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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Table 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Fuel Oil (thousand) Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 10 14 13 13 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 10 16 11 11 5,001 to 10,000 15 22 18 18 10,001 to 25,000 15 24 19 19 25,001 to 50,000 13 25 29 29 50,001 to 100,000 14 27 21 22 100,001 to 200,000 13 36 34 34 200,001 to 500,000 13 37 33 33 Over 500,000 17 51 50 50 Principal Building Activity Education 17 17 16 17 Food Sales and Service 25 36 16 16 Health Care 29 48 47 47 Lodging 27 37 32 32 Mercantile and Service 14 25 26 26 Office 14 19 21 21 Public Assembly 23 46 35 34 Public Order and Safety 28 48 46 46 Religious Worship

2

Fuel Consumption - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), 1994 Fuel Consumption

3

Amtrak fuel consumption study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a study of fuel consumption on National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) trains and is part of an effort to determine effective ways of conserving fuel on the Amtrak system. The study was performed by the Transportation Systems Center (TSC). A series of 26 test runs were conducted on Amtrak trains operating between Boston, Massachusetts, and New Haven, Connecticut, to measure fuel consumption, trip time and other fuel-use-related parameters. The test data were analyzed and compared with results of the TSC Train Performance Simulator replicating the same operations.

Hitz, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures This chapter analyzes trends in fuel economy, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures, using data unique to the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, as well as selected data from other sources. Analysis topics include the following: Following the oil supply and price disruptions caused by the Arab oil embargo of 1973-1974, motor gasoline price increases, the introduction of corporate average fuel economy standards, and environmental quality initiatives helped to spur major changes in vehicle technology. But have the many advances in vehicle technology resulted in measurable gains in the fuel economy of the residential vehicle fleet?

5

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Emissions and Fuel Consumption Impacts of IntelligentTravel Time, Fuel Consumption and Weigh Station Efficiency.EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION - Sustainable Approaches for

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: December 12, 5: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705:

7

Fuel Consumption | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Road Load Equation Jan 15 2014 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Glen E. Johnson Tennessee Tech University, Cookeville Energy and Transportation Science Division Seminar National Transportation Research Center, Room C-04 CONTACT : Email: Andreas Malikopoulos Phone:865.382.7827 Add to Calendar SHARE Ambitious goals have been set to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions over the next generation. Starting from first principles, we will derive relations to connect fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions to a vehicle's road load equation. The model suggests approaches to facilitate achievement of future fuel and emissions targets. About the speaker: Dr. Johnson is a 1973 Mechanical Engineering graduate of Worcester

8

Railroad fuel-oil consumption in 1928  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented, by districts, covering the consumption of fuel oil for various uses by railroads.

Redfield, A.H.

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Argonne TTRDC - TransForum v10n1 - Fuel Consumption vs. Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Great Debate: Fuel Consumption versus Fuel Economy Graphs for Fuel Consumption vs. Fuel Economy What is the difference between fuel consumption and fuel economy? In Europe,...

10

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Focus Area: Fuel Efficiency Topics: Market Analysis Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuelratings/ratings-search.cfm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadas-fuel-consumption-guide-websit Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This website provides a compilation of fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices

11

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Natural Resources Canada Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Analysis Tools Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuel-consumption-guide/fuel-consu Natural Resources Canada has compiled fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans, and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices to reduce fuel consumption. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

12

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard RFS Volumes by Year Enlarge illustration The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) is a federal program that requires transportation fuel sold in the U.S. to contain a minimum volume of

13

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Quality Standards Fuel Quality Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel Quality Standards The South Dakota Department of Public Safety may promulgate rules establishing: Standards for the maximum volume percentages of ethanol and methanol

14

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard At least 2% of all diesel fuel sold in Washington must be biodiesel or renewable diesel. This requirement will increase to 5% 180 days after the

15

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

16

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard Within six months following the point at which monthly production of denatured ethanol produced in Louisiana equals or exceeds a minimum annualized production volume of 50 million gallons, at least 2% of the

17

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991--Combined Consumption and Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

< < Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Overview Full Report Tables & Spreadsheets This report presents national-level estimates about energy use and consumption in the manufacturing sector as well as manufacturers' fuel-switching capability. Contact: Stephanie.battle@eia.doe.gov Stephanie Battle Director, Energy Consumption Division Phone: (202) 586-7237 Fax: (202) 586-0018 URL: http://www.eia.gov/emeu/mecs/mecs91/consumption/mecs1a.html File Last Modified: May 25, 1996

18

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under Low Carbon Fuel Standards? American Economic Journal:the Low Carbon Fuel Standard, Volume I Sta? Report: Initialpolicies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

,"Utah Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release Date:","7...

20

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

,"California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

22

,"Ohio Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release Date:","9...

23

,"Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

24

,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

25

,"Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

26

,"Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

27

,"Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release Date:","7...

28

Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

29

Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

30

South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption...

31

South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

32

,"Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:31:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570STX2" "Date","Texas...

33

Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

35

Table E7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit:...

36

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Carbon Fuel Low Carbon Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Carbon Fuel Standard Low Carbon Fuel Standard California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) Program requires a reduction in the carbon intensity of transportation

37

South Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel...

38

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cap would be placed on oil refineries and would require themwith the fuels. The refineries would be able to tradeto improve the efficiency of refineries and introduce low-

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions for fuels such as biofuels, electric- ity, andcould, for instance, sell biofuels or buy credits fromthat 36 billion gallons of biofuels be sold annu- ally by

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Utah Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

42

Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2010 25 23 25...

43

California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

44

California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

45

California Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

46

Ohio Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

47

Ohio Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

48

Colorado Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

49

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

50

Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

51

The individual contribution of automotive components to vehicle fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel consumption has grown to become a major point of interest as oil reserves are depleted. The purpose of this study is to determine the key components that cause variation in the instantaneous fuel consumption of vehicles ...

Napier, Parhys L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Michigan Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

53

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

54

Idaho Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

55

New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

56

New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

57

Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

58

Chapter 2. Consumption of Fossil Fuels - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

48 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 Chapter 2. Consumption of Fossil Fuels

59

Table 6.2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

60

Table 3.2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 257 12 22 579 6 182 2 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 56 * 1 121 * 126 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 25 * * 53 * 110 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 4 1 1 15 * 49 2 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 31 1 Q 100 1 2 0 4 3115 Dairy Products 105 33 2 2 66 1 * 0 2 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 212 69 5 3 125 2 Q 0 8 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 86 29 1 1 38 1 10 0 7 3121 Beverages

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,148 314 6 53 446 14 25 Q 291 20-49 1,018 297 13 22 381 18 97 5 185 50-99 1,095 305 7 13 440 6 130 9 186 100-249 1,728 411 16 11 793 7 131 7 353 250-499 1,916 391 16 11 583 3 185 5 722 500 and Over 7,323 720 21 21 2,569 21 300 348 3,323 Total 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 376 5,059 Employment Size Under 50 1,149 305 12 45 565 21 31

62

Property:RenewableFuelStandard/Year | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RenewableFuelStandard/Year RenewableFuelStandard/Year Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. Pages using the property "RenewableFuelStandard/Year" Showing 15 pages using this property. R Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2022 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2016 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2010 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2017 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2011 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2018 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2012 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2019 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2013 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2020 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2014 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2008 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2021 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2015 +

63

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Plan to Reduce State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption

64

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: August 9, 5: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on

65

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuels Standard Collaboration  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Carbon Fuels Low Carbon Fuels Standard Collaboration to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuels Standard Collaboration on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuels Standard Collaboration on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuels Standard Collaboration on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuels Standard Collaboration on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuels Standard Collaboration on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuels Standard Collaboration on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Carbon Fuels Standard Collaboration The New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services may engage in

66

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Fuel Blend Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fuel Blend Standard At least 85% of gasoline supplied to a retailer or sold in Hawaii must contain a minimum of 10% ethanol (E10), unless the Director determines that

67

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) Program The national RFS Program was developed to increase the volume of renewable

68

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Standard Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Standard Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Standard Development The state of Hawaii is responsible for facilitating the development of

69

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report: 2009 Update. REN21 Renewable Energy Policy NetworkRecent Devel- opments in Renewable Technologies: R&Dobjective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Transportation Clean Transportation Fuel Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Transportation Fuel Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Transportation Fuel Standards The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) administers the Oregon

71

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

72

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

73

The impact of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on vehicle usage and energy consumption. Journal of Urbanon vehicle usage and fuel consumption Jinwon Kim and Davidon vehicle usage and fuel consumption* Jinwon Kim and David

Kim, Jinwon; Brownstone, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

UK Availability and Consumption of Primary and Secondary Fuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Availability and Consumption of Primary and Secondary Fuels (1974) The then UK Department of Energy, in conjunction with the UK Government Statistical Service published statistics...

75

Consumption of alternative transportation fuels held steady in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The consumption of propane in heavy duty vehicles has ... Many fleets have replaced their light duty vehicles with flexible fueled and gasoline hybrid vehicles ...

76

Figure 64. Industrial energy consumption by fuel, 2011, 2025, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 64. Industrial energy consumption by fuel, 2011, 2025, and 2040 (quadrillion Btu) Natural Gas Petroleum and other liquids

77

,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","10312013"...

78

,"U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

79

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

80

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1998 ,"Release...

82

Missouri Renewable Fuel Standard Brochure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

The Missouri Renewable Fuel Standard The Missouri Renewable Fuel Standard requires ethanol in most gasoline beginning January 1, 2008. ARE YOU READY? TEN THINGS MISSOURI TANK OWNERS AND OPERATORS NEED TO KNOW ABOUT ETHANOL 1. Ethanol is a type of alcohol made usually from corn in Missouri and other states. 2. E10 is a blend of 10% ethanol and 90% unleaded gasoline. E85 is a blend of 75% to 85% fuel ethanol and 25% to 15% unleaded gasoline. Blends between E10 and E85 are not allowed to be sold at retail. 3. Any vehicle or small engine should run fine on E10, but only specially designed vehicles can use E85. 4. You are not required to label your dispensers disclosing the ethanol content if you are selling E10. However, you are required to label your dispensers if you are selling E85.

83

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. ... Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, 1949-2010:

84

Figure 6. Transportation energy consumption by fuel, 1990-2040 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 6. Transportation energy consumption by fuel, 1990-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Motor Gasoline, no E85 Pipeline Other E85 Jet Fuel

85

Table E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

86

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

87

Amtrak fuel consumption study. Final report May-Sep 80  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a study of fuel consumption on National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) trains and is part of an effort to determine effective ways of conserving fuel on the Amtrak system. The study was performed by the Transportation Systems Center (TSC) under the sponsorship of the Federal Railroad Administration and in cooperation with Amtrak. A series of 26 test runs were conducted on Amtrak trains operating between Boston, Massachusetts, and New Haven, Connecticut, to measure fuel consumption, trip time and other fuel-use-related parameters. The test data were analyzed and compared with results of the TSC Train Performance Simulator replicating the same operations. Results of the tests showed that the average fuel consumption for the 157.7 mile trip was 368 gallons and that the average fuel use efficiency was 277 ton-miles per gallon. Fuel consumption and fuel use efficiency were found to increase consistently with increasing train tonnage. One locomotive was also found to consume about 12 percent more fuel than the other locomotive tested. The fuel consumption and trip time results for individual runs varied between +8.0 to -9.5 and +5.4 and -10.7 percent, respectively, of the Train Performance Simulator results. However, when averaged over the ten test runs analyzed, the fuel consumption and trip time results were within 1.04 and 0.03 percent, respectively, of the simulator. Throttle notch settings and train speed profiles also agreed well with simulated results.

Hitz, J.S.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

89

Energy Information Administration - Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 1,672 1,455 1,147 Net Electricity 3 158 184 175 Natural Gas 456 388 326 Coal 48 36 14 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 8 W 1 Residual Fuel Oil 10 * 4 Natural Gas 52 39 27 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 74 79 76 Residual Fuel Oil 19 * 11 Natural Gas 369 329 272 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 68 86 77 Notes 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 'Total' is the sum of all energy sources listed below, including net steam (the sum of purchases, generation from renewable resources, and net transfers), and other energy that respondents indicated was used to produce heat and power. It is the fuel quantities across all end-uses.

90

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Just. The welfare economics of a biofuel tax credit and theD. Zilberman. Challenge of biofuel: ?lling the tank withoutsuch as renewable fuel (biofuel) standards (RFS), fuel GHG

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuelcomparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel121, 2011. C. Fischer. Renewable Portfolio Standards: When

Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Moving Forward With Fuel Economy Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council. Automotive Fuel Economy: How Far Can We Go? (Lee Schipper. Automobile Fuel. Economy and CO 2 Emissions inGraham. The Effect of Fuel Economy Standards on Automobile

Schipper, Lee

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Blend Biodiesel Blend Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Blend Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Blend Standards Biodiesel blends are considered compliant with Texas Low Emissions Diesel Fuel (TxLED) regulations if the diesel fuel is compliant with TxLED

94

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

95

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

96

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

97

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

98

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

99

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

100

Development of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model 2. Brown, S. ,Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model Clark, N. N. andModal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model 4.6. E XHAUST A

Barth, Matthew; Younglove, Theodore; Scora, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Standard Schedule Standard Schedule Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule Sector Liquid Transportation Fuels Spatial Resolution National Geographic Scope United States Temporal Resolution Annual The United States Environmental Protection Agency, under the National Renewable Fuel Standard program and as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), periodically revises the volumetric standards for cellulosic biofuel, biomass-based diesel, advanced biofuel, and total renewable fuel that must be used in transportation fuel each year. The table below lists the current RFS2 schedule in billions of gallons: Year Renewable Biofuel Advanced Biofuel Cellulosic Biofuel Biomass-based Diesel Undifferentiated Total 2008 9 9

102

New Zealand Energy Data: Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to oil and other...

103

,"U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:27:42 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3025US2" "Date","U.S....

104

,"U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:27:42 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3025US2" "Date","U.S. Natural...

105

Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2010: 22: 20: 22: 21: 22: 21: 22: 22: 21: 22 ...

106

South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul...

107

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:31:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570SNM2" "Date","New...

108

Property:RenewableFuelStandard/Total | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Total Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "RenewableFuelStandard/Total" Showing 15 pages using this property. R Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 13.95 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 26 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15.2 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 28 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 16.55 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 30 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 18.15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 9 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 33 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 20.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 11.1 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 36 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 22.25 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 12.95 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 24 +

109

Vehicle Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated ... Gas volumes delivered for use as vehicle fuel are included in the State annual totals through 2010 but not in ...

110

Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

111

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, 1949-2010: Year: Light-Duty Vehicles, Short Wheelbase 1: Light-Duty Vehicles, Long Wheelbase 2:

112

Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,225 1,736 1,807 1,582 4,278 2,390 2,537 1990's 27,720 36,088 36,741 35,503 37,347 39,116 40,334 40,706 39,601 41,149 2000's 42,519 42,243 44,008 44,762 44,016 43,386 38,938 41,197 40,286 39,447 2010's 37,316 35,339 37,397 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

113

Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 29,750 31,237 31,121 29,705 35,751 40,508 38,392 1990's 39,249 42,166 39,700 39,211 35,432 34,900 35,236 30,370 26,034 25,055 2000's 25,934 28,266 25,525 26,276 27,818 27,380 28,435 28,213 27,161 24,089 2010's 23,238 24,938 27,809 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

114

Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 121,848 123,993 104,292 102,185 123,008 121,936 134,132 1990's 82,828 83,733 86,623 74,925 66,600 75,845 69,235 71,155 63,368 68,393 2000's 69,174 63,137 63,031 56,018 55,970 45,837 46,205 51,499 42,957 39,002 2010's 40,814 42,633 42,123 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

115

Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 12,572 16,185 17,090 13,633 16,249 17,446 19,820 1990's 12,182 14,154 13,217 13,051 13,939 14,896 15,409 15,597 16,524 19,272 2000's 20,602 20,991 25,767 28,829 24,053 24,408 23,868 25,276 23,574 25,282 2010's 27,104 28,582 29,157 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

116

Codes and Standards: Hydrogen Fuel Purity Specifications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes and Standards: Codes and Standards: Hydrogen Fuel Purity Specifications Walter F. Podolski Fuel Purity Workshop Los Angeles, CA April 26, 2004 ChevronTexaco ConocoPhillips EXONMobil FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Organizational Structure Codes and Standards for Commercial Hydrogen/Fuel Cell Vehicles Goal is to support commercialization decision in the 2015 timeframe * Ensure acceptability to all stake-holders - Regulators, insurers, public * Enable commercial feasibility * Facilitate rapid introduction of technical advances Issues * What we want to avoid - Premature Standards, Codes, and Regulations that slow introduction of new technologies - Competing national and international SDOs and professional organizations * What we want to encourage - Flexible guidelines that enable demonstration

117

Property:RenewableFuelStandard/RenewableBiofuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RenewableBiofuel RenewableBiofuel Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "RenewableFuelStandard/RenewableBiofuel" Showing 15 pages using this property. R Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 12.6 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 13.2 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 13.8 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 14.4 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 9 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 10.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 15 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 12 +

118

Property:RenewableFuelStandard/UndifferentiatedAdvancedBiofuel | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UndifferentiatedAdvancedBiofuel UndifferentiatedAdvancedBiofuel Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "RenewableFuelStandard/UndifferentiatedAdvancedBiofuel" Showing 14 pages using this property. R Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 0.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 4.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 1.75 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 4.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 4.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 2.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 0.1 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 3 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 0.2 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 3.5 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 0.3 + Renewable Fuel Standard Schedule + 4 +

119

Fuel Cells & Renewable Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.....................................................12 SOFC Battery Range Extender Auxiliary Power Unit (SOFC) as Military APU Replacements" (presentation, DOD-DOE Workshop on Fuel Cells in Aviation cell plasma lighting demonstration, a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) battery range extender APU

120

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2000 Previous slide Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Comparing Pathways Projected fuel consumption and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(all-electric 10-20 miles, 40-60 miles) · Fuel cells (hybrid with batteries) #12;Mid-size passenger car Vehicles by UC Davis, DOE, and MIT #12;Mid-size Passenger car Year Electric range mi Charge depleting mpg capability #12;Vehicle types and advanced technologies considered Vehicle types · Mid-size passenger cars

California at Davis, University of

122

Alaska Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 96,603 109,333 62,341 71,104 112,404 151,280 189,702 1990's 166,155 187,106 197,975 202,199 200,809 253,695 255,500 230,578 242,271 224,355 2000's 226,659 229,206 241,469 255,701 237,530 259,829 218,153 227,374 211,878 219,161 2010's 211,918 208,531 214,335 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease

123

Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 183,870 204,390 193,822 189,173 229,053 200,239 163,218 1990's 228,485 125,198 123,111 130,916 139,427 178,827 177,508 144,787 176,262 136,708 2000's 141,785 135,786 114,919 123,585 129,825 134,434 138,558 154,323 166,500 169,631 2010's 157,751 147,268 163,325 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease

124

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,270 1,530 1,924 1970's 2,251 2,419 2,847 2,725 1,649 1,760 3,043 3,210 2,134 2,889 1980's 1,320 1,580 3,278 3,543 5,236 4,575 4,715 5,799 4,983 4,767 1990's 6,031 3,502 3,381 4,145 3,252 3,069 3,299 2,275 1,706 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

125

Mississippi Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 8,582 9,158 8,521 1970's 7,893 5,840 9,153 6,152 5,357 7,894 4,836 4,979 5,421 8,645 1980's 4,428 4,028 7,236 6,632 7,202 6,296 6,562 8,091 7,100 5,021 1990's 7,257 4,585 4,945 4,829 3,632 3,507 3,584 3,652 3,710 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

126

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

127

Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

Patinkin, L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0...

129

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Codes and Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop on Digg

130

Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ... Space Heating - Main or Secondary ... Forms EIA-457 A-G of the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption

131

Battery control strategy Diesel generator Fuel consumption Hybrid system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standalone diesel generators (DGs) are widely utilized in remote areas in Indonesia. Some areas use microhydro (MH) systems with DGs backup. However, highly diesel fuel price makes such systems become uneconomical. This paper introduces hybrid photovoltaic (PV)/MH/DG/battery systems with a battery control strategy to minimize the diesel fuel consumption. The method is applied to control the state of charge (SOC) level of the battery based on its previous level and the demand load condition to optimize the DG operation. Simulation results show that operations of the hybrid PV/MH/DG/battery with the battery control strategy needs less fuel consumption than PV/MH/DG and MH/DG systems.

Ayong Hiendro; Yohannes M. Simanjuntak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

"Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" 0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day)" ,,,," Inputs for Heat",,," Primary Consumption" " "," Primary Consumption for all Purposes",,," Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," for Nonfuel Purposes",,,"RSE" ," ------------------------------------",,," ------------------------------------",,," -------------------------------",,,"Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","Factors"

133

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units Electricity (billion kWh) Natural Gas (billion cf) Fuel Oil

134

Table WH10. Consumption Intensity by Main Water Heating Fuel Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Main Water Heating Fuel Used (physical units/number of household members) Electricity Table WH10. Consumption Intensity by Main Water Heating Fuel Used, 2005

135

Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas (billion cf) Major Fuels Used 4 (physical units) Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units

136

Table WH6. Average Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Major Fuels Used 5 (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel as a water heating source) Electricity (kWh) Table WH6. Average Consumption for Water ...

137

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

138

Utilization of Fuel Consumption Data in an Ecodriving Incentive System for Heavy-Duty Vehicle Drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Driver behavior is one of the greatest factors determining fuel consumption and, thus, carbon dioxide emissions from a heavy-duty vehicle. The difference in fuel consumption can be up to 30%, depending on the driver. Education, monitoring, and feedback ...

Heikki Liimatainen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Blast Pulping Liquor NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Total United States 311 Food 11 0 7 0 0 1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 5 0 2 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 0 1 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Products 1 0 1 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 4 0 4 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 3 0 2 0 0 1 3121 Beverages 3 0 2 0 0 1 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0 0 0 0 0 314 Textile Product Mills

140

Development of a predictive system for car fuel consumption using an artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A predictive system for car fuel consumption using a back-propagation neural network is proposed in this paper. The proposed system is constituted of three parts: information acquisition system, fuel consumption forecasting algorithm and performance ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Back-propagation algorithm, Fuel consumption

Jian-Da Wu; Jun-Ching Liu

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A forecasting system for car fuel consumption using a radial basis function neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A predictive system for car fuel consumption using a radial basis function (RBF) neural network is proposed in this paper. The proposed work consists of three parts: information acquisition, fuel consumption forecasting algorithm and performance evaluation. ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Car fuel consumption, Radial basis function algorithm

Jian-Da Wu; Jun-Ching Liu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Table 2b. Relative Standard Errors for Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities, per Square Foot, Specific to Occupied and Vacant Floorspace, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) In Total Floor- space In Occupied Floor- space In Vacant Floor- space Per Square Foot Per Occupied Square Foot Per Vacant Square Foot All Buildings 4 5 5 9 4 4 4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5 6 6 12 6 6 9 5,001 to 10,000 4 9 9 13 9 9 9 10,001 to 25,000 5 7 7 14 5 5 7 25,001 to 50,000 7 10 10 21 10 10 11 50,001 to 100,000 7 12 12 15 8 8 10 100,001 to 200,000 9 13 13 24 10 11 10 200,001 to 500,000 10 13 13 19 11 11 10 Over 500,000 26 18 18 34

143

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the more-polluting fossil fuels being consumed abroaddomestic fuel consumers and fossil fuel suppliers. Numericalequivalent quantity of fossil fuel but may replace more or

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Fuel consumption: Industrial, residential, and general studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel consumption in industrial and residential sectors. General studies of fuel supply, demand, policy, forecasts, and consumption models are presented. Citations examine fuel information and forecasting systems, fuel production, international economic and energy activities, heating oils, and pollution control. Fuel consumption in the transportation sector is covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

146

State Clean Energy Practices: Renewable Fuel Standards  

SciTech Connect

The State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) project is supported by the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program within the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project seeks to quantify the impacts of existing state policies, and to identify crucial policy attributes and their potential applicability to other states. The goal is to assist states in determining which clean energy policies or policy portfolios will best accomplish their environmental, economic, and security goals. For example, renewable fuel standards (RFS) policies are a mechanism for developing a market for renewable fuels in the transportation sector. This flexible market-based policy, when properly executed, can correct for market failures and promote growth of the renewable fuels industry better than a more command-oriented approach. The policy attempts to correct market failures such as embedded fossil fuel infrastructure and culture, risk associated with developing renewable fuels, consumer information gaps, and lack of quantification of the non-economic costs and benefits of both renewable and fossil-based fuels. This report focuses on renewable fuel standards policies, which are being analyzed as part of this project.

Mosey, G.; Kreycik, C.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

State Clean Energy Practices: Renewable Fuel Standards  

SciTech Connect

The State Clean Energy Policies Analysis (SCEPA) project is supported by the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Program within the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project seeks to quantify the impacts of existing state policies, and to identify crucial policy attributes and their potential applicability to other states. The goal is to assist states in determining which clean energy policies or policy portfolios will best accomplish their environmental, economic, and security goals. For example, renewable fuel standards (RFS) policies are a mechanism for developing a market for renewable fuels in the transportation sector. This flexible market-based policy, when properly executed, can correct for market failures and promote growth of the renewable fuels industry better than a more command-oriented approach. The policy attempts to correct market failures such as embedded fossil fuel infrastructure and culture, risk associated with developing renewable fuels, consumer information gaps, and lack of quantification of the non-economic costs and benefits of both renewable and fossil-based fuels. This report focuses on renewable fuel standards policies, which are being analyzed as part of this project.

Mosey, G.; Kreycik, C.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Safety, Codes & Standards Search Search Help Safety, Codes & Standards EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Safety, Codes & Standards Printable Version Share this...

149

RECENT TRENDS IN EMERGING TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abundance of energy can be improved both by developing new sources of fuel and by improving efficiency of energy utilization, although we really need to pursue both paths to improve energy accessibility in the future. Currently, 2.7 billion people or 38% of the world s population do not have access to modern cooking fuel and depend on wood or dung and 1.4 billion people or 20% do not have access to electricity. It is estimated that correcting these deficiencies will require an investment of $36 billion dollars annually through 2030. In growing economies, energy use and economic growth are strongly linked, but energy use generally grows at a lower rate due to increased access to modern fuels and adaptation of modern, more efficient technology. Reducing environmental impacts of increased energy consumption such as global warming or regional emissions will require improved technology, renewable fuels, and CO2 reuse or sequestration. The increase in energy utilization will probably result in increased transportation fuel diversity as fuels are shaped by availability of local resources, world trade, and governmental, environmental, and economic policies. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the recently emerging trends, but not to suggest winners. This paper will focus on liquid transportation fuels, which provide the highest energy density and best match with existing vehicles and infrastructure. Data is taken from a variety of US, European, and other sources without an attempt to normalize or combine the various data sources. Liquid transportation fuels can be derived from conventional hydrocarbon resources (crude oil), unconventional hydrocarbon resources (oil sands or oil shale), and biological feedstocks through a variety of biochemical or thermo chemical processes, or by converting natural gas or coal to liquids.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety, Codes and Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical Publications on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Hydrogen

151

Historic Fuel Standards | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

52512 52512 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142252512 Varnish cache server Historic Fuel Standards Home > Blogs > Graham7781's blog Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 30 August, 2012 - 15:16 auto fuel efficiency obama standards vehicle White House On Tuesday, Ray Lahood, Secretary of the U.S. Department of Transportation, and Lisa P. Jackson, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator, unveiled the joint effort, along with the Obama Administration, to create

152

Table US8. Average Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood (cords) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Table US8.

153

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and ...

154

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of ...

155

Table 8.7a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of ...

156

Figure 102. U.S. motor gasoline and diesel fuel consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 102. U.S. motor gasoline and diesel fuel consumption, 2000-2040 (million barrels per day) Motor Gasoline Petroleum Portion ...

157

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 ...

158

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table ...

159

Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 ...

160

Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linked Data Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Dataset Summary...

162

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Resources  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Resources to someone by E-mail Resources to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Resources on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Resources on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Resources on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Resources on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Resources on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Resources on AddThis.com... More in this section... Codes and Standards Resources The codes and standards resources linked below help project developers and code officials prepare and review code-compliant projects. Standards Development Organizations Standards development organizations (SDOs) are responsible for leading the

163

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Maine has adopted the California motor vehicle emissions standards

164

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards New Jersey has adopted California motor vehicle emissions standards as set

165

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Washington adopted the California motor vehicle emission standards in Title

166

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Maryland has adopted the California motor vehicle emission standards in

167

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Codes and Standards Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Codes and Standards Basics Codes and standards ensure processes and products meet uniform safety and performance requirements. Here you will find basic information about definitions, publishing codes and standards, legal enforcement, and

168

Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Codes and Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

E85 Codes and E85 Codes and Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Codes and Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Codes and Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Codes and Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Codes and Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Codes and Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Codes and Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Business Case Equipment Options Equipment Installation Codes, Standards, & Safety Vehicles Laws & Incentives E85 Codes, Standards, and Safety

169

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards California's LEV II exhaust emissions standards apply to Model Year (MY)

170

Table N5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

171

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Any new light-duty passenger car, light-duty truck, or medium-duty

172

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Under the Oregon LEV Program, all new passenger cars, light-duty trucks,

173

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Connecticut Low Emission Vehicles II Program requires that all new

174

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Pennsylvania Clean Vehicles Program requires that all new passenger

175

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management has adopted

176

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards The Massachusetts LEV Program requires all new passenger cars and

177

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards Under the Clean Cars Act of 2008, the Mayor of the District of Columbia

178

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle Standards New vehicles sold or offered for sale in Vermont must meet California emissions and compliance requirements in Title 13 of the California Code of

179

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Emission Vehicle Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Emission Vehicle (LEV) Standards All new passenger vehicles, light-duty trucks, and medium-duty vehicles

180

New Zealand Energy Data: Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to oil and other petroleum products. Included here are two oil consumption datasets: quarterly petrol consumption by sector (agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial; commercial; residential; transport industry; and international transport), from 1974 to 2010; and oil consumption by fuel type (petrol, diesel, fuel oil, aviation fuels, LPG, and other), also for the years 1974 through 2010. The full 2010 Energy Data File is available: http://www.med.govt.nz/upload/73585/EDF%202010.pdf. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 02nd, 2010 (4 years ago)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Multi-objective fuel policies: Renewable fuel standards versus Fuel greenhouse gas intensity standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

abroad while greater quantity of crude oil will be consumedoil (oilsands) and biofuel respectively. p denotes the fuel price, q the quantity,

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Water consumption footprint and land requirements of alternative diesel and jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Renewable Fuels Standard 2 (RFS2) is an important component of alternative transportation fuels policy in the United States (US). By mandating the production of alternative fuels, RFS2 attempts to address a number of ...

Staples, Mark Douglas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Codes and Standards Outreach for Emerging Fuel Cell Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technologies. Provide information on hydrogen and fuel cell * technologies codes and standards to code officials, project developers, and other interested parties. Present...

184

Template:Set RenewableFuelStandard | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Document Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTemplate:SetRenewableFuelStandard&oldid269035" Category: Articles with...

185

Fuel economy standards have affected vehicle efficiency - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This new footprint standard required that all vehicle manufacturers improve their fuel economy at a similar rate, regardless of the types and sizes of vehicles sold.

186

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sok_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sok_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

187

,"Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_smi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_smi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

188

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sms_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sms_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:50 PM"

189

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

190

,"Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:48 PM"

191

,"Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sak_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sak_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:46 PM"

192

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1840_sky_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1840_sky_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:39 PM"

193

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:47 PM"

194

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sne_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sne_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:51 PM"

195

,"California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:47 PM"

196

,"Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sil_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sil_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:21 PM"

197

,"Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sco_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sco_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:48 PM"

198

,"Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sut_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sut_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:53 PM"

199

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_swy_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_swy_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:54 PM"

200

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_spa_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_spa_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sky_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sky_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

202

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1840_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1840_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:44 PM"

203

,"Kansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

204

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_stn_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_stn_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

205

,"Montana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_smt_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_smt_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:50 PM"

206

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-846, '2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey,' and Office of Petroleum and Biofuels Statistics, Form EIA-810, 'Monthly Refinery Report' for 2010, and the Bureau of the...

207

Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of ...

208

Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of ...

209

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.7a) ...

210

U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 8,328: 9,341 ...

211

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Codes and Standards  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Codes and Standards Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Codes and Standards Resources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center - Codes and Standards Resources Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Best Practices Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/codes_standards.html This resource provides an overview of codes and standards related to alternative fuel vehicles, dispensing, storage, and infrastructure to help project developers and code officials prepare and review code-compliant projects. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies: Improve - Enhance infrastructure & policies Learn more about the avoid, shift, improve framework for limiting air

212

New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards Will Continue to Inspire Innovation July 29, 2011 - 1:48pm Addthis President Barack Obama delivers remarks on fuel efficiency standards for 2017-2025 model year cars and light-duty trucks during an event at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., July 29, 2011. Seated behind the President are at left are auto industry executives and Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. (Official White House Photo by Samantha Appleton) President Barack Obama delivers remarks on fuel efficiency standards for 2017-2025 model year cars and light-duty trucks during an event at the Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., July 29, 2011. Seated behind the President are at left are auto industry executives and

213

Table 8.5d Consumption of Combustible Fuels for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

biomass. Through 2000, also includes non-renewable waste ... (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 4 Jet fuel, kerosene, other petroleum ...

214

Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

215

Comments on the Joint Proposed Rulemaking to Establish Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Standards and Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on occupant safety than fuel economy standards that arethe automobile fuel economy standards program, NHTSA docketCorporate Average Fuel Economy Standards Docket No. NHTSA

Wenzel, Thomas P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 383,077 389,525 367,572 348,731 408,115 398,180 429,269 1990's 428,657 456,954 460,571 448,822 423,878 427,853 450,033 426,873 401,314 399,509 2000's 404,059 371,141 382,503 363,903 366,341 355,193 358,985 365,323 355,590 362,009 2010's 368,830 384,248 408,316 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

217

Table 4.2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) 327993 Mineral Wool 39 12 0 * 24 * 0 3 * 331 Primary Metals 1,328 412 1 9 537 3 23 291 53 331111 Iron and...

218

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by 2005, and by 2020 gas use exceeds coal by 29 percent. Oil currently provides a larger share of world energy consumption than any other energy source and is expected to remain in that position

219

Evaluation of fuel consumption potential of medium and heavy duty vehicles through modeling and simulation.  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this report is to provide quantitative data to support the Committee in its task of establishing a report to support rulemaking on medium- and heavy-duty fuel efficiency improvement. In particular, it is of paramount importance for the Committee to base or illustrate their conclusions on established models and actual state-of-the art data. The simulations studies presented in the report have been defined and requested by the members of the National Academy committee to provide quantitative inputs to support their recommendations. As such, various technologies and usage scenarios were considered for several applications. One of the objective is to provide the results along with their associated assumptions (both vehicle and drive cycles), information generally missing from public discussions on literature search. Finally, the advantages and limitations of using simulation will be summarized. The study addresses several of the committee tasks, including: (1) Discussion of the implication of metric selection; (2) Assessing the impact of existing technologies on fuel consumption through energy balance analysis (both steady-state and standard cycles) as well as real world drive cycles; and (3) Impact of future technologies, both individually and collectively.

Delorme, A.; Karbowski, D.; Sharer, P.; Energy Systems

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Evaluations of 1997 Fuel Consumption Patterns of Heavy Duty Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed 21st Century Truck program selected three truck classes for focused analysis. On the basis of gross vehicle weight (GVW) classification, these were Class 8 (representing heavy), Class 6 (representing medium), and Class 2b (representing light). To develop and verify these selections, an evaluation of fuel use of commercial trucks was conducted, using data from the 1997 Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS). Truck fuel use was analyzed by registered GVW class, and by body type.

Santini, Danilo

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

222

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UCDITSRR0707 A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for CaliforniaEnergy Commission. A Low Carbon Fuel Standard For CaliforniaCalifornia, Davis. A Low Carbon Fuel Standard For California

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: TechnicalOrder S-01-07: Low Carbon Fuel Standard. Sacramento, CA.California, Davis. A Low Carbon Fuel Standard For California

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Microsoft Word - EVS25_Primary Factors Impact Fuel Consumption of PHEV_FINAL.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EVS-25 Shenzhen, China, Nov. 5-9, 2010 EVS-25 Shenzhen, China, Nov. 5-9, 2010 The 25th World Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium & Exhibition Factors Affecting the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Richard 'Barney' Carlson, Matthew G. Shirk, and Benjamin M. Geller Energy Storage and Transportation Systems Department, Idaho National Laboratory 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83401, USA E-mail: richard.carlson@inl.gov Abstract- Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have proven to significantly reduce petroleum consumption when compared to conventional internal combustion engine vehicles by utilizing onboard electrical energy storage for propulsion. Through extensive testing of PHEVs, analysis has shown that fuel consumption of PHEVs is more

225

Recent world fossil-fuel and primary energy production and consumption trends  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide fossil fuel and primary electric power production figures since 1973 show a recent drop in oil production similar to the 1975 decline after recession. Crude oil consumption has declined since 1978, while production has increased. Natural gas production and consumption continue to increase as does power generation from all energy sources. Differences are noted between data sources and comparisons made of the validity of the data. 13 references, 7 figures, 12 tables. (DCK)

Parent, J.D.

1982-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

226

Alaska Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,659 2,240 6,864 1970's 4,748 8,459 16,056 15,217 14,402 17,842 15,972 17,336 15,895 12,153 1980's 30,250 15,249 94,232 97,828 111,069 64,148 72,686 116,682 153,670 192,239 1990's 193,875 223,194 234,716 237,702 238,156 292,811 295,834 271,284 281,872 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

227

Arkansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,267 4,027 6,268 1970's 9,184 6,433 4,740 3,000 4,246 4,200 4,049 4,032 3,760 7,661 1980's 1,949 2,549 5,096 5,384 5,922 12,439 9,062 11,990 12,115 11,586 1990's 7,101 1,406 5,838 6,405 4,750 5,551 5,575 6,857 8,385 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

228

New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 46,793 46,331 45,309 1970's 47,998 46,114 48,803 52,553 43,452 38,604 49,160 43,751 37,880 50,798 1980's 36,859 22,685 55,722 47,630 50,662 46,709 35,615 48,138 41,706 42,224 1990's 65,889 44,766 53,697 49,658 54,786 52,589 81,751 64,458 59,654 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

229

Utah Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,956 1,503 2,113 1970's 633 2,115 1,978 2,435 4,193 7,240 9,150 7,585 8,325 14,123 1980's 7,594 511 5,965 4,538 8,375 9,001 13,289 17,671 16,889 16,211 1990's 19,719 13,738 12,611 12,526 13,273 27,012 27,119 24,619 27,466 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

230

Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,828 1,992 2,277 1970's 2,317 2,212 1,509 1,238 1,206 1,218 1,040 1,107 1,160 1,214 1980's 989 1,040 9,772 8,361 9,038 9,095 6,335 3,254 2,942 2,345 1990's 3,149 2,432 2,812 3,262 2,773 2,647 2,426 2,457 2,325 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

231

North Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 17,133 16,163 14,691 1970's 14,067 13,990 12,773 12,462 11,483 12,008 15,998 13,697 12,218 3,950 1980's 1,017 13,759 3,514 4,100 4,563 4,710 3,974 5,194 4,014 3,388 1990's 6,939 11,583 8,462 8,256 11,306 11,342 11,603 8,572 8,309 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

232

Michigan Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,798 2,012 2,074 1970's 3,440 2,145 2,143 2,551 3,194 8,420 7,647 8,022 11,076 14,695 1980's 6,494 3,461 9,699 8,130 8,710 8,195 7,609 9,616 8,250 8,003 1990's 9,094 9,595 7,274 8,171 9,766 9,535 8,489 12,060 9,233 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

233

Kansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 7,842 15,867 17,587 1970's 20,841 27,972 28,183 32,663 35,350 27,212 31,044 29,142 30,491 48,663 1980's 24,521 19,665 41,392 37,901 40,105 42,457 38,885 44,505 45,928 43,630 1990's 40,914 44,614 43,736 56,657 44,611 47,282 49,196 46,846 33,989 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

234

Oklahoma Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 65,167 84,259 103,361 1970's 98,417 101,126 98,784 80,233 80,780 79,728 84,025 77,631 82,046 128,475 1980's 59,934 56,785 91,465 79,230 91,707 88,185 84,200 104,415 100,926 90,225 1990's 111,567 88,366 92,978 99,869 91,039 80,846 73,039 81,412 61,543 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

235

U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 595,172 687,356 598,475 573,793 741,268 697,703 640,633 1990's 807,735 672,314 710,250 723,118 699,842 792,315 799,629 776,306 771,366 679,480 2000's 746,889 747,411 730,579 758,380 731,563 756,324 782,992 861,063 864,113 913,229 2010's 916,797 938,340 987,957 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

236

West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,052 2,276 0 1970's 2,551 3,043 3,808 2,160 1,909 1,791 1,490 1,527 1,233 1,218 1980's 2,482 2,515 6,426 5,826 7,232 7,190 6,658 8,835 8,343 7,882 1990's 9,631 7,744 8,097 7,065 8,087 8,045 6,554 7,210 6,893 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

237

Colorado Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,668 2,361 2,604 1970's 2,726 3,231 4,676 7,202 5,822 7,673 7,739 9,124 10,619 21,610 1980's 7,041 7,093 13,673 10,000 10,560 10,829 9,397 12,095 11,622 12,221 1990's 17,343 23,883 21,169 24,832 24,347 25,130 27,492 29,585 31,074 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

238

Montana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,904 5,188 6,183 1970's 5,091 6,148 5,924 4,281 3,683 2,315 2,754 2,972 2,792 4,796 1980's 3,425 1,832 2,012 1,970 2,069 2,138 1,808 2,088 1,994 1,766 1990's 2,262 1,680 1,871 2,379 2,243 2,238 2,401 2,277 2,000 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

239

Ohio Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,656 3,505 2,879 1970's 3,140 4,302 3,397 3,548 2,957 2,925 2,742 2,814 3,477 22,094 1980's 1,941 1,776 3,671 4,377 5,741 5,442 5,243 5,802 4,869 3,876 1990's 5,129 1,476 1,450 1,366 1,332 1,283 1,230 1,201 1,125 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

240

SAE Fuel Cell Codes and Standards Final Scientific/Technical Report 1.0  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the SAE Fuel Cell Standards Final Scientific/Technical Report which details the SAE Fuel Cell standards developed and related activies during the reporting period.

Caroline Michaels

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

242

Table N5.2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

243

Feebates and Fuel Economy Standards: Impacts on Fuel Use in Light-Duty Vehicles and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the potential impacts of a national feebate system, a market-based policy that consists of graduated fees on low-fuel-economy (or high-emitting) vehicles and rebates for high-fuel-economy (or lowemitting) vehicles. In their simplest form, feebate systems operate under three conditions: a benchmark divides all vehicles into two categories-those charged fees and those eligible for rebates; the sizes of the fees and rebates are a function of a vehicle's deviation from its benchmark; and placement of the benchmark ensures revenue neutrality or a desired level of subsidy or revenue. A model developed by the University of California for the California Air Resources Board was revised and used to estimate the effects of six feebate structures on fuel economy and sales of new light-duty vehicles, given existing and anticipated future fuel economy and emission standards. These estimates for new vehicles were then entered into a vehicle stock model that simulated the evolution of the entire vehicle stock. The results indicate that feebates could produce large, additional reductions in emissions and fuel consumption, in large part by encouraging market acceptance of technologies with advanced fuel economy, such as hybrid electric vehicles.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950 2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly modelled by the proportional-proxy method. The primary conclusion from this study is the global monthly time series is statistically significantly different from a uniform distribution throughout the year. Uncertainty analysis of the data presented show that the proportional-proxy method used faithfully reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Gregg, JS [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Losey, London M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standards Standards Printable Version Codes and Standards Codes and standards have repeatedly been identified as a major institutional barrier to deploying hydrogen technologies. To enable the commercialization of hydrogen in consumer products, new model building codes and equipment and other technical standards will need to be developed and recognized by federal, state, and local governments. DOE is working to identify those codes and standards, to facilitate the development of such standards, and to support publicly available research and certification investigations that are necessary to develop a basis for such codes and standards. Photo of hydrogen fueling pump in Las Vegas, Nevada Led by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, DOE is working with code

246

Texas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 645,058 711,720 741,902 1970's 769,500 784,773 802,112 828,139 817,194 763,107 729,946 732,428 757,853 717,462 1980's 536,766 505,322 347,846 307,717 326,662 307,759 302,266 355,765 318,922 291,977 1990's 394,605 297,233 293,845 296,423 298,253 333,548 330,547 301,800 330,228 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption

247

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Supplemental Table 47 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release
2011-02-23T16:04:28Z 2011-03-31T19:33:44Z...

248

Louisiana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 195,990 212,134 273,213 1970's 287,222 292,589 312,145 336,832 347,098 301,816 556,772 591,292 558,877 305,181 1980's 196,033 180,687 337,398 275,698 303,284 258,069 243,283 301,279 272,455 256,123 1990's 258,267 195,526 220,711 222,813 207,171 209,670 213,721 227,542 194,963 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption

249

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

The Challenge of Achieving Californias Low Carbon Fuel Standard  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

vehicles (BEVs), fuel cell vehicles (FCVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and the consumption of significant quantities of low-CI ethanol.[2

251

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #704: December 5, 2011 Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for New Heavy Pickups and Vans to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 704: December 5, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for...

252

Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption . U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 1993 Household and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Number of Vehicles Vehicle-Miles Traveled Motor Fuel Consumption Motor Fuel Expenditures RSE Row Factor: (million) (percent) (billion) (percent) (billion gallons) (gallon percent) (quadril- lion Btu) (billion dollars) (percent) 0.9 0.8 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.0 Household Characteristics Total .................................................... 156.8 100.0 1,793 100.0 90.6 100.0 11.2 104.7 100.0 2.8 Census Region and Division Northeast ........................................... 26.6 17.0 299 16.7 14.5 16.0 1.8 17.2 16.4 5.7 New England ................................... 7.6 4.8 84 4.7 4.1 4.5 0.5 4.8 4.6 13.8 Middle Atlantic

253

Factors Affecting the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Primary Factors that Impact the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles RICHARD BARNEY CARLSON, MATTHEW G. SHIRK Idaho National Laboratory 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA richard.carlson@inl.gov Abstract Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) have proven to significantly reduce petroleum consumption as compared to conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICE) by utilizing electrical energy for propulsion. Through extensive testing of PHEVs, analysis has shown that the fuel consumption of PHEVs is more significantly affected than conventional vehicles by either the drivers input or by the environmental inputs around the vehicle. Six primary factors have been identified that significantly affect the fuel consumption of PHEVs. In this paper, these primary factors are analyzed from on-road driving and charging data from over 200 PHEVs throughout North America that include Hymotion Prius conversions and Hybrids Plus Escape conversions. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) tests plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) vehicles as part of its conduct of DOEs Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). In collaboration with its 75 testing partners located in 23 states and Canada, INL has collected data on 191 PHEVs, comprised of 12 different PHEV models (by battery manufacturer). With more than 1 million PHEV test miles accumulated to date, the PHEVs are fleet, track, and dynamometer tested. Six Primary Factors The six primary factors that significantly impact PHEV fuel consumption are listed below. Some of the factors are unique to plug-in vehicles while others are common for all types of vehicles. 1. Usable Electrical Energy is dictated by battery capacity, rate of depletion as well as when the vehicle was last plugged-in. With less electrical energy available the powertrain must use more petroleum to generate the required power output. 2. Driver Aggressiveness impacts the fuel consumption of nearly all vehicles but this impact is greater for high efficiency powertrains. 3. Accessory Utilization like air conditioner systems or defroster systems can use a significant amount of additional energy that is not contributing to the propulsion of the vehicle. 4. Route Type such as city, highway or mountainous driving can affect the fuel consumption since it can involve stop and go driving or ascending a step grade. 5. Cold Start / Key On includes control strategies to improve cold start emissions as well as control routines to quickly supply cabin heat. These control strategies are necessary for consumer acceptance even though fuel consumption is negatively impacted. 6. Ambient Temperature can reduce the efficiency of many powertrain components by significantly increasing fluid viscosity. For vehicles that utilize battery energy storage systems, the temperature of the battery system can greatly affect the power output capability therefore reducing its system effectiveness. The analysis of the six primary factors that impact fuel economy of PHEVs helped to identify areas of potential further development as well as may assist in informing drivers of these effects in an effort to modify driving behavior to reduce petroleum consumption.

Richard "Barney" Carlson; Matthew G. Shirk; Benjamin M. Geller

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SLA_2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,34 33419,9 33785,9 34150,8 34515,22

255

,"Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SFL_2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,7 33785,9 34150,27 34515,68 34880,75

256

,"Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sid_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sid_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SID_2" "Date","Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,6 40224,5 40252,6 40283,6 40313,6 40344,6 40374,6

257

,"Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sal_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sal_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:04 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAL_2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,3 33419,0 33785,3 34150,4 34515,3 34880,4

258

,"California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCA_2" "Date","California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,4 33419,9 33785,27 34150,255 34515,550

259

,"California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sca_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sca_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCA_2" "Date","California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1153 40224,1041 40252,1153 40283,1116

260

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sma_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sma_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Massachusetts Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SMA_2" "Date","Massachusetts Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,1 33785,2 34150,2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_ssd_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_ssd_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:58 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SSD_2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,0 40224,0 40252,0 40283,0 40313,0

262

,"Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sid_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sid_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SID_2" "Date","Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,10 34880,19

263

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0 44 43 * * 1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 0 1 1 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 0 1 0 0 1 0 321 Wood Products 0 218 * 13 199 6 321113 Sawmills 0 100 * 5 94 1 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 0 95 * 6 87 2 321219 Reconstituted Wood Products 0 52 0 6 46 1 3219 Other Wood Products

264

,"Indiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sin_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sin_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SIN_2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,4 40224,4 40252,4 40283,4 40313,4 40344,4

265

,"Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_shi_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_shi_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SHI_2" "Date","Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,0 40224,0 40252,0 40283,0 40313,0 40344,0

266

,"Colorado Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sco_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sco_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCO_2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,21 40224,19 40252,21 40283,20 40313,21

267

,"Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_saz_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_saz_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAZ_2" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,37 33785,46 34150,44 34515,61 34880,118

268

,"Georgia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sga_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sga_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SGA_2" "Date","Georgia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,78 40224,70 40252,78 40283,75 40313,78

269

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAR_2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,3 34880,2

270

,"Delaware Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sde_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sde_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Delaware Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SDE_2" "Date","Delaware Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,1 34880,1

271

,"Alaska Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sak_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sak_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:04 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAK_2" "Date","Alaska Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,2 40224,2 40252,2 40283,2 40313,2 40344,2

272

,"South Carolina Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_ssc_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_ssc_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:56 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Carolina Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SSC_2" "Date","South Carolina Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1

273

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sar_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sar_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAR_2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1 40313,1 40344,1

274

,"Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sal_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sal_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAL_2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,9 40224,8 40252,9 40283,9 40313,9 40344,9

275

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sct_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sct_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCT_2" "Date","Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,2

276

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:57 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SSD_2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,2 33785,5 34150,7 34515,5

277

,"Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SKS_2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,10 34880,2

278

,"Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sfl_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sfl_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SFL_2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,5 40224,5 40252,5 40283,5 40313,5 40344,5

279

,"Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_shi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_shi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SHI_2" "Date","Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 35611,284 35976,0 36341,380 36707,0 37072,0 37437,0 37802,0 38168,0

280

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sla_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sla_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SLA_2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1 40313,1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

,"Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sks_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sks_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SKS_2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1 40313,1 40344,1

282

TAX EXPENDITURES RELATED TO THE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION OF MOTOR FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-miles of travel RECS = Residential Energy Consumption Survey SIC = standard industrial classification SOx = sulfur industries, or oil over other energy industries: virtually all major energy sources require large investments.......................24 18.5.1 Corporate income-tax expenditures for the oil industry

Delucchi, Mark

283

Table 5b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per b. Relative Standard Errors for Total District Heat Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using District Heat (thousand) Total District Heat Consumption (trillion Btu) District Heat Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 11 16 16 16 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 27 78 76 76 5,001 to 10,000 38 60 51 51 10,001 to 25,000 18 43 36 35 25,001 to 50,000 24 68 51 51 50,001 to 100,000 18 40 30 30 100,001 to 200,000 27 33 35 36 200,001 to 500,000 22 31 26 27 Over 500,000 42 26 14 10 Principal Building Activity Education 17 29 22 23 Food Sales and Service 67 93 207 150 Health Care 35 26 25 14 Lodging 30 40 30 29 Mercantile and Service 40 74 59 58 Office 23 28 26 27 Public Assembly 25 33 25 26 Public Order and Safety

284

Table 6b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption (trillion Btu) Electricity Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 4 5 4 4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 5 6 6 6 5,001 to 10,000 4 9 9 9 10,001 to 25,000 5 7 5 5 25,001 to 50,000 7 10 10 10 50,001 to 100,000 7 12 8 8 100,001 to 200,000 9 13 10 10 200,001 to 500,000 10 13 11 11 Over 500,000 26 18 18 21 Principal Building Activity Education 8 9 6 6 Food Sales and Service 8 9 8 7 Health Care 14 12 12 9 Lodging 11 22 16 16 Mercantile and Service 5 7 7 7 Office 6 10 7 6 Public Assembly 7 12 28 30 Public Order and Safety 18 29 18 18 Religious Worship 10 10 11 11 Warehouse and Storage

285

Deriving In-Use PHEV Fuel Economy Predictions from Standardized Test Cycle Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have potential to reduce or eliminate the U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Quantifying the amount of petroleum each uses, however, is challenging. To estimate in-use fuel economy for conventional vehicles the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducts chassis dynamometer tests on standard historic drive cycles and then adjusts the resulting raw fuel economy measurements downward. Various publications, such as the forthcoming update to the SAE J1711 recommended practice for PHEV fuel economy testing, address the challenges of applying standard test procedures to PHEVs. This paper explores the issue of how to apply an adjustment method to such raw PHEV dynamometer test results in order to more closely estimate the in-use fuel and electricity consumption characteristics of these vehicles. The paper discusses two possible adjustment methods, and evaluates one method by applying it to dynamometer data and comparing the result to in-use fleet data (on an aftermarket conversion PHEV). The paper will also present the methodologies used to collect the data needed for this comparison.

John Smart; Richard "Barney" Carlson; Jeff Gonder; Aaron Brooker

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Safety, Codes, and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety, Codes, and Standards Safety, Codes, and Standards NREL's hydrogen safety, codes, and standards projects focus on ensuring safe operation, handling, and use of hydrogen and hydrogen systems through safety sensors and codes and standards for buildings and equipment. Safety Sensors To facilitate hydrogen safety, NREL is testing hydrogen sensors that detect leaks and monitor gas purity at the Safety Sensor Testing Laboratory. Because hydrogen is colorless and odorless, sensors are important for safe hydrogen fueling stations, equipment, and facilities. NREL researchers are testing fiber-optic sensor configurations resistant to electromagnetic interference. They also are testing protective and self-cleaning overlayer coatings for sensors. For remote hydrogen sensing, NREL is assessing sensor requirements and design options for innovative

287

Table 3b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Natural Gas Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

b. Relative Standards Errors per Sq Ft b. Relative Standards Errors per Sq Ft Table 3b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Natural Gas (thousand) Total Natural Gas Consumption (trillion Btu) Natural Gas Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 5 7 6 6 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 7 12 11 11 5,001 to 10,000 5 9 8 8 10,001 to 25,000 6 18 18 18 25,001 to 50,000 9 21 18 18 50,001 to 100,000 8 12 9 9 100,001 to 200,000 8 13 13 13 200,001 to 500,000 11 21 16 16 Over 500,000 15 27 22 23 Principal Building Activity Education 12 11 9 8 Food Sales and Service 8 12 10 9 Health Care 15 21 17 13 Lodging 12 22 16 16 Mercantile and Service 6 17 14 14 Office 7 24 24 24 Public Assembly 10 18 14 13 Public Order and Safety

288

Examining new fuel economy standards for the United States.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After decades of futile attempts to increase U.S. fuel economy standards for passenger cars, which have remained unchanged since enactment of the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards in Title V of the 1975 Energy Policy Conservation Act, it seems increasingly likely that new and tougher standards will be enacted in the near future - especially after the Senate's 21 June passage of energy efficiency bill H.R. 6. As this magazine went to press, the bill, which calls for a 40 percent increase in vehicle fuel economy by 2020 among other efficiency and alternative energy goals, was headed to the House of Representatives for more debate. Congress has seen proposals like this since the 1980s, but this is the first time that one of them has passed in the Senate. The Bush administration has also weighed in with a proposal to increase new vehicle fuel economy by 4 percent per year from 2011 to 2017, and the administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has asked Congress to grant the Secretary of Transportation the authority to restructure and increase CAFE standards for cars, a power denied by the original CAFE legislation. A confluence of events has led to this change of political climate, including: the failure of world oil production and refining capacity to keep pace with rapidly growing demand, especially from China and other emerging economies, which has led to the highest oil prices since the 1980s and growing fears that world production of conventional oil may be close to its peak and rapid decline; the escalating influence of oil resources on geopolitics as China seeks to guarantee its future access to supplies, enhanced revenues from the higher prices, which prop up authoritarian regimes in Iran, Venezuela, Russia, and elsewhere and allow them increasing freedom of action; the enhancement of the role of climate change in political decision making by new reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), with much strengthened language about the probability and severity of climate change and man's influence on it, and a recent Supreme Court decision rejecting the Environmental Protection Agency's assertion that it has no authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. New fuel economy standards will represent an ambitious and expensive undertaking on the part of the automobile industry and the nation, and proposals for new standards deserve careful congressional and public scrutiny.

Plotkin, S. E.; Energy Systems

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The OSU Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility: Standard Fuel Element Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oregon State University (OSU) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are currently collaborating on a test program which entails hydro-mechanical testing of a generic plate type fuel element, or standard fuel element (SFE), for the purpose of qualitatively demonstrating mechanical integrity of uranium-molybdenum monolithic plates as compared to that of uranium aluminum dispersion, and aluminum fuel plates due to hydraulic forces. This test program supports ongoing work conducted for/by the fuel development program and will take place at OSU in the Hydro-Mechanical Fuel Test Facility (HMFTF). Discussion of a preliminary test matrix, SFE design, measurement and instrumentation techniques, and facility description are detailed in this paper.

Wade R. Marcum; Brian G. Woods; Ann Marie Phillips; Richard G. Ambrosek; James D. Wiest; Daniel M. Wachs

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Fuel consumption: industrial, residential, and general studies. Volume 2. 1977-October, 1979 (a bibliography with abstracts). Report for 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect

Citations of research on fuel supply, demand, shortages, and conservation through effective utilization are presented. A few abstracts pertain to energy consumption in the agricultural sector, fuel substitution, economic studies, and environmental concerns relating to energy consumption. Bibliographies on electric power consumption and fuel consumption by transportation also are available. (This updated bibliography contains 159 abstracts, 29 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Hundemann, A.S.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Stationary Fuel Cell Application Codes and Standards: Overview and Gap Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report provides an overview of codes and standards related to stationary fuel cell applications and identifies gaps and resolutions associated with relative codes and standards.

Blake, C. W.; Rivkin, C. H.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document lists codes and standards typically used for U.S. stationary and portable fuel cell systems.

Not Available

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Cost and energy consumption estimates for the aluminum-air battery anode fuel cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of DOE's Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a study to generate estimates of the energy use and costs associated with the aluminum anode fuel cycle of the aluminum-air (Al-air) battery. The results of this analysis indicate that the cost and energy consumption characteristics of the mechanically rechargeable Al-air battery system are not as attractive as some other electrically rechargeable electric vehicle battery systems being developed by OESD. However, there are distinct advantages to mechanically rechargeable batteries, which may make the Al-air battery (or other mechanically rechargeable batteries) attractive for other uses, such as stand-alone applications. Fuel cells, such as the proton exchange membrane (PEM), and advanced secondary batteries may be better suited to electric vehicle applications. 26 refs., 3 figs., 25 tabs.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

EIA Average Energy Consumption 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table US8. Average Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units per Household Fuels Used (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel)

295

U.S. ethanol production and the Renewable Fuel Standard ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ...

296

Deriving In-Use PHEV Fuel Economy Predictions from Standardized Test Cycle Results: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Explores the issue of how to apply an adjustment method to raw plug-in hybrid vehicle dynamometer test results to better estimate PHEVs' in-use fuel and electricity consumption.

Gonder, J.; Brooker, A.; Carlson, R.; Smart, J.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The effects of driving style and vehicle performance on the real-world fuel consumption of U.S. light-duty vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even with advances in vehicle technology, both conservation and methods for reducing the fuel consumption of existing vehicles are needed to decrease the petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of the U.S. ...

Berry, Irene Michelle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

A plot study of the potential for Navy utilization of solid waste derived fuels to offset fossil fuels consumption. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A brief study was made to define problems that would be encountered in estimating potential Navy markets for various forms of waste derived fuels. Fossil fuel consumption estimates for boiler plants at several Navy activities were converted to waste derived fuel (WDF) estimates using a set of assumed rules judged technically feasible regarding boiler conversions and confirming fossil fuels and WDF. The results of this first study are presented indicating Navy boilers might represent a significant market for all the WDF a region could produce if the WDF were available in liquid as well as solid forms. The economic feasibility of conversions and WDF production are not addressed in this brief paper.

Capps, A.G.; Duffey-Armstrong, M.; Freeman, R.E.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

2006-01-0434 Standardized Equation for Hydrogen Gas Densities for Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in vehicle applications, the determination of the equilibrium temperature and pressure before and after usage the Fuel Consumption and Range of Fuel Cell Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicles Using Compressed FOR THE DENSITY OF HYDROGEN GAS The equilibrium temperature and pressure of the gas before and after usage within

Magee, Joseph W.

300

Plutonium Multirecycling in Standard PWRs Loaded with Evolutionary Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If it becomes necessary to stabilize the Pu inventory before the advent of Gen IV fast reactors, then it must be multirecycled in thermal neutron reactors like pressurized water reactors (PWRs). However, because of the neutron physics characteristics of Pu, it is difficult to multirecycle it in mixed-oxide (MOX)-fueled PWRs. Indeed, since there are fewer and fewer fissile isotopes in Pu, it is necessary to compensate by increasing its content, causing it to quickly reach values where the void coefficient is positive (above 12% Pu). To avoid this, Pu must be used together with enriched U so that its degradation is compensated by an increase of {sup 235}U enrichment. Two possibilities of mixing Pu and enriched U in the same assembly are presented (homogeneously and heterogeneously). In the first, called MOX-UE, all the fuel rods are made of PuO{sub 2}-U{sub enriched}O{sub 2}, whereas the second, called CORAIL, contains approximately one-third of standard MOX rods (PuO{sub 2}-U{sub tail}O{sub 2}) and two-thirds of UO{sub 2} rods. A variant of the CORAIL concept in which the MOX rods are substituted with inert matrix fuel rods (PuO{sub 2}-CeO{sub 2}) was also studied. These assemblies allow Pu to be multirecycled in standard PWRs, thus stabilizing the Pu inventory between 200 and 400 t heavy metal (for a nuclear electricity production of 400 TW.h(electric)/yr, i.e., typical of a country such as France). The number of reactors loaded with Pu depends on the performances of each concept in terms of Pu burning, and it represents between 80% (CORAIL with the MOX rods) and 30% (MOX-UE with 12% Pu) of the total power. There is only a small difference regarding the needs in natural U between the Pu monorecycling option and the different Pu multirecycling options. Hence, it appears that saving U should not be offered as an incentive for multirecycling Pu in PWRs.

Youinou, Gilles; Vasile, Alfredo [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique Cadarache (France)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed real-world school bus drive cycle data and selected similar standard drive cycles for testing on a chassis dynamometer. NREL tested a first-generation plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) school bus equipped with a 6.4L engine and an Enova PHEV drive system comprising a 25-kW/80 kW (continuous/peak) motor and a 370-volt lithium ion battery pack. A Bluebird 7.2L conventional school bus was also tested. Both vehicles were tested over three different drive cycles to capture a range of driving activity. PHEV fuel savings in charge-depleting (CD) mode ranged from slightly more than 30% to a little over 50%. However, the larger fuel savings lasted over a shorter driving distance, as the fully charged PHEV school bus would initially operate in CD mode for some distance, then in a transitional mode, and finally in a charge-sustaining (CS) mode for continued driving. The test results indicate that a PHEV school bus can achieve significant fuel savings during CD operation relative to a conventional bus. In CS mode, the tested bus showed small fuel savings and somewhat higher nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions than the baseline comparison bus.

Barnitt, R.; Gonder, J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Development of Standards in Support of Hydrogen-Fueled ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Society of Automotive Engineers International (SAE) has proposed a Hydrogen Fuel Quality Specification Guideline. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S. 517 Requested by Sens. Daschle & Murkowski  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Additional analysis of the impact of the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) ban provisions of S. 517.

Information Center

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Impact of Renewable Fuels Standard/MTBE Provisions of S.1766  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

SR/OIAF/2002-06 Release date: March 2002 This report analyzes the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS)/methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) provisions of S. 1766.

305

Impacts of Renewable Fuel and Electricity Standards on State Economies (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

This poster, submitted for the CU Energy Initiative/NREL Symposium on October 3, discusses the impacts of renewable fuel and electricity standards on state economies.

Brown, E.; Cory, K.; Brown, J.; Bird, L.; Sweezey, B.

2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

306

Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plumbing System Upgrade ... Building Newer than 1980 ... 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: ...

307

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Education Systems Analysis Contacts...

308

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas generation A Low Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part II: PolicyNatural Gas Industries .. 88 A Low Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part II: PolicyPolicy Analysis Page 88 Appendix A: Structure of the California Oil, Electricity, and Natural Gas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas generation A Low Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part II: PolicyNatural Gas Industries .. 88 A Low Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part II: PolicyPolicy Analysis Page 88 Appendix A: Structure of the California Oil, Electricity, and Natural Gas

Sperling, Daniel; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

DOE Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop April 26, 2004 Summary Notes Jim Ohi May 25, 2004 Neil Rossmeissl, DOE Technology Manager for Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards, welcomed the attendees and opened the workshop by providing background information on how an R&D plan for fuel purity would fit into the overall codes and standards R&D planning process. After introductions by the participants, Jim Ohi of NREL reviewed the agenda and the purpose of the workshop, which were to: 1. gain a better understanding of who is doing what in developing fuel purity guidelines and standards in terms of objectives, definitions, scope, timetable, and participants 2. develop a rough work breakdown structure of the fuel purity issue for the total "fuel

311

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1b. Fuel Consumption for Selected Industries,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,044 1,116 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 108 104 109 313 Textile Mills 254 205 178 314 Textile Product Mills 49 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 504 375 445 322 Paper 2,744 2,361 2,354 323 Printing and Related Support 98 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,622 3,202 3,396 325 Chemicals 3,704 3,769 3,195 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 348 336 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 969 1,052 1,105 331 Primary Metals 2,576 2,123 1,744 332 Fabricated Metal Products 441 387 397

312

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2b. Primary Fuel Consumption for Selected  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,572 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 156 166 313 Textile Mills 457 375 304 314 Textile Product Mills 85 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14 11 5 321 Wood Products 647 518 619 322 Paper 3,221 2,803 2,833 323 Printing and Related Support 199 197 171 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,873 3,454 3,657 325 Chemicals 4,851 4,803 4,181 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 691 707 683 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 1,235 1,331 1,385 331 Primary Metals 3,660 3,100 2,617 332 Fabricated Metal Products 791 706 670 333 Machinery 404 341 416 334 Computer and Electronic Products

313

Fuel economy standards have affected vehicle efficiency - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wind Geothermal ... were given the opportunity to comply with fleet-based standards or standards based on their sales-weighted "footprint ... CO2 (carbon ...

314

EPA finalizes Renewable Fuel Standard for 2013; additional ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... of producing significant volumes of non-ethanol advanced biofuels fuels such as biodiesel, renewable diesel, and biogas; Lacking foresight into EPA's future ...

315

EPA issues proposed rule for the 2014 Renewable Fuel Standard ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, ... power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand ... What is shale gas and why is it ...

316

Reference Materials and Standards for Fossil Fuels, Electric ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the energy consumed by the US Along with ... from the specification of fossil fuel raw materials ... relevant reference materials to support the emerging ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Table 7.4b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.4a) Coala Petroleum Natural Gasf Other Gasesg Biomass Otherj Distillate Fuel Oilb Residual Fuel Oilc

318

Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 A small amount of fuel oil used for appliances is included in "Fuel Oil" under "All Uses." NF = No applicable RSE row factor.

319

Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems Codes and Standards Citations (Brochure), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems Codes and Standards Citations This document lists codes and standards typically used for Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems projects. To determine which codes and standards apply to a specific project, you need to identify the codes and standards currently in effect within the jurisdiction where the project will be located. Some jurisdictions also have unique applicable ordinances or regulations. Learn about codes and standards basics at www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/codes_standards_basics.html. Find Stationary and Portable Fuel Cell Systems codes and standards in these categories:

320

Emissions of CO/sub 2/ to the atmosphere due to U. S. A. fossil fuel consumption  

SciTech Connect

Analysis and projection of carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere are estimated based on the Brookhaven reference energy system. Some new results are given on carbon dioxide contribution to the atmosphere from US fossil fuel consumption by different sectors including residential, commercial, industrial and transportation. The total weight of carbon as carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere and the additional CO/sub 2/ concentration over background by different subsectors in the years 1977, 1980, 1985, 1990, 2000 and 2020 are presented.

Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fuel Economy Standards for New Light Trucks (released in AEO2007)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In March 2006, NHTSA finalized CAFE standards requiring higher fuel economy performance for light-duty trucks in MY 2008 through 2011. Unlike the proposed CAFE standards discussed in AEO2006 [13], which would have established minimum fuel economy requirements by six footprint size classes, the final reformed CAFE standards specify a continuous mathematical function that determines minimum fuel economy requirements by vehicle footprint, defined as the wheelbase (the distance from the front axle to the center of the rear axle) times the average track width (the distance between the center lines of the tires) of the vehicle in square feet.

Information Center

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

322

Greenhouse Gas Reductions Under Low Carbon Fuel Standards?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to equate the marginal production cost of each fuel across ?e.g. , gasoline, has production costs C H (q) with C H > 0ethanol or hydrogen, has production costs C L (q) with C L >

Holland, Stephen P.; Knittel, Christopher R; Hughes, Jonathan E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

What Has the Federal Renewable Fuels Standard Accomplished - A National Perspective (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides an overview of the nation's biofuels industry accomplishments and a perspective on the challenges and implications of reaching goals set in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

Schwab, A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. Denning, C. B. A Low Carbon Fuel Standard for California227-241. E4Tech. 2007. Carbon Reporting under the Renewablepatterns and mechanisms of carbon exchange by terrestrial

Sperling, Daniel; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. Denning, C. B. A Low Carbon Fuel Standard for California227-241. E4Tech. 2007. Carbon Reporting under the Renewablepatterns and mechanisms of carbon exchange by terrestrial

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

What Has the Federal Renewable Fuels Standard Accomplished - A National Perspective (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides an overview of the nation's biofuels industry accomplishments and a perspective on the challenges and implications of reaching goals set in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

Schwab, A.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Safety, Codes and Standards Technical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Council (ICC), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Hydrogen Codes, Standards and Regulations Matrix-Matrix of codes...

328

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel use. Mesoscale Modeling Data Set and Mesoscale Modelobserved, quantified in the data set, and modeled to improveerrors for the validation data set are less than 2% for fuel

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

RSEs for Table C1A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Number of Buildings Floorspace Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings ..... 3.8 1 4.5 4. 5.0 16.4 32

330

Residual fuel consumption in the U.S. continues to decline - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil , gasoline, heating ... in the late 1970s, demand for residual fuel oil in the United ... Changes on both the residual fuel supply and demand side of the ...

331

Codes and Standards Requirements for Deployment of Emerging Fuel Cell Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this NREL report is to provide information on codes and standards (of two emerging hydrogen power fuel cell technology markets; forklift trucks and backup power units), that would ease the implementation of emerging fuel cell technologies. This information should help project developers, project engineers, code officials and other interested parties in developing and reviewing permit applications for regulatory compliance.

Burgess, R.; Buttner, W.; Riykin, C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Roadmap for Development of Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructructure and Analysis of Vehicular Natural Gas Consumption by Niche Sector  

SciTech Connect

Vehicular natural gas consumption is on the rise, totaling nearly 200 million GGEs in 2005, despite declines in total NGV inventory in recent years. This may be attributed to greater deployment of higher fuel use medium- and heavy-duty NGVs as compared to the low fuel use of the natural gas-powered LDVs that exited the market through attrition, many of which were bi-fuel. Natural gas station counts are down to about 1100 from their peak of about 1300. Many of the stations that closed were under-utilized or not used at all while most new stations were developed with greater attention to critical business fundamentals such as site selection, projected customer counts, peak and off-peak fueling capacity needs and total station throughput. Essentially, the nation's NGV fueling infrastructure has been--and will continue--going through a 'market correction'. While current economic fundamentals have shortened payback and improved life-cycle savings for investment in NGVs and fueling infrastructure, a combination of grants and other financial incentives will still be needed to overcome general fleet market inertia to maintain status quo. Also imperative to the market's adoption of NGVs and other alternative fueled vehicle and fueling technologies is a clear statement of long-term federal government commitment to diversifying our nation's transportation fuel use portfolio and, more specifically, the role of natural gas in that policy. Based on the current NGV market there, and the continued promulgation of clean air and transportation policies, the Western Region is--and will continue to be--the dominant region for vehicular natural gas use and growth. In other regions, especially the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic states and Texas, increased awareness and attention to air quality and energy security concerns by the public and - more important, elected officials--are spurring policies and programs that facilitate deployment of NGVs and fueling infrastructure. Because of their high per-vehicle fuel use, central fueling and sensitivity to fuel costs, fleets will continue to be the primary target for NGV deployment and station development efforts. The transit sector is projected to continue to account for the greatest vehicular natural gas use and for new volume growth. New tax incentives and improved life-cycle economics also create opportunities to deploy additional vehicles and install related vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure in the refuse, airport and short-haul sectors. Focusing on fleets generates the highest vehicular natural gas throughout but it doesn't necessarily facilitate public fueling infrastructure because, generally, fleet operators prefer not to allow public access due to liability concerns and revenue and tax administrative burdens. While there are ways to overcome this reluctance, including ''outside the fence'' retail dispensers and/or co-location of public and ''anchor'' fleet dispensing capability at a mutually convenient existing or new retail location, each has challenges that complicate an already complex business transaction. Partnering with independent retail fuel station companies, especially operators of large ''truck stops'' on the major interstates, to include natural gas at their facilities may build public fueling infrastructure and demand enough to entice the major oil companies to once again engage. Garnering national mass media coverage of success in California and Utah where vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure is more established will help pave the way for similar consumer market growth and inclusion of public accessibility at stations in other regions. There isn't one ''right'' business model for growing the nation's NGV inventory and fueling infrastructure. Different types of station development and ownership-operation strategies will continue to be warranted for different customers in different markets. Factors affecting NGV deployment and station development include: regional air quality compliance status and the state and/or local political climate regarding mandates and/or in

Stephen C. Yborra

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

We Can't Wait: Driving Forward with New Fuel Economy Standards |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Can't Wait: Driving Forward with New Fuel Economy Standards Can't Wait: Driving Forward with New Fuel Economy Standards We Can't Wait: Driving Forward with New Fuel Economy Standards November 16, 2011 - 4:04pm Addthis The Vehicle Cost Calculator helps consumers go beyond the sticker price of a vehicle and determine the lifetime cost when they head to the car lot. | Photo by Kino Praxis. The Vehicle Cost Calculator helps consumers go beyond the sticker price of a vehicle and determine the lifetime cost when they head to the car lot. | Photo by Kino Praxis. Heather Zichal Deputy Assistant to the President for Energy and Climate Change What does this project do? Saves you money by increasing the fuel efficiency equivalent of light-duty trucks and cars to 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. Drives innovation in the manufacturing sector and helps create

334

New improved standard for electron probe determination of organic sulfur in fossil fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on petroleum coke that is stable under an electron beam and contains a uniform sulfur content. Hence, it is a suitable standard for analysis of organic sulfur content of coal. It should be as applicable for analysis of organic sulfur in other fossil fuels. This standard is available for distribution.

Harris, L.A.; Raymond, R. Jr.; Gooley, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A STUDY OF THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN FEDERAL AND STATE MEASUREMENTS OF ON-HIGHWAY FUEL CONSUMPTION  

SciTech Connect

Annual highway fuel taxes are collected by the Treasury Department and placed in the Highway Trust Fund (HTF). There is, however, no direct connection between the taxes collected by the Treasury Department and the gallons of on-highway fuel use, which can lead to a discrepancy between these totals. This study was conducted to determine how much of a discrepancy exists between the total fuel usages estimated based on highway revenue funds as reported by the Treasury Department and the total fuel usages used in the apportionment of the HTF to the States. The analysis was conducted using data from Highway Statistics Tables MF-27 and FE-9 for the years 1991-2001. It was found that the overall discrepancy is relatively small, mostly within 5% difference. The amount of the discrepancy varies from year to year and varies among the three fuel types (gasoline, gasohol, special fuels). Several potential explanations for these discrepancies were identified, including issues on data, tax measurement, gallon measurement, HTF receipts, and timing. Data anomalies caused by outside forces, such as deferment of tax payments from one fiscal year to the next, can skew fuel tax data. Fuel tax evasion can lead to differences between actual fuel use and fuel taxes collected. Furthermore, differences in data collection and reporting among States can impact fuel use data. Refunds, credits, and transfers from the HTF can impact the total fuel tax receipt data. Timing issues, such as calendar year vs. fiscal year, can also cause some discrepancy between the two data sources.

Hwang, HL

2003-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

336

Table 8.5a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For 19491979, data are for gas turbine and internal combustion plant use of petroleum. For 19802000, ... 8 Wood and wood-derived fuels.

337

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

11 Commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants. 4 Jet fuel, kerosene, other petroleum liquids, and waste oil. 12 Industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants.

338

Summary of Preliminary Criticality Analysis for Peach Bottom Fuel in the DOE Standardized Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program is developing a standardized set of canisters for DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF). These canisters will be used for DOE SNF handling, interim storage, transportation, and disposal in the national repository. Several fuels are being examined in conjunction with the DOE SNF canisters. This report summarizes the preliminary criticality safety analysis that addresses general fissile loading limits for Peach Bottom graphite fuel in the DOE SNF canister. The canister is considered both alone and inside the 5-HLW/DOE Long Spent Fuel Co-disposal Waste Package, and in intact and degraded conditions. Results are appropriate for a single DOE SNF canister. Specific facilities, equipment, canister internal structures, and scenarios for handling, storage, and transportation have not yet been defined and are not evaluated in this analysis. The analysis assumes that the DOE SNF canister is designed so that it maintains reasonable geometric integrity. Parameters important to the results are the canister outer diameter, inner diameter, and wall thickness. These parameters are assumed to have nominal dimensions of 45.7-cm (18.0-in.), 43.815-cm (17.25-in), and 0.953-cm (0.375-in.), respectively. Based on the analysis results, the recommended fissile loading for the DOE SNF canister is 13 Peach Bottom fuel elements if no internal steel is present, and 15 Peach Bottom fuel elements if credit is taken for internal steel.

Henrikson, D.J.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Understanding and Informing the Policy Environment: State-Level Renewable Fuels Standards  

SciTech Connect

Renewable fuels standard (RFS) policies are becoming a popular public policy mechanism for developing the market for renewable fuels in the transportation sector. During the past decade, U.S. states and several countries began implementing these more market-based (less command and control) policies to support increased biofuels production and use. This paper presents an overview of current and proposed U.S. state-level policies, as well as selected electric sector policies and international fuel standard policies. Current U.S. state-level renewable fuel policies list drivers including an improved economy and environment, as well as fuel self-sufficiency. Best practices and experience from an evaluation of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) in the United States and international RFS policies can inform U.S. state-level policy by illustrating the importance of policy flexibility, binding targets, effective cost caps, and tradable permits. Understanding and building on the experiences from these previous policies can improve the policy mechanism and further develop a market for renewable fuels to meet the goals of improved economy, environment, and fuel self-sufficiency.

Brown, E.; Cory, K.; Arent, D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing SAE Safety Standards for Developing SAE Safety Standards for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) Polymer and Composite Materials R&D Gaps for Hydrogen Systems Michael Veenstra Ford Motor Company October 17, 2012 1 SAE Fuel Cell Vehicle Committee � Developing vehicle and systems-level, performance- based standards based on best available knowledge. � Cooperating with other organizations to verify current standards and develop new capabilities, when appropriate. � DOE-funded verification testing of methodologies � Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI) � CSA America � Overall objective � Use FCVs as current ICEs are used (without restrictions) � Facilitate rapid advances by the industry � Provide a technical basis for national and global requirements 2 SAE FCV ENABLING Standards

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Table 8.7a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total 5: Wood 8: Waste 9: Thousand ... electric utility data also include a small amount of fuel oil no. 4. 10 ... and other manufactured and waste gases derived from ...

342

Fossil fuel potential of Turkey: A statistical evaluation of reserves, production, and consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Turkey is a developing country with tremendous economic growth, its energy demand is also getting increased. Of this energy, about 70% is supplied from fossil fuels and the remaining 30% is from renewable sources. Among the fossil fuels, 90% of oil, natural gas, and coal are imported, and only 10% is from domestic sources. All the lignite is supplied from domestic sources. The total share of renewable sources and lignite in the total energy production is 45%. In order for Turkey to have sufficient and reliable energy sources, first the renewable energy sources must be developed, and energy production from fossil fuels, except for lignite, must be minimized. Particularly, scarcity of fossil fuels and increasing oil prices have a strong effect on economic growth of the country.

Korkmaz, S.; Kara-Gulbay, R.; Turan, M. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - options and costs  

SciTech Connect

The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the US Department of Energy. 20 refs., 1 tab.

Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... About Circular A-119About Us. Standards. Definition of Standards. Finding Standards. Information on Biometrics Standards.

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

345

Impact of Solar Control PVB Glass on Vehicle Interior Temperatures, Air-Conditioning Capacity, Fuel Consumption, and Vehicle Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study was to assess the impact of Saflex1 S-series Solar Control PVB (polyvinyl butyral) configurations on conventional vehicle fuel economy and electric vehicle (EV) range. The approach included outdoor vehicle thermal soak testing, RadTherm cool-down analysis, and vehicle simulations. Thermal soak tests were conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility in Golden, Colorado. The test results quantified interior temperature reductions and were used to generate initial conditions for the RadTherm cool-down analysis. The RadTherm model determined the potential reduction in air-conditioning (A/C) capacity, which was used to calculate the A/C load for the vehicle simulations. The vehicle simulation tool identified the potential reduction in fuel consumption or improvement in EV range between a baseline and modified configurations for the city and highway drive cycles. The thermal analysis determined a potential 4.0% reduction in A/C power for the Saflex Solar PVB solar control configuration. The reduction in A/C power improved the vehicle range of EVs and fuel economy of conventional vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

Rugh, J.; Chaney, L.; Venson, T.; Ramroth, L.; Rose, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Factor of two : halving the fuel consumption of new U.S. Automobiles by 2035  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the vehicle design and sales mix changes necessary to double the average fuel economy of new U.S. cars and light-trucks by model year 2035. To achieve this factor of two target, three technology options ...

Cheah, Lynette W

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A fuzzy diagnosis and advice system for optimization of emissions and fuel consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a fuzzy expert system has been developed, which is used for defining possible fuel system faults, ignition system faults, intake valve and exhaust valve faults and refers solution advice for these faults, which uses measurements of CO, ... Keywords: Diagnosis software, Emissions, Fuzzy expert systems, Spark ignition engine

Yavuz Kilagiz; Ahmet Baran; Zerrin Yildiz; Murat etin

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Analysis of Technology Options to Reduce the Fuel Consumption of Idling Trucks  

SciTech Connect

Long-haul trucks idling overnight consume more than 838 million gallons (20 million barrels) of fuel annually. Idling also emits pollutants. Truck drivers idle their engines primarily to (1) heat or cool the cab and/or sleeper, (2) keep the fuel warm in winter, and (3) keep the engine warm in the winter so that the engine is easier to start. Alternatives to overnight idling could save much of this fuel, reduce emissions, and cut operating costs. Several fuel-efficient alternatives to idling are available to provide heating and cooling: (1) direct-fired heater for cab/sleeper heating, with or without storage cooling; (2) auxiliary power units; and (3) truck stop electrification. Many of these technologies have drawbacks that limit market acceptance. Options that supply electricity are economically viable for trucks that are idled for 1,000-3,000 or more hours a year, while heater units could be used across the board. Payback times for fleets, which would receive quantity discounts on the prices, would be somewhat shorter.

F. Stodolsky; L. Gaines; A. Vyas

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Improving the performance and fuel consumption of dual chamber stratified charge spark ignition engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the nature of the combustion processes in a dual chamber stratified charge spark ignition engine is described. This work concentrated on understanding the mixing process in the main chamber gases. A specially constructed single cylinder engine was used to both conduct experiments to study mixing effects and to obtain experimental data for the validation of the computer model which was constructed in the theoretical portion of the study. The test procedures are described. Studies were conducted on the effect of fuel injection timing on performance and emissions using the combination of orifice size and prechamber to main chamber flow rate ratio which gave the best overall compromise between emissions and performance. In general, fuel injection gave slightly higher oxides of nitrogen, but considerably lower hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions than the carbureted form of the engine. Experiments with engine intake port redesign to promote swirl mixing indicated a substantial increase in the power output from the engine and, that an equivalent power levels, the nitric oxide emissions are approximately 30% lower with swirl in the main chamber than without swirl. The development of a computer simulation of the combustion process showed that a one-dimensional combustion model can be used to accurately predict trends in engine operation conditions and nitric oxide emissions even though the actual flame in the engine is not completely one-dimensional, and that a simple model for mixing of the main chamber and prechamber intake gases at the start of compression proved adequate to explain the effects of swirl, ignition timing, overall fuel air ratio, volumetric efficiency, and variations in prechamber air fuel ratio and fuel rate percentage on engine power and nitric oxide emissions. (LCL)

Sorenson, S.C.; Pan, S.S.; Bruckbauer, J.J.; Gehrke, G.R.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Effects of Village Power Quality on Fuel Consumption and Operating Expenses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alaska's rural village electric utilities are isolated from the Alaska railbelt electrical grid intertie and from each other. Different strategies have been developed for providing power to meet demand in each of these rural communities. Many of these communities rely on diesel electric generators (DEGs) for power. Some villages have also installed renewable power sources and automated generation systems for controlling the DEGs and other sources of power. For example, Lime Village has installed a diesel battery photovoltaic hybrid system, Kotzebue and Wales have wind-diesel hybrid systems, and McGrath has installed a highly automated system for controlling diesel generators. Poor power quality and diesel engine efficiency in village power systems increases the cost of meeting the load. Power quality problems may consist of poor power factor (PF) or waveform disturbances, while diesel engine efficiency depends primarily on loading, the fuel type, the engine temperature, and the use of waste heat for nearby buildings. These costs take the form of increased fuel use, increased generator maintenance, and decreased reliability. With the cost of bulk fuel in some villages approaching $1.32/liter ($5.00/gallon) a modest 5% decrease in fuel use can result in substantial savings with short payback periods depending on the village's load profile and the cost of corrective measures. This project over its five year history has investigated approaches to improving power quality and implementing fuel savings measures through the use of performance assessment software tools developed in MATLAB{reg_sign} Simulink{reg_sign} and the implementation of remote monitoring, automated generation control, and the addition of renewable energy sources in select villages. The results have shown how many of these communities would benefit from the use of automated generation control by implementing a simple economic dispatch scheme and the integration of renewable energy sources such as wind generation.

Richard Wies; Ron Johnson

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Proposed Revisions to Light Truck Fuel Economy Standard (released in AEO2006)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In August 2005, NHTSA published proposed reforms to the structure of CAFE standards for light trucks and increases in light truck CAFE standards for model years 2008 through 2011 [8]. Under the proposed new structure, NHTSA would establish minimum fuel economy levels for six size categories defined by the vehicle footprint (wheelbase multiplied by track width), as summarized in Table 3. For model years 2008 through 2010, the new CAFE standards would provide manufacturers the option of complying with either the standards defined for each individual footprint category or a proposed average light truck fleet standard of 22.5 miles per gallon in 2008, 23.1 miles per gallon in 2009, and 23.5 miles per gallon in 2010. All light truck manufacturers would be required to meet an overall standard based on sales within each individual footprint category after model year 2010.

Information Center

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Combining a New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standard with a Cap-and-Trade Policy: Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combining a New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standard with a Cap-and-Trade Policy: Energy and Economic coordinated design of future climate and energy policy. In this work we use a computable general equilibrium No. 217 May 2012 #12;The MIT Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change

353

State of California BOARD OF EQUALIZATION USE FUEL TAX REGULATIONS Regulation 1322. CONSUMPTION OF LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS IN VEHICLES FUELED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Users who operate motor vehicles powered by liquefied petroleum gas supplied directly to the engine from the cargo tank of the motor vehicle are authorized for the purpose of making tax returns to compute the gallons used on a mileper-gallon basis. The mile-per-gallon basis will be determined by tests. The tests will be made by the user and will be subject to review by the Board. All detail and test data should be retained for inspection by the Board. This method of computing use is authorized only for the purpose of making tax returns. Determinations may be imposed or refunds granted, if the Board upon audit of the users accounts and records, or upon the basis of tests made or other information determines that the return did not disclose the proper amount of tax due. See Regulation 1332 with respect to records on those motor vehicles powered by fuel not supplied directly to the

unknown authors

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TM TM -2003/171 A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption July 2003 Ho-Ling Hwang Lorena F. Truett Stacy C. Davis DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the followi ng source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange

355

Conversion and standardization of US university reactor fuels using LEU, status 1989  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, the US Department of Energy initiated a program to change the fuel used in most of the US university research reactors using HEU (93%) to LEU({lt}20{percent}) in order to minimize the risk of theft or diversion of this weapons-useable material. An important consideration in the LEU conversion planning process has been the desire to standardize the fuels that are used and to enhance the performance and utilization of the reactors. This paper describes the current status of this conversion process and the plans and schedules to complete an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. To date, three university reactors have been converted to LEU fuel, completed safety documentation for three reactors is being evaluated by the USNRC, and work on the safety documentation for six reactors is in progress. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA); Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Development of an energy consumption and cost data base for fuel cell total energy systems and conventional building energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and data sources used to develop an energy-consumption and system-cost data base for use in predicting the market penetration of phosphoric acid fuel cell total-energy systems in the nonindustrial building market. A computer program was used to simulate the hourly energy requirements of six types of buildings - office buildings, retail stores, hotels and motels, schools, hospitals, and multifamily residences. The simulations were done by using hourly weather tapes for one city in each of the ten Department of Energy administrative regions. Two types of building construction were considered, one for existing buildings and one for new buildings. A fuel cell system combined with electrically driven heat pumps and one combined with a gas boiler and an electrically driven chiller were compared with similar conventional systems. The methods of system simulation, component sizing, and system cost estimation are described for each system. The systems were simulated for a single building size for each building type. Methods were developed to extrapolate the system cost and performance data to other building sizes.

Pine, G.D.; Christian, J.E.; Mixon, W.R.; Jackson, W.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interim Standard for Plutonium in Soils", Los Alamoson the Use of Recycle Plutonium in Mixed Oxide Fuel in LightCharacterization of Particulate Plutonium Released in Fuel

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Benchmark Calculations for Standard and DUPIC CANDU Fuel Lattices Compared with the MCNP-4B Code  

SciTech Connect

Cell-code benchmark calculations have been performed for the standard CANDU and DUPIC CANDU fuel lattices compared with the MCNP-4B code. To consider the full isotopic composition and the temperature effect, new MCNP libraries have been generated from ENDF/B-VI release 3 and validated for typical benchmark problems. The lattice codes WIMS-AECL and HELIOS were then benchmarked by the MCNP code for the major physics parameters such as burnup reactivity, coolant void reactivity, fuel temperature coefficient, etc. The calculations have shown that the physics parameters estimated by the lattice codes are consistent with those by MCNP. However, there is a tendency that the error increases slightly when the fuel burnup is high. This study has shown that the WIMS-AECL produces reliable results for CANDU fuel analysis. However, it is recommended that the cross-section library be updated to be used for the high-burnup fuels even though the current results are generally acceptable. This study has also shown that the HELIOS code has the potential to be used for CANDU fuel lattice analysis in the future.

Roh, Gyuhong; Choi, Hangbok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2000-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium: Plans and schedules  

SciTech Connect

The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. To minimize this risk, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its final rule on ''Limiting the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Domestically Licensed Research and Test Reactors,'' in February 1986. This paper describes the plans and schedules developed by the US Department of Energy to coordinate an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. An important element in the planning process has been the desire to standardize the LEU fuels used in US university reactors and to enhance the performance and utilization of a number of these reactors. The program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years.

Young, H.H.; Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is standard in HVAC design and fan selection books 6 . Theof modulating design options. The cooling fan curve passesfan curve and the duct system curve. We calculated the furnace fuel consumption for each design

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Standardized DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Canister and Transportation System for Shipping to the National Repository  

SciTech Connect

The U.S.Department of Energys (DOE) National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), has been chartered with the responsibility for developing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) standardized canisters and a transportation cask system for shipping DOE SNF to the national repository. The mandate for this development is outlined in the Memorandum of Agreement for Acceptance of Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste that states, EM shall design and fabricate DOE SNF canisters for shipment to RW. (1) It also states, EM shall be responsible for the design, NRC certification, and fabrication of the transportation cask system for DOE SNF canisters or bare DOE SNF in accordance with 10 CFR Part 71. (2) In fulfillment of these requirements, the NSNFP has developed four SNF standardized canister configurations and has conceptually designed a versatile transportation cask system for shipping the canisters to the national repository.1 The standardized canister sizes were derived from the national repository waste package design for co-disposal of SNF with high-level waste (HLW). One SNF canister can be placed in the center of the waste package or one can be placed in one of five radial positions, replacing a HLW canister. The internal cavity of the transportation cask was derived using the same logic, matching the size of the internal cavity of the waste package. The size of the internal cavity for the transportation cask allows the shipment of multiple canister configurations with the application of a removable basket design. The standardized canisters have been designed to be loaded with DOE SNF, placed into interim storage, shipped to the national repository, and placed in a waste package without having to be reopened. Significant testing has been completed that clearly demonstrates that the standardized canisters can safely achieve their intended design goals. The transportation cask system will include all of the standard design features, with the addition of dual containment for the shipment of failed fuel. The transportation cask system will also meet the rigorous licensing requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to ensure that the design and the methods of fabrication employed will result in a shipping cask that will safely contain the radioactive materials under all credible accident scenarios. The standardization of the SNF canisters and the versatile design of the transportation cask system will eliminate a proliferation of designs and simplify the operations at the user sites and the national repository.

Pincock, David Lynn; Morton, Dana Keith; Lengyel, Arpad Leslie

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Trends in the size distribution, highway use, and consumption of gasoline and diesel fuels of the U.S. Commercial Truck Fleet, 1977-2002.  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on various major long-range (1977-2002, 1982-2002) U.S. commercial trucking trends by using U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census Vehicle/Truck Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS/TIUS) data from this period, as well as selected 1977-2002 data from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Highway Statistics. Analyses are made of (1) overall passenger vehicle versus truck consumption patterns of gasoline and diesel fuel and (2) the population growth and fuels used by all commercial truck classes and selected truck types (single unit and combination). Selected vehicle miles traveled, gallons per vehicle miles traveled, and gallons per cargo ton-miles traveled trends, as well as the effect of cargo tons per truck on fuel consumption, are also assessed. In addition, long-range trends of related factors (such as long-haul mileages driven by heavy trucks) and their impacts on both reducing fuel consumption per cargo-ton-mile and the relative shares of total commercial fuel use among truck classes were examined. Results of these trends on U.S. petroleum consumption are identified. The effects of basic engineering design and performance, national Interstate highway construction legislation, national demographic trends (such as suburbanization), and changes in U.S. corporate operational requirements are discussed. Their impacts on both the long-distance hauling and shorter-distance urban and suburban delivery markets of the commercial trucking industry are highlighted.

Bertram, K. M.; Santini, D. J.; Anderson, J. L.; Vyas, A. D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Annual book of ASTM Standards 2008. Section Five. Petroleum products, lubricants, and fossil fuels. Volume 05.06. Gaseous fuels; coal and coke  

SciTech Connect

The first part covers standards for gaseous fuels. The second part covers standards on coal and coke including the classification of coals, determination of major elements in coal ash and trace elements in coal, metallurgical properties of coal and coke, methods of analysis of coal and coke, petrogrpahic analysis of coal and coke, physical characteristics of coal, quality assurance and sampling.

NONE

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

Statement by U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on EPA's Renewable Fuel Standard Waiver Announcement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

WASHINGTON -- The following is a statement from U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman in response to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) announcement on the Renewable Fuel Standard...

365

The Economic, Energy, and GHG Emissions Impacts of Proposed 20172025 Vehicle Fuel Economy Standards in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increases in the U.S. Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) Standards for 2017 to 2025 model year light-duty vehicles are currently under consideration. This analysis uses an economy-wide model with detail in the passenger ...

Karplus, Valerie

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

National Codes and Standards Coordination - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Carl Rivkin, (Primary Contact), Chad Blake, Robert Burgess, William Buttner, and Matthew Post National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3839 Email: carl.rivkin@nrel.gov DOE Manager Antonio Ruiz Phone: (202) 586-0729 Email: Antonio.Ruiz@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: * CSA, Standards, Cleveland, OH * FP2 Fire Protection Engineering, Golden, CO * GWS Solutions, Tolland, CT * Kelvin Hecht, Avon, CT * MorEvents, Englewood, CO * SAE International (SAE), Warrendale, PA

367

Industry and Education Experts Work Together to Establish Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Technician Training Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

s more and more AFVs find s more and more AFVs find their places in the transporta- tion industry, the need for qualified technicians to service these vehicles continues to grow. To help meet this need, transportation indus- try and education experts are working together to develop standards for AFV technician training, standards that will serve as a valuable tool for AFV technician training programs now and in the future. Background Section 411 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) requires that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ensure the availability of training programs for voluntary certification of alternative fuels technicians. To meet this requirement, DOE entered into a 5-year cooperative agreement with the National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation (NATEF) to develop and implement

368

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

369

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

parking garages. Web Page: For related information, ... "Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey." 6 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, ...

370

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Consumption Fuel consumption is estimated from RTECS data on the vehicle stock (Chapter 2) and miles traveled (Chapter 3), in combination with vehicle fuel efficiency ratings, adjusted to account for individual driving circumstances. The first two sections of this chapter present estimates of household vehicle fuel efficiency and household fuel consumption calculated from these fuel efficiency estimates. These sections also discuss variations in fuel efficiency and consumption based on differences in household and vehicle characteristics. The third section presents EIA estimates of the potential savings from replacing the oldest (and least fuel-efficient) household vehicles with new (and more fuel-efficient) vehicles. The final section of this chapter focuses on households receiving (or eligible to receive) supplemental income under

371

Component Standard Research and Development - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Robert Burgess (Primary Contact), William Buttner, Matthew Post, Carl Rivkin, Chad Blake National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3823 Email: robert.burgess@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Antonio Ruiz Phone: (202) 586-0729 Email: Antonio.Ruiz@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: SAE International, Troy, MI Project Start Date: Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Support development of new codes and standards * required for commercialization of hydrogen technologies. Create code language that is based on the latest scientific *

372

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utilizing Bioenergy By-products in Beef Production Systems The newly expanded renewable fuels standard requires 36 billion gallons of renewable fuels be used annually by 2022, which allows continued

373

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - PDF Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1 U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 Table 2 U.S. per Household Vehicle Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel ...

374

Assessment of Technologies for Compliance with the Low Carbon Fuel Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 2020, with the rest being E85 flex-fuel vehicles (5.8%),HEVs, hybrid flex-fuel E85 vehicles, and PHEVs, will be

Yeh, Sonia; Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Parker, Nathan C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C35A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption...

376

Safety, Codes & Standards Sub-Program Overview - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program IntroductIon The Safety, Codes and Standards sub-program supports research and development (R&D) to provide an experimentally validated fundamental understanding of the relevant physics, critical data, and safety information needed to define the requirements for technically sound and defensible codes and standards. This information is used to help facilitate and enable the widespread deployment and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. In Fiscal Year (FY) 2012, the sub-program continued to identify and evaluate safety

377

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a regular basis at the time of the 1990 RECS personal interviews. Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991...

378

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 110 Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Used in the Home: For electricity or natural gas, the quantity is the...

379

Modelling Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption in China has attracted considerable research interest since the middle 1990s. This is largely prompted by the environmental ramifications of the extensive use of fossil fuels in the country to propel two decades of high economic growth. Since the late 1980s, there has been an increasing awareness on the part of the Chinese government of the imperative for the balance of economic growth and environmental protection. The government has since taken various measures ranging from encouraging energy-saving practice, controlling waste discharges to financing R & D programs on improving energy efficiency. Against this backdrop has seen a constant decline of the energy intensity of the economy, measured as the ratio of total energy consumed in standard coal equivalent to the real GDP since 1989. Using the 1987 and 1997 input-output tables for China, the present study examines the impact of technical and structural changes in the economy on industry fuel consumption over the 10-year period. Technical changes are reflected in changes in direct input-output coefficients, which capture the technical evolvement of intermediate production processes. Structural changes refer to shifts in the pattern of final demand for energy, including the import and export composition of various fuels. Six fuels are included in the study, namely, coal, oil, natural gas, electricity, petroleum and coke and gas, which cover all of the energy types available in the input-output tables. It is found that the predominant force of falling energy intensity was changes in direct energy input requirements in various industries. Such changes were responsible for a reduction in the consumption of four of the six fuels per unit of total output. Structural changes were not conducive for improv...

Baiding Hu Department; Baiding Hu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project: Feasibility of BNFP Site as MOX Fuel Supply Facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation was made of the technical feasibility, cost, and schedule for converting the existing unused Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Facility (BNFP) into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) CANDU fuel fabrication plant for disposition of excess weapons plutonium. This MOX fuel would be transported to Ontario where it would generate electricity in the Bruce CANDU reactors. Because CANDU MOX fuel operates at lower thermal load than natural uranium fuel, the MOX program can be licensed by AECB within 4.5 years, and actual Pu disposition in the Bruce reactors can begin in 2001. Ontario Hydro will have to be involved in the entire program. Cost is compared between BNFP and FMEF at Hanford for converting to a CANDU MOX facility.

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

World Biofuels Production Potential Understanding the Challenges to Meeting the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates the worldwide potential to produce biofuels including biofuels for export. It was undertaken to improve our understanding of the potential for imported biofuels to satisfy the requirements of Title II of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) in the coming decades. Many other countries biofuels production and policies are expanding as rapidly as ours. Therefore, we modeled a detailed and up-to-date representation of the amount of biofuel feedstocks that are being and can be grown, current and future biofuels production capacity, and other factors relevant to the economic competitiveness of worldwide biofuels production, use, and trade. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identified and prepared feedstock data for countries that were likely to be significant exporters of biofuels to the U.S. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) calculated conversion costs by conducting material flow analyses and technology assessments on biofuels technologies. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) integrated the country specific feedstock estimates and conversion costs into the global Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) MARKAL (MARKet ALlocation) model. The model uses least-cost optimization to project the future state of the global energy system in five year increments. World biofuels production was assessed over the 2010 to 2030 timeframe using scenarios covering a range U.S. policies (tax credits, tariffs, and regulations), as well as oil prices, feedstock availability, and a global CO{sub 2} price. All scenarios include the full implementation of existing U.S. and selected other countries biofuels policies (Table 4). For the U.S., the most important policy is the EISA Title II Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). It progressively increases the required volumes of renewable fuel used in motor vehicles (Appendix B). The RFS requires 36 billion (B) gallons (gal) per year of renewable fuels by 2022. Within the mandate, amounts of advanced biofuels, including biomass-based diesel and cellulosic biofuels, are required beginning in 2009. Imported renewable fuels are also eligible for the RFS. Another key U.S. policy is the $1.01 per gal tax credit for producers of cellulosic biofuels enacted as part of the 2008 Farm Bill. This credit, along with the DOE's research, development and demonstration (RD&D) programs, are assumed to enable the rapid expansion of U.S. and global cellulosic biofuels production needed for the U.S. to approach the 2022 RFS goal. While the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has yet to issue RFS rules to determine which fuels would meet the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and land use restrictions specified in EISA, we assume that cellulosic ethanol, biomass-to-liquid fuels (BTL), sugar-derived ethanol, and fatty acid methyl ester biodiesel would all meet the EISA advanced biofuel requirements. We also assume that enough U.S. corn ethanol would meet EISA's biofuel requirements or otherwise be grandfathered under EISA to reach 15 B gal per year.

Sastri, B.; Lee, A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, 1751-1991; and an estimate of their isotopic composition and latitudinal distribution  

SciTech Connect

This work briefly discusses four of the current research emphases at Oak Ridge National Laboratory regarding the emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from fossil fuel consumption, natural gas flaring and cement manufacture. These emphases include: (1) updating the 1950 to present time series of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, (2) extending this time series back to 1751, (3) gridding the data at 1{sup 0} by 1{sup 0} resolution, and (4) estimating the isotopic signature of these emissions. In 1991, global emissions of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel and cement increased 1.5% over 1990 levels to 6188 {times} 10{sup 6} metric tonnes C. The Kuwaiti oil fires can account for all of the increase. Recently published energy data (Etemad et al., 1991) allow extension of the CO emissions time series back to 1751. Preliminary examination shows good agreement with two other, but shorter, energy time series. A latitudinal distribution of carbon emissions is being completed. A southward shift in the major mass of CO{sub 2} emissions is occurring from European-North American latitudes towards central-southeast Asian latitudes, reflecting the growth of population and industrialization at these lower latitudes. The carbon isotopic signature of these emissions has been re-examined. The emissions of the last two decades are approximately 1{per_thousand} lighter than previously reported (Tans, 1981). This lightening of the emissions signature is due to fossil fuel gases and liquids, including a revision of their {delta}{sup 13}C isotopic signature and an increased production rate.

Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.; Boden, T.; Bischof, S.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

StreetSmart : modeling vehicle fuel consumption with mobile phone sensor data through a participatory sensing framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vehicle energy efficiency has become a priority of governments, researchers, and consumers in the wake of rising fuels costs over the last decade. Traditional Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) vehicles are particularly ...

Oehlerking, Austin Louis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Codes and Standards Gap Analysis Helps DOE Define Research Priorities (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 * November 2010 6 * November 2010 Fuel Vehicle Codes and Standards Gap Documents Impacted Gap Resolution HYDROGEN High pressure storage, handling, and use of hydrogen presents hazards specific to high- pressure systems that may not be completely addressed NFPA 2, NFPA 52, NFPA 55 CGA H series of documents, IFC Evaluated codes and standards that address high pressures to determine if requirements are adequate HYDROGEN Incomplete requirements for sensing technologies NFPA 2, NFPA 52, NFPA 55, IFC Support the use of sensing technologies that replace odorants through evaluating sensing technologies and supporting code and standards development work in sensing technologies HYDROGEN Off-road vehicle storage tank requirements are incomplete CSA HGV 2,

385

RSE Table 5.4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4;" 4 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.4;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,3,9

386

Assessment of Technologies for Compliance with the Low Carbon Fuel Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuels (e.g. , compressed natural gas, oil derived from tar20% by volume), compressed natural gas, electricity, and

Yeh, Sonia; Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Parker, Nathan C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Residential energy consumption survey. Consumption patterns of household vehicles, supplement: January 1981-September 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on the fuel consumption characteristics on household vehicles in the 48 contiguous States and the District of Columbia is presented by monthly statistics of fuel consumption, expenditures, miles per gallon, and miles driven.

Not Available

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Table SH8. Average Consumption for Space Heating by Main Space ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil Main Space Heating Fuel Used (million Btu of consumption per household using the fuel as a main heating source) Any Major Fuel 4 Table SH8.

389

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

F23: Nuclear Energy Consumption, Price, and Expenditure Estimates, 2011 State Nuclear Electric Power Nuclear Fuel Consumption Prices Expenditures Million Kilowatthours Trillion Btu...

390

Renewable Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Renewable Portfolio Standard Renewable Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Hawaii Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider Hawaii Public Utilities Commission Under Hawaii's Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), each electric utility company that sells electricity for consumption in Hawaii must establish the following percentages of "renewable electrical energy" sales: * 10% of its net electricity sales by December 31, 2010;

391

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

must be provided (such as E85 filling stations, dedicatedmodest changes (e.g. , E85 flex-fuel vehicles), but

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

must be provided (such as E85 filling stations, dedicatedmodest changes (e.g. , E85 flex-fuel vehicles), but

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conversion from soybean to corn ethanol production in theproduced in the US: corn ethanol and soybean biodiesel. USDAdifferent fuels such as corn ethanol, cellulosic ethanol,

Sperling, Daniel; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conversion from soybean to corn ethanol production in theproduced in the US: corn ethanol and soybean biodiesel. USDAdifferent fuels such as corn ethanol, cellulosic ethanol,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Assessment of Technologies for Compliance with the Low Carbon Fuel Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GREET Pathway for Corn Ethanol. Version 2.1. Stationarygasoline fuel, 6%from corn ethanol, and 17% from diesel. Webased biofuels including corn ethanol, Brazilian sugarcane

Yeh, Sonia; Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Parker, Nathan C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Assessment of Technologies for Compliance with the Low Carbon Fuel Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of U.S. croplands for biofuels increases greenhouse gasesthe indirect Effects of Biofuels Production. Renewable FuelsTyner, W. E. ; Birur, D. K. Biofuels for all? Understanding

Yeh, Sonia; Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Parker, Nathan C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

existing solid-fuel biomass direct combustion sector stemGasification The partial combustion of biomass in an oxygen-biomass) and energy conversion technologies (combustion,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

existing solid-fuel biomass direct combustion sector stemGasification The partial combustion of biomass in an oxygen-biomass) and energy conversion technologies (combustion,

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Consumer-products minimum energy-efficiency-standards program. Topical report on Subtask 3. 1. Evaluation of energy consumption savings of boost heaters in dishwashers  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the energy conservation and life cycle cost benefits of boost heaters for dishwashers is presented to provide technical information to assist in determining whether to modify the dishwasher test procedure to include boost heaters. Two manufacturers are offering dishwashers which have an inlet water temperature requirement of 120/sup 0/F. Cleaning performance in these appliances is maintained with an electric coil in the sump of the dishwasher, which boosts the incoming water to its final temperature. Both manufacturers have petitioned DOE for exemption from efficiency standards, since current DOE test procedures give no credit for water heater energy savings. The evaluation shows boost heaters to be energy conserving for all conditions. The life cycle cost analysis indicates boost heaters are cost effective in all cases for homes with electric water heaters, and in most cases for homes having gas water heaters. Additionally the proposed standards for dishwashers will lower water consumption in 1985 model dishwashers such that boost heaters will become cost effective in all cases.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Alternative Fuels - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), Transporation Channel of Alternative Fuels

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Monthly 2008 Utility and Nonutility Fuel Receipts and Fuel Quality...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tags fossil fuel receipts, coal receipts, oil receipts, gas receipts, fossil fuel consumption, electricity generating fuel Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data...

402

Comments on the Joint Proposed Rulemaking to Establish Light-Duty Vehicle Greenhouse Gas Emission Standards and Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards  

SciTech Connect

I appreciate the opportunity to provide comments on the joint rulemaking to establish greenhouse gas emission and fuel economy standards for light-duty vehicles. My comments are directed at the choice of vehicle footprint as the attribute by which to vary fuel economy and greenhouse gas emission standards, in the interest of protecting vehicle occupants from death or serious injury. I have made several of these points before when commenting on previous NHTSA rulemakings regarding CAFE standards and safety. The comments today are mine alone, and do not necessarily represent the views of the US Department of Energy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, or the University of California. My comments can be summarized as follows: (1) My updated analysis of casualty risk finds that, after accounting for drivers and crash location, there is a wide range in casualty risk for vehicles with the same weight or footprint. This suggests that reducing vehicle weight or footprint will not necessarily result in increased fatalities or serious injuries. (2) Indeed, the recent safety record of crossover SUVs indicates that weight reduction in this class of vehicles resulted in a reduction in fatality risks. (3) Computer crash simulations can pinpoint the effect of specific design changes on vehicle safety; these analyses are preferable to regression analyses, which rely on historical vehicle designs, and cannot fully isolate the effect of specific design changes, such as weight reduction, on crash outcomes. (4) There is evidence that automakers planned to build more large light trucks in response to the footprint-based light truck CAFE standards. Such an increase in the number of large light trucks on the road may decrease, rather than increase, overall safety.

Wenzel, Thomas P

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

403

Natural Gas Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 23,103,793 23,277,008 22,910,078 24,086,797 24,477,425 25,533,448 1949-2012 Alabama 418,512 404,157 454,456 534,779 598,514 666,738 1997-2012 Alaska 369,967 341,888 342,261 333,312 335,458 343,110 1997-2012

404

Fuel economy regulations and efficiency technology improvements in U.S. cars since 1975  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light-duty vehicles account for 43% of petroleum consumption and 23% of green- house gas emissions in the United States. Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards are the primary policy tool addressing petroleum ...

MacKenzie, Donald Warren

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Standard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Standard Standard rock For at least two generations, the depth of underground muon experiments has been reduced to depth in "standard rock." This is by definition the overburden of the Cayuga Rock Salt Mine near Ithaca, New York, where K. Greisen and collaborators made seminal observations of muons at substantial depths[1]. Ref. 1 says only "Most of the ground consists of shales of various types, with average density 2.65 g/cm 2 and average atomic number 11." Menon and Murthy later extended the definition: Z 2 /A = 5.5, Z/A = 0.5, and and ρ = 2.65 g/cm 2 [2]. It was thus not-quite-sodium. Lohmann[3] further assumed the mean excitation energy and density effect parameters were those of calcium carbonate, with no adjustments for the slight density difference. We use their definition for this most important material. (Extracted from D.E. Groom, N.V. Mokhov, and S.I. Striganov,

406

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

407

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

408

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

biodiesel Go biodiesel Go Generated_thumb20130810-31804-kwxulv U.S. Biodiesel Production, Exports, and Consumption Generated_thumb20130810-31804-kwxulv Trend of U.S. biodiesel production, exports, and consumption from 2001-2011 Last update August 2012 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-s6una1 U.S. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Biofuels Generated_thumb20130810-31804-s6una1 Comparison of greenhouse gas emissions from biofuels, developed by the EPA for Renewable Fuel Standard 2 rule Last update February 2010 View Graph Graph Download Data Biodiesel-stations Biodiesel Fueling Station Locations by State Biodiesel-stations View Map Graph Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ngbjor Biomass-Based Diesel RFS2 Mandates and Consumption Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ngbjor

409

Table 37. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 37. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology Type and Fuel Type (trillion Btu) Light-Duty Consumption by Technology Type Conventional Vehicles 1/

410

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

53 Figure 3-2: Production costs and GHG emissions for fossil58 Figure 3-5: Fuel production costFigure 4-5: Ethanol production costs from MSW with variable

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

53 Figure 3-2: Production costs and GHG emissions for fossil58 Figure 3-5: Fuel production costFigure 4-5: Ethanol production costs from MSW with variable

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Miller (1980). "Oil Shales and Carbon Dioxide." Sciencefor CO2 evolved from oil shale." Fuel Processing TechnologyCTLs, or CTL synfuels), and oil shale-based synthetic crude

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. Miller (1980). "Oil Shales and Carbon Dioxide." Sciencefor CO2 evolved from oil shale." Fuel Processing TechnologyCTLs, or CTL synfuels), and oil shale-based synthetic crude

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for CO2 evolved from oil shale." Fuel Processing TechnologyT. and G. A. Miller (1980). "Oil Shales and Carbon Dioxide."oil, coal, tar sands, oil shale Natural gas, biomass Natural

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Regulation of GHG emissions from transportation fuels: Emission quota versus emission intensity standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cars capable of running on E85 in addition to gasoline, inthat these would run on E85 50% of the time; estimates seemex fuel vehicles are run on E85 less than 1% of the time. 7

Rajagopal, Deepak

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for CO2 evolved from oil shale." Fuel Processing TechnologyT. and G. A. Miller (1980). "Oil Shales and Carbon Dioxide."oil, coal, tar sands, oil shale Natural gas, biomass Natural

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Manufacture of Corn Ethanol. St. Louis, National CornWetcake is a form of corn ethanol co-product that requiresTypical dry-grind corn ethanol facilities burn fossil fuels

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid vehicles (C5) Fuel cell vehicles Battery electric vehicles Low- GHG Biofuel Existing Vehicles and Advancedand Advanced Batteries Plug-in hybrid vehicles (F5, F10) Battery electric

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid vehicles (C5) Fuel cell vehicles Battery electric vehicles Low-GHG Biofuel Existing Vehicles and Advancedand Advanced Batteries Plug-in hybrid vehicles (F5, F10) Battery electric

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for production of Fischer Tropsch liquids and power viahigher value is for Fischer-Tropsch liquids. See Section 4.cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel from wood

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for production of Fischer Tropsch liquids and power viahigher value is for Fischer-Tropsch liquids. See Section 4.cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel from wood

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Operator Certification Standards for Fossil Fuel Fired Plants: Survey of State and Regional Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Agency has only started addressing the issue of certification for fossil fuel power plant operators within the last two years. This report, which includes data collected from research of state and local authorities that currently require power plant operators to be certified or licensed, is the first phase of a certification program for Fossil Fuel Fired Power Plants. The report also addresses the possible future shortage of skilled workers needed by the power plants and the ...

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

423

Global residential appliance standards  

SciTech Connect

In most countries, residential electricity consumption typically ranges from 20% to 40% of total electricity consumption. This energy is used for heating, cooling, refrigeration and other end-uses. Significant energy savings are possible if new appliance purchases are for models with higher efficiency than that of existing models. There are several ways to ensure or encourage such an outcome, for example, appliance rebates, innovative procurement, and minimum efficiency standards. This paper focuses on the latter approach. At the present time, the US is the only country with comprehensive appliance energy efficiency standards. However, many other countries, such as Australia, Canada, the European Community (EC), Japan and Korea, are considering enacting standards. The greatest potential impact of minimum efficiency standards for appliances is in the developing countries (e.g., China and India), where saturations of household appliances are relatively low but growing rapidly. This paper discusses the potential savings that could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also could be achieved from global appliance efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers. It also discusses the impediments to establishing common standards for certain appliance types, such as differing test procedures, characteristics, and fuel prices. A methodology for establishing global efficiency standards for refrigerators and freezers is described.

Turiel, I.; McMahon, J.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (US); Lebot, B. [Agence Francaise pour la Maitrise de l`Energie, Valbonne (FR)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

FY 2012 USED FUEL DISPOSITION CAMPAIGN TRANSPORTATION TASK REPORT ON INL EFFORTS SUPPORTING THE MODERATOR EXCLUSION CONCEPT AND STANDARDIZED TRANSPORTATION  

SciTech Connect

Following the defunding of the Yucca Mountain Project, it is reasonable to assume that commercial used fuel will remain in storage for a longer time period than initially assumed. Previous transportation task work in FY 2011, under the Department of Energys Office of Nuclear Energy, Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, proposed an alternative for safely transporting used fuel regardless of the structural integrity of the used fuel, baskets, poisons, or storage canisters after an extended period of storage. This alternative assures criticality safety during transportation by implementing a concept that achieves moderator exclusion (no in-leakage of moderator into the used fuel cavity). By relying upon a component inside of the transportation cask that provides a watertight function, a strong argument can be made that moderator intrusion is not credible and should not be a required assumption for criticality evaluations during normal or hypothetical accident conditions of transportation. This Transportation Task report addresses the assigned FY 2012 work that supports the proposed moderator exclusion concept as well as a standardized transportation system. The two tasks assigned were to (1) promote the proposed moderator exclusion concept to both regulatory and nuclear industry audiences and (2) advance specific technical issues in order to improve American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 3 rules for storage and transportation containments. The common point behind both of the assigned tasks is to provide more options that can be used to resolve current issues being debated regarding the future transportation of used fuel after extended storage.

D. K. Morton

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Criticality Analysis for Proposed Maximum Fuel Loading in a Standardized SNF Canister with Type 1a Baskets  

SciTech Connect

This document represents a summary version of the criticality analysis done to support loading SNF in a Type 1a basket/standard canister combination. Specifically, this engineering design file (EDF) captures the information pertinent to the intact condition of four fuel types with different fissile loads and their calculated reactivities. These fuels are then degraded into various configurations inside a canister without the presence of significant moderation. The important aspect of this study is the portrayal of the fuel degradation and its effect on the reactivity of a single canister given the supposition there will be continued moderation exclusion from the canister. Subsequent analyses also investigate the most reactive dry canister in a nine canister array inside a hypothetical transport cask, both dry and partial to complete flooding inside the transport cask. The analyses also includes a comparison of the most reactive configuration to other benchmarked fuels using a software package called TSUNAMI, which is part of the SCALE 5.0 suite of software.

Chad Pope; Larry L. Taylor; Soon Sam Kim

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fuel.vp  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Table F7: Distillate Fuel Oil Consumption Estimates, 2011 State Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric Power Total Residential Commercial Industrial...

427

Combining a New Vehicle Fuel Economy Standard with a Cap-and-Trade Policy: Energy and Economic Impact in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States has adopted fuel economy standards that require increases in the on-road efficiency of new passenger vehicles, with the goal of reducing petroleum use, as well as (more recently) greenhouse gas (GHG) ...

Karplus, V.J.

428

"Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," " " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " "," ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" "NAICS"," ","for ","Residual","and","Natural","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "Code(a)","End Use","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)"," Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coke and Breeze)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,4,9

429

Standard Compliance: Guidelines to Help State and Alternative Fuel Provider Fleets Meet Their Energy Policy Act Requirements, 10 CFR Part 490 (Book)  

SciTech Connect

This guidebook addresses the primary requirements of the Alternative Fuel Transportation Program to help state and alternative fuel provider fleets comply with the Energy Policy Act via the Standard Compliance option. It also addresses the topics that covered fleets ask about most frequently.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C10A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption...

431

* Corresponding author -kfingerman@berkeley.edu 1 Integrating Water Sustainability into the Low Carbon Fuel Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Gleick, 1994) to over 39 gallons for fuel from tar sands or oil shale (Davis and Velikanov, 1979). Nearly requires from 3.4 gallons of water (Gleick, 1994) to over 60 gallons for processing of tar sands or oil shale (Davis and Velikanov, 1979). These figures, however, reflect almost the entirety of the life

Kammen, Daniel M.

432

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consumption and expenditures, April 1984 through March 1985: Part 2, Regional data. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect

Included here are data at the Census region and division level on consumption of and expenditures for the major fuels used in residential households - electricity, natural gas, fuel oil/kerosene, and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on wood consumption. Section 1 of this report contains data on the average amount of energy consumed per household for space heating in 1984 and the corresponding expenditures. Sections 2 through 7 summarize the energy consumption and expenditure patterns. Appendices A through D contain information on how the survey was conducted, estimates of the size of the housing unit in square feet and the quality of the data. Procedures for calculating relative standard errors (RSE) are located in Appendix C, Quality of the Data. Procedures for estimating the end-use statistics are located in Appendix D. Census and weather maps, and related publications are located in Appendices E through G.

Not Available

1987-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

433

Table 2.10 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditure ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

parking garages. Note: Data are estimates. Statistics for individual fuels are for all buildings using each fuel. ... "Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption

434

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching (MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey 1994 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Logo Full Report - (file size 5.4 MB) pages:531 Selected Sections (PDF format) Contents (file size 56 kilobytes, 10 pages). Overview (file size 597 kilobytes, 11 pages). Chapters 1-3 (file size 265 kilobytes, 9 pages). Chapter 4 (file size 1,070 kilobytes, 15 pages). Appendix A - Detailed Tables Tables A1 - A8 (file size 1,031 kilobytes, 139 pages). Tables A9 - A23 (file size 746 kilobytes, 119 pages). Tables A24 - A29 (file size 485 kilobytes, 84 pages). Tables A30 - A44 (file size 338 kilobytes, 39 pages). Appendix B (file size 194 kilobytes, 24 pages). Appendix C (file size 116 kilobytes, 16 pages).

435

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ZIP (all tables) Release Date: January 11, 2013 : CE4.1 End-Use Consumption by Fuel Totals, U.S. Homes: XLS: CE4.2 End-Use Consumption by Fuel Totals, Northeast Homes ...

436

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C2. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy Sources in Physical Units, 2011 State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power f Fuel Ethanol g...

437

Approaches to representing aircraft fuel efficiency performance for the purpose of a commercial aircraft certification standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing concern over the potential harmful effects of green house gas emissions from various sources has motivated the consideration of an aircraft certification standard as one way to reduce aircraft C02 emissions and ...

Yutko, Brian M. (Brian Matthew)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Approaches to Representing Aircraft Fuel Efficiency Performance for the Purpose of a Commercial Aircraft Certification Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing concern over the potential harmful effects of green house gas emissions from various sources has motivated the consideration of an aircraft certification standard as one way to reduce aircraft CO2 emissions and ...

Yutko, Brian

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

439

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Manufacture of Corn Ethanol. St. Louis, National CornTypical dry-grind corn ethanol facilities burn fossil fuelsin a standard dry-grind corn ethanol refinery may now fall

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The gross output for the petroleum and coal products subsector grew by about 3 percent, ... Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey, MECS Definition of Fuel Use, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EA-1778: Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433 and 435, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and 10 CFR Part 435, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings.

442

Evaluation of transuranium isotopes inventory for Candu/ACR standard and SEU spent fuel and the possibility to transmute them  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The main disadvantage of nuclear energy is the quantity of long lived radioactive waste produced in a NPP. Transmutation could be one of the solutions to reduce it. Waste transmutation will require a suitable deployment of techniques for spent fuel reprocessing. At present, reprocessing is done by aqueous methods that are very efficient for Pu separation (up to 99.9%). For transmutation applications, new partitioning processes must be developed for minor actinides separation from the high level waste. Although these processes are still very much at the research stage, industrial scale-up will result in the deployment of new, more specific separation techniques for transmutation applications. Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) techniques could contribute to reduce the radioactive inventory and its associated radio-toxicity. Scientists are looking for ways to drastically reduce both the mass and the radio-toxicity of the nuclear waste to be stored in a deep geological repository, and to reduce the time needed to reach the radioactivity level of the raw material originally used to produce energy. The first stage in the transmutation process is the isotopes inventory formed in the spent fuel. In this paper is made an intercomparison evaluation using WIMS 5B.12 and ORIGEN computer codes. Using these two codes, there is evaluated the isotopes released by a fuel standard from a Candu reactor. Moreover, there is simulated an inventory released by a Candu-SEU reactor and an ACR reactor. (authors)

Ghizdeanu, Elena Nineta; Pavelescu, Alexandru [University Politehnica of Bucharest - Faculty of Power Engineering, 313 Splaiul Independentei, RO-060042, Bucharest 6 (Romania); Balaceanu, Victoria [Institute for Nuclear Research, Campului Str., 1, Mioveni P.O. Box 78, 0300 Pitesti (Romania)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. energy-related carbon-dioxide emissions, including both direct fuel consumption (primarily natural gas)

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Commerce study looks at cost of pollution control for fossil-fuel power industry  

SciTech Connect

Environmental controls for fossil-fuel power plants consumed 1.3 percent of the national fuel used in 1974, with the largest demand going for sulfur dioxide emission control. Projections for power plant consumption to meet environmental standards range as high as eight percent in the 1980s. Less-energy-consuming systems include coal blending, tall stacks, and supplementary control systems; while high consumers are using coal washing operations in place of scrubbers, fuel transportation, conversion to acceptable fuels, waste heat disposal, and particulate controls. A summary table presents sulfur dioxide regulations in terms of their goals and their anticipated minimum and maximum fuel consumption. (DCK)

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption and Expenditures Tables Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel ............................................... 124 Table C2. Total Energy Expenditures by Major Fuel................................................ 130 Table C3. Consumption for Sum of Major Fuels ...................................................... 135 Table C4. Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels....................................................... 140 Table C5. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels................................................................................................... 145 Table C6. Expenditures by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels......................... 150 Table C7. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of

446

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

447

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

448

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

449

Preliminary design specification for Department of Energy standardized spent nuclear fuel canisters. Volume 2: Rationale document  

SciTech Connect

This document (Volume 2) is a companion document to a preliminary design specification for the design of canisters to be used during the handling, storage, transportation, and repository disposal of Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This document contains no procurement information, such as the number of canisters to be fabricated, explicit timeframes for deliverables, etc. However, this rationale document does provide background information and design philosophy in order to help engineers better understand the established design criteria (contained in Volume 1 respectively) necessary to correctly design and fabricate these DOE SNF canisters.

1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

450

Table SH7. Average Consumption for Space Heating by Main Space ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil (gallons) Main Space Heating Fuel Used (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel as a main heating source) Table SH7.

451

RSE Table 5.7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.7  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.7;" 7 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.7;" " Unit: Percents." " ",,,"Distillate" " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,4,9 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel",6,4,10,2,10,13 " Conventional Boiler Use",12,5,14,2,10,8 " CHP and/or Cogeneration Process",4,2,6,3,2,19

452

RSE Table 5.8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8;" 8 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.8;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," ","Distillate"," "," " " ","Net Demand",,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " ","for ","Residual","and","Natural ","LPG and","(excluding Coal" "End Use","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,3,6,2,3,9 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel",6,4,14,2,9,13 " Conventional Boiler Use",12,5,14,2,10,8 " CHP and/or Cogeneration Process",4,2,6,3,2,18

453

RSE Table 5.6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ",," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural","LPG and","(excluding Coal"," " "End Use","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coke and Breeze)","Other(e)" ,"Total United States" "TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION",2,2,3,6,2,3,9,2 "Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel",0,11,4,14,2,9,13,0

454

Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

861,063 864,113 913,229 916,797 938,340 987,957 1983-2012 861,063 864,113 913,229 916,797 938,340 987,957 1983-2012 Alabama 11,345 11,136 10,460 10,163 10,367 12,389 1983-2012 Alaska 227,374 211,878 219,161 211,918 208,531 214,335 1983-2012 Arizona 20 20 17 19 17 12 1983-2012 Arkansas 1,502 2,521 4,091 5,340 6,173 6,599 1983-2012 California 56,936 64,689 63,127 64,931 44,379 51,154 1983-2012 Colorado 39,347 44,231 64,873 66,083 78,800 76,462 1983-2012 Florida 654 897 94 4,512 4,896 6,080 1983-2012 Gulf of Mexico 115,528 102,389 103,976 108,490 101,217 93,985 1999-2012 Illinois 39 41 62 50 101 122 1983-2012 Indiana 101 161 211 283 433 506 1983-2012 Kansas 10,232 12,803 15,169 13,461 12,781 17,017 1983-2012 Kentucky 2,676 3,914 4,862 5,626 5,925 6,095 1983-2012

455

Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View...

456

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan - Section 3.7 Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety, Codes and Standards Safety, Codes and Standards Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan Page 3.7 - 1 3.7 Hydrogen Safety, Codes and Standards The United States and many other countries have established laws and regulations that require commercial products and infrastructure to meet all applicable codes and standards to demonstrate that they are safe, perform as designed and are compatible with the systems in which they are used. Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies have a history of safe use with market deployment and commercialization underway. The Safety, Codes and Standards sub-program (SCS) facilitates deployment and commercialization of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies by developing information resources for their safe use. SCS relies on extensive input from automobile

457

The effects of energy policies in China on energy consumption and GDP1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biogas, stalks and firewood by rural residents by region, and fossil fuel energy consumption refers variable is: Biogas consumption per capita Stalks consumption per capita Firewood consumption per capita FE

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

458

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

459

The Analysis and Assessment on Heating Energy Consumption of SAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The article introduced the fuel-energy consumption and outdoor temperatures of three heating terms from year 1999 to 2002 of SAT's fuel-boiler heating system. It demonstrated the relationship between the consumption and the temperatures by using the regression analysis method. It also calculated the economization of the fuel, introduced the methods of economizing fuel and, made an assessment on it.

Zhang, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Margins up; consumption down  

SciTech Connect

The results of a survey of dealers in the domestic fuel oil industry are reported. Wholesale prices, reacting to oversupply, decreased as did retail prices; retail prices decreased at a slower rate so profit margins were larger. This trend produced competitive markets as price-cutting became the method for increasing a dealer's share of the profits. Losses to other fuels decreased, when the figures were compared to earlier y; and cash flow was very good for most dealers. In summary, profits per gallon of oil delivered increased, while the consumption of gasoline per customer decreased. 22 tables.

Mantho, M.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data Background image of CNSTAT logo The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) routinely uses feedback from customers and outside experts to help improve its programs and products. As part of an assessment of its consumption

463

Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavy-water-moderated, light-water-moderated and liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors fueled with natural or low-enriched uranium and containing thorium mixed with the uranium or in separate target channels. U-232 decays with a 69-year half-life through 1.9-year half-life Th-228 to Tl-208, which emits a 2.6 MeV gamma ray upon decay. We find that pressurized light-water-reactors fueled with LEU-thorium fuel at high burnup (70 MWd/kg) produce U-233 with U-232 contamination levels of about 0.4 percent. At this contamination level, a 5 kg sphere of U-233 would produce a gammaray dose rate of 13 and 38 rem/hr at 1 meter one and ten years after chemical purification respectively. The associated plutonium contains 7.5 percent of the undesirable heat-generating 88-year half-life isotope Pu-238. However, just as it is possible to produce weapon-grade plutonium in low-burnup fuel, it is also practical to use heavy-water reactors to produce U-233 containing only a few ppm of U-232 if the thorium is segregated in target channels and discharged a few times more frequently than the natural-uranium driver fuel. The dose rate from a 5-kg solid sphere of U-233 containing 5 ppm U-232 could be reduced by a further factor of 30, to about 2 mrem/hr, with a close-fitting lead sphere weighing about 100 kg. Thus the proliferation resistance of thorium fuel cycles depends very much upon how they are implemented. The original version of this manuscript was received by Science & Global Security on

Jungmin Kang A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

101. Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Consumption 1. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

465

Performance of Thorium-Based Mixed Oxide Fuels for the Consumption of Plutonium and Minor Actinides in Current and Advanced Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A renewed interest in thorium-based fuels has arisen lately based on the need for proliferation resistance, longer fuel cycles, higher burnup and improved wasteform characteristics. Recent studies have been directed toward homogeneously mixed, heterogeneously mixed, and seed-and-blanket thorium-uranium fuel cycles that rely on "in situ" use of the bred-in U-233. However, due to the higher initial enrichment required to achieve acceptable burnups, these fuels are encountering economic constraints. Thorium can nevertheless play a large role in the nuclear fuel cycle; particularly in the reduction of plutonium. While uranium-based mixedoxide (MOX) fuel will decrease the amount of plutonium, the reduction is limited due to the breeding of more plutonium (and higher actinides) from the U-238. Here we present calculational results and a comparison of the potential burnup of a thorium-based and uranium-based mixed oxide fuel in a light water reactor (LWR). Although the uranium-based fuels outperformed the thorium-based fuels in achievable burnup, a depletion comparison of the initially charged plutonium (both reactor and weapons grade) showed that the thorium-based fuels outperformed the uranium-based fuels by more that a factor of 2; where more than 70% of the total plutonium in the thorium-based fuel is consumed during the cycle. This is significant considering that the achievable burnup of the thorium-based fuels were 1.4 to 4.6 times less than the uranium-based fuels. Furthermore, use of a thorium-based fuel could also be used as a strategy for reducing the amount of long-lived nuclides (including the minor actinides), and thus the radiotoxicity in spent nuclear fuel. Although the breeding of U-233 is a concern, the presence of U-232 and its daughter products can aid in making this fuel self-protecting, and/or enough U-238 can be added to denature the fissile uranium. From these calculations, it appears that thorium-based fuel for plutonium incineration is superior as compared to uranium-based fuel, and should be considered as an alternative to traditional MOX in both current and future reactor designs.

Weaver, Kevan Dean; Herring, James Stephen

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Renewable Portfolio Standard | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portfolio Standard Portfolio Standard Renewable Portfolio Standard < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Water Solar Heating & Cooling Water Heating Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standard Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority The New York Public Service Commission (PSC) adopted a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) in September 2004 and issued implementation rules in April 2005. As originally designed, New York's RPS had a renewables target of 25% of state electricity consumption by 2013, but was expanded in January 2010 to 30% by 2015 by order of the PSC. Of this 30%, approximately 20.7% of the

467

The Impact of Residential Density on Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding total residential transportation energy usageon Vehicle Usage and Energy Consumption total annual fuelUsage and Energy Consumption Gasoline-equivalent gallons per year total

Golob, Thomas F; Brownstone, David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Table 2.1f Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.1f Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year: Primary Consumption 1: Fossil Fuels: Nuclear

469

Transportation fuels and engines for optimum energy utilization: An assessment of energy consumption from resources through end use: Final report, Volume 1, August 1985 for the project, Technical assessment of future engines and alternative fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was initiated to investigate the potential for improving the resource utilization efficiency in the manufacture and end-use of fuels for transportation. While emphasis is placed on the development of fuels from coal and oil shale and on the engine technologies most suitable for those fuels, petroleum-derived fuels are considered as well. A necessary part of this study was to develop information about the energy efficiency of various steps of fuel processing, both with synthetic fuels and petroleum. The configurations of synthetic fuel processes and petroleum refineries are, of course, seemingly endless in number, so, in order to keep the study at a manageable and affordable scope, only a very limited number of synthetic fuel processes were investigated in detail and only major upgrading process operations were included.

Thomas, R.L.; Cornell, J.J.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) 2009 Technical ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) Using the 2009 microdata file to compute estimates and standard errors (RSEs) February 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis

471

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Fossil Fuels Fossil Fuels (as commingled) Coal Natural Gas excluding Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Petroleum Total Natural Gas including Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Motor Gasoline including Fuel Ethanol a Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline excluding Fuel Ethanol a Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Alabama ........... 651.0 614.8 156.5 13.4 12.8 304.5 13.4 49.1 549.5 1,815.4 614.8 319.8 Alaska ............... 15.5 337.0 85.1 118.2 1.3 31.9 1.9 28.6 267.1 619.6 337.0 34.6 Arizona ............. 459.9 293.7 151.8 21.5 9.1 297.3 (s) 21.1 500.9 1,254.5 293.7 323.4 Arkansas ........... 306.1 288.6 134.9 5.9 9.4 165.4 0.2 19.8 335.7 930.5 288.6 175.6 California .......... 55.3 2,196.6 567.0 549.7 67.2 1,695.4 186.9 339.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 2,196.6

472

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shortcomings. First, it targets only biofuels and not othertarget of 50 and 60% GHG reductions is an admirable but clumsy approach. It forces biofuels

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two years ago it was corn ethanol; now it is electricity forethanol in Brazil and corn ethanol in the United States.and state subsidies for corn ethanol, and now is providing

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land-use changes. When biofuel production increases, land ison carbon releases. If biofuel production does not result in

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or buy credits from biofuel producers, or they could buyon the oil distributors, biofuel producers, and electricityland-use changes. When biofuel production increases, land is

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Fuel.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table F9: Residual Fuel Oil Consumption Estimates, 2011 State Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric Power Total Commercial Industrial Transportation Electric Power Total...

477

Health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants. Volume 6 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. [In California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants, emphasizing impacts which may occur through emissions into the atmosphere, and treating other impacts briefly. Federal regulations as well as California state and local regulations are reviewed. Emissions are characterized by power plant type, including: coal-fired, oil-fired, gas-fired, combined cycle and advanced fossil-fuel plants; and liquid and vapor geothermal systems. Dispersion and transformation of emissions are treated. The state of knowledge of health effects, based on epidemiological, physiological, and biomedical studies, is reviewed.

Case, G.D.; Bertolli, T.A.; Bodington, J.C.; Choy, T.A.; Nero, A.V.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency.

479

December 2007 Standards Forum and Standards Actions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Standards Forum & Standards Actions Page 1 December 2007 The Standards Forum & Standards Actions Page 1 December 2007 Continued on next page Technical Standards Program Manager's Note 1 Teaching Standards Development- Inspiring the Next Generation 2 The EPA Radiation Standard for Spent-Fuel Storage in a Geological Repository 3 Expanded Access to Hydrogen Codes and Standards 4 Really Following the Building Code 6 Technical Standards Manager Spotlight 7

480

Fuel Economy Web Services  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

rating for fuelType1 scoreAlt - EPA 1-10 smog rating for fuelType2 smartwayScore - SmartWay Code standard - Vehicle Emission Standard Code stdText - Vehicle Emission Standard...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel consumption standards" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 8020: Reduction in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction in Fuel Consumption with Fuel Cell Vehicles Update to: 5018 Originator: Tien Nguyen Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 29, 2008 Item: A hydrogen-powered fuel...

482

Automobile Buyer Decisions about Fuel Economy and Fuel Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automotive Technology and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 Throughof the Corporate Average Fuel Economy Standards. EconomicImplications for Fuel Economy Policy. Presentation to SAE

Kurani, Ken; Turrentine, Thomas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

NIST: NIF - PEM Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fuel cells are operationally equivalent to a battery. The reactants or fuel in a fuel cell can be replaced unlike a standard disposable or rechargeable ...

484

Table AP2. Total Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units U.S. Households (millions) Fuels Used (physical units) Electricity (billion kWh)

485

Table AP5. Average Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table AP5. Average Consumption for Home Appliances and Lighting by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units per Household U.S. Households (millions) Fuels Used

486

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy

487

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C12A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of...

488

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major...

489

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1...

490

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C9A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3...

491

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C11A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of...

492

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C5A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of...

493

Illinois energy consumption 1963-1977  

SciTech Connect

This report contains current and historical Illinois energy consumption data by consuming sector and fuel type. It also contains detailed description of mapping techniques used in developing the data.

Hill, L.; Biermann, W.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Table SH5. Total Expenditures for Space Heating by Major Fuels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Space Heating Fuel 4 (millions) Fuel Oil U.S. Households ... 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Natural Gas

495

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Exemptions from Standard...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Standard Compliance Alternative Fuel Vehicles Biodiesel Credits Reporting Exemptions Alternative Compliance Alternative Fuel Petitions...

496

EPAct Transportation Regulatory Activities: Reporting Standard...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Covered Fleets Compliance Methods Standard Compliance Alternative Fuel Vehicles Biodiesel Credits Reporting Exemptions Alternative Compliance Alternative Fuel Petitions...

497

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ...

498

Table 10.1 Renewable Energy Production and Consumption by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Production equals consumption for all renewable energy sources except biofuels. 9 Wood and wood-derived fuels. 2 Total biomass inputs to the ...

499

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ...

500

Modelling road and rail freight energy consumption: A comparative study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??After reviewing land based freight growth trends nationally and internationally, this thesis discusses the main parameters governing fuel consumption, as well as past approaches in (more)

Parajuli, Ashis

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z