas from the turbo-expander together with the requisite combustion air; a high-pressure steam boiler heated by the combustion of the expanded fuel gas on the outer surface of the porous fiber burner, the boiler being connected to pass the resulting flue gas with low NO{sub x} content through the heat exchanger to heat the fuel gas at high pressure; a steam turbine connected to receive and expand highpressure steam from the boiler and to return expanded and condensed steam to the boiler; and an electric generator driven by the steam turbine.

Garbo, P.W.

1991-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

Effect of syngas composition on combustion and exhaust emission characteristics in a pilot-ignited dual-fuel engine operated in PREMIER combustion mode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to investigate the performance and emissions of a pilot-ignited, supercharged, dual-fuel engine powered by different types of syngas at various equivalence ratios. It was found that if certain operating conditions were maintained, conventional engine combustion could be transformed into combustion with two-stage heat release. This mode of combustion has been investigated in previous studies with natural gas, and has been given the name \\{PREmixed\\} Mixture Ignition in the End-gas Region (PREMIER) combustion. PREMIER combustion begins as premixed flame propagation, and then, because of mixture autoignition in the end-gas region, ahead of the propagating flame front, a transition occurs, with a rapid increase in the heat release rate. It was determined that the mass of fuel burned during the second stage affected the rate of maximum pressure rise. As the fuel mass fraction burned during the second stage increased, the rate of maximum pressure rise also increased, with a gradual decrease in the delay between the first increase in the heat release rate following pilot fuel injection and the point when the transition to the second stage occurred. The H2 and CO2 content of syngas affected the engine performance and emissions. Increased H2 content led to higher combustion temperatures and efficiency, lower CO and HC emissions, but higher \\{NOx\\} emissions. Increased CO2 content influenced performance and emissions only when it reached a certain level. In the most recent studies, the mean combustion temperature, indicated thermal efficiency, and \\{NOx\\} emissions decreased only when the CO2 content of the syngas increased to 34%. PREMIER combustion did not have a major effect on engine cycle-to-cycle variation. The coefficient of variation of the indicated mean effective pressure (COVIMEP) was less than 4% for all types of fuel at various equivalence ratios, indicating that the combustion was within the stability range for engine operation.

Ulugbek Azimov; Eiji Tomita; Nobuyuki Kawahara; Yuji Harada

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Modelling the Fate of Sulphur During Pulverized Coal Combustion under Conventional and Oxy-fuel Conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Focus of the present study is on the fate of sulphur during coal combustion and modelling of the corresponding \\{SOx\\} formation mechanisms. The sulphur chemistry during coal combustion in general is briefly described and potential effects of the oxy-fuel conditions are explained. Details about the developed sulphur chemistry model which covers both heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction pathways are given. The model describes the sulphur transformation in a sequence of stages: the release of coal-bound sulphur, gas phase reactions of sulphuric species, and self-retention of sulphur oxides by coal ash. The model is evaluated against experimental data from IFK's semi-industrial scale furnace (500 kWth) firing lignite at conventional and oxy-fuel combustion conditions. Four reference cases are considered, i.e. air and oxy-fuel mode in both non-staged and staged operation. Based on the results from the basic combustion simulation with AIOLOS, the sulphur chemistry model has been applied in a subsequent post-processing step. The sulphur related results show that the general trends regarding the species concentrations may be predicted correctly. The specific characteristics and the effect of oxy-fuel conditions and oxidant staging are captured correspondingly within the simulation results. Yet, certain deficiencies concerning the quantitative prediction could be identified which necessitate further investigations.

Michael Müller; Uwe Schnell; Günter Scheffknecht

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Influence of Lime Addition to Ilmenite in Chemical-Looping Combustion (CLC) with Solid Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of calcined and sulfated limestone addition in an oxygen carrier bed of ilmenite has been investigated for chemical-looping combustion (CLC) with solid fuel. The experiments have been performed in a laboratory-batch fluidized-bed reactor ...

Guillaume Teyssié; Henrik Leion; Georg L. Schwebel; Anders Lyngfelt; Tobias Mattisson

2011-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Preface Background The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 is prepared by the Electric Power Divi- sion; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S.

257

Oxy-fuel Combustion and Integrated Pollutant Removal as Retrofit Technologies for Removing CO2 from Coal Fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One third of the US installed capacity is coal-fired, producing 49.7% of net electric generation in 20051. Any approach to curbing CO2 production must consider the installed capacity and provide a mechanism for preserving this resource while meeting CO2 reduction goals. One promising approach to both new generation and retrofit is oxy-fuel combustion. Using oxygen instead of air as the oxidizer in a boiler provides a concentrated CO2 combustion product for processing into a sequestration-ready fluid.... Post-combustion carbon capture and oxy-fuel combustion paired with a compression capture technology such as IPR are both candidates for retrofitting pc combustion plants to meet carbon emission limits. This paper will focus on oxy-fuel combustion as applied to existing coal power plants.

Ochs, T.L.; Oryshchyn, D.B.; Summers, C.A.; Gerdemann, S.J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Advanced High Efficiency Clean Diesel Combustion with Low Cost for Hybrid Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Clean, in-cylinder combustion can be enabled by a micro-variable circular orifice, dual mode PCCI, dew film combustion, and a novel combustion chamber design

259

Conversion of jet fuel and butanol to syngas by filtration combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Replacing batteries with fuel cells is a promising approach for powering portable devices; however, hydrogen fuel generation and storage are challenges to the acceptance of this technology. A potential solution to this problem is on-site fuel reforming, in which a rich fuel/air mixture is converted to a hydrogen-rich syngas. In this paper, we present experimental results of the conversion of jet fuel (Jet-A) and butanol to syngas by non-catalytic filtration combustion in a porous media reactor operating over a wide range of equivalence ratios and inlet velocities. Since the focus of this study is the production of syngas, our primary results are the hydrogen yield, the carbon monoxide yield, and the energy conversion efficiency. In addition, the production of soot that occurred during testing is discussed for both fuels. Finally, an analysis of the potential for these fuels and others to be converted to syngas based on the present experiments and data available in the literature is presented. This study is intended to increase the understanding of filtration combustion for syngas production and to illuminate the potential of these fuels for conversion to syngas by non-catalytic methods.

Colin H. Smith; Daniel I. Pineda; Casey D. Zak; Janet L. Ellzey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Science Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant & Hydrogen Internal Combustion Engine Vehicle Testing Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant is a model alternative fuel refueling system, dispensing hydrogen, compressed natural gas (CNG), and hydrogen/ CNG blends (HCNG). The plant is used daily to fuel vehicles operated in Arizona Public Service's fleet. Hydrogen Subsystem The plant's hydrogen system consists of production, compression, storage, and dispensing. The hydrogen produced is suitable for use in fuel cell-powered vehicles, for which the minimum hydrogen purity goal is 99.999%. Hydrogen is produced using an electrolysis process that separates water into hydrogen and oxygen. At present, the hydrogen is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Office Record Office Record Record #: 13012 Date: September 18, 2013 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 Update to: Record 12020 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: October 16, 2013 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2013 technology 1 and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $67/kW when manufactured at a volume of 100,000 units/year, and $55/kW at 500,000 units/year. Rationale: The DOE Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Office supports projects that perform detailed analysis to estimate cost status of fuel cell systems, updated on an annual basis [1]. In fiscal year 2013, Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) updated their 2012 cost analysis of an 80-kW

262

Aggressive fuel designs minimize fuel costs for the ANO-1 PWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel cycle design objectives are influenced by the desire of utilities to attain top performer status in the industry and to become more cost competitive. At Energy, we are seeking aggressive fuel designs and core management schemes that reduce costs without compromising operating margins. Recent efforts at the Arkansas Nuclear One (ANO-1) plant demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach and led to important benefits for both the utility and the fuel vendor, Babcock Wilcox. With our acquisition of the CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 advanced physics code, we initiated a proactive approach to the design of cycle 12 of ANO-1. The primary goal was to explore the use of advanced designs to reduce front-end fuel cycle costs for cycle 12. A secondary goal was to incorporate those features into cycle 12 that could lead to further cost or margin improvements in later cycles.

Ober, T.G.; Megehee, K.B.; Bencheikh, A.; Thompson, R.A. (Entergy Operations, Jackson, MS (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Non-Petroleum-Based Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

* Consumers experience 25-30% drop in fuel economy with FFV's, attributable to lower energy content 7 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy FT008: NPBF...

264

Chemical Kinetic Simulation of the Combustion of Bio-based Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to environmental and economic issues, there has been an increased interest in the use of alternative fuels. However, before widespread use of biofuels is feasible, the compatibility of these fuels with specific engines needs to be examined. More accurate models of the chemical combustion of alternative fuels in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines are necessary, and this project evaluates the performance of emissions models and uses the information gathered to study the chemical kinetics involved. The computer simulations for each alternative fuel were executed using the Chemkin chemical kinetics program, and results from the runs were compared with data gathered from an actual engine that was run under similar conditions. A new heat transfer mechanism was added to the existing model's subroutine, and simulations were then conducted using the heat transfer mechanism. Results from the simulation proved to be accurate when compared with the data taken from the actual engine. The addition of heat transfer produced more realistic temperature and pressure data for biodiesel when biodiesel's combustion was simulated in an HCCI engine. The addition of the heat transfer mechanism essentially lowered the peak pressures and peak temperatures during combustion of all fuels simulated in this project.

Ashen, Ms. Refuyat [Oak Ridge High School; Cushman, Ms. Katherine C. [Oak Ridge High School

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Vaporizer design criteria for ethanol fueled internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been identified in conversion of diesel engines of farm tractors for using alcohol fuels. Distillation at atmospheric pressure does not yield 200 proof ethanol, (Winston, 1981), so with present technology, ethanol produced on farms is aqueous. A... engines 2. Modify diesel to tolerate straight ethanol injection. 3. Mix ethanol with diesel fuel. 4. Carburete the ethanol separately Converting Diesels To SI Engines Most diesel engines currently used in tractors operate with compression ratios...

Ariyaratne, Arachchi Rallage

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

266

Impact of solid fuel combustion technology on valence speciation of chromium in fly ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fly ash (FA) generated in real furnaces was used to evaluate the impact of the kind of the solid fuel burnt and combustion technology on chromium speciation, particularly the presence of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) forms as well as readily and hardly leachable chromium(VI) species in FAs. The \\{FAs\\} originated from a pulverized coal combustion boiler (PCC boiler), a fluidized bed combustion boiler (FBC boiler), a stoker-fired boiler (SF boiler), a municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI), a cement rotary kiln (CRK) and a modern domestic boiler (DB). The speciation analysis of chromium was carried out by means of extraction followed by catalytic cathodic stripping voltammetry with adsorption of Cr(III)-DTPA complexes (CCSV-DTPA) for determination of Cr(VI) and AAS was used for determination of Cr content. It has been revealed that the antagonistic action of alkali metal compounds and iron oxides plays a crucial role in shaping valence speciation of chromium. According to the proposed transformation path of oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI), hard coal combustion in an SF boiler, an FBC boiler or a domestic boiler will generate \\{FAs\\} with a low Cr(VI) level. Replacing fuel with biomass should create favorable conditions for generating FA enriched with Cr(VI). Relatively high concentrations of Cr(VI) can also be expected in FA generated in the process of high-temperature combustion of coal in PCC boilers.

Ryszard ?wietlik; Marzena Trojanowska; Monika ?o?y?ska; Artur Molik

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

DOE cost comparison study industrial fluidized bed combustion vs conventional coal technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compares the capital and operating costs of two different industrial boiler technologies, each producing 250,000 lbs steam/hr. These technologies are: Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) and Pulverized Coal (PC) combustion used in conjunction with a limestone Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system. Three separate turnkey plant designs have been completed. Two of these plant designs incorporate FBC technology and have been designated FBA-16 and FBV-16. The first FBC design (FBA-16) contains two shop assembled, rail shippable fluid bed boilers capable of producing 125,000 lbs/hr each. The second plant design (FBV-16) utilizes a single 250,000 lbs/hr fluid bed boiler shipped by rail in large sections for field assembly. The third plant design utilizes a conventional pulverized coal (PC) boiler in conjunction with a C-E Air Quality Control System (AQCS) limestone scrubber. Capital costs were generated for the three turnkey plant designs just described. The FBA-16, FBV-16, and Conventional Unit plant designs have associated capital costs of $24.4, $22.8, and $24.7 million, respectively. Comparisons between plant capital cost estimates are valid and informative. The total operational costs, which include contingencies on new product design for the Fluid Bed Units, were found to vary between four and seven percent higher than the Conventional Unit. When contingencies are not included, the operating costs were found to be between one and three percent higher than the Conventional Unit. As can be seen, the operating costs for the bed designs are close enough to be considered similar when considering the nature of the study. The efficiency of the fluid bed plant designs can be increased and required capital equipment reduced by improvements to the plant design with time and more development. Some potential design modifications are outlined.

Myrick, D.T.

1980-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

268

Solid Fuel - Oxygen Fired Combustion for Production of Nodular Reduced Iron to Reduce CO2 Emissions and Improve Energy Efficiencies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current trend in the steel industry is an increase in iron and steel produced in electric arc furnaces (EAF) and a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the market demands of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling capabilities. This demand creates opportunity to convert iron ore or other iron bearing materials to Nodular Reduced Iron (NRI) in a recently designed Linear Hearth Furnace (LHF). NRI is a metallized iron product containing 98.5 to 96.0% iron and 2.5 to 4% C. It is essentially a scrap substitute with little impurity that can be utilized in a variety of steelmaking processes, especially the electric arc furnace. The objective of this project was to focus on reducing the greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) through reducing the energy intensity using specialized combustion systems, increasing production and the use of biomass derived carbon sources in this process. This research examined the use of a solid fuel-oxygen fired combustion system and compared the results from this system with both oxygen-fuel and air-fuel combustion systems. The solid pulverized fuels tested included various coals and a bio-coal produced from woody biomass in a specially constructed pilot scale torrefaction reactor at the Coleraine Minerals Research Laboratory (CMRL). In addition to combustion, the application of bio-coal was also tested as a means to produce a reducing atmosphere during key points in the fusion process, and as a reducing agent for ore conversion to metallic iron to capture the advantage of its inherent reduced carbon footprint. The results from this study indicate that the approaches taken can reduce both greenhouse gas emissions and the associated energy intensity with the Linear Hearth Furnace process for converting iron ore to metallic iron nodules. Various types of coals including a bio-coal produced though torrefaction can result in production of NRI at reduced GHG levels. The process results coupled with earlier already reported developments indicate that this process technique should be evaluated at the next level in order to develop parameter information for full scale process design. Implementation of the process to full commercialization will require a full cost production analysis and comparison to other reduction technologies and iron production alternatives. The technical results verify that high quality NRI can be produced under various operating conditions at the pilot level.

Donald R. Fosnacht; Richard F. Kiesel; David W. Hendrickson; David J. Englund; Iwao Iwasaki; Rodney L. Bleifuss; Mathew A. Mlinar

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

269

Combustion of single biomass particles in air and in oxy-fuel conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The combustion behaviors of four different pulverized biomasses were evaluated in the laboratory. Single particles of sugarcane bagasse, pine sawdust, torrefied pine sawdust and olive residue were burned in a drop-tube furnace, set at 1400 K, in both air and O2/CO2 atmospheres containing 21, 30, 35, and 50% oxygen mole fractions. High-speed and high-resolution images of single particles were recorded cinematographically and temperature–time histories were obtained pyrometrically. Combustion of these particles took place in two phases. Initially, volatiles evolved and burned in spherical envelope flames of low-luminosity; then, upon extinction of these flames, char residues ignited and burned in brief periods of time. This behavior was shared by all four biomasses of this study, and only small differences among them were evident based on their origin, type and pre-treatment. Volatile flames of biomass particles were much less sooty than those of previously burned coal particles of analogous size and char combustion durations were briefer. Replacing the background N2 gas with CO2, i.e., changing from air to an oxy-fuel atmosphere, at 21% O2 impaired the intensity of combustion; reduced the combustion temperatures and lengthened the burnout times of the biomass particles. Increasing the oxygen mole fraction in CO2 to 28–35% restored the combustion intensity of the single biomass particles to that in air.

Juan Riaza; Reza Khatami; Yiannis A. Levendis; Lucía Álvarez; María V. Gil; Covadonga Pevida; Fernando Rubiera; José J. Pis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Impact of Aviation Non-CO2 Combustion Effects on the Environmental Feasibility of Alternative Jet Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Materials and Methods ... The purely paraffinic nature and lack of sulfur present in SPK fuels has been shown to cause changes in the combustion emissions from gas turbine engines;(13-16) hence, the purpose of this paper is 2-fold: (1) develop ratios by which the CO2 from combustion can be scaled to include the climate forcing from non-CO2 combustion effects of conventional jet fuel and SPK, and (2) quantify how including non-CO2 combustion species within the fuel life cycle changes the merit of alternative jet fuels relative to conventional jet fuel from the perspective of climate change. ... We thank Mr. Chris Dorbian, Mrs. Hsin Min Wong, Prof. Steven Barrett, Prof. Jessika Trancik, and Prof. Ian Waitz for their help in improving the quality of the work presented herein as well as Warren Gillette and Lourdes Maurice, of FAA, and Tim Edwards and Bill Harrison, both of AFRL, for their leadership in managing this project. ...

Russell W. Stratton; Philip J. Wolfe; James I. Hileman

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

271

Operational and environmental benefits of oxy-fuel combustion in the steel industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the high flame temperature of conventional oxygen-fuel burners, these burners have typically not been used in reheat furnaces where temperature uniformity is critical. Praxair has developed a number of burners and associated control systems that have been successfully operated in a variety of reheat furnaces beginning in 1980. The burners have also recently been used for ladle preheating. All burners have been operated with 100% oxygen. The patented burners have designs that result in flame temperatures equivalent to conventional air-fuel burners. Flexible flame patterns are possible, resulting in uniform temperature distribution. In addition, the low flame temperature combined with minimal nitrogen in the furnace results in very low NO{sub x} emissions. The design of the control systems insure safe and reliable operation. In the following sections, oxygen-fuel combustion will be described, with a discussion of fuel savings and other benefits. Unique designs will be discussed along with the features which make them applicable to reheat applications and which result in lower emissions. Other equipment provided with the burners to complete the oxy-fuel combustion system will be described briefly. There will also be a short discussion of how both the fuel and oxygen price can affect the economics of fuel saving. Results from the commercial retrofit installations in continuous and batch reheat furnaces, soaking pits and ladle preheaters will be described. Finally, NO{sub x} emissions data will be discussed.

Farrell, L.M. [Praxair, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States); Pavlack, T.T. [Praxair, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States); Rich, L. [North American Manufacturing Co., Coraopolis, PA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Oxy-fuel combustion systems for pollution free coal fired power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jupiter Oxygen's patented oxy-fuel combustion systems1 are capable of economically generating power from coal with ultra-low emissions and increased boiler efficiency. Jupiter's system uses pure oxygen as the combustion agent, excluding air and thus nitrogen, concentrating CO2 and pollutants for efficient capture with near zero NOx production, reducing exhaust mass flow, and increasing radiant heat transfer. Flue-gas recirculation rates can be varied to add flexibility to new boiler designs using this technology. Computer modeling and thermal analysis have identified important design considerations in retrofit applications.

Ochs, Thomas L.; Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Gross, Dietrich (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.); Patrick, Brian (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.); Gross, Alex (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.); Dogan, Cindy; Summers, Cathy A.; Simmons, William (CoalTeck LLC); Schoenfeld, Mark (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS -POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS - POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS Senior scientist - "Towards Hydrogen Society" ·biomass resources - potentials, limits ·biomass carbon cycle ·biomass for hydrogen - as compared to other H2- sources and to other biomass paths #12;BIOMASS - THE CARBON CYCLE

274

DOE Project 18546, AOP Task 1.1, Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research in 2011 was focused on diesel range fuels and diesel combustion and fuels evaluated in 2011 included a series of oxygenated biofuels fuels from University of Maine, oxygenated fuel compounds representing materials which could be made from sewage, oxygenated marine diesel fuels for low emissions, and a new series of FACE fuel surrogates and FACE fuels with detailed exhaust chemistry and particulate size measurements. Fuels obtained in late 2011, which will be evaluated in 2012, include a series of oil shale derived fuels from PNNL, green diesel fuel (hydrotreated vegetable oil) from UOP, University of Maine cellulosic biofuel (levulene), and pyrolysis derived fuels from UOP pyrolysis oil, upgraded at University of Georgia. We were able to demonstrate, through a project with University of Wisconsin, that a hybrid strategy for fuel surrogates provided both accurate and rapid CFD combustion modeling for diesel HCCI. In this strategy, high molecular weight compounds are used to more accurately represent physical processes and smaller molecular weight compounds are used for chemistry to speed chemical calculations. We conducted a small collaboration with sp3H, a French company developing an on-board fuel quality sensor based on near infrared analysis to determine how to use fuel property and chemistry information for engine control. We were able to show that selected outputs from the sensor correlated to both fuel properties and to engine performance. This collaboration leveraged our past statistical analysis work and further work will be done as opportunity permits. We conducted blending experiments to determine characteristics of ethanol blends based on the gasoline characteristics used for blending. Results indicate that much of the octane benefits gained by high level ethanol blending can be negated by use of low octane gasoline blend stocks, as allowed by ASTM D5798. This may limit ability to optimize engines for improved efficiency with ethanol fuels. Extensive data from current and previous years was leveraged into participation with several large proposal teams, as our fuels database covers a very wide range of conventional and emerging fuels and biofuels.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Method of regulating the amount of underfire air for combustion of wood fuels in spreader-stroke boilers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of metering underfire air for increasing efficiency and reducing particulate emissions from wood-fire, spreader-stoker boilers is disclosed. A portion of the combustion air, approximately one pound of air per pound of wood, is fed through the grate into the fuel bed, while the remainder of the combustion air is distributed above the fuel in the furnace, and the fuel bed is maintained at a depth sufficient to consume all oxygen admitted under fire and to insure a continuous layer of fresh fuel thereover to entrap charred particles inside the fuel bed.

Tuttle, Kenneth L. (Federal Way, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Tables 7 Tables May 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997 Tables ii Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

277

Organic combustion fingerprints of three common home heating fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper discusses the chemical structures of three common home heating fuels: wood, coal, and No. 2 fuel oil. GC and GC/MS data are then presented which demonstrate how the thermal destruction of each fuel results in the production of a characteristic group of organic 'fingerprint' compounds. For wood, where the chief structural element is lignin polymer, they are methoxy benzenes, methoxy phenols, and alkyl bezenes. For coal, where the polymer contains more fused-ring structures, the chief products are fused-ring aromatics with structures of three or more rings, benzothiophenes, and to a lesser extent methyl-substituted phenols. For oil, the chief byproducts are unburned droplets of the oil. The paper concludes with a brief discussion of how these fingerprints can be used as apportionment guides in complex airsheds.

Steiber, R.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Combustion Phasing Model for Control of a Gasoline-Ethanol Fueled SI Engine with Variable Valve Timing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combustion Phasing Model for Control of a Gasoline-Ethanol Fueled SI Engine with Variable Valve engine efficiency. Fuel-flexible engines permit the increased use of ethanol-gasoline blends. Ethanol points across the engine operating range for four blends of gasoline and ethanol. I. INTRODUCTION Fuel

279

Influence of Biodiesel Fuel on the Combustion and Emission Formation in a Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The injector needle lift trace at low engine speed was almost identical for both fuels, while at maximum engine speed, a shorter injection delay was observed for biodiesel fuel and the injector needle opened earlier as with D2 fuel. ... Figure 1 Comparison of the engine torque (M), fuel consumption (Gh), and brake specific energy consumption (ge) at full load for biodiesel fuel (BD) and D2 fuel in (a) TAM and (b) MAN engines. ... (7)?Sanatore, A.; Cardone, M.; Rocco, V.; Prati, M. V. A comparative analysis of combustion process in DI diesel engine fueled with biodiesel and diesel fuel. ...

Ales Hribernik; Breda Kegl

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Exhaust Emissions and Combustion Characteristics of a Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Fueled with Methanol?Diesel Fuel Blends at Different Injection Timings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exhaust Emissions and Combustion Characteristics of a Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Fueled with Methanol?Diesel Fuel Blends at Different Injection Timings ... Because of their fuel economy and high reliability, compression-ignition (CI) engines known as diesel engines have been penetrating a number of markets around the world. ...

Mustafa Canakci; Cenk Sayin; Metin Gumus

2008-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts in 1984 to electric utility plants is presented, with some data provided for each year from 1979 through 1984. Data were collected on Forms FERC-423 and EIA-759. Fuels are coal, fuel oil, and natural gas. Data are reported by company and plant, by type of plant, and by State and Census Region, with US totals. This report contains information on fossil fuel receipts to electric utility plants with a combined steam capacity of 50 megawatts or larger. Previous reports contained data on all electric plants with a combined capacity of 25 megawatts or larger. All historical data in this publication have been revised to reflect the new reporting threshold. Peaking unit data are no longer collected. A glossary of terms, technical notes, and references are also provided. 7 figs., 62 tabs.

Not Available

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Standard test method for heat of combustion of hydrocarbon fuels by bomb calorimeter (high-precision method)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This method covers the determination of the heat of combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. It is designed specifically for use with aviation turbine fuels when the permissible difference between duplicate determinations is of the order of 0.1%. It can be used for a wide range of volatile and nonvolatile materials where slightly greater differences in precision can be tolerated. The heat of combustion is determined by burning a weighed sample in an oxygen-bomb calorimeter under controlled conditions. The temperature is measured by means of a platinum resistance thermometer. The heat of combustion is calculated from temperature observations before, during, and after combustion, with proper allowance for thermochemical and heat-transfer corrections. Either isothermal or adiabatic calorimeters may be used. The heat of combustion is a measure of the energy available from a fuel. A knowledge of this value is essential when considering the thermal efficiency of equipment for producing either power or heat.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Investigation of a Coupled Fuel Reactor for Coal-Fueled Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To determine the solids circulation rate, an annular loop-seal was designed. ... Shen, L.; Wu, J.; Xiao, J.Experiments on chemical looping combustion of coal with a NiO based oxygen carrier Combust. ... Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research (2013), 52 (18), 6119-6128 CODEN: IECRED; ISSN:0888-5885. ...

Hongming Sun; Lei Xu; Zhenshan Li; Ningsheng Cai

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

284

Stabilization of liquid hydrocarbon fuel combustion by using a programmable microwave discharge in a subsonic airflow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under conditions of a programmable discharge (a surface microwave discharge combined with a dc discharge), plasma-enhanced combustion of alcohol injected into a subsonic (M = 0.3-0.9) airflow in the drop (spray) phase is stabilized. It is shown that the appearance of the discharge, its current-voltage characteristic, the emission spectrum, the total emission intensity, the heat flux, the electron density, the hydroxyl emission intensity, and the time dependences of the discharge current and especially discharge voltage change substantially during the transition from the airflow discharge to stabilized combustion of the liquid hydrocarbon fuel. After combustion stabilization, more than 80% of liquid alcohol can burn out, depending on the input power, and the flame temperature reaches {approx}2000 K.

Kopyl, P. V.; Surkont, O. S.; Shibkov, V. M.; Shibkova, L. V. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Hydrogen production in ultrarich combustion of hydrocarbon fuels in porous media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rich and ultrarich combustion of methane, ethane, and propane inside inert porous media is studied experimentally and numerically to examine the suitability of the concept for hydrogen production. Temperature, velocities, and chemical products of the combustion waves were recorded experimentally at a range of equivalence ratios from stoichiometry (? = 1.0) to ? = 2.5, for a filtration velocity of 12 cm/s. Two-temperature numerical model based on comprehensive heat transfer and chemical mechanisms is found to be in a good qualitative agreement with experimental data. Partial oxidation products of methane, ethane, and propane (H2, CO, and C2 hydrocarbons) are dominant for ultrarich superadiabatic combustion. The maximum hydrogen yield is close to 50% for all fuels, and carbon monoxide yield is close to 80%.

Mario Toledo; Valeri Bubnovich; Alexei Saveliev; Lawrence Kennedy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Fresh Way to Cut Combustion, Crop and Air Heating Costs Avoids Million BTU Purchases: Inventions and Innovation Combustion Success Story  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Success story written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new space heating method that uses solar energy to heat incoming combustion, crop, and ventilation air.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

287

Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

Ramsden, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7: January 16, 7: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Digg

289

DOE cost comparison study: industrial fluidized bed combustion vs conventional coal technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study compares the capital and operating costs of two different industrial boiler technologies, each producing 250,000 lbs steam/hr: Fluidized Bed Combustion (FBC) and Pulverized Coal (PC) combustion used in conjunction with a limestone Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system. Three separate turnkey plant designs have been completed. Two of these plant designs incorporate FBC technology and have been designated FBA-16 and FBV-16. The first FBC design (FBA-16) contains two shop assembled, rail-shippable, fluid-bed boilers capable of producing 125,000 lbs/h each. The second plant design (FBV-16) utilizes a single fluid bed boiler shipped by rail in large sections for field assembly. This single unit is capable of producing 250,000 lbs/h. The third plant design utilizes a conventional pulverized coal (PC) boiler used in conjunction with a C-E Air Quaity Control System (AQCS) limestone scrubber. The FBA-16 and FBV-16 fluid bed designs were found to be competitive with the conventional unit. Capital costs were generated for the three turnkey plant designs just described. The FBA-16, FBV-16, and Conventional Unit plant designs have associated capital costs of $24.4, $22.8, and $24.7 million, respectively. A substantial cost reduction can be realized for plant capacities less than 180,000 lbs steam/h by incorporating a single FBA-16 type boiler. The operating costs for the bed designs are close enough to be considered similar when considering the nature of the study. The efficiency of the fluid bed plant designs can be increased and required capital equipment reduced by improvements to the plant design. Some potential design modifications are outlined. Extensive design and background research was prformed to increase the validity and relevance of this report.

Myrick, D.T.

1980-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

290

Analysis of environmental factors impacting the life cycle cost analysis of conventional and fuel cell/battery-powered passenger vehicles. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the further developments and testing of the Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Model previously developed by Engineering Systems Management, Inc. (ESM) on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under contract No. DE-AC02-91CH10491. The Model incorporates specific analytical relationships and cost/performance data relevant to internal combustion engine (ICE) powered vehicles, battery powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and fuel cell/battery-powered electric vehicles (FCEVs).

NONE

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Investigation of Combustion and Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine with Oxygenated Fuels and Thermal Barrier Coating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Combustion and Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine with Oxygenated Fuels and Thermal Barrier Coating ... Exhaust gas emissions from diesel engines have become a serious problem to the researchers; therefore, a method of reduction of gas emission is needed. ... Their results show that the engine can achieve ultra-low emission without fundamental change to the combustion system. ...

P. Ramu; C. G. Saravanan

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

292

Methane Steam Reforming Thermally Coupled with Fuel Combustion: Application of Chemical Looping Concept as a Novel Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane Steam Reforming Thermally Coupled with Fuel Combustion: Application of Chemical Looping Concept as a Novel Technology ... One of these new methods is chemical looping combustion (CLC). ... Experimental Study of Chemical-Looping Reforming in a Fixed-Bed Reactor: Performance Investigation of Different Oxygen Carriers on Al2O3 and TiO2 Support ...

Mohammad Reza Rahimpour; Marziyeh Hesami; Majid Saidi; Abdolhossein Jahanmiri; Mahdi Farniaei; Mohsen Abbasi

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

293

Achieve Continuous Injection of Solid Fuels into Advanced Combustion System Pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is the development of a mechanical rotary-disk feeder, known as the Stamet Posimetric High Pressure Solids Feeder System, to feed dry granular coal continuously and controllably into pressurized environments of up to 35 kg/cm{sup 2} (500 psi). This was to be accomplished in two phases. The first task was to review materials handling experience in pressurized operations as it related to the target pressures for this project, and review existing coal preparation processes and specifications currently used in advanced combustion systems. Samples of existing fuel materials were obtained and tested to evaluate flow, sealing and friction properties. This provided input data for use in the design of the Stamet Feeders for the project, and ensured that the material specification used met the requirements of advanced combustion & gasification systems. Ultimately, Powder River Basin coal provided by the PSDF facility in Wilsonville, AL was used as the basis for the feeder design and test program. Based on the material property information, a Phase 1 feeder system was designed and built to accomplish feeding the coal to an intermediate pressure up to 21 kg/cm{sup 2} (300 psi) at feed rates of approximately 100 kilograms (220lbs) per hour. The pump & motor system was installed in a custom built test rig comprising an inlet vessel containing an active live-wall hopper mounted in a support frame, transition into the pump inlet, transition from pump outlet and a receiver vessel containing a receiver drum supported on weigh cells. All pressure containment on the rig was rated for the final pressure requirement of 35 kg/cm{sup 2} (500psi). A program of testing and modification was carried out in Stamet's facility in CA, culminating in successful feeding of coal into the Phase 1 target of 21 kg/cm{sup 2} (300psi) gas pressure in December 2003. Further testing was carried out at CQ Inc's facility in PA, providing longer run times and experience of handling and feeding the coal in winter conditions. Based on the data developed through the testing of the Phase I unit, a Phase II system was designed for feeding coal into pressures of up to 35 kg/cm{sup 2} (500 psi). A further program of testing and modification was then carried out in Stamet's facility, with the target pressure being achieved in January 2005. Repeated runs at pressure were achieved, and optimization of the machine resulted in power reductions of 60% from the first successful pressure runs. General design layout of a commercial-scale unit was conducted, and preliminary cost estimates for a commercial unit obtained.

Derek L. Aldred; Timothy Saunders

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Microsoft Word - 41776_GE_Fuel Flexible Combustion_Factsheet_Rev01_10-03-03.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FACTS SHEET FACTS SHEET Fuel Flexible Combustion for Coproduction Plant Applications I.) Project Participants: Prime Participant: General Electric Sub-award Participant: Georgia Tec II.) Project Description: A. Objective: Develop a multi-fuel low emission combustor for Vision 21 plant and gas turbine system applications. Combustion system development includes the development of combustion modeling tools for low Btu fuel compositions. The combustion system is targeted at Vision 21 coproduction plant operating conditions & fuels. A system model of the proposed Vision 21 plant design will be constructed to predict overall plant efficiencies. B. Background/Relevancy: A primary goal of the Vision 21 program is the development of high-efficiency, low-emission energy plants (Vision 21 plants) that produce electric

295

Influence of input momentum and losses in the turbine on the efficiency of a turbofan engine with periodic fuel combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that research carried out by leading aeroengine manufactures on the use of the thermodynamically high-efficient GTE cycle with the periodic fuel combustion is very urgent. The investigation results...

V. I. Bogdanov; A. K. Dormidontov

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Thermo economic evaluation of oxy fuel combustion cycle in Kazeroon power plant considering enhanced oil recovery revenues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxy fuel combustion and conventional cycle (currently working cycle ... for enhanced oil recovery in the various oil price indices is conducted and indices net present ... models reveal that gross efficiency of t...

Ehsan Torabnejad; Ramin Haghighi-Khoshkhoo…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Experimental Investigation of Fuel-Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion Mode in a Multi-Cylinder, Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to provide the combustion and emission characteristics resulting from fuel-reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion mode utilizing dual-fuel approach in a light-duty, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel injection of gasoline before intake valve opening (IVO) and early-cycle, direct injection of diesel fuel was used as the charge preparation and fuel blending strategy. In order to achieve the desired auto-ignition quality through the stratification of the fuel-air equivalence ratio ( ), blends of commercially available gasoline and diesel fuel were used. Engine experiments were performed at an engine speed of 2300rpm and an engine load of 4.3bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). It was found that significant reduction in both nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was realized successfully through the RCCI combustion mode even without applying exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). However, high carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were observed. The low combustion gas temperature during the expansion and exhaust processes seemed to be the dominant source of high CO emissions in the RCCI combustion mode. The high HC emissions during the RCCI combustion mode could be due to the increased combustion quenching layer thickness as well as the -stratification at the periphery of the combustion chamber. The slightly higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of the RCCI combustion mode was observed than the other combustion modes, such as the conventional diesel combustion (CDC) mode, and single-fuel, premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion mode. The parametric study of the RCCI combustion mode revealed that the combustion phasing and/or the peak cylinder pressure rise rate of the RCCI combustion mode could be controlled by several physical parameters premixed ratio (rp), intake swirl intensity, and start of injection (SOI) timing of directly injected fuel unlike other low temperature combustion (LTC) strategies.

Cho, Kukwon [ORNL] [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL] [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

OXY-fuel Combustion at the CANMET Vertical Combustor Research Faciltiy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OXY-FUEL COMBUSTION OXY-FUEL COMBUSTION At the CANMET Vertical Combustor Research Facility M.A.Douglas 1 ( madougla@nrcan.gc.ca ; +001-613-996-2761) E. Chui ( echui@nrcan.gc.ca ; +001-613-943-1774) Y. Tan ( ytan@nrcan.gc.ca ; +001-613-992- 8150) G. K. Lee 2 ( gklee@magma.ca ; +001-613-829-3845) E. Croiset 3 ( ecroiset@uwaterloo.ca ; +001-519-888-4567-ext 6472) K. V. Thambimuthu 4 ( kelly.thambimuthu@nrcan.gc.ca ) CANMET Energy Technology Centre, Natural Resources Canada, 1 Haanel Dr., Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, K1A 1M1 ABSTRACT The CANMET Energy Technology Center is a division of Natural Resources Canada and undertakes primary research and technology development activities for the benefit of Canadians and a wide range of external clients. The Vertical Combustor Research Facility (VCRF) was built in 1994 and is CANMET's

299

Comparative Investigation of Blade Lean Effect in Hydrogen?Fueled Combustion Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently environmental problems have been actively researched all over the world. To overcome air pollution and fossil fuel exhaustion we have been investigating a hydrogen?fueled propulsion system. In the system hydrogen is injected from the turbine blade and/or vane surface. The system can realize higher power lighter weight and lower emission than conventional systems. However there exist many problems for the realization. One of them is the extremely high temperature region appearing on the wall. In the present study we clarify the effect of blade lean on the generation of high temperature region. The combusting turbulent flowfield around a normal a compound lean and a reverse compound lean blades are simulated using RANS and 5?step reduced combustion model. Comparing the numerical results it is confirmed that compound lean is promising to suppress the high temperature region.

R. Nakamura; M. Suzuki; M. Yamamoto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

Wijmans Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Evaluation of Novel and Low-Cost Materials for Bipolar Plates in PEM Fuel Cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Bipolar plate material and fabrication costs make up a significant fraction of the total cost in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack. In an… (more)

Desrosiers, Kevin Campbell

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Survey Results and Analysis of the Cost and Efficiency of Various Operating Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existing Hydrogen Fueling Stations were surveyed to determine capital and operational costs. Recommendations for cost reduction in future stations and for research were developed.

Cornish, John

2011-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

303

Hybrid combustion-premixed gasoline homogeneous charge ignited by injected diesel fuel-4-stroke cycle engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the formation and testing of two hybrid combustion engines, wherein a premixed gasoline homogeneous charge was ignited by a small amount of injected diesel fuel under high compression ratio, by modifying open chamber and prechamber 4-stroke cycle diesel engines. It was found that the premixed gasoline was effective not only for decreasing the fuel consumption but also for reducing the smoke density both in the heavy and over-load regions. The effect of introducing a small amount N/sub 2/ gas for suppressing the diesel knock in the heavy load region also was examined.

Yonetani, H.; Okanishi, N.; Fukutani, I.; Watanabe, E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Effect of fuel injection velocity on MILD combustion of syngas in axially-staged combustor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The role of fuel injection velocity on MILD (Moderate or Intense Low-oxygen Dilution) combustion of coal-derived syngas was examined in an axially staged combustor, where the secondary air was mixed with the flue gases from the gas generation zone to produce hot and diluted oxidant prior to its mixing with the secondary fuel. The global flame signatures, OH? radicals distribution, and exhaust emissions were obtained through experimental measurements, while the mixing behavior between the secondary fuel and oxidant was numerically studied. Higher secondary fuel injection velocity within 199–299 m/s facilitated the earlier entrainment of oxidizer into the secondary fuel and increased the flame lift-off height, resulting in a lower flame temperature, a more distributed reaction zone and reduced \\{NOx\\} emissions, but higher pressure loss and CO formation. The MILD regime yields lower \\{NOx\\} emissions compared to the traditional diffusion combustion mode, and the N2O-intermediate mechanism dominates the NO production in the syngas MILD flame with adiabatic flame temperature lower than 1565 K according to the prediction of the chemical reactor network model.

Ming-ming Huang; Wei-wei Shao; Yan Xiong; Yan Liu; Zhe-dian Zhang; Fu-lin Lei; Yun-han Xiao

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2013 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

306

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling...

307

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data for 1991 and 1990 receipts and costs for fossil fuels discussed in the Executive Summary are displayed in Tables ES1 through ES7. These data are for electric generating plants with a total steam-electric and combined-cycle nameplate capacity of 50 or more megawatts. Data presented in the Executive Summary on generation, consumption, and stocks of fossil fuels at electric utilities are based on data collected on the Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-759, ``Monthly Power Plant Report.`` These data cover all electric generating plants. The average delivered cost of coal, petroleum, and gas each decreased in 1991 from 1990 levels. Overall, the average annual cost of fossil fuels delivered to electric utilities in 1991 was $1.60 per million Btu, a decrease of $0.09 per million Btu from 1990. This was the lowest average annual cost since 1978 and was the result of the abundant supply of coal, petroleum, and gas available to electric utilities. US net generation of electricity by all electric utilities in 1991 increased by less than I percent--the smallest increase since the decline that occurred in 1982.3 Coal and gas-fired steam net generation, each, decreased by less than I percent and petroleum-fired steam net generation by nearly 5 percent. Nuclear-powered net generation, however, increased by 6 percent. Fossil fuels accounted for 68 percent of all generation; nuclear, 22 percent; and hydroelectric, 10 percent. Sales of electricity to ultimate consumers in 1991 were 2 percent higher than during 1990.

Not Available

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

308

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data for 1991 and 1990 receipts and costs for fossil fuels discussed in the Executive Summary are displayed in Tables ES1 through ES7. These data are for electric generating plants with a total steam-electric and combined-cycle nameplate capacity of 50 or more megawatts. Data presented in the Executive Summary on generation, consumption, and stocks of fossil fuels at electric utilities are based on data collected on the Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-759, Monthly Power Plant Report.'' These data cover all electric generating plants. The average delivered cost of coal, petroleum, and gas each decreased in 1991 from 1990 levels. Overall, the average annual cost of fossil fuels delivered to electric utilities in 1991 was $1.60 per million Btu, a decrease of $0.09 per million Btu from 1990. This was the lowest average annual cost since 1978 and was the result of the abundant supply of coal, petroleum, and gas available to electric utilities. US net generation of electricity by all electric utilities in 1991 increased by less than I percent--the smallest increase since the decline that occurred in 1982.3 Coal and gas-fired steam net generation, each, decreased by less than I percent and petroleum-fired steam net generation by nearly 5 percent. Nuclear-powered net generation, however, increased by 6 percent. Fossil fuels accounted for 68 percent of all generation; nuclear, 22 percent; and hydroelectric, 10 percent. Sales of electricity to ultimate consumers in 1991 were 2 percent higher than during 1990.

Not Available

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2009  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Date: October 7, 2009 2 Date: October 7, 2009 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2009 Update to: Record 8019 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: October 7, 2009 Item: The cost of an 80-kW automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system operating on direct hydrogen and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year is $61/kW for 2009 technology in 2009 dollars ($51/kW in 2002 dollars for comparison with targets). Rationale: In fiscal year 2009, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2008 cost analyses of 80-kW direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2009 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2]. DTI and TIAX use Design for Manufacturing and Assembly

310

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 Date: August 17, 2011 2 Date: August 17, 2011 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2011 Update to: Record 10004 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 7, 2011 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2011 technology 1 and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $49/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: In fiscal year 2011, Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) 2 updated the 2010 Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) cost analysis of 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems, based on 2011 technology and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year [1]. Results from the analysis were communicated to the DOE

311

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 8002: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

02 Date: October 31, 2008 02 Date: October 31, 2008 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2007 Update to: Record 5005 Originator: Nancy Garland and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: April 3, 2009 Item: The cost of an 80-kW automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system operating on direct hydrogen and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year is $94/kW for 2007 technology in 2007 dollars ($82/kW in 2002 dollars for comparison with targets). Rationale: In fiscal year 2007, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2006 cost analyses of direct hydrogen, 80-kW, PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2007 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2].

312

Effect of Bioethanol Blended Diesel Fuel and Engine Load on Spray, Combustion, and Emissions Characteristics in a Compression Ignition Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Yan et al.(8) investigated the combustion and emission characteristics of diesel engines fueled with ethanol–diesel blended fuel in a single cylinder diesel engine. ... Figure 11 shows the indicated specific fuel consumption (ISFC) characteristics of diesel–bioethanol blended fuels at various engine loads. ... Tests on the engine fuelled with diesel only were made, and the performance evaluated to form a basis for comparison for those of ethanol-diesel dual fuelling. ...

Su Han Park; In Mo Youn; Yunsung Lim; Chang Sik Lee

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

313

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation reports on the status of mass production cost estimation for direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell systems.

314

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE-EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE-EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE-EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R and D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the 1st quarterly progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2000 and ending December 31, 2000. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, objectives of this program, and provides a summary of initial program activities covering program management and preliminary progress in first year tasks including lab- and bench-scale design, facilities preparation, and process/kinetic modeling. More over, the report presents and discusses preliminary results particularly form the bench-scale design and process modeling efforts including a process flow diagram that incorporates the AGC module with other vision-21 plant components with the objective of maximizing H{sub 2} production and process efficiency.

George Rizeq; Ravi Kumar; Janice West; Vitali Lissianski; Neil Widmer; Vladimir Zamansky

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the second annual technical progress report for the Vision 21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2001 and ending September 30, 2002. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design and assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the thermodynamic efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. General Electric Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Advanced Gasification-Combustion (AGC) concept to produce H{sub 2} and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from solid fuels. The AGC module offers potential for reduced cost and increased energy efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems. GE EER was awarded a Vision-21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the AGC technology. Work on this three-year program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the AGC technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on preliminary modeling work in the first quarter of this program, has an estimated process efficiency of approximately 67% based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal. The three-year R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the AGC concept. This is the fifth quarterly technical progress report for the Vision-21 AGC program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract: DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2001 and ending December 31, 2001. The report includes an introduction summarizing the AGC concept, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities covering program management and progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design, and economic studies.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Tomasz Wiltowski; Tom Miles; Bruce Springsteen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The use of auxiliary ignition devices to improve combustion of low centane-high volatility fuels in a diesel engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of auxiliary ignition devices to improve the combustion of low cetane-high volatility fuels in a Diesel engine is described. Previous combustion with a low cetane-high volatility fuel (with a spark plug located at the periphery of the cylinder) resulted in engine knock at heavy loads and poor engine operation at light loads. In the present investigation, several new ignition devices were used to ignite the fuel in the center of the cylinder, to allow combustion to be controlled by rate of injection. The devices used were an extended spark electrode, a fuel spray deflector, a nozzle glow ring, and a nozzle fuel cage. High speed photography and heat release were used to characterize the ignition and combustion process of the low cetane fuel in conjunction with the ignition devices. Combustion with all of the ignition devices was initiated in the center of the cylinder, significantly reducing engine knock. The use of the auxiliary ignition devices to ignite the fuel in the center of the chamber demonstrated extended operation of the Diesel engine for all of the devices tested.

Stroia, B.L.; Abata. D.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Forecasting the Costs of Automotive PEM Fuel Cell Systems: Using Bounded Manufacturing Progress Functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel cell stacks (Savote (1998)) Estimating manufactunng costfuel cell stacks, $20/kWfor fuel processors, and $20/kWfor "balance of plant" auxlhary components These costCosts of Automotive PEM Fuel Cell Systems (PEM)fuel cell stack

Lipman, Timonthy E.; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Fireside Corrosion in Oxy-Fuel Combustion of Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal is to develop technologies for pulverized coal boilers with >90% CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration and <35% increase in the cost of electricity. Air-fired power plant experience shows a corrosion loss max at 680-700 C. Low melting point alkali metal trisulfates, such as (K,Na){sub 3}Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}, become thermally unstable above this temperature range. Some overall conclusions are: (1) CO{sub 2} + 30% H{sub 2}O more corrosive than Ar + 30% H{sub 2}O; (2) Excess O{sub 2} in H{sub 2}O can, in some cases, greatly increase oxidation; (3) Coal ash is generally innocuous without SO{sub 3}3 in gas phase; and (4) Long-term exposures are starting to establish differences between air-firing and oxy-firing conditions.

G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; G. H. Meier; K. Jung; N. Mu; N. M. Yanar; F. S. Pettit

2011-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

320

Cold start fuel management of port-fuel-injected internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study is to investigate how changes in fueling strategy in the second cycle of engine operation influence the delivered charge fuel mass and engine out hydrocarbon (EOHC) emissions in that and subsequent ...

Cuseo, James M. (James Michael)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

In Situ Measurement Technique for Simultaneous Detection of K, KCl, and KOH Vapors Released During Combustion of Solid Biomass Fuel in a Single Particle Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A quantitative and simultaneous measurement of K, KCl, and KOH vapors from a burning fuel sample combusted in a single particle reactor was performed using collinear photofragmentation...

Sorvajärvi, Tapio; DeMartini, Nikolai; Rossi, Jussi; Toivonen, Juha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Numerical Modelling of Oxy-Fuel Combustion in a Full-Scale Tangentially-Fired Pulverised Coal Boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling study to investigate Victorian brown coal combustion in a 550 MW utility boiler under the air-fired (standard) and three oxy-fuel-fired cases. The standard case was modelled based on the real operating conditions of Loy Yang A power plant located in the state of Victoria, Australia. A level of confidence of the present CFD model was achieved validating four parameters of the standard combustion case, as well as the previous preliminary CFD studies which were conducted on a lab-scale (100 kW) unit firing lignite and propane under oxy-fuel-fired scenarios. The oxy-fuel combustion cases are known as OF25 (25vol. % O2 concentration), OF27 (27vol. % O2 concentration), and OF29 (29vol. % O2 concentration). The predictions of OF29 combustion case were considerably similar to the standard firing results in terms of gas temperature levels and radiative heat transfer compared with OF25 and OF27 combustion scenarios. This similarity was because of increasing the residence time of pulverised coal (PC) in the combustion zone and O2 concentration in feed oxidizer gases. Furthermore, a significant increase in the CO2 concentrations and a noticeable decrease in the nitric oxides (NOx) formation were noted under all oxy-fuel combustion conditions. This numerical study of oxy-fuel combustion in a full-scale tangentially-fired PC boiler is important prior to its execution in real-life power plants.

Audai Hussein Al-Abbas; Jamal Naser; David Dodds; Aaron Blicblau

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on

324

Combustion behavior of a spark ignition engine fueled with synthetic gases derived from biogas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Combustion results obtained from a spark ignition engine fueled with two synthetic gases obtained from catalytic decomposition of biogas are presented in this paper. These results are compared with those obtained when the engine was fueled with gasoline, methane and with the biogas from which synthetic gases are extracted. Experimental tests were performed under a wide range of speeds and at three equivalence ratios. Results showed that fractions of hydrogen in synthetic gases increased maximum pressures inside cylinder. Moreover, peak pressures were detected closer to top dead center than methane and biogas. Despite the fraction of diluents in the composition of synthetic gases, high speeds and lean conditions resulted in higher indicated efficiencies than those obtained with gasoline. Moreover, combustion speed and heat release rate were strongly influenced by the proportion of diluents and hydrogen in gaseous blends. CO and CO2 content in the composition of synthetic gases contributed to increase the exhaust concentrations of these pollutants compared with the other fuels, while HC decreased because of the small fraction of methane which remained unburned. Although \\{NOx\\} emissions were mitigated by diluents, like CO2 and air excess, high hydrogen fraction in composition of syngas involved elevated \\{NOx\\} emissions due to the increase in flame temperature that hydrogen produces.

J. Arroyo; F. Moreno; M. Muñoz; C. Monné; N. Bernal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Trace elements in co-combustion of solid recovered fuel and coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trace element partitioning in co-combustion of a bituminous coal and a solid recovered fuel (SRF) was studied in an entrained flow reactor. The experiments were carried out at conditions similar to pulverized coal combustion, with SRF shares of 7.9 wt.% (wet basis), 14.8 wt.% and 25.0 wt.%. In addition, the effect of additives such as NaCl, PVC, ammonium sulphate, and kaolinite on trace element partitioning was investigated. The trace elements studied were As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Sb and Zn, since these elements were significantly enriched in SRF as compared to coal. During the experiments, bottom ash was collected in a chamber, large fly ash particles were collected by a cyclone with a cut-off diameter of ~ 2.5 ?m, and the remaining fly ash particles were gathered in a filter. It was found that when coal was co-fired with SRF, the As, Cd, Pb, Sb and Zn content in filter ash/cyclone ash increased almost linearly with their content in fuel ash. This linear tendency was affected when the fuels were mixed with additives. The volatility of trace elements during combustion was assessed by applying a relative enrichment (RE) factor, and TEM–EDS analysis was conducted to provide qualitative interpretations. The results indicated that As, Cd, Pb, Sb and Zn were highly volatile when co-firing coal and SRF, whereas the volatility of Cr was relatively low. Compared with coal combustion, co-firing of coal and SRF slightly enhanced the volatility of Cd, Pb and Zn, but reduced the volatility of Cr and Sb. The Cl-based additives increased the volatility of Cd, Pb and As, whereas addition of ammonium sulphate generally decreased the volatility of trace elements. Addition of kaolinite reduced the volatility of Pb, while the influence on other trace elements was insignificant. The results from the present work imply that trace element emission would be significantly increased when coal is co-fired with SRF, which may greatly enhance the toxicity of the dusts from coal-fired power plant. In order to minimize trace element emission in co-combustion, in addition to lowering the trace element content in SRF, utilizing SRF with low Cl content and coal with high S and aluminosilicates content would be desirable.

Hao Wu; Peter Glarborg; Flemming Jappe Frandsen; Kim Dam-Johansen; Peter Arendt Jensen; Bo Sander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Effect of Injection Pressure on the Combustion, Performance, and Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Fueled with Methanol-blended Diesel Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Injection Pressure on the Combustion, Performance, and Emission Characteristics of a Diesel Engine Fueled with Methanol-blended Diesel Fuel ... Recently, the use of diesel engines has increased by virtue of their low fuel consumption and high efficiencies. ... Tests on the engine fuelled with diesel only were made, and the performance evaluated to form a basis for comparison for those of ethanol-diesel dual fuelling. ...

Mustafa Canakci; Cenk Sayin; Ahmet Necati Ozsezen; Ali Turkcan

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

327

CFD analysis of bubble hydrodynamics in a fuel reactor for a hydrogen-fueled chemical looping combustion system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigates the temporal development of bubble hydrodynamics in the fuel reactor of a hydrogen-fueled chemical looping combustion (CLC) system by using a computational model. The model also investigates the molar fraction of products in gas and solid phases. The study assists in developing a better understanding of the CLC process, which has many advantages such as being a potentially promising candidate for an efficient carbon dioxide capture technology. The study employs the kinetic theory of granular flow. The reactive fluid dynamic system of the fuel reactor is customized by incorporating the kinetics of an oxygen carrier reduction into a commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. An Eulerian multiphase treatment is used to describe the continuum two-fluid model for both gas and solid phases. CaSO4 and H2 are used as an oxygen carrier and a fuel, respectively. The computational results are validated with the experimental and numerical results available in the open literature. The CFD simulations are found to capture the features of the bubble formation, rise and burst in unsteady and quasi-steady states very well. The results show a significant increase in the conversion rate with higher dense bed height, lower bed width, higher free board height and smaller oxygen carrier particles which upsurge an overall performance of the CLC plant.

Atal Bihari Harichandan; Tariq Shamim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Modelin combustion of multicomponent fuel droplets: formulation and application to transportation fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will be presented along with an organization of the new formulation and results, which will be presented in subsequent sections. 4 2. REVIEW OF LITERATURE 2.1 DROPLET COMBUSTION THEORY Research on evaporation/gasification... is motionless in a stagnant, gravity-free, oxidizing environment of infinite extent. The lack of either forced or natural convection implies the assumption of spherical symmetry. The basic mechanisms leading to the complete gasification of the droplet...

Vittilapuram Subramanian, Kannan

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

329

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - I: DUPIC Fuel Fabrication Cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary conceptual design of a Direct Use of spent Pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel In Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel fabrication plant was studied, which annually converts spent PWR fuel of 400 tonnes heavy element (HE) into CANDU fuel. The capital and operating costs were estimated from the viewpoint of conceptual design. Assuming that the annual discount rate is 5% during the construction (5 yr) and operation period (40 yr) and contingency is 25% of the capital cost, the levelized unit cost (LUC) of DUPIC fuel fabrication was estimated to be 616 $/kg HE, which is mostly governed by annual operation and maintenance costs that correspond to 63% of LUC. Among the operation and maintenance cost components being considered, the waste disposal cost has the dominant effect on LUC ({approx}49%). From sensitivity analyses of production capacity, discount rate, and contingency, it was found that the production capacity of the plant is the major parameter that affects the LUC.

Choi, Hangbok; Ko, Won Il; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Investigation of different manganese ores as oxygen carriers in chemical-looping combustion (CLC) for solid fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The chemical-looping combustion (CLC) process is a novel solution for efficient combustion with direct capture of carbon dioxide. The process uses a metal oxide as an oxygen carrier to transfer oxygen from an air to a fuel reactor, where the fuel reacts with the solid oxygen carrier. In this work, six different manganese ores are investigated as oxygen carriers for CLC application. The chemical-looping characteristics of the oxygen carriers were evaluated in a laboratory-scale fluidized-bed reactor in the temperature range of 900–970 °C during alternating reducing and oxidizing conditions. Three of the manganese ores showed a small oxygen release in inert environment between 850 and 950 °C. During reactivity tests, the gas yield with methane increased with the temperature and complete conversion of 50% CO in H2 was obtained for all of the ores. The rates of char gasification of two fuels, namely Mexican petroleum coke and Swedish wood char, were compared for the different manganese ores at 970 °C and with 50% H2O in N2 as fluidizing gas. Ilmenite and a manufactured Mn-oxide oxygen carrier consisting of Mn3O4 and MgO-stabilized ZrO2 as support were also included for comparison. The char gasification rate and the gas conversion were higher with the manganese ores and the Mn-oxide oxygen carrier compared to ilmenite. However, the higher reactivity of the manganese ores with H2 and the ensuing decrease in H2 inhibition for manganese ores is not sufficient to explain their higher rate of char gasification. Surface analysis of partially gasified petcoke particles in the presence of manganese ores showed formation of cavities and channels as well as a uniform distribution of potassium and sodium elements. The rate of char gasification also increased with the concentration of potassium and sodium impurities in the manganese ores. Thus the results suggest that the increased rate of char conversion for manganese ores is due to alkali-catalyzed steam gasification. The increase in rate of char gasification, in combination with potentially low costs of these materials suggests that manganese ores could be interesting materials for CLC with solid fuels.

Mehdi Arjmand; Henrik Leion; Tobias Mattisson; Anders Lyngfelt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE EER (prime contractor) was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on process modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of 68%, based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal, and an estimated equivalent electrical efficiency of 60%. The Phase I R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the tenth quarterly technical progress report for the Vision 21 UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting January 1, 2003 and ending March 31, 2003. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE EER) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GE EER was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GE EER, California Energy Commission, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on process modeling work, has an estimated process efficiency of 68%, based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal, and an estimated equivalent electrical efficiency of 60%. The Phase I R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the ninth quarterly technical progress report for the Vision 21 UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting October 1, 2002 and ending December 31, 2002. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab- and bench-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale design and assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

FUEL-FLEXIBLE GASIFICATION-COMBUSTION TECHNOLOGY FOR PRODUCTION OF H2 AND SEQUESTRATION-READY CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is expected that in the 21st century the Nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It will be necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact performance of fossil fuel utilization. GE Global Research (GEGR) has developed an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP module offers the potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions including NO{sub x}. GEGR (prime contractor) was awarded a Vision 21 program from U.S. DOE NETL to develop the UFP technology. Work on this Phase I program started on October 1, 2000. The project team includes GEGR, Southern Illinois University at Carbondale (SIU-C), California Energy Commission (CEC), and T. R. Miles, Technical Consultants, Inc. In the UFP technology, coal/opportunity fuels and air are simultaneously converted into separate streams of (1) pure hydrogen that can be utilized in fuel cells, (2) sequestration-ready CO{sub 2}, and (3) high temperature/pressure oxygen-depleted air to produce electricity in a gas turbine. The process produces near-zero emissions and, based on process modeling with best-case scenario assumptions, has an estimated process efficiency of 68%, based on electrical and H{sub 2} energy outputs relative to the higher heating value of coal, and an estimated equivalent electrical efficiency of 60%. The Phase I R&D program will determine the operating conditions that maximize separation of CO{sub 2} and pollutants from the vent gas, while simultaneously maximizing coal conversion efficiency and hydrogen production. The program integrates lab-, bench- and pilot-scale studies to demonstrate the UFP technology. This is the eleventh quarterly technical progress report for the Vision 21 UFP program supported by U.S. DOE NETL (Contract No. DE-FC26-00FT40974). This report summarizes program accomplishments for the period starting April 1, 2003 and ending June 30, 2003. The report includes an introduction summarizing the UFP technology, main program tasks, and program objectives; it also provides a summary of program activities and accomplishments covering progress in tasks including lab-scale experimental testing, pilot-scale assembly, and program management.

George Rizeq; Janice West; Arnaldo Frydman; Raul Subia; Vladimir Zamansky; Hana Loreth; Lubor Stonawski; Tomasz Wiltowski; Edwin Hippo; Shashi Lalvani

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Thermodynamic Performances and Cost Analysis of Advanced Biomass Combustion Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, plant configurations with different options for drying the biomass before combustion have been discussed. Conventional indirect processes,...

Roberto Carapellucci

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a small impact on the average price of jet fuel and carbon dioxide emissions. We also find thatMarket Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States Niven Winchester, Dominic Mc on recycled paper #12;1 Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States Niven Winchester

336

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Energy for hydrogen and fuel cell vehicle markethybrid, electric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal ofof the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles & the

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Alternative Fuels Trade Model, ORNL-6771, SeptemberAssessing the Market Benefits of Alternative Motor Fuels –Comparison of Cars with Alternative Fuels/Engines, Energy

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

\\{NOx\\} emission characteristics of fluidized bed combustion in atmospheres rich in oxygen and water vapor for high-nitrogen fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present study examines the influence of water vapor in combustion atmosphere on \\{NOx\\} emission from oxygen-enriched combustion of air-dried distilled spirit lees and its char in a laboratory fluidized bed of 760 mm high and 68 mm in inner diameter. Steam was added into the fluidizing gas to vary the vapor content in the combustion atmosphere. At a combustion temperature of 950 °C and a steam-to-fuel mass ratio (S/F) of 0.5, the presence of water vapor reduced the \\{NOx\\} concentration in the flue gas for low O2 contents (?30 vol.%) in the combustion agent but increased the \\{NOx\\} emission for high O2 contents (?40 vol.%). The possible causes were clarified for this shift from suppression to promotion of fuel-N conversion into \\{NOx\\} with raising O2 concentration in the combustion agent. Varying temperature from 850 °C to 1150 °C resulted in a peak conversion of fuel-N to \\{NOx\\} in the temperature range of 950–1050 °C for all the tested O2 concentrations. Increasing the O2 concentration tended to lower the critical temperature corresponding to such a peak fuel-N conversion. Testing results also suggested that the presence of excessive water vapor in the combustion atmosphere would inhibit the release of fuel-N in the devolatilization stage and promote the formation of some reducing gases. In addition to the anticipated diluting effect, the steam addition also shortened the reaction time for homogeneous and heterogeneous \\{NOx\\} reduction by the reducing gases and char. It is postulated that the formation of OH radicals at high O2 content and high temperature could cause the observed increase in the \\{NOx\\} emission.

Chuanqiang Zhu; Shuyuan Liu; Huan Liu; Juan Yang; Xiaoxing Liu; Guangwen Xu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Optical-Engine Study of a Low-Temperature Combustion Strategy Employing a Dual-Row, Narrow-Included-Angle Nozzle and Early, Direct Injection of Diesel Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Insight into mechanisms causing observed sharp emissions increase with diesel fuel injection is gained through experiments in an optical engine employing a similar low-temperature combustion strategy of early, direct injection of diesel fuel.

340

Presence of estrogenic activity from emission of fossil fuel combustion as detected by a recombinant yeast bioassay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Estrogenic activities of emission samples generated by fossil fuel combustion were investigated with human estrogen receptor (ER) recombinant yeast bioassay. The results showed that there were weak but clear estrogenic activities in combustion emissions of fossil fuels including coal, petroleum, and diesel. The estrogenic relative potency (RP) of fossil fuel combustion was the highest in petroleum-fired car, followed by coal-fired stove, diesel-fired agrimotor, coal-fired electric power station. On the other hand, the estrogenic relative inductive efficiency (RIE) was the highest in coal-fired stove and coal-fired electric power station, followed by petroleum-fired car and diesel-fired agrimotor. The estrogenic activities in the sub-fractions from chromatographic separation of emitted materials were also determined. The results indicated that different chemical fractions in these complex systems have different estrogenic potencies. The GC/MS analysis of the emission showed that there were many aromatic carbonyls, big molecular alcohol, \\{PAHs\\} and derivatives, and substituted phenolic compounds and derivatives which have been reported as environmental estrogens. The existence of estrogenic substances in fossil fuel combustion demands further investigation of their potential adverse effects on human and on the ecosystem. The magnitude of pollution due to global usage of fossil fuels makes it imperative to understand the issue of fossil fuel-derived endocrine activities and the associated health risks, particularly the aggregated risks stemmed from exposure to toxicants of multiple sources.

Jingxian Wang; Wenzhong Wu; Bernhard Henkelmann; Li You; Antonius Kettrup; Karl-Werner Schramm

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Compression and combustion of non-cryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel for inertial fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variants of a target with a solid thermonuclear fuel in the form of deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals for an inertial fusion have been proposed. The laser-pulse-induced compression of non-cryogenic targets, as well as ignition and combustion of such targets, has been examined. The numerical calculations show that, despite a decrease in the caloric content of the fuel and an increase in the energy losses on intrinsic radiation in the target containing deuterium-tritium hydrides of light metals as compared to the target containing deuterium-tritium ice, the non-cryogenic target can ensure the fusion gain sufficient for its use in the energy cycle of a thermonuclear power plant based on the inertial plasma confinement method.

Gus'kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Zmitrenko, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Packed Bed Combustion: An Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Packed Bed Combustion - University of Ottawa - CICS 2005 fuel fuel feed air products air fuel Retort) products Underfeed Combustion fuel feed air #12;Packed Bed Combustion - University of Ottawa - CICS 2005 required #12;Packed Bed Combustion - University of Ottawa - CICS 2005 Overfeed Bed fuel motion products air

Hallett, William L.H.

343

FBC (fluidized-bed combustors) engineering correlations for estimating the combustion efficiency of a range of fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simplified engineering correlations are presented for estimating the combustion efficiency of a wide range of fuel types in fluidized bed boilers. The correlations are presented in such a way that they can be applied to various boiler designs, including both bubbling and circulating beds. Major emphasis is placed on minimizing the boiler design and operating details required, thereby enhancing the usefulness of these methods as screening tools. The impact of fuel type is addressed by making use of the fuel characterization parameters measured by the Babcock and Wilcox Company for the Electric Power Research Institute. It is demonstrated that the methods described give combustion efficiency estimates that agree well with typical observations from some well-documented fluidized bed combustion test facilities. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Daw, C.S.; Chandran, R.R.; Duqum, J.N.; Perna, M.A.; Petrill, E.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Advanced Combustion, Emission Control, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

06 06 a n n u a l p r o g r e s s r e p o r t L e s s d e p e n d e n c e o n f o r e i g n o i l t o d a y, a n d t r a n s i t i o n t o a p e t r o l e u m - f r e e , e m i s s i o n s - f r e e v e h i c l e t o m o r r o w . F r e e d o m C A r A n d V e h i C l e T e C h n o l o g i e s P r o g r A m AdvAnced combustion, emission controls, HeAltH impActs, And Fuels merit review And peer evAluAtion Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 2006 Dear Colleague: This document summarizes the comments provided by the Review Panel for the FY 2006 Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Combustion, Emission Controls, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, the "ACE Review," held on May 15-18, 2006 at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The raw evaluations and comments of the panel were provided (with reviewers' names deleted) to the presenters in early June and were used by national laboratory

345

Post-combustion Carbon Capture with a Gas Separation Membrane: Parametric Study, Capture Cost, and Exergy Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Post-combustion Carbon Capture with a Gas Separation Membrane: Parametric Study, Capture Cost, and Exergy Analysis ... (5) In a post-combustion CO2 capture process, the purity of the captured CO2 in the permeate stream mainly depends upon the selectivity of CO2 over the other gas species, such as N2 and O2. ... Capturing CO2 from flue gases in a power plant is not like traditional gas processing or purification, there are no strict requirements on the decarbonized sweet gas, which means no strict requirement on the CO2 concentration in the sweet gas or CO2 capture ratio. ...

Xiangping Zhang; Xuezhong He; Truls Gundersen

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

346

Co-combustion of biomass and gaseous fuel in a novel configuration of fluidized bed: Combustion characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Experimental study on co-combustion of rice straw and natural gas has been performed in a bubbling fluidized bed. The used combustor allows a novel jetting-fountain configuration and the conventional operation as well. In the jetting-fountain configuration, natural gas premixed with the air sufficient for combustion proceeds through the jet pipe to create a jet-fountain zone. Whereas only the air required for rice straw combustion passes through the gas distributor. The findings of the experiments confirm that smooth combustion of natural gas with rice straw can be performed in the novel jetting-fountain fluidized bed. This avoids acoustic effects and explosions of burning bubbles that occurs in the conventional operation. Natural gas contribution had a major impact on combustion characteristics and the performance of the combustor has been found to be much better when applying the jetting-fountain configuration. There are considerable reductions (up to 64%, 28% and 34%) in CO, \\{NOx\\} and SO2 emissions, respectively. The fixed carbon loss reduces (up to 65%) as well. Combustion efficiency records generally higher values with the jetting-fountain configuration. Combustion efficiency steadily improves with increasing natural gas contribution (up to 99.8%). Increasing bed temperature (up to 900 °C) is beneficial for reducing CO, decreasing fixed carbon loss and improving combustion efficiency. The existence of an optimum bed temperature for sulfur retention has been confirmed. As normal, \\{NOx\\} increases with bed temperature.

F. Okasha; G. Zaater; S. El-Emam; M. Awad; E. Zeidan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Flex Fuel Optimized SI and HCCI Engine  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of a cost effective and reliable dual combustion mode engine (multi-cylinder and flex fuel) using cost effective actuating system (two-step valves and electrical cam phasing...

348

Experimental Investigation of the Effects of Fuel Characteristics on High Efficiency Clean Combustion (HECC) in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to understand fuel property effects on low temperature combustion (LTC) processes in a light-duty diesel engine. These types of combustion modes are often collectively referred to as high efficiency clean combustion (HECC). A statistically designed set of research fuels, the Fuels for Advanced Combustion Engines (FACE), were used for this study. Engine conditions consistent with low speed cruise (1500 rpm, 2.6 bar BMEP) were chosen for investigating fuel property effects on HECC operation in a GM 1.9-L common rail diesel engine. The FACE fuel matrix includes nine combinations of fuel properties including cetane number (30 to 55), aromatic contents (20 to 45 %), and 90 % distillation temperature (270 to 340 C). HECC operation was achieved with high levels of EGR and adjusting injection parameters, e.g. higher fuel rail pressure and single injection event, which is also known as Premixed Charge Compression Ignition (PCCI) combustion. Engine performance, pollutant emissions, and details of the combustion process are discussed in this paper. Cetane number was found to significantly affect the combustion process with variations in the start of injection (SOI) timing, which revealed that the ranges of SOI timing for HECC operation and the PM emission levels were distinctively different between high cetane number (55) and low cetane number fuels (30). Low cetane number fuels showed comparable levels of regulated gas emissions with high cetane number fuels and had an advantage in PM emissions.

Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Han, Manbae [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

SciTech Connect: Crude Glycerol as Cost-Effective Fuel for Combined...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Crude Glycerol as Cost-Effective Fuel for Combined Heat and Power to Replace Fossil Fuels, Final Technical Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Crude Glycerol as...

350

Durable, Low-cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of low cost, durable membranes and membranes electrode assemblies (MEAs) that operate under reduced relative humidity (RH) conditions remain a critical challenge for the successful introduction of fuel cells into mass markets. It was the goal of the team lead by Arkema, Inc. to address these shortages. Thus, this project addresses the following technical barriers from the fuel cells section of the Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: (A) Durability (B) Cost Arkema’s approach consisted of using blends of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) and proprietary sulfonated polyelectrolytes. In the traditional approach to polyelectrolytes for proton exchange membranes (PEM), all the required properties are “packaged” in one macromolecule. The properties of interest include proton conductivity, mechanical properties, durability, and water/gas transport. This is the case, for example, for perfluorosulfonic acid-containing (PFSA) membranes. However, the cost of these materials is high, largely due to the complexity and the number of steps involved in their synthesis. In addition, they suffer other shortcomings such as mediocre mechanical properties and insufficient durability for some applications. The strength and originality of Arkema’s approach lies in the decoupling of ion conductivity from the other requirements. Kynar® PVDF provides an exceptional combination of properties that make it ideally suited for a membrane matrix (Kynar® is a registered trademark of Arkema Inc.). It exhibits outstanding chemical resistance in highly oxidative and acidic environments. In work with a prior grant, a membrane known as M41 was developed by Arkema. M41 had many of the properties needed for a high performance PEM, but had a significant deficiency in conductivity at low RH. In the first phase of this work, the processing parameters of M41 were explored as a means to increase its proton conductivity. Optimizing the processing of M41 was found to increase its proton conductivity by almost an order of magnitude at 50% RH. Characterization of the membrane morphology with Karren More at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed that the membrane morphology was complex. This technology platform was dubbed M43 and was used as a baseline in the majority of the work on the project. Although its performance was superior to M41, M43 still showed proton conductivity an order of magnitude lower than that of a PFSA membrane at 50% RH. The MEA performance of M43 could be increased by reducing the thickness from 1 to 0.6 mils. However, the performance of the thinner M43 still did not match that of a PFSA membrane.

Chris Roger; David Mountz; Wensheng He; Tao Zhang

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

351

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantification of fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions at fine space and time resolution is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle and climate change research. As atmospheric CO{sub 2} measurements expand with the advent of a dedicated remote sensing platform and denser in situ measurements, the ability to close the carbon budget at spatial scales of {approx}100 km{sup 2} and daily time scales requires fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventories at commensurate resolution. Additionally, the growing interest in U.S. climate change policy measures are best served by emissions that are tied to the driving processes in space and time. Here we introduce a high resolution data product (the 'Vulcan' inventory: www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/) that has quantified fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions for the contiguous U.S. at spatial scales less than 100 km{sup 2} and temporal scales as small as hours. This data product, completed for the year 2002, includes detail on combustion technology and 48 fuel types through all sectors of the U.S. economy. The Vulcan inventory is built from the decades of local/regional air pollution monitoring and complements these data with census, traffic, and digital road data sets. The Vulcan inventory shows excellent agreement with national-level Department of Energy inventories, despite the different approach taken by the DOE to quantify U.S. fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emissions. Comparison to the global 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} fossil fuel CO{sub 2} inventory, used widely by the carbon cycle and climate change community prior to the construction of the Vulcan inventory, highlights the space/time biases inherent in the population-based approach.

Gurney, Kevin R.; Mendoza, Daniel L.; Zhou, Yuyu; Fischer, Marc L.; Miller, Chris C.; Geethakumar, Sarath; de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

352

Physico-chemical characteristics of eight different biomass fuels and comparison of combustion and emission results in a small scale multi-fuel boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study describes the results from the investigation of 7 different biomass fuel types produced on a farm, and a commercial grade wood pellet, for their physical, chemical, thermo-gravimetric and combustion properties. Three types of short rotation coppice (SRC) willow, two species of conifers, forest residues (brash), commercially produced wood-pellets and a chop harvested energy grass crop Miscanthus giganteus spp., (elephant grass) were investigated. Significant differences (p Combustion tests in a 120 kW multi-fuel boiler revealed differences, some significant, in the maximum output, energy conversion efficiency, gaseous emission profiles and ash residues produced from the fuels. It was concluded that some of the combustion results could be directly correlated with the inherent properties of the different fuels. Ash production and gaseous emissions were the aspects of performance that were clearly and significantly different though effects on energy outputs were more varied and less consistent. The standard wood pellet fuel returned the best overall performance and miscanthus produced the largest amount of total ash and clinker after combustion in the boiler.

E.G.A. Forbes; D.L. Easson; G.A. Lyons; W.C. McRoberts

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Dioxin and trace metal emissions from combustion of carbonized RDF slurry fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1994, the U.S. generated approximately 209 million tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW), with 61% landfilled, 24% recycled, and 15% processed through Municipal Waste Combustion (MWC). In order to divert a larger portion of this generated MSW from landfills, MWC will have to play a growing role in MSW disposal. However, recently promulgated New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for MWC will add an additional financial burden, through mandated emission reductions and air pollution control technologies, to an already financially pressured MWC marketplace. In the past, Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF), a solid fuel produced from MSW, has been fired in industrial and coal boilers as an alternative means of MWC. While lower sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) emissions provided the impetus, firing RDF in industrial and coal boilers frequently suffered from several disadvantages including increased solids handling, increased excess air requirements, increased air emissions, increased slag formation in the boiler, and higher fly ash resistivity. This paper summarizes the latest emissions and combustion tests with the carbonized RDF slurry fuel. With EnerTech`s SlurryCarb{trademark} process, a pumpable slurry of RDF is continuously pressurized with a pump to between 1200 and 2500 psi. The RDF slurry is pressurized above the saturated steam curve to maintain a liquid state when the slurry is heated to approximately 480-660{degrees}F. Slurry pressure and temperature then are maintained for less than 30 minutes in plug-flow reactors. At this temperature and pressure, oxygen functional groups in the molecular structure of the RDF are split off as carbon dioxide gas. This evolved carbon dioxide gas comprises a significant weight percentage of the feed RDF, but only a minimal percentage of the heating value.

Klosky, M. [EnerTech Environmental, Inc., Atlanta, GA (United States); Fisher, M. [American Plastics Council, Washington, DC (United States); Singhania, A. [American Plastics Council/Amoco Chemicals, Alpharetta, GA (United States)] [and others

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NRELTP-5600-56408...

355

Energy Department Invests Over $7 Million to Commercialize Cost-Effective Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department announced more than $7 million for projects that will help bring cost-effective, advanced hydrogen and fuel cell technologies online faster.

356

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

current, and projected costs for delivering and dispensing hydrogen. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 13013 More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Delivery Roadmap US...

357

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report by NREL discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment.

358

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost Projections – 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about past, current, and projected costs for delivering and dispensing hydrogen.

359

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hydrogen fuel by electrolysis meeting equal consumer costhydrogen fuel production by water electrolysis to provide lower fuel costFig. 2: Cost hydrogen bywater of (Coil) electrolysis as

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Cost–Performance Analysis and Optimization of Fuel-Burning Thermoelectric Power Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy cost analysis and optimization of thermoelectric (TE) power generators burning fossil fuel show a lower initial cost ... The produced heat generates electric power. Unlike waste heat recovery systems, the ...

Kazuaki Yazawa; Ali Shakouri

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Investigation of Fuel Effects on Dilute, Mixing-Controlled Combustion in an Optical Direct-Injection Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

School of Engineering, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California 94132, and Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 ... Additionally, data obtained from this study provide fundamental insights into NOx and PM formation mechanisms in diesel engines. ... Results show that increasing fuel oxygenation produces lower in-cylinder and engine-out soot levels, consistent with existing studies of the effects of fuel oxygenation on soot emissions from diesel engines. ...

A. S. (Ed) Cheng; Ansis Upatnieks; Charles J. Mueller

2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

362

Modeling Energy Flow in an Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) System with CO2 Capture Integrated with Oxy-fuel Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxy-coal combustion is one of the technical solutions for mitigating CO2 in thermal power plants. ... Currently, more than 85% of the energy that drives modern economies comes from fossil fuels, and this has stimulated research and development into more sustainable alternative energy sources. ... Other species, such as SO2, various nitrogen compounds, HCl, and Hg, are also present in quantities dependent upon the fossil fuel composition and the amount of air that leaks into the boiler. ...

Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshcyhn; Stephen Gerdemann; Thomas Ochs; John Clark

2012-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

363

Numerical and Experimental Analysis of Combustion and Exhaust Emissions in a Dual-Fuel Diesel/Natural Gas Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Department of Mechanical Engineering, UTV, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy, and IM-CNR, Istituto Motori of Italian National Research Council, Naples, Italy ... Accordingly, the use of NG as primary fuel allows the same compression ratio of the conventional diesel engine; thus, existing diesel engines can be easily converted to dual-fuel operation. ... Thus, a more general combustion model (G-equation or EDC) could be considered to represent flame propagation. ...

Stefano Cordiner; Michele Gambino; Sabato Iannaccone; Vittorio Rocco; Riccardo Scarcelli

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

364

Projected Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Hydrogen Technologies for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each combination of technologies necessary to produce, deliver, and distribute hydrogen for transportation use has a corresponding levelized cost, energy requirement, and greenhouse gas emission profile depending upon the technologies' efficiencies and costs. Understanding the technical status, potential, and tradeoffs is necessary to properly allocate research and development (R&D) funding. In this paper, levelized delivered hydrogen costs, pathway energy use, and well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions are reported for multiple hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. Technologies analyzed include both central and distributed reforming of natural gas and electrolysis of water, and central hydrogen production from biomass and coal. Delivery options analyzed include trucks carrying liquid hydrogen and pipelines carrying gaseous hydrogen. Projected costs, energy use, and emissions for current technologies (technology that has been developed to at least the bench-scale, extrapolated to commercial-scale) are reported. Results compare favorably with those for gasoline, diesel, and E85 used in current internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and flexible fuel vehicles. Sensitivities of pathway cost, pathway energy use, WTW energy use, and WTW emissions to important primary parameters were examined as an aid in understanding the benefits of various options. Sensitivity studies on production process energy efficiency, total production process capital investment, feed stock cost, production facility operating capacity, electricity grid mix, hydrogen vehicle market penetration, distance from the hydrogen production facility to city gate, and other parameters are reported. The Hydrogen Macro-System Model (MSM) was used for this analysis. The MSM estimates the cost, energy use, and emissions trade offs of various hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways under consideration. The MSM links the H2A Production Model, the Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM), and the Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emission, and Energy for Transportation (GREET) Model. The MSM utilizes the capabilities of each component model and ensures the use of consistent parameters between the models to enable analysis of full hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. To better understand spatial aspects of hydrogen pathways, the MSM is linked to the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA). The MSM is available to the public and enables users to analyze the pathways and complete sensitivity analyses.

Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M. J.; Timbario, T. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liu. A parametric study of PEM fuel cell performances.economic design of PEM fuel cell systems by multi-objectiveEstimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell System for Automotive

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Euler-Euler simulation of wood chip combustion on a grate - effect of fuel moisture content and full scale application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nowadays, it is common practice to perform CFD calculations for optimisation purposes of technical biomass combustion applications. A numerical model for wood chip combustion on grate firing arrangements has been developed. The model is based on an Euler-Euler approach, enabling a detailed multiphase description of the combustion chamber in terms of flow, turbulence and heat transfer. The model explicitly accounts for interactions between bed and freeboard region and comprises a global description of the whole incineration process associated with wood combustion. For validation purposes, the effect of fuel moisture content in a 240 kWth test facility has been observed experimentally and the results are opposed to the model predictions. Additionally, measurements within a 58 MWth full scale grate firing system have been conducted and the scalability of the numerical model towards industrial applications is investigated.

D. Kurz; U. Schnell; G. Scheffknecht

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A photographic study of the combustion of low cetane fuels in a Diesel engine aided with spark assist  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental investigation of the ignition and combustion characteristics of two low cetane fuels in a spark assisted Diesel engine is described. A three cylinder Diesel engine was modified for single cylinder operation and fitted with a spark plug located in the periphery of the spray plume. Optical observations of ignition and combustion were obtained with high speed photography. Optical access was provided by a quartz piston crown and extended head arrangement. The low cetane fuels, a light end, low viscosity fuel and a heavy end, high viscosity fuel which were blended to bracket No. 2 Diesel fuel on the distillation curve, demonstrated extended operation in the modified Diesel engine. Qualitative and quantitative experimental observations of ignition delay, pressure rise, heat release, spray penetration and geometery were compared and evaluated against theoretical predictions. Results indicate that controlled combustion of extended fuel blends in a Diesel engine may be possible without inlet air preconditioning and that engine knock may be avoided when heat release is optimized with proper spark and injection timing.

Abata, D.L.; Fritz, S.G.; Stroia, B.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A Cost Benefit Analysis of California's Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

s Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks (LUFTs)”. Submitted to theCalifornia’s Underground Storage Tank Program”. Submitted tos Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks” by Samantha Carrington

Carrington-Crouch, Robert

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Energetic analysis of a syngas-fueled chemical-looping combustion combined cycle with integration of carbon dioxide sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical-looping combustion for power generation has significant advantages over conventional combustion. Mainly, it allows an integration of CO2 capture in the power plant without energy penalty; secondly, a less exergy destruction in the combustion chemical transformation is achieved, leading to a greater overall thermal efficiency. Most efforts have been devoted to systems based on methane as a fuel, although other systems for alternative fuels have can be proposed. This paper focus on the study of the energetic performance of this concept of combustion in a gas turbine combined cycle when synthesis gas is used as fuel. After optimization of some thermodynamic parameters of the cycle, the power plant performance is evaluated under diverse working conditions and compared to a conventional gas turbine system. Energy savings related with CO2 capture and storage have been quantified. The overall efficiency increase is found to be significant, reaching values of around 5% (even more in some cases). In order to analyze the influence of syngas composition on the results, different H2-content fuels are considered. In a context of real urgency to reduce green house gas emissions, this work is intended to contribute to the conceptual development of highly efficient alternative power generation systems.

Ángel Jiménez Álvaro; Ignacio López Paniagua; Celina González Fernández; Rafael Nieto Carlier; Javier Rodríguez Martín

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Separation of particulate from flue gas of fossil fuel combustion and gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gas from combustion or gasification of fossil fuel contains flyash and other particulate. The flyash is separated from the gas in a plurality of standleg moving granular-bed filter modules. Each module includes a dipleg through which the bed media flows into the standleg. The bed media forms a first filter bed having an upper mass having a first frusto-conical surface in a frusto-conical member at the entrance to the standleg and a lower mass having a second frusto-conical surface of substantially greater area than the first surface after it passes through the standleg. A second filter media bed may be formed above the first filter media bed. The gas is fed tangentially into the module above the first surface. The flyash is captured on the first frusto-conical surface and within the bed mass. The processed gas flows out through the second frusto-conical surface and then through the second filter bed, if present. The bed media is cleaned of the captured flyash and recirculated to the moving granular bed filter. Alternatively, the bed media may be composed of the ash from the combustion which is pelletized to form agglomerates. The ash flows through the bed only once; it is not recycled.

Yang, Wen-Ching (Murrysville, PA); Newby, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Lippert, Thomas E. (Murrysville, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Separation of particulate from flue gas of fossil fuel combustion and gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The gas from combustion or gasification of fossil fuel contains fly ash and other particulates. The fly ash is separated from the gas in a plurality of standleg moving granular-bed filter modules. Each module includes a dipleg through which the bed media flows into the standleg. The bed media forms a first filter bed having an upper mass having a first frusto-conical surface in a frusto-conical member at the entrance to the standleg and a lower mass having a second frusto-conical surface of substantially greater area than the first surface after it passes through the standleg. A second filter media bed may be formed above the first filter media bed. The gas is fed tangentially into the module above the first surface. The fly ash is captured on the first frusto-conical surface and within the bed mass. The processed gas flows out through the second frusto-conical surface and then through the second filter bed, if present. The bed media is cleaned of the captured fly ash and recirculated to the moving granular bed filter. Alternatively, the bed media may be composed of the ash from the combustion which is pelletized to form agglomerates. The ash flows through the bed only once; it is not recycled. 11 figs.

Yang, W.C.; Newby, R.A.; Lippert, T.E.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

372

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Central to any study of climate change is the development of an emission inventory that identifies and quantifies the State's primary anthropogenic sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion accounted for 80 percent of California GHG emissions (CARB, 2007a). Even though these CO2 emissions are well characterized in the existing state inventory, there still exist significant sources of uncertainties regarding their accuracy. This report evaluates the CO2 emissions accounting based on the California Energy Balance database (CALEB) developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in terms of what improvements are needed and where uncertainties lie. The estimated uncertainty for total CO2 emissions ranges between -21 and +37 million metric tons (Mt), or -6percent and +11percent of total CO2 emissions. The report also identifies where improvements are needed for the upcoming updates of CALEB. However, it is worth noting that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) GHG inventory did not use CALEB data for all combustion estimates. Therefore the range in uncertainty estimated in this report does not apply to the CARB's GHG inventory. As much as possible, additional data sources used by CARB in the development of its GHG inventory are summarized in this report for consideration in future updates to CALEB.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Price, Lynn

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

373

Overview of Biomass Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main combustion systems for biomass fuels are presented and the respective requirements ... etc.) in industrial boilers or for co-combustion in power plants. For fuels with high ... moving grate firings are u...

T. Nussbaumer; J. E. Hustad

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 – October 1, 2009

375

A Low Cost, High Capacity Regenerable Sorbent for Pre-combustion CO{sub 2} Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the proposed research is to develop a low cost, high capacity CO{sub 2} sorbent and demonstrate its technical and economic viability for pre-combustion CO{sub 2} capture. The specific objectives supporting our research plan were to optimize the chemical structure and physical properties of the sorbent, scale-up its production using high throughput manufacturing equipment and bulk raw materials and then evaluate its performance, first in bench-scale experiments and then in slipstream tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas. One of the objectives of the laboratory-scale evaluations was to demonstrate the life and durability of the sorbent for over 10,000 cycles and to assess the impact of contaminants (such as sulfur) on its performance. In the field tests, our objective was to demonstrate the operation of the sorbent using actual coal-derived synthesis gas streams generated by air-blown and oxygen-blown commercial and pilot-scale coal gasifiers (the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in these gas streams is significantly different, which directly impacts the operating conditions hence the performance of the sorbent). To support the field demonstration work, TDA collaborated with Phillips 66 and Southern Company to carry out two separate field tests using actual coal-derived synthesis gas at the Wabash River IGCC Power Plant in Terre Haute, IN and the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. In collaboration with the University of California, Irvine (UCI), a detailed engineering and economic analysis for the new CO{sub 2} capture system was also proposed to be carried out using Aspen PlusTM simulation software, and estimate its effect on the plant efficiency.

Alptekin, Gokhan

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

Determination of the optimum fuel burn-up and energy intensities of nuclear fuel by the method of cost calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report gives the procedure for determining the economical efficiency of the utilization of nuclear fuel in a reactor on the basis of calculated costs. The expression obtained for the fuet constituent of the

Yu. I. Koryakin; V. V. Batov; V. G. Smirnov

1964-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fuel Cells for Transportation FY 2001 Progress Report V. PEM STACK COMPONENT COST REDUCTION1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Cells for Transportation FY 2001 Progress Report 113 V. PEM STACK COMPONENT COST REDUCTION1 A. High-Performance, Matching PEM Fuel Cell Components and Integrated Pilot Manufacturing Processes Mark K polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell components and pilot manufacturing processes to facilitate

378

Low-cost, non-precious metal/polymer composite catalysts for fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will fuel cells take their place as a centerpiece of a hydrogen economy and position hydrogen as a major) activity in known-to-date non- precious metal. Fuel cell testing of the composite Figure 2 shows a hydrogenLow-cost, non-precious metal/polymer composite catalysts for fuel cells R. Bashyam and P. Zelenay 1

379

Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AURORA Program Overview Topic 4A. Transport within the PEM Stack / Transport Studies Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks Award#: DE-EE0000472 US DOE Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting Washington, DC September 30, 2009 Program Objectives The objective of this program is to optimize the efficiency of a stack technology meeting DOE cost targets. As cost reduction is of central importance in commercialization, the objective of this program addresses all fuel cell applications. AURORA C. Performance Technical Barriers Premise: DOE cost targets can be met by jointly exceeding both the Pt loading (1.0 W/cm2) targets.

380

Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H2 and Sequestration-Ready CO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the near future, the nation will continue to rely on fossil fuels for electricity, transportation, and chemicals. It is necessary to improve both the process efficiency and environmental impact of fossil fuel utilization including greenhouse gas management. GE Global Research (GEGR) investigated an innovative fuel-flexible Unmixed Fuel Processor (UFP) technology with potential to produce H{sub 2}, power, and sequestration-ready CO{sub 2} from coal and other solid fuels. The UFP technology offers the long-term potential for reduced cost, increased process efficiency relative to conventional gasification and combustion systems, and near-zero pollutant emissions. GE was awarded a contract from U.S. DOE NETL to investigate and develop the UFP technology. Work started on the Phase I program in October 2000 and on the Phase II effort in April 2005. In the UFP technology, coal, water and air are simultaneously converted into (1) hydrogen rich stream that can be utilized in fuel cells or turbines, (2) CO{sub 2} rich stream for sequestration, and (3) high temperature/pressure vitiated air stream to produce electricity in a gas turbine expander. The process produces near-zero emissions with an estimated efficiency higher than Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process with conventional CO{sub 2} separation. The Phase I R&D program established the chemical feasibility of the major reactions of the integrated UFP technology through lab-, bench- and pilot-scale testing. A risk analysis session was carried out at the end of Phase I effort to identify the major risks in the UFP technology and a plan was developed to mitigate these risks in the Phase II of the program. The Phase II effort focused on three high-risk areas: economics, lifetime of solids used in the UFP process, and product gas quality for turbines (or the impact of impurities in the coal on the overall system). The economic analysis included estimating the capital cost as well as the costs of hydrogen and electricity for a full-scale UFP plant. These costs were benchmarked with IGCC polygen plants with similar level of CO{sub 2} capture. Based on the promising economic analysis comparison results (performed with the help from Worley Parsons), GE recommended a 'Go' decision in April 2006 to continue the experimental investigation of the UFP technology to address the remaining risks i.e. solids lifetime and the impact of impurities in the coal on overall system. Solids attrition and lifetime risk was addressed via bench-scale experiments that monitor solids performance over time and by assessing materials interactions at operating conditions. The product gas under the third reactor (high-temperature vitiated air) operating conditions was evaluated to assess the concentration of particulates, pollutants and other impurities relative to the specifications required for gas turbine feed streams. During this investigation, agglomeration of solids used in the UFP process was identified as a serious risk that impacts the lifetime of the solids and in turn feasibility of the UFP technology. The main causes of the solids agglomeration were the combination of oxygen transfer material (OTM) reduction at temperatures {approx}1000 C and interaction between OTM and CO{sub 2} absorbing material (CAM) at high operating temperatures (>1200 C). At the end of phase II, in March 2008, GEGR recommended a 'No-go' decision for taking the UFP technology to the next level of development, i.e. development of a 3-5 MW prototype system, at this time. GEGR further recommended focused materials development research programs on improving the performance and lifetime of solids materials used in UFP or chemical looping technologies. The scale-up activities would be recommended only after mitigating the risks involved with the agglomeration and overall lifetime of the solids. This is the final report for the phase II of the DOE-funded Vision 21 program entitled 'Fuel-Flexible Gasification-Combustion Technology for Production of H{sub 2} and Sequestration-Ready CO{sub 2}' (DOE Award No.

Parag Kulkarni; Jie Guan; Raul Subia; Zhe Cui; Jeff Manke; Arnaldo Frydman; Wei Wei; Roger Shisler; Raul Ayala; om McNulty; George Rizeq; Vladimir Zamansky; Kelly Fletcher

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Preparation and combustion of coal-water fuel from the Sin Pun coal deposit, southern Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to an inquiry by the Department of Mineral Resources in Thailand, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) prepared a program to assess the responsiveness of Sin Pun lignite to the temperature and pressure conditions of hot-water drying. The results indicate that drying made several improvements in the coal, notably increases in heating value and carbon content and reductions in equilibrium moisture and oxygen content. The equilibrium moisture content decreased from 27 wt% for the raw coal to about 15 wt% for the hot-water-dried (HWD) coals. The energy density for a pumpable coal-water fuel (CWF) indicates an increase from 4500 to 6100 Btu/lb by hot-water drying. Approximately 650 lb of HWD Sin Pun CWF were fired in the EERC`s combustion test facility. The fuel burned extremely well, with no feed problems noted during the course of the test. Fouling and slagging deposits each indicated a very low rate of ash deposition, with only a dusty layer formed on the cooled metal surfaces. The combustor was operated at between 20% and 25% excess air, resulting in a flue gas SO{sub 2} concentration averaging approximately 6500 parts per million.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Bromine as an ash forming element in a fluidised bed boiler combusting solid recovered fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plastic materials are the main sources of chlorine in solid recovered fuels (SRF). Chlorine is attributed to be the main initiator of slagging, fouling and corrosion in biomass and waste combustion as it lowers the melting point of ash forming matter and reacts chemically with the heat transfer surface steels. SRF may also contain sources of bromine in the form of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) applied in many plastics and textiles. Results presented in this paper from an experimental campaign at an 80 MWth bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) boiler show that bromine is behaving in a similar manner as chlorine: bromine was found at the corrosion front in boiler membrane wall tubes, and as water soluble salts in aerosol samples collected from the furnace and electrostatic precipitator (ESP) ash. It is evident from these results and the data in the literature that most of the salts of bromine are, by both their fate and physical and chemical properties, similar to those of chlorine. It can be concluded that it if there is a source of bromine in the fuel corrosive high vapour pressure bromides can be formed analogously to chlorides.

Pasi Vainikka; Sonja Enestam; Jaani Silvennoinen; Raili Taipale; Patrik Yrjas; Ari Frantsi; Janne Hannula; Mikko Hupa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Evaluating the manufacturability and combustion behaviors of sludge-derived fuel briquettes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Based on the physical and chemical properties as well as calorific values of pulp sludge and textile sludge, this study investigates the differences between manufacturability, relationship between extrusion pressure and formability, as well as stability and combustion behaviors of extruded sludge-derived fuel briquettes (ESBB) and cemented sludge-derived fuel blocks (CSBB). The optimum proportion and relevant usage ESBB policies are proposed as well. Experimental results indicate that a large amount of water can be saved during the ESBB manufacturing process. Additionally, energy consumption decreases during the drying process. ESBB also has a more compact structure than that of CSBB, and its mean penetration loading is approximately 18.7 times higher as well. Moreover, the flame temperature of ESBB (624–968 °C) is significantly higher than that of CSBB (393–517 °C). Also, the dry bulk density and moisture regain of ESBB is significantly related to the penetration loading. Furthermore, the optimum mix proportion of ESBB is co-determined by the formability of pulp sludge and the calorific values of textile sludge. While considering the specific conditions (including formability, stability and calorific values), the recommended mix proportion for ESBB is PS50TS50.

Ing-Jia Chiou; I-Tsung Wu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Effect of the Addition of Diglyme in Diesel Fuel on Combustion and Emissions in a Compression?Ignition Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the application of pure oxygenated fuels, Fleisch et al.,1 Kapus et al.,2 and Sorenson et al.3 have studied dimethyl ether (DME) in the modified diesel engine, and their results showed that the engine could achieve ultralow emission prospects without fundamental changes in combustion systems. ... 16 Mitsuo et al.17 investigated the effects of DGM on engine exhaust emissions in three different diesel engines. ... (18)?Heywood, J. B. Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals; McGraw-Hill Book Company, New York, 1988. ...

Yi Ren; Zuohua Huang; Haiyan Miao; Deming Jiang; Ke Zeng; Bing Liu; Xibin Wang

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

385

CONCEPTUAL STUDIES OF A FUEL-FLEXIBLE LOW-SWIRL COMBUSTION SYSTEM FOR THE GAS TURBINE IN CLEAN COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports the results of preliminary analyses that show the feasibility of developing a fuel flexible (natural gas, syngas and high-hydrogen fuel) combustion system for IGCC gas turbines. Of particular interest is the use of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's DLN low swirl combustion technology as the basis for the IGCC turbine combustor. Conceptual designs of the combustion system and the requirements for the fuel handling and delivery circuits are discussed. The analyses show the feasibility of a multi-fuel, utility-sized, LSI-based, gas turbine engine. A conceptual design of the fuel injection system shows that dual parallel fuel circuits can provide range of gas turbine operation in a configuration consistent with low pollutant emissions. Additionally, several issues and challenges associated with the development of such a system, such as flashback and auto-ignition of the high-hydrogen fuels, are outlined.

Smith, K.O.; Littlejohn, David; Therkelsen, Peter; Cheng, Robert K.; Ali, S.

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basis (e.g. , to remove bunker fuels, cement production,+ imports ?exports ? bunkers ? non ? fuel uses ? stockMarland and Rotty, 1984). Bunker fuels are fuels used in

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

An investigation of diesel–ignited propane dual fuel combustion in a heavy-duty diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents a detailed experimental analysis of diesel–ignited propane dual fuel combustion on a 12.9-l, six-cylinder, production heavy-duty diesel engine. Gaseous propane was fumigated upstream of the turbocharger air inlet and ignited using direct injection of diesel sprays. Results are presented for brake mean effective pressures (BMEP) from 5 to 20 bar and different percent energy substituted (PES) by propane at a constant engine speed of 1500 rpm. The effect of propane PES on apparent heat release rates, combustion phasing and duration, fuel conversion and combustion efficiencies, and engine-out emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx), smoke, carbon monoxide (CO), and total unburned hydrocarbons (HC) were investigated. Exhaust particle number concentrations and size distributions were also quantified for diesel–ignited propane combustion. With stock engine parameters, the maximum propane PES was limited to 86%, 60%, 33%, and 25% at 5, 10, 15, and 20 bar BMEPs, respectively, either by high maximum pressure rise rates (MPRR) or by excessive HC and CO emissions. With increasing PES, while fuel conversion efficiencies increased slightly at high \\{BMEPs\\} or decreased at low BMEPs, combustion efficiencies uniformly decreased. Also, with increasing PES, \\{NOx\\} and smoke emissions were generally decreased but these reductions were accompanied by higher HC and CO emissions. Exhaust particle number concentrations decreased with increasing PES at low loads but showed the opposite trends at higher loads. At 10 bar BMEP, by adopting a different fueling strategy, the maximum possible propane PES was extended to 80%. Finally, a limited diesel injection timing study was performed to identify the optimal operating conditions for the best efficiency-emissions-MPRR tradeoffs.

Andrew C. Polk; Chad D. Carpenter; Kalyan Kumar Srinivasan; Sundar Rajan Krishnan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity H2 Gasoline, bio-fuel, H2, electricity Gasoline,bio-diesel, DME, CH2/LH2 Gasoline, electricity, H2 Powertrains ICE, hybrid, plug-in hybrid, battery, fuel

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

390

Coal-Fueled Diesel Technology Assessment Study: systems performance and cost comparisons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the performance of diesel engines operating on coal-based fuels and compares their power generation costs with those of corresponding oil-burning prime movers. Similar performance and cost comparisons are also presented for an alternative prime mover, the direct-fired gas turbine in both a simple-cycle and a regenerative-cycle configuration. The coal-based fuels under consideration include micronized coal, coal slurries, and coal-derived gaseous fuels. The study focuses on medium-speed diesel engines for locomotive, marine, small stationary power, and industrial cogeneration applications in the 1000 to 10,000 kW size range. This report reviews the domestic industrial and transportation markets for medium-speed engines currently using oil or gas. The major problem areas involving the operation of these engines on coal-based fuels are summarized. The characteristics of available coal-based fuels are discussed and the costs of various fuels are compared. Based on performance data from the literature, as well as updated cost estimates originally developed for the Total Energy Technology Alternatives Studies program, power generation costs are determined for both oil-fueled and coal-fueled diesel engines. Similar calculations are also performed for direct-fired gas turbines. The calculations illustrate the sensitivity of the power generation cost to the associated fuel cost for these prime movers. The results also show the importance of reducing the cost of available coal-based fuels, in order to improve the economic competitiveness of coal-fueled prime movers relative to engines operating on oil or gas. 50 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

Holtz, R.E.; Krazinski, J.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Effects of Combustion-Induced Vortex Breakdown on Flashback Limits of Syngas-Fueled Gas Turbine Combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Turbine combustors of advanced power systems have goals to achieve very low pollutants emissions, fuel variability, and fuel flexibility. Future generation gas turbine combustors should tolerate fuel compositions ranging from natural gas to a broad range of syngas without sacrificing operational advantages and low emission characteristics. Additionally, current designs of advanced turbine combustors use various degrees of swirl and lean premixing for stabilizing flames and controlling high temperature NOx formation zones. However, issues of fuel variability and NOx control through premixing also bring a number of concerns, especially combustor flashback and flame blowout. Flashback is a combustion condition at which the flame propagates upstream against the gas stream into the burner tube. Flashback is a critical issue for premixed combustor designs, because it not only causes serious hardware damages but also increases pollutant emissions. In swirl stabilized lean premixed turbine combustors onset of flashback may occur due to (i) boundary layer flame propagation (critical velocity gradient), (ii) turbulent flame propagation in core flow, (iii) combustion instabilities, and (iv) upstream flame propagation induced by combustion induced vortex breakdown (CIVB). Flashback due to first two foregoing mechanisms is a topic of classical interest and has been studied extensively. Generally, analytical theories and experimental determinations of laminar and turbulent burning velocities model these mechanisms with sufficient precision for design usages. However, the swirling flow complicates the flashback processes in premixed combustions and the first two mechanisms inadequately describe the flashback propensity of most practical combustor designs. The presence of hydrogen in syngas significantly increases the potential for flashback. Due to high laminar burning velocity and low lean flammability limit, hydrogen tends to shift the combustor operating conditions towards flashback regime. Even a small amount of hydrogen in a fuel blend triggers the onset of flashback by altering the kinetics and thermophysical characteristics of the mixture. Additionally, the presence of hydrogen in the fuel mixture modifies the response of the flame to the global effects of stretch and preferential diffusion. Despite its immense importance in fuel flexible combustor design, little is known about the magnitude of fuel effects on CIVB induced flashback mechanism. Hence, this project investigates the effects of syngas compositions on flashback resulting from combustion induced vortex breakdown. The project uses controlled experiments and parametric modeling to understand the velocity field and flame interaction leading to CIVB driven flashback.

Ahsan Choudhuri

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Gasoline-like Fuel Effects on High-load, Boosted HCCI Combustion Employing Negative Valve Overlap Strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years a number of studies have demonstrated that boosted operation combined with external EGR is a path forward for expanding the high load limit of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) operation with the negative valve overlap (NVO) valve strategy. However, the effects of fuel composition with this strategy have not been fully explored. In this study boosted HCCI combustion is investigated in a single-cylinder research engine equipped with direct injection (DI) fueling, cooled external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), laboratory pressurized intake air, and a fully-variable hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) valve train. Three fuels with significant compositional differences are investigated: regular grade gasoline (RON = 90.2), 30% ethanol-gasoline blend (E30, RON = 100.3), and 24% iso-butanol-gasoline blend (IB24, RON = 96.6). Results include engine loads from 350 to 800 kPa IMEPg for all fuels at three engine speeds 1600, 2000, and 2500 rpm. All operating conditions achieved thermal efficiency (gross indicated efficiency) between 38 and 47%, low NOX emissions ( 0.1 g/kWh), and high combustion efficiency ( 96.5%). Detailed sweeps of intake manifold pressure (atmospheric to 250 kPaa), EGR (0 25% EGR), and injection timing are conducted to identify fuel-specific effects. The major finding of this study is that while significant fuel compositional differences exist, in boosted HCCI operation only minor changes in operational conditions are required to achieve comparable operation for all fuels. In boosted HCCI operation all fuels were able to achieve matched load-speed operation, whereas in conventional SI operation the fuel-specific knock differences resulted in significant differences in the operable load-speed space. Although all fuels were operable in boosted HCCI, the respective air handling requirements are also discussed, including an analysis of the demanded turbocharger efficiency.

Kalaskar, Vickey B [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL; Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

394

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

395

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2007, 2010, and 2015, and is the first annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

396

CFD modelling of air-fired and oxy-fuel combustion in a large-scale furnace at Loy Yang A brown coal power station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Oxy-fuel combustion technique is a viable option to reduce several types of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions from the pulverized coal (PC) combustion systems. In this paper, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling study has been developed in order to investigate the Victorian brown coal combustion in a 550 MW utility boiler under the air-fired (reference case) and three oxy-fuel-fired scenarios. The reference firing case was modelled based on the operating conditions of Loy Yang A power plant located in the state of Victoria, Australia. While Chalmers’ oxy-fuel combustion approach was selected for the present oxy-fuel combustion simulations, which referred to as OF25 (25 vol.% O2), OF27 (27 vol.% O2), and OF29 (29 vol.% O2). User-defined functions (UDFs) were written and incorporated into the CFD code to calculate the following mathematical models: the PC devolatilization, char burnout, multi-step chemical reactions, mass and heat transfer, carbon in fly-ash, and \\{NOx\\} formation/destruction. A level of confidence of the CFD model was achieved validating four different parameters of the conventional combustion case, as well as the previous preliminary CFD studies that conducted on a 100 kW unit firing propane and lignite under oxy-fuel combustion environments. The numerical results of OF29 combustion condition were considerably similar to the reference firing results in terms of gas temperature levels and radiative heat transfer relative to the OF25 and OF27 combustion cases. This similarity was due to increasing the residence time of PC in the combustion zone and O2-enriched in feed oxidizer gases. A significant increase in the CO2 concentrations and a noticeable decrease in the \\{NOx\\} formation were observed under all oxy-fuel combustion scenarios. The combustion chemistry was adopted in these investigations in order to capture the effects of O2 concentrations and gas temperatures on the CO/CO2 production rate and equilibrium between H2 and H2O in the combustion zone. Also, the use of O2-enriched atmospheres during oxy-fuel-fired cases was slightly enhanced the carbon burnout rate. These predicted results were reasonably consistent with the experimental investigations and numerical modelling found in the literature. This study of Victorian brown coal oxy-fuel combustion in a large-scale tangentially-fired boiler is important prior to its implementation in real-life.

Audai Hussein Al-Abbas; Jamal Naser; David Dodds

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Clean Cities Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clean Cities Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane Clean Cities Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane Clean Cities Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane May 15, 2013 - 4:10pm Addthis Mississippi's Community Counseling Services converted 29 vans to run on propane, saving more than $1.50 per gallon on fuel or more than $60,000 a year. | Photo courtesy of Community Counseling Services. Mississippi's Community Counseling Services converted 29 vans to run on propane, saving more than $1.50 per gallon on fuel or more than $60,000 a year. | Photo courtesy of Community Counseling Services. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What are the key facts? Mississippi's Community Counseling Services converted 29 vans to run on propane, saving more than $1.50 per gallon on fuel or more than $60,000

398

Cost analysis of air cargo transport and effects of fluctuations in fuel price  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study developed a model with cost functions formulated for different stages of cargo transport operation. A case analysis was performed with actual data from four air cargo traffic routes and eight aircraft types to validate the applicability of the model. The results show that the optimal payloads for various aircraft types vary with fuel price fluctuations. Furthermore, this study determined optimal types of freighter aircraft for different routes. Freight rates increase with rises in fuel price due to the corresponding increase in the fuel surcharge, thus bringing in higher total revenue. When the increase in total revenue exceeds the rise in fuel cost, the optimal payload will drop. Not only can the cost functions reveal the impact of fuel price fluctuations on different aspects of air cargo transport, they can also assist airlines in selecting the aircraft type with the best fuel economy for different route distances and cargo volumes.

Ching-Cheng Chao; Ching-Wen Hsu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Clean Cities Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane Clean Cities Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane May 15, 2013 - 4:10pm Addthis Mississippi's Community Counseling Services converted 29 vans to run on propane, saving more than $1.50 per gallon on fuel or more than $60,000 a year. | Photo courtesy of Community Counseling Services. Mississippi's Community Counseling Services converted 29 vans to run on propane, saving more than $1.50 per gallon on fuel or more than $60,000 a year. | Photo courtesy of Community Counseling Services. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What are the key facts? Mississippi's Community Counseling Services converted 29 vans to run on propane, saving more than $1.50 per gallon on fuel or more than $60,000

400

High-Bandwidth Modulation of H2/Syngas Fuel to Control Combustion Dynamics in Micro-Mixing Lean Premix - Parker Hannifin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bandwidth Modulation of H Bandwidth Modulation of H 2 /Syngas Fuel to Control Combustion Dynamics in Micro-Mixing Lean Premix-Parker Hannifin Background In this congressionally directed project, Parker Hannifin Corporation (Parker), in cooperation with Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), will enhance its micro-mixing injector platform to improve combustion operability in lean premix turbine systems by attenuating the combustion dynamics. This will be accomplished

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Advanced combustion methods for simultaneous reduction of emissions and fuel consumption of compression ignition engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, advanced combustion modes i.e. improved low-temperature combustion (LTC) and reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) have been achieved in a diesel engine. LTC mode has been improved us...

P. Brijesh; A. Chowdhury; S. Sreedhara

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Carbon Capture and Storage From Fossil Fuels and Biomass – Costs and Potential Role in Stabilizing the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The capture and storage of CO2 from combustion of fossil fuels is gaining attraction as a means to deal with climate change. CO2...emissions from biomass conversion processes can also be captured. If that is done...

Christian Azar; Kristian Lindgren; Eric Larson; Kenneth Möllersten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Cost-Effective Choices of Marine Fuels in a Carbon-Constrained World: Results from a Global Energy Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Choices of Marine Fuels in a Carbon-Constrained World: Results from a Global Energy Model ... † Department

Maria Taljegard; Selma Brynolf; Maria Grahn; Karin Andersson; Hannes Johnson

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

404

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Batteries Fuel Efficiency & Emissions Combustion Engines Fuel Effects on Combustion Idle Reduction Emissions Waste Heat Recovery Lightweighting Parasitic Loss Reduction Lubricants...

405

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - III: Spent DUPIC Fuel Disposal Cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal costs of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and DUPIC fuels have been estimated based on available literature data and the engineering design of a spent CANDU fuel disposal facility by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The cost estimation was carried out by the normalization concept of total electricity generation. Therefore, the future electricity generation scale was analyzed to evaluate the appropriate capacity of the high-level waste disposal facility in Korea, which is a key parameter of the disposal cost estimation. Based on the total electricity generation scale, it is concluded that the disposal unit costs for spent CANDU natural uranium, CANDU-DUPIC, and PWR fuels are 192.3, 388.5, and 696.5 $/kg heavy element, respectively.

Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Roh, Gyuhong; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Comparison of the combustion behavior of Orimulsion{trademark} and heavy fuel oil in 70 MW flames  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of an experimental study are shown in this publication to compare the combustion behavior of heavy fuel oil (HFO) and Orimulsion in 70 MW flames. The investigation was carried out with the use of the combustion test rig at the International Combustion Limited in Derby, UK. The main objective of this test work was to quantify the extent of differences in flame properties, particulate and gaseous emissions of Orimulsion and HFO. Under identical combustion conditions, axial profiles of flame temperature and radiation heat flux were determined at 70 MW thermal input and 1% O{sub 2} for both fuels. Gas compositions at flame tail and furnace exit were obtained to estimate flame length and emission of gaseous pollutants. Stack concentration, carbon content, size and chemical composition of fly ash were also measured. The effect of excess air level on exit NOx and CO concentration were studied. Results of detailed flame measurements and the parametric study have shown that orimulsion fuel can be burnt with 99.97% efficiency at 1% exit O{sub 2} with a modified burner system of Dunamenti Power Station. However, significant implications of Orimulsion firing were observed. Gas temperature data and CO concentrations at flame tail have indicated a 1.5--2 m longer flame for Orimulsion. At flame tail, gas temperature in the Orimulsion flame was higher by 100 C than that for HFO. Lower radiant heat flux was measured in the near burner region for Orimulsion. Higher SO{sub 3}, SO{sub 2} and lower NOx emission were found when firing Orimulsion. Despite the higher ash content of Orimulsion, its combustion resulted in smaller particulate emission, which might be due to fly ash deposition in the furnace.

Barta, L.E. [Inst. for Energy, Budapest (Hungary); Horvath, G. [Hungarian Power Companies, Ltd., Budapest (Hungary); Allen, J.W.; Darar, J.S.; Wright, J.A. [International Combustion Ltd., Derby (United Kingdom). Rolls Royce Industrial Power Group; Szederkenyi, S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Corrosion performance of structural alloys for oxy-fuel combustion systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy is intensely promoting research and development of oxyfuel combustion systems that employ oxygen, instead of air, for burning the fuel. The resulting flue gas primarily consists of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} that facilitates sequestration of CO{sub 2}, thereby leading to reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions. Also, as the oxidant is bereft of N{sub 2}, NO{sub x} emissions are minimized to a great extent from the exhaust gas. Studies at NETL have indicated that oxy-fuel combustion can increase efficiency in the power plants from the current 30-35% to 50-60%. However, the presence of H{sub 2}O/CO{sub 2} and trace constituents like nitrogen and sulfur in the environment at the operating temperatures and pressures can have adverse effects on the corrosion and mechanical properties of structural alloys. Thus, there is a critical need to evaluate the response of structural and turbine materials in simulated H{sub 2}O/CO{sub 2} environments in an effort to select materials that have adequate high temperature mechanical properties and environmental performance. During the past year, a program was initiated to evaluate the corrosion performance of structural alloys in CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-steam environments at elevated temperatures. Materials selected for the study include intermediate-chromium ferritic steels, Fe-Cr-Ni heat-resistant alloys, and nickelbased superalloys. Coupon specimens of several of the alloys were exposed to pure CO{sub 2} at temperatures between 650 and 850C for times up to 1450 h. The corrosion tests in CO{sub 2}-50% steam environment was conducted at temperatures between 650 and 850C for times up to 1250 h. The steam for the experiment was generated by pumping distilled water and converting it to steam in the preheat portion of the furnace, ahead of the specimen exposure location. Preliminary results will be presented on weight change, scale thickness, internal penetration, and microstructural characteristics of corrosion products.

Natesan, K.; Rink, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

409

Direct Visualization of Spray and Combustion Inside a DI-SI Engine and Its Implications to Flex-Fuel VVT Operations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fuel, injection timing, and valve deactivation in a DI optical accessible engine with side-mounted, multi-hole injector are investigated using CFD and high-speed imaging of sprays and combustion.

410

Fundamental aspects of coal-water fuel droplet combustion and secondary atomization of coal-water mixtures. Volume I, final report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Final Report is issued in two volumes, covering research into the combustion of coal-water fuels (CWF). Two separate but related tasks are discussed; the present report, Volume I, contains results obtained under Task ...

Sarofim, Adel F.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Combustion Engines  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Combustion Engines Combustion Engines Improving the efficiency of internal combustion engines is one of the most promising and cost-effective near- to mid-term approaches to increasing highway vehicles' fuel economy. The Vehicle Technologies Office's research and development activities address critical barriers to commercializing higher efficiency, very low emissions advanced internal combustion engines for passenger and commercial vehicles. This technology has great potential to reduce U.S. petroleum consumption, resulting in greater economic, environmental, and energy security. Already offering outstanding drivability and reliability to over 230 million passenger vehicles, internal combustion engines have the potential to become substantially more efficient. Initial results from laboratory engine tests indicate that passenger vehicle fuel economy can be improved by more than up to 50 percent, and some vehicle simulation models estimate potential improvements of up to 75 percent. Advanced combustion engines can utilize renewable fuels, and when combined with hybrid electric powertrains could have even further reductions in fuel consumption. As the EIA reference case forecasts that by 2035, more than 99 percent of light- and heavy-duty vehicles sold will still have internal combustion engines, the potential fuel savings is tremendous.

412

An exergy based approach to determine production cost and CO2 allocation for petroleum derived fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The renewable and non-renewable exergy and CO2 costs of petroleum derived fuels produced in Brazil are evaluated using exergoeconomy to rationally distribute the exergy costs and the CO2 emitted in processes with more than one product. An iterative procedure is used to take into account the cyclic interactions of the processed fuels. The renewable and non-renewable exergy costs together with the CO2 cost provide a reasonable way to compare different fuels and can be used to assess an enormous quantity of processes that make use of petroleum derived products. The system considers Brazilian typical processes and distances: offshore oil and gas production, transportation by shuttle tankers and pipelines, and refining. It was observed that the renewable exergy cost contribution in the total exergy cost of petroleum derived fuels is negligible. On average, the refining process is responsible, for 85% of the total unit exergy cost. Total unit exergy costs of gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas, natural gas and fuel oil were found to be: 1.081 MJ/MJ, 1.074 MJ/MJ, 1.064 MJ/MJ, 1.05 MJ/MJ, respectively. The hydrotreatment process increases diesel cost from 1.038 MJ/MJ to 1.11 MJ/MJ in order to decrease its sulphur content. The CO2 cost reflects the extent of processing as well as the C/H ratio of the used fuel. Hence, coke followed by hydrotreated diesel have the largest CO2 cost among the fuels, 91 gCO2/MJ and 79 gCO2/MJ, respectively.

J.A.M. Silva; D. Flórez-Orrego; S. Oliveira Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

The effect of low-temperature oxidation on the fuel and produced oil during in situ combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combustion tube experiments using 10.2{degrees} API crude oil were performed, in which a different sample matrix was used in each run. Three matrix types were tested: sand, sand and clay, and sand and sand fines. As a result of the low fuel concentration, low-temperature oxidation (LTO) was observed in the run where the matrix consisted of sand only. High-temperature oxidation (HTO) was observed in runs where either clay or sand fines were part of the matrix. Ignition was not obtained in the LTO run, which had a reaction front temperature of only 350{degrees}C (662{degrees}F), compared to a combustion front temperature of 500{degrees}C (932{degrees}F) for the HTO runs. From elemental analysis, the fuel during the LTO run was determined to be an oxygenated hydrocarbon with an atomic oxygen-carbon ratio of 0.3.

Mamora, D.D. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Brigham, W.E. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Developing Low-Cost, Highly Efficient Heat Recovery for Fuel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy is utilizing its current commercialization channels to market the new hybrid fuel cell technologies. Distribution partners LOGAN Energy, Pfister Energy, and PPL Energy Plus...

415

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biogas, LPG, ethanol, bio-diesel, DME, CH2/LH2 Gasoline,Gasoline, bio-fuel, H2, electricity Gasoline, diesel, CNG,

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2012. Status: 50% complete. Budget FY12 390K (Vehicle System) 50K (Fuel Cell Specific runs) 75K (link with market analysis) Barriers Evaluate the...

417

MN Center for Renewable Energy: Cellulosic Ethanol, Optimization of Bio-fuels in Internal Combustion Engines, & Course Development for Technicians in These Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report for Grant #DE-FG02-06ER64241, MN Center for Renewable Energy, will address the shared institutional work done by Minnesota State University, Mankato and Minnesota West Community and Technical College during the time period of July 1, 2006 to December 30, 2008. There was a no-cost extension request approved for the purpose of finalizing some of the work. The grant objectives broadly stated were to 1) develop educational curriculum to train technicians in wind and ethanol renewable energy, 2) determine the value of cattails as a biomass crop for production of cellulosic ethanol, and 3) research in Optimization of Bio-Fuels in Internal Combustion Engines. The funding for the MN Center for Renewable Energy was spent on specific projects related to the work of the Center.

John Frey

2009-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10,000-psi tank cost $2,458, or $11.1/kWh. Carbon fiber wastank cost is in the range of $10-$17/kWh and carbon fiber

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

On the Combustion of Hydrogen-Rich Gaseous Fuels with Low Calorific Value in a Porous Burner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It was also observed that, for the Wobbe Index varying from 5 to 44 MJ/Nm3, it is possible to burn stably at ?260 kW/m2, which reveals the fuel interchangeability potential of the present burner design. ... A range of low calorific value gaseous fuel mixtures containing CH4, H2, CO2, CO, and N2 have been burned in a porous radiant burner to analyze the effects of the fuel composition on flame stability and pollutant emissions. ... There are, however, gaps in the fundamental understanding of syngas combustion and emissions, as most previous research has focused on flames burning individual fuel components such as H2 and CH4, rather than syngas mixts. ...

R. W. Francisco, Jr.; F. Rua; M. Costa; R. C. Catapan; A. A. M. Oliveira

2009-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

various data sets, estimates of bunker fuel consumption forvarious data sets, estimates of bunker fuel consumption foras international marine bunker fuel. For the remaining 5% of

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as international marine bunker fuel. For the remaining 5% ofOf the distillate fuel consumed by all marine vessels, weresidual fuel oil from international marine travel. However,

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive...

424

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Application: 2009 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application: 2009 Update This report is the third annual update of a...

425

Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation: September 30, 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of sensitivity and Monte Carlo analyses on PEM fuel cell components and the overall system are presented including the most important cost factors and the effects of selected scenarios.

Carlson, E. J.; Kopf, P.; Sinha, J.; Sriramulu, S.; Yang, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11007: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Record 11007 from the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate the hydrogen threshold cost of $2.00 to $4.00 per gasoline gallon equivalent.

427

Impacts of Renewable Generation on Fossil Fuel Unit Cycling: Costs and Emissions (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prepared for the Clean Energy Regulatory Forum III, this presentation looks at the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and reexamines the cost and emissions impacts of fossil fuel unit cycling.

Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Denholm, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

A network approach for identifying minimum-cost aircraft routing and fuel-allocating decisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering A NETWORK APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING MINIMUM-COST AIRCRAFT ROUTING AJVD FUEL-ALLOCATING DECISIONS A Thesis by NADER MAHMOUD KABBAVI Approved as to style and content by...A NETWORK APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING MINIMUM-COST AIRCRAFT ROUTING AND FUEL-ALLOCATING DECISIONS A Thesis by NADER MAHMOUD KABBANI Submitted to the OIIice of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

Kabbani, Nader Mahmoud

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12001: H2 Production and Delivery Cost Apportionment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

01 Date: May 14, 2012 01 Date: May 14, 2012 Title: H 2 Production and Delivery Cost Apportionment Originator: Scott Weil, Sara Dillich, Fred Joseck, and Mark Ruth Approved by: Sunita Satyapal and Rick Farmer Date: December 14, 2012 Item: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the untaxed cost of hydrogen (H 2 ) (produced, delivered, and dispensed) at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a $/mile basis with competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. As established in Record 11007 [1], this cost ranges from $2.00-$4.00/gge a of H 2 (based on $2007). The threshold cost can be apportioned into its constituent H 2 production and delivery costs, which can then serve as the respective cost targets for multi-year planning of the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT)

430

Experimental study on combustion characteristics of a spark-ignition engine fueled with natural gas–hydrogen blends combining with EGR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An experimental study on the effect of hydrogen fraction and EGR rate on the combustion characteristics of a spark-ignition engine fueled with natural gas–hydrogen blends was investigated. The results show that flame development duration, rapid combustion duration and total combustion duration are increased with the increase of EGR rate and decreased with the increase of hydrogen fraction in the blends. Hydrogen addition shows larger influence on flame development duration than that on rapid combustion duration. The coefficient of variation of the indicated mean effective pressure increases with the increase of EGR rate. And hydrogen addition into natural gas decreases the coefficient of variation of the indicated mean effective pressure, and this effectiveness becomes more obviously at high EGR rate. Engine fueled with natural gas–hydrogen blends combining with proper EGR rate can realize the stable low temperature combustion in gas engine.

Erjiang Hu; Zuohua Huang; Bing Liu; Jianjun Zheng; Xiaolei Gu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

A PRODUCTIVITY AND COST COMPARISON OF TWO NON-COMMERCIAL FOREST FUEL REDUCTION MACHINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A PRODUCTIVITY AND COST COMPARISON OF TWO NON-COMMERCIAL FOREST FUEL REDUCTION MACHINES M. Chad-commercial equipment designs in a fuel reduction treatment. The machines were: 1) a swing-boom excavator (SBE) equipped with a rotary disc mulching head, and 2) a drive-to- tree flexible tracked machine (FTM) with a rotating drum

Bolding, M. Chad

432

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system cost model, and oil security metrics model (OSMM).the Energy Security Benefits of Reduced U.S. Oil Imports,

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Fuel cycle cost, reactor physics and fuel manufacturing considerations for Erbia-bearing PWR fuel with > 5 wt% U-235 content  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The efforts to reduce fuel cycle cost have driven LWR fuel close to the licensed limit in fuel fissile content, 5.0 wt% U-235 enrichment, and the acceptable duty on current Zr-based cladding. An increase in the fuel enrichment beyond the 5 wt% limit, while certainly possible, entails costly investment in infrastructure and licensing. As a possible way to offset some of these costs, the addition of small amounts of Erbia to the UO{sub 2} powder with >5 wt% U-235 has been proposed, so that its initial reactivity is reduced to that of licensed fuel and most modifications to the existing facilities and equipment could be avoided. This paper discusses the potentialities of such a fuel on the US market from a vendor's perspective. An analysis of the in-core behavior and fuel cycle performance of a typical 4-loop PWR with 18 and 24-month operating cycles has been conducted, with the aim of quantifying the potential economic advantage and other operational benefits of this concept. Subsequently, the implications on fuel manufacturing and storage are discussed. While this concept has certainly good potential, a compelling case for its short-term introduction as PWR fuel for the US market could not be determined. (authors)

Franceschini, F.; Lahoda, E. J.; Kucukboyaci, V. N. [Westinghouse Electric Co. LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

2004 DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Review Presentation COST AND PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENTS FOR A PEM FUEL CELL TURBOCOMPRESSOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to assist the Department of Energy in the development of a low cost, reliable and high performance air compressor/expander. Technical Objective 1: Perform a turbocompressor systems PEM fuel cell trade study to determine the enhanced turbocompressor approach. Technical Objective 2: Using the results from technical objective 1, an enhanced turbocompressor will be fabricated. The design may be modified to match the flow requirements of a selected fuel cell system developer. Technical Objective 3: Design a cost and performance enhanced compact motor and motor controller. Technical Objective 4: Turbocompressor/motor controller development.

Mark K. Gee

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Calculation of the heats of combustion of aromatic hydrocarbons contained in power-generating fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The additive method of group contributions is used for the calculation of the heats of combustion of aromatic hydrocarbons of different structures.

E. V. Sagadeev; V. V. Sagadeev

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Calculation of the Heats of Combustion of Saturated Hydrocarbons Contained in Power-Generating Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An empirical method is suggested for the calculation of the heats of combustion of saturated hydrocarbons by the additive scheme proceeding from their...

E. V. Sagadeev; V. V. Sagadeev

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

The effect of wood biomass blending with pulverized coal on combustion characteristics under oxy-fuel condition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, combustion from the co-firing of coal and wood biomass, and thermal characteristics such as ignition temperature, burn-out temperature, and activation energy were discussed using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). We investigated the effects of biomass blending with two kinds of pulverized coal (bituminous Shenhua, and sub-bituminous Adaro) under air and oxy-fuel conditions. The coal fraction in the blended samples was set to 1, 0.8, and 0.5. The oxygen fraction in the oxidant was set to 0.21, 0.3, 0.5, and 0.8. The ignition temperature was governed by the fuel composition, particularly in the blended biomass which has a much higher content of volatile matter comparing to coal. However, the burnout temperature, which shows a strong relationship with char combustion, depended on the oxidant ingredients rather than on the fuel components. Thermal characteristics such as ignition, burnout temperature, reaction region, and heat flow were very similar between air and a 0.3 oxygen concentration under oxy-fuel conditions with Shenhua coal.

Seongyool Ahn; Gyungmin Choi; Duckjool Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Flex Fuel Optimized SI and HCCI Engine  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

mode engine for a blend of gasoline and E85 for the best fuel economy - Development of a cost effective and reliable dual combustion mode engine - Development of a model-based SI...

439

Economic costs and environmental impacts of alternative fuel vehicle fleets in local government: An interim assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic costs and environmental impacts of alternative fuel vehicle fleets in local government. This paper examines the cost effectiveness and environmental impact of the conversion of a 180 plus vehicle of Civil and Materials Engineering, and Institute for Environmental Science and Policy, University

Illinois at Chicago, University of

440

On the Path to Low Cost Renewable Fuels, an Important Breakthrough |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

On the Path to Low Cost Renewable Fuels, an Important Breakthrough On the Path to Low Cost Renewable Fuels, an Important Breakthrough On the Path to Low Cost Renewable Fuels, an Important Breakthrough April 18, 2013 - 4:10pm Addthis NREL Scientist Bryon Donohoe looks at different views of ultra structures of pre-treated biomass materials in the Cellular Visualization room of the Biomass Surface Characterization Lab. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL. NREL Scientist Bryon Donohoe looks at different views of ultra structures of pre-treated biomass materials in the Cellular Visualization room of the Biomass Surface Characterization Lab. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL. A researcher examines a strain of the fermentation microorganism Zymomonas mobilis on a culture plate. NREL has genetically engineered and patented its own strains of Zymomonas mobilis to more effectively ferment the multiple sugars found in biomass as part of the cellulosic ethanol-to-renewable fuel conversion process. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cost combustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Materials and Modules for Low Cost, High Performance Fuel Cell Humidifiers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Kick-off Meeting, Kick-off Meeting, Wash. D.C - 10/01/2009 Materials and Modules for Low Cost, High Performance Fuel Cell Humidifiers Prime Contractor: W. L. Gore & Associates Elkton, MD Principal Investigator: William B. Johnson Sub-Contractor: dPoint Technologies Vancouver, BC W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. DOE Kick-off Meeting, Wash. D.C - 10/01/2009 Ahluwalia, et. al, ibid. Mirza, Z. DOE Hydrogen Program Review, June 9-13, 2008; Washington, DC Background W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. DOE Kick-off Meeting, Wash. D.C - 10/01/2009 Objective and Technical Barriers Addressed More efficient, low-cost humidifiers can increase fuel cell inlet humidity: Reduce system cost and size of balance of plant; Improve fuel cell performance; Improve fuel cell durability. OBJECTIVE: Demonstrate a durable, high performance water

442

Comparison of costs for automobile energy conservation vs synthetic fuel production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This preliminary analysis suggests that there are a large number of potential technical options for reducing energy consumption in automobiles. Furthermore, the cost to the user of purchasing these conservation options is less than the discounted cost of purchasing the additional fuel required if the conservation option is not chosen. There is a significant cost savings even if fuel costs remain at current levels. These savings would increase if fuel prices continue to rise or if more costly than synthetic fuels, at least for another 15 to 20 years. Cost-effective conservation could enable new vehicles to reach 40 to 50 mpg corporate average fuel economy by the year 2000. It is clear that the potential for making these changes exists, but better data are needed to evaluate many of these options and to ensure the development and implementation of those that are desirable. Specifically, there is a need for more applied research in government and industry laboratories. Key areas for this work are discussed here for: (1) optimized engine designs, and (2) efficient vehicle body structures. 10 references, 10 figures, 3 tables.

Gorman, R.; Heitner, K.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of total oil increase in oil prices. demand; thus, we assume6), which results from oil price changes, is a real cost toanalysis when we use low-oil-price case and high-oil-price

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Numerical investigation of Solid Recovered Fuels’ co-firing with brown coal in large scale boilers – Evaluation of different co-combustion modes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the current work the co-combustion of Solid Recovered Fuels’ (SRFs’) with brown coal in large scale pulverised coal boilers under different operational conditions is numerically investigated. In order to overcome the difficulty of the complex, inhomogeneous nature of waste recovered fuels, SRF is modelled as a mixture of two different fractions, the biogenic and the plastic one. For each fraction different combustion mechanisms are presented, whilst for the first time the proposed combustion mechanism of the plastic fraction is incorporated in a commercial CFD code and validated against available experimental data. A 600 MWe brown coal boiler is simulated as a reference and its operational characteristics are compared with parameterised scenarios of SRF co-firing conditions. Based on the numerical results, the optimum co-firing concepts regarding the more efficient operation of the boiler (hot spots and fuel’s burnout) are identified, decreasing the environmental impact of the boiler’s emissions.

Michalis Agraniotis; Nikos Nikolopoulos; Aris Nikolopoulos; Panagiotis Grammelis; Emmanuel Kakaras

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

manufacture. - Demonstrate our metal plate application in portable, stationary and automobile fuel cell systems. 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50...

446

Flex Fuel Polygeneration: Optimizing Cost, Sustainability, and Resiliency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Energy sources · Energy carriers 2 #12;Initial Analysis of FFPG Systems · Design power plants;Conventional Approaches to Energy Conversion (Coal, Biomass, Wind, Natural Gas, Photons) ( Fuel, Chemicals, Electricity, Biochar, Heat) Energy Source Energy Carrier Energy Carrier Energy Source Energy Carrier 5 #12;The

Daniels, Thomas E.

447

Proof of concept for integrating oxy-fuel combustion and the removal of all pollutants from a coal fired flame  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The USDOE/Albany Research Center and Jupiter Oxygen Corporation, working together under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement, have demonstrated proof-of-concept for the integration of Jupiter’s oxy-fuel combustion and an integrated system for the removal of all stack pollutants, including CO2, from a coal-fired flame. The components were developed using existing process technology with the addition of a new oxy-coal combustion nozzle. The results of the test showed that the system can capture SOx, NOx, particulates, and even mercury as a part of the process of producing liquefied CO2 for sequestration. This is part of an ongoing research project to explore alternative methods for CO2 capture that will be applicable to both retrofit and new plant construction.

Ochs, Thomas L.; Patrick, Brian (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.); Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Gross, Alex (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.); Summers, Cathy A.; Simmons, William (CoalTeck LLC); Schoenfield, Mark (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.); Turner, Paul C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

A study of the effect of process variables on forward combustion oil recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIST OF FIGURES AND TABLES Figure Pa ge Schematic Diagram of Combustion Tube Apparatus 12 Fuel Concentration vs. Clay Content in Matri~. 27 Fuel Concentration vs. Clay Content in Matrix Midway-Sunset Crude Oil 28 Fuel Concentration vs. Oil... the combustion tube through the use of proper equipment de- sign. Further possible design improvements were found as a result of this study. INTRODUCTION The increasing cost of locating new crude oil reserves has re- sulted in intensive research...

Berry, Holland James

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Engine performance and emissions from the combustion of low-temperature Fischerâ??Tropsch synthetic diesel fuel and biodiesel rapeseed methyl ester blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combustion of oxygenated biodiesel (rapeseed methyl ester (RME)) improves the engine-out particulate matter, hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, while the low-temperature Fischerâ??Tropsch synthetic paraffinic diesel fuel improves engine-out NOx, CO, hydrocarbon and particulate matter emissions. Blending synthetic diesel (SD) fuel with oxygenated biodiesel could unlock potential performance synergies in the fuel properties (e.g. O2 content in RME and high cetane number of the synthetic fuels) of such blends and benefit engine performance and emissions. The combustion of synthetic diesel fuel/RME blend, named synthetic diesel B50, has shown similar combustion characteristics to diesel fuel, while simultaneous improvements in engine efficiency and smoke-NOx trade-off were achieved by taking advantage of the fuel's properties. The engine thermal efficiency was dependent on the fuel type, and followed the general trend: synthetic diesel > SDB50 > diesel > RME. Therefore, it has been shown that the design of a synthetic fuel with properties similar to the fuel blends presented in this work could improve engine-out NOx, smoke and hydrocarbon emissions and maintain or improve engine performance.

Kampanart Theinnoi; Athanasios Tsolakis; Sathaporn Chuepeng; Andrew P.E. York; Roger F. Cracknell; Richard H. Clark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of residual fuel oil are identical in the inventory and inCARB SEDS inventory fuel use Residual fuel oil Distillatein their oil and gas extraction processes. In its inventory,

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Effect of Oxygenated Fuel on Combustion and Emissions in a Light-Duty Turbo Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of fuel oxygen content on soot reduction in diesel engines is well-known. ... Fuel consumption was determined by weighing the fuel at the beginning and end of each test mode or each fuel blend through a Sartorius precision scale, with an accuracy of ±2 g. ... studies on effects of oxygenated fuels in conjunction with single and split fuel injections were conducted at high and low loads on a Caterpillar SCOTE DI diesel engine. ...

Juhun Song; Kraipat Cheenkachorn; Jinguo Wang; Joseph Perez; André L. Boehman; Philip John Young; Francis J. Waller

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Hetero-/homogeneous combustion of syngas mixtures over platinum at fuel-rich stoichiometries and pressures up to 14 bar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The catalytic and gas-phase combustion of H2/CO/O2/N2 mixtures was investigated in a platinum-coated channel-flow reactor at fuel-rich equivalence ratios 2–7, H2:CO volumetric ratios 1:2 to 5:1, pressures 1–14 bar, and wall temperatures 750–1250 K. In situ, 1-D Raman measurements of major gas-phase species concentrations over the catalyst boundary layer assessed the catalytic processes. Gas-phase combustion was monitored by planar laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of the OH radical at pressures p ? 5 bar and of hot O2 at p > 5 bar, wherein OH-LIF was not applicable due to strong quenching. Simulations were performed with a 2-D elliptic code that included detailed heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reaction mechanisms. The capacity of O2-LIF to assess the flame front positions at elevated pressures and fuel-rich stoichiometries has been demonstrated. The employed reaction schemes reproduced the measured H2, CO and O2 catalytic conversions as well as the flame positions and shapes over the entire investigated parameter range. Even though the catalytic conversion of the limiting O2 reactant was nearly transport-limited, the competition between H2 and CO for O2 consumption allowed for evaluation of the catalytic kinetics. Under rich stoichiometries, the oxidation of CO(s) via the HCOO(s) reaction pathway was significant. The sensitivity of gaseous combustion on catalytic reactions was strong, exemplifying the need of accurate surface chemistry when modeling syngas hetero-/homogeneous combustion. Adsorption of the H radical considerably inhibited gaseous combustion, especially at the lowest H2:CO ratios. The key surface reactions affecting gas-phase combustion were the same for all pressures. For a given stoichiometry, the sensitivity of homogeneous ignition on the inlet concentration of CO was modest, as the preferential catalytic oxidation of CO increased the H2:CO ratio over the gaseous induction zone.

Marco Schultze; John Mantzaras; Felix Grygier; Rolf Bombach

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Combustion Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using a liquid fuel. The air and fuel valve designs are vastly different, with different flow characteristics. These factors make the initial adjustment of the system difficult, and proper maintenance of ratio accuracy unlikely. Linked valves... casing of the fuel control regulator with the combustion air piping. The upstream pressure on the burner air orifice is applied to the main diaphragm of the pressure balanced regulator. Assuming sufficient gas pressure at the regulator inlet...

Riccardi, R. C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Vehiculos de combustible flexible: brindando opciones en combustible renovable (Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice), Programa de Technologias de Vehiculos (Vehicle Technologies Program - VTP) (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Mayo 2010 Mayo 2010 la Junta de Recursos del Aire de California. El uso de conversiones no certificadas es ilegal y puede afectar la garantía de su vehículo. Para obtener más información sobre el pro- ceso de conversión de vehículos, consulte la Guía de certificación actualizada para convertidores de combustible alternativo de la EPA en su sitio web, www.epa.gov/otaq/ cert/dearmfr/cisd0602.pdf. ¿El E85 afecta el desempeño del vehículo?

455

Sandia National Laboratories Combustion Research Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen & Combustion Technologies Department Livermore, CA DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure collector, compressor, high-P storage, pump, FC stack (efficiency vs power) · Developing: ICE gen-set, wind Borns, Scott Jones, Paul Pickard ­ Economic modeling of H2 unit cost · Production: reforming

456

Selecting the proper fuel gas for cost-effective oxyfuel cutting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivating factor behind recent research and development efforts in metal cutting has been the growing need for companies everywhere to embrace emerging technologies if they are to complete in the global economy. To quickly implement these productivity improvements and gain lower bottom line costs for welding and cutting operations, rapid commercialization of these process advancements is needed. Although initially more expensive, additive-enhanced fuel gases may be the most cost-effective choice for certain cutting applications. The cost of additive-enhanced fuel gases can be justified where oxygen pricing is low (such as with bulk oxygen). Propylene exhibited equal cutting speeds to acetylene and improved cutting economy under specific conditions, which involved longer cuts on thicker base materials. With a longer cut distance, the extra time required to reach the kindling temperature (when compared to acetylene) becomes less critical. It is important to note that kindling temperature was reached more rapidly with propylene than it was with propane, but both fuel gases were slower than acetylene. When factors such as these are considered, many applications are found to be more cost effectively performed with the more expensive acetylene or propylene fuel gases. Each individual application must be studied on a singular basis to determine the most cost-effective choice when selecting the fuel gas.

Lyttle, K.A.; Stapon, W.F.G. [Praxair, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States); Guimaraes, A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Optical-Engine and Surrogate-Fuels Research for an Improved Understanding of Fuel Effects on Advanced-Combustion Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

458

Calculation of the Heat of Combustion of Hydrocarbon Components of Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development is continued of the empirical method for the calculation of the heat of combustion of organic compounds and, in particular, of hydrocarbons of different structures by the additive scheme...

E. V. Sagadeev; V. V. Sagadeev

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Combustion of Hydrocarbon and Other Types of Chemical Fuels  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Reaction mechanisms have been tested and validated extensively through comparisons between computed results and measured data from laboratory experiments (e.g., shock tubes, laminar flames, rapid compression machines, flow reactors, stirred reactors) and from practical systems (e.g., diesel engines, spark-ignition engines, homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engines). These kinetic models are used to examine a wide range of combustion systems.[Taken from https://www-pls.llnl.gov/?url=science_and_technology-chemistry-combustion

460

Multi objective optimization of solid oxide fuel cell stacks considering parameter effects: Fuel utilization and hydrogen cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the context of stationary power generation fuel cell based systems are being predicted as a valuable option to tabernacle the thermodynamic cycle based power plants. In this paper multi objective optimization approach is used to optimize the planer solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks performance using genetic algorithm technique. Multi objective optimization generates the most attractive operating conditions of a SOFC system. This allows performing the optimization of the system regarding to two different objectives. Two pairs of different objectives are considered in this paper as distinguished strategies. In the first strategy minimization of the breakeven per-unit energy cost ($/kWh) and maximization of the output power is considered. Similarly two other objectives are also considered in the second strategy as minimization of the breakeven per-unit energy cost ($/kWh) and maximization of the electrical efficiency. Optimization of the first strategy predicts a maximum power output of 108.33?kW at a breakeven per-unit energy cost of 0.51 $/kWh and minimum breakeven per-unit energy cost of 0.30 $/kWh at a power of 42.18?kW. In the second strategy maximum efficiency of 63.93% at a breakeven per-unit energy cost of 0.42$/kWh is predicted while minimum breakeven per-unit energy cost of 0.25 $/kWh at efficiency of 48.3% is obtained. At the end evaluation of parameter effects on multi objective optimization regarding different hydrogen costs and fuel utilization factors are presented. It is worthy to note that the sensitivity analysis for multi objective optimization can be considered both as an advanced analysis tool and as support to technology managers engineers and decision makers when working by such as systems.

Atefeh Behzadi Forough; Ramin Roshandel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Future marine fuels - Prediction and alleviation of potential combustion and lubrication problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reviews the current and future marine fuels market and future fuel quality. It also describes the development of a method of ranking fuels by ignition delay which has led to the concept of a Calculated Carbon Aromaticity Index derived from simple fuel inspection properties. It also shows how increased engine fouling and corrosive wear, which might be expected from future quality fuel, can be controlled by improvements in lubrication and due attention to engine temperatures.

Williams, R.E.; Belcher, P.R.; Hengeveld, J.; Newbery, P.J.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, laboratory fellow and technical director of the INL High Temperature Electrolysis team, today announced that the latest fuel cell modification has set a new mark in endurance. The group's Integrated Laboratory Scale experiment has now operated continuously for 2,583 hours at higher efficiencies than previously attained. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

McGraw, Jennifer

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

463

Cost Study for Manufacturing of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems can be designed to produce electricity from fossil fuels at extremely high net efficiencies, approaching 70%. However, in order to penetrate commercial markets to an extent that significantly impacts world fuel consumption, their cost will need to be competitive with alternative generating systems, such as gas turbines. This report discusses a cost model developed at PNNL to estimate the manufacturing cost of SOFC power systems sized for ground-based distributed generation. The power system design was developed at PNNL in a study on the feasibility of using SOFC power systems on more electric aircraft to replace the main engine-mounted electrical generators [Whyatt and Chick, 2012]. We chose to study that design because the projected efficiency was high (70%) and the generating capacity was suitable for ground-based distributed generation (270 kW).

Weimar, Mark R.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Gotthold, David W.; Whyatt, Greg A.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

464

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Low Cost Sorbent for  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO2 Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO2 Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-NT0005497 TDA sorbent test equipment TDA sorbent test equipment. TDA Research Inc. will produce and evaluate a low-cost solid sorbent developed in prior laboratory testing. The process uses an alkalized alumina adsorbent to capture carbon dioxide (CO2) at intermediate temperature and near ambient pressure. The physical adsorbent is regenerated with low-pressure steam. Although the regeneration is primarily by concentration swing, the adsorption of steam on the sorbent during regeneration also provides approximately 8°C to 10°C of temperature swing, further enhancing the regeneration rate. The sorbent is transferred between two moving bed reactors. Cycling results in gas

465

Combustion and Emission Characteristics of a Direct-Injection Diesel Engine Fueled with Diesel?Diethyl Adipate Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The advantage of a diesel engine compared with a gasoline engine is the fuel economy benefits; however, the high NOx and smoke emissions still remain the main obstacles for the increasing application of diesel engines with the increasing concerns for environmental protection and implementation of more stringent exhaust gas regulations, thus further reduction in engine emissions becomes one of major tasks in engine development. ... In the application of pure oxygenated fuels, Fleisch et al.,1 Kapus et al.,2 and Sorenson et al.3 have studied dimethyl ether (DME) in the modified diesel engine, and their results showed that the engine could achieve ultralow emission prospects without fundamental change in combustion systems. ... Murayama, T.; Zheng, M.; Chikahisa, T. Simultaneous reduction of smoke and NOx from a DI diesel engine with EGR and dimethyl carbonate; SAE paper 952518, Society of Automotive Engineers:? Warrendale, PA, 1995. ...

Yi Ren; Zuohua Huang; Haiyan Miao; Deming Jiang; Ke Zeng; Bing Liu; Xibin Wang

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

466

Chemical-looping combustion of solid fuels in a 10 kW reactor system using natural minerals as oxygen carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is an unmixed combustion concept where fuel and combustion air are kept separate by means of an oxygen carrier, and the CO2 capture is inherently achieved. This work presents findings from a continuously operated 10 kW pilot for solid fuels. Using petcoke as fuel, the following oxygen carriers are compared: (a) ilmenite, (b) ilmenite + lime, (c) manganese ore, and (d) manganese ore + lime. Compared to ilmenite, the use of manganese ore as oxygen carrier greatly enhanced the rate of gasification. By adding lime particles to the Mn ore, performance improved further. The addition of lime to ilmenite had a small beneficial effect on gas conversion and char gasification rate.

Carl Linderholm; Anders Lyngfelt; Cristina Dueso

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467