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1

Methanol fuel cell model: Anode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An isothermal, steady-state model of an anode in a direct methanol feed, polymer electrolyte fuel cell is presented. The anode is considered to be a porous electrode consisting of an electronically conducting catalyst structure that is thinly coated with an ion-selective polymer electrolyte. The pores are filled with a feed solution of 2 M methanol in water. Four species are transported in the anode: water, methanol, hydrogen ions, and carbon dioxide. All four species are allowed to transport in the x-direction through the depth of the electrode. Species movement in the pseudo y-direction is taken into account for water, methanol, and carbon dioxide by use of an effective mass-transfer coefficient. Butler-Volmer kinetics are observed for the methanol oxidation reaction. Predictions of the model have been fitted with kinetic parameters from experimental data, and a sensitivity analysis was performed to identify critical parameters affecting the anode`s performance. Kinetic limitations are a dominant factor in the performance of the system. At higher currents, the polymer electrolyte`s conductivity and the anode`s thickness were also found to be important parameters to the prediction of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell anode`s behavior in the methanol oxidation region 0.5--0.6 V vs. a reversible hydrogen electrode.

Baxter, S.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Battaglia, V.S.; White, R.E. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Novel Anode Materials For Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Dissertation committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and fabrication of alternative anodes for direct methane oxidation in SOFC". Publisher: Twente University Press, P cells (SOFC). The principles and materials employed for SOFC are described. Emphasis is on the anode (PAFC), · the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), · the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Each type of fuel

Verweij, Henk

3

Fuel cell having dual electrode anode or cathode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell that is characterized by including a dual electrode anode that is operable to simultaneously electro-oxidize a gaseous fuel and a liquid fuel. In alternative embodiments, a fuel cell having a single electrode anode is provided with a dual electrode cathode that is operable to simultaneously reduce a gaseous oxidant and a liquid oxidant to electro-oxidize a fuel supplied to the cell.

Findl, Eugene (Coram, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Fuel cell having dual electrode anode or cathode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell that is characterized by including a dual electrode anode that is operable to simultaneously electro-oxidize a gaseous fuel and a liquid fuel. In alternative embodiments, a fuel cell having a single electrode anode is provided with a dual electrode cathode that is operable to simultaneously reduce a gaseous oxidant and a liquid oxidant to electro-oxidize a fuel supplied to the cell.

Findl, E.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

5

Fuel cell system shutdown with anode pressure control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A venting methodology and pressure sensing and vent valving arrangement for monitoring anode bypass valve operating during the normal shutdown of a fuel cell apparatus of the type used in vehicle propulsion systems. During a normal shutdown routine, the pressure differential between the anode inlet and anode outlet is monitored in real time in a period corresponding to the normal closing speed of the anode bypass valve and the pressure differential at the end of the closing cycle of the anode bypass valve is compared to the pressure differential at the beginning of the closing cycle. If the difference in pressure differential at the beginning and end of the anode bypass closing cycle indicates that the anode bypass valve has not properly closed, a system controller switches from a normal shutdown mode to a rapid shutdown mode in which the anode inlet is instantaneously vented by rapid vents.

Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY); Doan, Tien M. (Columbia, MD); Keskula, Donald H. (Webster, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell - CellTech Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell-CellTech Power Background Direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer a theoretical efficiency advantage over traditional SOFCs operating on gasified carbon (syngas). CellTech Power LLC (CellTech) has been developing a liquid tin anode (LTA) SOFC that can directly convert carbonaceous fuels including coal into electricity without gasification. One of the most significant impediments

7

Novel Sulfur-Tolerant Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the unique advantages of SOFCs over other types of fuel cells is the potential for direct utilization of hydrocarbon fuels (it may involve internal reforming). Unfortunately, most hydrocarbon fuels contain sulfur, which would dramatically degrade SOFC performance at parts-per-million (ppm) levels. Low concentration of sulfur (ppm or below) is difficult to remove efficiently and cost-effectively. Therefore, knowing the exact poisoning process for state-of-the-art anode-supported SOFCs with Ni-YSZ cermet anodes, understanding the detailed anode poisoning mechanism, and developing new sulfur-tolerant anodes are essential to the promotion of SOFCs that run on hydrocarbon fuels. The effect of cell operating conditions (including temperature, H{sub 2}S concentration, cell voltage/current density, etc.) on sulfur poisoning and recovery of nickel-based anode in SOFCs was investigated. It was found that sulfur poisoning is more severe at lower temperature, higher H{sub 2}S concentration or lower cell current density (higher cell voltage). In-situ Raman spectroscopy identified the nickel sulfide formation process on the surface of a Ni-YSZ electrode and the corresponding morphology change as the sample was cooled in H{sub 2}S-containing fuel. Quantum chemical calculations predicted a new S-Ni phase diagram with a region of sulfur adsorption on Ni surfaces, corresponding to sulfur poisoning of Ni-YSZ anodes under typical SOFC operating conditions. Further, quantum chemical calculations were used to predict the adsorption energy and bond length for sulfur and hydrogen atoms on various metal surfaces. Surface modification of Ni-YSZ anode by thin Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} coating was utilized to enhance the sulfur tolerance. A multi-cell testing system was designed and constructed which is capable of simultaneously performing electrochemical tests of 12 button cells in fuels with four different concentrations of H{sub 2}S. Through systematical study of state-of-the-art anode-supported SOFC button cells, it is seen that the long-term sulfur poisoning behavior of those cells indicate that there might be a second-stage slower degradation due to sulfur poisoning, which would last for a thousand hour or even longer. However, when using G-18 sealant from PNNL, the 2nd stage poisoning was effectively prohibited.

Lei Yang; Meilin Liu

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

8

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation is a summary of a Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts.

Dinh, H.; Gennett, T.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

9

Electrocatalyst for alcohol oxidation at fuel cell anodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In some embodiments a ternary electrocatalyst is provided. The electrocatalyst can be used in an anode for oxidizing alcohol in a fuel cell. In some embodiments, the ternary electrocatalyst may include a noble metal particle having a surface decorated with clusters of SnO.sub.2 and Rh. The noble metal particles may include platinum, palladium, ruthenium, iridium, gold, and combinations thereof. In some embodiments, the ternary electrocatalyst includes SnO.sub.2 particles having a surface decorated with clusters of a noble metal and Rh. Some ternary electrocatalysts include noble metal particles with clusters of SnO.sub.2 and Rh at their surfaces. In some embodiments the electrocatalyst particle cores are nanoparticles. Some embodiments of the invention provide a fuel cell including an anode incorporating the ternary electrocatalyst. In some aspects a method of using ternary electrocatalysts of Pt, Rh, and SnO.sub.2 to oxidize an alcohol in a fuel cell is described.

Adzic, Radoslav (East Setauket, NY); Kowal, Andrzej (Cracow, PL)

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

10

OPERATION OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ANODES WITH PRACTICAL HYDROCARBON FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work was carried out to achieve a better understanding of how SOFC anodes work with real fuels. The motivation was to improve the fuel flexibility of SOFC anodes, thereby allowing simplification and cost reduction of SOFC power plants. The work was based on prior results indicating that Ni-YSZ anode-supported SOFCs can be operated directly on methane and natural gas, while SOFCs with novel anode compositions can work with higher hydrocarbons. While these results were promising, more work was clearly needed to establish the feasibility of these direct-hydrocarbon SOFCs. Basic information on hydrocarbon-anode reactions should be broadly useful because reformate fuel gas can contain residual hydrocarbons, especially methane. In the Phase I project, we have studied the reaction mechanisms of various hydrocarbons--including methane, natural gas, and higher hydrocarbons--on two kinds of Ni-containing anodes: conventional Ni-YSZ anodes and a novel ceramic-based anode composition that avoid problems with coking. The effect of sulfur impurities was also studied. The program was aimed both at achieving an understanding of the interactions between real fuels and SOFC anodes, and providing enough information to establish the feasibility of operating SOFC stacks directly on hydrocarbon fuels. A combination of techniques was used to provide insight into the hydrocarbon reactions at these anodes during SOFC operation. Differentially-pumped mass spectrometry was be used for product-gas analysis both with and without cell operation. Impedance spectroscopy was used in order to understand electrochemical rate-limiting steps. Open-circuit voltages measurements under a range of conditions was used to help determine anode electrochemical reactions. Life tests over a wide range of conditions were used to establish the conditions for stable operation of anode-supported SOFC stacks directly on methane. Redox cycling was carried out on ceramic-based anodes. Tests on sulfur tolerance of Ni-YSZ anodes were carried out.

Scott A. Barnett; Jiang Liu; Yuanbo Lin

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dinh (PI) Dinh (PI) Thomas Gennett National Renewable Energy Laboratory October 1, 2009 Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Objectives Develop cost-effective, reliable, durable fuel cells for portable power applications (e.g., cell phones, computers, etc.) that meet all DOE targets. Note that the energy density (Wh/L), volumetric (W/L), and specific power (W/kg) all depend on knowing the weight and volume of the entire DMFC system as well as the volume and concentration of fuel, which are system specific (power application and manufacturer dependent). In our model study the surface power density levels on HOPG will allow for indirect evaluation of our system to DOE's energy density

12

BSA 99-05: Anodes to Oxidize Alcohol in Fuel Cells  

BSA 99-05: Anodes to Oxidize Alcohol in Fuel Cells. BNL Reference Number: BSA 99-05. Summary. ... Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in ...

13

Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode water management  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell comprises a cathode gas diffusion layer, a cathode catalyst layer, an anode gas diffusion layer, an anode catalyst layer and an electrolyte. The diffusion resistance of the anode gas diffusion layer when operated with anode fuel is higher than the diffusion resistance of the cathode gas diffusion layer. The anode gas diffusion layer may comprise filler particles having in-plane platelet geometries and be made of lower cost materials and manufacturing processes than currently available commercial carbon fiber substrates. The diffusion resistance difference between the anode gas diffusion layer and the cathode gas diffusion layer may allow for passive water balance control.

Owejan, Jon P; Nicotera, Paul D; Mench, Matthew M; Evans, Robert E

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effect of Natural Gas Fuel Addition on the Oxidation of Fuel Cell Anode Gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The anode exhaust gas from a fuel cell commonly has a fuel energy density between 15 and 25% that of the fuel supply, due to the incomplete oxidation of the input fuel. This exhaust gas is subsequently oxidized (catalytically or non-catalytically), and the resultant thermal energy is often used elsewhere in the fuel cell process. Alternatively, additional fuel can be added to this stream to enhance the oxidation of the stream, for improved thermal control of the power plant, or to adjust the temperature of the exhaust gas as may be required in other specialty co-generation applications. Regardless of the application, the cost of a fuel cell system can be reduced if the exhaust gas oxidation can be accomplished through direct gas phase oxidation, rather than the usual catalytic oxidation approach. Before gas phase oxidation can be relied upon however, combustor design requirements need to be understood. The work reported here examines the issue of fuel addition, primarily as related to molten-carbonate fuel cell technology. It is shown experimentally that without proper combustor design, the addition of natural gas can readily quench the anode gas oxidation. The Chemkin software routines were used to resolve the mechanisms controlling the chemical quenching. It is found that addition of natural gas to the anode exhaust increases the amount of CH3 radicals, which reduces the concentration of H and O radicals and results in decreased rates of overall fuel oxidation.

Randall S. Gemmen; Edward H. Robey, Jr.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Durability Prediction of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode Material under Thermo-Mechanical and Fuel Gas Contaminants Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) operate under harsh environments, which cause deterioration of anode material properties and service life. In addition to electrochemical performance, structural integrity of the SOFC anode is essential for successful long-term operation. The SOFC anode is subjected to stresses at high temperature, thermal/redox cycles, and fuel gas contaminants effects during long-term operation. These mechanisms can alter the anode microstructure and affect its electrochemical and structural properties. In this research, anode material degradation mechanisms are briefly reviewed and an anode material durability model is developed and implemented in finite element analysis. The model takes into account thermo-mechanical and fuel gas contaminants degradation mechanisms for prediction of long-term structural integrity of the SOFC anode. The proposed model is validated experimentally using a NexTech ProbostatTM SOFC button cell test apparatus integrated with a Sagnac optical setup for simultaneously measuring electrochemical performance and in-situ anode surface deformation.

Iqbal, Gulfam; Guo, Hua; Kang , Bruce S.; Marina, Olga A.

2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

In situ reduction and evaluation of anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cracking (reaction VII) CH4 + H2O CO + 3H2 steam reforming (reaction VIII) CH4 + CO2 2CO + 2H2 dry.05.118 #12;Abstract Single chamber anode-supported fuel cells are investigated under several methane analyses of anode reduction are performed at 700°C. Carbon deposition is observed under diluted methane

17

Carbon Supported Polyaniline as Anode Catalyst: Pathway to Platinum-Free Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effectiveness of carbon supported polyaniline as anode catalyst in a fuel cell (FC) with direct formic acid electrooxidation is experimentally demonstrated. A prototype FC with such a platinum-free composite anode exhibited a maximum room-temperature specific power of about 5 mW/cm2

Zabrodskii, A G; Malyshkin, V G; Sapurina, I Y

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Electrocatalyst for Alcohol Oxidation at Fuel Cell Anodes - Energy ...  

Ethanol and other alcohols are nearly ideal reactants for fuel cells. Unfortunately they are difficult to oxidize, requiring breaking of carbon-carbon bonds. This ...

19

Improved anode catalysts for coal gas-fueled phosphoric acid fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of adapting phosphoric acid fuel cells to operate on coal gas fuels containing significant levels of contaminants such as CO, H{sub 2}S and COS has been investigated. The overall goal was the development of low-cost, carbon-supported anode fuel cell catalysts that can efficiently operate with a fossil fuel-derived hydrogen gas feed contaminated with carbon monoxide and other impurities. This development would reduce the cost of gas cleanup necessary in a coal gas-fueled PAFC power plant, thereby reducing the final power cost of the electricity produced. The problem to date has been that the contaminant gases typically adsorb on catalytic sites and reduce the activity for hydrogen oxidation. An advanced approach investigated was to modify these alloy catalyst systems to operate efficiently on coal gas containing higher levels of contaminants by increasing the alloy catalyst impurity tolerance and ability to extract energy from the CO present through (1) generation of additional hydrogen by promoting the CO/H{sub 2} water shift reaction or (2) direct oxidation of CO to CO{sub 2} with the same result. For operation on anode gases containing high levels of CO, a Pt-Ti-Zn and Pt-Ti-Ni anode catalyst showed better performance over a Pt baseline or G87A-17-2 catalyst. The ultimate aim of this effort was to allow PAFC-based power plants to operate on coal gas fuels containing increased contaminant concentrations, thereby decreasing the need for and cost of rigorous coal gas cleanup procedures. 4 refs., 15 figs., 10 tabs.

Kackley, N.D.; McCatty, S.A.; Kosek, J.A.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Reactions of the Carbon Anode in Alternative Battery and Fuel Cell Configurations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is formulated by combining carbonate dissociation with pre-existing anode mechanisms involving heterogeneous reaction kinetics. The proposed model accounts for both the observed preponderance of CO{sub 2} evolution and dependence of rate on carbon anode microstructure. Implications of the model for the design of carbon batteries and fuel cells are discussed, and the laboratory cells used in earlier research are described. High coulombic efficiencies for the net reaction C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2} require severely limiting the thickness of paste anodes in powder-fed fuel cells while the unreacting surfaces of solid prismatic anodes must be isolated from the CO{sub 2} product atmosphere to prevent Boudouard corrosion, according to C + CO{sub 2} = 2CO.

Cooper, J F; Krueger, R

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Energy Production from Coal Syngas Containing H2S via Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Utilizing Lanthanum Strontium Vanadate Anodes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lanthanum strontium vanadate (LSV), a perovskite ceramic electrocatalyst suitable for use as a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode, has shown significant activity toward the (more)

Cooper, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

LOW-TEMPERATURE, ANODE-SUPPORTED HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS WITH NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRODES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A simple, approximate analysis of the effect of differing cathode and anode areas on the measurement of cell performance on anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells, wherein the cathode area is smaller than the anode area, is presented. It is shown that the effect of cathode area on cathode polarization, on electrolyte contribution, and on anode resistance, as normalized on the basis of the cathode area, is negligible. There is a small but measurable effect on anode polarization, which results from concentration polarization. Effectively, it is the result of a greater amount of fuel transported to the anode/electrolyte interface in cases wherein the anode area is larger than the cathode area. Experiments were performed on cells made with differing cathode areas and geometries. Cathodic and anodic overpotentials measured using reference electrodes, and the measured ohmic area specific resistances by current interruption, were in good agreement with expectations based on the analysis presented. At 800 C, the maximum power density measured with a cathode area of {approx}1.1 cm{sup 2} was {approx}1.65 W/cm{sup 2} compared to {approx}1.45 W/cm{sup 2} for cathode area of {approx}2 cm{sup 2}, for anode thickness of {approx}1.3 mm, with hydrogen as the fuel and air as the oxidant. At 750 C, the measured maximum power densities were {approx}1.3 W/cm{sup 2} for the cell with cathode area {approx}1.1 cm{sup 2}, and {approx}1.25 W/cm{sup 2} for the cell with cathode area {approx}2 cm{sup 2}.

Anil V. Virkar

2001-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

23

Modeling of the anode side of a direct methanol fuel cell with analytical solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, analytical solutions were derived (for any methanol oxidation reaction order) for the profiles of methanol concentration and proton current density by assuming diffusion mass transport mechanism, Tafel kinetics, and fast proton transport in the anodic catalyst layer of a direct methanol fuel cell. An expression for the Thiele modulus that allows to express the anodic overpotential as a function of the cell current, and kinetic and mass transfer parameters was obtained. For high cell current densities, it was found that the Thiele modulus ($\\phi^2$) varies quadratically with cell current density; yielding a simple correlation between anodic overpotential and cell current density. Analytical solutions were derived for the profiles of both local methanol concentration in the catalyst layer and local anodic current density in the catalyst layer. Under the assumptions of the model presented here, in general, the local methanol concentration in the catalyst layer cannot be expressed as an explicit fun...

Mosquera, Martn A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Effect of operating parameters and anode gas impurities upon polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PEM fuel cells are actively under development for transportation and other applications. Integration of a PEM fuel cell stack with a methanol reformer requires an understanding of single cell performance under a range of operating conditions using anode gas contaminated with impurities. The effect of temperature, pressure, and anode gas impurities on single cell PEM performance was investigated with platinum black electrodes. Single cell performance remained unchanged as temperature was varied between 80 and 100 at 3 atm pressure. High water partial pressures at 120C produced a mass transfer limiting current. While operation at 120C did not reverse CO{sub 2} poisoning, anode air addition proved effective. Air injection also decreased CO poisoning at injected concentrations up to 200 ppm CO. Higher single cell tolerance was observed for CH{sub 3}OH than CO. Up to 1 mole % CH{sub 3}OH in the gas phase reduced the current density by less than 10%.

Weisbrod, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

Tao, Thomas

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

26

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report  

SciTech Connect

This SBIR program will result in improved LTA cell technology which is the fundamental building block of the Direct Coal ECL concept. As described below, ECL can make enormous efficiency and cost contributions to utility scale coal power. This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

Tao, Thomas

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

27

A Comparison of Molten Sn and Bi for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten Sn and Bi were examined at 973 and 1073 K for use as anodes in solid oxide fuel cells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes. Cells were operated under battery conditions, with dry He flow in the anode compartment, to characterize the electrochemical oxidation of the metals at the YSZ interface. For both metals, the open-circuit voltages (OCVs) were close to that expected based on their oxidation thermodynamics, ~0.93 V for Sn and ~0.48 V for Bi. With Sn, the cell performance degraded rapidly after the transfer of approximately 0.5-1.5 Ccm{sup 2} of charge due to the formation of a SnO{sub 2} layer at the YSZ interface. At 973 K, the anode impedance at OCV for freshly reduced Sn was approximately 3 {ohm}cm{sup 2} but this increased to well over 250 {ohm}cm{sup 2} after the transfer of of charge. Following the transfer of 8.2 Ccm{sup 2} at 1073 K, the formation of a 10{micro}m thick SnO{sub 2} layer was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. With Bi, the OCV anode impedance at 973 K was less than 0.25 {ohm}cm{sup 2} and remained constant until essentially all of the Bi had been oxidized to BiO{sub 2}. Some implications of these results for direct carbon fuel cells are discussed.

Jayakumar, A.; Lee, Sang Bok; Horns, A.; Vohs, J. M.; Gorte, R. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

LOW-TEMPERATURE, ANODE-SUPPORTED HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS WITH NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRODES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells with Ni + yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode, YSZ-samaria-doped ceria (SDC) bi-layer electrolyte and Sr-doped LaCoO{sub 3} (LSC) + SDC cathode were fabricated. Fuel used consisted of H{sub 2} diluted with He, N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O or CO{sub 2}, mixtures of H{sub 2} and CO, and mixtures of CO and CO{sub 2}. Cell performance was measured at 800 C with above-mentioned fuel gas mixtures and air as oxidant. For a given concentration of the diluent, the cell performance was higher with He as the diluent than with N{sub 2} as the diluent. Mass transport through porous Ni-YSZ anode for H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O, CO-CO{sub 2} binary systems and H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-diluent gas ternary systems was analyzed using multicomponent gas diffusion theory. At high concentrations of the diluent, the maximum achievable current density was limited by the anodic concentration polarization. From this measured limiting current density, the corresponding effective gas diffusivity was estimated. Highest effective diffusivity was estimated for fuel gas mixtures containing H{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-He mixtures ({approx}0.34 cm{sup 2}/s), and the lowest for CO-CO{sub 2} mixtures ({approx}0.07 cm{sup 2}/s). The lowest performance was observed with CO-CO{sub 2} mixture as a fuel, which in part was attributed to the lowest effective diffusivity of the fuels tested.

Anil V. Virkar

2001-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

29

Basic properties of a liquidt in anode solid oxide fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unconventional high temperature fuel cell system, the liquidt in anode solid oxide fuel cell(LTA-SOFC), is discussed. A thermodynamic analysis of a solid oxide fuel cell with a liquid metal anode is developed. Pertinent thermo chemical and thermo physical properties of liquid tin in particular are detailed. An experimental setup for analysis of LTA-SOFC anode kinetics is described, and data for a planar cell under hydrogen indicated an effective oxygen diffusion coefficient of 5.310?5 cm2 s?1 at 800 ?C and 8.910?5 cm2 s?1 at 900 ?C. This value is similar to previously reported literature values for liquid tin. The oxygen conductivity through the tin, calculated from measured diffusion coefficients and theoretical oxygen solubility limits, is found to be on the same order of thatofyttria-stabilizedzirconia(YSZ), a traditional SOFC electrolyte material. As such,the ohmicloss due to oxygen transport through the tin layer must be considered in practical system cell design since the tin layer will usually be at least as thick as the electrolyte.

Harry Abernathy; RandallGemmen; KirkGerdes; Mark Koslowske; ThomasTao

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

30

LOW-TEMPERATURE, ANODE-SUPPORTED HIGH POWER DENSITY SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS WITH NANOSTRUCTURED ELECTRODES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done during the entire project period, between October 1, 1999 and March 31, 2003, which includes a six-month no-cost extension. During the project, eight research papers have, either been, published, accepted for publication, or submitted for publication. In addition, several presentations have been made in technical meetings and workshops. The project also has provided support for four graduate students working towards advanced degrees. The principal technical objective of the project was to analyze the role of electrode microstructure on solid oxide fuel cell performance. Prior theoretical work conducted in our laboratory demonstrated that the particle size of composite electrodes has a profound effect on cell performance; the finer the particle size, the lower the activation polarization, the better the performance. The composite cathodes examined consisted of electronically conducting perovskites such as Sr-doped LaMnO{sub 3} (LSM) or Sr-doped LaCoO{sub 3} (LSC), which is also a mixed conductor, as the electrocatalyst, and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) or rare earth oxide doped CeO{sub 2} as the ionic conductor. The composite anodes examined were mixtures of Ni and YSZ. A procedure was developed for the synthesis of nanosize YSZ by molecular decomposition, in which unwanted species were removed by leaching, leaving behind nanosize YSZ. Anode-supported cells were made using the as-synthesized powders, or using commercially acquired powders. The electrolyte was usually a thin ({approx}10 microns), dense layer of YSZ, supported on a thick ({approx}1 mm), porous Ni + YSZ anode. The cathode was a porous mixture of electrocatalyst and an ionic conductor. Most of the cell testing was done at 800 C with hydrogen as fuel and air as the oxidant. Maximum power densities as high as 1.8 W/cm{sup 2} were demonstrated. Polarization behavior of the cells was theoretically analyzed. A limited amount of cell testing was done using liquid hydrocarbon fuels where reforming was achieved internally. Significant polarization losses also occur at the anode, especially at high fuel utilizations. An analysis of polarization losses requires that various contributions are isolated, and their dependence on pertinent parameters is quantitatively described. An investigation of fuel composition on gas transport through porous anodes was investigated and the role of fuel diluents was explored. This work showed that the molecular weight of the diluent has a significant effect on anode concentration polarization. This further showed that the presence of some molecular hydrogen is necessary to minimize polarization losses. Theoretical analysis has shown that the electrode microstructure has a profound effect on cell performance. In a series of experiments, cathode microstructural parameters were varied, without altering other parameters. Cathode microstructural parameters, especially three phase boundary (TPB) length, were estimated using techniques in quantitative stereology. Cell performance was quantitatively correlated with the relevant microstructural parameters, and charge transfer resistivity was explicitly evaluated. This is the first time that a fundamental parameter, which governs the activation polarization, has been quantitatively determined. An important parameter, which governs the cathodic activation polarization, and thus cell performance, is the ionic conductivity of the composite cathode. The traditional composite cathode is a mixture of LSM and YSZ. It is well known that Sr and Mg-doped LaGaO{sub 3} (LSGM), exhibits higher oxygen ion conductivity compared to YSZ. Cells were fabricated with composite cathodes comprising a mixture of LSM and LSGM. Studies demonstrated that LSGM-based composite cathodes exhibit excellent behavior. Studies have shown that Ni + YSZ is an excellent anode. In fact, in most cells, the principal polarization losses, at least at low fuel utilizations, are associated with the cathode. Theoretical analysis conducted in our group has also shown that anode-supported cells exhibi

Professor Anil V. Virkar

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

31

Composite solid oxide fuel cell anode based on ceria and strontium titanate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An anode and method of making the same wherein the anode consists of two separate phases, one consisting of a doped strontium titanate phase and one consisting of a doped cerium oxide phase. The strontium titanate phase consists of Sr.sub.1-xM.sub.xTiO.sub.3-.delta., where M is either yttrium (Y), scandium (Sc), or lanthanum (La), where "x" may vary typically from about 0.01 to about 0.5, and where .delta. is indicative of some degree of oxygen non-stoichiometry. A small quantity of cerium may also substitute for titanium in the strontium titanate lattice. The cerium oxide consists of N.sub.yCe.sub.1-yO.sub.2-.delta., where N is either niobium (Nb), vanadium (V), antimony (Sb) or tantalum (Ta) and where "y" may vary typically from about 0.001 to about 0.1 and wherein the ratio of Ti in said first phase to the sum of Ce and N in the second phase is between about 0.2 to about 0.75. Small quantities of strontium, yttrium, and/or lanthanum may additionally substitute into the cerium oxide lattice. The combination of these two phases results in better performance than either phase used separately as an anode for solid oxide fuel cell or other electrochemical device.

Marina, Olga A. (Richland, WA); Pederson, Larry R. (Richland, WA)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

32

FLUORINE CELL ANODE ASSEMBLY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved anode assembly is deslgned for use in electrolytlc cells ln the productlon of hydrogen and fluorlne from a moIten electrolyte. The anode assembly comprises a copper post, a copper hanger supported by the post, a plurality of carbon anode members, and bolt means for clamplng half of the anode members to one slde of the hanger and for clamplng the other half of the anode members to the other slde of the hanger. The heads of the clamplng bolts are recessed withln the anode members and carbon plugs are inserted ln the recesses above the bolt heads to protect the boIts agalnst corroslon. A copper washer is provided under the head of each clamplng boIt such that the anode members can be tightly clamped to the hanger with a resultant low anode jolnt resistance. (AEC)

Cable, R.E.; Goode, W.B. Jr.; Henderson, W.K.; Montillon, G.H.

1962-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Factors Affecting Limiting Current in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells or Debunking the Myth of Anode Diffusion Polarization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limiting current densities for solid oxide fuel cells were measured using both button cells and a flow-through cell. The cell anodes were supplied mixtures of humidified hydrogen and various inert gasses. It was demonstrated that the true limiting current in flow-through cells is reached when either: the hydrogen is nearly or completely depleted at the anode-electrolyte interface near the outlet; or when the concentration of steam at that interface becomes high enough to interfere with adsorption or transport of the remaining hydrogen near the triple-phase boundaries. Choice of inert gas had no effect on limiting currents in the flow-through tests, indicating that diffusion within the porous anode had no significant effect on cell performance at high currents. In the button cells, the apparent limiting currents were significantly changed by the choice of inert gas, indicating that they were determined by diffusion through the bulk gas within the support tube. It was concluded that the apparent limiting currents measured in button cells are influenced more by parameters of the experimental setup, such as the proximity of the fuel tube outlet, than by the physical properties of the anode.

Chick, Lawrence A.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Simner, Steven P.; Kirby, Brent W.; Powell, Michael R.; Canfield, Nathan L.

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

34

Ni coarsening in the three-phase solid oxide fuel cell anode - a phase-field simulation study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ni coarsening in Ni-yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) solid oxide fuel cell anodes is considered a major reason for anode degradation. We present a predictive, quantative modeling framework based on the phase-field approach to systematically examine coarsening kinetics in such anodes. The initial structures for simulations are experimentally acquired functional layers of anodes. Sample size effects and error analysis of contact angles are examined. Three phase boundary (TPB) lengths and Ni surface areas are quantatively identified on the basis of the active, dead-end, and isolated phase clusters throughout coarsening. Tortuosity evolution of the pores is also investigated. We find that phase clusters with larger characteristic length evolve slower than those with smaller length scales. As a result, coarsening has small positive effects on transport, and impacts less on the active Ni surface area than the total counter part. TPBs, however, are found to be sensitive to local morphological features and are only i...

Chen, Hsun-Yi; Cronin, J Scott; Wilson, James R; Barnett, Scott A; Thornton, Katsuyo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Improved anode catalysts for coal gas-fueled phosphoric acid fuel cells; Progress report No. 15, Quarterly No. 5, June 3--September 2, 1989  

SciTech Connect

The development, optimization and demonstration of contaminant-tolerant anode catalyst formulations for phosphoric acid fuel cells is the overall objective of this project. During this quarter, anode electrodes were prepared from the following carbon-supported catalysts for evaluation in the hydrogen/hydrogen test cell: 70Pt:10Ti:20Cr, 59Pt:26Ti:15Cu, 91Pt:6Ti:3Sn, 72Pt:22Ti:6Ru and 67Pt:33Ti:0.2Zn. The catalyst preparation with a target composition of 70Pt:20Ti:10Zn resulted in a material with very low Zn content, only 0.2%. This catalyst was processed into an anode electrode for testing, despite the low Zn content, since Pt--Ti materials have also shown promise as CO and H{sub 2}S-tolerant anode catalysts. 5 tabs.

Kackley, N.; Kosek, J.A.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Combined Theoretical and Experimental Investigation and Design of H2S Tolerant Anode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a high temperature fuel cell and it normally operates in the range of 850 to 1000 C. Coal syngas has been considered for use in SOFC systems to produce electric power, due to its high temperature and high hydrogen and carbon monoxide content. However, coal syngas also has contaminants like carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S). Among these contaminants, H{sub 2}S is detrimental to electrode material in SOFC. Commonly used anode material in SOFC system is nickel-yttria stabilized zirconia (Ni-YSZ). The presence of H{sub 2}S in the hydrogen stream will damage the Ni anode and hinder the performance of SOFC. In the present study, an attempt was made to understand the mechanism of anode (Ni-YSZ) deterioration by H{sub 2}S. The study used computation methods such as quantum chemistry calculations and molecular dynamics to predict the model for anode destruction by H{sub 2}S. This was done using binding energies to predict the thermodynamics and Raman spectroscopy to predict molecular vibrations and surface interactions. On the experimental side, a test stand has been built with the ability to analyze button cells at high temperature under syngas conditions.

Gerardine G. Botte; Damilola Daramola; Madhivanan Muthuvel

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

Demonstration of a Highly Efficient Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power System Using Adiabatic Steam Reforming and Anode Gas Recirculation  

SciTech Connect

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are currently being developed for a wide variety of applications because of their high efficiency at multiple power levels. Applications for SOFCs encompass a large range of power levels including 1-2 kW residential combined heat and power applications, 100-250 kW sized systems for distributed generation and grid extension, and MW-scale power plants utilizing coal. This paper reports on the development of a highly efficient, small-scale SOFC power system operating on methane. The system uses adiabatic steam reforming of methane and anode gas recirculation to achieve high net electrical efficiency. The anode exit gas is recirculated and all of the heat and water required for the endothermic reforming reaction are provided by the anode gas emerging from the SOFC stack. Although the single-pass fuel utilization is only about 55%, because of the anode gas recirculation the overall fuel utilization is up to 93%. The demonstrated system achieved gross power output of 1650 to 2150 watts with a maximum net LHV efficiency of 56.7% at 1720 watts. Overall system efficiency could be further improved to over 60% with use of properly sized blowers.

Powell, Michael R.; Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Mcvay, Gary L.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Deposition of Porous Anode Film of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell by Spray ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2009. Symposium, Fuel Cells: Materials, Processing, Manufacturing, Balance of Plant and...

39

A Partial Oxidation Technique for Fuel-Cell Anode Exhaust-Gas Synthesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the performance of a gas generator used to synthesize the exhaust gas from the anode of a molten-carbonate fuel cell. The composition of this gas is estimated to be that of equilibrium at 1,250 F and 1 atm: 48% CO2 , 39% H2O, 5% CO, and 8% H2, with an energy content of approximately 39 Btu/scf (higher heating value). To synthesize a range of gas compositions around this point, the gas generator partially oxidizes a mixture of CH4 , O2 , and CO2 to generate energy densities between 20 and 60 Btu/scf at temperatures between 1,198 and 1,350 F. Results show that the technique provides a relatively high ratio of CO to H2 concentrations compared with the target composition (CO:H2 of 2, versus 0.71). A detailed chemical model shows that the likely cause is quenching of the CO and H2 chemistry below 2,000 F.

Edward H. Robey, Jr.; Randall S. Gemmen

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

40

Electrochemical, Structural and Surface Characterization of Nickel/Zirconia Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes in Coal Gas Containing Antimony  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of antimony with the nickel-zirconia solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode has been investigated. Tests with both anode-supported and electrolyte-supported button cells were performed at 700 and 800oC in synthetic coal gas containing 10 ppb to 9 ppm antimony. Minor performance loss was observed immediately after Sb introduction to coal gas resulting in ca. 5 % power output drop. While no further degradation was observed during the following several hundred hours of testing, cells abruptly and irreversibly failed after 800-1500 hours depending on Sb concentration and test temperature. Antimony was found to interact strongly with nickel and result in extensive alteration phase formation, consistent with expectations based on thermodynamic properties. Nickel antimonide phases, NiSb and Ni5Sb2, were partially coalesced into large grains and eventually affected electronic percolation through the anode support. Initial degradation was attributed to diffusion of antimony to the active anode/electrolyte interface to form an adsorption layer.

Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Edwards, Danny J.

2011-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A degradation model for solid oxide fuel cell anodes due to impurities in coal syngas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer great promise as a clean and efficient alternative to conventional power generation technologies. A major advantage of SOFCs in (more)

Cayan, Fatma Nihan.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

PII-57: Multi-Scale Modeling of Ni/YSZ Fuel Cell Anode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrochemical reactions in a solid oxide fuel cell occur simultaneously as charge .... PII-66: Virtual Prototyping of Lightweight Designs Made with Cold and Hot...

43

Doped Yttrium Chromite-Ceria Composite as a Redox-Stable and Sulfur-Tolerant Anode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Ca- and Co-doped yttrium chromite (YCCC) - samaria-doped ceria (SDC) composite was studied in relation to a potential use as a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material. Tests performed using the yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte-supported cells revealed that the electrocatalytic activity of the YCCC-SDC anode towards hydrogen oxidation at 800 C was comparable to that of the Ni-YSZ anode. In addition, the YCCC-SDC anode exhibited superior sulfur tolerant characteristics showing less than 10% increase in a polarization resistance, fully reversible, upon exposure to 20 ppm H2S at 800 C. No performance degradation was observed during multiple reduction-oxidation (redox) cycles when the anode was intentionally exposed to the air environment followed by the reduction in hydrogen. The redox tolerance of the YCCC-SDC anode was attributed to the dimensional and chemical stability of the YCCC exhibiting minimal isothermal chemical expansion upon redox cycling.

Yoon, Kyung J.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Marina, Olga A.

2011-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

44

Performance of Anode-Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell with Thin Bi-Layer Electrolyte by Pulsed Laser Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anode-supported yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/samaria doped ceria (SDC) bi-layer electrolytes with uniform thickness and high density were fabricated by pulsed laser deposition at 1000 degrees C. Fuel cells with such bi-layer electrolytes were fabricated and tested, yielding open circuit voltages from 0.94 to 1.0 V at 600-700 degrees C. Power densities from 0.4 to 1.0 W cm{sup -2} at 0.7 V were achieved in air at temperatures of 600-700 degrees C. Cell performance was improved in flowing oxygen, with an estimated peak power density of over 2 W cm{sup -2} at 650 degrees C, assuming the same overall resistance over the entire range of current density. The high cell performance was attributed to the very low ohmic resistance of the fuel cell, owing to the small thickness of the electrolyte. Stable performance was also demonstrated in that the voltage of the fuel cell showed very little change at a constant current density of 1 A cm{sup -2} during more than 400 hours of operation at 650 degrees C in flowing oxygen. SEM analysis of the fuel cell after testing showed that the bi-layer electrolyte had retained its chemical and mechanical integrity.

Lu, Zigui; Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Fisher, Daniel; Wu, Naijuan; Ignatiev, Alex

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Characterization and Quantification of Electronic and Ionic Ohmic Overpotential and Heat Generation in a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a higher efficiency and power density requires an improved understanding and treatment of the irreversibilities. Losses due to the electronic and ionic resistances, which are also known as ohmic losses in the form of Joule heating, can hinder the SOFC's performance. Ohmic losses can result from the bulk material resistivities as well as the complexities introduced by the cell's microstructure. In this work, two-dimensional (2D), electronic and ionic transport models are used to develop a method of quantification of the ohmic losses within the SOFC anode microstructure. This quantification is completed as a function of properties determined from a detailed microstructure characterization, namely, the tortuosity of the electronic and ionic phases, phase volume fraction, contiguity, and mean free path. A direct modeling approach at the level of the pore-scale microstructure is achieved through the use of a representative volume element (RVE) method. The correlation of these ohmic losses with the quantification of the SOFC anode microstructure are examined. It is found with this analysis that the contributions of the SOFC anode microstructure on ohmic losses can be correlated with the volume fraction, contiguity, and mean free path.

Grew, Kyle N.; Izzo, John R.; Chiu, Wilson K.S.

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Rapidly refuelable fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a metal-air fuel cell where the consumable metal anode is movably positioned in the cell and an expandable enclosure, or bladder, is used to press the anode into contact with separating spacers between the cell electrodes. The bladder may be depressurized to allow replacement of the anode when consumed.

Joy, Richard W. (Santa Clara, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Electrochemical Performance and Stability of the Cathode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells IV. On the Ohmic loss in anode supported button cells with LSM or LSCF cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) with a variety of YSZ electrolyte thicknesses were fabricated by tape casting and lamination. The preparation of the YSZ electrolyte tapes with various thicknesses was accomplished by using doctor blades with different gaps between the precision machined, polished blade and the casting surface. The green tape was cut into discs, sintered at 1385C for 2 h, and subsequently creep-flattened at 1350C for 2 h. Either LSCF with an SDC interlayer or LSM+YSZ composite was used as the cathode material for the fuel cells. The ohmic resistances of these anode-supported fuel cells were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at temperatures from 500C to 750C. A linear relationship was found between the ohmic resistance of the fuel cell and the YSZ electrolyte thickness at all the measuring temperatures for both LSCF and LSM+YSZ cathode fuel cells. The ionic conductivities of the YSZ electrolyte, derived for the fuel cells with LSM+YSZ or LSCF cathodes, were independent of the cathode material and cell configuration. The ionic conductivities of the YSZ electrolyte was slightly lower than that of the bulk material, possibly due to Ni-doping into the electrolyte. The fuel cell with a SDC interlayer and LSCF cathode showed larger intercept resistance than the fuel cell with LSM+YSZ cathode, which was possibly due to the imperfect contact between the SDC interlayer and the YSZ electrolyte and the migration of Zr into the SDC interlayer to form an insulating solid solution during cell fabrication. Calculations of the contribution of the YSZ electrolyte to the total ohmic resistance showed that YSZ was still a satisfactory electrolyte at temperatures above 650C. Explorations should be directed to reduce the intercept resistance to achieve significant improvement in cell performance.

Lu, Zigui; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2010-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

48

Three-dimensional microstructural changes in the NiYSZ solid oxide fuel cell anode during operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microstructural evolution in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cermet anodes has been investigated using X-ray nanotomography along with differential absorption imaging. SOFC anode supports composed of Ni and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) were subjected to extended operation and selected regions were imaged using a transmission X-ray microscope. X-ray nanotomography provides unique insight into microstructure changes of all three phases (Ni, YSZ, pore) in three spatial dimensions, and its relation to performance degradation. Statistically significant 3D microstructural changes were observed in the anode Ni phase over a range of operational times, including phase size growth and changes in connectivity, interfacial contact area and contiguous triple-phase boundary length. These observations support microstructural evolution correlated to SOFC performance. We find that Ni coarsening is driven by particle curvature as indicated by the dihedral angles between the Ni, YSZ and pore phases, and hypothesize that growth occurs primarily by means of diffusion and particle agglomeration constrained by a pinning mechanism related to the YSZ phase. The decrease in Ni phase size after extended periods of time may be the result of a second process connected to a mobility-induced decrease in the YSZ phase size or non-uniform curvature resulting in a net decrease in Ni phase size.

Nelson G. J.; Chu Y.; Grew, K.N.; Izzo Jr. J.R.; Lombardo, J.J.; Harris, W.M.; Faes, A.; Hessler-Wyser, A.; Van herle, J.; Wang, S.; Virkar, A.V.; Chiu, W.K.S.

2012-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

49

Micro fuel cell  

SciTech Connect

An ambient temperature, liquid feed, direct methanol fuel cell device is under development. A metal barrier layer was used to block methanol crossover from the anode to the cathode side while still allowing for the transport of protons from the anode to the cathode. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an electrochemical engine that converts chemical energy into clean electrical power by the direct oxidation of methanol at the fuel cell anode. This direct use of a liquid fuel eliminates the need for a reformer to convert the fuel to hydrogen before it is fed into the fuel cell.

Zook, L.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hockaday, R. [Energy Related Devices Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

Fuel cell with internal flow control  

SciTech Connect

A fuel cell stack is provided with a plurality of fuel cell cassettes where each fuel cell cassette has a fuel cell with an anode and cathode. The fuel cell stack includes an anode supply chimney for supplying fuel to the anode of each fuel cell cassette, an anode return chimney for removing anode exhaust from the anode of each fuel cell cassette, a cathode supply chimney for supplying oxidant to the cathode of each fuel cell cassette, and a cathode return chimney for removing cathode exhaust from the cathode of each fuel cell cassette. A first fuel cell cassette includes a flow control member disposed between the anode supply chimney and the anode return chimney or between the cathode supply chimney and the cathode return chimney such that the flow control member provides a flow restriction different from at least one other fuel cell cassettes.

Haltiner, Jr., Karl J. (Fairport, NY); Venkiteswaran, Arun (Karnataka, IN)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

51

Development of metal-coated ceramic anodes for molten carbonate fuel cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the developmental efforts on metal coating of various ceramic substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and LiFeO{sub 2}) and the critical issues associated with fabricating anodes using metal-coated LiAlO{sub 2} substrates. Electroless Ni and Cu coating technology was developed to achieve complete metal coverage on LiAlO{sub 2} powder substrates. Metal coated SrTiO{sub 3} powders were fabricated into anodes by a process identical to that reported in the GE literature. Microstructural examination revealed that the grains of the ceramic had fused together, with the metal having dewetted from the surface of the ceramic. Alternate substrates that might allow for better wetting of the metal on the ceramic such as LiFeO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} were identified. Cu/Ni-coated (50:50 mol ratio, 50 w/o metal loading) LiFeO{sub 2} anodes were optimized to meet the MCFC anode specifications. Metal-coated gamma-LiAlO{sub 2} substrates were also developed. By using suitable chemical surface modification methods, the gamma-UAlO{sub 2} substrate surface may be modified to allow a stable metal coated anode to be fabricated. Creep testing of the metal coated ceramic anodes were conducted at IGT. It was determined that the predominant creep mechanism is due to particle rearrangement. The anode porosity, and mean pore size had significant effect on the creep of the anode. Lower porosity and pore size consistent with performance criteria are desired to reduce creep. Lower metal loading with uniformity of coverage will result in lower creep behavior of the anode. Of the two substrates evaluated, LiFeO{sub 2} in general exhibited lower creep which was attributed to superior metal adhesion.

Khandkar, A.C.; Elangovan, S.; Marianowski, L.G.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Development of metal-coated ceramic anodes for molten carbonate fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the developmental efforts on metal coating of various ceramic substrates (LiAlO{sub 2}, SrTiO{sub 3}, and LiFeO{sub 2}) and the critical issues associated with fabricating anodes using metal-coated LiAlO{sub 2} substrates. Electroless Ni and Cu coating technology was developed to achieve complete metal coverage on LiAlO{sub 2} powder substrates. Metal coated SrTiO{sub 3} powders were fabricated into anodes by a process identical to that reported in the GE literature. Microstructural examination revealed that the grains of the ceramic had fused together, with the metal having dewetted from the surface of the ceramic. Alternate substrates that might allow for better wetting of the metal on the ceramic such as LiFeO{sub 2} and Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} were identified. Cu/Ni-coated (50:50 mol ratio, 50 w/o metal loading) LiFeO{sub 2} anodes were optimized to meet the MCFC anode specifications. Metal-coated gamma-LiAlO{sub 2} substrates were also developed. By using suitable chemical surface modification methods, the gamma-UAlO{sub 2} substrate surface may be modified to allow a stable metal coated anode to be fabricated. Creep testing of the metal coated ceramic anodes were conducted at IGT. It was determined that the predominant creep mechanism is due to particle rearrangement. The anode porosity, and mean pore size had significant effect on the creep of the anode. Lower porosity and pore size consistent with performance criteria are desired to reduce creep. Lower metal loading with uniformity of coverage will result in lower creep behavior of the anode. Of the two substrates evaluated, LiFeO{sub 2} in general exhibited lower creep which was attributed to superior metal adhesion.

Khandkar, A.C.; Elangovan, S.; Marianowski, L.G.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Task 1: Modeling Study of CO Effects on Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Anodes Task 2: Study of Ac Impedance as Membrane/Electrode Manufacturing Diagnostic Tool  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon monoxide poisoning of polymer electrolyte fuel cell anodes is a key problem to be overcome when operating a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) on reformed fuels. CO adsorbs preferentially on the precious metal surface leading to substantial performance losses. Some recent work has explored this problem, primarily using various Pt alloys in attempts to lower the degree of surface deactivation. In their studies of hydrogen oxidation on Pt and Pt alloy (Pt/Sn, Pt/Ru) rotating disk electrodes exposed to H{sub 2}/CO mixtures, Gasteiger et al. showed that a small hydrogen oxidation current is observed well before the onset of major CO oxidative stripping (ca. 0.4 V) on Pt/Ru. However, these workers concluded that such current observed at low anode overpotentials was too low to be of practical value. Nonetheless, MST-11 researchers and others have found experimentally that it is possible to run a PEFC, e.g., with a Pt/Ru anode, in the presence of CO levels in the range 10--100 ppm with little voltage loss. Such experimental results suggest that, in fact, PEFC operation at significant current densities under low anode overpotentials is possible in the presence of such levels of CO, even before resorting to air bleeding into the anode feed stream. The latter approach has been shown to be effective in elimination of Pt anode catalyst poisoning effects at CO levels of 20--50 ppm for cells operating at 80 C with low Pt catalyst loading. The effect of oxygen bleeding is basically to lower P{sub CO} down to extremely low levels in the anode plenum thanks to the catalytic (chemical) oxidation of CO by dioxygen at the anode catalyst. In this modeling work the authors do not include specific description of oxygen bleeding effects and concentrate on the behavior of the anode with feed streams of H{sub 2} or reformate containing low levels of CO. The anode loss is treated in this work as a hydrogen and carbon monoxide electrode kinetics problem, but includes the effects of dilution of the feedstream with significant fractions of carbon dioxide and nitrogen and of mass transport losses in the gas diffusion backing. Not included in the anode model are ionic resistance and diffusion losses in the catalyst layer. They are looking to see if the overall pattern of polarization curves calculated based on such a purely kinetic model indeed mimics the central features of polarization curves observed for PEFCs operating on hydrogen with low levels of CO.

Thomas E. Springer

1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

55

Fuel cell system combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell system including a fuel reformer heated by a catalytic combustor fired by anode and cathode effluents. The combustor includes a turbulator section at its input end for intimately mixing the anode and cathode effluents before they contact the combustors primary catalyst bed. The turbulator comprises at least one porous bed of mixing media that provides a tortuous path therethrough for creating turbulent flow and intimate mixing of the anode and cathode effluents therein.

Pettit, William Henry (Rochester, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Creep resistant, metal-coated LiFeO[sub 2] anodes for molten carbonated fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A porous, creep-resistant, metal-coated, LiFeO[sub 2] ceramic electrode for fuel cells is disclosed. The electrode is particularly useful for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) although it may have utilities in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as well. 11 figs.

Khandkar, A.C.

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

57

Creep resistant, metal-coated LiFeO.sub.2 anodes for molten carbonated fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A porous, creep-resistant, metal-coated, LiFeO.sub.2 ceramic electrode for fuel cells is disclosed. The electrode is particularly useful for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) although it may have utilities in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as well.

Khandkar, Ashok C. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Fuel cell gas management system  

SciTech Connect

A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

59

Development of a Novel CO Tolerant Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Anode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Materials, School of Nanosciences and Engineering, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York Power, Incorporated, Latham, New York 12110, USA c Energy and Environment Applications Center, Institute inherent to storing hydrogen, liquid fuels such as propane, natural gas, and gasoline are used to produce

Weidner, John W.

60

Performance of Ni-Fe/gadolinium-doped CeO{sub2} anode supported tubular solid oxide fuel cells using steam reforming of methane  

SciTech Connect

Iron nanoparticles (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were added to NiO/gadolinium-doped CeO{sub 2} (GDC) anode supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) for the direct methane-water fuel operation. The cell was co-sintered at 1400 C, and the anode porosity is 31.8%. The main size corresponding to peak volume is around 1.5 {mu}m. When steam and methane directly fed to the cell, the power density is about 0.57 W cm{sup -2} at 650 C. It is the familiar performance for H{sub 2} operation (4 times of flow rate) with same fuel utilization. Compare with the testing temperature of 600 and 650 C, there is almost no carbon fiber deposition at 700 C with steam/methane (S/C) of 5. At the same time, fuel operation of high value of S/C (=3.3) resulted in fiber-like deposition and degradation of power performance based on loading test results.

Liang, B.; Suzuki, T.; Hamamoto, K.; Yamaguchi, T.; Sumi, H.; Fujishiro, Y.; Ingram, B. J.; Carter, J. D. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Palladium-based electrocatalysts and fuel cells employing such electrocatalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A direct organic fuel cell includes a fluid fuel comprising formic acid, an anode having an electrocatalyst comprising palladium nanoparticles, a fluid oxidant, a cathode electrically connected to the anode, and an electrolyte interposed between the anode and the cathode.

Masel; Richard I. (Champaign, IL), Zhu; Yimin (Urbana, IL), Larsen; Robert T. (Champaign, IL)

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

A Damage Model for Degradation in the Electrodes of solid oxide fuel cells: Modeling the effects of sulfur and antimony in the anode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over their designed lifetime, high temperature electrochemical devices, such as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), can experience degradation in their electrochemical performance due to environmental conditions, operating conditions, contaminants, and other factors. Understanding the different degradation mechanisms in SOFCs and other electrochemical devices is essential to reducing performance degradation and increasing the lifetime of these devices. In this paper SOFC degradation mechanisms are discussed and a damage model is presented which describes performance degradation in SOFCs due to damage or degradation in the electrodes of the SOFC. A degradation classification scheme is presented that divides the various SOFC electrode degradation mechanisms into categories based on their physical effects on the SOFC. The application of the damage model and the classification method is applied to sulfur poisoning and antimony poisoning which occur in the anode of SOFCs. For sulfur poisoning the model is able to predict the degradation in SOFC performance based on the operating temperature and voltage of the fuel cell and the concentration of gaseous sulfur species in the anode. For antimony poisoning the effects of nickel removal from the anode matrix is investigated.

Ryan, Emily M.; Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Solid oxide fuel cell with transitioned cross-section for improved anode gas management at the open end  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell (400) is made having a tubular, elongated, hollow, active section (445) which has a cross-section containing an air electrode (452) a fuel electrode (454) and solid oxide electrolyte (456) between them, where the fuel cell transitions into at least one inactive section (460) with a flattened parallel sided cross-section (462, 468) each cross-section having channels (472, 474, 476) in them which smoothly communicate with each other at an interface section (458).

Zafred, Paolo R. (Murrysville, PA); Draper, Robert (Pittsburgh, PA)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

64

Thermodynamic analysis of interactions between Ni-based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) anodes and trace species in a survey of coal syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermodynamic analysis was conducted to characterize the effects of trace contaminants in syngas derived from coal gasification on solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material. The effluents from 15 different gasification facilities were considered to assess the impact of fuel composition on anode susceptibility to contamination. For each syngas case, the study considers the magnitude of contaminant exposure resulting from operation of a warm gas cleanup unit at two different temperatures and operation of a nickel-based SOFC at three different temperatures. Contaminant elements arsenic (As), phosphorous (P), and antimony (Sb) are predicted to be present in warm gas cleanup effluent and will interact with the nickel (Ni) components of a SOFC anode. Phosphorous is the trace element found in the largest concentration of the three contaminants and is potentially the most detrimental. Poisoning was found to depend on the composition of the syngas as well as system operating conditions. Results for all trace elements tended to show invariance with cleanup operating temperature, but results were sensitive to syngas bulk composition. Synthesis gas with high steam content tended to resist poisoning.

Andrew Martinez; Kirk Gerdes; Randall Gemmen; James Postona

2010-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

65

Carbonate fuel cell system with thermally integrated gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell system employing a gasifier for generating fuel gas for the fuel cell of the fuel cell system and in which heat for the gasifier is derived from the anode exhaust gas of the fuel cell.

Steinfeld, George (Southbury, CT); Meyers, Steven J. (Huntington Beach, CA); Lee, Arthur (Fishkill, NY)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A Density Functional Theory of a Nickel-based Anode Catalyst for Application in a Direct Propane Fuel Cell .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The maximum theoretical energy efficiency of fuel cells is much larger than those of the steam-power-turbine cycles that are currently used for generating electrical power. (more)

Vafaeyan, Shadi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Fuel cell generator with fuel electrodes that control on-cell fuel reformation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel cell for a fuel cell generator including a housing including a gas flow path for receiving a fuel from a fuel source and directing the fuel across the fuel cell. The fuel cell includes an elongate member including opposing first and second ends and defining an interior cathode portion and an exterior anode portion. The interior cathode portion includes an electrode in contact with an oxidant flow path. The exterior anode portion includes an electrode in contact with the fuel in the gas flow path. The anode portion includes a catalyst material for effecting fuel reformation along the fuel cell between the opposing ends. A fuel reformation control layer is applied over the catalyst material for reducing a rate of fuel reformation on the fuel cell. The control layer effects a variable reformation rate along the length of the fuel cell.

Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Basel, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Zhang, Gong (Murrysville, PA)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

68

Steam reforming of fuel to hydrogen in fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell capable of utilizing a hydrocarbon such as methane as fuel and having an internal dual catalyst system within the anode zone, the dual catalyst system including an anode catalyst supporting and in heat conducting relationship with a reforming catalyst with heat for the reforming reaction being supplied by the reaction at the anode catalyst.

Fraioli, Anthony V. (Hawthorne Woods, IL); Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Steam reforming of fuel to hydrogen in fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell is described capable of utilizing a hydrocarbon such as methane as fuel and having an internal dual catalyst system within the anode zone, the dual catalyst system including an anode catalyst supporting and in heat conducting relationship with a reforming catalyst with heat for the reforming reaction being supplied by the reaction at the anode catalyst.

Young, J.E.; Fraioli, A.V.

1983-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

70

REACTIVE FORCE FIELDS FOR Y-DOPED BaZrO3 ELECTROLYTE AND NI-ANODE. POTENTIAL CATHODE MATERIALS FOR APPLICATION IN PROTON CERAMIC FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on quantum mechanical data obtained for the Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} electrolyte and Ni-anode Reactive Force Field parameters have been developed for further molecular dynamics simulations of the proton diffusion and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. Electronic and atomic structures of different terminations of the (001) BaZrO{sub 3} surface have been studied using first-principles calculations. Several potential cathode materials for the Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} system were synthesized via glycine nitrate combustion method. Of the five potential cathode materials examined BaZr{sub 0.40}Pr{sub 0.40}Gd{sub 0.20}O{sub 3} and BaZr{sub 0.60}Y{sub 0.20}Co{sub 0.20}O{sub 3} appear to be the most promising for further applications in proton ceramic fuel cells. Fuel cell test of a Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} thin film using platinum ink for both electrodes have been performed. The obtained results shows that a robust method for fabricating crack-free thin membranes, as well as methods for sealing anode and cathode chambers, have successfully been developed.

Boris Merinov; Adri van Duin; Sossina Haile; William A. Goddard III

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

How Fuel Cells Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Fuel Cells Work How Fuel Cells Work Diagram: How a PEM fuel cell works. 1. Hydrogen fuel is channeled through field flow plates to the anode on one side of the fuel cell, while oxygen from the air is channeled to the cathode on the other side of the cell. 2. At the anode, a platinum catalyst causes the hydrogen to split into positive hydrogen ions (protons) and negatively charged electrons. 3. The Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) allows only the positively charged ions to pass through it to the cathode. The negatively charged electrons must travel along an external circuit to the cathode, creating an electrical current. 4. At the cathode, the electrons and positively charged hydrogen ions combine with oxygen to form water, which flows out of the cell.

72

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel...

73

Fuel Cell 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell 101 Fuel Cell 101 Don Hoffman Don Hoffman Ship Systems & Engineering Research Division March 2011 Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Fuel Cell Operation * A Fuel Cell is an electrochemical power source * It supplies electricity by combining hydrogen and oxygen electrochemically without combustion. * It is configured like a battery with anode and cathode. * Unlike a battery, it does not run down or require recharging and will produce electricity and will produce electricity, heat and water as long as fuel is supplied. 2H + + 2e - O 2 + 2H + + 2e - 2H 2 O H 2 Distribution Statement A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 2 FUEL FUEL CONTROLS Fuel Cell System HEAT & WATER CLEAN CLEAN EXHAUST EXHAUST

74

BSA 01-07: Carbon Monoxide Tolerant Fuel Cell Electrocatalyst  

This fuel cell anode includes an electrocatalyst that has a conductive support material, ... Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the ...

75

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells...

76

Compact fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel electrochemical cell which may be a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is disclosed where the cathodes (144, 140) may be exposed to the air and open to the ambient atmosphere without further housing. Current collector (145) extends through a first cathode on one side of a unit and over the unit through the cathode on the other side of the unit and is in electrical contact via lead (146) with housing unit (122 and 124). Electrical insulator (170) prevents electrical contact between two units. Fuel inlet manifold (134) allows fuel to communicate with internal space (138) between the anodes (154 and 156). Electrically insulating members (164 and 166) prevent the current collector from being in electrical contact with the anode.

Jacobson, Craig (Moraga, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA); Lu, Chun (Richland, WA)

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

77

INVESTIGATION INTO THE EFFECTS OF TRACE COAL SYN GAS SPECIES ON THE PERFORMANCE OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ANODES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coal is the United States most widely used fossil fuel for the production of electric power. Coals availability and cost dictates that it will be (more)

Trembly, Jason P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well as the space shuttle. Although fuel cells have been successfully used in such applications, they have proven difficult to make more cost-effective and durable for commercial applications, particularly for the rigors of daily transportation. Since the 1970s, scientists at Los Alamos have managed to make various scientific breakthroughs that have contributed to the development of modern fuel cell systems. Specific efforts include the following: * Finding alternative and more cost-effective catalysts than platinum. * Enhancing the durability of fuel cells by developing advanced materials and

79

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Animation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on...

80

Electrolysis cell for reprocessing plutonium reactor fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell for refining a mixture of metals including spent fuel containing U and Pu contaminated with other metals, the cell including a metallic pot containing a metallic pool as one anode at a lower level, a fused salt as the electrolyte at an intermediate level and a cathode and an anode basket in spaced-apart positions in the electrolyte with the cathode and anode being retractable to positions above the electrolyte during which spent fuel may be added to the anode basket and the anode basket being extendable into the lower pool to dissolve at least some metallic contaminants, the anode basket containing the spent fuel acting as a second anode when in the electrolyte.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Steindler, Martin J. (Park Forest, IL); Burris, Leslie (Naperville, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Electrolysis cell for reprocessing plutonium reactor fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell for refining a mixture of metals including spent fuel containing U and Pu contaminated with other metals is claimed. The cell includes a metallic pot containing a metallic pool as one anode at a lower level, a fused salt as the electrolyte at an intermediate level and a cathode and an anode basket in spaced-apart positions in the electrolyte with the cathode and anode being retractable to positions above the electrolyte during which spent fuel may be added to the anode basket. The anode basket is extendable into the lower pool to dissolve at least some metallic contaminants; the anode basket contains the spent fuel acting as a second anode when in the electrolyte.

Miller, W.E.; Steindler, M.J.; Burris, L.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

82

Solid oxide fuel cell with single material for electrodes and interconnect  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell having a plurality of individual cells. A solid oxide fuel cell has an anode and a cathode with electrolyte disposed therebetween, and the anode, cathode and interconnect elements are comprised of substantially one material.

McPheeters, Charles C. (Naperville, IL); Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Fuel cell membrane humidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell assembly has an anode side and a cathode side separated by the membrane and generating electrical current by electrochemical reactions between a fuel gas and an oxidant. The anode side comprises a hydrophobic gas diffusion backing contacting one side of the membrane and having hydrophilic areas therein for providing liquid water directly to the one side of the membrane through the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing. In a preferred embodiment, the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing are formed by sewing a hydrophilic thread through the backing. Liquid water is distributed over the gas diffusion backing in distribution channels that are separate from the fuel distribution channels.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells The Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is responsible for coordinating Federal efforts to facilitate development of a commercially relevant and robust solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. Specific objectives include achieving an efficiency of greater than 60 percent, meeting a stack cost target of $175 per kW, and demonstrating lifetime performance degradation of less than 0.2 percent per

85

Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fuel cells are an emerging technology that can provide heat and electricity for buildings and electrical power for vehicles and electronic devices.

86

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science » Materials Science » Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Melissa Fox Applied Energy Email Catherine Padro Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Fernando Garzon Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Piotr Zelenay Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Rod Borup Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Karen E. Kippen Experimental Physical Sciences Email Like a battery, a fuel cell consists of two electrodes separated by an electrolyte-in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, the separator is made of a thin polymeric membrane. Unlike a battery, a fuel cell does not need recharging-it continues to produce electricity as long as fuel flows

87

Generation of electricity with fuel cell using alcohol fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for generating electricity in a fuel cell, the fuel cell comprising a cathode, an electrolyte, an anode comprising a first, fluid-permeable face and a second face in contact with the electrolyte, and an external circuit connecting the cathode and the anode. It comprises bringing a lower primary alcohol into contact with the first fluid-permeable face of the anode, thereby permitting the lower primary alcohol to penetrate into the cross-section of the anode toward the second face; oxidizing the lower primary alcohol essentially to carbon dioxide and water at the second face of the anode, reducing a reducible gas at the cathode, and obtaining electricity from the fuel cell.

Reddy, N.R.K.V.; Taylor, E.J.

1992-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

Role of hydrous ruthenium oxide in Pt-Ru direct methanol fuel cell anode electrocatalysts: The importance of mixed electron/proton conductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pt-Ru is the favored anode catalyst for the oxidation of methanol in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The nanoscale Pt-Ru blacks are accepted to be bimetallic alloys as based on their X-ray diffraction patterns. These bulk and surface analyses show that although practical Pt-Ru blacks have diffraction patterns consistent with an alloy assignment, they are primarily a mix of Pt metal and Ru oxides plus some Pt oxides and only small amounts of Ru metal. Thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of as-received Pt-Ru electrocatalysts indicate that DMFC materials contain substantial amounts of hydrous ruthenium oxide (RuO{sub x}H{sub y}). A potential misidentification of nanoscale Pt-Ru blacks arises because RuO{sub x}H{sub y} is amorphous and cannot be discerned by X-ray diffraction. Hydrous ruthenium oxide is a mixed proton and electron conductor and innately expresses Ru-OH speciation. These properties are of key importance in the mechanism of methanol oxidation, in particular, Ru-OH is a critical component of the bifunctional mechanism proposed for direct methanol oxidation in that it is the oxygen-transfer species that oxidatively dissociates {single_bond}C{triple_bond}O fragments from the Pt surface. The catalysts and membrane-electrode assemblies of DMFCs should not be processed at or exposed to temperatures >150 C, as such conditions deleteriously lower the proton conductivity of hydrous ruthenium oxide and thus affect the ability of the Ru component of the electrocatalyst to dissociate water. With this analytical understanding of the true nature of practical nanoscale Pt-Ru electrocatalysts, the authors can now recommend that hydrous ruthenium oxide, rather than Ru metal or anhydrous RuO{sub 2}, is the preferred Ru speciation in these catalysts.

Rolison, D.R.; Hagans, P.L.; Swider, K.E.; Long, J.W. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Surface Chemistry Branch

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

Fuel cell integrated with steam reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A H.sub.2 -air fuel cell integrated with a steam reformer is disclosed wherein a superheated water/methanol mixture is fed to a catalytic reformer to provide a continuous supply of hydrogen to the fuel cell, the gases exhausted from the anode of the fuel cell providing the thermal energy, via combustion, for superheating the water/methanol mixture.

Beshty, Bahjat S. (Lower Makefield, PA); Whelan, James A. (Bricktown, NJ)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Separator plate for a fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separator plate is described for a fuel cell comprising an anode current collector, a cathode current collector and a main plate, the main plate disposed between the anode current collector and the cathode current collector. The anode current collector forms a flattened peripheral wet seal structure and manifold wet seal structure on the anode side of the separator plate and the cathode current collector forms a flattened peripheral wet seal structure and manifold wet seal structure on the cathode side of the separator plate. In this manner, the number of components required to manufacture and assemble a fuel cell stack is reduced. 9 figs.

Petri, R.J.; Meek, J.; Bachta, R.P.; Marianowski, L.G.

1996-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

91

Investigation into the effects of trace coal syn gas species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cell anodes, PhD. thesis, Russ College of Engineering and Technology of Ohio University  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coal is the United States most widely used fossil fuel for the production of electric power. Coals availability and cost dictates that it will be used for many years to come in the United States for power production. As a result of the environmental impact of burning coal for power production more efficient and environmentally benign power production processes using coal are sought. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) combined with gasification technologies represent a potential methodology to produce electric power using coal in a much more efficient and cleaner manner. It has been shown in the past that trace species contained in coal, such as sulfur, severely degrade the performance of solid oxide fuel cells rendering them useless. Coal derived syngas cleanup technologies have been developed that efficiently remove sulfur to levels that do not cause any performance losses in solid oxide fuel cells. The ability of these systems to clean other trace species contained in syngas is not known nor is the effect of these trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. This works presents the thermodynamic and diffusion transport simulations that were combined with experimental testing to evaluate the effects of the trace species on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells. The results show that some trace species contained in coal will interact with the SOFC anode. In addition to the transport and thermodynamic simulations that were completed experimental tests were completed investigating the effect of HCl and AsH3 on the performance of SOFCs.

Trembly, J.P.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

93

Ambient pressure fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ambient pressure fuel cell system is provided with a fuel cell stack formed from a plurality of fuel cells having membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs) that are hydrated with liquid water and bipolar plates with anode and cathode sides for distributing hydrogen fuel gas and water to a first side of each one of the MEAs and air with reactant oxygen gas to a second side of each one of the MEAs. A pump supplies liquid water to the fuel cells. A recirculating system may be used to return unused hydrogen fuel gas to the stack. A near-ambient pressure blower blows air through the fuel cell stack in excess of reaction stoichiometric amounts to react with the hydrogen fuel gas.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Annular feed air breathing fuel cell stack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stack of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is formed from a plurality of unit cells where each unit cell includes fuel cell components defining a periphery and distributed along a common axis, where the fuel cell components include a polymer electrolyte membrane, an anode and a cathode contacting opposite sides of the membrane, and fuel and oxygen flow fields contacting the anode and the cathode, respectively, wherein the components define an annular region therethrough along the axis. A fuel distribution manifold within the annular region is connected to deliver fuel to the fuel flow field in each of the unit cells. In a particular embodiment, a single bolt through the annular region clamps the unit cells together. In another embodiment, separator plates between individual unit cells have an extended radial dimension to function as cooling fins for maintaining the operating temperature of the fuel cell stack.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

EFFECT OF FUEL IMPURITY ON STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY OF Ni-YSZ ANODE OF SOFCs  

SciTech Connect

Electricity production through the integration of coal gasification with solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) may potentially be an efficient technique for clean energy generation. However, multiple minor and trace components are naturally present in coals. These impurities in coal gas not only degrade the electrochemical performance of Ni-YSZ anode used in SOFCs, but also severely endanger the structural integrity of the Ni-YSZ anode. In this paper, effect of the trace impurity of the coal syngases on the mechanical degradation of Ni-YSZ anode was studied by using an integrated experimental/modeling approach. Phosphorus is taken as an example of impurity. Anode-support button cell was used to experimentally explore the migration of phosphorous impurity in the Ni-YSZ anode of SOFCs. X-ray mapping was used to show elemental distributions and new phase formation. The subsequent finite element stress analyses were conducted using the actual microstructure of the anode to illustrate the degradation mechanism. It was found that volume expansion induced by the Ni phase change produces high stress level such that local failure of the Ni-YSZ anode is possible under the operating conditions

Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Carbonate fuel cell system with thermally integrated gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell system is described which employs a gasifier for generating fuel gas for the fuel cell of the fuel cell system and in which heat for the gasifier is derived from the anode exhaust gas of the fuel cell. 2 figs.

Steinfeld, G.; Meyers, S.J.; Lee, A.

1996-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fuel cell system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell system is comprised of a fuel cell module including sub-stacks of series-connected fuel cells, the sub-stacks being held together in a stacked arrangement with cold plates of a cooling means located between the sub-stacks to function as electrical terminals. The anode and cathode terminals of the sub-stacks are connected in parallel by means of the coolant manifolds which electrically connect selected cold plates. The system may comprise a plurality of the fuel cell modules connected in series. The sub-stacks are designed to provide a voltage output equivalent to the desired voltage demand of a low voltage, high current DC load such as an electrolytic cell to be driven by the fuel cell system. This arrangement in conjunction with switching means can be used to drive a DC electrical load with a total voltage output selected to match that of the load being driven. This arrangement eliminates the need for expensive voltage regulation equipment.

Early, Jack (Perth Amboy, NJ); Kaufman, Arthur (West Orange, NJ); Stawsky, Alfred (Teaneck, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fuel cell membranes and crossover prevention  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane electrode assembly for use with a direct organic fuel cell containing a formic acid fuel includes a solid polymer electrolyte having first and second surfaces, an anode on the first surface and a cathode on the second surface and electrically linked to the anode. The solid polymer electrolyte has a thickness t:.gtoreq..times..times..times..times. ##EQU00001## where C.sub.f is the formic acid fuel concentration over the anode, D.sub.f is the effective diffusivity of the fuel in the solid polymer electrolyte, K.sub.f is the equilibrium constant for partition coefficient for the fuel into the solid polymer electrolyte membrane, I is Faraday's constant n.sub.f is the number of electrons released when 1 molecule of the fuel is oxidized, and j.sub.f.sup.c is an empirically determined crossover rate of fuel above which the fuel cell does not operate.

Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); York, Cynthia A. (Newington, CT); Waszczuk, Piotr (White Bear Lake, MN); Wieckowski, Andrzej (Champaign, IL)

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

99

Electrolytic Cell For Production Of Aluminum Employing Planar Anodes.  

SciTech Connect

A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte, the method comprising providing a molten salt electrolyte having alumina dissolved therein in an electrolytic cell. A plurality of anodes and cathodes having planar surfaces are disposed in a generally vertical orientation in the electrolyte, the anodes and cathodes arranged in alternating or interleaving relationship to provide anode planar surfaces disposed opposite cathode planar surfaces, the anode comprised of carbon. Electric current is passed through anodes and through the electrolyte to the cathodes depositing aluminum at the cathodes and forming carbon containing gas at the anodes.

Barnett, Robert J. (Goldendale, WA); Mezner, Michael B. (Sandy, OR); Bradford, Donald R (Underwood, WA)

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

100

Plant-scale anodic dissolution of unirradiated IFR fuel pins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses anodic dissolution which is a major operation in the pyrometallurgical process for recycling spent metal fuels from the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR), an advanced reactor design developed at Argonne National Laboratory. This process involves electrorefining the heavy metals (uranium and plutonium) from chopped, steel-clad fuel segments. The heavy metals are electrotransported from anodic dissolution baskets to solid and liquid cathodes in a molten salt electrolyte (LiCl-KCI) at 500{degrees}C. Uranium is recovered on a solid cathode mandrel, while a uranium-plutonium mixture is recovered in a liquid cadmium cathode. The anode configuration consists of four baskets mounted on an anode shaft. These baskets provide parallel circuits in the electrolyte and salt flow through the chopped fuelbed as the baskets are rotated. The baskets for the engineering-scale tests were sized to contain up to 2.5 kg of heavy metal. Anodic dissolution of 10 kg batches of chopped, steel-clad simulated tuel (U-10% Zr and U-Zr-Fs alloy) was demonstrated.

Gay, E.C.; Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fuel Cell Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basics Basics Fuel Cell Basics August 14, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis Photo of two hydrogen fuel cells. Fuel cells are an emerging technology that can provide heat and electricity for buildings and electrical power for vehicles and electronic devices. How Fuel Cells Work Fuel cells work like batteries, but they do not run down or need recharging. They produce electricity and heat as long as fuel is supplied. A fuel cell consists of two electrodes-a negative electrode (or anode) and a positive electrode (or cathode)-sandwiched around an electrolyte. A fuel, such as hydrogen, is fed to the anode, and air is fed to the cathode. Activated by a catalyst, hydrogen atoms separate into protons and electrons, which take different paths to the cathode. The electrons go through an external circuit, creating a flow of electricity. The protons

102

Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer

103

Electron Microscopy Study of Novel Ru Doped La0.8Sr0.2CrO3 as Anode Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cells (SOFCs) Y. Wang,* B. D. Madsen,* W. Kobsiriphat,* S.A. Barnett* and L.D. Marks* * Department Fuel Cells (SOFCs) have been the center of research activities with the goal of improving energy into SOFCs to yield improved electrolyte and electrode performance [1,2]. For instance, small amounts

Marks, Laurence D.

104

Fuel cell electric power production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for generating electricity from a fuel cell includes generating a hydrogen-rich gas as the fuel for the fuel cell by treating a hydrocarbon feed, which may be a normally liquid feed, in an autothermal reformer utilizing a first monolithic catalyst zone having palladium and platinum catalytic components therein and a second, platinum group metal steam reforming catalyst. Air is used as the oxidant in the hydrocarbon reforming zone and a low oxygen to carbon ratio is maintained to control the amount of dilution of the hydrogen-rich gas with nitrogen of the air without sustaining an insupportable amount of carbon deposition on the catalyst. Anode vent gas may be utilized as the fuel to preheat the inlet stream to the reformer. The fuel cell and the reformer are preferably operated at elevated pressures, up to about a pressure of 150 psia for the fuel cell.

Hwang, Herng-Shinn (Livingston, NJ); Heck, Ronald M. (Frenchtown, NJ); Yarrington, Robert M. (Westfield, NJ)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Optimizing Anode Performance in DUBAL Reduction Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduction in Gross Carbon consumption by 5% over the past 4 years was achieved through optimization of anode quality, modification of anode design and...

106

Carbon-based Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The direct use of coal in the solid oxide fuel cell to generate electricity is an innovative concept for power generation. The C-fuel cell (carbon-based fuel cell) could offer significant advantages: (1) minimization of NOx emissions due to its operating temperature range of 700-1000 C, (2) high overall efficiency because of the direct conversion of coal to CO{sub 2}, and (3) the production of a nearly pure CO{sub 2} exhaust stream for the direct CO{sub 2} sequestration. The objective of this project is to determine the technical feasibility of using a highly active anode catalyst in a solid oxide fuel for the direct electrochemical oxidation of coal to produce electricity. Results of this study showed that the electric power generation from Ohio No 5 coal (Lower Kittanning) Seam, Mahoning County, is higher than those of coal gas and pure methane on a solid oxide fuel cell assembly with a promoted metal anode catalyst at 950 C. Further study is needed to test the long term activity, selectivity, and stability of anode catalysts.

Steven S. C. Chuang

2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ceramic Fuel Cells (SOFC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in hot box included Anode Electrolyte Key cost drivers identified for tubular designs * Cell * Current Collectors * Seals BOP in hot box: * Insulation (thermal) * Recuperator *...

108

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

109

Corrosion free phosphoric acid fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phosphoric acid fuel cell with an electrolyte fuel system which supplies electrolyte via a wick disposed adjacent a cathode to an absorbent matrix which transports the electrolyte to portions of the cathode and an anode which overlaps the cathode on all sides to prevent corrosion within the cell.

Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

111

Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol

112

Energy Basics: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Fuel Cells Photo of...

113

Catalytic membranes for fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell of the present invention comprises a cathode and an anode, one or both of the anode and the cathode including a catalyst comprising a bundle of longitudinally aligned graphitic carbon nanotubes including a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally and atomically distributed throughout the graphitic carbon walls of said nanotubes. The nanotubes also include nitrogen atoms and/or ions chemically bonded to the graphitic carbon and to the transition metal. Preferably, the transition metal comprises at least one metal selected from the group consisting of Fe, Co, Ni, Mn, and Cr.

Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yang, Junbing (Bolingbrook, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Naperville, IL)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

114

Cathode/Anode Selection and Full Cell Performance for Stationary ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Cathode/Anode Selection and Full Cell Performance for Stationary Li-ion Battery System. Author(s), Daiwon Choi, Donghai Wang, Vilayanur...

115

Anodization of Aluminum-Titanium Alloys for Solar Cell Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Anodization of Aluminum-Titanium Alloys for Solar Cell ... Migration of Nanotechnology from Laboratory to Market Place: Arci Experience.

116

Cathode Contact Materials for Anode-Supported Cell Development - Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cathode Contact Materials for Anode- Cathode Contact Materials for Anode- Supported Cell Development- Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is to advance energy options to fuel our economy, strengthen our security, and improve our environment. With the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA), NETL is leading the research, development, and demonstration of solid oxide

117

Importance of Gas-Phase Kinetics within the Anode Channel of a Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Chad Y. Sheng and Anthony M. Dean*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ReceiVed: December 12, 2003; In Final Form: February 27, 2004 Experiments using n-butane channel of a solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Butane conversion and product formation were monitored used: neat n-butane, 50% n-C4H10/50% H2O, and 50% n-C4H10/50% N2. These experiments demonstrate

Dean, Anthony M.

118

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offering cleaner, more-efficient alternatives to the combustion of gasoline and other fossil fuels. Fuel cells have the potential to replace the internal-combustion engine in...

119

Fuel-cell engine stream conditioning system  

SciTech Connect

A stream conditioning system for a fuel cell gas management system or fuel cell engine. The stream conditioning system manages species potential in at least one fuel cell reactant stream. A species transfer device is located in the path of at least one reactant stream of a fuel cell's inlet or outlet, which transfer device conditions that stream to improve the efficiency of the fuel cell. The species transfer device incorporates an exchange media and a sorbent. The fuel cell gas management system can include a cathode loop with the stream conditioning system transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell related to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Fuel Cell Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Links Fuel Cell Links The links below are provided as additional resources for fuel-cell-related information. Most of the linked sites are not part of, nor affiliated with, fueleconomy.gov. We do not endorse or vouch for the accuracy of the information found on such sites. Fuel Cell Vehicles and Manufacturers Chevrolet General Motors press release about the Chevrolet Fuel Cell Equinox Ford Ford overview of their hydrogen fuel cell vehicles Honda FCX Clarity official site Hyundai Hyundai press release announcing the upcoming Tucson Fuel Cell Mercedes-Benz Ener-G-Force Fuel-cell-powered concept SUV Nissan Nissan TeRRA concept SUV Toyota Overview of Toyota fuel cell technology Hydrogen- and Fuel-Cell-Related Information and Tools Fuel Cell Vehicles Brief overview of fuel cell vehicles provided by DOE's Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fuel cell system with combustor-heated reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell system including a fuel reformer heated by a catalytic combustor fired by anode effluent and/or fuel from a liquid fuel supply providing fuel for the fuel cell. The combustor includes a vaporizer section heated by the combustor exhaust gases for vaporizing the fuel before feeding it into the combustor. Cathode effluent is used as the principle oxidant for the combustor.

Pettit, William Henry (Rochester, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technology, which offers many advantages over traditional energy conversion systems including low emission and high efficiency, has become increasingly attractive to the utility, automotive, and defense industries (as shown in Figure 1). As an all solid-state energy conversion device, the SOFC operates at high temperatures (700-1,000 C) and produces electricity by electrochemically combining the fuel and oxidant gases across an ionically conducting oxide membrane. To build up a useful voltage, a number of cells or PENs (Positive cathode-Electrolyte-Negative anode) are electrically connected in series in a stack through bi-polar plates, also known as interconnects. Shown in Figure 2 (a) is a schematic of the repeat unit for a planar stack, which is expected to be a mechanically robust, high power-density and cost-effective design. In the stack (refer to Figure 2 (b)), the interconnect is simultaneously exposed to both an oxidizing (air) environment on the cathode side and a reducing (fuels such as hydrogen or natural gas) environment on the anode side for thousands of hours at elevated temperatures (700-1,000 C). Other challenges include the fact that water vapor is likely to be present in both of these environments, and the fuel is likely to contain sulfide impurities. Also, the interconnect must be stable towards any sealing materials with which it is in contact, under numerous thermal cycles. Furthermore, the interconnect must also be stable towards electrical contact materials that are employed to minimize interfacial contact resistance, and/or the electrode materials. Considering these service environments, the interconnect materials should possess the following properties: (1) Good surface stability (resistance to oxidation and corrosion) in both cathodic (oxidizing) and anodic (reducing) atmospheres. (2) Thermal expansion matching to the ceramic PEN and other adjacent components, all of which typically have a coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) in the range of 10.5-12.0 x 10{sup -6} K{sup -1}. (3) High electrical conductivity through both the bulk material and in-situ formed oxide scales. (4) Satisfactory bulk and interfacial mechanical/thermomechanical reliability and durability at the SOFC operating temperatures. (5) Good compatibility with other materials in contact with interconnects such as seals and electrical contact materials. Until recently, the leading candidate material for the interconnect was doped lanthanum chromite (LaCrO3), which is a ceramic material which can easily withstand the traditional 1000 C operating temperature. However, the high cost of raw materials and fabrication, difficulties in obtaining high-density chromite parts at reasonable sintering temperatures, and the tendency of the chromite interconnect to partially reduce at the fuel gas/interconnect interface, causing the component to warp and the peripheral seal to break, have plagued the commercialization of planar SOFCs for years. The recent trend in developing lower temperature, more cost-effective cells which utilize anode-supported, several micron-thin electrolytes and/or new electrolytes with improved conductivity make it feasible for lanthanum chromite to be supplanted by metals or alloys as the interconnect materials. Compared to doped lanthanum chromite, metals or alloys offer significantly lower raw material and fabrication costs.

Yang, Z Gary; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar

2003-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold

124

Energy Basics: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Fuel Cells Photo of two hydrogen fuel cells. Fuel cells are an emerging technology that can provide heat and electricity for buildings and electrical power for...

125

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operation of a Solid Polymer Fuel Cell: A Parametric Model,"1991). G. Bronoel, "Hydrogen-Air Fuel Cells Without PreciousG. Abens, "Development of a Fuel Cell Power Source for Bus,"

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

NETL: Fuel Cells - Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel CellsSolid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Contacts For information on the Fuel CellsSECA program, contact: Fuel Cells Technology Manager: Shailesh Vora 412-386-7515...

127

Novel Fuel Cells for Coal Based Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to acquire experimental data required to assess the feasibility of a Direct Coal power plant based upon an Electrochemical Looping (ECL) of Liquid Tin Anode Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (LTA-SOFC). The objective of Phase 1 was to experimentally characterize the interaction between the tin anode, coal fuel and cell component electrolyte, the fate of coal contaminants in a molten tin reactor (via chemistry) and their impact upon the YSZ electrolyte (via electrochemistry). The results of this work will provided the basis for further study in Phase 2. The objective of Phase 2 was to extend the study of coal impurities impact on fuel cell components other than electrolyte, more specifically to the anode current collector which is made of an electrically conducting ceramic jacket and broad based coal tin reduction. This work provided a basic proof-of-concept feasibility demonstration of the direct coal concept.

Thomas Tao

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

128

Annular feed air breathing fuel cell stack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stack of polymer electrolyte fuel cells is formed from a plurality of unit cells where each unit cell includes fuel cell components defining a periphery and distributed along a common axis, where the fuel cell components include a polymer electrolyte membrane, an anode and a cathode contacting opposite sides of the membrane, and fuel and oxygen flow fields contacting the anode and the cathode, respectively, wherein the components define an annular region therethrough along the axis. A fuel distribution manifold within the annular region is connected to deliver fuel to the fuel flow field in each of the unit cells. The fuel distribution manifold is formed from a hydrophilic-like material to redistribute water produced by fuel and oxygen reacting at the cathode. In a particular embodiment, a single bolt through the annular region clamps the unit cells together. In another embodiment, separator plates between individual unit cells have an extended radial dimension to function as cooling fins for maintaining the operating temperature of the fuel cell stack.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Neutzler, Jay K. (Peoria, AZ)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reversible Fuel Cells Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings

130

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Glossary This glossary contains terms and acronyms related to hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z - Acronyms A AC Generator (or Alternator) An electric device that produces an electric current that reverses direction many times per second. Also called a synchronous generator. Adsorption The adhesion of the molecules of gases, dissolved substances, or liquids to the surface of the solids or liquids with which they are in contact. Air The mixture of oxygen, nitrogen, and other gases that, with varying amounts of water vapor, forms the atmosphere of the earth. Alkaline Fuel Cell (AFC) A type of hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell in which the electrolyte is concentrated potassium hydroxide (KOH) and the hydroxide ions (OH-) are transported from the cathode to the anode.

131

FCT Fuel Cells: Fuel Cell R&D Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell R&D Activities to someone by E-mail Share FCT Fuel Cells: Fuel Cell R&D Activities on Facebook Tweet about FCT Fuel Cells: Fuel Cell R&D Activities on Twitter Bookmark...

132

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cell Technical Cell Technical Publications to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technical Publications on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Hydrogen Fuel Cells Safety, Codes & Standards Market Analysis Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings

133

A High Temperature Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operating on Phosphine Contaminated Coal Syngas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Solid oxide fuel cells that operate on phosphine contaminated coal syngas are subject to performance degradation due to alterations of the anode microstructure. Theoretical investigations (more)

De Silva, Kandaudage Channa R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Regenerative fuel cell engineering - FY99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors report the work conducted by the ESA-EPE Fuel Cell Engineering Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY99 on regenerative fuel cell system engineering. The work was focused on the evaluation of regenerative fuel cell system components obtained through the RAFCO program. These components included a 5 kW PEM electrolyzer, a two-cell regenerative fuel cell stack, and samples of the electrolyzer membrane, anode, and cathode. The samples of the electrolyzer membrane, anode, and cathode were analyzed to determine their structure and operating characteristics. Tests were conducted on the two-cell regenerative fuel cell stack to characterize its operation as an electrolyzer and as a fuel cell. The 5 kW PEM electrolyzer was tested in the Regenerative Fuel Cell System Test Facility. These tests served to characterize the operation of the electrolyzer and, also, to verify the operation of the newly completed test facility. Future directions for this work in regenerative fuel cell systems are discussed.

Michael A. Inbody; Rodney L. Borup; James C. Hedstrom; Jose Tafoya; Byron Morton; Lois Zook; Nicholas E. Vanderborgh

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A fuel cell overview  

SciTech Connect

This paper is an overview of the fuel cell as an efficient and environmentally benign energy conversion technology. The topics of the paper include their physical arrangement, types of fuel cells, status of commercial development, applications of the fuel cell power plants and comparison with existing alternatives, and good design practice for fuel cell safety.

Krumpelt, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Reiser, C.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect

Power densities in electrolyte Direct Methanol Fuel Cells have been achieved which are only three times lower than those achieved with similar reformate/air fuel cells. Remaining issues are: improved anode catalyst activity, demonstrated long-term stable performance, and high fuel efficiencies.

Ren, Xiaoming; Wilson, M.S.; Gottesfeld, S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fuel cells seminar  

SciTech Connect

This year`s meeting highlights the fact that fuel cells for both stationary and transportation applications have reached the dawn of commercialization. Sales of stationary fuel cells have grown steadily over the past 2 years. Phosphoric acid fuel cell buses have been demonstrated in urban areas. Proton-exchange membrane fuel cells are on the verge of revolutionizing the transportation industry. These activities and many more are discussed during this seminar, which provides a forum for people from the international fuel cell community engaged in a wide spectrum of fuel cell activities. Discussions addressing R&D of fuel cell technologies, manufacturing and marketing of fuel cells, and experiences of fuel cell users took place through oral and poster presentations. For the first time, the seminar included commercial exhibits, further evidence that commercial fuel cell technology has arrived. A total of 205 papers is included in this volume.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Fuel Cell - Solid Oxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrolyzer Research and Development Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Solid oxide diagram In an SOFC, oxygen from air is reduced to ions at the cathode, which diffuse through the...

139

Process and apparatus for recovery of fissionable materials from spent reactor fuel by anodic dissolution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical process and apparatus for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent metal clad fuel pins is disclosed. The process uses secondary reactions between U.sup.+4 cations and elemental uranium at the anode to increase reaction rates and improve anodic efficiency compared to prior art processes. In another embodiment of the process, secondary reactions between Cd.sup.+2 cations and elemental uranium to form uranium cations and elemental cadmium also assists in oxidizing the uranium at the anode.

Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Orland Park, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Wolson, Raymond D. (Lockport, IL); Gay, Eddie C. (Park Forest, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Solid oxide fuel cell with single material for electrodes and interconnect  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell is described having a plurality of individual cells. A solid oxide fuel cell has an anode and a cathode with electrolyte disposed there between, and the anode, cathode and interconnect elements are comprised of substantially one material. 9 figs.

McPheeters, C.C.; Nelson, P.A.; Dees, D.W.

1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

FCT Fuel Cells: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of a fuel cell stack A fuel cell uses the chemical energy of hydrogen to cleanly and efficiently produce electricity with water and heat as byproducts. (How much water?) Fuel cells are unique in terms of the variety of their potential applications; they can provide energy for systems as large as a utility

142

Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Workshop Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Workshop July 30, 2003 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Carbon Anode Electrochemistry Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells Coal Preprocessing Prior to Introduction Into the Fuel Cell Potential Market Applications for Direct Carbon Fuel Cells Discussion of Key R&D Needs Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

144

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: November 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

145

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newsletter Archives to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter Archives on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

146

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Subscribe to the Fuel Cell Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subscribe to the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Subscribe to the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter on...

147

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Portable Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Portable Power Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Portable Power Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

148

Anode for a secondary, high-temperature electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-temperature, secondary electrochemical cell includes an anode containing lithium, an electrolyte containing lithium ions and a cathode containing a chalcogen material such as sulfur or a metallic sulfide. The anode includes a porous substrate formed of, for instance, a compacted mass of entangled metallic fibers providing interstitial crevices for receiving molten lithium metal. The surfaces of the interstitial crevices are provided with a coating of cobalt metal to enhance the retention of the molten lithium metal within the substrate.

Vissers, Donald R. (Naperville, IL); Tani, Benjamin S. (Chicago, IL)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Solid polymer MEMS-based fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) based thin-film fuel cells for electrical power applications. The MEMS-based fuel cell may be of a solid oxide type (SOFC), a solid polymer type (SPFC), or a proton exchange membrane type (PEMFC), and each fuel cell basically consists of an anode and a cathode separated by an electrolyte layer. The electrolyte layer can consist of either a solid oxide or solid polymer material, or proton exchange membrane electrolyte materials may be used. Additionally catalyst layers can also separate the electrodes (cathode and anode) from the electrolyte. Gas manifolds are utilized to transport the fuel and oxidant to each cell and provide a path for exhaust gases. The electrical current generated from each cell is drawn away with an interconnect and support structure integrated with the gas manifold. The fuel cells utilize integrated resistive heaters for efficient heating of the materials. By combining MEMS technology with thin-film deposition technology, thin-film fuel cells having microflow channels and full-integrated circuitry can be produced that will lower the operating temperature an will yield an order of magnitude greater power density than the currently known fuel cells.

Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Morse, Jeffrey D. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

150

Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic core  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell is described for electrochemically combining fuel and oxidant for generating galvanic output, wherein the cell core has an array of electrolyte and interconnect walls that are substantially devoid of any composite inert materials for support. Instead, the core is monolithic, where each electrolyte wall consists of thin layers of cathode and anode materials sandwiching a thin layer of electrolyte material therebetween. The electrolyte walls are arranged and backfolded between adjacent interconnect walls operable to define a plurality of core passageways alternately arranged where the inside faces thereof have only the anode material or only the cathode material exposed. Means direct the fuel to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the anode-exposed core passageways and means direct the oxidant to the cathode-exposed core passageway; and means also direct the galvanic output to an exterior circuit. Each layer of the electrolyte and interconnect materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.01 cm thick; and each layer of the cathode and anode materials is of the order of 0.002 to 0.05 cm thick.

Ackerman, J.P.; Young, J.E.

1983-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News  

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Technologies Office: News on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies...

152

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Webinars to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell...

153

Fuel cell arrangement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber.

Isenberg, Arnold O. (Forest Hills Boro, PA)

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fuel cell arrangement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber. 3 figs.

Isenberg, A.O.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

155

California Fuel Cell Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Speaker(s): Bob Knight Date: October 19, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 The California Fuel Cell Partnership is a current collaboration among major automakers, fuel cell...

156

Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation.

McElroy, James F. (Hamilton, MA); Chludzinski, Paul J. (Swampscott, MA); Dantowitz, Philip (Peabody, MA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation. 2 figs.

McElroy, J.F.; Chludzinski, P.J.; Dantowitz, P.

1987-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Transformation Market Transformation Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies on AddThis.com... Early Adoption of Fuel Cells Early Market Applications for Fuel Cells

159

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation...  

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DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell...

160

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: January 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2010 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

162

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: January 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell...

163

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

09 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2009 New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

164

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office:...

165

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Buildings Roadmap...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells for Buildings Roadmap Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Buildings Roadmap Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell...

166

Cost and energy consumption estimates for the aluminum-air battery anode fuel cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of DOE's Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a study to generate estimates of the energy use and costs associated with the aluminum anode fuel cycle of the aluminum-air (Al-air) battery. The results of this analysis indicate that the cost and energy consumption characteristics of the mechanically rechargeable Al-air battery system are not as attractive as some other electrically rechargeable electric vehicle battery systems being developed by OESD. However, there are distinct advantages to mechanically rechargeable batteries, which may make the Al-air battery (or other mechanically rechargeable batteries) attractive for other uses, such as stand-alone applications. Fuel cells, such as the proton exchange membrane (PEM), and advanced secondary batteries may be better suited to electric vehicle applications. 26 refs., 3 figs., 25 tabs.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Power from the Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power for Buildings Using Fuel-Cell Cars, Proceedings ofwell as to drive down fuel-cell system costs through productis most likely to be the fuel-cell vehicle. Fuel cells are

Lipman, Timothy E.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter to someone by E-mail Share Fuel...

169

Fuel Cell Handbook update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to update the 1988 version of DOE`s Fuel Cell Handbook. Significant developments in the various fuel cell technologies required revisions to reflect state-of-the-art configurations and performance. The theoretical presentation was refined in order to make the handbook more useful to both the casual reader and fuel cell or systems analyst. In order to further emphasize the practical application of fuel cell technologies, the system integration information was expanded. In addition, practical elements, such as suggestions and guidelines to approximate fuel cell performance, were provided.

Owens, W.R.; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Engleman, R.R. Jr.; Stauffer, D.B.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fuel Cells Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Fuel Cells Information at NIST. Fuel Cells Information at NIST. (the links below are a compilation of programs ...

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

171

Energy Basics: Fuel Cell Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

172

Fuel Cells Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Judith Valerio at one of our 31 single-cell test stands Fuel Cell Team The FC team focus is R&D on polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells for commercial and military applications. Our program has had ongoing funding in the area of polymer electrolyte fuel cells since 1977 and has been responsible for enabling breakthroughs in the areas of thin film electrodes and air bleed for CO tolerance. For more information on the history of fuel cell research at Los Alamos, please click here. Fuel cells are an important enabling technology for the Hydrogen Economy and have the potential to revolutionize the way we power the nation and the world. The FC team is exploring the potential of fuel cells as energy-efficient, clean, and fuel-flexible alternatives that will

173

Study of the Behaviour of LSCM Anode Composites in a Segmented ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Conversion/Fuel Cells. Presentation Title, Study of the Behaviour of LSCM Anode Composites in a Segmented Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

174

NIST: NIF - PEM Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fuel cells are operationally equivalent to a battery. The reactants or fuel in a fuel cell can be replaced unlike a standard disposable or rechargeable ...

175

Fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature solid oxide electrolyte fuel cell generators which allow controlled leakage among plural chambers in a sealed housing. Depleted oxidant and fuel are directly reacted in one chamber to combust remaining fuel and preheat incoming reactants. The cells are preferably electrically arranged in a series-parallel configuration.

Isenberg, Arnold O. (Forest Hills, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fuel Cells publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science » Materials Science » Fuel Cells » Fuel Cells Publications Fuel Cells publications Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Melissa Fox Applied Energy Email Catherine Padro Sensors & Electorchemical Devices Email Fernando Garzon Sensors & Electorchemical Devices Email Piotr Zelenay Sensors & Electorchemical Devices Email Rod Borup Sensors & Electorchemical Devices Email Karen E. Kippen Chemistry Communications Email Like a battery, a fuel cell consists of two electrodes separated by an electrolyte-in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, the separator is made of a thin polymeric membrane. Unlike a battery, a fuel cell does not need recharging-it continues to produce electricity as long as fuel flows

177

Fuel Cells Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION / ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy Pat Davis 2 Fuel Cells Technical Goals & Objectives Goal : Develop and demonstrate fuel cell power system technologies for transportation, stationary, and portable applications. 3 Fuel Cells Technical Goals & Objectives Objectives * Develop a 60% efficient, durable, direct hydrogen fuel cell power system for transportation at a cost of $45/kW (including hydrogen storage) by 2010. * Develop a 45% efficient reformer-based fuel cell power system for transportation operating on clean hydrocarbon or alcohol based fuel that meets emissions standards, a start-up time of 30 seconds, and a projected manufactured cost of $45/kW by

178

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Joint Fuel Cell Bus Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings Webinars

179

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Transformation Market Transformation Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Market Applications for Fuel Cell Technologies on AddThis.com...

180

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increasing worldwide demand for premium power, emerging trend towards electric utility deregulation and distributed power generation, global environmental concerns and regulatory controls have accelerated the development of advanced fuel cell based power generation systems. Fuel cells convert chemical energy to electrical energy through electrochemical oxidation of gaseous and/or liquid fuels ranging from hydrogen to hydrocarbons. Electrochemical oxidation of fuels prevents the formation of Nox, while the higher efficiency of the systems reduces carbon dioxide emissions (kg/kWh). Among various fuel cell power generation systems currently being developed for stationary and mobile applications, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) offer higher efficiency (up to 80% overall efficiency in hybrid configurations), fuel flexibility, tolerance to CO poisoning, modularity, and use of non-noble construction materials of low strategic value. Tubular, planar, and monolithic cell and stack configurations are currently being developed for stationary and military applications. The current generation of fuel cells uses doped zirconia electrolyte, nickel cermet anode, doped Perovskite cathode electrodes and predominantly ceramic interconnection materials. Fuel cells and cell stacks operate in a temperature range of 800-1000 *C. Low cost ($400/kWe), modular (3-10kWe) SOFC technology development approach of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative of the USDOE will be presented and discussed. SOFC technology will be reviewed and future technology development needs will be addressed.

Singh, Prabhakar; Pederson, Larry R.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Viswanathan, Vish V.

2001-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparison of Cycling Performance of Lithium Ion Cell Anode Graphites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Cycling Performance of Lithium Ion Cell Anode Graphites Comparison of Cycling Performance of Lithium Ion Cell Anode Graphites Title Comparison of Cycling Performance of Lithium Ion Cell Anode Graphites Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ridgway, Paul L., Honghe Zheng, A. F. Bello, Xiangyun Song, Shidi Xun, Jin Chong, and Vincent S. Battaglia Journal Journal of The Electrochemical Society Volume 159 Issue 5 Pagination A520 Date Published 2012 ISSN 00134651 Abstract Battery grade graphite products from major suppliers to the battery industry were evaluated in 2325 coin cells with lithium counter electrodes. First and ongoing cycle efficiency, total and reversible capacity, cycle life and discharge rate performance were measured to compare these anode materials. We then ranked the graphites using a formula which incorporates these performance measures to estimate the cost of the overall system, relative to the cost of a system using MCMB. This analysis indicates that replacing MCMB with CCP-G8 (Conoco Phillips) would add little to no cost, whereas each of the other graphites would lead to a more costly system. Therefore we chose CCP-G8 as the new baseline graphite for the BATT program.

182

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USCAR FUEL CELL TECH TEAM USCAR FUEL CELL TECH TEAM CELL COMPONENT ACCELERATED STRESS TEST PROTOCOLS FOR PEM FUEL CELLS (Electrocatalysts, Supports, Membranes, and Membrane Electrode Assemblies) Revised May 26, 2010 Fuel cells, especially for automotive propulsion, must operate over a wide range of operating and cyclic conditions. The desired operating range encompasses temperatures from below the freezing point to well above the boiling point of water, humidity from ambient to saturated, and half-cell potentials from 0 to >1.5 volts. Furthermore, the anode side of the cell may be exposed to hydrogen and air during different parts of the driving and startup/shutdown cycles. The severity in operating conditions is greatly exacerbated by the transient and cyclic nature of

183

NETL: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Coal and Power Systems Fuel Cells SECA Logo Welcome to NETL's Fuel Cells Webpage. In partnership with private industry, educational institutions and national laboratories, we are leading the research, development, and demonstration of high efficiency, fuel flexible solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and coal-based SOFC power generation systems for stationary market large central power plants under the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA). The SECA cost reduction goal is to have SOFC systems capable of being manufactured at $400 per kilowatt by 2010. Concurrently, the scale-up, aggregation, and integration of the technology will progress in parallel leading to prototype validation of megawatt (MW)-class fuel flexible products by 2012 and 2015. The SECA coal-based systems goal is the development of large

184

NREL: Learning - Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Fuel cells and their ability to cleanly produce electricity from hydrogen and oxygen are what make hydrogen attractive as a "fuel" for transportation use particularly, but also as a general energy carrier for homes and other uses, and for storing and transporting otherwise intermittent renewable energy. Fuel cells function somewhat like a battery-with external fuel being supplied rather than stored electricity-to generate power by chemical reaction rather than combustion. Hydrogen fuel cells, for instance, feed hydrogen gas into an electrode that contains a catalyst, such as platinum, which helps to break up the hydrogen molecules into positively charged hydrogen ions and negatively charged electrons. The electrons flow from the electrode to a terminal that

185

Performance of Lithium Ion Cell Anode Graphites Under Various Cycling Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CA 94720 Performance of Lithium Ion Cell Anode Graphitesevaluated (in coin cells with lithium counter electrodes) asanode materials for lithium-ion cells intended for use in

Ridgway, Paul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Molten carbonate fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten electrolyte fuel cell with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas, the cell enclosures collectively providing an enclosure for the array and effectively avoiding the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components, the fuel cell further including an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL); Smith, James L. (Lemont, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Molten carbonate fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

1986-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

188

Layer-by-Layer Characterization of a Model Biofuel Cell Anode by (in Situ) Vibrational Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Layer-by-Layer Characterization of a Model Biofuel Cell Anode by (in Situ) Vibrational Spectroscopy during the construction of a model biofuel cell anode. The model anode was a layered structure formedDH to the CB layer confirmed successful enzyme immobilization. 1. Introduction Biofuel cells use microorganisms

Brolo, Alexandre G.

189

Distributed Energy Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Fuel Cells Energy Fuel Cells DOE Hydrogen DOE Hydrogen and and Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting Fuel Cell Coordination Meeting June 2-3, 2003 Electricity Users Kathi Epping Kathi Epping Objectives & Barriers Distributed Energy OBJECTIVES * Develop a distributed generation PEM fuel cell system operating on natural gas or propane that achieves 40% electrical efficiency and 40,000 hours durability at $400-750/kW by 2010. BARRIERS * Durability * Heat Utilization * Power Electronics * Start-Up Time Targets and Status Integrated Stationary PEMFC Power Systems Operating on Natural Gas or Propane Containing 6 ppm Sulfur 40,000 30,000 15,000 Hours Durability 750 1,250 2,500 $/kWe Cost 40 32 30 % Electrical Efficiency Large (50-250 kW) Systems 40,000 30,000 >6,000 Hours Durability 1,000 1,500 3,000

190

Process and apparatus for recovery of fissionable materials from spent reactor fuel by anodic dissolution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical process and apparatus for the recovery of uranium and plutonium from spent metal clad fuel pins is disclosed. The process uses secondary reactions between U{sup +4} cations and elemental uranium at the anode to increase reaction rates and improve anodic efficiency compared to prior art processes. In another embodiment of the process, secondary reactions between Cd{sup +2} cations and elemental uranium to form uranium cations and elemental cadmium also assists in oxidizing the uranium at the anode. 5 figs.

Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.; Wolson, R.D.; Gay, E.C.

1989-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fuel cell market applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a review of the US (and international) fuel cell development for the stationary power generation market. Besides DOE, GRI, and EPRI sponsorship, the US fuel cell program has over 40% cost-sharing from the private sector. Support is provided by user groups with over 75 utility and other end-user members. Objectives are to develop and demonstrate cost-effective fuel cell power generation which can initially be commercialized into various market applications using natural gas fuel by the year 2000. Types of fuel cells being developed include PAFC (phosphoric acid), MCFC (molten carbonate), and SOFC (solid oxide); status of each is reported. Potential international applications are reviewed also. Fuel cells are viewed as a force in dispersed power generation, distributed power, cogeneration, and deregulated industry. Specific fuel cell attributes are discussed: Fuel cells promise to be one of the most reliable power sources; they are now being used in critical uninterruptible power systems. They need hydrogen which can be generated internally from natural gas, coal gas, methanol landfill gas, or other fuels containing hydrocarbons. Finally, fuel cell development and market applications in Japan are reviewed briefly.

Williams, M.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

Grimble, R.E.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

193

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

Grimble, Ralph E. (Finleyville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

All ceramic structure for molten carbonate fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An all-ceramic molten carbonate fuel cell having a composition formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The structure includes an anode and cathode separated by an electronically conductive interconnect. The electrodes and interconnect are compositions ceramic materials. Various combinations of ceramic compositions for the anode, cathode and interconnect are disclosed. The fuel cell exhibits stability in the fuel gas and oxidizing environments. It presents reduced sealing and expansion problems in fabrication and has improved long-term corrosion resistance.

Smith, J.L.; Kucera, E.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell ...  

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell Power Industry (ANL-IN-00-030) Argonne National Laboratory. Contact ANL About This ...

196

Modeling & Simulation - Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GCTool Computer Model Helps Focus Fuel Cell Vehicle Research Somewhere near Detroit, an automotive engineer stares at the ceiling, wondering how to squeeze 1% more efficiency out...

197

Opportunities with Fuel Cells  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The concept for fuel cells was discovered in the nineteenth century. Today, units incorporating this technology are becoming commercially available for cogeneration applications.

Information Center

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Hydrogen Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

The fuel cell an energy conversion device that can efficiently capture and use the power of hydrogen is the key to making it happen.

199

Fuel quality issues in stationary fuel cell systems.  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cell systems are being deployed in stationary applications for the generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen. These systems use a variety of fuel cell types, ranging from the low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) to the high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Depending on the application and location, these systems are being designed to operate on reformate or syngas produced from various fuels that include natural gas, biogas, coal gas, etc. All of these fuels contain species that can potentially damage the fuel cell anode or other unit operations and processes that precede the fuel cell stack. These detrimental effects include loss in performance or durability, and attenuating these effects requires additional components to reduce the impurity concentrations to tolerable levels, if not eliminate the impurity entirely. These impurity management components increase the complexity of the fuel cell system, and they add to the system's capital and operating costs (such as regeneration, replacement and disposal of spent material and maintenance). This project reviewed the public domain information available on the impurities encountered in stationary fuel cell systems, and the effects of the impurities on the fuel cells. A database has been set up that classifies the impurities, especially in renewable fuels, such as landfill gas and anaerobic digester gas. It documents the known deleterious effects on fuel cells, and the maximum allowable concentrations of select impurities suggested by manufacturers and researchers. The literature review helped to identify the impurity removal strategies that are available, and their effectiveness, capacity, and cost. A generic model of a stationary fuel-cell based power plant operating on digester and landfill gas has been developed; it includes a gas processing unit, followed by a fuel cell system. The model includes the key impurity removal steps to enable predictions of impurity breakthrough, component sizing, and utility needs. These data, along with process efficiency results from the model, were subsequently used to calculate the cost of electricity. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to correlate the concentrations of key impurities in the fuel gas feedstock to the cost of electricity.

Papadias, D.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fuel Cell Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance, installation, and decommissioning the total project budget was approximately $3.7 million.

Gerald Brun

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Fuel Cell Development Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development Status Michael Short Systems Engineering Manager United Technologies Corporation Research Center Hamilton Sundstrand UTC Power UTC Fire & Security Fortune 50 corporation $52.9B in annual sales in 2009 ~60% of Sales are in building technologies Transportation Stationary Fuel Cells Space & Defense * Fuel cell technology leader since 1958 * ~ 550 employees * 768+ Active U.S. patents, more than 300 additional U.S. patents pending * Global leader in efficient, reliable, and sustainable fuel cell solutions UTC Power About Us PureCell ® Model 400 Solution Process Overview Power Conditioner Converts DC power to high-quality AC power 3 Fuel Cell Stack Generates DC power from hydrogen and air 2 Fuel Processor Converts natural gas fuel to hydrogen

202

Electrocatalysis issues in polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various electrocatalysis issues of impotance to low platinum loading polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are discussed. Thin film catalyst layer assemblies are used to investigate the effects of CO and CO{sub 2} on the anode as well as efforts to restore performance by oxygen bleeding into the anode feedstream. These electrodes behave differently than ionomer-impregnated E-TEK electrodes because the extra, exposed Pt in the latter case. The tolerance of Pt-Ru alloy thin film anodes to CO and CO{sub 2} are also evaluated. Thin film electrodes are also used to study Pt particle growth in aged electrodes as well as particle size effects on specific activity.

Wilson, M.S.; Derouin, C.R.; Valerio, J.A.; Gottesfeld, S.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Electrocatalysis issues in polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various electrocatalysis issues of impotance to low platinum loading polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) are discussed. Thin film catalyst layer assemblies are used to investigate the effects of CO and CO[sub 2] on the anode as well as efforts to restore performance by oxygen bleeding into the anode feedstream. These electrodes behave differently than ionomer-impregnated E-TEK electrodes because the extra, exposed Pt in the latter case. The tolerance of Pt-Ru alloy thin film anodes to CO and CO[sub 2] are also evaluated. Thin film electrodes are also used to study Pt particle growth in aged electrodes as well as particle size effects on specific activity.

Wilson, M.S.; Derouin, C.R.; Valerio, J.A.; Gottesfeld, S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Method of fabricating a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell  

SciTech Connect

In a two-step densifying process of making a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell, a limited number of anode-electrolyte-cathode cells separated by an interconnect layer are formed and partially densified. Subsequently, the partially densified cells are stacked and further densified to form a monolithic array.

Minh, Nguyen Q. (Fountain Valley, CA); Horne, Craig R. (Redondo Beach, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Method of fabricating a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a two-step densifying process of making a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell, a limited number of anode-electrolyte-cathode cells separated by an interconnect layer are formed and partially densified. Subsequently, the partially densified cells are stacked and further densified to form a monolithic array. 10 figures.

Minh, N.Q.; Horne, C.R.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Thin-film solid-oxide fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are energy conversion devices that would save billions of dollars in fuel costs alone each year in the United States if they could be implemented today for stationary and transportation applications (1-5). There are a wide variety of fuel cells available, e.g. molten carbonate, phosphoric acid, proton exchange membrane and solid-oxide. However, solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCS) are potentially more efficient and less expensive per kilowatt of power in comparison to other fuel cells. For transportation applications, the energy efficiency of a conventional internal combustion engine would be increased two-fold as replaced with a zero-emission SOFC. The basic unit of a SOFC consists of an anode and cathode separated by an oxygen-ion conducting, electrolyte layer. Manifolded stacks of fuel cells, with electrical interconnects, enable the transport and combination of a fuel and oxidant at elevated temperature to generate electrical current. Fuel cell development has proceeded along different paths based on the configuration of the anode-electrolyte-cathode. Various configurations include the tubular, monolithic and planar geometries. A planar geometry for the anode-electrolyte-cathode accompanied by a reduction in layer thickness offers the potential for high power density. Maximum power densities will require yet additional innovations in the assembly of fuel cell stacks with all of the manifolding stipulations for gas flow and electrical interconnects.

Jankowski, A.F.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Advanced Anodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , High-temperature Material Systems for Energy Conversion and Storage.

208

Fuels processing for transportation fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells primarily use hydrogen as the fuel. This hydrogen must be produced from other fuels such as natural gas or methanol. The fuel processor requirements are affected by the fuel to be converted, the type of fuel cell to be supplied, and the fuel cell application. The conventional fuel processing technology has been reexamined to determine how it must be adapted for use in demanding applications such as transportation. The two major fuel conversion processes are steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming. The former is established practice for stationary applications; the latter offers certain advantages for mobile systems and is presently in various stages of development. This paper discusses these fuel processing technologies and the more recent developments for fuel cell systems used in transportation. The need for new materials in fuels processing, particularly in the area of reforming catalysis and hydrogen purification, is discussed.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row. 5 figures.

Di Croce, A.M.; Draper, R.

1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

210

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row.

Di Croce, A. Michael (Murrysville, PA); Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA)

1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

211

Miniature ceramic fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zuppero, Anthony C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 to someone by E-mail 2 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives Subscribe Program Presentations

213

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

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August 2013 to someone by E-mail August 2013 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2013 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter

214

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

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October 2012 to someone by E-mail October 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: October 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications

215

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

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April 2012 to someone by E-mail April 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: April 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives

216

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 to someone by E-mail 2 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: March 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives Subscribe

217

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

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3 to someone by E-mail 3 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: February 2013 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter

218

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 2012 to someone by E-mail September 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications

219

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop on Facebook Tweet...

220

Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation on Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation) for the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Review held in Arlington, Virginia on May 23-26, 2005.

Pesaran, A.; Kim, G.; Markel, T.; Wipke, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordinatio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting on Facebook Tweet about...

222

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 to someone by E-mail 3 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: May 2013 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives Subscribe Program Presentations

223

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

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2 to someone by E-mail 2 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: June 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Archives Subscribe

224

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

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September/October 2013 to someone by E-mail September/October 2013 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: September/October 2013 on AddThis.com... Publications

225

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter:  

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August 2012 to someone by E-mail August 2012 to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Newsletter: August 2012 on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter

226

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the batteries, and to power accessories like the air condi- tioner and heater. Hybrid electric cars can exceed#12;#12;Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines MODULE 8: FUEL CELL HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES CONTENTS 8.1 HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLES .................................................................................. 8-1 8

227

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and fuel cells offer great  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and electricity for fuel cell and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles while using proven stationary fuel cell technol vehicles with its own fuel cell technology. Currently, advanced vehicle technologies are being evalu- ated in addition to hydrogen fuel for local demonstration fuel cell vehicles. As advanced vehicles begin to enter

228

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

variety of other fuels, including natural gas and renewable fuels such as methanol or biogas. Hydrogen and fuel cells can provide these benefits and address critical challenges in...

229

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

230

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Reversible Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Reversible Fuel Cell Systems at Proton Energy, Mr. Everett Anderson, PROTON ON SITE Regenerative Fuel Cells for Energy Storage, Mr. Corky Mittelsteadt, Giner Electrochemical...

231

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

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Research, Development and Demonstration Plan* to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development and...

232

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Early Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologie...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adoption of Fuel Cell Technologies Federal Facilities Guide Read Procuring Fuel Cells for Stationary Power: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers for step-by-step guidance...

233

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell System Contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell System Contaminants Material Screening Data NREL designed this interactive material selector tool to help fuel cell developers and material suppliers explore the results...

234

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technologies and Products Supported by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office, finds DOE funding has led to more than 360 hydrogen and fuel cell patents, 36 commercial...

235

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offices, including Fuel Cell Technologies. Funding Opportunities SBIRSTTR Phase I Release 1 Technical Topics Announced for FY14-Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Topics Include...

236

Planar micro-direct methanol fuel cell prototyped by rapid powder blasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a planar micro-direct methanol fuel cell (@m-DMFC) fabricated by rapid prototyping-powder blasting technology. Using an elastomeric mask, we pattern two parallel microfluidic channels in glass. The anode and cathode of the fuel cell are formed ... Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cell, Microchannel, Nafion, Powder blasting

M. Shen; S. Walter; L. Dovat; M. A. M. Gijs

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Batteries and Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collage of electric cars, plug, battery research lab Collage of electric cars, plug, battery research lab Batteries and Fuel Cells EETD researchers study the basic science and development of advanced batteries and fuel cells for transportation, electric grid storage, and other stationary applications. This research is aimed at developing more environmentally friendly technologies for generating and storing energy, including better batteries and fuel cells. Li-Ion and Other Advanced Battery Technologies Research conducted here on battery technology is aimed at developing low-cost rechargeable advanced electrochemical batteries for both automotive and stationary applications. The goal of fuel cell research is to provide the technologies for the successful commercialization of polymer-electrolyte and solid oxide fuel

238

Fuel cell stack arrangements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Arrangements of stacks of fuel cells and ducts, for fuel cells operating with separate fuel, oxidant and coolant streams. An even number of stacks are arranged generally end-to-end in a loop. Ducts located at the juncture of consecutive stacks of the loop feed oxidant or fuel to or from the two consecutive stacks, each individual duct communicating with two stacks. A coolant fluid flows from outside the loop, into and through cooling channels of the stack, and is discharged into an enclosure duct formed within the loop by the stacks and seals at the junctures at the stacks.

Kothmann, Richard E. (Churchill Boro, PA); Somers, Edward V. (Murrysville, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4/3/2012 4/3/2012 eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Overview Flow Cell Workshop Washington, DC Dr. Sunita Satyapal & Dr. Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program 3/7/2011 Flow Cells for Energy Storage Workshop Purpose To understand the applied research and development needs and the grand challenges for the use of flow cells as energy-storage devices. Objectives 1. Understand the needs for applied research from stakeholders. 2. Gather input for future development of roadmaps and technical targets for flow cells for various applications. 3. Identify grand challenges and prioritize R&D needs. Flow cells combine the unique advantages of batteries and fuel cells and can offer benefits for multiple energy storage applications.

240

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Budget  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

242

Fuel Cells | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Fuel Cells Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Fuel Cells Incentives...

243

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Local Governments For Early Adopters For Students & Educators Careers in Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells...

244

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

500 2007 2013 Cumulative Number of Patents Fuel Cells ProductionDelivery Storage * DOE funding has led to 40 commercial hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and 65 emerging...

245

Solid oxide fuel cell process and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Conveying gas containing sulfur through a sulfur tolerant planar solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC) stack for sulfur scrubbing, followed by conveying the gas through a non-sulfur tolerant PSOFC stack. The sulfur tolerant PSOFC stack utilizes anode materials, such as LSV, that selectively convert H.sub.2S present in the fuel stream to other non-poisoning sulfur compounds. The remaining balance of gases remaining in the completely or near H.sub.2S-free exhaust fuel stream is then used as the fuel for the conventional PSOFC stack that is downstream of the sulfur-tolerant PSOFC. A broad range of fuels such as gasified coal, natural gas and reformed hydrocarbons are used to produce electricity.

Cooper, Matthew Ellis (Morgantown, WV); Bayless, David J. (Athens, OH); Trembly, Jason P. (Durham, NC)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Reduced temperature aluminum production in an electrolytic cell having an inert anode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aluminum is produced by electrolytic reduction of alumina in a cell having a cathode, an inert anode and a molten salt bath containing metal fluorides and alumina. The inert anode preferably contains copper, silver and oxides of iron and nickel. Reducing the molten salt bath temperature to about 900-950.degree. C. lowers corrosion on the inert anode constituents.

Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA); Kozarek, Robert L. (Apollo, PA); LaCamera, Alfred F. (Trafford, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Fuel cells: A handbook (Revision 3)  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy of reaction directly into electrical energy. In a typical fuel cell, gaseous fuels are fed continuously to the anode (negative electrode) compartment and an oxidant (i.e., oxygen from air) is fed continuously to the cathode (positive electrode) compartment; the electrochemical reactions take place at the electrodes to produce an electric current. A fuel cell, although having similar components and several characteristics, differs from a typical battery in several respects. The battery is an energy storage device, that is, the maximum energy that is available is determined by the amount of chemical reactant stored within the battery itself. Thus, the battery will cease to produce electrical energy when the chemical reactants are consumed (i.e., discharged). In a secondary battery, the reactants are regenerated by recharging, which involves putting energy into the battery from an external source. The fuel cell, on the other hand, is an energy conversion device which theoretically has the capability of producing electrical energy for as long as the fuel and oxidant are supplied to the electrodes. In reality, degradation or malfunction of components limits the practical operating life of fuel cells.

Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Stauffer, D.B.; Engleman, R.R.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fuel cell generator energy dissipator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a fuel cell generator when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated. During a generator shut down condition, electrically resistive elements are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel

Veyo, Stephen Emery (Murrysville, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey Todd (Valencia, PA); Gordon, John Thomas (Ambridge, PA); Shockling, Larry Anthony (Pittsburgh, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Fuel processing for fuel cell powered vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of auto companies have announced plans to have fuel cell powered vehicles on the road by the year 2004. The low-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells to be used in these vehicles require high quality hydrogen. Without a hydrogen-refueling infrastructure, these vehicles need to convert the available hydrocarbon fuels into a hydrogen-rich gas on-board the vehicle. Earlier analysis has shown that fuel processors based on partial oxidation reforming are well suited to meet the size and weight targets and the other performance-related needs of on-board fuel processors for light-duty fuel cell vehicles (1).

Ahmed, S.; Wilkenhoener, R.; Lee, S. H. D.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

250

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

States Energy Advisory Board (STEAB) States Energy Advisory Board (STEAB) Washington, DC Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager 3/14/2012 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 3/19/2013 eere.energy.gov * Introduction - Technology and Market Overview * DOE Program Overview - Mission & Structure - R&D Progress - Demonstration & Deployments * State Activities - Examples of potential opportunities Outline 3 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 3/19/2013 eere.energy.gov Fuel cells - convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy, bypassing inefficiencies associated with thermal energy conversion. Available energy is equal to the Gibbs free energy. Combustion Engines - convert chemical energy into thermal energy and

251

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency for applied research and development (R&D) of cutting edge hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. DOE supports R&D that makes it...

252

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency for applied research and development (R&D) of cutting edge hydrogen and fuel cell technologies. DOE supports R&D that makes it...

253

What's Up With Fuel Cells? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Up With Fuel Cells? Up With Fuel Cells? What's Up With Fuel Cells? June 8, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Sean Large Intern with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy We hear a lot about renewables like wind and solar these days, but what's the deal with fuel cells and is there a future in them? The truth is, fuel cells have been around for some time now; the idea originated in the 1840's. Though fuel cells come in a variety of forms, they all work in the same general manner: three sandwiched segments - the anode, the electrolyte and the cathode. At each of these segments two different chemical reactions occur. The net result of the two reactions is that fuel is consumed, and an electrical current is created, which can be used to power electrical devices, normally referred to as the load. The only emissions are water or

254

Anode Materials for Reprocessing of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to consume current stockpiles, uranium dioxide spent nuclear fuel will be .... and Synthesis of Intermetallic Clathrates for Energy Storage and Recovery.

255

Composite fuel cell membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bilayer or trilayer composite ion exchange membrane is described suitable for use in a fuel cell. The composite membrane has a high equivalent weight thick layer in order to provide sufficient strength and low equivalent weight surface layers for improved electrical performance in a fuel cell. In use, the composite membrane is provided with electrode surface layers. The composite membrane can be composed of a sulfonic fluoropolymer in both core and surface layers.

Plowman, K.R.; Rehg, T.J.; Davis, L.W.; Carl, W.P.; Cisar, A.J.; Eastland, C.S.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

256

Energy Basics: Fuel Cell Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Fuel Cell Vehicles Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel cell vehicles, powered by...

257

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cell TypesFuel Cell Types Note: ITSOFC is intermediate temperature SOFC and TSOFC is tubular SOFC #12

258

Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Provides an overview of fuel cell technology and research projects. Discusses the basic workings of fuel cells and their system components, main fuel cell types, their characteristics, and their development status, as well as a discussion of potential fuel cell applications.

NETL

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

260

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.eere.energy.gov/informationcenter hydrogen and electricity for fuel cell and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles while using proven stationary vehicles with its own fuel cell technology. Currently, advanced vehicle technologies are being evalu- ated and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Argonne TDC: Fuel Cell Technologies  

Emergency Response. Engineering. Environmental Research. Fuel Cells. Imaging Technology. Material Science. Nanotechnology. Physical Sciences. Sensor ...

262

Method for producing electricity from a fuel cell having solid-oxide ionic electrolyte  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Stabilized quadrivalent cation oxide electrolytes are employed in fuel cells at elevated temperatures with a carbon and/or hydrogen containing fuel anode and an oxygen cathode. The fuel cell is operated at elevated temperatures with conductive metallic coatings as electrodes and desirably having the electrolyte surface blackened. Of particular interest as the quadrivalent oxide is zirconia.

Mason, David M. (Los Altos, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary to someone by Glossary to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Glossary on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Webinars Data Records Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Glossary

264

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations to Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Presentations on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications Newsletter Program Presentations Multimedia Conferences & Meetings Annual Merit Review Proceedings Workshop & Meeting Proceedings Webinars Data Records Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells

265

Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2}) that simulates the composition of the coal syngas. At 800 C, the stack achieved a power density of 1176 W, which represents the largest power level demonstrated for CO in the literature. Although the FB-DCFC performance results obtained in this project were definitely encouraging and promising for practical applications, DCFC approaches pose significant technical challenges that are specific to the particular DCFC scheme employed. Long term impact of coal contaminants, particularly sulfur, on the stability of cell components and cell performance is a critically important issue. Effective current collection in large area cells is another challenge. Lack of kinetic information on the Boudouard reactivity of wide ranging solid fuels, including various coals and biomass, necessitates empirical determination of such reaction parameters that will slow down development efforts. Scale up issues will also pose challenges during development of practical FB-DCFC prototypes for testing and validation. To overcome some of the more fundamental problems, initiation of federal support for DCFC is critically important for advancing and developing this exciting and promising technology for third generation electricity generation from coal, biomass and other solid fuels including waste.

Turgut Gur

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel cell devices to charge electronics such as cell phones and audio players. EERE funding for hydrogen and fuel cells has led to more than 450 patents, 60 commercial...

267

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Durability Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Durability Working Group Durability Working Group The Durability Working Group meets twice per year to exchange information, create synergies, and collaboratively develop both an understanding of and tools for studying degradation mechanisms of polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. Its members include principle investigators and supporting personnel from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded durability projects. More information on DOE durability activities can be found in the Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. Description Technical Targets Meetings Contacts Description DOE durability targets for stationary and transportation fuel cells are 40,000 hours and 5,000 hours, respectively, under realistic operating conditions. In the most demanding applications, realistic operating conditions include impurities in the fuel and air, starting and stopping, freezing and thawing, and humidity and load cycles that result in stresses on the chemical and mechanical stability of the fuel cell materials, components, and interfaces. Degradation-exacerbating conditions resulting from cyclic operation include hydrogen starvation, differential pressure imbalance, oxidation-reduction cycling, and oxygen ingress to the anode, resulting in high cathode potentials. Significant progress has been made in determining the degradation mechanisms of fuel cell components and developing improved materials. However, as stated in the 2008 DOE Fuel Cell Solicitation, there is a need for further research and development in the following areas:

268

Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& & Renewable Energy Stationary Fuel Cells: Overview of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Pete Devlin Fuel Cell Technologies Program United States Department of Energy Federal Utility Partnership Working Group April 14 th , 2010 2 * DOE Fuel Cell Market Transformation Overview * Overview of CHP Concept * Stationary Fuel Cells for CHP Applications * Partnering and Financing (Sam Logan) * Example Project Outline 3 Fuel Cells: Addressing Energy Challenges Energy Efficiency and Resource Diversity  Fuel cells offer a highly efficient way to use diverse fuels and energy sources. Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Air Pollution:  Fuel cells can be powered by emissions-free fuels that are produced from clean, domestic resources. Stationary Power (including CHP & backup power)

269

Biomass Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilize ceramic microchannel reactor technology for * reforming of natural gas and biogas fuels for subsequent electrochemical oxidation within a solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC)....

270

Fuel cell electrode and method of preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell having good resistance to compressive creep includes electrodes having a superstructure of porous electrically conductive foam with surface sections adjacent to opposing surfaces of an electrolyte matrix impregnated with electrode catalyst materials. The catalyst materials are affixed in sections contiguous to an inner major surface by sinter bonding, electrochemical bonding or restrictive interstitial spacing. The outer sections of the porous plaque thickness are reserved for gas distribution to the electrode catalyst. Oxidant and fuel gases can be separately manifolded into alternate sides of a fuel cell stack by sealing opposing edges of the porous plaques containing the anode material in one set of opposing side surfaces and sealing opposing edges of the porous plaque containing cathode material in alternate side surfaces of the stack.

Kaun, T.D

1984-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

271

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Hydrogen Fuel Cell Engines MODULE 11:GLOSSARY AND CONVERSIONS CONTENTS 11.1 GLOSSARY Cell Engines MODULE 11:GLOSSARY AND CONVERSIONS OBJECTIVES This module is for reference only. Hydrogen MODULE 11: GLOSSARY AND CONVERSIONS PAGE 11-1 11.1 Glossary This glossary covers words, phrases

272

Sulfur tolerant anode materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this program is the development of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode which is more tolerant of sulfur contaminants in the fuel than the current state-of-the-art nickel-based anode structures. This program addresses two different but related aspects of the sulfur contamination problem. The primary aspect is concerned with the development of a sulfur tolerant electrocatalyst for the fuel oxidation reaction. A secondary issue is the development of a sulfur tolerant water-gas-shift reaction catalyst and an investigation of potential steam reforming catalysts which also have some sulfur tolerant capabilities. These two aspects are being addressed as two separate tasks.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Nondestructive characterization methods for monolithic solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cells (MSOFCS) represent a potential breakthrough in fuel cell technology, provided that reliable fabrication methods can be developed. Fabrication difficulties arise in several steps of the processing: First is the fabrication of uniform thin (305 {mu}m) single-layer and trilayer green tapes (the trilayer tapes of anode/electrolyte/cathode and anode/interconnect/cathode must have similar coefficients of thermal expansion to sinter uniformly and to have the necessary electrochemical properties); Second is the development of fuel and oxidant channels in which residual stresses are likely to develop in the tapes; Third is the fabrication of a ``complete`` cell for which the bond quality between layers and the quality of the trilayers must be established; and Last, attachment of fuel and oxidant manifolds and verification of seal integrity. Purpose of this report is to assess nondestructive characterization methods that could be developed for application to laboratory, prototype, and full-scale MSOFCs.

Ellingson, W.A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells: Technology Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its most common configuration, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) uses an oxygen ion conducting ceramic electrolyte membrane, perovskite cathode and nickel cermet anode electrode. Cells operate in the 600-1000 C temperature range and utilize metallic or ceramic current collectors for cell-to-cell interconnection. Recent development in engineered electrode architectures, component materials chemistry, cell and stack designs and fabrication processes have led to significant improvement in the electrical performance and performance stability as well as reduction in the operating temperature of such cells. Large kW-size power generation systems have been designed and field demonstrated. This paper reviews the status of SOFC power generation systems with emphasis on cell and stack component materials, electrode reactions, materials reactions and corrosion processes

Singh, Prabhakar; Minh, Nguyen Q.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Fuel Cells & Renewable Portfolio Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.....................................................12 SOFC Battery Range Extender Auxiliary Power Unit (SOFC) as Military APU Replacements" (presentation, DOD-DOE Workshop on Fuel Cells in Aviation cell plasma lighting demonstration, a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) battery range extender APU

276

Hawaii Fuel Cell Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Test Facility presented to DOE Hydrogen Codes and Standards Coordinating Committee Fuel Purity Specifications Workshop Renaissance Hollywood Hotel by Rick Rocheleau...

277

Handbook of fuel cell performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intent of this document is to provide a description of fuel cells, their performances and operating conditions, and the relationship between fuel processors and fuel cells. This information will enable fuel cell engineers to know which fuel processing schemes are most compatible with which fuel cells and to predict the performance of a fuel cell integrated with any fuel processor. The data and estimates presented are for the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells because they are closer to commercialization than other types of fuel cells. Performance of the cells is shown as a function of operating temperature, pressure, fuel conversion (utilization), and oxidant utilization. The effect of oxidant composition (for example, air versus O/sub 2/) as well as fuel composition is examined because fuels provided by some of the more advanced fuel processing schemes such as coal conversion will contain varying amounts of H/sub 2/, CO, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/O, and sulfur and nitrogen compounds. A brief description of fuel cells and their application to industrial, commercial, and residential power generation is given. The electrochemical aspects of fuel cells are reviewed. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is discussed, including how it is affected by operating conditions; and the molten carbonate fuel cell is discussed. The equations developed will help systems engineers to evaluate the application of the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells to commercial, utility, and industrial power generation and waste heat utilization. A detailed discussion of fuel cell efficiency, and examples of fuel cell systems are given.

Benjamin, T.G.; Camara, E.H.; Marianowski, L.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

PEM FUEL CELL TURBOCOMPRESSOR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to assist the Department of Energy in the development of a low cost, reliable and high performance air compressor/expander. Technical Objective 1: Perform a turbocompressor systems PEM fuel cell trade study to determine the enhanced turbocompressor approach. Technical Objective 2: Using the results from technical objective 1, an enhanced turbocompressor will be fabricated. The design may be modified to match the flow requirements of a selected fuel cell system developer. Technical Objective 3: Design a cost and performance enhanced compact motor and motor controller. Technical Objective 4: Turbocompressor/motor controller development.

Mark K. Gee

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fuel processor for fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Springer, Thomas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Huff, James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Fuel Cell Bus Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) held a Fuel Cell Bus Workshop on June 7, 2010 in Washington, D.C. in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Program Annual Merit Review. The workshop plenary and breakout session brought together technical experts from industry, end users, academia, DOE national laboratories, and other government agencies to address the status and technology needs of fuel cell powered buses. Meeting Summary Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Summary Report Presentations Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Overview & Purpose, Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos, DOE Users Perspective on Advanced Fuel Cell Bus Technology, Nico Bouwkamp, CaFCP and Leslie Eudy, NREL Progress and Challenges for PEM Transit Fleet Applications, Tom Madden, UTC Power, LLC

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Presents Annual Merit Review Awards May 21, 2013 The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program presented its annual awards...

282

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) hosted a Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Manufacturing R&D Workshop August 11-12, 2011, in...

283

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) held a Biogas and Fuel Cells Workshop June 11-13, 2012, in...

284

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office FY2014 Budget Request Briefing on April 12 Apr 9, 2013 The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will hold a budget briefing for stakeholders on Friday, April...

285

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: New Fuel Cell Projects Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agenda (PDF 83 KB) New Fuel Cell Projects Overview (PDF 1.2 MB), P. Davis, DOE New Fuel Cell Projects Overview (PDF 609 KB), N. Garland, DOE Membranes Membranes and MEAs for Dry,...

286

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the cost and increasing the performance of fuel cell propulsion systems, and most major vehicle manufacturers are geared to launch fuel cell electric vehicles in the U.S. market...

287

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- tions, distributed power generation, and cogeneration (in which excess heat released during electricity the imported petroleum we currently use in our cars and trucks. Why Fuel Cells? Fuel cells directly convert the chemical energy in hydrogen to electricity, with pure water and potentially useful heat as the only

288

Increasing the CO tolerance of PEM fuel cells via current pulsing and self-oxidation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to determine and compare the effect of cell current pulsing and "self-oxidation" in increasing the CO tolerance of a PEM fuel cell. The most effective pulsing parameter values were also determined. Current pulsing involves periodically demanding positive current pulses from the fuel cell to create an anode over-potential, while "self-oxidation" or sustained potential oscillations is achieved when the anode catalyst becomes so saturated with CO that the anode over-potential increases to a value at which CO is oxidized from the catalyst surface. The CO tolerance of a fuel cell system with a Pt-Ru anode was tested using 50 and 496 ppm CO in the anode fuel. The performance of the system declined with an increase in CO concentration. Current pulses of various amplitude, frequency, and duty cycle were applied to the cell while CO was present in the anode fuel. With 50 ppm CO in the anode fuel, the most effective pulse in increasing CO tolerance while maintaining normal cell operation was 1.0 A/cm2, 0.25 Hz, and a 5% duty cycle. A pulse (120 Hz, 50% duty cycle) similar to the ripple current often generated when converting DC to single-phase 60 Hz AC had a positive effect on the CO tolerance of the system, but at frequencies that high, the pulse duration was not long enough to completely oxidize the CO from the catalyst surface. With 496 ppm CO in the anode fuel, a pulse of 1.0 A/cm2, 0.5 Hz, and a 20% duty cycle proved most effective. When the cell was exposed to 496 ppm CO, without employing pulsing, "self-oxidation" occurred and CO was periodically oxidized from the catalyst surface. However, pulsing allowed the cell to operate at the desired voltage and power a higher percentage of the time than "self-oxidation"; hence, pulsing was more effective.

Thomason, Arthur Hugh

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Each of the blocks includes a square center channel which forms a vertical shaft when the blocks are arranged in a stacked array. Positioned within the channel is a SOFC unit cell such that a plurality of such SOFC units disposed within a vertical shaft form a string of SOFC units coupled in series. A first pair of facing inner walls of each of the blocks each include an interconnecting channel hole cut horizontally and vertically into the block walls to form gas exit channels. A second pair of facing lateral walls of each block further include a pair of inner half circular grooves which form sleeves to accommodate anode fuel and cathode air tubes. The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs.

Riley, Brian (Willimantic, CT)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Internal reforming fuel cell assembly with simplified fuel feed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell assembly in which fuel cells adapted to internally reform fuel and fuel reformers for reforming fuel are arranged in a fuel cell stack. The fuel inlet ports of the fuel cells and the fuel inlet ports and reformed fuel outlet ports of the fuel reformers are arranged on one face of the fuel cell stack. A manifold sealing encloses this face of the stack and a reformer fuel delivery system is arranged entirely within the region between the manifold and the one face of the stack. The fuel reformer has a foil wrapping and a cover member forming with the foil wrapping an enclosed structure.

Farooque, Mohammad (Huntington, CT); Novacco, Lawrence J. (Brookfield, CT); Allen, Jeffrey P. (Naugatuck, CT)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to improve the properties of the current state-of-the-art materials used for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The objectives are to: (1) develop materials based on modifications of the state-of-the-art materials; (2) minimize or eliminate stability problems in the cathode, anode, and interconnect; (3) Electrochemically evaluate (in reproducible and controlled laboratory tests) the current state-of-the-art air electrode materials and cathode/electrolyte interfacial properties; (4) Develop accelerated electrochemical test methods to evaluate the performance of SOFCs under controlled and reproducible conditions; and (5) Develop and test materials for use in low-temperature SOFCs.

Armstrong, T.; Stevenson, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Microbial fuel cell treatment of ethanol fermentation process water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for removing inhibitor compounds from a cellulosic biomass-to-ethanol process which includes a pretreatment step of raw cellulosic biomass material and the production of fermentation process water after production and removal of ethanol from a fermentation step, the method comprising contacting said fermentation process water with an anode of a microbial fuel cell, said anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of said inhibitor compounds while producing electrical energy or hydrogen from said oxidative degradation, and wherein said anode is in electrical communication with a cathode, and a porous material (such as a porous or cation-permeable membrane) separates said anode and cathode.

Borole, Abhijeet P. (Knoxville, TN)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

293

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Delivery and Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling (Text Alternative Version) on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications

294

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Hydrogen International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications

295

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technology Validation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies...

296

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure - Program Areas - Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel cell Welcome> Program Areas> Program Areas Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Production & Delivery | Storage | Fuel Cell R&D | Systems Integration & Analysis | Safety...

297

Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cells for Microstructure Interrogations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment microbial fuel cells demonstrating marine (left)Model of hydrogen fuel cell kinetic losses including5 FutureWork 5.1 Microfluidic Microbial Fuel Cell Continued

Parra, Erika Andrea

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress of Canada's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Industry Jump to: navigation, search Name Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap...

299

Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field there between for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells. 11 figs.

Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

300

Overview of fuel processing options for polymer electrolyte fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) is being developed for use in heavy- and light-duty transportation applications. While this fuel cell has been used successfully in buses and vans with compressed hydrogen as the on-board fuel [1,2], the fuel cell system must incorporate fuel processing (reforming) for any other on-board fuel to produce the hydrogen or hydrogen-rich fuel gas to be fed to the fuel cell stack. This is true even for alternative methods of storing hydrogen, such as use of a metal hydride or liquefied hydrogen. The ``fuel processing`` needed to recover the hydrogen includes providing the heat of dissociation of the hydride and cooling the hydrogen to the temperature of the fuel cell stack. Discussed below are some of the options being considered for processing of on-board fuels (other than compressed hydrogen) to generate the fuel cell anode gas, and the effects of fuel processing on system design, efficiency, steady-state and dynamic performance, and other factors.

Kumar, R.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

uses of fuel cell technologies. MotorWeek H2 on the Horizon Video Learn how car makers, energy suppliers, and the government are bringing fuel cell electric vehicles and hydrogen...

302

Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks James Cross, Nuvera 4:30 Fuel Cell Fundamentals at Low and Subzero Temperatures Adam Weber, LBNL 4:50 Development and Validation of...

303

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Events Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Events to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Events on Facebook Tweet...

304

DOE Fuel Cell Subprogram (Presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* By 2010, develop a fuel cell system for consumer electronics (<50 W) with an energy density of 1,000 WhL. * By 2010, develop a fuel cell system for auxiliary power units (3-30...

305

2009 Fuel Cell Market Report  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of

306

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Databases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Databases The Fuel Cell Technologies Office is developing databases to make it easier for users to find up-to-date...

307

Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

Ren; Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

308

Precious Metal Recovery from Fuel Cell MEA's  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2003, Engelhard Corporation received a DOE award to develop a cost-effective, environmentally friendly approach to recover Pt from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The most important precious metal used in fuel cells is platinum, but ruthenium is also added to the anode electrocatalyst if CO is present in the hydrogen stream. As part of the project, a large number of measurements of Pt and Ru need to be made. A low-cost approach to measuring Pt is using the industry standard spectrophotometric measurement of Pt complexed with stannous chloride. The interference of Ru can be eliminated by reading the Pt absorbance at 450 nm. Spectrophotometric methods for measuring Ru, while reported in the literature, are not as robust. This paper will discuss the options for measuring Pt and Ru using the method of UV-VIS spectrophotometry

Lawrence Shore

2004-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

309

Organic fuel cells and fuel cell conducting sheets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive direct organic fuel cell includes an organic fuel solution and is operative to produce at least 15 mW/cm.sup.2 when operating at room temperature. In additional aspects of the invention, fuel cells can include a gas remover configured to promote circulation of an organic fuel solution when gas passes through the solution, a modified carbon cloth, one or more sealants, and a replaceable fuel cartridge.

Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); Ha, Su (Champaign, IL); Adams, Brian (Savoy, IL)

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Webinars  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Databases Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems...

311

Energy Conversion/Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Energy Conversion/Fuel Cells. Sponsorship, MS&T Organization.

312

Fuel Cell Handbook, Fourth Edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

sections have been updated from the previous edition. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed with proven cell designs, focusing instead on advancing the system surrounding the fuel cell to lower life cycle costs. Section 7, Fuel Cell Systems, has been significantly revised to characterize near-term and next-generation fuel cell power plant systems at a conceptual level of detail. Section 8 provides examples of practical fuel cell system calculations. A list of fuel cell URLs is included in the Appendix. A new index assists the reader in locating specific information quickly.

Stauffer, D.B; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Klett, M.G.; Engleman, R.R.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Fuel Cell Handbook, Fourth Edition  

SciTech Connect

Robust progress has been made in fuel cell technology since the previous edition of the Fuel Cell Handbook was published in January 1994. This Handbook provides a foundation in fuel cells for persons wanting a better understanding of the technology, its benefits, and the systems issues that influence its application. Trends in technology are discussed, including next-generation concepts that promise ultra high efficiency and low cost, while providing exceptionally clean power plant systems. Section 1 summarizes fuel cell progress since the last edition and includes existing power plant nameplate data. Section 2 addresses the thermodynamics of fuel cells to provide an understanding of fuel cell operation at two levels (basic and advanced). Sections 3 through 6 describe the four major fuel cell types and their performance based on cell operating conditions. The section on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells has been added to reflect their emergence as a significant fuel cell technology. Phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, and solid oxide fuel cell technology description sections have been updated from the previous edition. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed with proven cell designs, focusing instead on advancing the system surrounding the fuel cell to lower life cycle costs. Section 7, Fuel Cell Systems, has been significantly revised to characterize near-term and next-generation fuel cell power plant systems at a conceptual level of detail. Section 8 provides examples of practical fuel cell system calculations. A list of fuel cell URLs is included in the Appendix. A new index assists the reader in locating specific information quickly.

Stauffer, D.B; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Klett, M.G.; Engleman, R.R.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycles  

SciTech Connect

Carbonate fuel cells developed in commercial 2.85 MW size, have an efficiency of 57.9%. Studies of higher efficiency hybrid power cycles were conducted to identify an economically competitive system and an efficiency over 65%. A hybrid power cycle was identified that includes a direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle, which generates power at a LHV efficiency over 70%; it is called a Tandem Technology Cycle (TTC). In a TTC operating on natural gas fuel, 95% of the fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming the fuel, and flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell system which generates 72% of the power. The portion of fuel cell anode exhaust not recycled, is burned and heat is transferred to compressed air from a gas turbine, heating it to 1800 F. The stream is then heated to 2000 F in gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 13% of the power. Half the gas turbine exhaust flows to anode exhaust burner and the rest flows to the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Studies of the TTC for 200 and 20 MW size plants quantified performance, emissions and cost-of-electricity, and compared the TTC to gas turbine combined cycles. A 200-MW TTC plant has an efficiency of 72.6%; estimated cost of electricity is 45.8 mills/kWhr. A 20-MW TTC plant has an efficiency of 65.2% and a cost of electricity of 50 mills/kWhr.

Steinfeld, G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fuel cell sub-assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell sub-assembly comprising a plurality of fuel cells, a first section of a cooling means disposed at an end of the assembly and means for connecting the fuel cells and first section together to form a unitary structure.

Chi, Chang V. (Brookfield, CT)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Commercialization of fuel-cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is an abbreviated version of the ''Report of the DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Commercialization Working Group (AFC2WG),'' released January 1995. We describe fuel-cell commercialization for stationary power applications of phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide, and polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

Penner, S.S.; Appleby, A.J.; Baker, B.S.; Bates, J.L.; Buss, L.B.; Dollard, W.J.; Farris, P.J.; Gillis, E.A.; Gunsher, J.A.; Khandkar, A.; Krumpelt, M.; O'Sullivan, J.B.; Runte, G.; Savinell, R.F.; Selman, J.R.; Shores, D.A.; Tarman, P.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The Stirred Tank Reactor Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design and operation of a differential Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is described. The fuel cell design is based on coupled Stirred Tank Reactors (STR); the gas phase in each reactor compartment was well mixed. The characteristic times for reactant flow, gas phase diffusion and reaction were chosen so that the gas compositions at both the anode and cathode are uniform. The STR PEM fuel cell is one-dimensional; the only spatial gradients are transverse to the membrane. The STR PEM fuel cell was employed to examine fuel cell start- up, and its dynamic responses to changes in load, temperature and reactant flow rates. Multiple time scales in systems response are found to correspond to water absorption by the membrane, water transport through the membrane and stress-related mechanical changes of the membrane.

Benziger, J; Karnas, E; Moxley, J; Teuscher, C; Kevrekidis, Yu G; Benziger, Jay

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Precious Metal Recovery from Fuel Cell MEA's  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the next-generation power sources is the proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, which runs on pure hydrogen or hydrogen-rich reformate. At the heart of the PEM fuel cell is a membrane electrode assembly (MEA). The MEA is a laminate composed of electrode layers sandwiched between outer layers, fabricated from either carbon fiber or fabric and which control the diffusion of reactant gases, and the inner polymer mebrane. Hydrogen is oxidized at the anode to form protons, which migrate through the membrane and react with oxygen at the cathode to form water. In this type of fuel cell, platinum catalyzes the reactions at both electrodes. Realization of a future that includes ubiquitous use of hydrogen fuel cell-powered vehicles will be partially contingent on a process for recycling components of the fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies. In aggregate, the platinum used for the fuel cell will represent a large pool of this precious metal, and the efficient recycling of Pt from MEA's will be a cost-enabling factor for success of this technology. Care must be taken in the reclamation process because of the presence of fluoropolymers in the MEA. While Pt is normally recovered with high yield, the combustion process commonly applied to remove an organic matrix will also liberate a large volume of HF, a gas which is both toxic and corrosive. Carbonyl fluoride, which has a recommended exposure limit of 2ppmv, is another undesirable product of fluoroploymer combustion. In 2003, the Department of Energy awarded Engelhard Corporation an 80% cost share grant for a five-year project budgeted at $5.9MM. The principal objective is reclaiming platinum from fuel cell MEA's without producing fluorine-containing emissions. Over the last three years, Engelhard has approached the problem from several directions in balancing the two goals: a commercially-viable recycling process and an environmentally favorable one. Working with both fresh and aged fuel cells, it has been shown that precious metals can be liberated at high yield using microwave assisted acid digestion, but exposure of the gas diffusion electrode surfaces is required. A low-cost solvent-stripping process has been identified for two geometries of fuel cell MEA's: GDL and GDE. This paper will detail progress made in realizing a practical, "green" process for recovery of Pt from PEM fuel cell MEA's

Lawrence Shore

2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

319

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Vehicle Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Cell Vehicle Tax Fuel Cell Vehicle Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Vehicle Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Vehicle Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Vehicle Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Vehicle Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Vehicle Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Vehicle Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel Cell Vehicle Tax Credit South Carolina residents that claim the federal fuel cell vehicle tax credit are eligible for a state income tax credit equal to 20% of the

320

Fuel Cell Handbook, Fifth Edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress continues in fuel cell technology since the previous edition of the Fuel Cell Handbook was published in November 1998. Uppermost, polymer electrolyte fuel cells, molten carbonate fuel cells, and solid oxide fuel cells have been demonstrated at commercial size in power plants. The previously demonstrated phosphoric acid fuel cells have entered the marketplace with more than 220 power plants delivered. Highlighting this commercial entry, the phosphoric acid power plant fleet has demonstrated 95+% availability and several units have passed 40,000 hours of operation. One unit has operated over 49,000 hours. Early expectations of very low emissions and relatively high efficiencies have been met in power plants with each type of fuel cell. Fuel flexibility has been demonstrated using natural gas, propane, landfill gas, anaerobic digester gas, military logistic fuels, and coal gas, greatly expanding market opportunities. Transportation markets worldwide have shown remarkable interest in fuel cells; nearly every major vehicle manufacturer in the U.S., Europe, and the Far East is supporting development. This Handbook provides a foundation in fuel cells for persons wanting a better understanding of the technology, its benefits, and the systems issues that influence its application. Trends in technology are discussed, including next-generation concepts that promise ultrahigh efficiency and low cost, while providing exceptionally clean power plant systems. Section 1 summarizes fuel cell progress since the last edition and includes existing power plant nameplate data. Section 2 addresses the thermodynamics of fuel cells to provide an understanding of fuel cell operation at two levels (basic and advanced). Sections 3 through 8 describe the six major fuel cell types and their performance based on cell operating conditions. Alkaline and intermediate solid state fuel cells were added to this edition of the Handbook. New information indicates that manufacturers have stayed with proven cell designs, focusing instead on advancing the system surrounding the fuel cell to lower life cycle costs. Section 9, Fuel Cell Systems, has been significantly revised to characterize near-term and next-generation fuel cell power plant systems at a conceptual level of detail. Section 10 provides examples of practical fuel cell system calculations. A list of fuel cell URLs is included in the Appendix. A new index assists the reader in locating specific information quickly.

Energy and Environmental Solutions

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS AT REDUCED CATALYST LOADINGS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We focus in this paper on the reduction of catalyst loading in direct methanol fuel cells currently under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Based on single-cell DMFC testing, we discuss performance vs. catalyst loading trade-offs and demonstrate optimization of the anode performance. We also show test data for a short five-cell DMFC stack with the average total platinum loading of 0.53 mg cm{sup {minus}2} and compare performance of this stack with the performance of a single direct methanol fuel cell using similar total amount of precious metal.

P. ZELENAY; F. GUYON; SM. GOTTESFELD

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Direct methanol fuel cells at reduced catalyst loadings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We focus in this paper on the reduction of catalyst loading in direct methanol fuel cells currently under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Based on single-cell DMFC testing, we discuss performance vs. catalyst loading trade-offs and demonstrate optimization of the anode performance. We also show test data for a short five-cell DMFC stack with the average total platinum loading of 0.53 mg cm{sup -2} and compare performance of this stack with the performance of a single direct methanol fuel cell using similar total amount of precious metal.

Zelenay, P. (Piotr); Guyon, F. (Francois); Gottesfeld, Shimshon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Direct Conversion of Carbon Fuels in a Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anodes of elemental carbon may be discharged in a galvanic cell using a molten carbonate electrolyte, a nickel-foam anode-current collector, and a porous nickel air cathode to achieve power densities of 40-100 mW/cm{sup 2}. We report cell and anode polarization, surface area, primary particle size and a crystallization index for nine particulate carbon samples derived from fuel oil, methane, coal, charred biological material and petroleum coke. At 800 C, current densities of 50-125 mA/cm{sup 2} were measured at a representative cell voltage of 0.8 V. Power densities for cells with two carbon-anode materials were found to be nearly the same on scales of 2.8- and 60 cm{sup 2} active area. Constant current operation of a small cell was accompanied by constant voltage during multiple tests of 10-30 hour duration. Cell voltage fell off after the carbon inventory was consumed. Three different cathode structures are compared, indicating that an LLNL fabricated porous nickel electrode with <10 {micro}m pores provides improved rates compared with nickel foam with 100-300 {micro}m pores. Petroleum coke containing substantial sulfur and ash discharges at a slightly lower rate than purified petroleum coke. The sulfur leads to degradation of the anode current collector over time. A conceptual model for electrochemical reactivity of carbon is presented which indicates the importance of (1) bulk lattice disorder, which continually provides surface reactive sites during anodic dissolution and (2) electrical conductivity, which lowers the ohmic component of anode polarization.

Cherepy, N J; Fiet, K J; Krueger, R; Jankowski, A F; Cooper, J F

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

324

Large Gas Bubbles under the Anodes of Aluminum Electrolysis Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Retrofit of a Combined Breaker Feeder with a Chisel Bath Contact Detection System to Reduce Anode Effect Frequency in a Potroom Simulating Traffic in a...

325

Carbonate fuel cell matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbonate fuel cell matrix is described comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles. 8 figs.

Farooque, M.; Yuh, C.Y.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

326

Carbonate fuel cell matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

Farooque, Mohammad (Huntington, CT); Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fuel cell oxygen electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxygen electrode for a fuel cell utilizing an acid electrolyte has a substrate of an alkali metal tungsten bronze of the formula: A.sub.x WO.sub.3 where A is an alkali metal and x is at least 0.2, which is covered with a thin layer of platinum tungsten bronze of the formula: Pt.sub.y WO.sub.3 where y is at least 0.8.

Shanks, Howard R. (Ames, IA); Bevolo, Albert J. (Ames, IA); Danielson, Gordon C. (Ames, IA); Weber, Michael F. (Wichita, KS)

1980-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Market Transformation Market Transformation Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial Incentives for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Projects on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Financial

329

Stationary power applications for polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The benefits provided by Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells (PEFC) for power generation (e.g. low operating temperatures, and non-corrosive and stable electrolyte), as well as advances in recent years in lowering their cost and improving anode poisoning tolerance, are stimulating interest in the system for stationary power applications. A significant market potentially exists for PEFCs in certain stationary applications where PEFC technology is a more attractive alternative to other fuel cell technologies. A difficulty with the PEFC is its operation on reformed fuels containing CO, which poisons the anode catalyst. This difficulty can be alleviated in several ways. One possible approach is described whereby the product reformate is purified using a relatively low cost, high-throughput hydrogen permselective separator. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the utility of the concept.

Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Landgrebe, A.R. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the Fuel Cell Technologies Office About the Fuel Cell Technologies Office The Fuel Cell Technologies Office conducts comprehensive efforts to overcome the technological, economic, and institutional barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cells. The office is aligned with the strategic vision and goals of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The office's efforts will help secure U.S. leadership in clean energy technologies and advance U.S. economic competitiveness and scientific innovation. What We Do DOE is the lead federal agency for directing and integrating activities in hydrogen and fuel cell R&D as authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The Fuel Cell Technologies Office is responsible for coordinating the R&D activities for DOE's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, which includes activities within four DOE offices (Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy [EERE], Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and Office of Science).

331

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder Workshop Bethesda, Maryland Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager 10/2/2012 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Overview Fuel Cells - An Emerging Global Industry Clean Energy Patent Growth Index [1] shows that fuel cell patents lead in the clean energy field with over 950 fuel cell patents issued in 2011. * Nearly double the second place holder, solar, which has ~540 patents. [1] http://cepgi.typepad.com/files/cepgi-4th-quarter-2011-1.pdf United States 46% Germany 7% Korea 7% Canada 3% Taiwan 1% Great Britain 1% France 1% Other 3% Japan 31% Fuel Cell Patents Geographic Distribution 2002-2011 Top 10 companies: GM, Honda, Samsung,

332

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8/5/2011 eere.energy.gov 8/5/2011 eere.energy.gov 5 th International Conference on Polymer Batteries & Fuel Cells Argonne, Illinois Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager August 4, 2011 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 8/5/2011 eere.energy.gov Fuel Cells: Benefits & Market Potential The Role of Fuel Cells Key Benefits Very High Efficiency Reduced CO 2 Emissions * 35-50%+ reductions for CHP systems (>80% with biogas) * 55-90% reductions for light- duty vehicles * up to 60% (electrical) * up to 70% (electrical, hybrid fuel cell / turbine) * up to 85% (with CHP) Reduced Oil Use * >95% reduction for FCEVs (vs. today's gasoline ICEVs)

333

Reformate fuel cell system durability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to identify the factors limiting the durability of fuel cells and fuel processors. This includes identifying PEM fuel cell durability issues for operating on pure hydrogen, and those that arise from the fuel processing of liquid hydrocarbons (e.g., gasoline) as a function of fuel composition and impurity content. Benchmark comparisons with the durability of fuel cells operating on pure hydrogen are used to identify limiting factors unique to fuel processing. We describe the design, operation and operational results of the durability system, including the operating conditions for the system, fuel processor sub-section operation over 1000 hours, post-mortem characterization of the catalysts in the fuel processor, and single cell operation.

Borup, R. L. (Rodney L.); Inbody, M. A. (Michael A.); Uribe, F. A. (Francisco A.); Tafoya, J. (Jose I.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

ELECTROCHEMISTRY AND ON-CELL REFORMATION MODELING FOR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL STACKS  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Providing adequate and efficient cooling schemes for solid-oxide-fuel-cell (SOFC) stacks continues to be a challenge coincident with the development of larger, more powerful stacks. The endothermic steam-methane reformation reaction can provide cooling and improved system efficiency when performed directly on the electrochemically active anode. Rapid kinetics of the endothermic reaction typically causes a localized temperature depression on the anode near the fuel inlet. It is desirable to extend the endothermic effect over more of the cell area and mitigate the associated differences in temperature on the cell to alleviate subsequent thermal stresses. In this study, modeling tools validated for the prediction of fuel use, on-cell methane reforming, and the distribution of temperature within SOFC stacks, are employed to provide direction for modifying the catalytic activity of anode materials to control the methane conversion rate. Improvements in thermal management that can be achieved through on-cell reforming is predicted and discussed. Two operating scenarios are considered: one in which the methane fuel is fully pre-reformed, and another in which a substantial percentage of the methane is reformed on-cell. For the latter, a range of catalytic activity is considered and the predicted thermal effects on the cell are presented. Simulations of the cell electrochemical and thermal performance with and without on-cell reforming, including structural analyses, show a substantial decrease in thermal stresses for an on-cell reforming case with slowed methane conversion.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Jarboe, Daniel T.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Korolev, Alexander; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Singh, Prabhakar

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

Combined coal gasifier and fuel cell system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes a process whereby a molten carbonate fuel cell is combined with a catalytic coal or coal char gasifier for providing the reactant gases comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide used in the operation of the fuel cell. These reactant gases are stripped of sulfur compounds and particulate material and are then separated in discrete gas streams for conveyance to appropriate electrodes in the fuel cell. The gasifier is arranged to receive the reaction products generated at the anode of the fuel cell by the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction therein. These reaction products from the anode are formed primarily of high temperature steam and carbon dioxide to provide the steam, the atmosphere and the heat necessary to endothermically pyrolyze the coal or char in the presence of a catalyst. The reaction products generated at the cathode are substantially formed of carbon dioxide which is used to heat air being admixed with the carbon dioxide stream from the gasifier for providing the oxygen required for the reaction in the fuel cell and for driving an expansion device for energy recovery. A portion of this carbon dioxide from the cathode may be recycled into the fuel cell with the air-carbon dioxide mixture. 1 fig.

Gmeindl, F.D.; Geisbrecht, R.A.

1989-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

336

Combined goal gasifier and fuel cell system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molten carbonate fuel cell is combined with a catalytic coal or coal char gasifier for providing the reactant gases comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide used in the operation of the fuel cell. These reactant gases are stripped of sulfur compounds and particulate material and are then separated in discrete gas streams for conveyance to appropriate electrodes in the fuel cell. The gasifier is arranged to receive the reaction products generated at the anode of the fuel cell by the electricity-producing electrochemical reaction therein. These reaction products from the anode are formed primarily of high temperature steam and carbon dioxide to provide the steam, the atmosphere and the heat necessary to endothermically pyrolyze the coal or char in the presence of a catalyst. The reaction products generated at the cathode are substantially formed of carbon dioxide which is used to heat air being admixed with the carbon dioxide stream from the gasifier for providing the oxygen required for the reaction in the fuel cell and for driving an expansion device for energy recovery. A portion of this carbon dioxide from the cathode may be recycled into the fuel cell with the air-carbon dioxide mixture.

Gmeindl, Frank D. (Morgantown, WV); Geisbrecht, Rodney A. (New Alexandria, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption The following are exempt from state sales tax: 1) any device, equipment, or

338

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Cell Motor Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Credit A tax credit of up to $4,000 is available for the purchase of qualified

339

Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

National Fuel Cell Bus National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type National Fuel Cell Bus Program (NFCBP) The goal of the NFCBP is to facilitate the development of commercially

340

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Cell Motor Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel Cell Motor Vehicle Tax Deduction A taxpayer is eligible for a $2,000 tax deduction for the purchase of a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Journal of Power Sources 140 (2005) 331339 Numerical study of a flat-tube high power density solid oxide fuel cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Research and development in MCFC, SOFC, PEM and Fuels #12;FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct Electrolyte Anode Cathode Electrolyte FCE SOFC Systems Background SOFC MW Module FCE utilizes VPS (Versa Power Systems) fuel cell technology in FCEs SOFC stack modules and systems. FCE/VPS team is engaged

342

Energy Basics: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Hydrogen and Fuel Cell...

343

High efficiency carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hybrid power cycle studies were conducted to identify a high efficiency, economically competitive system. A hybrid power cycle which generates power at an LHV efficiency > 70% was identified that includes an atmospheric pressure direct carbonate fuel cell, a gas turbine, and a steam cycle. In this cycle, natural gas fuel is mixed with recycled fuel cell anode exhaust, providing water for reforming fuel. The mixed gas then flows to a direct carbonate fuel cell which generates about 70% of the power. The portion of the anode exhaust which is not recycled is burned and heat transferred through a heat exchanger (HX) to the compressed air from a gas turbine. The heated compressed air is then heated further in the gas turbine burner and expands through the turbine generating 15% of the power. Half the exhaust from the turbine provides air for the anode exhaust burner. All of the turbine exhaust eventually flows through the fuel cell cathodes providing the O2 and CO2 needed in the electrochemical reaction. Exhaust from the cathodes flows to a steam system (heat recovery steam generator, staged steam turbine generating 15% of the cycle power). Simulation of a 200 MW plant with a hybrid power cycle had an LHV efficiency of 72.6%. Power output and efficiency are insensitive to ambient temperature, compared to a gas turbine combined cycle; NOx emissions are 75% lower. Estimated cost of electricity for 200 MW is 46 mills/kWh, which is competitive with combined cycle where fuel cost is > $5.8/MMBTU. Key requirement is HX; in the 200 MW plant studies, a HX operating at 1094 C using high temperature HX technology currently under development by METC for coal gassifiers was assumed. A study of a near term (20 MW) high efficiency direct carbonate fuel cell/turbine hybrid power cycle has also been completed.

Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Sanderson, R.A. [Sanderson (Robert) and Associates, Wethersfield, CT (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Emissions Laws & Incentives Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles

345

Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

clean clean Fuel Cell Power Plant Experience Naval Applications US Department of Energy/ Office of Naval Research Shipboard Fuel Cell Workshop Washington, DC March 29, 2011 FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. *FuelCell Energy, Inc. *Renewable and Liquid Fuels Experience *HTPEM Fuel Cell Stack for Shipboard APU *Solid Oxide Experience and Applications DOE-ONR Workshop FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and "DFC" are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. FuelCell Energy, Inc. * Premier developer of fuel cell technology - founded in 1969 * Over 50 power installations in North America, Europe, and Asia * Industrial, commercial, utility

346

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - National Fuel Cell Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center The National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC) at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) plays a crucial role in NREL's independent, third-party analysis of hydrogen fuel cell technologies in real-world operation. The NFCTEC is designed for secure management, storage, and processing of proprietary data from industry. Access to the off-network NFCTEC is limited to NREL's Technology Validation Team, which analyzes detailed data and reports on fuel cell technology status, progress, and technical challenges. Graphic representing NREL's Hydrogen Secure Data Center and the variety of applications from which it gathers data, including fuel cell (FC) stacks, FC backup power, FC forklifts, FC cars, FC buses, and FC prime power, and hydrogen infrastructure.

347

EFFECTS OF FUEL IMPURITIES ON PEM FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power generation with polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), particularly those designed for domestic and transportation applications, will likely operate on hydrogen reformed from hydrocarbons. The primary sources of H{sub 2} can be methane (from natural gas), gasoline or diesel fuel. Unfortunately, the reforming process generates impurities that may negatively affect FC performance. The effects of CO impurity have received most of the attention. However, there are other impurities that also may be detrimental to FC: operation. Here we present the effects of ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, methane and ethylene. Two structural domains of the membrane and electrode assembly (MEA) are usually affected by the presence of a harmful impurity. First, the impurity may decrease the ionic conductivity in the catalyst layer or in the bulk membrane. Second, the impurity may chemisorb onto the anode catalyst surface, suppressing the catalyst activity for H{sub 2} oxidation. Catalyst poisoning by CO is the best known example of this kind of effect. Fuel reforming processes [1] generally involve the reaction of a fuel source with air. The simultaneous presence of N{sub 2} and H{sub 2} may generate NH{sub 3} in concentrations of 30 to 90 ppm [1]. The effect of NH{sub 3} on performance depends on the impurity concentration and the time of anode exposure [2]. Higher concentrations result in more rapid performance decreases. If the cell is exposed to ammonia for about 1 hour and then returned to neat H{sub 2}, it will recover its original performance very slowly (about 12 hrs). This behavior is quite different from that of CO, which can be quickly purged from the anode with pure H{sub 2}, resulting in complete performance restoration within a few minutes. Longer exposure times (e.g. >15 hrs) to ammonia result in severe and irreversible losses in performance. It seems that replacement of H{sup +} ions by NH{sub 4}{sup +} ions, first within the anode catalyst layer and then in the membrane, is the primary reason for cell current losses. H{sub 2}S also adversely affects FC performance. Figure 1 depicts the current density changes in a FC exposed to both 1 and 3 ppm H{sub 2}S while operating at a constant voltage of 0.5 V. As expected, the greater the contamination level the faster the current density drops. Eventually in each case the cell becomes totally disabled. The effect H{sub 2}S appears to be cumulative, because even sub-ppm H{sub 2}S levels will decrease the FC performance if the exposure is long enough. We have recorded slow current droppings to about 20% of the initial value after exposure to concentrations of H{sub 2}S of 200 parts per billion (10{sup 9}) for 650 hours. Exposure to higher concentrations of H{sub 2}S may bring catastrophic consequences. We have exposed cell anodes to H{sub 2}S burps of the order of 8 ppm, and observed that the current at 0.5 V dropped from 1.1 to 0.3 A cm{sup -2} in just few minutes. Figure 2 shows the effect of H{sub 2}S on cell polarization. Curves b and c in this figure were recorded after 4 and 21 hours of exposure to 1 ppm H{sub 2}S, respectively, while keeping the cell at a constant voltage of 0.5 V. Regardless impurity concentration and running time, replacing the contaminated fuel stream with pure H{sub 2} does not allow any recovery as observed with CO poisoning. Cyclic voltammmetry (CV) indicates that H{sub 2}S chemisorbs very strongly onto Pt catalyst surface and high voltages are required for full cleansing of the H{sub 2}S-poisoned active sites. After full anode poisoning with H{sub 2}S (curve c), the electrode was subjected to CV (up to 1.4 V) and then the polarization curve d (with neat H{sub 2}) was recorded. The complete cell performance recovery is apparent from this curve. A more extended discussion on H{sub 2}S catalyst poisoning and cleaning will be presented. We also tested methane (0.5 % by vol.) and ethylene (50 ppm) as potential fuel impurities and we found no effects on performance.

Uribe, F. A. (Francisco A.); Zawodzinski, T. A. (Thomas A.), Jr.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems PVL Line  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In July 2010, Stark State College (SSC), received Grant DE-EE0003229 from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Golden Field Office, for the development of the electrical and control systems, and mechanical commissioning of a unique 20kW scale high-pressure, high temperature, natural gas fueled Stack Block Test System (SBTS). SSC worked closely with subcontractor, Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems (US) Inc. (RRFCS) over a 13 month period to successfully complete the project activities. This system will be utilized by RRFCS for pre-commercial technology development and training of SSC student interns. In the longer term, when RRFCS is producing commercial products, SSC will utilize the equipment for workforce training. In addition to DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies program funding, RRFCS internal funds, funds from the state of Ohio, and funding from the DOE Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program have been utilized to design, develop and commission this equipment. Construction of the SBTS (mechanical components) was performed under a Grant from the State of Ohio through Ohio's Third Frontier program (Grant TECH 08-053). This Ohio program supported development of a system that uses natural gas as a fuel. Funding was provided under the Department of Energy (DOE) Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program for modifications required to test on coal synthesis gas. The subject DOE program provided funding for the electrical build, control system development and mechanical commissioning. Performance testing, which includes electrical commissioning, was subsequently performed under the DOE SECA program. Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems is developing a megawatt-scale solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stationary power generation system. This system, based on RRFCS proprietary technology, is fueled with natural gas, and operates at elevated pressure. A critical success factor for development of the full scale system is the capability to test fuel cell components at a scale and under conditions that can be accurately extrapolated to full system performance. This requires specially designed equipment that replicates the pressure (up to 6.5 bara), temperature (about 910 C), anode and cathode gas compositions, flows and power generation density of the full scale design. The SBTS fuel cell anode gas is produced through the reaction of pipeline natural gas with a mixture of steam, CO2, and O2 in a catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) reactor. Production of the fuel cell anode gas in this manner provides the capability to test a fuel cell with varying anode gas compositions ranging from traditional reformed natural gas to a coal-syngas surrogate fuel. Stark State College and RRFCS have a history of collaboration. This is based upon SSCAs commitment to provide students with skills for advanced energy industries, and RRFCS need for a workforce that is skilled in high temperature fuel cell development and testing. A key to this approach is the access of students to unique SOFC test and evaluation equipment. This equipment is designed and developed by RRFCS, with the participation of SSC interns. In the near-term, the equipment will be used by RRFCS for technology development. When this stage is completed, and RRFCS has moved to commercial products, SSC will utilize this equipment for workforce training. The RRFCS fuel cell design is based upon a unique ceramic substrate architecture in which a porous, flat substrate (tube) provides the support structure for a network of solid oxide fuel cells that are electrically connected in series. These tubes are grouped into a {approx}350-tube repeat configuration, called a stack/block. Stack/block testing, performed at system conditions, provides data that can be confidently scaled to full scale performance. This is the basis for the specially designed and developed test equipment that is required for advancing and accelerating the RRFCS SOFC power system development program. All contract DE-EE0003229 objectives were achieved and deliverables completed during the peri

Susan Shearer - Stark State College; Gregory Rush - Rolls-Royce Fuel Cell Systems

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells for Portable Power...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Session - Fuel Cell Portable Power Perspectives End User Perspective - Industry Consumer Electronics Power (PDF 1.51 MB) Jerry Hallmark, Motorola Portable Power Sources (above...

350

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells, Prof. Andrew Herring, Colorado School of Mines Electrocatalysis in Alkaline Electrolytes, Prof. Sanjeev...

351

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

high conductivity) for this application include tin oxide, indium tin oxide, and zinc oxide. Contact: Bryan Pivovar 303-275-3809 Printable Version Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Research...

352

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

portable power and auxiliary power applications in a limited fashion where earlier market entry would assist in the development of a fuel cell manufacturing base. This DOE...

353

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan* The Fuel Cell Technologies Office Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration (MYRD&D) Plan* describes the goals,...

354

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with a focus on improving the performance and durability and reducing the cost of fuel cell components and systems. Research efforts involve: Developing advanced catalysts,...

355

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Newsletter: August 2013 The August 2013 issue of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office newsletter includes stories in these categories: In the News Funding Opportunities Webinars and...

356

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Technologies Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogen and fuel cells. This information is provided in documents such as technical and project reports, conference proceedings and journal articles, technical presentations, and...

357

An advanced fuel cell simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cell power generation systems provide a clean alternative to the conventional fossil fuel based systems. Fuel cell systems have a high e?ciency and use easily available hydrocarbons like methane. Moreover, since the by-product is water, they have a very low environmental impact. The fuel cell system consists of several subsystems requiring a lot of e?ort from engineers in diverse areas. Fuel cell simulators can provide a convenient and economic alternative for testing the electrical subsystems such as converters and inverters. This thesis proposes a low-cost and an easy-to-use fuel cell simulator using a programmable DC supply along with a control module written in LabVIEW. This simulator reproduces the electrical characteristics of a 5kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack under various operating conditions. The experimental results indicate that the proposed simulator closely matches the voltage-current characteristic of the SOFC system under varying load conditions. E?ects of non-electrical parameters like hydrogen ?ow rate are also modeled and these parameters are taken as dynamic inputs from the user. The simulator is customizable through a graphical user interface and allows the user to model other types of fuel cells with the respective voltage-current data. The simulator provides an inexpensive and accurate representation of a solid oxide fuel cell under steady state and transient conditions and can replace an actual fuel cell during testing of power conditioning equipment.

Acharya, Prabha Ramchandra

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hybrid Fuel Cell Technology Overview  

SciTech Connect

For the purpose of this STI product and unless otherwise stated, hybrid fuel cell systems are power generation systems in which a high temperature fuel cell is combined with another power generating technology. The resulting system exhibits a synergism in which the combination performs with an efficiency far greater than can be provided by either system alone. Hybrid fuel cell designs under development include fuel cell with gas turbine, fuel cell with reciprocating (piston) engine, and designs that combine different fuel cell technologies. Hybrid systems have been extensively analyzed and studied over the past five years by the Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and others. These efforts have revealed that this combination is capable of providing remarkably high efficiencies. This attribute, combined with an inherent low level of pollutant emission, suggests that hybrid systems are likely to serve as the next generation of advanced power generation systems.

None available

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financial Opportunities Financial Opportunities Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation on Digg

360

Optimization of Fuel Cell System Operating Conditions for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Indirect Methanol Pem Fuel Cell System, SAE 2001, (paperof automotive PEM fuel cell stacks, SAE 2000 (paper numberParasitic Loads in Fuel Cell Vehicles, International Journal

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Improved electrolytes for fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present day fuel cells based upon hydrogen and oxygen have limited performance due to the use of phosphoric acid as an electrolyte. Improved performance is desirable in electrolyte conductivity, electrolyte management, oxygen solubility, and the kinetics of the reduction of oxygen. Attention has turned to fluorosulfonic acids as additives or substitute electrolytes to improve fuel cell performance. The purpose of this project is to synthesize and electrochemically evaluate new fluorosulfonic acids as superior alternatives to phosphoric acid in fuel cells. (VC)

Gard, G.L.; Roe, D.K.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Electrolyte paste for molten carbonate fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The electrolyte matrix and electrolyte reservoir plates in a molten carbonate fuel cell power plant stack are filled with electrolyte by applying a paste of dry electrolyte powder entrained in a dissipatable carrier to the reactant flow channels in the current collector plate. The stack plates are preformed and solidified to final operating condition so that they are self sustaining and can be disposed one atop the other to form the power plant stack. Packing the reactant flow channels with the electrolyte paste allows the use of thinner electrode plates, particularly on the anode side of the cells. The use of the packed electrolyte paste provides sufficient electrolyte to fill the matrix and to entrain excess electrolyte in the electrode plates, which also serve as excess electrolyte reservoirs. When the stack is heated up to operating temperatures, the electrolyte in the paste melts, the carrier vaporizes, or chemically decomposes, and the melted electrolyte is absorbed into the matrix and electrode plates.

Bregoli, Lawrance J. (Southwick, MA); Pearson, Mark L. (New London, CT)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Staged venting of fuel cell system during rapid shutdown  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A venting methodology and system for rapid shutdown of a fuel cell apparatus of the type used in a vehicle propulsion system. H.sub.2 and air flows to the fuel cell stack are slowly bypassed to the combustor upon receipt of a rapid shutdown command. The bypass occurs over a period of time (for example one to five seconds) using conveniently-sized bypass valves. Upon receipt of the rapid shutdown command, the anode inlet of the fuel cell stack is instantaneously vented to a remote vent to remove all H.sub.2 from the stack. Airflow to the cathode inlet of the fuel cell stack gradually diminishes over the bypass period, and when the airflow bypass is complete the cathode inlet is also instantaneously vented to a remote vent to eliminate pressure differentials across the stack.

Clingerman, Bruce J. (Palmyra, NY); Doan, Tien M. (Columbia, MD); Keskula, Donald H. (Webster, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Molten carbonate fuel cell separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a stacked array of molten carbonate fuel cells, a fuel cell separator is positioned between adjacent fuel cells to provide isolation as well as a conductive path therebetween. The center portion of the fuel cell separator includes a generally rectangular, flat, electrical conductor. Around the periphery of the flat portion of the separator are positioned a plurality of elongated resilient flanges which form a gas-tight seal around the edges of the fuel cell. With one elongated flange resiliently engaging a respective edge of the center portion of the separator, the sealing flanges, which are preferably comprised of a noncorrosive material such as an alloy of yttrium, iron, aluminum or chromium, form a tight-fitting wet seal for confining the corrosive elements of the fuel cell therein. This arrangement permits a good conductive material which may be highly subject to corrosion and dissolution to be used in combination with a corrosion-resistant material in the fuel cell separator of a molten carbonate fuel cell for improved fuel cell conductivity and a gas-tight wet seal.

Nickols, Richard C. (East Hartford, CT)

1986-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

365

Molten carbonate fuel cell separator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a stacked array of molten carbonate fuel cells, a fuel cell separator is positioned between adjacent fuel cells to provide isolation as well as a conductive path therebetween. The center portion of the fuel cell separator includes a generally rectangular, flat, electrical conductor. Around the periphery of the flat portion of the separator are positioned a plurality of elongated resilient flanges which form a gas-tight seal around the edges of the fuel cell. With one elongated flange resiliently engaging a respective edge of the center portion of the separator, the sealing flanges, which are preferably comprised of a noncorrosive material such as an alloy of yttrium, iron, aluminum or chromium, form a tight-fitting wet seal for confining the corrosive elements of the fuel cell therein. This arrangement permits a good conductive material which may be highly subject to corrosion and dissolution to be used in combination with a corrosion-resistant material in the fuel cell separator of a molten carbonate fuel cell for improved fuel cell conductivity and a gas-tight wet seal.

Nickols, R.C.

1984-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

366

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Office - Education Students learn about solar energy. DOE supports demonstrations and commercialization by providing technically accurate and objective...

367

CLIMATE CHANGE FUEL CELL PROGRAM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the first year of operation of a fuel cell power plant located at the Sheraton Edison Hotel, Edison, New Jersey. PPL EnergyPlus, LLC installed the plant under a contract with the Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. A DFC{reg_sign}300 fuel cell, manufactured by FuelCell Energy, Inc. of Danbury, CT was selected for the project. The fuel cell successfully operated from June 2003 to May 2004. This report discusses the performance of the plant during this period.

Steven A. Gabrielle

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

368

LADWP FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) is currently one of the most active power utility companies in researching fuel cell technology. Fuel cells offer many benefits and are now used as an alternative to traditional internal combustion engines in power generation. In continuing it's role as the leader in fuel cell research, LADWP has installed a pre-commercial molten carbonate fuel cell on August 2001 at its headquarter, the John Ferraro Building (JFB). The goal of this project is to learn more about the actual behavior of the fuel cell running under real world conditions. The fuel cell ran smoothly through the first year of operation with very high efficiency, but with some minor setbacks. The JFB fuel cell project is funded by the City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power with partial grant funding from the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buydown Program. The technical evaluation and the benefit-cost evaluation of the JFB fuel cell are both examined in this report.

Thai Ta

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

369

Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

as high as 90% is achievable. This high efficiency operation saves money, saves energy, and reduces greenhouse gas emissions. Regenerative or Reversible Fuel Cells This...

370

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Education  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Offices | Consumer Information Education Search Search Help Education EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Education Printable Version Share this resource Send a link...

371

LADWP FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) is currently one of the most active power utility companies in researching fuel cell technology. Fuel cells offer many benefits and are now used as an alternative to traditional internal combustion engines in power generation. In continuing it's role as the leader in fuel cell research, LADWP has installed a pre-commercial molten carbonate fuel cell on August 2001 at its headquarter, the John Ferraro Building (JFB). The goal of this project is to learn more about the actual behavior of the fuel cell running under real world conditions. The fuel cell ran smoothly through the first year of operation with very high efficiency, but with some minor setbacks. The JFB fuel cell project is funded by the City of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power with partial grant funding from the Department of Defense's Climate Change Fuel Cell Buydown Program. The technical evaluation and the benefit-cost evaluation of the JFB fuel cell are both examined in this report.

Thai Ta

2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results will be documented in a report by Pacific Northwest National Lab: "Pathways to Commercial Success: Technologies and Products Supported by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and...

373

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Availability on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations

374

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations

375

Nano-structured solid oxide fuel cell design with superior power output at high and intermediate operation temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a thin-film yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte was developed and tested. This novel SOFC shows a similar multilayer set-up as other current anode-supported SOFCs and is composed of a Ni/8YSZ anode, a gas-tight ...

Tim Van Gestel; Feng Han; Doris Sebold; Hans Peter Buchkremer; Detlev Stver

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News News Recent news stories and press releases related to the Fuel Cell Technologies Office are presented below. To see past news items, refer to the news archives for 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, and 2003. Subscribe to Fuel Cell Technologies Office updates. January 10, 2014 Upcoming Live Discussion on Energy 101: Fuel Cells Join the Energy Department at 2:00 p.m. ET on Thursday, January 16 for the first Energy 101 Google+ Hangout, which will focus on fuel cells. More January 10, 2014 Help Design the Hydrogen Fueling Station of Tomorrow The Energy Department posted a blog yesterday about the Hydrogen Education Foundation's Hydrogen Student Design Contest. More December 20, 2013 Your Holidays...Brought to You by Fuel Cells

377

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for stand-alone utility and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) Catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. However, carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electro catalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decreases cell performance. The irreversible poisoning of the anode can occur even in CO concentrations as low as few parts per million (ppm). In this work, we have synthesized several novel elctrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C, Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell, using CO concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel that varies from 10 to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effects of catalyst composition and electrode film preparation method on the performance of PEM fuel cell were also studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalyst (10 wt% Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt% Pt/Mo/C) were more CO tolerant than the 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method was better than the brushing technique for the preparation of electrode film.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2002-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

378

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record 12012: Fuel Cell Bus Targets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record Record #: 12012 Date: March 2, 2012 Title: Fuel Cell Bus Targets Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Approved by: Sunita Satyapal * Date: September 12, 2012 Item: Performance, cost, and durability targets for fuel cell transit buses are presented in Table 1. These market-driven targets represent technical requirements needed to compete with alternative technologies. They do not represent expectations for the status of the technology in future years. Table 1. Performance, cost, and durability targets for fuel cell transit buses. Units 2012 Status 2016 Target Ultimate Target Bus Lifetime years/miles 5/100,000 1 12/500,000 12/500,000 Power Plant Lifetime 2,3 hours 12,000 18,000 25,000

379

List of Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Incentives | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Incentives Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 192 Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 192) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional Residential Utility Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes AlabamaSAVES Revolving Loan Program (Alabama) State Loan Program Alabama Commercial Industrial Institutional Building Insulation Doors Energy Mgmt. Systems/Building Controls

380

Fuel Cell Power PlantsFuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Safety and Grid Interface Direct Fuel Cell Module: FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct Fuel generation of combined heat andcombined heat and power ­Clean Power with natural gas f lfuel ­Renewable Power with biofuels ·Grid connected power generationgeneration ­High Efficiency Grid support

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles August 20, 2013 - 9:11am Addthis Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel...

382

Manufacturing Fuel Cell Manhattan Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to to DOE Fuel Cell Manufacturing Workshop 2011 John Christensen, PE NREL Consultant DOE Fuel Cell Market Transformation Support August 11, 2011 Manufacturing Fuel Cell Manhattan Project √ Identify manufacturing cost drivers to achieve affordability √ Identify best practices in fuel cell manufacturing technology √ Identify manufacturing technology gaps √ Identify FC projects to address these gaps MFCMP Objectives Completed Final Report due out Nov 2010 B2PCOE Montana Tech SME's Industry Academia Government FC Consortiums Power ranges * <0.5 kW (man portable / man wearable) * 0.5 kW< Power range < 10 kW (mobile power) Fuels: Hydrogen and reformed hydrocarbons *Packaged Fuels < 0.5 kW * Near term solution * Move through the supply chain like batteries

383

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Shockling, Larry A. (Plum Borough, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell...

385

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Webinar to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Waste-to-Energy using Fuel Cells Webinar on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell...

386

Fuel Cells for Robots  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Robots For Robots Fuel Cells For Robots Pavlo Rudakevych iRobot Pavlo Rudakevych iRobot Product Needs Product Needs * Military/Police/Search and Rescue - PackBot - Gladiator - ThrowBot/UGCV * Industrial and Oil - CoWorker - MicroRig * Military/Police/Search and Rescue - PackBot - Gladiator - ThrowBot/UGCV * Industrial and Oil - CoWorker - MicroRig PackBot PackBot * Mission capable robots * Rugged, portable tools for minimal casualty engagements * Assisting behaviors * Small size and weight * Mission capable robots * Rugged, portable tools for minimal casualty engagements * Assisting behaviors * Small size and weight System Concept System Concept System Concept System Concept System Concept Continued System Concept Continued * Modular payload bays - 3 primary - 1 head - 4 side pods * Each payload socket supports - Ethernet

387

Non-consumable anode and lining for aluminum electrolytic reduction cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxidation resistant, non-consumable anode, for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum, has a composition comprising copper, nickel and iron. The anode is part of an electrolytic reduction cell comprising a vessel having an interior lined with metal which has the same composition as the anode. The electrolyte is preferably composed of a eutectic of AlF.sub.3 and either (a) NaF or (b) primarily NaF with some of the NaF replaced by an equivalent molar amount of KF or KF and LiF.

Beck, Theodore R. (Seattle, WA); Brooks, Richard J. (Seattle, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Heated transportable fuel cell cartridges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell stack protective system is made where a plurality of fuel cells, each containing liquid electrolyte subject to crystallization, is enclosed by a containing vessel, and where at least one electric heater is placed in the containing vessel and is capable of preventing electrolyte crystallization.

Lance, Joseph R. (N. Huntingdon, PA); Spurrier, Francis R. (Whitehall, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Bronx Zoo Fuel Cell Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 200 kW Fuel Cell has been installed in the Lion House, Bronx Zoo, NY. The Fuel Cell is a 200 kW phosphoric acid type manufactured by United Technologies Corporation (UTC) and will provide thermal energy at 725,000 Btu/hr.

Hoang Pham

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Hydrogen and Fuel Cells R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids --Hydrogen Storage Materials --Hydrogen Storage Systems Modeling and Analysis --Thermochemical Hydrogen * Fuel Cells --Polymer Electrolyte --Modeling & Analysis --Fuel...

391

Pt/Pd electrocatalyst electrons for fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to improved electrochemical cells and to novel electrodes for use therein. In particular, the present invention comprises a fuel cell used primarily for the consumption of impure hydrogen fuels containing carbon monoxide or carbonaceous fuels where the electrode in contact with the fuel is not substantially poisoned by carbon monoxide. The anode of the fuel cell comprises a Pd/Pt alloy supported on a graphitized or partially graphitized carbon material. Fuel cells which comprise as essential elements a fuel electrode, an oxidizing electrode, and an electrolyte between said electrodes are devices for the direct production of electricity through the electrochemical combustion of a fuel and oxidant. These devices are recognized for their high efficiency as energy conversion units, since unlike conventional combustion engines, they are not subject to the limitations of the Carnot heat cycle. It is the primary object of the present invention to provide an electrode having high electrochemical activity for an electrochemical cell. It is another object of the present invention to provide an electrode having an electro-catalyst which is highly resistant to the corrosive environment of an electrochemical cell.

Stonehart, P.

1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

392

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells - Fuel Cell - Polymer Electrolyte  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Research Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Research Xiaoping Wang measures the stability of a platinum cathode electrocatalyst. Xiaoping Wang measures the stability of a platinum cathode electrocatalyst. One of the main barriers to the commercialization of polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems, especially for automotive use, is the high cost of the platinum electrocatalysts. Aside from the cost of the precious metal, concern has also been raised over the adequacy of the world supply of platinum, if fuel cell vehicles were to make a significant penetration into the global automotive fleet. At Argonne, chemists are working toward the development of low-cost nonplatinum electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction--durable materials that would be stable in the fuel

393

1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Office eere.energy.gov DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to demonstrate: World's first tri-generation station World's first fuel cell forklifts World's first fuel cell

394

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compressed Natural Gas Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Compressed Natural Gas and Hydrogen Fuels Workshop on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Educational Publications

395

Climate Change Fuel Cell Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 200 kW, natural gas fired fuel cell was installed at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the financial and operational suitability of retrofit fuel cell technology at a medium sized college. Target audience was design professionals and the wider community, with emphasis on use in higher education. ''Waste'' heat from the fuel cell was utilized to supplement boiler operations and provide domestic hot water. Instrumentation was installed in order to measure the effectiveness of heat utilization. It was determined that 26% of the available heat was captured during the first year of operation. The economics of the fuel cell is highly dependent on the prices of electricity and natural gas. Considering only fuel consumed and energy produced (adjusted for boiler efficiency), the fuel cell saved $54,000 in its first year of operation. However, taking into account the price of maintenance and the cost of financing over the short five-year life span, the fuel cell operated at a loss, despite generous subsidies. As an educational tool and market stimulus, the fuel cell attracted considerable attention, both from design professionals and the general public.

Alice M. Gitchell

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Effects of coal-derived trace species on the performance of molten carbonate fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the present study was to determine in detail the interaction effects of 10 simultaneously present, coal-gas contaminants, both on each other and on components of the Carbonate Fuel Cell. The primary goal was to assess underlying chemistries and reaction mechanisms which may cause decay in fuel cell performance or endurance as a result of both physics-chemical and/or mechanical interactions with the cell components and internal fuel cell parts. It was found, both from theory and cell test evidence, that trace contaminant interactions may occur with: Fuel-cell Electrodes (e.g., in this study with the Ni-anode), Lithium/Potassium Carbonate Electrolyte, Nickel and SS-Hardware, and by Mechanical Obstruction of Gas Flow in the Anode Plenum.

Pigeaud, A.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600 C than conventional manganite or cobaltite cathodes.

S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

NETL: Fuel Cells/SECA News - Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells/Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Fuel Cells/Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) News Archive SECA Workshop Proceedings, Peer Reviews, and Annual Reports 2013 Archive 2012 Archive 2011 Archive Previous Highlights FuelCell Energy's Stack Boosts Power and Minimizes Degradation FuelCell Energy has developed a new solid oxide fuel cell stack design that boosts the overall power output of the fuel cell stack by nearly 50%. FuelCell Energy also achieved a voltage degradation rate of 1.3% per 1000 hours after testing the fuel cells for 26,000 hours of operation. This breakthrough by FuelCell Energy of greater power from the fuel cell stack while minimizing fuel cell degradation pushes it further towards meeting SECA's goal of a market ready, affordable solid oxide fuel cell ready by the year 2010. (5/05)

399

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Partnership for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells in the Economy to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: International Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells in the...

400

Fuel Cell Today | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Today Jump to: navigation, search Name Fuel Cell Today Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC1N 8EE Product Fuel Cell Today is a online information service for the global fuel cell...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: NewsDetail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office: NewsDetail on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: NewsDetail on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: NewsDetail on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell...

402

Nanostructured Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Electrodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

post-Doping of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes,? P.h.D.and Technology of Ceramic Fuel Cells, p. 209, Elsevier, NewI. Birss, in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC IX), S. C. Singhal

Sholklapper, Tal Zvi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Solar-Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LemonsR. A. ( 1990) Fuel Cells for Transportation. Jour- DC,M. A. (1992). Hydrogen Fuel-Cell Vehicles. Re- koebensteinsolid tember. oxide fuel cell development. Journal of

DeLuchi, Mark A.; Ogden, Joan M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Characterization of Fuel-Cell Diffusion Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrolyte membrane fuel cells, 2009. C. Lim and C. Y.directly into full fuel-cell simulations to predictFCgen1020ACS, www.ballard.com/fuel-cell-products, Accessed

Gunterman, Haluna Penelope Frances

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Fuel Cell Markets Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cell Markets Ltd Place Buckinghamshire, United Kingdom Zip SL0 9AQ Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Fuel Cell Markets was set up to assist companies in the fuel cell and...

406

Novel carbonaceous materials used as anodes in lithium ion cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to synthesize disordered carbons used as anodes in lithium ion batteries, where the porosity and surface area are controlled. Both parameters are critical since the irreversible capacity obtained in the first cycle seems to be associated with the surface area (an exfoliation mechanism occurs in which the exposed surface area continues to increase).

Sandi, G.; Winans, R.E.; Carrado, K.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the available chemical free energy directly into electrical energy, without going through heat exchange process. Of all different types of fuel cells, the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for stand-alone utility and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) Catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. However, carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electro catalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decreases cell performance. The irreversible poisoning of the anode can occur even in CO concentrations as low as few parts per million (ppm). In this work, we have synthesized several novel elctrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C, Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell, using CO concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel that varies from 10 to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effects of catalyst composition and electrode film preparation method on the performance of PEM fuel cell were also studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalyst (10 wt% Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt% Pt/Mo/C) were more CO tolerant than the 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method was better than the brushing technique for the preparation of electrode film.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

408

INTEGRATED GASIFICATION COMBINED CYCLE PROJECT 2 MW FUEL CELL DEMONSTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With about 50% of power generation in the United States derived from coal and projections indicating that coal will continue to be the primary fuel for power generation in the next two decades, the Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) has been conducted since 1985 to develop innovative, environmentally friendly processes for the world energy market place. The 2 MW Fuel Cell Demonstration was part of the Kentucky Pioneer Energy (KPE) Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) project selected by DOE under Round Five of the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The participant in the CCTDP V Project was Kentucky Pioneer Energy for the IGCC plant. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE), under subcontract to KPE, was responsible for the design, construction and operation of the 2 MW fuel cell power plant. Duke Fluor Daniel provided engineering design and procurement support for the balance-of-plant skids. Colt Engineering Corporation provided engineering design, fabrication and procurement of the syngas processing skids. Jacobs Applied Technology provided the fabrication of the fuel cell module vessels. Wabash River Energy Ltd (WREL) provided the test site. The 2 MW fuel cell power plant utilizes FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell (DFC) technology, which is based on the internally reforming carbonate fuel cell. This plant is capable of operating on coal-derived syngas as well as natural gas. Prior testing (1992) of a subscale 20 kW carbonate fuel cell stack at the Louisiana Gasification Technology Inc. (LGTI) site using the Dow/Destec gasification plant indicated that operation on coal derived gas provided normal performance and stable operation. Duke Fluor Daniel and FuelCell Energy developed a commercial plant design for the 2 MW fuel cell. The plant was designed to be modular, factory assembled and truck shippable to the site. Five balance-of-plant skids incorporating fuel processing, anode gas oxidation, heat recovery, water treatment/instrument air, and power conditioning/controls were built and shipped to the site. The two fuel cell modules, each rated at 1 MW on natural gas, were fabricated by FuelCell Energy in its Torrington, CT manufacturing facility. The fuel cell modules were conditioned and tested at FuelCell Energy in Danbury and shipped to the site. Installation of the power plant and connection to all required utilities and syngas was completed. Pre-operation checkout of the entire power plant was conducted and the plant was ready to operate in July 2004. However, fuel gas (natural gas or syngas) was not available at the WREL site due to technical difficulties with the gasifier and other issues. The fuel cell power plant was therefore not operated, and subsequently removed by October of 2005. The WREL fuel cell site was restored to the satisfaction of WREL. FuelCell Energy continues to market carbonate fuel cells for natural gas and digester gas applications. A fuel cell/turbine hybrid is being developed and tested that provides higher efficiency with potential to reach the DOE goal of 60% HHV on coal gas. A system study was conducted for a 40 MW direct fuel cell/turbine hybrid (DFC/T) with potential for future coal gas applications. In addition, FCE is developing Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power plants with Versa Power Systems (VPS) as part of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program and has an on-going program for co-production of hydrogen. Future development in these technologies can lead to future coal gas fuel cell applications.

FuelCell Energy

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

fuel cells | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cells cells Dataset Summary Description Developed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fuel Cell Technologies by Argonne National Laboratory and RCF Economic and Financial Consulting, Inc., JOBS and economic impacts of Fuel Cells (JOBS FC) is a spreadsheet model that estimates economic impacts from the manufacture and use of select types of fuel cells. Source Argonne Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords fuel cells Job Creation Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon File without Macros. Full version at official link. (xlsx, 2.8 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License Comment From Argonne National Lab

410

Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

Grot, Stephen [President, Ion Power Inc.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

A feasibility study of internal evaporative cooling for proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of using the technique of ultrasonic nebulization of water into the anode gas stream for evaporative cooling of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The basic concept of this form of internal evaporative cooling of the PEM fuel cell is to introduce finely atomized liquid water into the anode gas stream, so that the finely atomized liquid water adsorbs onto the anode and then moves to the cathode via electro-osmotic drag, where this water then evaporates into the relatively dry cathode gas stream, carrying with it the waste thermal energy generated within the fuel cell. The thermal and electrical performance of a 50 cm2 PEM fuel cell utilizing this technique was compared to the performance obtained with conventional water management. Both techniques were compared over a range of humidification chamber temperatures for both the anode and cathode gas streams so as to determine the robustness of the proposed method. The proposed method produced only meager levels of evaporative cooling (at best 2 watts, for which a minimum of 30 watts was required for adequate cooling), but the average cell voltage increased considerably (as much as a 10% gain), and the technique increased the fault tolerance of the fuel cell (the Nafion? membrane did not dry out even if cell temperature went well in excess of 70° C despite both anode and cathode humidification temperatures of 55° C). An interesting phenomena was also observed wherein the fuel cell voltage oscillated regularly with a period of tens of seconds, and that the amplitude of this oscillation corresponded inversely with the level of humidification received by the fuel cell.

Snyder, Loren E

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Technologies Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Program Overview Richard Farmer Richard Farmer Acting Acting Program Program Manager Manager Acting Acting Program Program Manager Manager 2010 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting 2010 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting (7 June 2010) (7 June 2010) The Administration's Clean Energy Goals 9 9 Double Renewable Double Renewable Energy Capacity by 2012 9 Invest $150 billion over ten years i in energy R&D to transition to a clean energy economy clean energy economy 9 Reduce GHG emissions 83% by 2050 2 t t Æ Æ F l ll ff hi hl ffi i di f l d Fuel Cells Address Our Key Energy Challenges Increasing Energy Increasing Energy Ef ficiency and Resource Diversity Efficiency and Resource Diversity Æ Æ Fuel cells offer a highly efficient way to use diverse fuels and energy sources.

413

Navy fuel cell demonstration project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report on a field evaluation by the Department of the Navy of twenty 5-kW PEM fuel cells carried out during 2004 and 2005 at five Navy sites located in New York, California, and Hawaii. The key objective of the effort was to obtain an engineering assessment of their military applications. Particular issues of interest were fuel cell cost, performance, reliability, and the readiness of commercial fuel cells for use as a standalone (grid-independent) power option. Two corollary objectives of the demonstration were to promote technological advances and to improve fuel performance and reliability. From a cost perspective, the capital cost of PEM fuel cells at this stage of their development is high compared to other power generation technologies. Sandia National Laboratories technical recommendation to the Navy is to remain involved in evaluating successive generations of this technology, particularly in locations with greater environmental extremes, and it encourages their increased use by the Navy.

Black, Billy D.; Akhil, Abbas Ali

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Reversible Planar Solid Oxide Fuel-Fed Electrolysis Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Hydrogen and Electricity Production Operating on Natural Gas/Biomass Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis technique was developed to co-generate hydrogen and electricity directly from a fuel at a reduced cost of electricity. Solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs), which were comprised of 8YSZ electrolytes sandwiched between thick anode supports and thin cathodes, were constructed and experimentally evaluated at various operation conditions on lab-level button cells with 2 cm2 per-cell active areas as well as on bench-scale stacks with 30 cm2 and 100 cm2 per-cell active areas. To reduce the concentration overpotentials, pore former systems were developed and engineered to optimize the microstructure and morphology of the Ni+8YSZ-based anodes. Chemically stable cathode materials, which possess good electronic and ionic conductivity and exhibit good electrocatalytic properties in both oxidizing and reducing gas atmospheres, were developed and materials properties were investigated. In order to increase the specific hydrogen production rate and thereby reduce the system volume and capital cost for commercial applications, a hybrid system that integrates the technologies of the SOFEC and the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC), was developed and successfully demonstrated at a 1kW scale, co-generating hydrogen and electricity directly from chemical fuels.

Tao, Greg, G.

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Hydrocarbon Reformers for Fuel Cell Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several new or emerging technologies are vying to compete in the distributed resources market; notably, fuel cells and microturbines. Fuel cells represent an idealized power generation technology with tremendous long-term promise. As a hydrogen-fueled system, however, fuel cells need either a hydrogen fuel supply infrastructure or fuel processing (reforming and clean-up) technology to convert conventional fossil fuels to a hydrogen-rich energy source. This report provides an overview of fuel processing t...

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Climate Change Fuel Cell Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Verizon is presently operating the largest Distributed Generation Fuel Cell project in the USA. Situated in Long Island, NY, the power plant is composed of seven (7) fuel cells operating in parallel with the Utility grid from the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA). Each fuel cell has an output of 200 kW, for a total of 1.4 mW generated from the on-site plant. The remaining power to meet the facility demand is purchased from LIPA. The fuel cell plant is utilized as a co-generation system. A by-product of the fuel cell electric generation process is high temperature water. The heat content of this water is recovered from the fuel cells and used to drive two absorption chillers in the summer and a steam generator in the winter. Cost savings from the operations of the fuel cells are forecasted to be in excess of $250,000 per year. Annual NOx emissions reductions are equivalent to removing 1020 motor vehicles from roadways. Further, approximately 5.45 million metric tons (5 millions tons) of CO2 per year will not be generated as a result of this clean power generation. The project was partially financed with grants from the New York State Energy R&D Authority (NYSERDA) and from Federal Government Departments of Defense and Energy.

Paul Belard

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Resources Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Hydrogen Fuel Cells Safety, Codes & Standards Market Analysis Educational Publications Newsletter

418

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

eere.energy.gov eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Program DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program January 5, 2011 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov * Overview - Goals & Objectives - Technology Status & Key Challenges * Progress - Research & Development - Deployments - Recovery Act Projects * Budget * Key Publications Agenda: DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program 3 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Program Mission The mission of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program is to enable the widespread commercialization of a portfolio of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies through basic and applied research, technology development and demonstration, and

419

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Transformation  

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supporting the role that fuel cells play in our nation's energy portfolio. Through its market transformation efforts, the Fuel Cell Technologies Office seeks to accelerate the...

420

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Systems Integration  

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Systems Integration to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Systems Integration on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Systems Integration on...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act  

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Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

422

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Infrastructure Market...  

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Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

423

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Transformation  

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Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

424

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Related Financial Opportunities  

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Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

425

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Technical Publications  

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Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

426

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: 2013 Webinar Archives  

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Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

427

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Market Analysis Reports  

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of Energy - Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Market Analysis Reports Reports about fuel cell and hydrogen technology market analysis...

428

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Information Resources  

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Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME...

429

Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Summary Report  

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equipment is heavy and costly * Slow response time of the fuel cell adversely affects regenerative energy recovery potential and efficiency Barriers to full fuel cell bus...

430

Energy Conversion Devices Fuel Cell Electrocatalyst Development...  

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Fuel Cell(tm) Texaco Ovonic Fuel Cell Company, LLC non-precious metal catalysts regenerative braking energy absorption capability wide temperature range instant...

431

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Program Presentations  

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Presentations The Fuel Cell Technologies Office staff members give presentations about fuel cells and hydrogen at a variety of conferences. Some of their presentations are below....

432

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Durability Working Group  

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About Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Durability Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office:...

433

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Past Financial Opportunities  

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used. Technology Solicitation Title Open Date Close Date Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Medium Duty Trucks, Roof-top Backup Power, and Advanced Hydrogen...

434

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Annual Progress Reports  

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Progress Reports to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Annual Progress Reports on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Annual Progress Reports on...

435

Battery-Size Regenerative Fuel Cells  

ORNL 2010-G01073/jcn UT-B ID 201002378 Battery-Size Regenerative Fuel Cells Technology Summary A battery-size regenerative fuel cell with energy ...

436

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Educational Publications  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

437

EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office Home Page  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

438

EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office - Webmaster  

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Webmaster Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office - Webmaster to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office -...

439

EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office - Contacts  

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Contacts Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office - Contacts to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Fuel Cell Technologies Office -...

440

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Projects  

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Projects NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell research projects focus on developing, integrating, and demonstrating advanced hydrogen production, hydrogen storage, and fuel cell...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel cell anode" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Sensor Workshop  

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CSA Standards DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Element One, Inc. EmersonTherm-O-Disc FM Global Fuel Cell & Hydrogen Energy Association H2scan Honeywell Analytics Intelligent...

442

Fuel Cell Power Electronics Status & Challenges Tejinder ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Fuel cell powered critical refrigeration loads, preventing ... Ref. CL&P Connecticut Outage Map for October 2011 Fuel Cells: Power Through the Storm ...

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

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Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blog Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Blog Bioenergy Buildings Geothermal Government Energy Management Homes Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Manufacturing Solar Vehicles Water Wind Blog Archive Recent...

444

Fuel Cell Store Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Fuel Cell Store, Inc Place San Diego, California Zip 92154 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product San Diego-based firm selling fuel cell stacks, components, and hydrogen...

445

Technology Validation: Fuel Cell Bus Evaluations (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Poster discusses hydrogen fuel cell transit bus evaluations conducted for the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, & Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT). It was presented at the 2006 HFCIT Program Review.

Eudy, L.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Fuel Cell Technologies Office: IPHE Infrastructure Workshop  

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IPHE Infrastructure Workshop to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: IPHE Infrastructure Workshop on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: IPHE...

447

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications  

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Information Resources Information Resources Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Hydrogen Technical Publications on AddThis.com... Publications Program Publications Technical Publications Hydrogen Fuel Cells Safety, Codes & Standards

448

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation...  

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of the DOE Hydrogen Program (PDF 1.1 MB), JoAnn Milliken, DOE Hydrogen Program Manager SOFC Technology R&D Needs (PDF 1.7 MB), Steven Shaffer, Delphi Chief Engineer, Fuel Cell...

449

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells Today: Early Market...  

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Here (music) Hydrogen and fuel cell technologies are beginning to enter the market and learning demonstrations are spreading to various parts of the country. As you begin to see...

450

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles...  

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the cost and increasing the performance of fuel cell propulsion systems, and most major vehicle manufacturers are geared to launch FCEVs in the U.S. market between 2015 and 2020....

451

Calling All Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Calling All Fuel Cells Calling All Fuel Cells Calling All Fuel Cells December 7, 2012 - 4:31pm Addthis Altergy had more than 60 fuel cells in the immediate Hurricane Sandy disaster area that acted as backup power for cell phone towers. | Photo courtesy of Altergy. Altergy had more than 60 fuel cells in the immediate Hurricane Sandy disaster area that acted as backup power for cell phone towers. | Photo courtesy of Altergy. Sunita Satyapal Program Manager, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Technology Program What is a fuel cell? A fuel cell is a device that uses a fuel and oxygen to create electricity by an electrochemical process. A fuel cell can provide energy for systems as large as a utility power station and as small as a laptop computer. During Hurricane Sandy, fuel cells were instrumental in providing backup

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Calling All Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Calling All Fuel Cells Calling All Fuel Cells Calling All Fuel Cells December 7, 2012 - 4:31pm Addthis Altergy had more than 60 fuel cells in the immediate Hurricane Sandy disaster area that acted as b