National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fuel consumers generally

  1. Fact #591: October 5, 2009 Consumer Reports Tests Vehicle Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5, 2009 Consumer Reports Tests Vehicle Fuel Economy by Speed Fact 591: October 5, 2009 Consumer Reports Tests Vehicle Fuel Economy by Speed Seven vehicles were tested by ...

  2. Indonesian fuel consumers shouldering development costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-08-22

    A graph shows how Indonesia's prices for regular and premium leaded gasolines and diesel fuel compare to the world average price, in US dollars per gallon: USA $0.28 lower for regular leaded gasoline, $0.30 lower for premium leaded, and $0.48 lower for diesel. Such proximity to world averages is of note in the context that Indonesia, a developing country with pressing needs for industrial and social development, does not internally provide the deep consumer subsidies that have long persisted in many such oil-producing countries. Although the other three countries shown on the graph have recently moved to cut internal fuel price subsidies, they still price these three important fuels more deeply below the world average than does Indonesia. A table details Indonesia's internal market price changes over time, by petroleum product. A chart tracks Indonesia's oil exports since 1966. The year of the first world oil price shock, 1973, shows a dramatic increase in exports, but that near-doubling was not repeated during the period of the second price shock, 1978-1979. As of 182, exports (by now including condensates) had fallen to pre-Arab Oil Embargo levels. This issue contains the fuel price/tax series and the principal industrial fuel prices for August 1984 for countries of the Western Hemisphere. Also, beginning with this issue, Energy Detente will appear only in English rather than both English and Spanish, as heretofore.

  3. U.S. Fuel Consumed at Refineries

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Liquefied Petroleum Gases 2,404 1,291 1,521 1,311 2,305 3,009 1986-2015 Distillate Fuel Oil 440 483 539 475 309 364 1986-2015 Residual Fuel Oil 980 759 540 443 413 395 1986-2015 ...

  4. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlstrom, Charles, M., Jr.

    2009-07-07

    This report is the final technical report for DOE Program DE-FC36-04GO14301 titled “Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications”. Due to the public nature of this report some of the content reported in confidential reports and meetings to the DOE is not covered in detail in this report and some of the content has been normalized to not show actual values. There is a comparison of the projects accomplishments with the objectives, an overview of some of the key subsystem work, and a review of the three levels of prototypes demonstrated during the program. There is also a description of the eventual commercial product and market this work is leading towards. The work completed under this program has significantly increased the understanding of how Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) can be deployed successfully to power consumer electronic devices. The prototype testing has demonstrated the benefits a direct methanol fuel cell system has over batteries typically used for powering consumer electronic devices. Three generations of prototypes have been developed and tested for performance, robustness and life. The technologies researched and utilized in the fuel cell stack and related subsystems for these prototypes are leveraged from advances in other industries such as the hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell industry. The work under this program advanced the state of the art of direct methanol fuel cells. The system developed by MTI micro fuel cells aided by this program differs significantly from conventional DMFC designs and offers compelling advantages in the areas of performance, life, size, and simplicity. The program has progressed as planned resulting in the completion of the scope of work and available funding in December 2008. All 18 of the final P3 prototypes builds have been tested and the results showed significant improvements over P2 prototypes in build yield, initial performance, and durability. The systems have

  5. Fact #764: January 28, 2013 Model Year 2013 Brings More Fuel Efficient Choices for Consumers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Over the last six years, manufacturers have made more fuel efficient choices available to consumers in several size classes. For a consumer purchasing a new large car in 2008, the highest combined...

  6. Fact #591: October 5, 2009 Consumer Reports Tests Vehicle Fuel Economy by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Speed | Department of Energy 1: October 5, 2009 Consumer Reports Tests Vehicle Fuel Economy by Speed Fact #591: October 5, 2009 Consumer Reports Tests Vehicle Fuel Economy by Speed Seven vehicles were tested by Consumer Reports recently to determine the fuel economy of the vehicles at a given speed. For these vehicles, the decline in fuel economy from a speed of 55 miles per hour (mph) to 75 mph was between 20% and 30%. The Honda Insight, which is a hybrid vehicle, had the greatest fuel

  7. H2FIRST: A partnership to advance hydrogen fueling station technology driving an optimal consumer experience.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moen, Christopher D.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Pratt, Joseph William; Balfour, Bruce; Noma, Edwin Yoichi; Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; K. Wipke; J. Kurtz; D. Terlip; K. Harrison; S. Sprik

    2014-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) is establishing the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) partnership, led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). FCTO is establishing this partnership and the associated capabilities in support of H2USA, the public/private partnership launched in 2013. The H2FIRST partnership provides the research and technology acceleration support to enable the widespread deployment of hydrogen infrastructure for the robust fueling of light-duty fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). H2FIRST will focus on improving private-sector economics, safety, availability and reliability, and consumer confidence for hydrogen fueling. This whitepaper outlines the goals, scope, activities associated with the H2FIRST partnership.

  8. SPEAR fuel reliability code system. General description. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, R.

    1980-03-01

    A general description is presented for the SPEAR fuel reliability code system. Included is a discussion of the methodology employed and the structure of the code system, as well as discussion of the major components: the data preparation routines, the mechanistic fuel performance model, the mechanistic cladding failure model, and the statistical failure model.

  9. Survey Evidence on the Willingness of U.S. Consumers to Pay for Automotive Fuel Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Evans, David H; Hiestand, John

    2013-01-01

    Prospect theory, which was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2002, holds that human beings faced with a risky bet will tend to value potential losses about twice as much as potential gains. Previous research has demonstrated that prospect theory could be sufficient to explain an energy paradox in the market for automotive fuel economy. This paper analyzes data from four random sample surveys of 1,000 U.S. households each in 2004, 2011, 2012 and 2013. Households were asked about willingness to pay for future fuel savings as well as the annual fuel savings necessary to justify a given upfront payment. Payback periods inferred from household responses are consistent over time and across different formulations of questions. Mean calculated payback periods are short, about 3 years, but there is substantial dispersion among individual responses. Calculated payback periods do not appear to be correlated with the attributes of respondents. Respondents were able to quantitatively describe their uncertainty about both vehicle fuel economy and future fuel prices. Simulation of loss averse behavior based on this stated uncertainty illustrate how loss aversion could lead consumers to substantially undervalue future fuel savings relative to their expected value.

  10. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Preprint M. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Bremson University of California Davis K. Solo Lexidyne, LLC Presented at the 31st USAEE/IAEE North American Conference Austin, Texas November 4-7, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5600-56898 January 2013 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a

  11. Silicon Based Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Chip for Portable Consumer Electronics -- Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Ludwiszewski

    2009-06-29

    LSIs fuel cell uses efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology, is manufactured using Micro Electrical Mechanical System (MEMS) fabrication methods, and runs on high energy fuels, such as butane and ethanol. The companys Fuel Cell on a Chip technology enables a form-factor battery replacement for portable electronic devices that has the potential to provide an order-of-magnitude run-time improvement over current batteries. Further, the technology is clean and environmentally-friendly. This Department of Energy funded project focused on accelerating the commercialization and market introduction of this technology through improvements in fuel cell chip power output, lifetime, and manufacturability.

  12. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Bremson, J.; Solo, K.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of retail stations can be a significant barrier to the adoption of alternative fuel light-duty vehicles in household markets. This is especially the case during early market growth when retail stations are likely to be sparse and when vehicles are dedicated in the sense that they can only be fuelled with a new alternative fuel. For some bi-fuel vehicles, which can also fuel with conventional gasoline or diesel, limited availability will not necessarily limit vehicle sales but can limit fuel use. The impact of limited availability on vehicle purchase decisions is largely a function of geographic coverage and consumer perception. In this paper we review previous attempts to quantify the value of availability and present results from two studies that rely upon distinct methodologies. The first study relies upon stated preference data from a discrete choice survey and the second relies upon a station clustering algorithm and a rational actor value of time framework. Results from the two studies provide an estimate of the discrepancy between stated preference cost penalties and a lower bound on potential revealed cost penalties.

  13. Consumer Choice of E85 Denatured Ethanol Fuel Blend: Price Sensitivity and Cost of Limited Fuel Availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David

    2014-12-01

    The promotion of greater use of E85, a fuel blend of 85% denatured ethanol, by flex-fuel vehicle owners is an important means of complying with the Renewable Fuel Standard 2. A good understanding of factors affecting E85 demand is necessary for effective policies that promote E85 and for developing models that forecast E85 sales in the United States. In this paper, the sensitivity of aggregate E85 demand to E85 and gasoline prices is estimated, as is the relative availability of E85 versus gasoline. The econometric analysis uses recent data from Minnesota, North Dakota, and Iowa. The more recent data allow a better estimate of nonfleet demand and indicate that the market price elasticity of E85 choice is substantially higher than previously estimated.

  14. Consumer Choice of E85 Denatured Ethanol Fuel Blend: Price Sensitivity and Cost of Limited Fuel Availability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David

    2014-12-01

    The promotion of greater use of E85, a fuel blend of 85% denatured ethanol, by flex-fuel vehicle owners is an important means of complying with the Renewable Fuel Standard 2. A good understanding of factors affecting E85 demand is necessary for effective policies that promote E85 and for developing models that forecast E85 sales in the United States. In this paper, the sensitivity of aggregate E85 demand to E85 and gasoline prices is estimated, as is the relative availability of E85 versus gasoline. The econometric analysis uses recent data from Minnesota, North Dakota, and Iowa. The more recent data allowmore » a better estimate of nonfleet demand and indicate that the market price elasticity of E85 choice is substantially higher than previously estimated.« less

  15. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Preprint M. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Bremson University of California Davis K. Solo Lexidyne, LLC Presented at the 31st USAEE/IAEE North American Conference Austin, Texas November 4-7, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5600-56898

  16. A general framework for the assessment of solar fuel technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herron, JA; Kim, J; Upadhye, AA; Huber, GW; Maravelias, CT

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of carbon dioxide and water into fuels in a solar refinery presents a potential solution for reducing greenhouse gas emissions, while providing a sustainable source of fuels and chemicals. Towards realizing such a solar refinery, there are many technological advances that must be met in terms of capturing and sourcing the feedstocks (namely CO2, H2O, and solar energy) and in catalytically converting CO2 and H2O. In the first part of this paper, we review the state-of-the-art in solar energy collection and conversion to solar utilities (heat, electricity, and as a photon source for photo-chemical reactions), CO2 capture and separation technology, and non-biological methods for converting CO2 and H2O to fuels. The two principal methods for CO2 conversion include (1) catalytic conversion using solar-derived hydrogen and (2) direct reduction of CO2 using H2O and solar energy. Both hydrogen production and direct CO2 reduction can be performed electro-catalytically, photo-electrochemically, photo-catalytically, and thermochemically. All four of these methods are discussed. In the second part of this paper, we utilize process modeling to assess the energy efficiency and economic feasibility of a generic solar refinery. The analysis demonstrates that the realization of a solar refinery is contingent upon significant technological improvements in all areas described above (solar energy capture and conversion, CO2 capture, and catalytic conversion processes).

  17. SPEAR-BETA fuel performance code system. Volume 1. General description. Final report. [BWR; PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christensen, R.

    1982-04-01

    This document provides a general description of the SPEAR-BETA fuel reliability code system. Included is a discussion of the methodology employed and the structure of the code system, as well as discussion of the major components: the data preparation routines, the mechanistic fuel performance model, the mechanistic cladding failure model, and the statistical failure model.

  18. Fuel Economy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department is investing in groundbreaking research that will make cars weigh less, drive further and consume less fuel.

  19. Consumer Vehicle Choice Model Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Changzheng; Greene, David L

    2012-08-01

    In response to the Fuel Economy and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions standards, automobile manufacturers will need to adopt new technologies to improve the fuel economy of their vehicles and to reduce the overall GHG emissions of their fleets. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed the Optimization Model for reducing GHGs from Automobiles (OMEGA) to estimate the costs and benefits of meeting GHG emission standards through different technology packages. However, the model does not simulate the impact that increased technology costs will have on vehicle sales or on consumer surplus. As the model documentation states, “While OMEGA incorporates functions which generally minimize the cost of meeting a specified carbon dioxide (CO2) target, it is not an economic simulation model which adjusts vehicle sales in response to the cost of the technology added to each vehicle.” Changes in the mix of vehicles sold, caused by the costs and benefits of added fuel economy technologies, could make it easier or more difficult for manufacturers to meet fuel economy and emissions standards, and impacts on consumer surplus could raise the costs or augment the benefits of the standards. Because the OMEGA model does not presently estimate such impacts, the EPA is investigating the feasibility of developing an adjunct to the OMEGA model to make such estimates. This project is an effort to develop and test a candidate model. The project statement of work spells out the key functional requirements for the new model.

  20. Alternatives to traditional transportation fuels: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report presents the first compilation by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of information on alternatives to gasoline and diesel fuel. The purpose of the report is: (1) to provide background information on alternative transportation fuels and replacement fuels compared with gasoline and diesel fuel, and (2) to furnish preliminary estimates of alternative transportation fuels and alternative fueled vehicles as required by the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT), Title V, Section 503, ``Replacement Fuel Demand Estimates and Supply Information.`` Specifically, Section 503 requires the EIA to report annually on: (1) the number and type of alternative fueled vehicles in existence the previous year and expected to be in use the following year, (2) the geographic distribution of these vehicles, (3) the amounts and types of replacement fuels consumed, and (4) the greenhouse gas emissions likely to result from replacement fuel use. Alternative fueled vehicles are defined in this report as motorized vehicles licensed for on-road use, which may consume alternative transportation fuels. (Alternative fueled vehicles may use either an alternative transportation fuel or a replacement fuel.) The intended audience for the first section of this report includes the Secretary of Energy, the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the automobile manufacturing industry, the transportation fuel manufacturing and distribution industries, and the general public. The second section is designed primarily for persons desiring a more technical explanation of and background for the issues surrounding alternative transportation fuels.

  1. Nondestructive inspection of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) fueled clad girth welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, M. A. H.; George, T. G.; Lynch, C.; Padilla, M.; Moniz, P.; Guerrero, A.; Moyer, M. W.; Placr, A.

    1998-01-15

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The GPHS is fabricated using an iridium-alloy to contain the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet. GPHS capsules will be utilized in the upcoming Cassini mission to explore Saturn and its moons. The physical integrity of the girth weld is important to mission safety and performance. Because past experience had revealed a potential for initiation of small cracks in the girth weld overlap zone, a nondestructive inspection of each capsule weld is required. An ultrasonic method was used to inspect the welds of capsules fabricated for the Galileo mission. The instrument, transducer, and method used were state of the art at the time (early 1980s). The ultrasonic instrumentation and methods used to inspect the Cassini GPHSs was significantly upgraded from those used for the Galileo mission. GPHSs that had ultrasonic reflectors in excess of the reject specification level were subsequently inspected with radiography to provide additional engineering data used to accept/reject the heat source. This paper describes the Galileo-era ultrasonic instrumentation and methods and the subsequent upgrades made to support testing of Cassini GPHSs. Also discussed is the data obtained from radiographic examination and correlation to ultrasonic examination results.

  2. Nondestructive inspection of General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) fueled clad girth welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, M.A.; George, T.G.; Lynch, C.; Padilla, M.; Moniz, P.; Guerrero, A.; Moyer, M.W.; Placr, A.

    1998-01-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The GPHS is fabricated using an iridium-alloy to contain the {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel pellet. GPHS capsules will be utilized in the upcoming Cassini mission to explore Saturn and its moons. The physical integrity of the girth weld is important to mission safety and performance. Because past experience had revealed a potential for initiation of small cracks in the girth weld overlap zone, a nondestructive inspection of each capsule weld is required. An ultrasonic method was used to inspect the welds of capsules fabricated for the Galileo mission. The instrument, transducer, and method used were state of the art at the time (early 1980s). The ultrasonic instrumentation and methods used to inspect the Cassini GPHSs was significantly upgraded from those used for the Galileo mission. GPHSs that had ultrasonic reflectors in excess of the reject specification level were subsequently inspected with radiography to provide additional engineering data used to accept/reject the heat source. This paper describes the Galileo-era ultrasonic instrumentation and methods and the subsequent upgrades made to support testing of Cassini GPHSs. Also discussed is the data obtained from radiographic examination and correlation to ultrasonic examination results. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. fuel

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4%2A en Cheaper catalyst may lower fuel costs for hydrogen-powered cars http:www.nnsa.energy.govblogcheaper-catalyst-may-lower-fuel-costs-hydrogen-powered-cars

  4. fuel

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4%2A en Cheaper catalyst may lower fuel costs for hydrogen-powered cars http:nnsa.energy.govblogcheaper-catalyst-may-lower-fuel-costs-hydrogen-powered-cars

  5. Fuels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing ... Heavy Duty Fuels DISI Combustion HCCISCCI Fundamentals Spray Combustion Modeling ...

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun ...

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Minnesota (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minnesota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Minnesota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun ...

  8. Consumer Electronics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  9. Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    fuel vehicles produced, the number of alternative fuel vehicles in use, and the amount of alternative transportation fuels consumed in the United States. References Retrieved from...

  10. Small-scale biomass fueled cogeneration systems - A guidebook for general audiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiltsee, G.

    1993-12-01

    What is cogeneration and how does it reduce costs? Cogeneration is the production of power -- and useful heat -- from the same fuel. In a typical biomass-fueled cogeneration plant, a steam turbine drives a generator, producing electricity. The plant uses steam from the turbine for heating, drying, or other uses. The benefits of cogeneration can mostly easily be seen through actual samples. For example, cogeneration fits well with the operation of sawmills. Sawmills can produce more steam from their waste wood than they need for drying lumber. Wood waste is a disposal problem unless the sawmill converts it to energy. The case studies in Section 8 illustrate some pluses and minuses of cogeneration. The electricity from the cogeneration plant can do more than meet the in-house requirements of the mill or manufacturing plant. PURPA -- the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 -- allows a cogenerator to sell power to a utility and make money on the excess power it produces. It requires the utility to buy the power at a fair price -- the utility`s {open_quotes}avoided cost.{close_quotes} This can help make operation of a cogeneration plant practical.

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Renewable Fuel Distributor and Vehicle Manufacturer Liability Protection Renewable fuel refiners, suppliers, terminals, wholesalers, distributors, retailers, and motor vehicle manufacturers and dealers are not liable for property damages related to a customer's purchase of renewable fuel, including blends, if the consumer selected the fuel for use. Motor fuel blended with any amount of renewable fuel will not be considered a defective product provided the fuel compiles with motor fuel quality

  12. General circulation model calculations of the direct radiative forcing by anthropogenic sulfate and fossil-fuel soot aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, J.M.; Roberts, D.L.; Slingo, A.

    1997-07-01

    A new radiation code within a general circulation model is used to assess the direct solar and thermal radiative forcing by sulfate aerosol of anthropogenic origin and soot aerosol from fossil-fuel burning. The radiative effects of different aerosol profiles, relative humidity parameterizations, chemical compositions, and internal and external mixtures of the two aerosol types are investigated. The contribution to the radiative forcing from cloudy sky regions is found to be negligible for sulfate aerosol; this is in contrast to recent studies where the cloudy sky contribution was estimated using a method in which the spatial correlation between cloud amount and sulfate burden was ignored. However, the radiative forcing due to fossil-fuel soot aerosol is enhanced in cloudy regions if soot aerosol exists within or above the cloud. The global solar radiative forcing due to sulfate aerosol is estimated to be -0.38 W m{sup -2} and the global thermal radiative forcing is estimated to be +0.01 W m{sup -2}. The hemispheric mean radiative forcings vary by only about 10% for reasonable assumptions about the chemical form of the sulfate aerosol and the relative humidity dependence; the uncertainties in the aerosol loading are far more significant. If a soot/sulfate mass ratio of 0.075 is assumed, then the global solar radiative forcing weakens to -0.18 W m{sup -2} for an external mixture and weakens further for an internal mixture. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the radiative forcing shows strong negative/positive forcing contrasts that may influence the dynamical response of the atmosphere. Although these results are extremely sensitive to the adopted soot/sulfate ratio and the assumed vertical profile, they indicate that fossil-fuel soot aerosol may exert a nonnegligible radiative forcing and emphasize the need to consider each anthropogenic aerosol species. 58 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  14. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA); Leggett, Robert D. (Richland, WA); Baker, Ronald B. (Richland, WA)

    1989-01-01

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  15. Fuel pin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Leggett, Robert D.; Baker, Ronald B.

    1989-10-03

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  16. Fuel-efficient cruise performance model for general aviation piston engine airplanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkinson, R.C.H.

    1982-01-01

    The uses and limitations of typical Pilot Operating Handbook cruise performance data, for constructing cruise performance models suitable for maximizing specific range, are first examined. These data are found to be inadequate for constructing such models. A new model of General Aviation piston-prop airplane cruise performance is then developed. This model consists of two subsystem models: the airframe-propeller-atmosphere subsystem model; and the engine-atmosphere subsystem model. The new model facilitates maximizing specific range; and by virtue of its simplicity and low volume data storage requirements, appears suitable for airborne microprocessor implementation.

  17. Evaluation of Aqueous and Powder Processing Techniques for Production of Pu-238-Fueled General Purpose Heat Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-06-01

    This report evaluates alternative processes that could be used to produce Pu-238 fueled General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) for radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG). Fabricating GPHSs with the current process has remained essentially unchanged since its development in the 1970s. Meanwhile, 30 years of technological advancements have been made in the fields of chemistry, manufacturing, ceramics, and control systems. At the Department of Energy’s request, alternate manufacturing methods were compared to current methods to determine if alternative fabrication processes could reduce the hazards, especially the production of respirable fines, while producing an equivalent GPHS product. An expert committee performed the evaluation with input from four national laboratories experienced in Pu-238 handling.

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Labeling Requirements Alternative fuel dispensers must be labeled with information to help consumers make informed decisions about fueling a vehicle, including the name of the fuel and the minimum percentage of the main component of the fuel. Labels may also list the percentage of other fuel components. This requirement applies to, but is not limited to, the following fuel types: methanol, denatured ethanol, and/or other alcohols; mixtures containing 85% or more by volume of

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    The Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection must pursue the establishment and maintenance of sufficient alternative fueling infrastructure at public ...

  20. North Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel ... Natural Gas Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by ...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Consumer Vehicle Technology Data

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about consumer...

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in California (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun ...

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Mexico (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in New Mexico (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul ...

  4. Consumers (Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure) Consumer Acceptance Group A

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CONSUMERS (CONSUMER ACCEPTANCE AND CHARGING INFRASTRUCTURE) EV Everywhere Workshop July 30, 2012 Consumer Acceptance Group A Breakout Session #1 - Brainstorm Consumer Acceptance Barriers * Building category awareness * "Butts in the seat" * \Car sharing & rental * DOE should run a pilot project with rental car & car sharing companies to subsidize initial integration of Evs into those fleets * Social media * Groupon coupons - need to use the breadth of available social media

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    fuel use. For these purposes, alternative fuels are natural gas, hydrogen, propane, or electricity used to operate a motor vehicle. (Reference Connecticut General Statutes 4a-59

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel and Vehicle Incentives The California Energy Commission (CEC) administers the Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program (ARFVTP) to provide financial incentives for businesses, vehicle and technology manufacturers, workforce training partners, fleet owners, consumers, and academic institutions with the goal of developing and deploying alternative and renewable fuels and advanced transportation technologies. The CEC must prepare and adopt an annual Investment

  7. Consumer Vehicle Technology Data

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technologies Relevance: An informed understanding of the consumer allows VTO to achieve petroleum-use reduction goals through: * Robust assumptions for consumer modeling,...

  8. Consumer Vehicle Technology Data

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technologies. Relevance: An informed understanding of the consumer allows VTO to achieve petroleum-use reduction goals through: * Robust assumptions for consumer modeling,...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office: Resources for Consumers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consumers Vehicle Technologies Office: Resources for Consumers As technologies supported by the Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) come on to the market, regular drivers will benefit from lower fuel costs and less time spent at the gas station. Through FuelEconomy.gov and the Alternative Fuels Data Center, VTO provides a variety of resources to help drivers choose the most efficient vehicle that meets their needs and get the most out of the vehicle they have now. Green Racing highlights the

  10. Summary report : universal fuel processor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coker, Eric Nicholas; Rice, Steven F.; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.; Miller, James Edward; Cornelius, Christopher James; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Pickett, Lyle M.

    2008-01-01

    The United States produces only about 1/3 of the more than 20 million barrels of petroleum that it consumes daily. Oil imports into the country are roughly equivalent to the amount consumed in the transportation sector. Hence the nation in general, and the transportation sector in particular, is vulnerable to supply disruptions and price shocks. The situation is anticipated to worsen as the competition for limited global supplies increases and oil-rich nations become increasingly willing to manipulate the markets for this resource as a means to achieve political ends. The goal of this project was the development and improvement of technologies and the knowledge base necessary to produce and qualify a universal fuel from diverse feedstocks readily available in North America and elsewhere (e.g. petroleum, natural gas, coal, biomass) as a prudent and positive step towards mitigating this vulnerability. Three major focus areas, feedstock transformation, fuel formulation, and fuel characterization, were identified and each was addressed. The specific activities summarized herein were identified in consultation with industry to set the stage for collaboration. Two activities were undertaken in the area of feedstock transformation. The first activity focused on understanding the chemistry and operation of autothermal reforming, with an emphasis on understanding, and therefore preventing, soot formation. The second activity was focused on improving the economics of oxygen production, particularly for smaller operations, by integrating membrane separations with pressure swing adsorption. In the fuel formulation area, the chemistry of converting small molecules readily produced from syngas directly to fuels was examined. Consistent with the advice from industry, this activity avoided working on improving known approaches, giving it an exploratory flavor. Finally, the fuel characterization task focused on providing a direct and quantifiable comparison of diesel fuel and JP-8.

  11. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Consumer Vehicle Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data | Department of Energy Consumer Vehicle Technology Data Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Consumer Vehicle Technology Data Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about consumer vehicle technology data. van003_singer_2015_o.pdf (546.73 KB) More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Consumer

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Renewable Fuel Sales Volume Goals The Wisconsin Legislature sets goals for minimum annual renewable fuel sales volumes based on annual renewable fuel volumes required under the federal Renewable Fuel Standard. On an annual basis, the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP), in cooperation with the Department of Commerce, the Department of Revenue, and the Energy Office, must determine whether the annual goals for the previous year were met. If the goals were

  13. 2011 Fuel Economy Guide Now Available | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Agency (EPA) released the 2011 Fuel Economy Guide. This annual guide provides consumers with information about estimated mileage and fuel costs for model year 2011 vehicles. ...

  14. North Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Vehicle Fuel ...

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    329 3,007 3,329 3,222 3,329 3,222 1997-2016 Alabama 21 19 21 20 36 34 2010-2016 Alaska 1 1 1 1 1 1 2010-2016 Arizona 192 173 192 186 206 199 2010-2016 Arkansas 3 3 3 3 3 3 2010-2016 California 1,565 1,413 1,565 1,514 1,447 1,400 2010-2016 Colorado 30 27 30 29 31 30 2010-2016 Connecticut 5 5 5 5 2 2 2010-2016 Delaware 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2016 District of Columbia 95 86 95 92 76 73 2010-2016 Florida 19 18 19 19 27 26 2010-2016 Georgia 111 100 111 107 102 99 2010-2016 Hawaii 1 1 1 1 0 0 2010-2016

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    28,664 29,974 29,970 30,044 35,280 34,459 1997-2015 Alabama 105 192 193 190 224 220 1988-2015 Alaska 20 11 11 9 10 11 1997-2015 Arizona 2,015 1,712 1,707 1,730 2,032 1,976 1988-2015 Arkansas 16 21 21 27 31 28 1988-2015 California 13,572 14,660 14,671 14,121 16,581 16,467 1988-2015 Colorado 249 282 281 269 316 314 1988-2015 Connecticut 41 27 27 46 54 44 1988-2015 Delaware 1 1 1 1 1 1 1988-2015 District of Columbia 883 879 870 861 1,011 993 1988-2015 Florida 60 84 84 175 206 159 1988-2015 Georgia

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    28,664 29,974 29,970 30,044 35,280 34,459 1997-2015 Alabama 105 192 193 190 224 220 1988-2015 Alaska 20 11 11 9 10 11 1997-2015 Arizona 2,015 1,712 1,707 1,730 2,032 1,976 ...

  18. Rapidly refuelable fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Joy, Richard W. (Santa Clara, CA)

    1983-01-01

    This invention is directed to a metal-air fuel cell where the consumable metal anode is movably positioned in the cell and an expandable enclosure, or bladder, is used to press the anode into contact with separating spacers between the cell electrodes. The bladder may be depressurized to allow replacement of the anode when consumed.

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel-Efficient Tire Program Development The California Energy Commission (CEC) must adopt and implement a state-wide Fuel-Efficient Tire Program that includes a consumer information and education program and minimum tire efficiency standards. The CEC must consult with the California Integrated Waste Management Board on the program's adoption, implementation, and regular review. (Reference California Public Resources Code 25770-2577

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in New Mexico (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul ...

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Ohio (Including Vehicle Fuel) (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 136,340 110,078 102,451 66,525 ...

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel Economy Test Procedures and Labeling The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for motor vehicle fuel economy testing. Manufacturers test their own vehicles and report the results to EPA. EPA reviews the results and confirms a portion of them using their own testing facilities. To aid consumers shopping for new vehicles, EPA redesigned the fuel economy window sticker posted on all new cars and light trucks starting with Model Year 2013 vehicles to be easier to read and

  3. Statistical Analysis of the Factors Influencing Consumer Use of E85

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bromiley, P.; Gerlach, T.; Marczak, K.; Taylor, M.; Dobrovolny, L.

    2008-07-01

    Evaluating the sales patterns of E85 retail outlets can provide important information about consumer behavior regarding E85, locating future E85 fueling infrastructure, and developing future alternative fuel policies and programs.

  4. S. 790: This Act may be cited as the Motor Fuel Consumer Protection Act of 1991, introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, April 9, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill would amend the antitrust laws in order to preserve and promote wholesale and retail competition in the retail gasoline market. The bill describes limits on the ownership and operation of service stations. The main provision is the it shall be unlawful for any producer or refiner to require any retail motor fuel dealer to purchase more than 70% of the monthly retail sales of motor fuel from such refiner or producer. Motor fuel refers to gasoline, diesel fuel, alcohol, or any mixture of these sold for use in automobiles and related vehicles.

  5. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  6. Model Year 2013 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  7. Model Year 2011 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  8. Model Year 2012 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles.

  9. Consumer Vehicle Technology Data

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    State Agency Low Carbon Fuel Use Requirement Beginning January 1, 2017, at least 3% of the aggregate amount of bulk transportation fuel purchased by the state government must be from very low carbon transportation fuel sources. Beginning January 1, 2018, the required amount of very low carbon transportation fuel purchased will increase by 1% annually until January 1, 2024. Some exemptions may apply, as determined by the California Department of General Services (DGS). Very low carbon fuel is

  11. Consumer Guide for Solar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    MARC’s Consumer Guide to Solar provides answers to frequently asked questions, as well as guidance on how to get started with solar energy. The objective in creating this resource was to provide clear information to consumers in the Kansas City region who are interested in installing solar on their home or business.

  12. Hydrogen Fuel Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Energy » Hydrogen & Fuel Cells » Hydrogen Fuel Basics Hydrogen Fuel Basics August 14, 2013 - 2:06pm Addthis Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed in a fuel cell, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic resources, such as natural gas, nuclear power, biomass, and renewable power like solar and wind. These qualities make it an attractive fuel option for transportation and electricity generation applications. It can be used in cars, in houses,

  13. ,"U.S. Total Sales of Residual Fuel Oil by End Use"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Oil Company Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to Electric Utility Consumers (Thousand Gallons)","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil SalesDeliveries to...

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Ethanol Blend Requirement Suppliers that import gasoline for sale in North Carolina must offer fuel that is not pre-blended with fuel alcohol but that is suitable for future blending. Future contract provisions that restrict distributors or retailers from blending gasoline with fuel alcohol are void. (Reference North Carolina General Statutes 75-90, 105-449.60

  15. Fuel Cell Technical Publications | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technical Publications » Fuel Cell Technical Publications Fuel Cell Technical Publications Technical information about fuel cells published in technical reports, conference proceedings, journal articles, and websites is provided here. General Transportation Stationary/Distributed Power Auxiliary and Portable Power Manufacturing Material Handling Equipment General The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2015: Powering Corporate Sustainability (Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association, January 2016)

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Consumer-Segmented Vehicle Choice Modeling: the MA3T Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about consumer...

  17. Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Spent Nuclear Fuel Release date: December 7, 2015 Next release date: Late 2018 Spent nuclear fuel data are collected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) for the Department of Energy's Office of Standard Contract Management (Office of the General Counsel) on the Form GC-859, "Nuclear Fuel Data Survey." The data include detailed characteristics of spent nuclear fuel discharged from commercial U.S. nuclear power plants and currently stored at commercial sites in the United

  18. Consumer Energy Atlas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This first edition of the Atlas provides, in reference form, a central source of information to consumers on key contacts concerned with energy in the US. Energy consumers need information appropriate to local climates and characteristics - best provided by state and local governments. The Department of Energy recognizes the authority of state and local governments to manage energy programs on their own. Therefore, emphasis has been given to government organizations on both the national and state level that influence, formulate, or administer policies affecting energy production, distribution, and use, or that provide information of interest to consumers and non-specialists. In addition, hundreds of non-government energy-related membership organizations, industry trade associations, and energy publications are included.

  19. Chapter 11. Fuel Economy: The Case for Market Failure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; German, John; Delucchi, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    The efficiency of energy using durable goods, from automobiles to home air conditioners, is not only a key determinant of economy-wide energy use but also of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, climate change and energy insecurity. Energy analysts have long noted that consumers appear to have high implicit discount rates for future fuel savings when choosing among energy using durable goods (Howarth and Sanstad, 1995). In modeling consumers choices of appliances, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has used discount rates of 30 percent for heating systems, 69 percent for choice of refrigerator and up to 111 percent for choice of water heater (U.S. DOE/EIA, 1996). Several explanations have been offered for this widespread phenomenon, including asymmetric information, bounded rationality and transaction costs. This chapter argues that uncertainty combined with loss aversion by consumers is sufficient to explain the failure to adopt cost effective energy efficiency improvements in the market for automotive fuel economy, although other market failures appear to be present as well. Understanding how markets for energy efficiency function is crucial to formulating effective energy policies (see Pizer, 2006). Fischer et al., (2004), for example, demonstrated that if consumers fully value the discounted present value of future fuel savings, fuel economy standards are largely redundant and produce small welfare losses. However, if consumers value only the first three years of fuel savings, then fuel economy standards can significantly increase consumer welfare. The nature of any market failure that might be present in the market for energy efficiency would also affect the relative efficacy of energy taxes versus regulatory standards (CBO, 2003). If markets function efficiently, energy taxes would generally be more efficient than regulatory standards in increasing energy efficiency and reducing energy use. If markets are decidedly inefficient, standards would likely be

  20. Fuel Cells 2000 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fuel Cells 2000 Place: Washington DC, Washington, DC Zip: 20005 Product: A non-profit project providing educational informaiton on fuel cells to the general public and private...

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    In Electric Vehicle (PEV) Annual Fee PEV owners are required to pay an annual license fee of $200 for non-commercial PEVs and $300 for commercial PEVs. The Georgia Department of Revenue may adjust fees annually based on vehicle fuel economy and the Consumer Price Index through July 1, 2018. (Reference Georgia Code 40-2-15

  2. Sandia Energy - Optima: Co-Optimization of Fuels and Engines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stakeholder and consumer value. The initiative will accelerate the widespread deployment of significantly improved fuels and vehicles (passenger to light truck to heavy-duty...

  3. Fuel Economy Sticker Revs Up Used Car Sales | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FuelEconomy.govs newest tool -- the Used Car Fuel Economy Label -- makes it easier for consumers to compare used cars, select the most fuel-efficient model and save money at ...

  4. Homeowners: Respond to Fuel Shortages | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    At the same time, the demand for fuel may spike due to evacuations, or because consumers are buying more fuel to power backup generators during electrical outages. All these ...

  5. Fuel Options

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Production Market Transformation Fuel Cells Predictive Simulation of Engines ... Twitter Google + Vimeo Newsletter Signup SlideShare Fuel Options HomeCapabilitiesFuel ...

  6. Predicting Individual Fuel Economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong; Greene, David L

    2011-01-01

    To make informed decisions about travel and vehicle purchase, consumers need unbiased and accurate information of the fuel economy they will actually obtain. In the past, the EPA fuel economy estimates based on its 1984 rules have been widely criticized for overestimating on-road fuel economy. In 2008, EPA adopted a new estimation rule. This study compares the usefulness of the EPA's 1984 and 2008 estimates based on their prediction bias and accuracy and attempts to improve the prediction of on-road fuel economies based on consumer and vehicle attributes. We examine the usefulness of the EPA fuel economy estimates using a large sample of self-reported on-road fuel economy data and develop an Individualized Model for more accurately predicting an individual driver's on-road fuel economy based on easily determined vehicle and driver attributes. Accuracy rather than bias appears to have limited the usefulness of the EPA 1984 estimates in predicting on-road MPG. The EPA 2008 estimates appear to be equally inaccurate and substantially more biased relative to the self-reported data. Furthermore, the 2008 estimates exhibit an underestimation bias that increases with increasing fuel economy, suggesting that the new numbers will tend to underestimate the real-world benefits of fuel economy and emissions standards. By including several simple driver and vehicle attributes, the Individualized Model reduces the unexplained variance by over 55% and the standard error by 33% based on an independent test sample. The additional explanatory variables can be easily provided by the individuals.

  7. 2009 Fuel Cell Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vincent, Bill; Gangi, Jennifer; Curtin, Sandra; Delmont, Elizabeth

    2010-11-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general.

  8. Waste reduction through consumer education. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, E.Z.

    1996-05-01

    The Waste Reduction through Consumer Education research project was conducted to determine how environmental educational strategies influence purchasing behavior in the supermarket. The objectives were to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate consumer education strategies for waste reduction. The amount of waste generated by packaging size and form, with an adjustment for local recyclability of waste, was determined for 14 product categories identified as having more waste generating and less waste generating product choices (a total of 484 products). Using supermarket scan data and shopper identification numbers, the research tracked the purchases of shoppers in groups receiving different education treatments for 9 months. Statistical tests applied to the purchase data assessed patterns of change between the groups by treatment period. Analysis of the data revealed few meaningful statistical differences between study groups or changes in behavior over time. Findings suggest that broad brush consumer education about waste reduction is not effective in changing purchasing behaviors in the short term. However, it may help create a general awareness of the issues surrounding excess packaging and consumer responsibility. The study concludes that the answer to waste reduction in the future may be a combination of voluntary initiatives by manufacturers and retailers, governmental intervention, and better-informed consumers.

  9. Fuel Behavior Modeling Issues Associated with Future Fast Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yacout, A.M.; Hofman, G.L.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Kim, Y.S.

    2007-07-01

    Major issues of concern related to advanced fast reactor fuel behavior are discussed here with focus on phenomena that are encountered during irradiation of metallic fuel elements. Identification of those issues is part of an advanced fuel simulation effort that aims at improving fuel design and reducing reliance on conventional approach of design by experiment which is both time and resource consuming. (authors)

  10. Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview of Fuel Cell Electric Bus Development Leslie Eudy, National Renewable Energy Laboratory September 12, 2013 2 Why Fuel Cells for Transit Buses? * Reduce transit bus emissions * Improve fuel efficiency * Improve vehicle performance * Consumer Acceptance * Transit industry is excellent test-bed for new technologies o Centrally fueled and maintained o Fixed routes with urban stop-go duty cycle o Professional operators and mechanics o Federal Capital Funding Support o High Visibility &

  11. Analyzing the Sensitivity of Hydrogen Vehicle Sales to Consumers' Preferences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L; Lin, Zhenhong; Dong, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The success of hydrogen vehicles will depend on consumer behavior as well as technology, energy prices and public policy. This study examines the sensitivity of the future market shares of hydrogen-powered vehicles to alternative assumptions about consumers preferences. The Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies model was used to project future market shares. The model has 1,458 market segments, differentiated by travel behavior, geography, and tolerance to risk, among other factors, and it estimates market shares for twenty advanced power-train technologies. The market potential of hydrogen vehicles is most sensitive to the improvement of drive train technology, especially cost reduction. The long-run market success of hydrogen vehicles is less sensitive to the price elasticity of vehicle choice, how consumers evaluate future fuel costs, the importance of fuel availability and limited driving range. The importance of these factors will likely be greater in the early years following initial commercialization of hydrogen vehicles.

  12. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  13. Model Year 2015 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  14. Model Year 2014 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  15. Model Year 2016 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  16. Model Year 2007 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  17. Model Year 2010 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-10-14

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  18. Model Year 2009 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  19. Model Year 2005 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  20. Model Year 2008 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-10-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  1. Model Year 2006 Fuel Economy Guide: EPA Fuel Economy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-11-01

    The Fuel Economy Guide is published by the U.S. Department of Energy as an aid to consumers considering the purchase of a new vehicle. The Guide lists estimates of miles per gallon (mpg) for each vehicle available for the new model year. These estimates are provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in compliance with Federal Law. By using this Guide, consumers can estimate the average yearly fuel cost for any vehicle. The Guide is intended to help consumers compare the fuel economy of similarly sized cars, light duty trucks and special purpose vehicles. The vehicles listed have been divided into three classes of cars, three classes of light duty trucks, and three classes of special purpose vehicles.

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Parking Incentive Programs The California Department of General Services (DGS) and California Department of Transportation (DOT) must develop and implement AFV parking incentive programs in public parking facilities operated by DGS with 50 or more parking spaces and park-and-ride lots owned and operated by DOT. The incentives must provide meaningful and tangible benefits to drivers, such as preferential spaces, reduced fees, and fueling infrastructure. Fueling

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: PEV Consumer Behavior in Practice

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by University of California, Davis at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about PEV consumer...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Impact Analysis: PEV Consumer Behavior in Practice

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by University of California, Davis at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about PEV consumer...

  5. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Opportunity fuels - fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels - are discussed in outline form. The type and source of fuels, types of fuels, combustability, methods of combustion, refinery wastes, petroleum coke, garbage fuels, wood wastes, tires, and economics are discussed.

  6. Experimental and Modeling Study of the Flammability of Fuel Tank Headspace Vapors from Ethanol/Gasoline Fuels; Phase 3: Effects of Winter Gasoline Volatility and Ethanol Content on Blend Flammability; Flammability Limits of Denatured Ethanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, D. P.; Bardon, M. F.; Clark, W.

    2011-07-01

    This study assessed differences in headspace flammability for summertime gasolines and new high-ethanol content fuel blends. The results apply to vehicle fuel tanks and underground storage tanks. Ambient temperature and fuel formulation effects on headspace vapor flammability of ethanol/gasoline blends were evaluated. Depending on the degree of tank filling, fuel type, and ambient temperature, fuel vapors in a tank can be flammable or non-flammable. Pure gasoline vapors in tanks generally are too rich to be flammable unless ambient temperatures are extremely low. High percentages of ethanol blended with gasoline can be less volatile than pure gasoline and can produce flammable headspace vapors at common ambient temperatures. The study supports refinements of fuel ethanol volatility specifications and shows potential consequences of using noncompliant fuels. E85 is flammable at low temperatures; denatured ethanol is flammable at warmer temperatures. If both are stored at the same location, one or both of the tanks' headspace vapors will be flammable over a wide range of ambient temperatures. This is relevant to allowing consumers to splash -blend ethanol and gasoline at fueling stations. Fuels compliant with ASTM volatility specifications are relatively safe, but the E85 samples tested indicate that some ethanol fuels may produce flammable vapors.

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Bond Exemption for Small Biofuels Suppliers Fuel blenders or suppliers of ethanol or biodiesel are not required to file a bond with the North Carolina Department of Revenue when the expected motor fuel tax liability is less than $2,000. (Reference North Carolina General Statutes 105-449.72

  8. EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Group C Breakout Report EV Everywhere Consumer Acceptance and Charging Infrastructure Workshop: Consumer Acceptance and Public Policy Group C ...

  9. Micro and Man-Portable Fuel Cells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Power Power Tool (commercial) Power Tool (consumer) Digital Still Camera Fuel Cell Sweet Spot ??? ??? ??? ??? ??? 5 Handset Chargers Comparative Analysis 3 h 16 Pack 1-3 h 3 h ...

  10. Science DMZ Fuels Fusion Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science DMZ Fuels Fusion Research General Atomics remote controls fusion experiments, bridges...

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Tax Exemption The retail sale, use, storage, and consumption of alternative fuels is exempt from the state retail sales and use tax. (Reference North Carolina General Statutes 105-164.13

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Tax Exemption An individual who produces biodiesel for use in that individual's private passenger vehicle is exempt from the state motor fuel excise tax. (Reference North Carolina General Statutes 105-449.88

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle (FCEV) Emissions Inspection Exemption Qualified PEVs and FCEVs are exempt from state emissions inspection requirements. Other restrictions may apply. (Reference North Carolina General Statutes 20-4.01 and 20-183.2

  14. Injector having multiple fuel pegs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hadley, Mark Allan; Felling, David Kenton

    2013-04-30

    A fuel injector is provided, including a fuel injector body, a plurality of fuel vanes, and a plurality of fuel pegs. The injector body includes a manifold and an inlet. The manifold is configured for receiving fuel, and the inlet is configured for receiving air. The fuel vanes are located within the injector body and are positioned in a direction that is generally parallel with a longitudinal axis of the injector body to orient the air flowing from the inlet. The plurality of fuel pegs are fluidly connected to the manifold and are arranged within the plurality of fuel vanes. The plurality of fuel pegs are each spaced at a distance that is about equal between each of the plurality of fuel pegs.

  15. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korton, George

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure

  16. Potential use of California lignite and other alternate fuel for enhanced oil recovery. Phase I and II. Final report. [As alternative fuels for steam generation in thermal EOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, R.; Shimizu, A.; Briggs, A.

    1980-02-01

    The Nation's continued reliance on liquid fossil fuels and decreasing reserves of light oils gives increased impetus to improving the recovery of heavy oil. Thermal enhanced oil recovery EOR techniques, such as steam injection, have generally been the most effective for increasing heavy oil production. However, conventional steam generation consumes a large fraction of the produced oil. The substitution of alternate (solid) fuels would release much of this consumed oil to market. This two-part report focuses on two solid fuels available in California, the site of most thermal EOR - petroleum coke and lignite. Phase I, entitled Economic Analysis, shows detailed cost comparisons between the two candidate fuels and also with Western coal. The analysis includes fuels characterizations, process designs for several combustion systems, and a thorough evaluation of the technical and economic uncertainties. In Phase II, many technical parameters of petroleum coke combustion were measured in a pilot-plant fluidized bed. The results of the study showed that petroleum coke combustion for EOR is feasible and cost effective in a fluidized bed combustor.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, W.F.; Tellefson, D.R.; Shimazaki, T.T.

    1962-04-10

    A plate type fuel element which is particularly useful for organic cooled reactors is described. Generally, the fuel element comprises a plurality of fissionable fuel bearing plates held in spaced relationship by a frame in which the plates are slidably mounted in grooves. Clearance is provided in the grooves to allow the plates to expand laterally. The plates may be rigidly interconnected but are floatingly supported at their ends within the frame to allow for longi-tudinal expansion. Thus, this fuel element is able to withstand large temperature differentials without great structural stresses. (AEC)

  18. Fuel cell stack arrangements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kothmann, Richard E.; Somers, Edward V.

    1982-01-01

    Arrangements of stacks of fuel cells and ducts, for fuel cells operating with separate fuel, oxidant and coolant streams. An even number of stacks are arranged generally end-to-end in a loop. Ducts located at the juncture of consecutive stacks of the loop feed oxidant or fuel to or from the two consecutive stacks, each individual duct communicating with two stacks. A coolant fluid flows from outside the loop, into and through cooling channels of the stack, and is discharged into an enclosure duct formed within the loop by the stacks and seals at the junctures at the stacks.

  19. Consumer's Guide to the economics of electric-utility ratemaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    This guide deals primarily with the economics of electric utilities, although certain legal and organizational aspects of utilities are discussed. Each of the seven chapters addresses a particular facet of public-utility ratemaking. Chapter One contains a discussion of the evolution of the public-utility concept, as well as the legal and economic justification for public utilities. The second chapter sets forth an analytical economic model which provides the basis for the next four chapters. These chapters contain a detailed examination of total operating costs, the rate base, the rate of return, and the rate structure. The final chapter discusses a number of current issues regarding electric utilities, mainly factors related to fuel-adjustment costs, advertising, taxes, construction work in progress, and lifeline rates. Some of the examples used in the Guide are from particular states, such as Illinois and California. These examples are used to illustrate specific points. Consumers in other states can generalize them to their states and not change the meaning or significance of the points. 27 references, 8 tables.

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Biofuels Program Impact Studies The Oregon Department of Energy (ODOE) must conduct periodic impact studies related to the biofuels industry in the state. These studies should evaluate such criteria as: jobs created; current and projected feedstock availability; amount of biofuels blends produced and consumed in the state; cost comparison of biofuels blends and petroleum fuel; environmental impacts; and the extent to which Oregon producers import biofuels or biofuels feedstocks from outside the

  1. NREL Hosts Consumer Energy Expo

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hosts Consumer Energy Expo For more information contact: Sarah Holmes Barba, 303-275-3023 email: Sarah Barba Golden, Colo., May. 23, 2001 - Consumers can learn about reducing their home energy consumption and get advice from experts who specialize in energy efficient and renewable energy products and services at the Consumer Energy Expo June 14 - 16 at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The Expo includes exhibits and activities for the entire family.

  2. HCCI experiments with gasoline surrogate fuels modeled by a semidetailed chemical kinetic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrae, J.C.G.; Head, R.A.

    2009-04-15

    Experiments in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine have been conducted with four gasoline surrogate fuel blends. The pure components in the surrogate fuels consisted of n-heptane, isooctane, toluene, ethanol and diisobutylene and fuel sensitivities (RON-MON) in the fuel blends ranged from two to nine. The operating conditions for the engine were p{sub in}=0.1 and 0.2 MPa, T{sub in}=80 and 250 C, {phi}=0.25 in air and engine speed 1200 rpm. A semidetailed chemical kinetic model (142 species and 672 reactions) for gasoline surrogate fuels, validated against ignition data from experiments conducted in shock tubes for gasoline surrogate fuel blends at 1.0{<=} p{<=}5.0MPa, 700{<=} T{<=}1200 K and {phi}=1.0, was successfully used to qualitatively predict the HCCI experiments using a single zone modeling approach. The fuel blends that had higher fuel sensitivity were more resistant to autoignition for low intake temperature and high intake pressure and less resistant to autoignition for high intake temperature and low intake pressure. A sensitivity analysis shows that at high intake temperature the chemistry of the fuels ethanol, toluene and diisobutylene helps to advance ignition. This is consistent with the trend that fuels with the least Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC) behavior show the highest octane sensitivity, and become less resistant to autoignition at high intake temperatures. For high intake pressure the sensitivity analysis shows that fuels in the fuel blend with no NTC behavior consume OH radicals and acts as a radical scavenger for the fuels with NTC behavior. This is consistent with the observed trend of an increase in RON and fuel sensitivity. With data from shock tube experiments in the literature and HCCI modeling in this work, a correlation between the reciprocal pressure exponent on the ignition delay to the fuel sensitivity and volume percentage of single-stage ignition fuel in the fuel blend was found. Higher fuel

  3. Examining the potential for voluntary fuel economy standards in the United States and Canada.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plotkin, S.; Greene, D.; Duleep, K.

    2003-03-19

    This report is designed to assist the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. government in general, and Natural Resources Canada with understanding the potential for voluntary fuel economy standards designed to increase the fuel economy of the North American fleet of light-duty vehicles (LDVs-passenger cars and light trucks) within a 10-15-year timeframe. The approach of this study has been: First, to examine and evaluate recent fuel economy initiatives taken in Japan and Europe; Second, to review the technologies available to improve fuel economy in the U.S. (and Canadian) fleets, focusing on their costs and fuel economy improvement potential; Third, to identify and broadly evaluate some alternatives to the current U.S. and Canadian Corporate Average Fuel Economy system of specifying uniform fuel economy targets (27.5 mpg for cars, 20.7 mpg for light trucks) for individual companies; and Fourth, to try to determine an approximate level of fuel economy increase and form of company agreements that would be conducive to a voluntary agreement, based on the assumption that an acceptable voluntary standard would impose an equitable burden on each manufacturer and would be approximately cost-effective from consumers' private perspectives.

  4. Consumers Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Data Utility Id 11788 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes ISO MISO Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes This...

  5. Fuel performance annual report for 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M. ); Wu, S. . Div. of Systems Technology)

    1992-06-01

    This annual report, the twelfth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1989 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related US Nuclear Regulatory Commission evaluations are included.

  6. Fuel performance annual report for 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.; Wu, S.

    1988-03-01

    This annual report, the ninth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1986 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission evaluations are included. 550 refs., 12 figs., 31 tabs.

  7. Fuel performance: Annual report for 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.; Wu, S.

    1989-03-01

    This annual report, the tenth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1987 in commercial nuclear power plants and an indication of trends. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to more detailed information and related US Nuclear Regulator Commission evaluations are included. 384 refs., 13 figs., 33 tabs.

  8. Fuel performance annual report for 1990. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preble, E.A.; Painter, C.L.; Alvis, J.A.; Berting, F.M.; Beyer, C.E.; Payne, G.A.; Wu, S.L.

    1993-11-01

    This annual report, the thirteenth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1990 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience and trends, fuel problems high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided . References to additional, more detailed information, and related NRC evaluations are included where appropriate.

  9. Fuel performance annual report for 1983. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, W.J.; Dunenfeld, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    This annual report, the sixth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1983 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel design changes, fuel surveillance programs, fuel operating experience, fuel problems, high-burnup fuel experience, and items of general significance are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included.

  10. Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop Fuel experts from China, India, and the United States shared lessons learned about deploying CNG- and hydrogen-fueled vehicles in public transit fleets and the consumer sector at the Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels: Lessons Learned for the Safe Deployment of Vehicles workshop. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) hosted the workshop on

  11. Alternatives to traditional transportation fuels 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    Interest in alternative transportation fuels (ATF`s) has increased in recent years due to the drives for cleaner air and less dependence upon foreign oil. This report, Alternatives to Traditional Transportation Fuels 1996, provides information on ATFs, as well as the vehicles that consume them.

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Vehicles Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel

  13. Catalysts compositions for use in fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Steven S.C.

    2015-12-02

    The present invention generally relates to the generation of electrical energy from a solid-state fuel. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a solid-oxide fuel cell for generating electrical energy from a carbon-based fuel, and to catalysts for use in a solid-oxide fuel cell.

  14. Catalysts compositions for use in fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang, Steven S.C.

    2015-12-01

    The present invention generally relates to the generation of electrical energy from a solid-state fuel. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a solid-oxide fuel cell for generating electrical energy from a carbon-based fuel, and to catalysts for use in a solid-oxide fuel cell.

  15. Sipping fuel and saving lives: increasing fuel economy withoutsacrificing safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Deborah; Greene, David L.; Ross, Marc H.; Wenzel, Tom P.

    2007-06-11

    The public, automakers, and policymakers have long worried about trade-offs between increased fuel economy in motor vehicles and reduced safety. The conclusion of a broad group of experts on safety and fuel economy in the auto sector is that no trade-off is required. There are a wide variety of technologies and approaches available to advance vehicle fuel economy that have no effect on vehicle safety. Conversely, there are many technologies and approaches available to advance vehicle safety that are not detrimental to vehicle fuel economy. Congress is considering new policies to increase the fuel economy of new automobiles in order to reduce oil dependence and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The findings reported here offer reassurance on an important dimension of that work: It is possible to significantly increase the fuel economy of motor vehicles without compromising their safety. Automobiles on the road today demonstrate that higher fuel economy and greater safety can co-exist. Some of the safest vehicles have higher fuel economy, while some of the least safe vehicles driven today--heavy, large trucks and SUVs--have the lowest fuel economy. At an October 3, 2006 workshop, leading researchers from national laboratories, academia, auto manufacturers, insurance research industry, consumer and environmental groups, material supply industries, and the federal government agreed that vehicles could be designed to simultaneously improve safety and fuel economy. The real question is not whether we can realize this goal, but the best path to get there. The experts' studies reveal important new conclusions about fuel economy and safety, including: (1) Vehicle fuel economy can be increased without affecting safety, and vice versa; (2) Reducing the weight and height of the heaviest SUVs and pickup trucks will simultaneously increase both their fuel economy and overall safety; and (3) Advanced materials can decouple size from mass, creating important new possibilities for

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Emerging Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Electricity Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alabama (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 36,984 28,384 27,217 23,714 21,027 21,010 22,537 23,488 21,619 24,186 23,647 25,742 2002 36,559 33,467 32,355 26,061 23,580 27,901 29,889 30,615 26,781 22,744 22,838 31,044 2003 39,779 34,222 26,412 23,422 20,310 22,858 27,147 32,162 21,482 18,885 20,502 29,389 2004 38,499 36,343 31,829 27,460 26,994 26,923 32,691 29,710 24,787 23,688 22,042 29,661 2005 32,785 29,012 29,689 22,622 22,525 26,381 30,759 31,841

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alaska (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 12,927 11,677 12,492 10,557 9,618 8,588 9,860 10,185 9,784 11,290 11,926 13,523 2002 12,414 11,258 11,090 10,310 10,076 11,260 10,510 9,907 9,717 10,827 10,291 11,621 2003 9,731 8,407 9,561 9,112 8,639 8,518 8,461 8,717 8,895 10,027 9,481 10,141 2004 12,414 10,221 10,996 9,967 9,462 9,831 9,829 8,537 9,512 9,377 9,374 11,436 2005 11,592 10,185 10,627 9,847 9,809 9,712 10,596 10,360 10,325 10,740 11,792 11,516 2006

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 26,139 20,654 21,940 16,528 13,819 12,558 14,779 16,061 15,014 18,239 19,675 22,233 2002 24,431 24,940 22,284 19,166 15,635 16,964 18,741 17,700 16,789 16,932 17,770 21,567 2003 27,116 27,256 22,904 18,625 17,603 17,849 18,208 18,467 15,282 16,402 16,960 20,603 2004 24,746 25,909 21,663 16,382 15,991 14,085 14,456 14,551 11,956 14,094 13,138 18,337 2005 22,386 19,719 19,170 15,597 14,643 15,315 16,703 17,392

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 57,089 50,447 49,042 41,157 30,506 23,904 22,403 22,033 19,905 22,672 30,231 42,797 2002 47,541 44,713 45,909 30,319 24,230 22,105 26,301 21,119 21,764 34,563 38,884 46,826 2003 44,971 47,164 38,292 25,380 24,811 18,484 23,772 23,529 20,981 22,248 39,408 48,023 2004 47,548 44,859 30,853 28,458 23,766 20,408 22,895 21,210 20,651 26,731 39,719 50,977 2005 50,356 41,495 39,617 33,501 25,108 20,725 26,350 23,387

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Florida (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 34,086 30,338 35,463 39,708 42,466 46,947 53,430 53,352 55,306 52,955 42,205 47,598 2002 50,177 41,302 50,453 55,845 56,767 62,343 67,197 70,144 65,136 64,259 47,600 45,144 2003 53,384 43,538 54,761 51,487 62,575 58,312 64,041 61,764 62,150 59,558 56,488 50,525 2004 50,877 49,866 51,687 53,442 62,663 69,628 72,443 70,540 70,259 66,961 50,122 53,169 2005 59,417 49,956 60,238 55,269 64,436 69,719 90,376 84,114

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 49,414 34,292 35,867 25,368 20,633 20,544 24,229 26,863 21,857 25,679 23,983 34,450 2002 44,041 37,992 33,260 23,775 22,612 24,924 30,113 29,701 24,899 23,785 32,829 47,106 2003 56,470 43,704 31,355 30,232 21,920 20,512 23,789 26,828 21,628 22,981 26,920 45,508 2004 52,486 48,806 31,529 28,718 26,610 24,562 26,132 26,093 22,927 22,025 29,012 49,125 2005 47,756 39,503 39,085 25,191 23,198 26,957 31,619 33,089

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Hawaii (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 253 237 247 243 237 244 242 227 226 220 217 225 2002 236 226 225 234 226 224 239 222 224 215 227 236 2003 251 236 234 229 226 218 224 218 223 218 216 239 2004 243 230 239 240 221 235 229 222 226 221 230 236 2005 242 225 240 240 245 238 224 225 226 218 229 240 2006 241 226 242 237 239 235 229 222 233 223 223 231 2007 259 226 229 232 234 244 241 218 223 244 256 244 2008 245 237 235 238 225 233 238 211 211 206 204

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 9,061 8,656 6,890 5,799 4,539 3,728 4,106 4,145 4,609 5,611 7,528 8,984 2002 8,747 8,547 7,861 5,699 4,667 3,654 3,038 2,812 3,303 4,162 5,950 7,000 2003 7,519 7,632 7,150 5,498 4,487 3,443 4,268 3,399 3,902 3,977 6,312 7,657 2004 10,168 9,168 7,032 4,556 4,391 3,602 3,672 3,601 3,844 4,668 6,536 8,238 2005 9,355 8,465 6,757 6,168 3,946 3,381 3,511 3,614 3,733 4,635 6,142 9,403 2006 8,375 8,140 7,439 5,455 3,877

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Indiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 77,275 61,840 57,608 37,045 27,762 26,685 25,473 29,184 25,697 34,650 39,146 51,997 2002 65,893 58,962 58,569 44,882 32,659 27,696 30,899 30,668 28,357 37,204 49,556 68,056 2003 80,534 70,155 52,368 35,903 31,266 25,652 24,580 26,666 27,072 34,914 46,556 64,253 2004 80,680 70,341 53,056 37,842 30,840 25,006 25,592 27,498 26,658 33,102 43,630 65,054 2005 72,775 58,428 61,390 39,473 30,697 28,897 28,628 29,602

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Iowa (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 33,183 29,626 26,788 17,172 12,430 10,449 10,249 10,177 10,494 14,476 16,865 23,400 2002 28,527 25,072 25,693 18,706 13,413 10,076 9,731 9,815 10,403 14,561 22,219 27,225 2003 31,445 32,450 25,482 16,870 12,421 10,288 9,892 10,030 10,550 13,644 20,542 26,599 2004 32,639 30,955 23,081 15,569 11,543 10,481 9,546 10,080 10,193 14,132 20,759 27,591 2005 34,272 27,838 24,671 18,370 13,180 12,206 11,888 11,542 11,838

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kentucky (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 31,659 23,182 21,670 14,953 9,527 8,890 9,668 9,881 10,024 12,591 16,271 23,216 2002 26,131 24,533 23,241 14,879 12,317 11,623 13,804 10,869 11,129 14,628 21,069 27,646 2003 34,776 29,032 20,580 14,017 10,797 9,334 9,467 10,296 10,390 13,196 16,933 27,218 2004 32,640 27,566 21,630 15,771 12,331 11,249 10,810 11,428 10,883 13,355 17,689 27,203 2005 29,373 24,036 24,578 15,557 13,614 13,693 12,658 14,134 12,122

  14. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Louisiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 90,750 82,773 86,038 87,577 81,223 77,877 93,937 105,743 93,365 92,353 85,277 92,797 2002 102,807 96,945 102,315 94,281 91,511 97,058 107,870 109,348 97,986 94,054 96,857 102,289 2003 106,504 91,821 89,554 89,376 88,426 78,863 91,469 95,243 85,824 84,198 83,677 94,139 2004 101,114 98,005 96,851 86,763 89,143 89,075 96,344 98,583 93,156 94,397 89,577 99,046 2005 102,652 87,403 100,620 97,398 104,027 102,860 104,234

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maryland (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 28,398 21,618 21,408 13,900 9,252 8,342 9,046 11,007 9,109 12,662 13,558 17,125 2002 24,221 22,802 20,670 12,534 8,846 8,846 10,514 12,842 10,157 12,911 20,408 28,827 2003 31,739 28,530 21,240 15,685 9,809 8,723 8,128 7,986 7,131 11,863 16,167 27,049 2004 33,576 27,062 20,558 14,623 9,867 8,560 7,704 8,271 7,535 11,725 16,222 26,279 2005 29,469 25,497 24,272 13,414 10,273 10,104 9,641 11,634 8,302 12,060 16,807

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 133,140 112,047 111,301 76,191 48,707 41,686 43,845 44,577 40,142 59,283 71,352 92,053 2002 119,902 108,891 104,208 87,138 63,810 52,457 51,899 47,094 40,938 53,419 82,015 114,268 2003 140,545 133,702 114,085 80,651 53,258 37,279 35,261 42,115 32,744 49,901 69,659 99,067 2004 137,906 127,671 102,442 76,978 54,610 41,310 38,001 37,565 37,285 48,239 71,870 107,025 2005 133,079 112,812 108,608 72,884 50,886 47,768

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Mississippi (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 26,479 16,635 19,646 21,739 20,948 20,348 30,696 31,715 28,537 28,525 24,653 28,356 2002 29,331 28,518 28,650 25,702 23,117 27,335 33,509 29,104 24,492 19,663 18,433 24,444 2003 29,743 24,826 20,395 19,195 18,492 16,946 17,613 19,394 16,780 14,228 16,133 21,577 2004 23,187 23,828 21,311 19,087 24,565 21,821 24,034 23,064 18,228 18,641 15,628 21,305 2005 23,881 20,984 23,827 18,047 21,247 24,690 29,577 32,966

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Missouri (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 51,986 40,694 34,239 22,717 13,209 12,679 16,175 16,218 12,056 13,682 18,230 29,876 2002 39,936 35,157 34,198 24,362 15,624 13,116 15,351 13,593 11,804 14,038 22,945 32,834 2003 42,257 42,379 33,569 21,083 13,307 10,498 12,889 15,215 9,788 10,817 17,229 30,354 2004 41,477 43,268 30,344 20,642 15,737 12,404 12,556 11,676 12,399 11,977 16,704 31,367 2005 42,227 35,965 31,014 19,890 15,686 13,519 13,855 14,649 12,548

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Montana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,993 8,301 5,782 5,036 3,055 2,439 2,359 2,152 2,135 3,446 5,081 6,696 2002 7,738 6,859 7,247 5,853 4,084 2,965 2,265 2,298 2,711 4,300 5,929 6,147 2003 7,471 6,977 6,706 4,682 3,515 2,729 2,042 2,006 2,468 3,629 6,282 7,503 2004 8,787 6,926 5,508 3,906 3,279 2,725 2,154 2,098 2,533 3,912 5,268 6,895 2005 8,717 6,227 5,828 4,563 3,517 2,678 2,135 2,426 2,551 4,121 4,933 7,501 2006 7,064 7,060 7,344 4,972 3,562

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nebraska (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 17,481 15,747 13,983 11,129 7,094 5,429 8,556 6,368 5,506 5,854 10,730 11,012 2002 16,123 14,049 12,938 10,424 6,676 4,984 8,748 7,414 6,786 6,218 9,753 13,269 2003 15,675 15,319 13,354 8,644 6,232 4,472 7,653 7,469 5,904 6,758 8,775 13,011 2004 16,104 16,445 12,058 7,983 6,255 5,830 6,952 6,641 4,338 5,935 8,995 13,129 2005 17,242 14,641 11,440 8,360 6,579 5,853 7,874 8,028 6,345 6,081 8,200 13,733 2006 15,551

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nevada (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 19,952 19,433 17,795 12,312 12,723 11,650 12,329 14,023 12,067 12,854 12,525 17,842 2002 18,621 16,951 15,943 11,123 11,789 13,044 14,033 14,618 13,988 13,798 14,840 16,521 2003 17,053 15,548 15,238 12,410 12,410 13,355 17,113 17,666 15,088 14,301 14,598 18,798 2004 19,886 20,030 14,760 11,514 13,220 16,819 20,333 19,864 17,480 16,556 18,897 22,720 2005 23,220 21,494 17,907 16,239 13,790 15,823 20,156 20,490

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oregon (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 21,689 25,019 21,080 18,224 15,822 14,891 14,036 15,541 15,102 16,822 18,239 22,097 2002 25,687 22,100 21,179 14,501 12,612 11,363 9,336 12,198 12,978 14,195 16,780 20,005 2003 23,496 19,260 18,102 13,784 12,066 11,146 16,560 16,275 17,015 16,463 19,222 21,940 2004 26,773 24,112 19,699 16,486 14,346 12,752 16,235 16,733 16,179 17,146 21,137 23,569 2005 25,874 23,392 21,951 20,274 11,452 11,481 14,502 16,348 15,706

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Pennsylvania (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 96,012 79,547 77,363 52,992 33,092 26,098 25,208 27,662 29,499 38,457 46,614 63,083 2002 80,458 74,651 70,773 53,368 38,209 33,401 32,700 34,743 30,425 40,462 58,542 83,877 2003 101,975 96,176 79,246 53,759 36,015 29,095 30,298 32,640 26,799 39,895 47,467 78,054 2004 100,298 95,715 73,189 54,937 42,873 33,367 36,047 33,735 32,060 34,578 50,908 74,224 2005 90,958 84,388 85,058 50,137 38,196 34,547 36,133 37,648

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Tennessee (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 43,045 30,197 26,202 21,053 13,399 12,059 12,967 13,230 11,569 16,135 19,011 23,239 2002 37,019 31,272 27,242 19,932 14,058 12,918 12,293 12,439 11,103 13,432 20,337 31,833 2003 37,778 37,692 27,915 18,989 14,580 13,392 11,615 12,627 12,016 13,775 16,202 27,807 2004 34,375 33,788 24,928 18,001 14,262 11,211 10,988 11,553 11,041 11,874 13,718 24,756 2005 30,997 29,214 25,561 19,122 13,849 11,579 11,055 13,522

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 20,043 17,426 13,012 11,173 7,791 7,056 6,214 6,023 6,572 9,189 11,646 18,505 2002 19,727 17,659 15,165 8,453 7,113 5,260 5,915 6,481 7,591 11,589 13,814 16,447 2003 16,474 16,494 12,825 10,664 6,942 5,612 6,174 6,166 6,229 7,898 13,299 16,533 2004 21,414 17,627 10,247 9,033 6,775 5,344 6,398 5,617 6,456 8,714 13,097 17,058 2005 18,357 16,430 13,763 12,951 9,253 7,461 7,380 6,187 6,053 6,449 9,027 16,786 2006

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 1,164 1,003 1,084 834 544 381 304 307 361 438 658 827 2002 1,127 1,149 960 808 575 428 330 336 348 485 803 1,003 2003 1,153 1,191 1,062 906 539 367 293 312 325 502 708 1,029 2004 1,154 1,381 1,072 829 517 421 331 342 365 479 769 1,011 2005 1,211 1,280 1,199 776 558 404 310 298 295 418 666 943 2006 1,112 1,063 1,190 745 501 415 318 318 347 481 658 893 2007 1,104 1,375 1,250 915 536 382 340 331 342 423 696 1,158

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wisconsin (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 52,126 51,020 52,466 24,969 17,238 15,421 16,478 16,540 16,716 25,355 26,981 41,400 2002 49,850 43,815 48,646 31,946 24,278 16,100 16,531 15,795 16,659 28,429 39,330 49,912 2003 62,523 55,695 44,756 32,270 20,752 15,502 15,630 18,099 16,485 24,636 36,907 47,677 2004 65,038 48,498 41,599 27,544 21,106 15,420 15,949 14,951 16,063 23,268 33,602 56,693 2005 59,667 45,463 47,647 29,885 23,265 22,788 21,959 22,549

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wyoming (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2001 7,475 6,484 5,643 5,505 4,182 3,864 3,515 3,541 3,688 4,790 5,518 6,170 2002 6,844 5,846 6,319 5,737 5,034 4,070 4,980 4,124 4,599 6,126 7,421 8,523 2003 7,672 7,313 7,026 5,737 4,976 4,408 4,112 4,164 4,356 5,062 5,554 7,236 2004 7,555 7,180 6,077 5,400 4,775 4,216 4,064 4,187 4,024 5,032 6,153 6,963 2005 7,585 6,443 6,231 5,612 5,092 4,247 4,081 3,903 4,080 4,829 5,360 7,262 2006 7,304 6,824 6,957 5,389 4,762

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,434 3,514 3,395 2,369 1,720 1,215 1,673 1,117 1,189 1,382 1,955 3,507 1990 4,550 3,040 2,645 2,167 1,626 984 1,157 1,164 1,195 1,353 1,921 2,487 1991 3,334 3,576 2,761 1,886 1,332 1,149 1,128 1,052 1,093 1,311 2,120 2,968 1992 3,739 3,833 2,671 2,287 1,513 1,225 1,108 1,078 1,136 1,320 1,983 3,338 1993 3,532 3,599 3,655 2,569 1,551 1,179 1,084 1,070 1,111 1,259 2,073 3,041 1994 4,325

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Alaska (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,500 2,691 2,258 1,949 1,569 1,287 1,042 1,091 1,202 1,577 2,144 2,429 1990 2,447 2,584 2,429 1,809 1,456 1,134 1,061 1,077 1,148 1,554 2,106 2,818 1991 2,579 2,388 2,149 1,896 1,576 1,171 1,069 1,073 1,198 1,561 1,930 2,308 1992 2,414 2,372 2,319 1,935 1,597 1,206 1,084 1,013 1,252 1,790 1,928 2,390 1993 2,487 2,471 2,051 1,863 1,441 1,055 917 957 1,112 1,563 1,785 2,301 1994 2,367 2,156

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Arizona (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,945 3,572 2,845 2,275 1,994 1,951 1,805 1,579 1,597 1,634 2,296 3,108 1990 3,706 3,577 3,165 2,338 2,174 1,854 1,686 1,580 1,610 1,555 2,018 3,139 1991 3,716 3,091 2,935 2,785 2,039 1,637 1,669 1,722 1,375 1,609 1,941 3,077 1992 3,647 3,011 2,898 2,352 1,620 1,754 1,690 1,505 1,601 1,580 1,858 3,573 1993 3,422 2,954 3,056 2,408 1,851 2,035 1,654 1,601 1,521 1,551 2,100 3,416 1994 3,689

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Arkansas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,919 4,336 3,961 2,180 1,261 1,357 1,019 1,007 1,096 1,245 1,948 3,942 1990 4,957 3,368 2,807 2,223 1,398 1,065 1,030 1,043 1,081 1,260 1,948 2,949 1991 5,034 4,043 2,848 1,778 1,211 1,027 998 1,023 1,045 1,184 2,497 3,297 1992 4,159 3,861 2,708 2,114 1,358 1,108 1,062 1,022 1,029 1,219 2,078 3,596 1993 4,757 4,174 3,999 2,923 1,540 1,078 1,013 1,047 1,126 1,389 2,480 3,473 1994 5,101

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Colorado (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,522 10,845 9,208 6,135 4,160 3,082 2,328 2,119 2,303 3,232 5,441 8,102 1990 10,718 9,546 8,633 6,902 5,116 3,122 2,167 2,127 2,069 2,918 5,301 7,682 1991 12,120 9,991 7,910 6,328 4,849 2,826 2,180 2,040 2,087 3,017 6,096 9,494 1992 10,794 9,450 7,609 5,965 3,631 3,055 2,430 2,183 2,312 3,078 5,594 10,319 1993 11,775 10,132 9,435 6,499 4,292 3,119 2,445 2,357 3,012 3,108 6,080 9,396

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Connecticut (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,909 3,749 3,937 2,897 2,106 1,625 1,528 1,579 1,551 1,685 2,324 3,891 1990 4,318 3,869 3,369 3,009 1,743 1,483 1,358 1,315 1,352 1,603 2,456 3,534 1991 4,341 3,973 3,566 2,352 1,462 1,030 995 1,020 884 1,423 2,396 3,396 1992 4,417 4,374 3,940 2,941 1,779 1,149 1,046 1,061 1,075 1,562 2,623 3,871 1993 4,666 4,995 4,461 3,038 1,583 1,161 1,122 1,070 1,121 1,789 2,896 3,525 1994 5,882

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Delaware (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 632 605 624 398 249 166 128 133 144 182 294 630 1990 784 530 530 419 239 174 139 138 136 163 309 480 1991 677 653 579 414 237 161 146 142 145 203 354 541 1992 744 755 686 537 308 198 166 152 162 240 395 622 1993 739 818 858 574 284 140 165 155 155 229 412 666 1994 945 1,076 856 510 259 209 157 156 172 221 345 554 1995 829 935 854 527 341 223 182 168 205 209 417 851 1996 1,099 1,181 885

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Florida (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,493 3,435 3,545 3,083 2,670 2,570 2,525 2,369 2,484 2,444 2,868 3,620 1990 4,101 3,305 3,246 3,026 2,860 2,673 2,584 2,497 2,483 2,521 3,285 3,725 1991 3,875 3,770 3,782 3,363 2,978 2,674 2,845 2,708 2,998 2,798 3,519 3,954 1992 4,408 4,364 3,856 3,741 3,382 3,085 2,976 2,881 2,849 2,954 3,317 3,914 1993 3,951 4,078 4,088 3,871 3,362 3,085 2,919 2,830 2,887 2,983 3,336 3,760 1994 4,619

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Georgia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,127 7,499 5,163 3,921 2,982 2,340 2,411 2,360 2,589 3,475 4,834 8,389 1990 8,162 5,935 5,172 3,960 2,844 2,498 2,359 2,535 2,416 3,098 4,228 6,280 1991 7,680 6,782 5,905 3,348 2,820 2,387 2,381 2,482 2,346 3,082 5,153 6,670 1992 8,066 6,952 5,778 4,381 3,103 2,596 2,536 2,503 2,462 3,201 4,640 7,642 1993 7,627 7,915 7,796 4,837 3,069 2,544 2,570 2,481 2,440 3,312 5,214 7,719 1994 9,543

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Hawaii (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 187 178 174 175 181 175 182 173 175 179 172 177 1990 190 188 188 180 181 188 195 180 180 183 184 185 1991 192 177 169 187 173 173 187 172 179 177 178 185 1992 190 180 174 183 177 184 174 173 178 168 178 184 1993 185 190 179 177 168 183 174 170 168 173 183 172 1994 195 176 190 185 181 184 177 178 184 177 189 185 1995 200 180 185 183 185 188 186 178 179 179 178 177 1996 200 192 184 190 172

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Idaho (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,567 1,575 1,160 692 409 355 301 249 321 435 785 1,176 1990 1,313 1,283 1,000 610 479 389 293 280 292 459 822 1,315 1991 1,848 1,291 956 822 623 405 316 304 329 424 942 1,321 1992 1,543 1,167 834 643 447 343 345 330 369 465 889 1,557 1993 1,806 1,673 1,294 828 566 387 383 360 381 507 947 1,543 1994 1,510 1,457 1,121 771 480 377 374 306 357 571 1,098 1,667 1995 1,754 1,319 1,154 951 708 487

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Indiana (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 11,170 11,376 9,613 5,768 3,297 1,904 1,579 1,659 2,217 3,850 7,577 13,614 1990 11,991 9,374 7,958 6,087 3,191 1,963 1,658 1,860 1,991 4,087 6,640 10,462 1991 13,081 10,656 8,567 4,535 2,546 1,648 1,613 1,710 2,358 3,614 7,821 10,233 1992 12,060 10,265 8,437 6,172 3,400 2,004 1,811 1,955 2,131 4,253 8,135 12,097 1993 12,941 12,125 10,972 6,557 2,866 2,100 1,819 1,838 2,442 4,559 8,381

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Iowa (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,372 7,466 6,928 4,133 2,216 1,380 1,190 1,234 1,247 179 3,738 7,110 1990 8,087 6,374 5,719 4,261 2,409 1,602 1,226 1,204 1,302 2,087 3,726 5,955 1991 9,237 6,828 5,412 3,305 1,993 1,308 1,090 1,198 1,308 2,482 5,287 7,167 1992 7,145 6,709 4,949 3,883 1,877 1,427 1,100 1,257 1,433 2,645 5,843 7,827 1993 8,688 7,779 6,773 4,316 2,029 1,481 1,214 1,214 1,637 2,869 5,694 6,642 1994 9,353 8,260

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Kansas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,155 7,697 6,870 5,433 3,660 2,547 3,366 4,812 3,081 2,785 4,386 6,763 1990 8,061 6,230 5,114 4,800 3,112 2,848 4,906 4,462 3,836 2,893 3,877 5,907 1991 10,250 7,397 5,694 4,278 3,082 2,657 4,321 3,994 2,629 2,656 6,075 5,538 1992 6,844 5,862 4,372 4,571 3,736 2,814 3,609 3,462 3,132 3,162 4,867 7,543 1993 8,768 7,385 7,019 4,938 2,840 2,559 3,348 3,324 2,395 2,469 4,413 6,565 1994 8,139

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Kentucky (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5,139 5,507 4,546 2,840 1,766 1,167 1,099 991 1,147 954 3,327 6,648 1990 5,355 4,280 3,496 2,702 1,576 1,129 1,037 1,077 1,025 2,050 3,194 4,884 1991 6,313 5,098 3,647 1,925 1,198 1,029 941 991 1,338 1,862 4,197 5,161 1992 6,191 4,758 3,874 2,612 1,600 1,132 1,066 1,158 1,209 2,237 4,064 5,519 1993 5,878 5,863 5,207 2,934 1,330 1,449 1,029 1,060 1,220 2,417 3,997 5,433 1994 8,181 6,018

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,399 3,365 3,462 2,362 1,790 1,479 1,399 1,340 1,433 1,568 2,035 3,524 1990 4,528 2,757 2,490 2,135 1,628 1,499 1,361 1,238 1,275 1,487 2,082 2,491 1991 3,639 3,555 2,713 1,974 1,539 1,418 1,504 1,253 1,229 1,440 2,347 2,842 1992 4,060 4,003 2,743 2,367 1,769 1,564 1,556 1,431 1,508 1,577 2,295 3,574 1993 3,260 3,207 3,075 2,376 1,742 1,454 1,267 1,277 1,290 1,346 2,091 2,771 1994 3,925

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Maine (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 229 226 221 160 106 63 51 50 60 96 128 269 1990 268 227 211 175 108 70 52 47 62 83 157 219 1991 282 265 236 180 101 73 65 65 59 103 152 278 1992 322 318 315 229 157 80 79 52 67 116 188 285 1993 356 364 291 192 107 80 71 67 77 166 224 316 1994 458 364 302 181 128 79 63 71 84 135 207 309 1995 350 373 288 211 128 77 70 71 86 129 254 389 1996 413 386 356 208 132 82 74 75 78 172 280 310 1997 433

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Massachusetts (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 7,394 6,984 7,234 5,392 3,703 2,150 1,726 1,894 1,799 2,720 3,647 6,864 1990 8,247 6,548 6,367 5,235 3,381 2,491 2,009 2,040 1,906 2,416 4,275 5,704 1991 7,617 7,579 6,948 5,504 3,772 2,466 2,435 2,188 1,939 2,666 4,048 6,027 1992 8,184 8,736 8,217 7,049 4,450 2,768 3,072 2,884 2,753 3,776 5,530 6,933 1993 8,556 9,118 9,026 6,491 4,195 3,184 2,692 2,802 2,766 3,878 5,622 7,098 1994

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Michigan (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 26,553 25,448 24,717 16,375 10,150 5,954 4,570 4,467 5,047 8,855 15,776 28,269 1990 26,939 22,780 20,870 15,431 9,230 5,638 4,610 4,865 5,117 8,592 14,122 21,237 1991 29,054 24,902 21,321 14,617 9,583 5,601 4,916 4,508 5,510 9,450 12,966 23,131 1992 26,677 24,979 22,443 17,769 10,406 5,883 4,981 4,964 5,431 9,760 16,298 24,211 1993 28,122 27,427 25,623 18,238 9,009 5,968 5,035 4,140 5,767

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Minnesota (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 13,112 13,607 11,411 6,916 3,980 2,416 2,112 2,011 2,475 4,718 8,764 13,661 1990 12,696 11,412 9,846 6,734 4,032 2,369 2,100 2,060 2,342 4,865 7,491 12,066 1991 15,649 11,426 10,026 6,092 4,220 2,541 2,315 2,304 2,930 5,399 10,392 12,580 1992 13,000 11,075 10,134 7,517 3,602 2,467 2,244 2,296 2,631 5,092 9,526 12,795 1993 14,685 12,874 11,396 7,267 3,588 2,549 2,190 2,207 2,952 5,614

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,372 2,502 2,411 1,407 947 739 718 701 754 939 1,350 2,727 1990 3,199 2,007 1,675 1,541 1,070 884 819 818 841 1,137 1,508 2,050 1991 2,704 2,572 1,977 1,291 901 875 806 834 865 989 1,721 2,208 1992 2,817 2,595 1,758 1,473 994 888 885 867 847 942 1,489 2,387 1993 2,663 2,583 2,559 1,756 1,108 925 904 864 843 985 1,710 2,298 1994 3,417 2,993 2,136 1,456 1,012 942 992 973 1,000 1,050

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Missouri (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,118 10,280 9,192 5,246 2,799 2,359 1,829 1,780 2,021 2,798 4,716 9,903 1990 11,634 7,979 6,849 5,622 3,309 2,310 2,034 1,971 2,083 2,863 4,811 7,921 1991 12,748 9,932 7,479 4,261 2,760 2,181 1,853 1,896 2,056 2,689 6,471 8,864 1992 10,201 9,060 6,835 5,601 3,144 2,547 1,849 1,993 2,024 2,728 5,335 9,646 1993 12,062 10,467 10,336 6,750 3,580 2,266 2,066 1,959 2,222 2,864 5,974 9,124

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Montana (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,029 1,923 1,841 1,208 687 478 330 381 442 806 1,235 1,781 1990 1,912 1,705 1,402 998 766 487 323 348 347 782 1,206 1,889 1991 2,425 1,435 1,450 1,053 843 431 357 341 438 724 1,559 1,790 1992 1,726 1,464 1,099 930 568 377 365 331 523 810 1,271 2,095 1993 2,465 1,705 1,741 1,137 682 434 437 416 535 819 1,508 1,999 1994 1,844 1,936 1,465 1,100 699 452 362 348 423 860 1,447 2,043 1995 2,085

  12. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Nebraska (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4,202 4,825 4,252 2,505 1,648 1,757 3,381 4,240 1,634 2,109 2,602 4,196 1990 4,765 4,019 3,355 2,799 1,480 1,325 4,837 2,596 2,333 2,334 2,552 4,094 1991 5,452 4,111 3,382 2,193 1,771 1,779 5,675 4,406 1,961 2,056 3,468 4,037 1992 4,332 3,760 2,970 2,411 1,781 1,330 2,366 2,393 1,710 2,508 3,988 4,941 1993 5,784 3,806 4,611 3,119 1,629 1,388 1,324 1,828 1,333 2,164 3,495 4,263 1994 5,469

  13. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Nevada (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,156 2,125 1,533 1,100 1,004 890 790 805 811 954 1,257 1,690 1990 1,959 1,963 1,740 1,185 1,006 970 879 782 701 1,157 1,026 1,705 1991 2,447 1,839 1,739 1,593 1,333 1,121 947 1,005 761 1,104 1,095 1,976 1992 2,327 1,873 1,725 1,335 1,012 945 1,015 824 872 982 1,022 2,170 1993 2,271 2,110 2,016 1,314 1,341 1,052 919 939 909 1,047 1,421 2,211 1994 2,334 2,277 1,995 1,456 1,300 1,136 995 909

  14. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in New York (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 25,565 24,630 25,344 18,494 12,079 8,747 8,382 8,305 8,812 11,741 16,631 27,650 1990 24,659 23,697 22,939 17,706 11,586 10,272 9,602 9,683 10,261 12,661 17,210 24,715 1991 28,442 25,685 23,462 17,684 11,669 9,641 10,331 9,764 9,195 11,571 17,033 25,121 1992 29,246 29,912 27,748 23,039 13,518 9,915 9,327 9,456 9,582 12,860 16,804 25,808 1993 28,857 29,740 28,926 20,266 11,667 11,221 10,477

  15. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in North Carolina (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 4,784 4,016 4,367 3,046 2,022 1,568 1,475 1,454 1,534 1,843 2,639 4,396 1990 5,379 3,690 3,400 2,747 1,820 1,445 1,394 1,480 1,596 1,795 2,715 3,817 1991 4,947 4,647 3,990 2,629 1,928 1,677 1,613 1,679 1,789 2,052 3,200 4,162 1992 5,169 5,066 3,983 3,296 2,205 1,733 1,591 1,607 1,679 2,138 3,010 4,941 1993 5,866 5,566 5,426 3,602 1,988 1,532 1,437 1,539 1,674 2,067 3,379 3,292 1994

  16. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in North Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,789 1,669 1,514 1,027 508 335 269 238 340 464 951 1,506 1990 1,666 1,457 1,243 1,048 616 383 315 298 370 561 916 1,363 1991 1,917 1,394 1,253 847 629 320 302 314 348 633 1,241 1,535 1992 1,489 1,380 1,082 937 529 298 279 262 363 576 1,015 1,549 1993 1,911 1,477 1,339 925 477 347 317 294 381 629 1,068 1,478 1994 2,016 1,812 1,339 932 526 302 284 288 315 530 1,241 1,198 1995 1,807

  17. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Ohio (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 23,636 24,435 21,187 13,360 8,237 3,927 3,565 3,735 4,397 8,946 15,949 30,143 1990 25,317 19,642 20,361 13,373 7,446 4,838 3,975 4,165 4,240 7,272 13,757 19,190 1991 26,286 24,481 20,157 11,779 6,341 3,971 3,703 3,933 4,196 8,065 15,488 21,940 1992 26,321 24,820 20,215 15,893 7,455 5,016 4,291 4,260 4,418 9,092 15,094 23,770 1993 25,230 26,706 25,531 15,019 6,359 5,221 3,939 3,860 4,492 9,636

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Oklahoma (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,069 7,033 6,197 2,868 1,601 1,279 1,180 1,097 1,241 1,528 2,542 5,873 1990 7,587 5,618 4,176 3,424 2,281 1,519 1,312 1,355 1,235 1,613 2,520 4,567 1991 8,702 6,014 4,265 2,489 1,702 1,330 1,290 1,279 1,299 1,590 3,974 5,653 1992 6,180 5,310 3,653 2,956 1,785 1,540 1,407 1,292 1,240 1,449 2,608 5,771 1993 7,076 6,147 5,910 3,743 2,057 1,439 1,324 1,432 1,345 1,544 3,424 5,327 1994 6,644

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Oregon (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,884 3,283 2,761 1,724 1,140 989 823 804 882 972 1,624 2,363 1990 2,984 3,031 2,562 1,550 1,268 1,157 821 769 823 1,050 1,697 2,737 1991 4,074 2,764 2,407 2,048 1,610 1,274 902 812 855 927 1,898 2,758 1992 3,231 2,465 1,925 1,542 1,171 884 784 782 863 1,105 1,652 3,166 1993 4,148 3,370 2,880 1,927 1,448 1,010 915 840 934 1,099 1,918 3,557 1994 3,388 3,166 2,480 1,836 1,234 1,078 865 801

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Rhode Island (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,032 979 1,003 855 565 457 471 518 560 657 654 1,014 1990 1,195 903 893 857 577 244 413 365 508 587 763 774 1991 1,089 979 864 605 667 414 538 540 555 628 496 895 1992 1,076 1,128 1,103 1,047 676 498 448 479 411 609 654 951 1993 1,140 1,359 1,325 907 429 330 273 364 243 503 1,008 1,324 1994 1,919 1,974 1,626 1,092 653 542 343 599 384 569 1,010 1,338 1995 1,077 1,679 1,883 1,353 901

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in South Carolina (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,176 1,936 2,098 1,489 1,094 891 908 808 866 970 1,324 1,964 1990 2,455 1,649 1,576 1,262 1,040 846 836 830 872 965 1,315 1,749 1991 2,199 2,076 1,746 1,143 908 818 810 859 875 952 1,492 1,917 1992 2,276 2,158 1,745 1,436 1,068 944 820 882 875 1,006 1,345 2,089 1993 2,268 2,155 2,200 1,507 1,007 877 832 840 846 947 1,463 2,070 1994 2,845 2,472 1,910 1,174 1,027 1,342 913 949 947

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in South Dakota (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 1,339 1,454 1,253 776 413 276 203 197 255 434 851 1,374 1990 1,398 1,234 1,064 769 537 306 230 223 239 459 825 1,269 1991 1,723 1,243 1,076 713 543 303 263 251 309 588 1,176 1,286 1992 1,314 1,174 1,007 828 460 303 291 284 324 558 1,104 1,476 1993 1,847 1,496 1,344 995 531 342 315 291 392 632 1,083 1,429 1994 1,738 1,695 1,285 846 524 347 239 322 329 531 946 1,472 1995 1,619 1,491

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Tennessee (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,960 6,840 6,382 4,054 2,529 1,916 1,802 1,659 1,843 2,355 3,769 7,404 1990 8,672 5,800 4,578 3,811 2,474 1,988 1,652 1,791 1,597 2,276 3,426 5,490 1991 7,499 7,400 5,761 3,131 2,231 1,829 1,640 1,708 1,837 2,454 4,304 6,158 1992 7,343 6,834 5,069 4,205 2,436 2,016 1,838 1,681 1,933 2,368 3,963 6,846 1993 7,296 7,526 7,354 4,605 2,613 1,992 1,884 1,811 1,992 2,565 4,648 6,470 1994 9,690

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 21,163 22,930 20,215 15,779 11,310 10,731 12,786 11,350 9,367 10,345 12,823 23,871 1990 21,376 16,323 17,118 14,054 12,299 14,204 14,184 11,592 9,448 9,571 12,192 19,981 1991 26,377 18,723 16,796 15,181 11,439 10,763 12,769 11,125 8,843 11,156 17,192 20,608 1992 22,907 19,049 15,866 14,174 12,557 10,879 13,768 12,966 11,356 11,672 17,386 22,093 1993 21,489 18,444 16,162 14,455 12,175 12,943

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Utah (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,283 3,376 2,280 1,227 653 472 357 346 390 522 1,313 2,304 1990 2,864 2,779 2,272 1,203 860 581 373 364 374 629 1,382 2,540 1991 4,055 3,108 2,282 1,771 1,316 668 405 375 407 551 1,634 2,704 1992 3,330 2,952 1,866 1,155 642 457 410 372 405 545 1,329 3,120 1993 3,922 3,682 2,988 1,839 1,248 707 597 594 606 946 2,023 3,436 1994 3,929 3,846 2,665 2,037 962 814 820 787 882 1,883 3,542 4,335 1995

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Vermont (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 315 300 283 199 105 66 57 57 73 130 189 307 1990 338 288 269 196 116 68 46 62 84 127 195 261 1991 335 311 259 187 105 61 55 58 82 133 188 284 1992 366 354 320 231 118 75 79 75 77 144 211 269 1993 347 368 350 199 124 80 62 67 83 143 235 324 1994 476 455 341 269 150 90 65 69 88 144 187 334 1995 388 406 352 277 140 89 70 72 95 130 242 410 1996 458 445 381 279 153 97 67 69 90 162 276 348 1997

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 6,164 6,056 5,721 4,051 2,446 2,129 1,866 1,485 1,985 2,192 3,612 6,474 1990 6,162 5,181 5,100 4,541 2,412 1,831 1,802 1,772 1,671 2,233 3,251 5,081 1991 6,667 5,956 5,270 3,581 2,481 2,159 1,867 2,057 1,860 2,625 3,855 5,701 1992 7,072 6,690 5,985 4,523 3,289 2,271 2,085 2,055 1,903 3,275 4,714 6,895 1993 7,432 7,800 7,347 4,850 2,842 2,177 1,987 2,033 2,106 3,073 4,355 6,877 1994 8,677

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Washington (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 5,343 5,561 5,424 3,672 2,194 1,851 1,671 1,548 1,357 2,083 3,366 4,433 1990 5,136 5,666 4,496 3,289 2,728 1,951 1,639 1,476 1,575 2,249 3,444 5,071 1991 6,279 5,277 4,597 4,047 3,025 2,400 1,831 1,635 1,689 2,099 3,802 5,057 1992 5,564 4,840 3,855 3,179 2,343 1,830 1,575 1,514 1,734 2,240 3,418 5,709 1993 7,058 5,670 5,157 3,785 2,774 1,905 1,801 1,750 1,829 2,236 3,639 6,016 1994

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in West Virginia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 3,177 3,265 2,807 2,041 1,476 881 785 853 859 1,373 2,036 3,704 1990 3,701 2,707 2,391 2,064 1,224 924 889 845 862 1,237 1,963 2,585 1991 3,061 2,971 2,522 1,725 1,068 810 848 823 915 1,365 2,169 2,767 1992 3,659 3,565 2,986 2,322 1,341 999 812 855 910 1,482 2,092 3,396 1993 3,123 3,522 3,444 2,169 1,218 992 818 914 983 1,510 2,404 3,286 1994 4,653 3,681 3,246 2,031 1,437 982 812 973

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Wisconsin (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 10,596 10,988 10,169 6,662 3,882 2,012 1,562 1,499 1,718 3,437 6,386 11,183 1990 11,878 9,411 8,746 5,436 3,701 2,130 1,686 1,617 1,786 3,865 6,030 10,074 1991 13,062 10,137 8,785 5,471 3,084 1,643 1,853 1,415 2,229 4,335 8,565 10,938 1992 11,235 10,037 9,113 6,870 3,632 1,986 1,759 1,615 1,954 4,108 7,918 11,087 1993 12,658 11,647 10,442 7,011 3,438 2,418 1,843 1,719 2,326 4,637 7,976

  11. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in the District of Columbia (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1989 2,133 2,021 2,066 1,635 999 803 692 763 712 775 1,090 2,052 1990 1,986 1,857 1,789 1,384 951 699 514 572 721 574 836 1,589 1991 2,204 2,308 2,131 1,381 1,063 784 705 794 689 658 1,071 1,764 1992 2,300 2,256 2,132 1,774 1,056 764 718 673 653 753 1,103 1,921 1993 2,352 2,438 2,166 1,550 1,150 731 664 703 684 841 1,040 1,909 1994 2,303 1,865 1,483 1,588 979 815 753 692 740

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Alabama (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 293,981 299,146 299,872 2000's 315,202 299,631 343,913 316,665 350,734 323,143 358,141 385,209 369,750 418,677 2010's 496,051 558,116 622,359 573,981 599,473 640,707

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Arkansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 241,664 247,908 241,648 2000's 240,672 217,765 233,046 237,428 205,480 202,946 221,378 214,298 221,983 230,488 2010's 256,102 266,194 278,304 263,281 249,549 270,209

  14. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in California (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,049,536 2,228,414 2,264,158 2000's 2,434,770 2,400,993 2,218,923 2,218,715 2,353,823 2,196,741 2,248,988 2,327,205 2,330,514 2,256,380 2010's 2,196,086 2,096,279 2,337,017 2,352,421 2,265,431 2,257,216

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Colorado (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 272,530 289,945 288,147 2000's 321,784 412,773 404,873 377,794 378,894 405,509 383,452 435,360 426,034 420,500 2010's 396,083 345,663 327,108 361,779 367,021 NA

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Delaware (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 46,499 40,794 55,968 2000's 48,325 50,090 52,167 46,143 48,019 46,863 43,172 48,139 48,144 50,126 2010's 54,685 79,251 100,630 95,008 99,736 99,543

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Georgia (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 363,402 360,973 328,730 2000's 408,209 343,698 375,567 372,492 388,751 406,852 414,377 435,919 419,057 456,082 2010's 521,557 512,466 605,262 617,310 645,253 683,796

  18. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Hawaii (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2,894 2,654 3,115 2000's 2,841 2,818 2,734 2,732 2,772 2,793 2,782 2,848 2,700 2,605 2010's 2,625 2,616 2,687 2,853 2,927 2,929

  19. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 63,483 63,781 66,160 2000's 66,758 73,723 65,510 65,329 69,572 69,202 69,202 74,395 81,646 78,166 2010's 75,647 77,343 83,274 98,843 87,647 98,782

  20. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Illinois (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,062,536 944,170 992,865 2000's 1,017,283 940,691 1,036,615 987,964 941,964 958,727 883,080 954,100 987,137 931,329 2010's 942,205 960,018 910,611 1,024,851 1,062,377 960,624

  1. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Indiana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 545,839 514,407 549,639 2000's 564,919 494,706 533,754 520,352 519,785 524,415 489,881 528,655 544,202 500,135 2010's 564,904 619,977 642,209 664,817 703,637 712,946

  2. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Iowa (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 243,181 223,287 222,943 2000's 224,299 215,348 215,482 220,263 216,625 229,717 225,929 280,954 311,672 301,340 2010's 300,033 296,098 285,038 314,742 317,784 NA

  3. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Kansas (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 252,275 259,783 240,248 2000's 253,037 224,367 239,449 227,436 213,122 206,537 217,981 246,094 244,181 243,199 2010's 235,316 241,473 223,188 241,292 246,547 NA

  4. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maine (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 6,290 5,716 6,572 2000's 43,971 94,569 100,659 69,973 85,478 61,088 63,541 62,430 69,202 69,497 2010's 75,821 69,291 67,504 63,247 59,362

  5. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Maryland (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 208,890 185,583 193,142 2000's 208,894 175,611 193,766 194,280 192,242 200,336 179,949 198,715 193,613 193,988 2010's 205,688 187,921 201,550 193,232 201,199 205,407

  6. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Michigan (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 958,506 846,478 919,922 2000's 926,633 874,578 926,299 888,584 881,257 875,492 767,509 762,502 748,655 703,346 2010's 713,533 745,769 761,544 787,603 824,527 NA

  7. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Missouri (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 275,838 253,157 259,054 2000's 277,206 281,875 273,073 259,526 260,708 265,485 250,290 269,825 288,847 260,976 2010's 274,361 265,534 250,902 271,341 290,421 271,116

  8. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Montana (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 54,138 54,093 55,129 2000's 57,725 54,529 58,451 56,074 54,066 55,200 60,602 60,869 64,240 66,613 2010's 60,517 68,113 61,963 68,410 71,435

  9. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Nebraska (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 128,092 127,840 118,536 2000's 123,791 118,933 117,427 113,320 110,725 114,402 125,202 145,253 160,685 156,161 2010's 161,284 162,219 150,961 166,233 165,620 149,107

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oklahoma (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 459,508 490,070 456,573 2000's 450,596 400,740 429,152 443,139 444,514 487,723 528,236 563,474 590,997 566,176 2010's 582,389 559,215 587,287 539,056 508,363 539,439

  11. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Oregon (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 172,588 216,058 224,767 2000's 213,063 218,632 193,006 205,415 225,263 225,277 214,346 242,371 261,105 240,765 2010's 232,900 194,336 211,232 236,276 216,365 233,523

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Pennsylvania (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 664,782 609,779 648,194 2000's 659,042 596,041 632,035 651,938 662,513 656,097 625,944 711,945 705,284 755,938 2010's 811,209 866,775 918,490 959,041 1,042,647 1,078,18

  13. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Utah (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 137,700 139,522 133,518 2000's 137,213 135,123 135,699 125,899 128,441 130,286 152,283 183,237 192,281 182,187 2010's 185,228 184,581 178,941 199,684 198,278 187,452

  14. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Vermont (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 8,052 7,726 8,025 2000's 10,411 7,906 8,353 8,386 8,672 8,358 8,041 8,851 8,609 8,621 2010's 8,428 8,558 8,077 9,512 10,554 11,7

  15. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Virginia (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 240,244 252,233 267,269 2000's 258,975 228,670 247,351 254,008 268,674 292,043 264,954 309,866 286,497 304,266 2010's 359,208 352,281 392,255 401,623 404,939

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Washington (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 247,530 281,143 279,656 2000's 280,617 303,060 227,360 243,072 253,663 256,580 256,842 265,211 291,535 302,930 2010's 278,139 257,945 255,356 308,148 298,088 296,056

  17. Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Wyoming (Including Vehicle Fuel)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 70,792 77,652 60,593 2000's 63,384 60,385 69,633 67,627 65,639 64,753 65,487 67,693 66,472 61,774 2010's 67,736 70,862 73,690 74,597 73,096 72,979

  18. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 30,401 34,749 37,275 1970's 36,254 36,657 37,389 33,126 35,349 33,439 34,450 34,303 29,649 36,717 1980's 28,525 26,860 25,876 26,665 27,567 25,836 25,128 22,384 25,562 26,469 1990's 24,287 23,711 25,232 25,723 25,526 26,228 29,000 32,360 25,705 27,581 2000's 25,580 26,391 25,011 25,356 26,456 25,046 24,396 23,420 25,217 24,293 2010's 27,071 25,144 21,551 25,324

  19. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Arkansas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 35,295 37,886 39,962 1970's 39,169 30,832 32,457 33,789 31,040 33,291 34,011 33,913 34,612 33,442 1980's 30,690 28,282 29,438 27,739 28,995 26,731 24,949 24,603 27,457 27,271 1990's 25,129 25,986 25,314 28,998 27,407 27,409 31,006 29,441 28,062 27,898 2000's 33,180 32,031 32,928 31,746 29,821 31,521 31,286 32,187 36,924 36,373 2010's 40,232 39,986 41,435 47,636

  20. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in California (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 184,630 189,903 206,861 1970's 209,945 239,685 231,536 232,774 228,988 240,239 219,840 227,543 221,441 258,490 1980's 258,151 236,910 236,202 215,918 191,838 205,044 182,794 212,904 248,397 259,118 1990's 285,090 287,608 285,008 250,283 261,989 278,761 235,068 253,923 282,153 244,701 2000's 246,439 245,795 238,308 232,912 231,597 233,082 244,432 251,024 251,045

  1. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Colorado (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 39,942 47,287 52,256 1970's 59,081 62,805 63,154 69,844 68,322 76,288 75,959 72,597 71,422 74,831 1980's 66,952 58,913 66,991 64,615 71,890 68,975 61,620 64,355 68,515 67,477 1990's 66,290 68,938 66,420 71,647 65,870 66,639 68,914 69,074 63,132 59,346 2000's 60,874 65,011 66,939 62,616 61,956 62,099 59,851 63,231 65,806 62,441 2010's 57,658 55,843 51,795 58,787

  2. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Delaware (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,968 2,084 2,526 1970's 2,804 3,010 3,205 3,093 3,169 2,964 3,078 2,815 3,005 2,842 1980's 3,246 3,783 3,577 3,428 3,827 3,412 3,514 3,741 4,041 4,184 1990's 4,042 4,253 4,965 5,195 5,459 5,743 6,694 6,608 5,590 6,119 2000's 5,125 5,680 7,477 8,437 8,465 8,383 8,134 8,628 8,868 11,684 2010's 12,193 10,478 10,034 11,170 11,882 11,189

  3. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Florida (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 22,501 21,890 24,721 1970's 26,914 25,478 23,243 24,315 22,527 31,745 39,681 41,236 35,386 36,638 1980's 30,182 33,702 29,788 29,228 30,481 30,674 35,829 37,492 37,834 35,105 1990's 36,306 39,264 41,727 41,151 39,935 40,383 41,810 36,700 37,659 36,269 2000's 47,904 49,286 55,803 54,283 56,321 57,690 50,625 51,097 50,901 50,371 2010's 54,065 53,532 54,659 59,971

  4. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Georgia (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 30,202 36,034 39,020 1970's 38,726 41,881 44,992 47,253 44,317 49,438 46,351 55,268 60,266 62,437 1980's 58,763 57,139 54,718 56,280 55,909 51,519 50,405 54,592 55,963 53,089 1990's 49,486 51,036 53,861 57,525 54,051 56,536 61,377 57,220 55,419 43,581 2000's 58,793 50,645 48,631 50,273 55,047 52,902 48,137 48,591 51,518 53,627 2010's 60,153 56,602 51,918 57,195

  5. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Hawaii (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,715 1,610 1,607 1,548 1,328 1,858 1,883 2,019 2,049 2,129 1990's 2,223 2,148 2,144 2,123 2,200 2,199 2,132 1,751 1,747 1,749 2000's 1,771 1,749 1,720 1,751 1,803 1,838 1,813 1,836 1,769 1,752 2010's 1,777 1,768 1,850 1,873 1,931 1,908

  6. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Idaho (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 4,972 6,374 6,613 1970's 5,851 8,232 10,712 9,387 8,040 12,177 8,742 8,405 5,503 6,923 1980's 5,756 5,422 5,729 5,758 8,493 8,999 8,543 7,618 8,252 9,024 1990's 8,535 9,582 8,932 10,675 10,088 10,360 11,506 11,433 11,676 12,618 2000's 13,414 13,623 13,592 12,019 12,995 13,231 13,573 14,274 16,333 15,740 2010's 15,033 16,855 15,838 18,485 16,963 16,171

  7. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Illinois (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 175,281 174,565 189,006 1970's 193,434 210,424 224,488 218,530 216,114 215,718 246,659 243,686 251,895 237,199 1980's 228,178 223,427 218,751 204,834 232,170 213,528 204,979 191,047 215,257 196,171 1990's 200,267 193,844 196,964 203,157 197,558 203,802 218,054 202,850 174,687 188,520 2000's 201,768 189,160 204,570 211,710 204,039 201,882 196,361 203,368 222,382

  8. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Kansas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 37,141 46,232 54,062 1970's 52,632 56,246 61,286 52,674 53,461 51,705 57,310 51,815 64,532 60,931 1980's 58,880 52,036 55,470 52,535 57,516 56,522 55,730 53,609 61,120 58,554 1990's 56,045 58,571 53,973 56,023 52,253 53,122 57,229 41,482 41,788 38,952 2000's 40,297 37,560 38,802 37,781 36,779 29,616 27,505 30,546 33,531 32,512 2010's 31,799 32,117 25,452 33,198

  9. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Kentucky (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 32,313 36,089 41,934 1970's 42,461 42,352 42,843 45,797 42,320 38,497 57,203 50,170 46,647 40,509 1980's 39,359 36,379 35,260 34,111 36,138 33,758 32,666 33,298 35,718 36,148 1990's 31,806 33,700 35,419 37,817 36,744 38,610 40,972 38,627 32,464 35,798 2000's 38,669 35,255 35,942 38,212 36,989 36,894 32,590 34,386 37,167 35,438 2010's 36,818 34,592 30,771 37,422

  10. Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    through 1996) in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 51,062 56,937 54,010 1970's 70,321 67,515 66,331 59,518 58,097 50,662 43,567 44,563 65,300 115,743 1980's 39,996 39,507 33,729 34,906 33,088 30,228 27,985 27,845 27,475 27,156 1990's 24,937 25,452 28,445 25,157 24,184 23,833 25,746 25,613 24,042 24,559 2000's 25,687 24,604 25,540 25,161 24,700 25,085 22,240 23,863 22,869 23,672 2010's 27,009 25,925 26,294 28,875