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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Clean Burn Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

developer planning to build a 60m gallons per year (227.12m litres per year) bioethanol plant in Raeford, North Carolina. References Clean Burn Fuels LLC1 LinkedIn...

2

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment and Fuel Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Equipment Biodiesel Equipment and Fuel Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment and Fuel Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment and Fuel Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment and Fuel Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment and Fuel Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment and Fuel Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Equipment and Fuel Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Equipment and Fuel Tax Exemption

3

Advanced Nuclear Fuel Concepts for Minor Actinide Burning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, New fuel cycle strategies entail advanced nuclear fuel concepts. This especially applies for the burning of minor actinides in a fast reactor cycle ...

4

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Nuclear Fuel Handling Equipment Application and Maintenance Guide: Fuel Handling Equipment Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel handling is a critical task during a nuclear power plant refueling outage. The proper operation of fuel handling equipment (such as fuel handling machines, fuel upending machines, fuel transfer carriages, and fuel elevators) is important to a successful refueling outage and to preparing fuel for eventual disposal.BackgroundThe fuel handling system contains the components used to move fuel from the time that the new fuel is received until the spent fuel ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

5

SIDA DemoEast programme in Estonia. Supply, delivery and installation of wood pellet burning equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

burning equipment SUMMARY DemoEast programme is a part of Baltic Billion Fund 2 with the overall aim and Kiltsi light oil fired boilers have been converted to wood pellets burning. The supplier

6

Modeling Deep Burn TRISO Particle Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the DOE Deep Burn program TRISO fuel is being investigated as a fuel form for consuming plutonium and minor actinides, and for greater efficiency in uranium utilization. The result will thus be to drive TRISO particulate fuel to very high burn-ups. In the current effort the various phenomena in the TRISO particle are being modeled using a variety of techniques. The chemical behavior is being treated utilizing thermochemical analysis to identify phase formation/transformation and chemical activities in the particle, including kernel migration. First principles calculations are being used to investigate the critical issue of fission product palladium attack on the SiC coating layer. Density functional theory is being used to understand fission product diffusion within the plutonia oxide kernel. Kinetic Monte Carlo techniques are shedding light on transport of fission products, most notably silver, through the carbon and SiC coating layers. The diffusion of fission products through an alternative coating layer, ZrC, is being assessed via DFT methods. Finally, a multiscale approach is being used to understand thermal transport, including the effect of radiation damage induced defects, in a model SiC material.

Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Samolyuk, German D [ORNL; Schuck, Paul C [ORNL; Rudin, Sven [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wills, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wirth, Brian D. [University of California, Berkeley; Kim, Sungtae [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Pollution Control Pollution Control Equipment Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollution Control Equipment Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Pollution Control Equipment Exemption Dedicated original equipment manufacturer natural gas vehicles and

8

Thermal regimes of high burn-up nuclear fuel rod  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature distribution in the nuclear fuel rods for high burn-up is studied. We use the numerical and analytical approaches. It is shown that the time taken to have the stationary thermal regime of nuclear fuel rod is less than one minute. We can make the inference that the behavior of the nuclear fuel rod can be considered as a stationary task. Exact solutions of the temperature distribution in the fuel rods in the stationary case are found. Thermal regimes of high burn-up the nuclear fuel rods are analyzed.

Kudryashov, Nikolai A; Chmykhov, Mikhail A; 10.1016/j.cnsns.2009.05.063

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Production Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Production Equipment Tax Exemption

10

Production of CO2 from Fossil Fuel Burning by Fuel Type, 1860...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Historical Global Estimates Production of CO2 from Fossil Fuel Burning by Fuel Type, 1860-1982 (NDP-006) DOI: 10.3334CDIACffe.ndp006 image Data image...

11

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulation Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulation Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulation Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulation Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulation Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulation Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulation Exemption on AddThis.com...

12

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

13

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on AddThis.com...

14

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Production Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Production and Blending Equipment Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

15

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

16

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - LADWP to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - LADWP on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - LADWP on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - LADWP on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - LADWP on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - LADWP on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - LADWP on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal

17

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mandatory Electric Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mandatory Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Building Standards on

18

Local Burn-Up Effects in the NBSR Fuel Element  

SciTech Connect

This study addresses the over-prediction of local power when the burn-up distribution in each half-element of the NBSR is assumed to be uniform. A single-element model was utilized to quantify the impact of axial and plate-wise burn-up on the power distribution within the NBSR fuel elements for both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. To validate this approach, key parameters in the single-element model were compared to parameters from an equilibrium core model, including neutron energy spectrum, power distribution, and integral U-235 vector. The power distribution changes significantly when incorporating local burn-up effects and has lower power peaking relative to the uniform burn-up case. In the uniform burn-up case, the axial relative power peaking is over-predicted by as much as 59% in the HEU single-element and 46% in the LEU single-element with uniform burn-up. In the uniform burn-up case, the plate-wise power peaking is over-predicted by as much as 23% in the HEU single-element and 18% in the LEU single-element. The degree of over-prediction increases as a function of burn-up cycle, with the greatest over-prediction at the end of Cycle 8. The thermal flux peak is always in the mid-plane gap; this causes the local cumulative burn-up near the mid-plane gap to be significantly higher than the fuel element average. Uniform burn-up distribution throughout a half-element also causes a bias in fuel element reactivity worth, due primarily to the neutronic importance of the fissile inventory in the mid-plane gap region.

Brown N. R.; Hanson A.; Diamond, D.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - Indiana Michigan Power to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - Indiana Michigan Power on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - Indiana Michigan Power on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - Indiana Michigan Power on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - Indiana Michigan Power on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - Indiana Michigan Power on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric

20

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Highway Electric Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Highway

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) and Battery Exchange Station Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) and Battery Exchange Station Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) and Battery Exchange Station Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) and Battery Exchange Station Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) and Battery Exchange Station Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) and Battery Exchange Station Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric

22

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Incentive - Bay Area to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Incentive - Bay...

23

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - DTE Energy to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - DTE Energy...

24

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Equipment Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blending Blending Equipment Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Equipment Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Equipment Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Equipment Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Equipment Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Equipment Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Equipment Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Blending Equipment Tax Exemption Qualified equipment used for storing and blending petroleum-based fuel with

25

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Installing New E85 Installing New E85 Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Installing New E85 Equipment on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Business Case Equipment Options Equipment Installation Codes, Standards, & Safety Vehicles Laws & Incentives

26

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Equipment Options for Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Equipment Options for E85 Fueling Systems on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Business Case Equipment Options

27

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

Hayes, A C; Nieto, Michael Martin; WIlson, W B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

A. C. Hayes; H. R. Trellue; Michael Martin Nieto; W. B. WIlson

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

29

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Commercial Electric Commercial Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebate - Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Electric Vehicle

30

Storage of burned PWR and BWR fuel  

SciTech Connect

In the last few years, credit for fuel burnup has been allowed in the design and criticality safety analysis of high-density spent-fuel storage racks. Design and operating philosophies, however, differ significantly between pressurized water reactor (PWR)- and boiling water reactor (BWR)-type plants because: (1) PWR storage pools generally use soluble boron, which provides backup criticality control under accident conditions; and (2) BWR fuel generally contains gadolinium burnable poison, which results in a characteristically peaked burnup-dependent reactivity variation. In PWR systems, the reactivity decreases monotonically with burnup in a nearly linear fashion (excluding xenon effects), and a two-region concept is feasible. In BWR systems, the reactivity is initially low, increases as fuel burnup progresses, and reaches a maximum at a burnup where the gadolinium is nearly depleted. In any spent-fuel storage rack design, uncertainties due to manufacturing tolerances and in calculational methods must be included to assure that the highest reactivity (k/sub eff/) is less than the 0.95 US Nuclear Regulatory Commission limit. In the absence of definitive critical experiment data with spent fuel, the uncertainty due to depletion calculations must be assumed on the basis of judgment. High-density spent-fuel storage racks may be designed for both PWR and BWR plants with credit for burnup. However, the design must be tailored to each plant with appropriate consideration of the preferences/specifications of the utility operating staff.

Turner, S.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Equipment Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Sales Sales Equipment Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Equipment Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Equipment Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Equipment Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Equipment Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Equipment Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Sales Equipment Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Sales Equipment Tax Credit Qualified retailers may be eligible for a corporate income tax credit of

32

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Parts and Equipment to Conserve Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Parts and Vehicle Parts and Equipment to Conserve Fuel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Parts and Equipment to Conserve Fuel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Parts and Equipment to Conserve Fuel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Parts and Equipment to Conserve Fuel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Parts and Equipment to Conserve Fuel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Parts and Equipment to Conserve Fuel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Parts and Equipment to Conserve Fuel on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Low Rolling Resistance Tires Maintenance Driving Behavior

33

Equipment specifications for an electrochemical fuel reprocessing plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrochemical reprocessing is a technique used to chemically separate and dissolve the components of spent nuclear fuel, in order to produce new metal fuel. There are several different variations to electrochemical reprocessing. These variations are accounted for by both the production of different types of spent nuclear fuel, as well as different states and organizations doing research in the field. For this electrochemical reprocessing plant, the spent fuel will be in the metallurgical form, a product of fast breeder reactors, which are used in many nuclear power plants. The equipment line for this process is divided into two main categories, the fuel refining equipment and the fuel fabrication equipment. The fuel refining equipment is responsible for separating out the plutonium and uranium together, while getting rid of the minor transuranic elements and fission products. The fuel fabrication equipment will then convert this plutonium and uranium mixture into readily usable metal fuel.

Hemphill, Kevin P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Open Access Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Open Access Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Open Access Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Open Access Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Open Access Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Open Access Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Open Access Requirements on AddThis.com...

35

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Incentive - Austin Energy to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Incentive - Austin Energy on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Incentive - Austin Energy on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Incentive - Austin Energy on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Incentive - Austin Energy on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Incentive - Austin Energy on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Incentive - Austin Energy on AddThis.com...

36

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Onboard Idle Reduction Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction

37

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Financing to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Financing on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Financing on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Financing on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Financing on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Financing on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Financing on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

38

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Rebate -  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Rebate - GWP to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Rebate - GWP on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Rebate - GWP on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Rebate - GWP on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Rebate - GWP on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Rebate - GWP on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Rebate - GWP on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

39

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Study to someone by E-mail Study to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Study on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Study on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Study on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Study on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Study on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Study on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Study

40

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Grants - Bay Area to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Grants - Bay Area on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Grants - Bay Area on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Grants - Bay Area on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Grants - Bay Area on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Grants - Bay Area on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Grants - Bay Area on AddThis.com... More in this section...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

42

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebates to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebates on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebates on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebates on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebates on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebates on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rebates on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

43

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Rules to someone by E-mail Rules to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rules on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rules on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rules on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rules on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rules on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rules on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Rules

44

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

45

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

47

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Credit and Charging Incentive - NIPSCO to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Credit and Charging Incentive - NIPSCO on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Credit and Charging Incentive - NIPSCO on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Credit and Charging Incentive - NIPSCO on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Credit and Charging Incentive - NIPSCO on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Credit and Charging Incentive - NIPSCO on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric

48

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Policies for Multi-Unit Dwellings to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Policies for Multi-Unit Dwellings on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Policies for Multi-Unit Dwellings on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Policies for Multi-Unit Dwellings on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Policies for Multi-Unit Dwellings on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Policies for Multi-Unit Dwellings on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric

49

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Vehicle Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Multi-Unit Dwelling Installations and Access to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Multi-Unit Dwelling Installations and Access on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Multi-Unit Dwelling Installations and Access on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Multi-Unit Dwelling Installations and Access on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Multi-Unit Dwelling Installations and Access on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Multi-Unit Dwelling Installations and Access on Digg

50

Results of emissions testing while burning densified refuse derived fuel, Dordt College, Sioux Center, Iowa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Environmental Services, Inc. provided engineering and source testing services to the Council of Great Lake Governors to support their efforts in promoting the development and utilization of densified refuse derived fuels (d-RDF) and pelletized wastepaper fuels in small steam generating facilities. The emissions monitoring program was designed to provide a complete air emissions profile while burning various refuse derived fuels. The specific goal of this test program was to conduct air emissions tests at Dordt College located in Sioux Center, Iowa and to identify a relationship between fuel types and emission characteristics. The sampling protocol was carried out June 12 through June 20, 1989 on boiler {number sign}4. This unit had been previously modified to burn d-RDF. The boiler was not equipped with any type of air pollution control device so the emissions samples were collected from the boiler exhaust stack on the roof of the boilerhouse. The emissions that were sampled included: particulates; PM{sub 10} particulates; hydrochloric acid; dioxins; furans; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB); metals and continuous monitors for CO, CO{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub x}NO{sub x} and total hydrocarbons. Grab samples of the fuels were collected, composited and analyzed for heating value, moisture content, proximate and ultimate analysis, ash fusion temperature, bulk density and elemental ash analysis. Grab samples of the boiler ash were also collected and analyzed for total hydrocarbons total dioxins, total furans, total PCBs and heavy metals. 77 figs., 20 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Coated Particle and Deep Burn Fuels Monthly Highlights December 2010  

SciTech Connect

During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for November 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/323, was distributed to program participants on December 9, 2010. The final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU (transuranic elements) Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing (ORNL); (4) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling (ORNL).

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and improved stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel including a vertical feed combustion chamber for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack, a major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprising a water jacket for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid and for convection circulation of the fluid for confining the locus of wood fuel combustion to the bottom of the vertical gravity feed combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel extending from the laterally directed draft outlet affords delayed travel time in a high temperature environment to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air as an actively induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion and high temperature zone. Active sources of forced air and induced draft are included, multiple use and circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel includes a vertical feed combustion chamber (15) for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack. A major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprises a water jacket (14) for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid for convection circulation of the fluid. The locus (31) of wood fuel combustion is thereby confined to the refractory base of the combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel (34) extending laterally from the base of the chamber affords delayed travel time in a high temperature refractory environment sufficient to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air prior to extraction of heat in heat exchanger (16). Induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion chamber and refractory high temperature zone to the heat exchanger and flue. Also included are active sources of forced air and induced draft, multiple circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global warming Researchers ScienceDaily (July 30, 2010) -- Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels biofuels, such as wood, manure, dung, and other solid biomass used for home heating and cooking in many

55

Coal-fueled diesel technology development -- Fuel injection equipment for coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of the abrasive and corrosive nature of coal water slurries, the development of coal-fueled diesel engine technology by GE-Transportation Systems (GE-TS) required special fuel injection equipment. GE-Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD) undertook the design and development of fuel injectors, piston pumps, and check valves for this project. Components were tested at GE-CRD on a simulated engine cylinder, which included a cam-actuated jerk pump, prior to delivery to GE-TS for engine testing.

Johnson, R.N.; Hayden, H.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Oxidation of volatiles in residential wood burning equipment. Final technical report, September 1980-February 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to measure, through the use of laboratory combustors, those conditions which promote complete combustion of wood volatiles in residential wood burning equipment. The conditions of interest are combustion temperature, residence time, stoichiometry, and air mixing. The project objectives are met through two laboratory approaches: (1) model compound studies: in order to measure the overall rates of oxidative pyrolysis of biomass volatiles, and to determine the types of intermediate organic species which are likely to form as part of this process, model compounds have been reacted in a specialized jet-stirred reactor, which has been developed as part of this research. (2) high-intensity wood combustion: in order to study the clean combustion of wood, that is, to investigate the conceptual design features required for clean burning, and to ascertain the levels and types of pollutant and condensible species which are most difficult to oxidize, a high-intensity, research wood combustor has been developed and examined for the different phases of the wood burning cycle. Although the objectives of the project have been met, it has not been possible, because of support limitations, to thoroughly explore several interesting aspects which have arisen because of this research. For example, a third laboratory system in which wood pyrolysis gas is injected directly into the a well characterized reactor, so that the kinetics and mechanisms of the gas-phase reaction of the actual biomass volatiles can be studied, could not be thoroughly developed. Refinements in the high-intensity wood combustor, which would bring its design features closer to practicality for the industry, could not be considered. 32 references, 37 figures, 10 tables.

Malte, P.C.; Thornton, M.M.; Kamber, P.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

High Burn-Up Properties of the Fuel Variants Irradiated in IFA-649  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "standard product" uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel pellet has remained unchanged for many years and provides excellent performance in all but the most extreme reactor operation. The requirement to prolong fuel residence in commercial reactors, thus increasing discharge levels of burn-up, has led to a need for detailed measurements of high burn-up properties under a variety of normal and off-normal conditions. The changes in fuel material properties, such as density and swelling, ...

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

59

Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guide explains the different types of alternative fuel commercial mowers and lists the makes and models of the ones available on the market. Turf grass is a fixture of the American landscape and the American economy. It is the nation's largest irrigated crop, covering more than 40 million acres. Legions of lawnmowers care for this expanse during the growing season-up to year-round in the warmest climates. The annual economic impact of the U.S. turf grass industry has been estimated at more than $62 billion. Lawn mowing also contributes to the nation's petroleum consumption and pollutant emissions. Mowers consume 1.2 billion gallons of gasoline annually, about 1% of U.S. motor gasoline consumption. Commercial mowing accounts for about 35% of this total and is the highest-intensity use. Large property owners and mowing companies cut lawns, sports fields, golf courses, parks, roadsides, and other grassy areas for 7 hours per day and consume 900 to 2,000 gallons of fuel annually depending on climate and length of the growing season. In addition to gasoline, commercial mowing consumes more than 100 million gallons of diesel annually. Alternative fuel mowers are one way to reduce the energy and environmental impacts of commercial lawn mowing. They can reduce petroleum use and emissions compared with gasoline- and diesel-fueled mowers. They may also save on fuel and maintenance costs, extend mower life, reduce fuel spillage and fuel theft, and promote a 'green' image. And on ozone alert days, alternative fuel mowers may not be subject to the operational restrictions that gasoline mowers must abide by. To help inform the commercial mowing industry about product options and potential benefits, Clean Cities produced this guide to alternative fuel commercial lawn equipment. Although the guide's focus is on original equipment manufacturer (OEM) mowers, some mowers can be converted to run on alternative fuels. For more information about propane conversions. This guide may be particularly helpful for organizations that are already using alternative fuels in their vehicles and have an alternative fuel supply or electric charging in place (e.g., golf cart charging stations at most golf courses). On the flip side, experiencing the benefits of using alternative fuels in mowing equipment may encourage organizations to try them in on-road vehicles as well. Whatever the case, alternative fuel commercial lawnmowers are a powerful and cost-effective way to reduce U.S. petroleum dependence and help protect the environment.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

>Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis (NDP-058a) Prepared by Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Date Published: February 1998 (Revised for the Web: 2003) CONTENTS Abstract Documentation file for Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Abstract Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis. (March 1998) Antoinette L. Brenkert DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058.2003 This data package presents the gridded (one degree latitude by one degree longitude) summed emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

Fossil Fuel and Biomass Burning Effect on Climate—Heating or Cooling?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission from burning of fossil fuels and biomass (associated with deforestation) generates a radiative forcing on the atmosphere and a possible climate chaw. Emitted trace gases heat the atmosphere through their greenhouse effect, while ...

Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser; Robert L. Mahoney

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

General analysis of breed-and-burn reactors and limited-separations fuel cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new theoretical framework is introduced, the "neutron excess" concept, which is useful for analyzing breed-and-burn (B&B) reactors and their fuel cycles. Based on this concept, a set of methods has been developed which ...

Petroski, Robert C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500ºC to 600ºC) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion • Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment • Extrusion database on DU metal • Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys • Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys • Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys • Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment • Sintering database on DU metal • Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys • Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich outlining the beginning of the materials processing setup. Also included within this section is a thesis proposal by Jeff Hausaman. Appendix C contains the public papers and presentations introduced at the 2010 American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting. Appendix A—MSNE theses of David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich and proposal by Jeff Hausaman A.1 December 2009 Thesis by David Garnetti entitled “Uranium Powder Production Via Hydride Formation and Alpha Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications” A.2 September 2009 Presentation by David Garnetti (same title as document in Appendix B.1) A.3 December 2010 Thesis by Grant Helmreich entitled “Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications” A.4 October 2010 Presentation by Grant Helmreich (same title as document in Appendix B.3) A.5 Thesis Proposal by Jeffrey Hausaman entitled “Hot Extrusion of Alpha Phase Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors” Appendix B—External presentations introduced at the 2010 ANS Winter Meeting B.1 J.S. Hausaman, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, “Powder Metallurgy of Alpha Phase Uranium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors,” Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.2 PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.1 B.3 G.W. Helmreich, W.J. Sames, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, “Uranium Powder Production Using a Hydride-Dehydride Process,” Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.4. PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.3 B.5 Poster Presentation from C.3 Appendix C—Fuel cycle research and development undergraduate materials and poster presentation C.1 Poster entitled “Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys” presented at the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program Annual Meeting C.2 April 2011 Honors Undergraduate Thesis by William Sames, Research Fellow, entitled “Uranium Metal Powder Production, Particle Dis

Sean M. McDeavitt

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

64

Method and apparatus for controlling fuel/air mixture in a lean burn engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The system for controlling the fuel/air mixture supplied to a lean burn engine when operating on natural gas, gasoline, hydrogen, alcohol, propane, butane, diesel or any other fuel as desired. As specific humidity of air supplied to the lean burn engine increases, the oxygen concentration of exhaust gas discharged by the engine for a given equivalence ratio will decrease. Closed loop fuel control systems typically attempt to maintain a constant exhaust gas oxygen concentration. Therefore, the decrease in the exhaust gas oxygen concentration resulting from increased specific humidity will often be improperly attributed to an excessive supply of fuel and the control system will incorrectly reduce the amount of fuel supplied to the engine. Also, the minimum fuel/air equivalence ratio for a lean burn engine to avoid misfiring will increase as specific humidity increases. A relative humidity sensor to allow the control system to provide a more enriched fuel/air mixture at high specific humidity levels. The level of specific humidity may be used to compensate an output signal from a universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor for changing oxygen concentrations at a desired equivalence ratio due to variation in specific humidity specific humidity. As a result, the control system will maintain the desired efficiency, low exhaust emissions and power level for the associated lean burn engine regardless of the specific humidity level of intake air supplied to the lean burn engine.

Kubesh, John Thomas (San Antonio, TX); Dodge, Lee Gene (San Antonio, TX); Podnar, Daniel James (San Antonio, TX)

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

65

Apparatus and method for burning a lean, premixed fuel/air mixture with low NOx emission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for enabling a burner to stably burn a lean fuel/air mixture. The burner directs the lean fuel/air mixture in a stream. The apparatus comprises an annular flame stabilizer; and a device for mounting the flame stabilizer in the fuel/air mixture stream. The burner may include a body having an internal bore, in which case, the annular flame stabilizer is shaped to conform to the cross-sectional shape of the bore, is spaced from the bore by a distance greater than about 0.5 mm, and the mounting device mounts the flame stabilizer in the bore. An apparatus for burning a gaseous fuel with low NOx emissions comprises a device for premixing air with the fuel to provide a lean fuel/air mixture; a nozzle having an internal bore through which the lean fuel/air mixture passes in a stream; and a flame stabilizer mounted in the stream of the lean fuel/air mixture. The flame stabilizer may be mounted in the internal bore, in which case, it is shaped and is spaced from the bore as just described. In a method of burning a lean fuel/air mixture, a lean fuel/air mixture is provided, and is directed in a stream; an annular eddy is created in the stream of the lean fuel/air mixture; and the lean fuel/air mixture is ignited at the eddy.

Kostiuk, Larry W. (Edmonton, CA); Cheng, Robert K. (Kensington, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Equipment concepts for dry intercask transfer of spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of a study of preconceptual design and analysis of four intercask transfer concepts. The four concepts are: a large shielded cylindrical turntable that contains an integral fuel handling machine (turntable concept); a shielded fuel handling machine under which shipping and storage casks are moved horizontally (shuttle concept); a small hot cell containing equipment for transferring fuel between shipping and storage casks (that enter and leave the cell on carts) in a bifurcated trench (trench concept); and a large hot cell, shielded by an earthen berm, that houses equipment for handling fuel between casks that enter and leave the cell on a single cart (igloo concept). The casks considered in this study are most of the transport casks currently operable in the USA, and the storage casks designated REA-2023 and GNS Castor-V. Exclusive of basic services assumed to be provided at the host site, the design and capital costs are estimated to range from $9 to $13 million. The portion of capital costs for portable equipment (for potential later use at another site) was estimated to range from 70% to 98%, depending on the concept. Increasing portability from a range of 70 to 90% to 98% adds $2 to 4 million to the capital costs. Operating costs are estimated at about $2 million/year for all concepts. Implementation times range from about 18 months for the more conventional systems to 40 months for the more unique systems. Times and costs for relocation to another site are 10 to 14 months and about $1 million, plus shipping costs and costs of new construction at the new site. All concepts have estimated capacities for fuel transfer at least equal to the criterion set for this study. Only the hot cell concepts have capability for recanning or repair of canisters. Some development is believed to be required for the turntable and shuttle concepts, but none for the other two concepts.

Schneider, K.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Nuclear Fuel Handling Equipment Application and Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel handling is a critical item during a nuclear power plant refueling outage. The proper operation of fuel handling equipment, such as fuel handling machines, fuel upending machines, fuel transfer carriages, and fuel elevators, is important to a successful refueling outage and to preparing fuel for eventual disposal.

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

68

REPORT: Inert-Matrix Fuel: Actinide ''Burning'' and Direct ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2007 ... Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241 Am ...

69

Combustion, Control, and Fuel Effects in a Spark Assisted HCCI Engine Equipped with Variable Valve Timing  

SciTech Connect

Widespread implementation of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines is presently hindered by stability, control, and load range issues. Although the operable HCCI speed/load range is expanding, it is likely that the initial HCCI engines will rely on conventional combustion for part of the operating cycle. In the present study, we have investigated the role of fuel properties and chemistry on the operation of a spark-assisted gasoline HCCI engine. The engine employed is a single cylinder, 500 cc, port fuel injected research engine, operating near lambda = 1.0 and equipped with hydraulic variable valve actuation. HCCI is initiated by early exhaust valve closing to retain exhaust in the cylinder, thereby increasing the cylinder gas temperature. This is also referred to as a 'negative overlap' strategy. A total of 10 custom blended gasolines and three different batches of indolene from two suppliers were run at 5 speed-load combinations and performance was characterized by timing sweeps. Within the quality of the data set, we can say the all fuels provided equivalent combustion and performance characteristics when compared at the same combustion phasing. The fuels did, however, require different degrees of retained exhaust as measured by exhaust valve closing angle to achieve the same combustion phasing. Fuels with higher octane sensitivity were found to ignite more easily or more quickly and to burn more quickly than fuels with lower octane sensitivity. This is an expected result since the engine is naturally aspirated and operates with high compression temperatures due to the high retained exhaust fraction and recompression.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Final Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Project Report Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL Nuclear Engineering Education Research Program (grant # DE-FG07-99ID13767) Rodney C. Ewing (co-PI) Lumin Wang (co-PI) October 30,2002 For the Period of 07/01/1999 to 06/30/2002 Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 1 1. Background Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (239Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241Am, Cm and 237Np). In Europe, Canada and Japan studies have determined much improved efficiencies for burn- up of actinides using inert-matrix fuels. This innovative approach also considers the properties of the inert-matrix fuel as a nuclear waste form for direct disposal after one-

71

K Basins floor sludge retrieval system knockout pot basket fuel burn accident  

SciTech Connect

The K Basins Sludge Retrieval System Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report (HNF-2676) identified and categorized a series of potential accidents associated with K Basins Sludge Retrieval System design and operation. The fuel burn accident was of concern with respect to the potential release of contamination resulting from a runaway chemical reaction of the uranium fuel in a knockout pot basket suspended in the air. The unmitigated radiological dose to an offsite receptor from this fuel burn accident is calculated to be much less than the offsite risk evaluation guidelines for anticipated events. However, because of potential radiation exposure to the facility worker, this accident is precluded with a safety significant lifting device that will prevent the monorail hoist from lifting the knockout pot basket out of the K Basin water pool.

HUNT, J.W.

1998-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

72

Fuel Economy and Emissions of a Vehicle Equipped with an Aftermarket Flexible-Fuel Conversion Kit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) grants Certificates of Conformity for alternative fuel conversion systems and also offers other forms of premarket registration of conversion kits for use in vehicles more than two model years old. Use of alternative fuels such as ethanol, natural gas, and propane are encouraged by the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Several original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) produce emissions-certified vehicles capable of using alternative fuels, and several alternative fuel conversion system manufacturers produce EPA-approved conversion systems for a variety of alternative fuels and vehicle types. To date, only one manufacturer (Flex Fuel U.S.) has received EPA certifications for ethanol fuel (E85) conversion kits. This report details an independent evaluation of a vehicle with a legal installation of a Flex Fuel U.S. conversion kit. A 2006 Dodge Charger was baseline tested with ethanol-free certification gasoline (E0) and E20 (gasoline with 20 vol % ethanol), converted to flex-fuel operation via installation of a Flex Box Smart Kit from Flex Fuel U.S., and retested with E0, E20, E50, and E81. Test cycles included the Federal Test Procedure (FTP or city cycle), the highway fuel economy test (HFET), and the US06 test (aggressive driving test). Averaged test results show that the vehicle was emissions compliant on E0 in the OEM condition (before conversion) and compliant on all test fuels after conversion. Average nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions exceeded the Tier 2/Bin 5 intermediate life NO{sub X} standard with E20 fuel in the OEM condition due to two of three test results exceeding this standard [note that E20 is not a legal fuel for non-flexible-fuel vehicles (non-FFVs)]. In addition, one E0 test result before conversion and one E20 test result after conversion exceeded the NOX standard, although the average result in these two cases was below the standard. Emissions of ethanol and acetaldehyde increased with increasing ethanol, while nonmethane organic gas and CO emissions remained relatively unchanged for all fuels and cycles. Higher fraction ethanol blends appeared to decrease NO{sub X} emissions on the FTP and HFET (after conversion). As expected, fuel economy (miles per gallon) decreased with increasing ethanol content in all cases.

Thomas, John F [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Effect of Fuel Fraction on Small Modified CANDLE Burn-up Based Gas Cooled Fast Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE Burn-up has been performed. The objective of this research is to get optimal design parameters of such type reactors. The parameters of nuclear design including the critical condition, conversion ratio, and burn-up level were compared. These parameters are calculated by variation in the fuel fraction 47.5% up to 70%. Two dimensional full core multi groups diffusion calculations was performed by CITATION code. Group constant preparations are performed by using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library. In this design the reactor cores with cylindrical cell two dimensional R-Z core models are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The placement of fuel in core arranged so that the result of plutonium from natural uranium can be utilized optimally for 10 years reactor operation. Modified CANDLE burn-up was established successfully in a core radial width 1.4 m. Total thermal power output for reference core is 550 MW. Study on the effect of fuel to coolant ratio shows that effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) is in almost linear relations with the change of the fuel volume to coolant ratio.

Ariani, Menik [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Physics Department, Sriwijaya University, Kampus Indralaya, Ogan Ilir, Sumatera Selatan (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Asiah, Nur [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Shafii, M. Ali [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Physics Department, Andalas University, Kampus Limau Manis, Padang, Sumatera Barat (Indonesia); Khairurrijal

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

A compact breed and burn fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel blanket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-life breed-and-burn (B and B) type fast reactor has been investigated from the neutronics points of view. The B and B reactor has the capability to breed the fissile fuels and use the bred fuel in situ in the same reactor. In this work, feasibility of a compact sodium-cooled B and B fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel as blanket material has been studied. In order to derive a compact B and B fast reactor, a tight fuel lattice and relatively large fuel pin are used to achieve high fuel volume fraction. The core is initially loaded with an LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) fuel and a metallic fuel is used in the core. The Monte Carlo depletion has been performed for the core to see the long-term behavior of the B and B reactor. Several important parameters such as reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron generation lifetime, fission power, and fast neutron fluence, are analyzed through Monte Carlo reactor analysis. Evolution of the core fuel composition is also analyzed as a function of burnup. Although the long-life small B and B fast reactor is found to be feasible from the neutronics point of view, it is characterized to have several challenging technical issues including a very high fast neutron fluence of the structural materials. (authors)

Hartanto, D.; Kim, Y. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

76

Vortex combustor for low NOx emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

Steele, Robert C. (Woodinville, WA); Edmonds, Ryan G. (Renton, WA); Williams, Joseph T. (Kirkland, WA); Baldwin, Stephen P. (Winchester, MA)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

77

Clean Cities Guide to Alternative Fuel Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Guide to Guide to Alternative Fuel Commercial Lawn Equipment Contents Introduction........................... 4 Compressed Natural Gas ........................ 6 Biodiesel ................................. 6 Electricity ............................... 7 Propane .................................. 8 Incentives ............................... 14 Special Considerations ...... 14 Resources............................... 15 A single commercial lawnmower can annually use as much gaso- line or diesel fuel as a commercial work truck. Powering commercial lawn service equipment with alternative fuels is an effective way to reduce petroleum use. Alternative fuels can also reduce pollutant emissions compared with conventional fuels. Nu- merous biodiesel, compressed natural gas, electric, and propane

78

Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights January 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for December 2010, ORNL/TM-2011/10, was distributed to program participants on January 12, 2011. As reported last month, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights February 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for January 2010, ORNL/TM-2011/30, was distributed to program participants on February 8, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; and (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights March 2011  

SciTech Connect

During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for February 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/71, was distributed to program participants on March 8, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Thermomechanical Behavior, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (d) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; and (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Long-term tradeoffs between nuclear- and fossil-fuel burning  

SciTech Connect

A global energy/economics/environmental (E{sup 3}) model has been adapted with a nuclear energy/materials model to understand better {open_quotes}top-level{close_quotes}, long-term trade offs between civilian nuclear power, nuclear-weapons proliferation, fossil-fuel burning, and global economic welfare. Using a {open_quotes}business-as-usual{close_quotes} (BAU) point-of-departure case, economic, resource, proliferation-risk implications of plutonium recycle in LAIRs, greenhouse-gas-mitigating carbon taxes, and a range of nuclear energy costs (capital and fuel) considerations have been examined. After describing the essential elements of the analysis approach being developed to support the Los Alamos Nuclear Vision Project, preliminary examples of parametric variations about the BAU base-case scenario are presented. The results described herein represent a sampling from more extensive results collected in a separate report. The primary motivation here is: (a) to compare the BAU basecase with results from other studies; (b) to model on a regionally resolved global basis long-term (to year {approximately}2100) evolution of plutonium accumulation in a variety of forms under a limited range of fuel-cycle scenarios; and (c) to illustrate a preliminary connectivity between risks associated with nuclear proliferation and fossil-fuel burning (e.g., greenhouse-gas accumulations).

Krakowski, R.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Manual gas cutting equipment consists of gas regulators, gas hoses, cutting torches, cutting tips, and multipurpose wrenches. Auxiliary equipment may include a hand truck, tip cleaners, torch ignitors, and protective goggles. Machine cutting

83

Deep Burn Fuel Cycle Integration: Evaluation of Two-Tier Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a deep burn strategy using VHTRs (or DB-MHR), as a means of burning transuranics produced by LWRs, was compared to performing this task with LWR MOX. The spent DB-MHR fuel was recycled for ultimate final recycle in fast reactors (ARRs). This report summarizes the preliminary findings of the support ratio (in terms of MWth installed) between LWRs, DB-MHRs and ARRs in an equilibrium “two-tier” fuel cycle scenario. Values from literature were used to represent the LWR and DB-MHR isotopic compositions. A reactor physics simulation of the ARR was analyzed to determine the effect that the DB-MHR spent fuel cooling time on the ARR transuranic consumption rate. These results suggest that the cooling time has some but not a significant impact on the ARRs conversion ratio and transuranic consumption rate. This is attributed to fissile worth being derived from non-fissile or “threshold-fissioning” isotopes in the ARR’s fast spectrum. The fraction of installed thermal capacity of each reactor in the DB-MHR 2-tier fuel cycle was compared with that of an equivalent MOX 2-tier fuel cycle, assuming fuel supply and demand are in equilibrium. The use of DB-MHRs in the 1st-tier allows for a 10% increase in the fraction of fleet installed capacity of UO2-fueled LWRs compared to using a MOX 1st-tier. Also, it was found that because the DB-MHR derives more power per unit mass of transuranics charged to the fresh fuel, the “front-end” reprocessing demand is less than MOX. Therefore, more fleet installed capacity of DB-MHR would be required to support a given fleet of UO2 LWRs than would be required of MOX plants. However, the transuranic deep burn achieved by DB-MHRs reduces the number of fast reactors in the 2nd-tier to support the DB-MHRs “back-end” transuranic output than if MOX plants were used. Further analysis of the relative costs of these various types of reactors is required before a comparative study of these options could be considered complete.

S. Bays; H. Zhang; M. Pope

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring on a One Degree by One Degree Grid Cell Basis: 1950 to 1990 (NDP-058) data Data image ASCII Text Documentation PDF file PDF file Contributors R. J. Andres, G. Marland, I. Fung, and E. Matthews (contributors) DOI DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058 This data package presents data sets recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions.

85

Residential wood burning: Energy modeling and conventional fuel displacement in a national sample  

SciTech Connect

This research studied the natural, built, and behavioral factors predictive of energy consumption for residential space heating with wood or conventional fuels. This study was a secondary analysis of survey data from a nationwide representative sample of 5,682 households collected DOE in the 1984-1985 REC survey. Included were: weather, census division and utility data, interviewer-supplied dwelling measurements and respondent-reported energy-related family behaviors. Linear-regression procedures were used to develop a model that identified key determinants accounting for the variability in wood consumption. A nonlinear-regression model was employed to estimate the amount of conventional fuels used for space heating. The model was also used to estimate the amount of conventional fuels being displaced by wood-heating systems. There was a significant (p {le} .05) linear relationship between the dependent variable, square root of cords burned, various independent variables.

Warsco, K.S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel burning by fuel type, 1860-1982  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide emission calculations resulting from fossil fuel useage for the years 1860-1982 are presented.

Rotty, R.M.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States). Institute for Energy Analysis

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The Cellular Burning Regime in Type Ia Supernova Explosions - I. Flame Propagation into Quiescent Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a numerical investigation of the cellular burning regime in Type Ia supernova explosions. This regime holds at small scales (i.e. below the Gibson scale), which are unresolved in large-scale Type Ia supernova simulations. The fundamental effects that dominate the flame evolution here are the Landau-Darrieus instability and its nonlinear stabilization, leading to a stabilization of the flame in a cellular shape. The flame propagation into quiescent fuel is investigated addressing the dependence of the simulation results on the specific parameters of the numerical setup. Furthermore, we investigate the flame stability at a range of fuel densities. This is directly connected to the questions of active turbulent combustion (a mechanism of flame destabilization and subsequent self-turbulization) and a deflagration-to-detonation transition of the flame. In our simulations we find no substantial destabilization of the flame when propagating into quiescent fuels of densities down to ~10^7 g/cm^3, corroborating fundamental assumptions of large-scale SN Ia explosion models. For these models, however, we suggest an increased lower cutoff for the flame propagation velocity to take the cellular burning regime into account.

F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

88

Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights May 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for April 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/125, was distributed to program participants on May 10, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Fuel Performance Modeling - Fuel Performance Analysis; (2) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Thermomechanical Modeling, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport; (3) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; and (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights June 2011  

SciTech Connect

During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for May 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/126, was distributed to program participants on June 9, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Fuel Performance Modeling - Fuel Performance Analysis; (2) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Behavior, (b) Thermomechanical Modeling, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport; (3) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; and (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Conceptual engineering design and economic evaluation of the burn-acid- leach aqueous process and of the burn-fluoride-volatility process for recovering spent Rover fuel at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

Declassified 24 Sep 1973. Two detailed, conceptual process, equipment, and plant designs were prepared for facilities for recovering spent Rover fuel (highly enriched uranium-graphite) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plart. The results of the study indicate that the fluoridevolatility process is preferred on both economic and technical grounds. Both processes employ a comnion fuel shipping, storage, and charging system and use continuous, fluidized-bed oxidation of the fuel as the first step of the head-end operation. Subsequent operations in the aqueous process include batch leaching the ash with 5 M HF--10 M HNO/sub 3/ in two parallel lines of Teflon-lined leaching and feed-preparation equipment, followed by solvent extraction to decontaminate and recover the uranium as uranyl nitrate. Post-burning operations in the fluoride-volatiiity process include the continuous fluidized-bed and moving-bed fluorination of the ash followed by partial condensation to remove niobium pentafluoride and passage of the UF/sub 6/ through heated sodium fluoride pellets to completely decontaminate the uranium. The uranium is recovered as uranium hexafluoride. (auth)

Nicholson, E.L.

1965-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Clean Cities' Guide to Alternative Fuel Commercial Lawn Equipment (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guide explains the different types of alternative fuel commercial mowers and lists the makes and models of the ones available on the market.

Not Available

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Method of burning sulfur-containing fuels in a fluidized bed boiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of burning a sulfur-containing fuel in a fluidized bed of sulfur oxide sorbent wherein the overall utilization of sulfur oxide sorbent is increased by comminuting the bed drain solids to a smaller average particle size, preferably on the order of 50 microns, and reinjecting the comminuted bed drain solids into the bed. In comminuting the bed drain solids, particles of spent sulfur sorbent contained therein are fractured thereby exposing unreacted sorbent surface. Upon reinjecting the comminuted bed drain solids into the bed, the newly-exposed unreacted sorbent surface is available for sulfur oxide sorption, thereby increasing overall sorbent utilization.

Jones, Brian C. (Windsor, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights April 2011  

SciTech Connect

The baseline change proposal BCP-FCRD-11026 submitted to change the due date for M21AF080202 'Demonstrate fabrication of Transuranic kernels of Plutonium-239/3.5at%Neptunium-237 using newly installed glove box facilities in ORNL 7930 hot cell complex' from 4/25/11 to 3/30/12 was approved this month. During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for March 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/96, was distributed to program participants on April 8, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Thermomechanical Behavior, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (d) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling; and (6) ZrC Properties and Handbook - Properties of ZrC.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Small oil-fired heating equipment: The effects of fuel quality  

SciTech Connect

The physical and chemical characteristics of fuel can affect its flow, atomization, and combustion, all of which help to define the overall performance of a heating system. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of some important parameters of fuel quality on the operation of oil-fired residential heating equipment. The primary focus was on evaluating the effects of the fuel`s sulfur content, aromatics content, and viscosity. Since the characteristics of heating fuel are generally defined in terms of standards (such as ASTM, or state and local fuel-quality requirements), the adequacy and limitations of such specifications also are discussed. Liquid fuels are complex and their properties cannot generally be varied without affecting other properties. To the extent possible, test fuels were specially blended to meet the requirements of the ASTM limits but, at the same time, significant changes were made to the fuels to isolate and vary the selected parameters over broad ranges. A series of combustion tests were conducted using three different types of burners -- a flame-retention head burner, a high static-pressure-retention head burner, and an air-atomized burner. With some adjustments, such modern equipment generally can operate acceptably within a wide range of fuel properties. From the experimental data, the limits of some of the properties could be estimated. The property which most significantly affects the equipment`s performance is viscosity. Highly viscous fuels are poorly atomizated and incompletely burnt, resulting in higher flue gas emissions. Although the sulfur content of the fuel did not significantly affect performance during these short-term studies, other work done at BNL demonstrated that long-term effects due to sulfur can be detrimental in terms of fouling and scale formation on boiler heat exchanger tubes.

Litzke, W.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Nerva fuel nondestructive evaluation and characterization equipment and facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) is one of the technologies that the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has identified as essential for a manned mission to Mars. A base or prior work is available upon which to build in the development of nuclear rockets. From 1955 to 1973, the U.S Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) sponsored development and testing of a nuclear rocket engine under Project Rover. The rocket engine, called the Nuclear Engine for Rocket Vehicle Application (NERVA), used a graphite fuel element incorporating coated particle fuel. Much of the NERVA development and manufacturing work was performed at the Oak Ridge Y[minus]12 Plant. This paper gives a general review of that work in the area of nondestructive evaluation and characterization. Emphasis is placed on two key characteristics: uranium content and distribution and thickness profile of metal carbide coatings deposited in the gas passage holes.

Caputo, A.J. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, Y-12 Plant Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States))

1993-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

96

Alcohol as a fuel for farm and construction equipment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work in three areas dealing with the utilization of ethanol as fuel for farm and construction diesels is summarized. The first part is a review of what is known about the retrofitting of diesels for use of ethanol and the combustion problems involved. The second part is a discussion of the work that has been done under the contract on the performance of a single-cylinder, open-chamber diesel using solutions and emulsions of diesel fuel with ethanol. Data taken include performance, emissions and cylinder pressure-time for diesel fuel with zero to forty percent ethanol by volume. Analysis of the data includes calculation of heat release rates using a single zone model. The third part is a discussion of work done retrofitting a multicylinder turbocharged farm tractor diesel to use ethanol by fumigation. Three methods of ethanol introduction are discussed; spraying ethanol upstream and downstream of the compressor and prevaporization of the ethanol. Data on performance and emissions are given for the last two methods. A three zone heat release model is described and results from the model are given. A correlation of the ignition delay using prevaporized ethanol fumigation data is also given. Comparisons are made between fumigation in DI and IDI engines.

Borman, G L; Foster, D E; Meyers, P S; Uyehara, O A

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the available data from laboratory, pilot and full-scale SCR units was reviewed, leading to hypotheses about the mechanism for mercury oxidation by SCR catalysts.

Constance Senior

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Performance in the Key Early Markets of Material Handling Equipment and Backup Power (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes the results of NREL's analysis of hydrogen fuel cell performance in the key early markets of material handling equipment (MHE) and backup power.

Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

Ramsden, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The Cellular Burning Regime in Type Ia Supernova Explosions - II. Flame Propagation into Vortical Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the interaction of thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernova explosions with vortical flows by means of numerical simulations. In our study, we focus on small scales, where the flame propagation is no longer dominated by the turbulent cascade originating from large-scale effects. Here, the flame propagation proceeds in the cellular burning regime, resulting from a balance between the Landau-Darrieus instability and its nonlinear stabilization. The interaction of a cellularly stabilized flame front with a vortical fuel flow is explored applying a variety of fuel densities and strengths of the velocity fluctuations. We find that the vortical flow can break up the cellular flame structure if it is sufficiently strong. In this case the flame structure adapts to the imprinted flow field. The transition from the cellularly stabilized front to the flame structure dominated by vortices of the flow proceeds in a smooth way. The implications of the results of our simulations for Type Ia Supernova explosion models are discussed.

F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Reactivity loss validation of high burn-up PWR fuels with pile-oscillation experiments in MINERVE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ALIX experimental program relies on the experimental validation of the spent fuel inventory, by chemical analysis of samples irradiated in a PWR between 5 and 7 cycles, and also on the experimental validation of the spent fuel reactivity loss with bum-up, obtained by pile-oscillation measurements in the MINERVE reactor. These latter experiments provide an overall validation of both the fuel inventory and of the nuclear data responsible for the reactivity loss. This program offers also unique experimental data for fuels with a burn-up reaching 85 GWd/t, as spent fuels in French PWRs never exceeds 70 GWd/t up to now. The analysis of these experiments is done in two steps with the APOLLO2/SHEM-MOC/CEA2005v4 package. In the first one, the fuel inventory of each sample is obtained by assembly calculations. The calculation route consists in the self-shielding of cross sections on the 281 energy group SHEM mesh, followed by the flux calculation by the Method Of Characteristics in a 2D-exact heterogeneous geometry of the assembly, and finally a depletion calculation by an iterative resolution of the Bateman equations. In the second step, the fuel inventory is used in the analysis of pile-oscillation experiments in which the reactivity of the ALIX spent fuel samples is compared to the reactivity of fresh fuel samples. The comparison between Experiment and Calculation shows satisfactory results with the JEFF3.1.1 library which predicts the reactivity loss within 2% for burn-up of {approx}75 GWd/t and within 4% for burn-up of {approx}85 GWd/t. (authors)

Leconte, P.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Eschbach, R.; Di-Salvo, J.; Antony, M.; Pepino, A. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility: Building 382 Rev. 1, 02/11/00 Facility: Building 382 Rev. 1, 02/11/00 Training: (1) ESH114 Lockout/Tagout ASD125 APS LOTO ESH371 Electrical Safety - General ESH195 PPE ESH141 Hand and Power Tools (2) ESH707 Accelerator Worker ESH738 GERT (3) ESH196 Hazard Communication ESH376 or 456 Chemical Waste (4) ASDSF6 (5) ESH170 OSHA Lead Standard ESH196 Hazard Communication ESH195 PPE ESH141 Hand and Power Tools (6) ESH195 PPE ESH141 Hand and Power Tools (7) Informal OJT (8) Formal OJT Management Tools: (A) ANL-E ESH Manual SMART (B) APS-SAD APS-CO (C) Waste Handling Procedure Manual Equipment Hazards Engineered Controls Electrical Safety Training References Electrical Safety Procedures Mechanical Safety Training References Mechanical

103

U.S. Department of Energy-Funded Performance Validation of Fuel Cell Material Handling Equipment (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This webinar presentation to the UK Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association summarizes how the U.S. Department of Energy is enabling early fuel cell markets; describes objectives of the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center; and presents performance status of fuel cell material handling equipment.

Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Saur, G.; Ainscough, C.; Post, M.; Peters, M.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Material Handling Equipment Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3704 Email: todd.ramsden@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Peter Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: Oorja Protonics, Inc., Fremont, CA Project Start Date: June 1, 2010 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Operate and maintain fuel-cell-powered material * handling equipment (MHE) using direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology. Compile operational data of DMFCs and validate their * performance under real-world operating conditions. Provide an independent technology assessment that * focuses on DMFC system performance, operation, and

106

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Total Cost Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56408 April 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. HT12.8610 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56408

107

High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

Francesco Venneri; Chang-Keun Jo; Jae-Man Noh; Yonghee Kim; Claudio Filippone; Jonghwa Chang; Chris Hamilton; Young-Min Kim; Ji-Su Jun; Moon-Sung Cho; Hong-Sik Lim; MIchael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Vincent Descotes; Brian Boer

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the third Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the second set of mercury measurements was made after the catalysts had been exposed to flue gas for about 2,000 hours. There was good agreement between the Ontario Hydro measurements and the SCEM measurements. Carbon trap measurements of total mercury agreed fairly well with the SCEM. There did appear to be some loss of mercury in the sampling system toward the end of the sampling campaign. NO{sub x} reductions across the catalysts ranged from 60% to 88%. Loss of total mercury across the commercial catalysts was not observed, as it had been in the March/April test series. It is not clear whether this was due to aging of the catalyst or to changes in the sampling system made between March/April and August. In the presence of ammonia, the blank monolith showed no oxidation. Two of the commercial catalysts showed mercury oxidation that was comparable to that in the March/April series. The other three commercial catalysts showed a decrease in mercury oxidation relative to the March/April series. Oxidation of mercury increased without ammonia present. Transient experiments showed that when ammonia was turned on, mercury appeared to desorb from the catalyst, suggesting displacement of adsorbed mercury by the ammonia.

Constance Senior; Temi Linjewile

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment, Burn-up and Cooling Time of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument  

SciTech Connect

An outline of this presentation of what a Differential Die-Away (DDA) instrument can do are: (1) Principle of operation of DDA instrument; (2) Determination of initial enrichment (IE) ({sigma} < 5%); (3) Determination of burn up (BU) ({sigma} {approx} 6%); (4) Determination of cooling time (CT) ({sigma} {approx} 20-50%); and (5) DDA instrument as a standalone device. DDA response (fresh fuel vs. spent fuel) is: (1) Fresh fuel => DDA response increases (die-away time is longer) with increasing fissile content; and (2) Spent fuel => DDA response decreases (die-away time is shorter) with higher burn-up (i.e. more neutron absorbers present).

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

110

Design and Operation of Equipment to Detect and Remove Water within Used Nuclear Fuel Storage Bottles  

SciTech Connect

Inspection and drying equipment has been implemented in a hot cell to address the inadvertent ingress of water into used nuclear fuel storage bottles. Operated with telemanipulators, the system holds up to two fuel bottles and allows their threaded openings to be connected to pressure transducers and a vacuum pump. A prescribed pressure rebound test is used to diagnose the presence of moisture. Bottles found to contain moisture are dried by vaporization. The drying process is accelerated by the application of heat and vacuum. These techniques detect and remove virtually all free water (even water contained in a debris bed) while leaving behind most, if not all, particulates. The extracted water vapour passes through a thermoelectric cooler where it is condensed back to the liquid phase for collection. Fuel bottles are verified to be dry by passing the pressure rebound test.

C.C. Baker; T.M. Pfeiffer; J.C. Price

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

Ramsden, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge burnup level, while retaining its inherent safety characteristics. Using generic pebble bed reactor cores, this task will perform physics calculations to evaluate the capabilities of the pebble bed reactor to perform utilization and destruction of LWR used-fuel transuranics. The task will use established benchmarked models, and will introduce modeling advancements appropriate to the nature of the fuel considered (high TRU content and high burn-up).

B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fertile free fuels for plutonium and minor actinides burning in LWRs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feasibility of using various uranium-free fuels for plutonium incineration in present light water reactors is investigated. Two major categories of inert matrix fuels are studied: composite ceramic fuel particles ...

Zhang, Yi, 1979-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Underwriters Laboratories now accepting certification investigation requests for E85 fuel dispensing equipment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

MEDIA CONTACT: Joe Hirschmugl Global Media Relations Supervisor Underwriters Laboratories Phone: +1 847 830-1404 E-mail: Joseph.F.Hirschmugl@us.ul.com PRESS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Underwriters Laboratories Announces Development of Certification Requirements for E85 Dispensers Now Accepting Product Submittals for Certification Investigation NORTHBROOK, Ill. Oct. 16, 2007 - Underwriters Laboratories (UL), North America's leading safety testing and certification organization, announced the establishment of safety requirements for E85 fuel dispensing equipment, and is now accepting submittals for certification investigations. The establishment of safety requirements follows the completion of UL's comprehensive research program to investigate potential safety concerns associated with dispensing

115

Apparatus and method for burning a lean, premixed fuel/air ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; ...

116

Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal  

SciTech Connect

A process for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage.

Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Sethi, Vijay (Laramie, WY); Brecher, Lee E. (Laramie, WY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

P2-03: 3D Characterization of High Burn-up MOX Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently fast reactor performance is largely defined by the limitations of the materials involved in reactors, especially the metallic or mixed oxide ((U, Pu)O2) fuel ...

118

Deep Burn Develpment of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors - July 2010  

SciTech Connect

The DB Program Quarterly Progress Report for April - June 2010, ORNL/TM/2010/140, was distributed to program participants on August 4. This report discusses the following: (1) TRU (transuranic elements) HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Fuel Modeling - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) 5.3 Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU HTR Fuel Qualification - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development, (c) ZrC Properties and Handbook; and (3) HTR Fuel Recycle - (a) Recycle Processes, (b) Graphite Recycle, (c) Pyrochemical Reprocessing - METROX (metal recovery from oxide fuel) Process Development.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage. 1 fig.

Merriam, N.W.; Sethi, V.; Brecher, L.E.

1994-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

120

The closed cycle gas turbine, the most efficient turbine burning any fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are two types of gas turbines. The open cycle is very well known as, for example, the JET. The closed cycle in the U.S.A. is just starting to be well known. In Europe, the closed cycle gas turbine has been used in power plants, especially in Germany, and have been very efficient in burning coal. Concentrated in this paper is the Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) as it is the most efficient type of turbine. There are the following sections in this paper: closed cycle gas turbine in more detail; various advantages of the CCGT; Nuclear power; and three comments.

Sawyer, R.T.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Deep Burn: Development of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors- Monthly Highlights November 2010  

SciTech Connect

During FY 2011 the DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for October 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/300, was distributed to program participants on November 29, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant utilizing wood waste products as a fuel has been designed. This plant will yield a 50% efficiency improvement compared to conventional wood-fueled steam power plants. The power plant features an externally-fired gas turbine combined cycle system that obtains its heat input from a high temperature, high pressure ceramic air heater burning wood waste products as a fuel. This paper presents the results of the design study including the cycle evaluation and a description of the major components of the power plant. The cycle configuration is based on maximum fuel efficiency with minimum capital equipment risk. The cycle discussion includes design point performance of the power plant. The design represents a significant step forward in wood-fueled power plants.

Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Emissions From Various Biodiesel Sources Compared to a Range of Diesel Fuels in DPF Equipped Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to measure the impact of various sources of petroleum-based and bio-based diesel fuels on regulated emissions and fuel economy in diesel particulate filter (DPF) equipped diesel engines. Two model year 2008 diesel engines were tested with nine fuels including a certification ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), local ULSD, high aromatic ULSD, low aromatic ULSD, and twenty percent blends of biodiesel derived from algae, camelina, soy, tallow, and yellow grease. Regulated emissions were measured over the heavy duty diesel transient test cycle. Measurements were also made of DPF-out particle size distribution and total particle count from a 13-mode steady state test using a fast mobility particle sizer. Test engines were a 2008 Cummins ISB and a 2008 International Maxx Force 10, both equipped with actively regenerated DPFs. Fuel consumption was roughly 2% greater over the transient test cycle for the B20 blends versus certification ULSD in both engines, consistent with the slightly lower energy content of biodiesel. Unlike studies conducted on older model engines, these engines equipped with diesel oxidation catalysts and DPFs showed small or no measurable fuel effect on the tailpipe emissions of total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM). No differences in particle size distribution or total particle count were seen in a comparison of certification ULSD and B20 soy, with the exception of engine idling conditions where B20 produced a small reduction in the number of nucleation mode particles. In the Cummins engine, B20 prepared from algae, camelina, soy, and tallow resulted in an approximately 2.5% increase in nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) compared to the base fuel. The International engine demonstrated a higher degree of variability for NO{sub x} emissions, and fuel effects could not be resolved (p > 0.05). The group of petroleum diesel test fuels produced a range of NO{sub x} emissions very similar to that caused by blending of biodiesel. Test cycles where an active regeneration of the DPF occurred resulted in a nearly threefold increase in NO{sub x} emissions and a 15% increase in fuel consumption. The full quantification of DPF regeneration events further complicates the accurate calculation of fuel impacts on emissions and fuel consumption.

Williams, A.; Burton, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.; Tester, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Feasibility of burning refuse derived fuel in institutional size oil-fired boilers. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates the feasibility of retrofitting existing oil-fired boilers of institutional size, approximately 3.63 to 36.3 Mg steam/h (8000 to 80,000 lbs steam/h) for co-firing with refuse-derived fuel (RDF). Relevant quantities describing mixtures of oil and RDF and combustion products for various levels of excess air are computed. Savings to be realized from the use of RDF are derived under several assumptions and allowable costs for a retrofit are estimated. An extensive survey of manufacturers of burners, boilers, and combustion systems showed that no hardware or proven design is yet available for such retrofit. Approaches with significant promises are outlined: the slagging burner, and a dry ash double vortex burner for low heat input from RDF. These two systems, and an evaluation of a small separate RDF dedicated combustor in support of the oil-fired boiler, are recommended as topics for future study.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Burns Prevention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burns Burns Burns can result from everyday things and activities in your home. The most common causes of burns are from scalds (steam, hot bath water, hot drinks and foods), fire, chemicals, electricity and overexposure to the sun. Some burns may be more serious than others. The severity of the burn is based on the depth of the burn. First degree burns are the least severe, and third degree burns are the most severe. Call 911 or seek medical attention if you are unsure of how severe your burn is. All burns are susceptible to tetanus (lockjaw). Get a tetanus shot every 10 years. If your last shot was 5 years ago, talk to your doctor - you may need a booster shot. Causes of Burns: Scalds Scalding injuries and burns are caused by hot tap water, hot beverages and food, and steam.

126

1 Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols outflow from India and 2 Arabia: Biomass/biofuel burning and fossil fuel combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols outflow from India and 2 Arabia: Biomass/biofuel tracer for biomass/biofuel burning, 16 number concentration of submicrometer carbon-containing particles and biomass/biofuel 22 burning are subject to long-range transport, thereby contributing to anthropogenic 23

Dickerson, Russell R.

127

High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor With Results from FY-2011 Activities  

SciTech Connect

The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

Michael A. Pope

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

129

Table 11.6 Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment, 1985-2010 (Megawatts)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," Installed Nameplate Capacity of Fossil-Fuel Steam-Electric Generators With Environmental Equipment," " 1985-2010 (Megawatts)" "Year","Coal",,,,"Petroleum and Natural Gas",,,,"Total 1" ,,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2",,,"Flue Gas","Total 2" ,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization",,"Particulate","Cooling","Desulfurization" ,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)",,"Collectors","Towers","(Scrubbers)"

130

Economic and Environmental Analysis of Fuel Cell Powered Materials Handling Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update describes an analysis of the economic and environmental attributes of forklift fleets powered by battery and fuel cell power plants. The report first provides background on the fuel cell forklift technology. The fuel cell forklift is then compared to three other technology options: conventional battery-powered forklifts, fast-charge forklifts at 15 kW of charging power, and fast-charge forklifts at 20 kW of charging power. This study develops models of the infrastructure and equipme...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Development of a closed-loop, lean-burn natural gas engine control system. Final report, February 1993-December 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project was to develop a closed-loop, lean-burn control system for medium and heavy duty, lean-burn, gaseous fueled engines. The closed-loop F/A ratio control system was designed to provide diesel engine-like performance and fuel economy, and take advantage of the emissions benefits of a gaseous fueled engine. The control system was designed to have the processing power and I/O capacity to accommodate the engine Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM`s).

Morris, D.A.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Deep Burn: Development of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors- Monthly Highlights October 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DB Program monthly highlights report for September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/252, was distributed to program participants by email on October 26. This report discusses: (1) Core and Fuel Analysis; (2) Spent Fuel Management; (3) Fuel Cycle Integration of the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor); (4) TRU (transuranic elements) HTR Fuel Qualification; (5) HTR Spent Fuel Recycle - (a) TRU Kernel Development (ORNL), (b) Coating Development (ORNL), (c) Characterization Development and Support, (d) ZrC Properties and Handbook; and (6) HTR Fuel Recycle.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Estimates of global, regional, and national annual CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring: 1950--1992  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the compilation, content, and format of the most comprehensive C0{sub 2}-emissions database currently available. The database includes global, regional, and national annual estimates of C0{sub 2} emissions resulting from fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing, and gas flaring in oil fields for 1950--92 as well as the energy production, consumption, and trade data used for these estimates. The methods of Marland and Rotty (1983) are used to calculate these emission estimates. For the first time, the methods and data used to calculate CO, emissions from gas flaring are presented. This C0{sub 2}-emissions database is useful for carbon-cycle research, provides estimates of the rate at which fossil-fuel combustion has released C0{sub 2} to the atmosphere, and offers baseline estimates for those countries compiling 1990 C0{sub 2}-emissions inventories.

Boden, T.A.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Andres, R.J. [University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Deep Burn: Development of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors- Monthly Highlights September 2010  

SciTech Connect

The DB Program monthly highlights report for August 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/184, was distributed to program participants by email on September 17. This report discusses: (1) Core and Fuel Analysis - (a) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Prismatic Design (Logos), (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Microfuel analysis for the DB HTR (INL, GA, Logos); (2) Spent Fuel Management - (a) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) repository behavior (UNLV), (b) Repository performance of TRISO fuel (UCB); (3) Fuel Cycle Integration of the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) - Synergy with other reactor fuel cycles (GA, Logos); (4) TRU (transuranic elements) HTR Fuel Qualification - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (5) HTR Spent Fuel Recycle - (a) TRU Kernel Development (ORNL), (b) Coating Development (ORNL), (c) Characterization Development and Support, (d) ZrC Properties and Handbook; and (6) HTR Fuel Recycle - (a) Graphite Recycle (ORNL), (b) Aqueous Reprocessing, (c) Pyrochemical Reprocessing METROX (metal recovery from oxide fuel) Process Development (ANL).

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment and Burn-up of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument  

SciTech Connect

A key objective of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is to utilize non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques to determine the elemental plutonium (Pu) content in a commercial-grade nuclear spent fuel assembly (SFA). In the third year of the NGSI Spent Fuel NDA project, the research focus is on the integration of a few NDA techniques. One of the reoccurring challenges to the accurate determination of Pu content has been the explicit dependence of the measured signal on the presence of neutron absorbers which build up in the assembly in accordance with its operating and irradiation history. The history of any SFA is often summarized by the parameters of burn-up (BU), initial enrichment (IE) and cooling time (CT). While such parameters can typically be provided by the operator, the ability to directly measure and verify them would significantly enhance the autonomy of the IAEA inspectorate. Within this paper, we demonstrate that an instrument based on a Differential Die-Away technique is in principle capable of direct measurement of IE and, should the CT be known, also the BU.

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

136

Design and construction of a prototype advanced on-line fuel burn-up monitoring system for the modular pebble bed reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) is a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear power reactor currently under study as a next generation reactor system. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multi-pass fuel circulation in which the fuel pebbles are randomly loaded and continuously cycled through the core until they reach their prescribed End-of-Life burn-up limit. Unlike the situation with a conventional light water reactor, depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management for MPBR will be highly inaccurate. An on-line measurement system is needed to accurately assess whether a given pebble has reached its End-of-Life burn-up limit and thereby provide an on-line, automated go/no-go decision on fuel disposition on a pebble-by-pebble basis. This project investigated approaches to analyzing fuel pebbles in real time using gamma spectroscopy and possibly using passive neutron counting of spontaneous fission neutrons to provide the speed, accuracy, and burn-up range required for burnup determination of MPBR. It involved all phases necessary to develop and construct a burn-up monitor, including a review of the design requirements of the system, identification of detection methodologies, modeling and development of potential designs, and finally, the construction and testing of an operational detector system. Based upon the research work performed in this project, the following conclusions are made. In terms of using gamma spectrometry, two possible approaches were identified for burnup assay. The first approach is based on the measurement of the absolute activity of Cs-137. However, due to spectral interference and the need for absolute calibration of the spectrometer, the uncertainty in burnup determination using this approach was found to range from {approx} {+-}40% at beginning of life to {approx} {+-}10% at the discharge burnup. An alternative approach is to use a relative burnup indicator. In this case, a self-calibration method was developed to obtain the spectrometer's relative efficiency curve based upon gamma lines emitted from {sup 140}La. It was found that the ratio of {sup 239}Np/{sup 132}I can be used in burnup measurement with an uncertainty of {approx} {+-}3% throughout the pebble's lifetime. In addition, by doping the fuel with {sup 60}Co, the use of the {sup 60}Co/{sup 134}Cs and {sup 239}Np/{sup 132}I ratios can simultaneously yield the enrichment and burnup of each pebble. A functional gamma-ray spectrometry measurement system was constructed and tested with light water reactor fuels. Experimental results were observed to be consistent with the predictions. On using the passive neutron counting method for the on-line burnup measurement, it was found that neutron emission rate of an irradiated pebble is sensitive to its burnup history and the spectral-averaged cross sections used in the depletion calculations; thus a large uncertainty exists in the correlation between neutron emission and burnup. At low burnup levels, the uncertainty in the neutron emission/burnup correlation is too high and neutron emission rate is too low so that it is impossible to determine a pebble's burnup by on-line neutron counting. At high burnup levels, due to the decreasing of the uncertainty in neutron emission rate and the super-linear feature of the correlation, the uncertainty in burnup determination was found to be {approx}7% at the discharge burnup, which is acceptable for determining whether a pebble should be discharged or not. In terms of neutron detection, because an irradiated pebble is a weak neutron source and a much stronger gamma source, neutron detector system should have high neutron detection efficiency and strong gamma discrimination capability. Of all the commonly used neutron detectors, the He-3 and BF3 detector systems were found to be able to satisfy the requirement on detection efficiency; but their gamma discrimination capability is only marginal for this on-line application. Even with thick gamma shielding, these two types of detectors sha

Su, Bingjing; Hawari, Ayman, I.

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 (2014) 162-169" DOI : 10.1016/j.fuel.2013.07.015 #12;2 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES, Sweden Abstract The adiabatic laminar burning velocities of a commercial gasoline and of a model fuel (n

138

New fuels for old  

SciTech Connect

A combination of price, availability, and government policies is forcing electric utilities to look to non-oil fuels even though only a small percentage of the conversions will be uncomplicated. Even those plants that originally burned coal will require extensive modifications to meet present pollution regulations and to restore their coal preparation and handling equipment. Hybrid fuels, such as coal-oil and coal-water, offer the flexibility of oil at a lower cost, but many utilities lack the capital to gamble on non-traditional alternatives. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) programs that can provide the information that utilities need to make fuel decisions include work on coal and oil or water mixtures, municipal solid wastes, peat, and wood residues. The information EPRI gathers will allow utilities to identify the alternative best suited to their existing equipment, financial position, environment, and location. (DCK)

Lihach, N.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Actinide Burning in CANDU Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actinide burning in CANDU reactors has been studied as a method of reducing the actinide content of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, and thereby decreasing the associated long term decay heat load. In this work simulations were performed of actinides mixed with natural uranium to form a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and also mixed with silicon carbide to form an inert matrix (IMF) fuel. Both of these fuels were taken to a higher burnup than has previously been studied. The total transuranic element destruction calculated was 40% for the MOX fuel and 71% for the IMF. (authors)

Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

How much carbon dioxide is produced by burning gasoline and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much carbon dioxide is produced by burning gasoline and diesel fuel? About 19.64 pounds of carbon dioxide (CO 2) are produced from burning a gallon of gasoline ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hydrogen Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

explored as a fuel for passenger vehicles. It can be used in fuel cells to power electric motors or burned in internal combustion engines (ICEs). It is an environmentally...

142

The burning bush  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISSN 1948-6596 The burning bush Fire in Mediterraneandiscussion. Pre- scription burning is used in many forest

Schwilk, Dylan W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Emissions characterization and particle size distribution from a DPF-equipped diesel truck fueled with biodiesel blends.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biodiesel may be derived from either plant or animal sources, and is usually employed as a compression ignition fuel in a blend with petroleum diesel… (more)

Olatunji, Idowu O.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-duty Engine in Conjunction with Ultra Low Sulfur Fuel (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discusses the full useful life exhaust emission performance of a NOx (nitrogen oxides) adsorber and diesel particle filter equipped light-duty and medium-duty engine using ultra low sulfur diesel fuel.

Thornton, M.; Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Weber, P.; Webb, C.

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

145

Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal of mercury from simulated flue gas. A business model was generated to summarize anti

J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills  

SciTech Connect

Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (<70%). High airflow rate was required to achieve >50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal of mercury from simulated flue gas. A business model was generated to summarize anti

J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

2010 Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power and Material Handling Equipment Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturing Readiness Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power and Material Handling Equipment Markets Doug Wheeler DJW Technology Michael Ulsh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-53046 August 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 2010 Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power

148

Burning plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration.

Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Sigmar, D.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Renewable Energy Equipment Manufacturer Tax Credit | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manufacturer Tax Credit Renewable Energy Equipment Manufacturer Tax Credit Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Commercial...

150

Considerations for Prescribed Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerations for Prescribed Burning NEW M EX ICO S TAE U N I V E R SI T YT Cooperative Extension prescribed burns ...................... 1 Fire effects ................................................ 3 Justification for burning ......................................... 3 Reclamation versus

Castillo, Steven P.

151

Neutronic Analysis of the Burning of Transuranics in Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Tri-Isotropic Particle-Fuel in a PWR  

SciTech Connect

Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU) – only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO2 and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO2 and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior is dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint.

Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou; Brian Boer

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: coupling experimental and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: coupling experimental for burning the fuel-lean mixtures of hydrogen or hydrogen-rich syngas fuels obtained from the gasification, including those burning lean hydrogen at both at atmospheric and elevated pressures [6]. The low

Bell, John B.

153

Geographic patterns of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring on a one degree by one degree grid cell basis: 1950 to 1990  

SciTech Connect

Data sets of one degree latitude by one degree longitude carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon (C) per year from anthropogenic sources have been produced for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO{sub 2} emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions. Global, regional and national annual estimates for 1950 through 1992 were published previously. Those national, annual CO{sub 2} emission estimates were based on statistics on fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing and gas flaring in oil fields as well as energy production, consumption and trade data, using the methods of Marland and Rotty. The national annual estimates were combined with gridded one-degree data on political units and 1984 human populations to create the new gridded CO{sub 2} emission data sets. The same population distribution was used for each of the years as proxy for the emission distribution within each country. The implied assumption for that procedure was that per capita energy use and fuel mix is uniform over a political unit. The consequence of this first-order procedure is that the spatial changes observed over time are solely due to changes in national energy consumption and nation-based fuel mix. Increases in emissions over time are apparent for most areas.

Brenkert, A.L. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Andres, R.J. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Fung, I. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies; Matthews, E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Spring Cleaning. Calorie Burning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spring Cleaning. Calorie Burning. Laundry: 73 Dusting: 85 Mopping the Floor: 153 Washing the Car Painting: 161 (Estimate based on 150 lb person per 30 minutes, more calories burned if weigh more, fewer calories burned if weigh less) Allergy Sufferers' Survival Guide > Wash your hair before bed to avoid

Acton, Scott

155

Historic American Engineering Record, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, Fuel Reprocessing Complex  

SciTech Connect

Just as automobiles need fuel to operate, so do nuclear reactors. When fossil fuels such as gasoline are burned to power an automobile, they are consumed immediately and nearly completely in the process. When the fuel is gone, energy production stops. Nuclear reactors are incapable of achieving this near complete burn-up because as the fuel (uranium) that powers them is burned through the process of nuclear fission, a variety of other elements are also created and become intimately associated with the uranium. Because they absorb neutrons, which energize the fission process, these accumulating fission products eventually poison the fuel by stopping the production of energy from it. The fission products may also damage the structural integrity of the fuel elements. Even though the uranium fuel is still present, sometimes in significant quantities, it is unburnable and will not power a reactor unless it is separated from the neutron-absorbing fission products by a method called fuel reprocessing. Construction of the Fuel Reprocessing Complex at the Chem Plant started in 1950 with the Bechtel Corporation serving as construction contractor and American Cyanamid Company as operating contractor. Although the Foster Wheeler Corporation assumed responsibility for the detailed working design of the overall plant, scientists at Oak Ridge designed all of the equipment that would be employed in the uranium separations process. After three years of construction activity and extensive testing, the plant was ready to handle its first load of irradiated fuel.

Susan Stacy; Julie Braun

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Sunrise Agri Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 55310 Sector Biomass Product Manufacturer of Biomass Fuel Pellets for Pellet Burning Stoves. References Sunrise Agri Fuels1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

157

Fuel Systems Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

company with divisions focusing on bringing cleaner-burning gaseous fuel (such as propane and natural gas) technology to various types of vehicles. References Fuel Systems...

158

BNL | Biomass Burns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Aerosols from biomass burning are recognized to perturb Earth's climate through the direct effect (both scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave radiation), the semi-direct effect (evaporation of cloud drops due to absorbing aerosols), and indirect effects (by influencing cloud formation and precipitation. Biomass burning is an important aerosol source, providing an estimated 40% of anthropogenically influenced fine carbonaceous particles (Bond, et al., 2004; Andrea and Rosenfeld, 2008). Primary organic aerosol (POA) from open biomass burns and biofuel comprises the largest component of primary organic aerosol mass emissions at northern temperate latitudes (de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Data from the IMPROVE

159

Burning Forest Residues231 Corstorphine Road www.forestry.gov.uk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Burning Forest Residues231 Corstorphine Road Edinburgh EH12 7AT www.forestry.gov.uk S E P T E M B E R 2 0 0 2 FCTN004 SUMMARY Burning forest residues is a traditional method of ground clearance following harvesting operations. Guidance is given on suitable types of cut material for burning, equipment

160

California Fuel Cell Partnership Alternative Fuels Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and maintenance are both important. Propane and CNG are NOT "cleaner burning". RSD is a very good tool but ... Measured grams pollutant per kg of fuel from RSD -quantifiable uncertainty Fuel sales from tax department inventories · Only need one week of work and fuel sales to get fuel based emissions inventories · RSD

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Uniform-burning matrix burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Bittersweet and Burning Bush  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bittersweet and Burning Bush Nature Bulletin No. 250 December 25, 1982 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation...

163

Laboratory - Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available Equipment. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z. B. Ohaus ... W. Barnstead ...

2013-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

164

Feasibility study for fuel-grade-ethanol complex, Kennewick, Washington. Volume III of V. Technical report. Appendix A, Book 1. Equipment and material specifications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Books 1 and 2 of Appendix A to Volume III, Technical Report, contain copies of major equipment and material specifications used in the preliminary design and engineering of the Ethanol Complex. These specifications are used in securing vendor quotations which are the basis of the plant definitive cost estimate. Section 3 contains copies of all equipment and material, process, and mechanical outline specifications. Included in this part are: cooling towers and mechanical equipment.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low Btu fuel from castings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low Btu gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollutis reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved. 5 figs.

Scheffer, K.D.

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

166

System and process for the abatement of casting pollution, reclaiming resin bonded sand, and/or recovering a low BTU fuel from castings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Air is caused to flow through the resin bonded mold to aid combustion of the resin binder to form a low BTU gas fuel. Casting heat is recovered for use in a waste heat boiler or other heat abstraction equipment. Foundry air pollution is reduced, the burned portion of the molding sand is recovered for immediate reuse and savings in fuel and other energy is achieved.

Scheffer, Karl D. (121 Governor Dr., Scotia, NY 12302)

1984-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

167

Prescribed Burning Costs: Trends and Influences in the National Forest System1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prescribed Burning Costs: Trends and Influences in the National Forest System1 David A. Cleaves,2 Service's National Forest System prescribed burning activity and costs are examined. Fuels management officers from 95 National Forests reported costs and acreage burned for 4 types of prescribed fire

Standiford, Richard B.

168

Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interannual variations in fossil fuel emissions. J. Geophys.Treat CO 2 from fossil fuel burning: global distribution ofdioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement

Gurney, Kevin R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Manufacturing Readiness Assessment for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Back-up Power and Material Handling Equipment Emerging Markets (Revised)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details NREL's activity to address the need to understand the current status and associated risk levels of the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell industry.

Wheeler, D.; Ulsh, M.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Fuel Contracts Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Fuel Contracts for Heavy-Duty Equipment

172

Gas turbines fired by solid fuels  

SciTech Connect

Steadily increasing energy requirements have spurred a search for new methods of generating energy from low-cost, abundant fuels. The development of a gas-turbine system equipped for the direct combustion of such fuels is now underway in the U.S. A one-megawatt pilot plant has been operating for over a year, using a fluidized bed to burn coal. The plant has also operated on wood waste and municipal solid waste as fuels. Methods have been developed for the suppression of noxious gases included among the combustion products, but there remain some problems with the removal of particulate matter from the exhaust gas prior to its entry into the turbine. A new high-temperature filter is being installed to alleviate these. A description of the one-megawatt pilot plant is provided, along with a discussion of operational results and mechanical problems and their solutions. A preliminary design for a full-scale plant is included.

Wade, G.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Sun tanning/burning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sun tanning/burning Sun tanning/burning Name: Richardo Cossyleon Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why doesn't the sun affect or burn people with dark pigment in their skin? Replies: Good question! The pigment, melanin, is more toward the surface of the upper skin layer and absorbs ultraviolet rays from the Sun or artificial sources. This absorption protects the lower layers from damage and inflammation (burning). A very dark skinned person may have over a 1000X the protection from UV compared to a fair skinned person. Fair skinned people should use sun-block lotions especially early in the warm season AND keep exposure to the sun, particularly at midday, to less than 30 min. Even if a person gets a good tan, the sun's UV will age the skin over time. It will get wrinkled and develop age lines, etc. after many years of exposure. Moderation is the key!

174

Enabling the Use of Hydrogen as a Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... While the burning of fossil fuels produces carbon ... powerful, efficient, and durable fuel-cell designs ... consensus standards that support model building ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

175

Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavy-water-moderated, light-water-moderated and liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors fueled with natural or low-enriched uranium and containing thorium mixed with the uranium or in separate target channels. U-232 decays with a 69-year half-life through 1.9-year half-life Th-228 to Tl-208, which emits a 2.6 MeV gamma ray upon decay. We find that pressurized light-water-reactors fueled with LEU-thorium fuel at high burnup (70 MWd/kg) produce U-233 with U-232 contamination levels of about 0.4 percent. At this contamination level, a 5 kg sphere of U-233 would produce a gammaray dose rate of 13 and 38 rem/hr at 1 meter one and ten years after chemical purification respectively. The associated plutonium contains 7.5 percent of the undesirable heat-generating 88-year half-life isotope Pu-238. However, just as it is possible to produce weapon-grade plutonium in low-burnup fuel, it is also practical to use heavy-water reactors to produce U-233 containing only a few ppm of U-232 if the thorium is segregated in “target ” channels and discharged a few times more frequently than the natural-uranium “driver ” fuel. The dose rate from a 5-kg solid sphere of U-233 containing 5 ppm U-232 could be reduced by a further factor of 30, to about 2 mrem/hr, with a close-fitting lead sphere weighing about 100 kg. Thus the proliferation resistance of thorium fuel cycles depends very much upon how they are implemented. The original version of this manuscript was received by Science & Global Security on

Jungmin Kang A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Open Burning Permit Events Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open Burning Permit Events Management Form Revision Date: 09/29/2010 OpenBurningPermit.docx A Use being burned: (check all that apply) [ ] Small logs (less than 16 in. long) [ ] Finished Lumber________________________________ As the individual responsible for this event, I have read the attached Regulations for Open Burning. The sponsoring

Manning, Sturt

177

2010 Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power and Materials Handling Equipment Markets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2008, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE), conducted a manufacturing readiness assessment (MRA) of fuel cell systems and fuel cell stacks for back-up power and material handling applications (MHE). To facilitate the MRA, manufacturing readiness levels (MRL) were defined that were based on the Technology Readiness Levels previously established by the US Department of Energy (DOE). NREL assessed the extensive existing hierarchy of MRLs developed by Department of Defense (DoD) and other Federal entities, and developed a MRL scale adapted to the needs of the Fuel Cell Technologies Program (FCTP) and to the status of the fuel cell industry. The MRL ranking of a fuel cell manufacturing facility increases as the manufacturing capability transitions from laboratory prototype development through Low Rate Initial Production to Full Rate Production. DOE can use MRLs to address the economic and institutional risks associated with a ramp-up in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell production. In 2010, NREL updated this assessment, including additional manufacturers, an assessment of market developments since the original report, and a comparison of MRLs between 2008 and 2010.

Wheeler, D.; Ulsh, M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane and methane-hydrogen (10%, 20% and 50% hydrogen by volume) mixtures have been ignited in a fan stirred bomb in turbulence and filmed using high speed cine schlieren imaging. Measurements were performed at 0.1 MPa (absolute) and 360 K. A turbulent burning velocity was determined for a range of turbulence velocities and equivalence ratios. Experimental laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers were also derived. For all fuels the turbulent burning velocity increased with turbulence velocity. The addition of hydrogen generally resulted in increased turbulent and laminar burning velocity and decreased Markstein number. Those flames that were less sensitive to stretch (lower Markstein number) burned faster under turbulent conditions, especially as the turbulence levels were increased, compared to stretch-sensitive (high Markstein number) flames. (author)

Fairweather, M. [School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ormsby, M.P.; Sheppard, C.G.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Woolley, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

179

Transuranic Burning Issues Related to a Second Geologic Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report defines issues that need to be addressed by a development program recently initiated to establish the viability of a transuranic burning concept application that would achieve a substantial delay to the need date for a second geologic repository. The visualized transuranic burning concept application is one in which spent fuel created after a date in the 2010 time frame or later would be processed and the separated plutonium used to start up liquid metal reactors (LMRs).

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment Applications  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Specific questions concerning equipment should be directed to the point of Specific questions concerning equipment should be directed to the point of contact responsible for the item(s) under consideration. This information is listed on the "Equipment Information" page, as well as on the grant award e-mail sent to the applicant. Step 1: Search and Apply for Equipment Note: If you know the Item Control Number of the equipment you need, you may go directly to the on-line application. Please follow these procedures to "Search Equipment" and apply for equipment using the LEDP Online Application: Select the "Search Equipment" menu link. Enter the type of equipment desired into the search box or choose the "Equipment List" link, which will allow you see a complete list of available equipment. Select the "Item Control Number" for the desired equipment. This

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Alcohol fuels program technical review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The last issue of the Alcohol Fuels Process R/D Newsletter contained a work breakdown structure (WBS) of the SERI Alcohol Fuels Program that stressed the subcontracted portion of the program and discussed the SERI biotechnology in-house program. This issue shows the WBS for the in-house programs and contains highlights for the remaining in-house tasks, that is, methanol production research, alcohol utilization research, and membrane research. The methanol production research activity consists of two elements: development of a pressurized oxygen gasifier and synthesis of catalytic materials to more efficiently convert synthesis gas to methanol and higher alcohols. A report is included (Finegold et al. 1981) that details the experimental apparatus and recent results obtained from the gasifier. The catalysis research is principally directed toward producing novel organometallic compounds for use as a homogeneous catalyst. The utilization research is directed toward the development of novel engine systems that use pure alcohol for fuel. Reforming methanol and ethanol catalytically to produce H/sub 2/ and CO gas for use as a fuel offers performance and efficiency advantages over burning alcohol directly as fuel in an engine. An application of this approach is also detailed at the end of this section. Another area of utilization is the use of fuel cells in transportation. In-house researchers investigating alternate electrolyte systems are exploring the direct and indirect use of alcohols in fuel cells. A workshop is being organized to explore potential applications of fuel cells in the transportation sector. The membrane research group is equipping to evaluate alcohol/water separation membranes and is also establishing cost estimation and energy utilization figures for use in alcohol plant design.

Not Available

182

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Business Case Equipment Options

183

5, 27912831, 2005 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 2791­2831, 2005 Biomass burning emissions P. Guyon et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction measurements of trace gas and aerosol particle emissions from biomass burning in Amazonia P. Guyon1 , G. Frank1. 2791 #12;ACPD 5, 2791­2831, 2005 Biomass burning emissions P. Guyon et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

184

Smoke Management for Prescribed Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smoke Management for Prescribed Burning E-1008 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Smoke Management for Prescribed Burning Extension #12;#12;Smoke Management for Prescribed Burning John R. Weir Research Associate Natural Resource

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

185

Burning Plasma Developments Presented to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Developments Dale Meade Presented to VLT Program Advisory Committee UCLA December 4 and Burning Plasma Issues · NSO PAC Activities First Meeting July 20-21, 2001 at GA Action Items and Status Second Meeting January 17-18, 2001 at MIT Agenda items · FuSAC Recommendation on a burning plasma

186

7, 1733917366, 2007 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA wet season experiment C. H. Mari a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tracing biomass burning plumes from. Mari (marc@aero.obs-mip.fr) 17339 #12;ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

187

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

Grimble, R.E.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

188

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

Grimble, Ralph E. (Finleyville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

An Interactive Simulation Framework for Burning Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simulation framework to integrate several aspects of the combustion and burning process in a unified and modular manner. A simple three gas flame model is used to simulate a combustion process, while air motion is simulated as a single moving fluid. Solid objects inside the simulation domain can catch fire and start burning. Heat information is transferred from the fluid simulator to a solid simulator, while the solid simulator injects fuel into the fluid simulation. We also present a simple yet effective method for modeling of object decomposition under combustion using level set methods. The interaction between modules is presented as well as a discussion of fluid-solid coupling. All simulation modules run together at interactive rates, enabling the user to tweak the simulation parameters and setup for desired behavior 1. 1

Zeki Melek; John Keyser

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Table WH1. Total Households Using Water Heating Equipment, 2005 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table WH1. Total Households Using Water Heating Equipment, 2005 Million U.S. Households Fuels Used (million U.S. households) Number of Water Heaters Used

191

Electric household equipment and electric fuel usage in the Tri-State Region and the United States: 1960-70. Working paper  

SciTech Connect

The possible impact of areawide residential location policy on future residential electricity usage in the Tri-State Metropolitan Region centering on New York City is investigated. This report is concerned with selected residential electric appliance usage in the Tri-State Region as compared with usage of these appliances across the United States between 1960 and 1970. Included are tabular representations of comparisons between residential air conditioner usage in the Tri-State Region and the United States. Tabular comparisons also are made with respect to residential appliance usage and electric fuel usage.

Hillman, B.

1973-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Efficient Driving Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Efficient Driving Behaviors to Conserve Fuel on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Management Strategies

193

Municipal solid waste combustion: Fuel testing and characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to screen and characterize potential biomass fuels from waste streams. This will be accomplished by determining the types of pollutants produced while burning selected municipal waste, i.e., commercial mixed waste paper residential (curbside) mixed waste paper, and refuse derived fuel. These materials will be fired alone and in combination with wood, equal parts by weight. The data from these experiments could be utilized to size pollution control equipment required to meet emission standards. This document provides detailed descriptions of the testing methods and evaluation procedures used in the combustion testing and characterization project. The fuel samples will be examined thoroughly from the raw form to the exhaust emissions produced during the combustion test of a densified sample.

Bushnell, D.J.; Canova, J.H.; Dadkhah-Nikoo, A.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Dual Fuel Conversion System for Diesel Engines: Inventions and Innovation Project Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project fact sheet written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new dual fuel conversion system allows diesel fuel switching with clean burning natural gas.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

195

Effect of inactive impurities on the burning of ICF targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of thermonuclear burning of the spherical deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets in the presence of low-Z impurities (such as lithium, carbon, or beryllium) with arbitrary concentrations is investigated. The effect of impurities produced due to the mixing of the thermonuclear fuel with the material of the structural elements of the target during its compression on the process of target burning is studied, and the possibility of using solid noncryogenic thermonuclear fuels in ICF targets is analyzed. Analytical dependences of the ignition energy and target thermonuclear gain on the impurity concentration are obtained. The models are constructed for homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas for the case in which the burning is initiated in the central heated region of the target and then propagates into the surrounding relatively cold fuel. Two possible configurations of an inhomogeneous plasma, namely, an isobaric configuration formed in the case of spark ignition of the target and an isochoric configuration formed in the case of fast ignition, are considered. The results of numerical simulations of the burning of the DT plasma of ICF targets in a wide range of impurity concentrations are presented. The simulations were performed using the TEPA one-dimensional code, in which the thermonuclear burning kinetics is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the strongest negative effect related to the presence of impurities is an increase in the energy of target ignition. It is substantiated that the most promising solid noncryogenic fuel is DT hydride of beryllium (BeDT). The requirements to the plasma parameters at which BeDT can be used as a fuel in noncryogenic ICF targets are determined. Variants of using noncryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel are proposed.

Gus'kov, S. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Engineering Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Nuclear fuel cycles for mid-century development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of nuclear fuel cycles was carried out. Fuel cycles reviewed include: once-through fuel cycles in LWRs, PHWRs, HTGRs, and fast gas cooled breed and burn reactors; single-pass recycle schemes: plutonium ...

Parent, Etienne, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

On burning regimes and long duration X-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen and helium accreted onto a neutron star undergo thermonuclear burning. Explosive burning is observed as a type I X-ray burst. We describe the different burning regimes and focus on some of the current inconsistencies between theory and observations. Of special interest are the rare kinds of X-ray bursts such as carbon-fueled superbursts and helium-fueled intermediately long X-ray bursts. These bursts are thought to originate deeper in the neutron star envelope, such that they are probes of the thermal properties of the crust. We investigate the possibility of observing superbursts with the wide-field instruments INTEGRAL-ISGRI and Swift-BAT. We find that only the brightest bursts are detectable.

L. Keek; J. J. M. in 't Zand

2008-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Summary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

equipment is heavy and costly * Slow response time of the fuel cell adversely affects regenerative energy recovery potential and efficiency Barriers to full fuel cell bus...

199

Dynamic Optimization of Lean Burn Engine Aftertreatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The competition to deliver fuel e#cient and environmentally friendly vehicles is driving the 1 2 Submitted to Journal of Dynamics Systems, Measurement, & Control automotive industry to consider ever more complex powertrain systems. Adequate performance of these new highly interactive systems can no longer be obtained through traditional approaches, which are intensive in hardware use and #nal control software calibration. This paper explores the use of Dynamic Programming to make model-based design decisions for a lean burn, direct injection spark ignition engine, in combination with a three way catalyst and an additional threeway catalyst, often referred to as a lean NOx trap. The primary contribution is the development ofavery rapid method to evaluate the tradeo#s in fuel economy and emissions for this novel powertrain system, as a function of design parameters and controller structure, over a standard emission test cycle. 1 Introduction Designing a powertrain system to m...

Jun-Mo Kang; Ilya Kolmanovsky; J. W. Grizzle

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

PRODUCTION OF NEW BIOMASS/WASTE-CONTAINING SOLID FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CQ Inc. and its team members (ALSTOM Power Inc., Bliss Industries, McFadden Machine Company, and industry advisors from coal-burning utilities, equipment manufacturers, and the pellet fuels industry) addressed the objectives of the Department of Energy and industry to produce economical, new solid fuels from coal, biomass, and waste materials that reduce emissions from coal-fired boilers. This project builds on the team's commercial experience in composite fuels for energy production. The electric utility industry is interested in the use of biomass and wastes as fuel to reduce both emissions and fuel costs. In addition to these benefits, utilities also recognize the business advantage of consuming the waste byproducts of customers both to retain customers and to improve the public image of the industry. Unfortunately, biomass and waste byproducts can be troublesome fuels because of low bulk density, high moisture content, variable composition, handling and feeding problems, and inadequate information about combustion and emissions characteristics. Current methods of co-firing biomass and wastes either use a separate fuel receiving, storage, and boiler feed system, or mass burn the biomass by simply mixing it with coal on the storage pile. For biomass or biomass-containing composite fuels to be extensively used in the U.S., especially in the steam market, a lower cost method of producing these fuels must be developed that includes both moisture reduction and pelletization or agglomeration for necessary fuel density and ease of handling. Further, this method of fuel production must be applicable to a variety of combinations of biomass, wastes, and coal; economically competitive with current fuels; and provide environmental benefits compared with coal. Notable accomplishments from the work performed in Phase I of this project include the development of three standard fuel formulations from mixtures of coal fines, biomass, and waste materials that can be used in existing boilers, evaluation of these composite fuels to determine their applicability to the major combustor types, development of preliminary designs and economic projections for commercial facilities producing up to 200,000 tons per year of biomass/waste-containing fuels, and the development of dewatering technologies to reduce the moisture content of high-moisture biomass and waste materials during the pelletization process.

David J. Akers; Glenn A. Shirey; Zalman Zitron; Charles Q. Maney

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (with Record of Technical Change No.1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Active Unit 490 consists of four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 03-56-001-03BA, Fire Training Area (FTA); RG-56-001-RGBA, Station 44 Burn Area; 03-58-001-03FN, Sandia Service Yard; and 09-54-001-09L2, Gun Propellant Burn Area. These CASs are located at the Tonopah Test Range near Areas 3 and 9. Historically, the FTA was used for training exercises where tires and wood were ignited with diesel fuel. Records indicate that water and carbon dioxide were the only extinguishing agents used during these training exercises. The Station 44 Burn Area was used for fire training exercises and consisted of two wooden structures. The two burn areas (ignition of tires, wood, and wooden structures with diesel fuel and water) were limited to the building footprints (10 ft by 10 ft each). The Sandia Service Yard was used for storage (i.e., wood, tires, metal, electronic and office equipment, construction debris, and drums of oil/grease) from approximately 1979 to 1993. The Gun Propellant Burn Area was used from the 1960s to 1980s to burn excess artillery gun propellant, solid-fuel rocket motors, black powder, and deteriorated explosives; additionally, the area was used for the disposal of experimental explosive items. Based on site history, the focus of the field investigation activities will be to: (1) determine the presence of contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) at each CAS, (2) determine if any COPCs exceed field-screening levels and/or preliminary action levels, and (3) determine the nature and extent of contamination with enough certainty to support selection of corrective action alternatives for each CAS. The scope of this CAIP is to resolve the question of whether or not potentially hazardous wastes were generated at three of the four CASs within CAU 490, and whether or not potentially hazardous and radioactive wastes were generated at the fourth CAS in CAU 490 (CAS 09-54-001-09L2). Suspected CAS-specific COPCs include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, explosives, and uranium and plutonium isotopes. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

202

57USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. Abstract: Despite a quarter of a century of prescribed burning by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of prescribed burning by the National Park Service (NPS) in California, there is reason to believe that the fuels situation is getting worse rather than better. The area burned in the past 10 years has declined by 42 percent compared to the previous 10 years. The total area burned per year from wildfire

Standiford, Richard B.

203

Fuel processor for fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Springer, Thomas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Huff, James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Agency Electric State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on

205

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Highway Electric State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Highway Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Regulations on

206

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Agency Electric State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Agency Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installation on

207

Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Description: Location of Equipment: Address Line 2: Address Line 3: City: State: Zip: Contact: Phone: Fax: Email address: Quantity: Original Acquisition Cost: 0.00 U.S....

208

Bending Burning Matches and Crumpling Burning Paper Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bending Burning Matches and Crumpling Burning Paper Zeki Melek Texas A&M University Department burning. Specifically, we can simulate the bending of burning matches, and the folding of burning paper interactively. 1 Introduction We present a simple method to increase the realism of the simu- lation of burning

Keyser, John

209

DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period January 1, 2001-March 31, 2001, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) finalized the engineering of the Willow Island cofiring project, completed the fuel characterizations for both the Willow Island and Albright Generating Station projects, and initiated construction of both projects. Allegheny and its contractor, Foster Wheeler, selected appropriate fuel blends and issued purchase orders for all processing and mechanical equipment to be installed at both sites. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations. The third quarter of the project involved completing the detailed designs for the Willow Island Designer Fuel project. It also included complete characterization of the coal and biomass fuels being burned, focusing upon the following characteristics: proximate and ultimate analysis; higher heating value; carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance testing for aromaticity, number of aromatic carbons per cluster, and the structural characteristics of oxygen in the fuel; drop tube reactor testing for high temperature devolatilization kinetics and generation of fuel chars; thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) for char oxidation kinetics; and related testing. The construction at both sites commenced during this quarter, and was largely completed at the Albright Generating Station site.

K. Payette; D. Tillman

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

BLM Burns District Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burns District Office Jump to: navigation, search Name BLM Burns District Office Place Hines, Oregon References BLM Burns District Office1 This article is a stub. You can help...

211

INHIBITION EFFECTS ON EXTINCTION OF POLYMER BURNING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON EXTINCTION OF POLYMER BURNING* W.J. Pitz R.F. SawyerQuantitative determinations of burning rates, extinctionlayer at the surface of a burning polymer. The char l ayer

Pitz, W.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Real-Time Fuel Gas Composition Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal  

... is that the composition of the gas from these sources varies widely. Fuel burns differently with differing ratios of methane, propane, and other combustible gases.

213

Electrochemical CO2 Capture and Instant Conversion into Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, burning fossil fuels produces CO2, emission of which to atmosphere causes global warming and climate change. A near-term realistic solution to ...

214

Third international symposium on alcohol fuels technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the opening of the Symposium, Dr. Sharrah, Senior Vice President of Continental Oil Company, addressed the attendees, and his remarks are included in this volume. The Symposium was concluded by workshops which addressed specific topics. The topical titles are as follows: alcohol uses; production; environment and safety; and socio-economic. The workshops reflected a growing confidence among the attendees that the alcohols from coal, remote natural gas and biomass do offer alternatives to petroleum fuels. Further, they may, in the long run, prove to be equal or superior to the petroleum fuels when the aspects of performance, environment, health and safety are combined with the renewable aspect of the biomass derived alcohols. Although considerable activity in the production and use of alcohols is now appearing in many parts of the world, the absence of strong, broad scale assessment and support for these fuels by the United States Federal Government was a noted point of concern by the attendees. The environmental consequence of using alcohols continues to be more benign in general than the petroleum based fuels. The exception is the family of aldehydes. Although the aldehydes are easily suppressed by catalysts, it is important to understand their production in the combustion process. Progress is being made in this regard. Of course, the goal is to burn the alcohols so cleanly that catalytic equipment can be eliminated. Separate abstracts are prepared for the Energy Data Base for individual presentations.

none,

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Alternative Fuel Vehicle Data  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report contains data on the number of onroad alternative fuel vehicles and hybrid vehicles made available by both the original equipment manufacturers and aftermarket vehicle conversion facilities and data on the use of alternative fueled vehicles and the amount of fuel they consume.

Information Center

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

Interim results: development of a head-end process for recovering uranium and thorium from crushed Fort St. Vrain fuel  

SciTech Connect

Development of processes and equipment for recovering uranium and thorium from crushed Ft. St. Vrain fuel is described. Primary burning, particle classification, particle breaking, secondary burning, and aqueous processing were studied. Interim pilot-plant results show that: (1) graphite can be burned at the plant equivalent rate of 35 kgC/hr-ft$sup 2$ in the primary burner and that fines can be consumed by recycle to the primary burner; (2) separation to greater than 95 percent pure fissile and 85 percent pure fertile particles can be effected by a gas classifier; (3) gas jets are capable of breaking silicon carbide coatings at rates compatible with plant requirements; gas utilization efficiencies are sufficiently great that off-gas generated by the jets is less than 5 percent of the off-gas generated by the process equipment; (4) an artificial inert bed is not required for secondary burning and the carbon content of the bed can easily be reduced to less than 2 percent in the secondary burner; (5) corrosion rates of thorex solution on 304 L stainless steel are sufficiently low to allow the dissolver to be constructed of 304 L stainless steel; and, (6) solids--liquid separation efficiencies using a continuous solid-bowl centrifuge are sufficiently high to process the dissolver product in a pulse-column extractor. Basic data on the process materials and conditions germane to the safety analysis for the process are also given. (JGB)

Hogg, G.W.; Rindfleisch, J.A.; Palmer, W.B.; Anderson, D.L.; Vavruska, J.S.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Burning Plasma Support Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning Plasma Support Research Program on Alcator C-Mod Presented by: Stephen M. Wolfe Alcator C-Mod Five Year Proposal Review MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center Cambridge, MA May...

218

Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies (Kansas) Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Property Tax Incentive Provider Revenue The Property Tax Exemption for Machinery, Equipment, Materials, and Supplies exists for low-dollar items of machinery, equipment, materials and supplies used for business purposes, or in activities by an entity not subject to Kansas income tax. A property tax exemption exists for all machinery, equipment, materials and supplies used for business purposes, or

219

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Dispenser Labeling Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Dispenser Fuel Dispenser Labeling Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Dispenser Labeling Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Dispenser Labeling Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Dispenser Labeling Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Dispenser Labeling Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Dispenser Labeling Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Dispenser Labeling Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel Dispenser Labeling Requirement All equipment used to dispense motor fuel containing at least 1% ethanol or

220

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hydrogen Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit A tax credit is available for the cost of hydrogen fueling equipment placed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Category:Burns, OR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burns, OR Burns, OR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Burns, OR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVHospital Burns OR Pa... 74 KB SVLargeHotel Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeHotel Burns OR ... 74 KB SVLargeOffice Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeOffice Burns OR... 69 KB SVMediumOffice Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMediumOffice Burns O... 71 KB SVMidriseApartment Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMidriseApartment Bur... 72 KB SVOutPatient Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVOutPatient Burns OR ... 69 KB SVPrimarySchool Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png

222

Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote Heterogeneity Patch Burning: Integrating Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Oklahoma State University June 2013 #12;#12;Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote Heterogeneity Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

223

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health Kees Kolff, MD, MPH April 21, 2012 #12;OUR #12;PT COGENERATION LLC A wood-burning cogeneration power plant - Generates electricity (for sale off paper making process, black and white liquor , sludge #12;SLASH BURNING Slash burned in 2008: Jefferson

224

FROM YEARNING TO BURNING Marshall Rosenbluth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FROM YEARNING TO BURNING Marshall Rosenbluth Possible broad-brush guidelines for "burning plasma" thinking December 6, 2000 The "yearn to burn" is well motivated. Most of us came into the fusion program for many years, the point at which science and the fusion energy goal converge is in a burning plasma

225

Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote Heterogeneity Patch Burning: Integrating Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Oklahoma State University September 2007 #12;#12;Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote Heterogeneity Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote

Debinski, Diane M.

226

The reapplication of energetic materials as boiler fuels  

SciTech Connect

Decommissioning of weapons stockpiles, off-specification production, and upgrading of weapons systems results in a large amount of energetic materials (EM) such as rocket propellant and primary explosives that need to be recycled or disposed of each year. Presently, large quantities of EM are disposed of in a process known as open-burn/open-detonation (OB/OD), which not only wastes their energy content, but may release large quantities of hazardous material into the environment. Here the authors investigate the combustion properties of several types of EM to determine the feasibility of reapplication of these materials as boiler fuels, a process that could salvage the energy content of the EM as well as mitigate any potential adverse environmental impact. Reapplication requires pretreatment of the fuels to make them safe to handle and to feed. Double-base nitrocellulose and nitroglycerin, trinitrotoluene (TNT), nitroguanidine, and a rocket propellant binder primarily composed of polybutidiene impregnated with aluminum flakes have been burned in a 100-kW downfired flow reactor. Most of these fuels have high levels of fuel-bound nitrogen, much of it bound in the form of nitrate groups, resulting in high NO{sub x} emissions during combustion. The authors have measured fuel-bound nitrate conversion efficiencies to NO{sub x} of up to 80%, suggesting that the nitrate groups do not follow the typical path of fuel nitrogen through HCN leading to NO{sub x}, but rather form NO{sub x} directly. They show that staged combustion is effective in reducing NO{sub x} concentrations in the postcombustion gases by nearly a factor of 3. In the rocket binder, measured aluminum particle temperatures in excess of 1700{degrees}C create high levels of thermal NO{sub x}, and also generate concern that molten aluminum particles could potentially damage boiler equipment. Judicious selection of the firing method is thus required for aluminum-containing materials.

Buckley, S.G.; Sclippa, G.C.; Ross, J.R. [and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Lignite Fuel Enhancement  

SciTech Connect

Pulverized coal power plants which fire lignites and other low-rank high-moisture coals generally operate with reduced efficiencies and increased stack emissions due to the impacts of high fuel moisture on stack heat loss and pulverizer and fan power. A process that uses plant waste heat sources to evaporate a portion of the fuel moisture from the lignite feedstock in a moving bed fluidized bed dryer (FBD) was developed in the U.S. by a team led by Great River Energy (GRE). The demonstration was conducted with Department of Energy (DOE) funding under DOE Award Number DE-FC26-04NT41763. The objectives of GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project were to demonstrate reduction in lignite moisture content by using heat rejected from the power plant, apply technology at full scale at Coal Creek Station (CCS), and commercialize it. The Coal Creek Project has involved several stages, beginning with lignite drying tests in a laboratory-scale FBD at the Energy Research Center (ERC) and development of theoretical models for predicting dryer performance. Using results from these early stage research efforts, GRE built a 2 ton/hour pilot-scale dryer, and a 75 ton/hour prototype drying system at Coal Creek Station. Operated over a range of drying conditions, the results from the pilot-scale and prototype-scale dryers confirmed the performance of the basic dryer design concept and provided the knowledge base needed to scale the process up to commercial size. Phase 2 of the GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project included design, construction and integration of a full-scale commercial coal drying system (four FBDs per unit) with Coal Creek Units 1 and 2 heat sources and coal handling system. Two series of controlled tests were conducted at Coal Creek Unit 1 with wet and dried lignite to determine effect of dried lignite on unit performance and emissions. Wet lignite was fired during the first, wet baseline, test series conducted in September 2009. The second test series was performed in March/April 2010 after commercial coal drying system was commissioned. Preliminary tests with dried coal were performed in March/April 2010. During the test Unit 2 was in outage and, therefore, test unit (Unit 1) was carrying entire station load and, also, supplying all auxiliary steam extractions. This resulted in higher station service, lower gross power output, and higher turbine cycle heat rate. Although, some of these effects could be corrected out, this would introduce uncertainty in calculated unit performance and effect of dried lignite on unit performance. Baseline tests with dried coal are planned for second half of 2010 when both units at Coal Creek will be in service to establish baseline performance with dried coal and determine effect of coal drying on unit performance. Application of GRE's coal drying technology will significantly enhance the value of lignite as a fuel in electrical power generation power plants. Although existing lignite power plants are designed to burn wet lignite, the reduction in moisture content will increase efficiency, reduce pollution and CO{sub 2} emissions, and improve plant economics. Furthermore, the efficiency of ultra supercritical units burning high-moisture coals will be improved significantly by using dried coal as a fuel. To date, Great River Energy has had 63 confidentiality agreements signed by vendors and suppliers of equipment and 15 utilities. GRE has had agreements signed from companies in Canada, Australia, China, India, Indonesia, and Europe.

Charles Bullinger; Nenad Sarunac

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Maintenance and storage of fuel oil for residential heating systems: A guide for residential heating system maintenance personnel  

SciTech Connect

The quality of No. 2 fuel affects the performance of the heating system and is an important parameter in the proper and efficient operation of an oil-burning system. The physical and chemical characteristics of the fuel can affect the flow, atomization and combustion processes, all of which help to define and limit the overall performance of the heating system. The use of chemical additives by fuel oil marketershas become more common as a method of improving the quality of the fuel, especially for handling and storage. Numerous types of additives are available, but reliable information on their effectiveness and proper use is limited. This makes selecting an additive difficult in many situations. Common types of problems that contribute to poor fuel quality and how they affect residential heating equipment are identified inof this booklet. It covers the key items that are needed in an effective fuel quality monitoring program, such as what to look for when evaluating the quality of fuel as it is received from a supplier, or how to assess fuel problems associated with poor storage conditions. References to standard procedures and brief descriptions of the procedures also are given. Approaches for correcting a fuel-related problem, including the potential uses of chemical additives are discussed. Different types of additives are described to help users understand the functions and limitations of chemical treatment. Tips on how to select andeffectively use additives also are included. Finally, the importance of preventative maintenance in any fuel monitoring program is emphasized.

Litzke, Wai-Lin

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama) Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama) Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction (Alabama) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Alabama Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive The Pollution Control Equipment Tax Deduction allows businesses to deduct from their Alabama net worth the net amount invested in all devices, facilities, or structures, and all identifiable components or materials for use therein, that are located in Alabama and are acquired or constructed primarily for the control, reduction, or elimination of air, ground, or water pollution or radiological hazards where such pollution or

230

Safety classification of systems 300 area N reactor fuel supply facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Classification of the Fuel Supply Shutdown (FSS) safety systems, equipment, and components is presented.

Benecke, M.W., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

1997-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

231

SUBCHAPTER D. OUTDOOR BURNING Sec. 352.081. REGULATION OF OUTDOOR BURNING. (a) In this  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUBCHAPTER D. OUTDOOR BURNING Sec. 352.081. REGULATION OF OUTDOOR BURNING. (a) In this section measurement that takes into consideration the burning index, spread component, or ignition component court of a county by order may prohibit or restrict outdoor burning in general or outdoor burning

232

Dynamic stability, blowoff, and flame characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxy-fuel combustion is a promising technology to implement carbon capture and sequestration for energy conversion to electricity in power plants that burn fossil fuels. In oxy-fuel combustion, air separation is used to ...

Shroll, Andrew Philip

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT TANK TO WHEELS EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

important. Propane and CNG are NOT "cleaner burning". RSD is a very good tool for emissions inventory. #12 pollutant per kg of fuel from RSD -quantifiable uncertainty Fuel sales from tax department -quite precise

234

Fuel effects in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homogenous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) combustion is a new method of burning fuel in internal combustion (IC) engines. In an HCCI engine, the fuel and air are premixed prior to combustion, like in a spark-ignition ...

Angelos, John P. (John Phillip)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Tax Exemption The following are exempt from state sales tax: 1) any device, equipment, or

236

Employing the EPRI Vista Program for Test Burn Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The drive to use fuel switching as a means to meet more stringent SO2 and NOX emissions requirements has in many cases led to both a reduction in power station efficiency and a poorer net plant heat rate (NPHR) at the power station, as well as significant reductions in operating margins and increases in the risk of unit derates. One excellent method to manage or mitigate this risk is a comprehensive test burn for fuels under consideration. The objectives of this technical report are to demonstrate how th...

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

237

Hydrogen Burning on Magnetar Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the rate of diffusive nuclear burning for hydrogen on the surface of a "magnetar" (Soft Gamma-Ray Repeater or Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar). We find that hydrogen at the photosphere will be burned on an extremely rapid timescale of hours to years, depending on composition of the underlying material. Improving on our previous studies, we explore the effect of a maximally thick "inert" helium layer, previously thought to slow down the burning rate. Since hydrogen diffuses faster in helium than through heavier elements, we find this helium buffer actually increases the burning rate for magnetars. We compute simple analytic scalings of the burning rate with temperature and magnetic field for a range of core temperature. We conclude that magnetar photospheres are very unlikely to contain hydrogen. This motivates theoretical work on heavy element atmospheres that are needed to measure effective temperature from the observed thermal emission and constrains models of AXPs that rely on magnetar cooling through thick light element envelopes.

P. Chang; P. Arras; L. Bildsten

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

238

Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Equipment List  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Equipment List Equipment List Already know the item control number? Submit Reset Item Control Number Equipment Name Date Entered Condition Picture 89022833290004 1300594 TLD DETECTOR 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833290005 1300595 PICOMETER 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833290008 1300598 READER 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833290010 1300600 DETECTOR VACUUM PUMP 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833290016 1300606 TLD READER 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833290018 1300608 READER 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833290019 1300609 ANALYZER WITH DETECTOR 12/16/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833180013 1300993 PRESSURE REGULATOR 12/04/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833180022 1301098 VACUUM GAUGE 12/04/2013 Repairable N/A 89022833180023 1301099 OSCILLOSCOPE 12/04/2013 Repairable N/A

239

Fire safety for your wood-burning appliance: tips for proper installation, operation, and maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dramatic increase in house fires caused by wood-burning appliances has accompanied the rediscovery of wood as an alternative heating fuel. The National Bureau of Standards attributed the majority of these fires to conditions related to the installation, operation or maintenance of the appliances rather than malfunctions or construction defects. This publication presents guidelines for the proper installation, use, and maintenance of wood-burning appliances in the home. (DMC)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Biomass Burning Observation Project Specifically,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning Observation Project Burning Observation Project Specifically, the aircraft will obtain measurements of the microphysical, chemical, hygroscopic, and optical properties of aerosols. Data captured during BBOP will help scientists better understand how aerosols combine and change at a variety of distances and burn times. Locations Pasco, Washington. From July through September, the G-1 will be based out of its home base in Washington. From this location, it can intercept and measure smoke plumes from naturally occurring uncontrolled fires across Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Northern California, and Western Montana. Smoke plumes aged 0-5 hours are the primary targets for this phase of the campaign. Memphis, Tennessee. In October, the plane moves to Tennessee to sample prescribed

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hot conditioning equipment conceptual design report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the conceptual design of the Hot Conditioning System Equipment. The Hot conditioning System will consist of two separate designs: the Hot Conditioning System Equipment; and the Hot Conditioning System Annex. The Hot Conditioning System Equipment Design includes the equipment such as ovens, vacuum pumps, inert gas delivery systems, etc.necessary to condition spent nuclear fuel currently in storage in the K Basins of the Hanford Site. The Hot Conditioning System Annex consists of the facility of house the Hot Conditioning System. The Hot Conditioning System will be housed in an annex to the Canister Storage Building. The Hot Conditioning System will consist of pits in the floor which contain ovens in which the spent nuclear will be conditioned prior to interim storage.

Bradshaw, F.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

242

Open Burning (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Program Info Start Date 2003 State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department The New Mexico Environment Department's Air Quality Bureau regulates the open burning rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board. These rules are established to protect public health and welfare by establishing controls on pollution produced by open burning. Open burning is allowed for recreational and ceremonial purposes, for barbecuing, for heating purposes in fireplaces, for the noncommercial cooking of food for human consumption and for warming by small wood fires at construction

243

Personal Protective Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) facepieces were exposed to thermal environments from propane-fueled calibration experiments and ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

244

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Maintenance to Conserve Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Maintenance to Vehicle Maintenance to Conserve Fuel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Maintenance to Conserve Fuel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Maintenance to Conserve Fuel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Maintenance to Conserve Fuel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Maintenance to Conserve Fuel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Maintenance to Conserve Fuel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Maintenance to Conserve Fuel on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Vehicle Maintenance to Conserve Fuel A comprehensive vehicle maintenance strategy can help fleet managers and

245

Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of Ethanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of Ethanol Certification Limits for Legacy Equipment (December 2008) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Status Update: Clarification of

247

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Planned Community and Condominium Electric  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Planned Community and Planned Community and Condominium Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Planned Community and Condominium Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Planned Community and Condominium Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Planned Community and Condominium Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Planned Community and Condominium Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Planned Community and Condominium Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Installations on Digg

248

FLAMES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA: DEFLAGRATION-DETONATION TRANSITION IN THE OXYGEN-BURNING FLAME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flame in a Type Ia supernova is a conglomerate structure that, depending on density, may involve separate regions of carbon, oxygen, and silicon burning, all propagating in a self-similar, subsonic front. The separation between these three burning regions increases as the density declines until eventually, below about 2 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}, only carbon burning remains active, the other two burning phases having 'frozen out' on stellar scales. Between 2 and 3 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}, however, there remains an energetic oxygen-burning region that trails the carbon burning by an amount that is sensitive to the turbulence intensity. As the carbon flame makes a transition to the distributed regime (Karlovitz number {approx}> 10), the characteristic separation between the carbon- and oxygen-burning regions increases dramatically, from a fraction of a meter to many kilometers. The oxygen-rich mixture between the two flames is created at a nearly constant temperature, and turbulence helps to maintain islands of well-mixed isothermal fuel as the temperature increases. The delayed burning of these regions can be supersonic and could initiate a detonation.

Woosley, S. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kerstein, A. R. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Aspden, A. J., E-mail: woosley@ucolick.org, E-mail: arkerst@sandia.gov, E-mail: ajaspden@lbl.gov [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

249

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal 20121120ballstatepresentation.pdf More Documents...

250

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects on cellular burning structures in lean premixedAnalyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixedthe turbulence of the burning process with the distribution

Bremer, Peer-Timo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Practical tip: Precooling topical calcineurin inhibitors tube; reduces burning sensation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inhibitors tube; reduces burning sensation Sultan Al-salkhenaizan@hotmail.com Abstract Burning sensation at theuse, does reduce the burning sensation and enable most

Al-Khenaizan, Sultan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been observed from the review that very limited experimental study has been conducted on using FB as re-burn fuel and there exists no model using FB as re-burn fuel. The objective of the current research is to develop a simplified numerical model for NOx reduction process with FB volatiles as the re-burn fuel and compare results with experimental data. In order to satisfy the objective, the proposed work has been divided into 4 tasks. (1) Modeling the combustion process involving the main fuel, ammonia mixture in the main burner. (2) Developing of a simple mixing model of main gases with reburn jet. (3) Selection of a suitable overall global mechanism of reactions for the re-burn fuels, coupling the reaction model with the mixing model and thereby developing the complete re-burn model. (4) Comparing the simulation results with the experimental results obtained from TAMU combustion facility.

Dr. Kalyan Annamalai; Dr. John Sweeten; Dr. Saqib Mukhtar; Soyuz Priyadarsan, Ph.D.; Arunvel Thangamani, ME

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Superconducting Power Equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Watch (Techwatch) report on superconducting power applications (EPRI report 1019995, Superconducting Power Equipment: Technology Watch 2010) introduced coverage about superconducting magnetic energy storage systems and superconducting transformers. The 2011 report contains additional information about superconducting power equipment, including progress to demonstrations in some projects. The 2011 report also includes a section on superconductin...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

254

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

256

Municipal Solid Waste Combustion : Fuel Testing and Characterization : Task 1 Report, May 30, 1990-October 1, 1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to screen and characterize potential biomass fuels from waste streams. This will be accomplished by determining the types of pollutants produced while burning selected municipal waste, i.e., commercial mixed waste paper residential (curbside) mixed waste paper, and refuse derived fuel. These materials will be fired alone and in combination with wood, equal parts by weight. The data from these experiments could be utilized to size pollution control equipment required to meet emission standards. This document provides detailed descriptions of the testing methods and evaluation procedures used in the combustion testing and characterization project. The fuel samples will be examined thoroughly from the raw form to the exhaust emissions produced during the combustion test of a densified sample.

Bushnell, Dwight J.; Canova, Joseph H.; Dadkhah-Nikoo, Abbas.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Techniques for Drivers Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Techniques for Drivers to Conserve Fuel on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Management Strategies Driver Techniques Fleet Rightsizing

258

Biomass Burning: A Driver for Global Change!  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning includes the burning of the world''s vegetation---forests, savannas, and agricultural lands---to clear the land and change its use. Only in the past decade have researchers realized the important contributions of biomass burning to the ...

Levine J. S.; III W. R. Cofer; Jr D. R. Cahoon; Winstead E. L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

7, 80178033, 2007 burning-tropopause  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 8017­8033, 2007 Biomass burning-tropopause mixing J. Brioude et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Mixing between a stratospheric intrusion and a biomass burning plume J. Brioude1 , O. R. Cooper1.brioude@noaa.gov) 8017 #12;ACPD 7, 8017­8033, 2007 Biomass burning-tropopause mixing J. Brioude et al. Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

260

MFE Burning Plasmas Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICCs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MFE Burning Plasmas and Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICCs) Bick Hooper LLNL Presentation power requires: · A burning plasma experiment · An advancing portfolio of ICCs · Plasma physics unified Improved Configurations Magnetic Configurations Knowledge Base Burning Plasma Phys. & Tech. Knowledge Base

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

TQ2. Global Biomass Burning What is the impact of global biomass burning on the terrestrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TQ2. Global Biomass Burning What is the impact of global biomass burning on the terrestrial and land use. MODIS active fire detections 2000-2006 for Southern California 2001-2004 mean annual burned (bottom), expressed as fraction of grid cell that burns each year. From Giglio et al. (2005), Atmos. Chem

Christian, Eric

262

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik SchoenbergA,E , Chien: The effectiveness of the Burning Index (BI) in predicting wildfire ac- tivity is assessed using 25 years of area

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

263

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik Schoenberg: The effectiveness of the Burning Index (BI) in predicting wildfire ac- tivity is assessed using 25 years of area

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

264

Hydrogen-burn survival: preliminary thermal model and test results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents preliminary Hydrogen Burn Survival (HBS) Program experimental and analytical work conducted through February 1982. The effects of hydrogen deflagrations on safety-related equipment in nuclear power plant containment buildings are considered. Preliminary results from hydrogen deflagration experiments in the Sandia Variable Geometry Experimental System (VGES) are presented and analytical predictions for these tests are compared and discussed. Analytical estimates of component thermal responses to hydrogen deflagrations in the upper and lower compartments of an ice condenser, pressurized water reactor are also presented.

McCulloch, W.H.; Ratzel, A.C.; Kempka, S.N.; Furgal, D.T.; Aragon, J.J.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electricity » Laws & Incentives Electricity » Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Federal Laws and Incentives for EVs The list below contains summaries of all Federal laws and incentives related to EVs. Incentives Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit Fueling equipment for natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane),

266

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane » Laws & Incentives Propane » Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Federal Laws and Incentives for Propane (LPG) The list below contains summaries of all Federal laws and incentives related to Propane (LPG). Incentives Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit Fueling equipment for natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane),

267

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel » Laws & Incentives Biodiesel » Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Federal Laws and Incentives for Biodiesel The list below contains summaries of all Federal laws and incentives related to Biodiesel. Incentives Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit Fueling equipment for natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane),

268

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol » Laws & Incentives Ethanol » Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Federal Laws and Incentives for Ethanol The list below contains summaries of all Federal laws and incentives related to Ethanol. Incentives Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit Fueling equipment for natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane),

269

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas » Laws & Incentives Natural Gas » Laws & Incentives Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Federal Laws and Incentives for Natural Gas The list below contains summaries of all Federal laws and incentives related to Natural Gas. Incentives Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Tax Credit Fueling equipment for natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (propane),

270

Approximate Dynamic Programming Solutions for Lean Burn Engine Aftertreatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The competition to deliver fuel e#cient and environmentally friendly vehicles is driving the automotive industry to consider ever more complex powertrain systems. Adequate performance of these new highly interactive systems can no longer be obtained through traditional approaches, which are intensive in hardware use and #nal control software calibration. This paper explores the use of dynamic programming to make model-based design decisions for a lean burn, direct injection spark ignition engine, in combination with a three way catalyst and lean NOx trap aftertreatment system. The primary contribution is the development ofavery rapid method to evaluate the tradeo#s in fuel economy and emissions for this novel powertrain system, as a function of design parameters and controller structure, over a standard emission test cycle. 1 Introduction Designing a powertrain system to meet drivability, fuel economy and emissions performance requirements is a complicated task. There are many tradeo...

Jun-Mo Kang; Ilya Kolmanovsky; J.W. Grizzle

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Fuel Supply Investigation for an Externally Fired Microturbine based Micro CHP System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Sudden change on earth’s climate, which is a result of an increase in CO2 in the atmosphere, is mainlycaused by burning of fossil fuels… (more)

Aga, Aboma Emiru

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Why are the retail pump prices for gasoline and diesel fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much carbon dioxide is produced by burning gasoline and diesel fuel? When was the last refinery built in the United States?

273

Affordable Near-term Burning-plasma Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Fusion energy is a potential energy source for the future with plentiful fuel supplies and is expected to have benign environmental impact. The issue with fusion energy has been the scientific feasibility, and recently the cost of this approach. The key technical milestone for fusion is the achievement of a self-sustained fusion fire, ignition, in the laboratory. Despite 40 years of research and the expenditure of almost $20B worldwide, a self-sustained fusion fire has not yet been produced in the laboratory. The fusion program needs a test bed, preferably more than one, where the dynamics of a burning plasma can be studied, optimized and understood so that the engineering requirements for an engineering test reactor can be determined. Engineering and physics concepts must be developed within the next decade that will lead to an Affordable Burning Plasma Experiment if fusion is going to be perceived as making progress toward a potential long-range energy source.

D.M. Meade; R.D. Wooley

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Energy Audit Equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tools (equipment) needed to perform an energy audit include those items which assist the auditor in measuring the energy used by equipment or lost in inefficiency. Each tool is designed for a specific measurement. They can be inexpensive simple tools or expensive technically complex or multifunctional tools. In general, tools are needed which measure light, temperature and humidity, electricity, air flow, heat loss, and general energy information.

Phillips, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Grid Equipment Reliability Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Throughout the world, utilities have witnessed changes to electrical power markets. These changes have presented new and continuous challenges to maintaining the transmission system's integrity. In the past, emphasis at the transmission level has been on the system as a whole and not at the equipment level. This report summarizes the finding of a study that investigated the need to develop a new set of metrics and benchmarks to measure and compare grid equipment performance.

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

276

Test Burns of Torrefied Wood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass fuel is an important option for mitigating the production of carbon dioxide emissions from generating units that are designed to fire conventional fossil fuels. The key attraction of biomass fuels is that they are carbon neutralthe carbon dioxide released by combustion was fixed or removed from the atmosphere by photosynthesis, so its return does not provide a net carbon addition. Utilities in the United States and Canada are considering options both for co-firing biomass with coal and for comple...

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

277

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kansas Incentives and Laws Kansas Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Biofuel Blending Equipment Tax Incentives Expired: 01/01/2012 A Storage and Blending Equipment Credit is available for the purchase, construction, or installation of qualified equipment used for storing and blending petroleum-based fuel with biodiesel, ethanol, or other biofuel. The equipment must be installed at a fuel terminal, refinery, or biofuel production facility. The tax credit is equal to 10% of the qualified investment for the first $10,000,000 invested, and 5% of the investment in excess of $10,000,000. The credit may be taken in 10 equal annual

278

Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) Wind Measurement Equipment: Registration (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Wind Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Aeronautics All wind measurement equipment associated with the development or study of wind-powered electric generation, whether owned or leased, shall be

279

Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: Detailed Report and Appendices Title Electricity Used by Office Equipment and Network Equipment in the U.S.: Detailed Report and Appendices Publication Type Report LBNL Report...

280

Equipment Inventory | Sample Preparation Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment Inventory Equipment Resources Title Equipment Type Facility Laboratory Building Room Accumet Basic AB15 pH meter pH Meter SSRL BioChemMat Prep Lab 2 131 209 Agate...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Stabilized fuel with silica support structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes a stabilized fuel which is supported by a silica support structure. The silica support structure provides a low density, high porosity vehicle for safely carrying hydrocarbon fuels. The silica support structure for hydrocarbon fuel does not produce toxic material residues on combustion which would pose environmentally sensitive disposal problems. The silica stabilized fuel composition is useful as a low temperature, continuous burning fire starter for wood or charcoal.

Poco, J.F.; Hrubesh, L.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

subpart W. Statutory Authority The current energy conservation standards for commercial refrigeration equipment are mandated by Part A-1, the "Certain Industrial Equipment" of...

283

Laboratory Equipment | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home Facilities Scientific Labs Equipment Query Equipment Lab: HFIR - Biology Lab HFIR - Post Beam Sample Handling Lab HFIR - User Chemistry Lab High Pressure Lab SNS -...

284

Equipment Insulation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Equipment Insulation Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Equipment Insulation...

285

NSLS Electrical Equipment Inspection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Equipment Inspection Information Electrical Equipment Inspection Information A note to vendors visiting NSLS A note to users visiting NSLS Proteus Electrical Conformity Remediation Currently Certified Electrical Equipment Inspectors: First Line Contacts Email Extension Poshka, Dennis poshka@bnl.gov 2825 Alternate Contacts Boerner Jr, Albert aboerner@bnl.gov 5990 Buda, Scott buda@bnl.gov 3914 Caruso, Michael caruso@bnl.gov 4100 Chmiel, Robert chmiel@bnl.gov 8141 Church, Randolph church@bnl.gov 2736 Clay, Barret clay@bnl.gov 7284 D'Alsace, Roy dalsace@bnl.gov 3973 Danneil, Christopher cdanneil@bnl.gov 8609 Davila, Peter davila@bnl.gov 7625 De Toll, Peter detoll@bnl.gov 4100 Durfee, Douglas ddurfee@bnl.gov 7625 Fulkerson, Michael fulkerso@bnl.gov 5194 Gallagher, John jgallagher@bnl.gov 5770 Harder, David dharder@bnl.gov 4978

286

Scientist Equipment and Outline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outline and Equipment Outline and Equipment LIGHT AND COLOR Grade levels: can be adapted for grades 2-8. Length of time: 30-45 minues. Room preference: Double classroom or all-purpose room. Equipment is located in the Lederman Science Center. Talk to Susan Dahl to borrow this set. Spectrum tube power supply, gas tubes and diffraction grating glasses Light box with red, green, and blue translucent film Power chord, extension chord Large set of lenses Small concave and convex lenses Magnetic optics kit, includes a small laser Slinky Flashlight Clear plastic tub, powdered milk Water Radiometer Electromagnetic energy spectrum poster Set of red, green and blue flood lights Where does light come from? Use a boy and a girl to make a human demonstration of molecules and atoms. Have students rub their hands together and notice friction equals heat.

287

Welcome to Hydrogen and Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can also be used as an energy carrier, or a fuel, to provide power. NASA has used hydro- gen for many years aboard the space shuttle to power equipment using a fuel cell....

288

Equipment Operational Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

289

Office Equipment Energy Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Miscellaneous electric loads in office buildings consume nearly 58 billion kilowatt hours per year, which translates to $6.1 billion in electricity costs to businesses. Most office space is not sub metered, thus making it difficult for tenants to know how much electricity they use. Consequently, they are unable to see how the amount they pay for their space is affected by the efficiency of equipment they choose and how they operate it. By using recommended power-saving equipment and best practices outlin...

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

290

Deep burn strategy for the optimized incineration of reactor waste plutonium in pebble bed high temperature gas–cooled reactors / Serfontein D.E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis advanced fuel cycles for the incineration, i.e. deep–burn, of weapons–grade plutonium, reactor–grade plutonium from pressurised light water reactors and reactor–grade plutonium +… (more)

Serfontein, Dawid Eduard.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: August 9, 5: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on

292

Lessons learned from hydrogen generation and burning during the TMI-2 event  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document summarizes what has been learned from generation of hydrogen in the reactor core and the hydrogen burn that occurred in the containment building of the Three Mile Island Unit No. 2 (TMI-2) nuclear power plant on March 28, 1979. During the TMI-2 loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), a large quantity of hydrogen was generated by a zirconium-water reaction. The hydrogen burn that occurred 9 h and 50 min after the initiation of the TMI-2 accident went essentially unnoticed for the first few days. Even through the burn increased the containment gas temperature and pressure to 1200/sup 0/F (650/sup 0/C) and 29 lb/in/sup 2/ (200 kPa) gage, there was no serious threat to the containment building. The processes, rates, and quantities of hydrogen gas generated and removed during and following the LOCA are described in this report. In addition, the methods which were used to define the conditions that existed in the containment building before, during, and after the hydrogen burn are described. The results of data evaluations and engineering calculations are presented to show the pressure and temperature histories of the atmosphere in various containment segments during and after the burn. Material and equipment in reactor containment buildings can be protected from burn damage by the use of relatively simple enclosures or insulation.

Henrie, J.O.; Postma, A.K.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Rhode Island Incentives and Laws Rhode Island Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Loans Expired: 04/10/2009 The Rhode Island Office of Energy Resources offers loans for up to five years, with low administrative fees, to state agencies and municipal governments to cover the incremental cost of purchasing original equipment manufactured AFVs. Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit Expired: 01/01/2008 The Alternative Fueled Vehicle and Filling Station Tax Credit entitles taxpayers to a tax credit equal to 50% of the capital, labor, and equipment

294

In Situ Burning of Oil Spills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... burns, the Teflon filters were weighed and sealed in Petri dishes, while the ... terrain, solar heating and surface friction creates a tur- bulent wind field ...

2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Performance Culture of Burning Man.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Theatre in the United States for the last twenty years has been evolving in scope by way of a cultural phenomenon known as Burning Man.… (more)

Clupper, Wendy Ann

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Effects of different fuels on a turbocharged, direct injection, spark ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following pages describe the experimentation and analysis of two different fuels in GM's high compression ratio, turbocharged direct injection (TDI) engine. The focus is on a burn rate analysis for the fuels - gasoline ...

Negrete, Justin E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same pressure that results from a more gradual increase. This disagrees with experiments, where

Reaugh, J E

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

298

HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation  

SciTech Connect

HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same pressure that results from a more gradual increase. This disagrees with experiments, where

Reaugh, J E

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

299

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Business Case for E85 Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Business Case Equipment Options Equipment Installation

300

Pulverized coal fuel injector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO.sub.2 formation.

Rini, Michael J. (Hebron, CT); Towle, David P. (Windsor, CT)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

2009 Fuel Cell Market Report, November 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

AIAA 2001-0339 INTERMITTENT BURNING AND ITS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AIAA 2001-0339 INTERMITTENT BURNING AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO PLATEAU BURNING OF COMPOSITE and Astronautics, Inc. with permission. INTERMITTENT BURNING AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO PLATEAU BURNING OF COMPOSITE; Fellow AIAA §Senior Research Engineer Abstract The plateau burning behavior of composite solid

Seitzman, Jerry M.

303

Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Biomass Equipment and Materials Compensating Tax Deduction < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Wind Maximum Rebate None Program Info Start Date 6/17/2005 State New Mexico Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% of value may be deducted for purposes of calculating Compensating Tax due Provider New Mexico Taxation and Revenue Department In 2005 New Mexico adopted a policy to allow businesses to deduct the value of biomass equipment and biomass materials used for the processing of biopower, biofuels or biobased products in determining the amount of

304

field_equipment.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EQUIPMENT INVENTORY EQUIPMENT INVENTORY Trucks * Five vac/pressure trucks, 60-90 bbl, up to 5 bpm at 5,000 lb. * Water/fi re truck, 110 bbl * Two dump trucks: 5-yard and 12-yard * Belly dump trailer * Chemical injection truck, 20 bbl capacity * Three crane trucks: 6,000 lb., 8,000 lb., and 30 ton * Klaeger swab truck * Rig-up truck with 21-foot poles, 30,000-lb. capacity * Winch truck, 40,000-lb. capacity * Two bucket trucks: 25-foot and 28-foot reach * Two welding trucks with Miller Trailblazer welder * Two Ditch Witches: 8" x 7' and 6" x 3" * International PayStar 5000 transport truck * Western Star transport truck Backhoes & Loaders * John Deere 410G backhoe * Cat 420 backhoe * Case 20W loader with 2-yard bucket * Bobcat skid loader with bucket, forks, post hole digger, and trencher attachments

305

Testing of the Burns-Milwaukee's Sun Oven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Burns-Milwaukee Sun Oven was tested at Sandia's Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 160 o C (320 o F). It heated two liters of water from room temperature to 80 o C, (175 o F), in 75 minutes. Observations were also made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on operation of the solar oven was also noted. ii 1 The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories evaluated a Sun Oven from Burns-Milwaukee at Sandia's Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque NM. It was designed for single family household cooking. It is targeting developing countries' alternative energy markets where conventional fuels are not available and wood is the primary fuel used for cooking. Because of the wide variety and types of solar...

Moss Solar Thermal; T. A. Moss

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Foodservice Equipment Applications Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A typical foodservice operation may spend 75 percent or more of its energy dollar to provide lighting, refrigeration, ventilation, and miscellaneous end uses. Performance characteristics and operational advantages make electricity an excellent option for powering major cooking equipment. This handbook describes the six most common types of major cooking appliances--griddles, fryers, broilers, ovens, ranges, and kettles--including typical applications and industry purchasing trends. Such information will ...

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

307

Review of Transmutation Fuel Studies  

SciTech Connect

The technology demonstration element of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is aimed at demonstrating the closure of the fuel cycle by destroying the transuranic (TRU) elements separated from spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Multiple recycle through fast reactors is used for burning the TRU initially separated from light-water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel. For the initial technology demonstration, the preferred option to demonstrate the closed fuel cycle destruction of TRU materials is a sodium-cooled fast reactor (FR) used as burner reactor. The sodium-cooled fast reactor represents the most mature sodium reactor technology available today. This report provides a review of the current state of development of fuel systems relevant to the sodium-cooled fast reactor. This report also provides a review of research and development of TRU-metal alloy and TRU-oxide composition fuels. Experiments providing data supporting the understanding of minor actinide (MA)-bearing fuel systems are summarized and referenced.

Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fuel Combustion Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Combustion Lab Fuel Combustion Lab NREL's Fuel Combustion Laboratory focuses on characterizing fuels at the molecular level. This information can then be used to understand and predict the fuel's effect on engine performance and emissions. By understanding the effects of fuel chemistry on ignition we can develop fuels that enable more efficient engine designs, using both today's technology and future advanced combustion concepts. This lab supports the distributed Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory, and the Biofuels activity. Photo of assembled IQT. Ignition Quality Tester The central piece of equipment in the Fuel Combustion Laboratory is the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT(tm)). The IQT(tm) is a constant volume combustion vessel that is used to study ignition properties of liquid

309

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Residential Electric Vehicle Supply  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Residential Electric Residential Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Residential Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Residential Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Residential Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Residential Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Residential Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Residential Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment (EVSE) Tax Credit on AddThis.com...

310

Biodiesel: The clean, green fuel for diesel engines (fact sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Natural, renewable resources such as vegetable oils and recycled restaurant greases can be chemically transformed into clean-burning biodiesel fuels. As its name implies, biodiesel is like diesel fuel except that it's organically produced. It's also safe for the environment, biodegradable, and produces significantly less air pollution than diesel fuel.

Tyson, K.S.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

311

Clean-Burning Motor Fuel or Electric Vehicle Personal Credit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), methanol, and electricity. These credits expire January 2009. (Reference...

312

Clean-Burning Motor Fuel or Electric Vehicle Corporate Credit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), methanol, and electricity. These credits expire January 2009. (Reference...

313

BIODIESEL BLENDS IN SPACE HEATING EQUIPMENT.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel is a diesel-like fuel that is derived from processing vegetable oils from various sources, such as soy oil, rapeseed or canola oil, and also waste vegetable oils resulting from cooking use. Brookhaven National laboratory initiated an evaluation of the performance of blends of biodiesel and home heating oil in space heating applications under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This report is a result of this work performed in the laboratory. A number of blends of varying amounts of a biodiesel in home heating fuel were tested in both a residential heating system and a commercial size boiler. The results demonstrate that blends of biodiesel and heating oil can be used with few or no modifications to the equipment or operating practices in space heating. The results also showed that there were environmental benefits from the biodiesel addition in terms of reductions in smoke and in Nitrogen Oxides (NOx). The latter result was particularly surprising and of course welcome, in view of the previous results in diesel engines where no changes had been seen. Residential size combustion equipment is presently not subject to NOx regulation. If reductions in NOx similar to those observed here hold up in larger size (commercial and industrial) boilers, a significant increase in the use of biodiesel-like fuel blends could become possible.

KRISHNA,C.R.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Equipment Certification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Equipment Certification Equipment Certification Jump to: navigation, search Policies requiring renewable energy equipment to meet certain standards serve to protect consumers from buying inferior equipment. These requirements not only benefit consumers; they also protect the renewable energy industry by making it more difficult for substandard systems to reach the market. [1] Equipment Certification Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 19) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Canada Oil and Gas Operations Act (Canada) Environmental Regulations Equipment Certification Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Generation Disclosure Industry Recruitment/Support Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting Canada Commercial Construction Developer

315

Visualizing Buoyant Burning Bubbles in Type Ia Supernovae at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning in Supernovae Buoyant Burning Bubbles in Type Ia Supernovae bubble-s.jpeg Flame ignition in type Ia supernovae leads to isolated bubbles of burning buoyant fluid. As a...

316

Effects of actinide burning on waste disposal at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

Release rates of 15 radionuclides from waste packages expected to result from partitioning and transmutation of Light-Water Reactor (LWR) and Actinide-Burning Liquid-Metal Reactor (ALMR) spent fuel are calculated and compared to release rates from standard LWR spent fuel packages. The release rates are input to a model for radionuclide transport from the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain to the water table. Discharge rates at the water table are calculated and used in a model for transport to the accessible environment, defined to be five kilometers from the repository edge. Concentrations and dose rates at the accessible environment from spent fuel and wastes from reprocessing, with partitioning and transmutation, are calculated. Partitioning and transmutation of LWR and ALMR spent fuel reduces the inventories of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium in the high-level waste by factors of 40 to 500. However, because release rates of all of the actinides except curium are limited by solubility and are independent of package inventory, they are not reduced correspondingly. Only for curium is the repository release rate much lower for reprocessing wastes.

Hirschfelder, J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

a strategy to replace at least 50% of commonwealth motor fleet light-duty vehicles with energy-efficient vehicles including hybrid electric, advanced lean burn, fuel cell, and...

318

REMOTE SENSING OF BURN SEVERITY AND THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BURN SEVERITY, TOPOGRAPHY AND VEGETATION IN INTERIOR ALASKA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING OF BURN SEVERITY AND THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BURN SEVERITY, TOPOGRAPHY likely to change vegetation type. Finally, vegetation recovery, estimated using a remotely-sensed................................................................................6 Chapter 2. Mapping Burn Severity Using Satellite Remote Sensing..........................8

Ruess, Roger W.

319

FESAC Panel on Burning Plasmas 1.What scientific issues should be addressed by a burning plasma physics experiment and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FESAC Panel on Burning Plasmas Charge 1.What scientific issues should be addressed by a burning of using various magnetic confinement concepts in studying burning plasma physics? As a part of your

320

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Part A-1 of Title III (42 U.S.C. 6311-6317) establishes a similar program for ''Certain Industrial Equipment,'' which includes commercial refrigeration equipment. Amendments to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

China production equipment sourcing strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis recommends a China business and equipment strategy for the Controls Conveyor Robotics Welding (CCRW) group at General Motors. The current strategy is to use globally common equipment through predetermined global ...

Chouinard, Natalie, 1979-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal March 29, 2012 | Tags: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR),...

323

The QSE-Reduced Nuclear Reaction Network for Silicon Burning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Iron and neighboring nuclei are formed by silicon burning in massive stars before core collapse and during supernova outbursts. Complete and incomplete silicon burning is… (more)

Parete-Koon, Suzanne T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

OLIGOMERIZATION OF LEVOGLUCOSAN IN PROXIES OF BIOMASS BURNING AEROSOLS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass burning aerosols play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere and therefore, affect global climate. Biomass burning aerosols are generally… (more)

Holmes, Bryan J.

325

UNCORRECTED 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNCORRECTED PROOF 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial 3 and subsistence groups as: Lisa Naughton-Treves et al., Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial

Kammen, Daniel M.

326

Dispensing Equipment Testing with Mid-Level Ethanol/Gasoline Test Fluid: Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Nonpetroleum-Based Fuel Task addresses the hurdles to commercialization of biomass-derived fuels and fuel blends. One such hurdle is the unknown compatibility of new fuels with current infrastructure, such as the equipment used at service stations to dispense fuel into automobiles. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Vehicle Technology Program and the Biomass Program have engaged in a joint project to evaluate the potential for blending ethanol into gasoline at levels higher than nominal 10 volume percent. This project was established to help DOE and NREL better understand any potentially adverse impacts caused by a lack of knowledge about the compatibility of the dispensing equipment with ethanol blends higher than what the equipment was designed to dispense. This report provides data about the impact of introducing a gasoline with a higher volumetric ethanol content into service station dispensing equipment from a safety and a performance perspective.

Boyce, K.; Chapin, J. T.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Oklahoma Incentives and Laws Oklahoma Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans Archived: 08/01/2013 The Oklahoma Department of Central Services' Alternative Fuels Conversion Loan program provides 0% interest loans to government fleets for converting vehicles to operate on alternative fuels, the construction of AFV fueling infrastructure, and the incremental cost associated with the purchase of an original equipment manufacturer AFV. The program provides up to $10,000 per converted or newly purchased AFV and up to $300,000 for the development or

329

Final assessment of MOX fuel performance experiment with Japanese PWR specification fuel in the HBWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to obtain high burn-up MOX fuel irradiation performance data, SBR and MIMAS MOX fuel rods with Pu-fissile enrichment of about 6 wt% had been irradiated in the HBWR from 1995 to 2006. The peak burn-up of MOX pellet achieved 72 GWd/tM. In this test, fuel centerline temperature, rod internal pressure, stack length and cladding length were measured for MOX fuel and UO{sub 2} fuel as reference. MOX fuel temperature is confirmed to have no significant difference in comparison with UO{sub 2}, taking into account of adequate thermal conductivity degradation due to PuO{sub 2} addition and burn-up development. And the measured fuel temperature agrees well with FINE code calculation up to high burn-up region. Fission gas release of MOX is possibly greater than UO{sub 2} based on temperature and pressure assessment. No significant difference is confirmed between SBR and MIMAS MOX on FGR behavior. MOX fuel swelling rate agrees well with solid swelling rate in the literature. Cladding elongation data shows onset of PCMI in high power region. (authors)

Fujii, Hajime; Teshima, Hideyuki; Kanasugi, Katsumasa [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 1-1, Wadasaki-cho 1-chome, Hyogo-ku, Kobe 652-8585 (Japan); Kosaka, Yuji [Nuclear Development Corporation, 622-12 Funaishikawa, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1111 (Japan); Arakawa, Yasushi [The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., 8 Yokota, 13 Goichi, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui, 919-1141 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Installed Cost Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 140,000 plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) have been sold since December 2010. Critical to maintaining this upward trend is achievement of a diverse and available charging infrastructure. The purpose of this study is to analyze one key element of the charging infrastructure—the cost of installation. While the fuel cost of electricity to charge a PEV is significantly lower than the cost of gasoline, the cost to hire an electrician to install electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) for ...

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

331

Substation Equipment Life Extension Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Utilities are under increasing pressure to maintain service reliability while operating aging transmission substations with leaner maintenance budgets and fewer experienced personnel. A structured life extension program can help utilities make equipment maintenance, replacement, and refurbishment decisions that ensure safe, reliable, cost-effective operation of transmission substation equipment. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Life Extension Guidelines for Substation Equipment-Fi...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

332

Dynamically balanced fuel nozzle and method of operation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method of operation designed to reduce undesirably high pressure oscillations in lean premix combustion systems burning hydrocarbon fuels are provided. Natural combustion and nozzle acoustics are employed to generate multiple fuel pockets which, when burned in the combustor, counteract the oscillations caused by variations in heat release in the combustor. A hybrid of active and passive control techniques, the apparatus and method eliminate combustion oscillations over a wide operating range, without the use of moving parts or electronics.

Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Janus, Michael C. (Baltimore, MD); Robey, Edward H. (Westover, WV)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC) are important components of atmospheric aerosols, little is known about their chemical compositions. Here we present detailed characterization of the NOC constituents of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) samples using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Accurate mass measurements combined with MS/MS fragmentation experiments of selected ions were used to assign molecular structures to individual NOC species. Our results indicate that N-heterocyclic alkaloid compounds - species naturally produced by plants and living organisms - comprise a substantial fraction of NOC in BBA samples collected from test burns of five biomass fuels. High abundance of alkaloids in test burns of ponderosa pine - a widespread tree in the western U.S. areas frequently affected by large scale fires - suggests that N-heterocyclic alkaloids in BBA can play a significant role in dry and wet deposition of fixed nitrogen in this region.

Laskin, Alexander; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Laskin, Julia

2009-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

334

Association between severity of prescribed burns and subsequent activity of conifer-infesting beetles in stands of longleaf pine  

SciTech Connect

A randomized complete block experiment was performed to measure the effect of prescribed, dormant-season burns of three different levels of severity (measured as fuel consumption and soil surface heating) on subsequent insect infestation and mortality of mature longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.). Multiple-funnel traps baited with a low release rate of turpentine and ethanol were used to monitor activity of certain coniferophagous beetles. Non-aggressive species, including the root beetles Hylastes salebrosus Eichhoff and H. tenuis Eichhoff, the ambrosia beetle Xyleborus pubescens Zimmermann, the reproduction weevil Pachylobius picivorus (Germar), and buprestid borers, were attracted to burned plots in numbers that correlated positively with burn severity. Beetle attraction to burned sites was greatest in the first weeks post-burn and disappeared by the second year. Two potential tree-killing bark beetles, Dendroctonus terebrans (Olivier) and Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff), were trapped in significant numbers but exhibited no attraction to burned plots. Tree mortality correlated significantly with the severity of the burns and amounted to 5% of stems in the hottest burn treatment after 3 years. The majority of the mortality was observed in the second and third years post-burn. Attacks of Ips and Dendroctonus bark beetles were apparent on nearly all dead or dying trees, and evidence suggested that root pathogens may have contributed to tree susceptibility to beetle attack and mortality. Our data indicate that selection of burn regimes that reduce or eliminate consumption of duff (e.g., favoring heading fires over backing fires) could significantly reduce mortality of longleaf pine managed for long rotations Published by Elsevier B.V.

Sullivan, Brian, T; Fettig, C. J.; Otrosina, William, J.; Dalusky, Mark, J.; Berrisford, C.W.

2003-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

335

The role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor in the future of nuclear power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment is made of the potential role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) in the future of nuclear power. The development of a usable actinide burning strategy could be an important factor in the acceptance and implementation of a next generation of nuclear power. First, the need for nuclear generating capacity is established through the analysis of energy and electricity demand forecasting models which cover the spectrum of bias from anti-nuclear to pro-nuclear. The analyses take into account the issues of global warming and the potential for technological advances in energy efficiency. We conclude, as do many others, that there will almost certainly be a need for substantial nuclear power capacity in the 2000--2030 time frame. We point out also that any reprocessing scheme will open up proliferation-related questions which can only be assessed in very specific contexts. The focus of this report is on the fuel cycle impacts of actinide burning. Scenarios are developed for the deployment of future nuclear generating capacity which exploit the advantages of actinide partitioning and actinide burning. Three alternative reactor designs are utilized in these future scenarios: The Light Water Reactor (LWR); the Modular Gas-Cooled Reactor (MGR); and the Integral Fast Reactor (FR). Each of these alternative reactor designs is described in some detail, with specific emphasis on their spent fuel streams and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Four separation and partitioning processes are utilized in building the future nuclear power scenarios: Thermal reactor spent fuel preprocessing to reduce the ceramic oxide spent fuel to metallic form, the conventional PUREX process, the TRUEX process, and pyrometallurgical reprocessing.

Hollaway, W.R.; Lidsky, L.M.; Miller, M.M.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Annex Volume C. Boiler emission report. Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC) test burn program was conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) located in Bruceton, Pa. One of the objectives of the study was to determine the feasibility of burning SRC fuels in boilers set up for fuel oil firing and to characterize emissions. Testing was conducted on the 700-hp oil-fired boiler used for research projects. No. 6 fuel oil was used for baseline data comparison, and the following SRC fuels were tested: SRC Fuel (pulverized SRC), SRC Residual Oil, and SRC-Water Slurry. Uncontrolled particulate emission rates averaged 0.9243 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Fuel, 0.1970 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Residual Oil, and 0.9085 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC-Water Slurry. On a lb/10/sup 6/ Btu basis, emissions from SRC Residual Oil averaged 79 and 78%, respectively, lower than the SRC Fuel and SRC-Water Slurry. The lower SRC Residual Oil emissions were due, in part, to the lower ash content of the oil and more efficient combustion. The SRC Fuel had the highest emission rate, but only 2% higher than the SRC-Water Slurry. Each fuel type was tested under variable boiler operating parameters to determine its effect on boiler emissions. The program successfully demonstrated that the SRC fuels could be burned in fuel oil boilers modified to handle SRC fuels. This report details the particulate emission program and results from testing conducted at the boiler outlet located before the mobile precipitator take-off duct. The sampling method was EPA Method 17, which uses an in-stack filter.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Wood-Burning Heating System Deduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute allows individual taxpayers a deduction for the purchase and installation of a wood-burning heating system. The deduction is equal to the total cost of purchase and installation for...

338

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #113: January 24, 2000 Fuel Conservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: January 24, 3: January 24, 2000 Fuel Conservation Equipment on Medium and Heavy Trucks: 1992-1997 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #113: January 24, 2000 Fuel Conservation Equipment on Medium and Heavy Trucks: 1992-1997 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #113: January 24, 2000 Fuel Conservation Equipment on Medium and Heavy Trucks: 1992-1997 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #113: January 24, 2000 Fuel Conservation Equipment on Medium and Heavy Trucks: 1992-1997 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #113: January 24, 2000 Fuel Conservation Equipment on Medium and Heavy Trucks: 1992-1997 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #113: January 24, 2000 Fuel Conservation Equipment on Medium and Heavy Trucks: 1992-1997 on Digg

339

Sizing and burn time measurements of micron-sized metal powders  

SciTech Connect

Detailed ignition and combustion mechanisms are needed to develop optimized propellant and energetic formulations using micron-sized metal powders, such as aluminum. Combustion researchers have traditionally used relatively coarse metal particles to characterize the burn time dependence on particle size. However, measurements of burn times for particles below 10 {mu}m in diameter are still needed for aluminum powders and other metal fuels. The apparatus described here sizes the particles just before the ignition event, providing a direct correlation between individual particle size and its burn time. Two lasers were utilized: a 785 nm laser diode for sizing the particles and a 125 W CO{sub 2} laser for particle ignition. The particles crossed the 785 nm laser beam just before crossing the CO{sub 2} laser beam. The particle size was determined from the amplitude of the scattered 785 nm light pulse. The burn time was determined from the duration of the visible light emission produced from the ignited particle. The in situ measured particle size distributions compared well with the size distributions measured for the same powders by a commercial instrument using low angle laser light scattering. Our measurements with two nominally spherical aluminum powders, suggest that the burn times increase from 0.5 to {approx}2.5 ms as the particle diameters increase from 3 to 8 {mu}m.

Gill, Robert J.; Mohan, Salil; Dreizin, Edward L. [New Jersey Institute of Technology Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Automated fuel pin loading system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automated loading system for nuclear reactor fuel elements utilizes a gravity feed conveyor which permits individual fuel pins to roll along a constrained path perpendicular to their respective lengths. The individual lengths of fuel cladding are directed onto movable transports, where they are aligned coaxially with the axes of associated handling equipment at appropriate production stations. Each fuel pin can be reciprocated axially and/or rotated about its axis as required during handling steps. The fuel pins are inserted as a batch prior to welding of end caps by one of two disclosed welding systems.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Brown, William F. (West Richland, WA); Steffen, Jim M. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Conceptual Design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor With Modified CANDLE Burn-up Scheme  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, conceptual design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input has been performed. In this study Gas Cooled Fast Reactor is slightly modified by employing modified CANDLE burn-up scheme so that it can use Natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Due to their hard spectrum, GCFR in this study showed very good performance in converting U-238 to plutonium in order to maintain the operation condition requirement of long-life reactors. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. With such condition we got an optimal design of 325 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input. The average discharge burn-up is about 290 GWd/ton HM.

Nur Asiah, A.; Su'ud, Zaki [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Ferhat, A. [National Nuclear Energ Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) (Indonesia); Sekimoto, H. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

342

Parke County REMC - Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Program | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parke County REMC - Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Program Parke County REMC - Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Program Parke County REMC - Energy Efficient Equipment Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Commercial Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Geothermal Heat Pump: 1 per home or business Program Info State Indiana Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Water Heater: $50 - $150 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $35 Air-Source/Dual Fuel Heat Pump: $150 - $500 Geothermal Heat Pump: $800 Provider Parke County REMC Parke County REMC offers rebates to commercial and residential customers for purchasing and installing qualifying energy efficient water heaters, air-source heat pumps, dual fuel heat pumps, and geothermal heat pumps.

343

Identify Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Identify Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:50am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 As defined by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction strategies for Federal vehicles and equipment are based on the three driving principles of petroleum reduction: Reduce vehicle miles traveled Improve fuel efficiency Use alternative fuels. These strategies provide a framework for an agency to use when developing a strategic plan that can be specifically tailored to match the agency's fleet profile and meet its mission. Agency fleet managers should evaluate petroleum reduction strategies and tactics for each fleet location, based on an evaluation of site-specific

344

Simulation of a Burning Plasma C. Kessel, PPPL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation of a Burning Plasma Experiment C. Kessel, PPPL UFA Workshop on Burning Plasma Science, December 11-13, 2000 #12;FIRE Burning Plasma Discharge Simulation with TSC ELMy H-mode, N, R=2.0 m, Ip=6.5 MA #12;Burning Plasma Experiment Simultaneously Needs · L-H mode transition · Non

345

BURNING PLASMA NEXT STEPS: DISCUSSION OF KEY DEVELOPMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BURNING PLASMA NEXT STEPS: DISCUSSION OF KEY DEVELOPMENTS Gerald A. Navratil Columbia University/FESAC Burning Plasma Strategy Dec 2002 NRC/NAS Interim Report on Burning Plasmas Jan 30, 2003 DOE of the physics of burning plasma, advance fusion technology, and contribute to the development of fusion energy

346

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames P.-T. Bremer1, G. Weber2 flames subject to different levels of tur- bulence. Due to their unstable nature, lean flames burn to quantitatively correlate the turbulence of the burning process with the distribution of burning regions, properly

347

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

348

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames Peer-Timo Bremer, Member levels of turbulence. Due to their unstable nature, lean flames burn in cells separated by locally the turbulence of the burning process with the distribution of burning regions, properly segmented and selected

Pascucci, Valerio

349

Effects of Range Burning on Kansas Flint Hills Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Range Burning on Kansas Flint Hills Soil CLENTON E. OWENSBY AND JOHN BRUCE WYRILL, III Highlight: Two tallgrass prairie areas burned annually for 20 (grazed) nnd 48 (un. grazed) years ar-spring burned ungrared plots were generally higher in soil pH, organic ma~fer, and K than late-spring burned

Owensby, Clenton E.

350

The influence of temperature in the gas emissions by using mixtures of diesel & olive seed oil as fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution is any gas or particulate that originates from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Anthropogenic sources mostly related to burning different kinds of fuel for energy. Moreover, the exhaust from burning fuels in automobiles, homes and ... Keywords: gas emissions, olive seed oil

Charalampos Arapatsakos; Dimitrios Christoforidis; Anastasios Karkanis

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards Program Information Oregon Program Type ApplianceEquipment Efficiency...

352

Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards Appliance and Equipment Energy Efficiency Standards Program Information New York Program Type ApplianceEquipment Efficiency Standards ''...

353

Data Center Equipment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Equipment Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Data Center Equipment Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleDataCenterEquip...

354

Electrical Equipment Inventory and Inspection Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrical Equipment Inventory and Inspection Information APS Non-NRTL Electrical Equipment Inventory Spreadsheet ANL Recognized Reputable Electrical Equipment Manufacturer List as...

355

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Plant design: Integrating Plant and Equipment Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Like power plant engineers, process plant engineers must design generating units to operate efficiently, cleanly, and profitably despite fluctuating costs for raw materials and fuels. To do so, they increasingly create virtual plants to enable evaluation of design concepts without the expense of building pilot-scale or demonstration facilities. Existing computational models describe an entire plant either as a network of simplified equipment models or as a single, very detailed equipment model. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project (Figure 5) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks to bridge the gap between models by integrating plant modeling and equipment modeling software. The goal of the effort is to provide greater insight into the performance of proposed plant designs. The software integration was done using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (Computer Aided Process Engineering–Open), or CO interface. Several demonstration cases based on operating power plants confirm the viability of this co-simulation approach.

Sloan, David (Alstrom Power); Fiveland, Woody (Alstrom Power); Zitney, S.E.; Osawe, Maxwell (Ansys, Inc.)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Selective NOx Recirculation for Stationary Lean-Burn Natural Gas Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective NOx Recirculation (SNR) involves cooling the engine exhaust gas and then adsorbing the oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from the exhaust stream, followed by the periodic desorption of NOx. By returning the desorbed, concentrated NOx into the engine intake and through the combustion chamber, a percentage of the NOx is decomposed during the combustion process. An initial study of NOx decomposition during lean-burn combustion was concluded in 2004 using a 1993 Cummins L10G 240hp natural gas engine. It was observed that the air/fuel ratio, injected NO (nitric oxide) quantity and engine operating points affected NOx decomposition rates of the engine. Chemical kinetic modeling results were also used to determine optimum NOx decomposition operating points and were published in the 2004 annual report. A NOx decomposition rate of 27% was measured from this engine under lean-burn conditions while the software model predicted between 35-42% NOx decomposition for similar conditions. A later technology 1998 Cummins L10G 280hp natural gas engine was procured with the assistance of Cummins Inc. to replace the previous engine used for 2005 experimental research. The new engine was equipped with an electronic fuel management system with closed-loop control that provided a more stable air/fuel ratio control and improved the repeatability of the tests. The engine was instrumented with an in-cylinder pressure measurement system and electronic controls, and was adapted to operate over a range of air/fuel ratios. The engine was connected to a newly commissioned 300hp alternating current (AC) motoring dynamometer. The second experimental campaign was performed to acquire both stoichiometric and slightly rich (0.97 lambda ratio) burn NOx decomposition rates. Effects of engine load and speed on decomposition were quantified, but Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) was not varied independently. Decomposition rates of up to 92% were demonstrated. Following recommendations at the 2004 ARES peer review meeting at Argonne National Laboratories, in-cylinder pressure was measured to calculate engine indicated mean effective pressure (IMEP) changes due to NOx injections and EGR variations, and to observe conditions in the cylinder. The third experimental campaign gathered NOx decomposition data at 800, 1200 and 1800 rpm. EGR was added via an external loop, with EGR ranging from zero to the point of misfire. The air/fuel ratio was set at both stoichiometric and slightly rich conditions, and NOx decomposition rates were calculated for each set of runs. Modifications were made to the engine exhaust manifold to record individual exhaust temperatures. The three experimental campaigns have provided the data needed for a comprehensive model of NOx decomposition during the combustion process, and data have confirmed that there was no significant impact of injected NO on in-cylinder pressure. The NOx adsorption system provided by Sorbent Technologies Corp. (Twinsburg, OH), comprised a NOx adsorber, heat exchanger and a demister. These components were connected to the engine, and data were gathered to show both the adsorption of NOx from the engine, and desorption of NOx from the carbon-based sorbent material back into the engine intake, using a heated air stream. In order to quantify the NOx adsorption/desorption characteristics of the sorbent material, a bench top adsorption system was constructed and instrumented with thermocouples and the system output was fed into a NOx analyzer. The temperature of this apparatus was controlled while gathering data on the characteristics of the sorbent material. These data were required for development of a system model. Preliminary data were gathered in 2005, and will continue in early 2006. To assess the economic benefits of the proposed SNR technology the WVU research team has been joined in the last quarter by Dr Richard Turton (WVU-Chemical Engineering), who is modeling, sizing and costing the major components. The tasks will address modeling and preliminary design of the heat exchanger, demister and NOx sorbent chamber s

Nigel Clark; Gregory Thompson; Richard Atkinson; Richard Turton; Chamila Tissera; Emre Tatli; Andy Zimmerman

2005-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

358

Experience Based Seismic Equipment Qualification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidelines that can be used to perform an experience-based seismic equipment qualification for verification of seismic adequacy of active electrical and mechanical equipment consistent with requirements of American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)-7. The report summarizes what requirements are sufficient to ensure that an item of equipment can perform its intended safety function after a design earthquake. The report also provides additional guidance on ensuring that an item of equi...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

359

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and management are key elements in a well developed asset management implementation. Consequently an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to the task of improving their capabilities for risk-based decision making. Equipment risk models are essential elements in a risk assessment process. However, most proposed power delivery equipment risk models require for their successful application some probabilistic representation describing the chances of equipment ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Risk assessment and management are key elements in a well-developed asset management implementation. Consequently, an increasing number of utility managers are devoting resources to the task of improving their capabilities for risk-based decision making. Equipment risk models are essential elements in the risk assessment process. However, for their application, most proposed power delivery equipment risk models require some probabilistic representation describing the chances of equipment failure. This re...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

vehicles are equipped with carburetion systems approved by the Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet or fuel systems that meet Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards....

362

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2011 Annual Progress Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Handling Equipment Demonstration, Todd Ramsden, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Landfill Gas-to-Hydrogen, Shannon Baxter-Clemmons, South Carolina Hydrogen and Fuel Cell...

363

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2012 Annual Progress Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Handling Equipment Demonstration, Todd Ramsden, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Landfill Gas-to-Hydrogen, Shannon Baxter-Clemmons, South Carolina Hydrogen and Fuel Cell...

364

ARRA Material Handling Equipment Composite Data Products: Data through Quarter 2 of 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) fuel cell material handling equipment composite data products for data through the second quarter of 2012.

Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ramsden, T.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

ARRA Material Handling Equipment Composite Data Products: Data Through Quarter 4 of 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) fuel cell material handling equipment composite data products for data through the fourth quarter of 2012.

Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Ainscough, C.; Saur, G.; Post, M.; Peters, M.; Ramsden, T.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Arkansas Incentives and Laws Arkansas Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Electric Vehicle (EV) Equipment and Fuel Cell Income Tax Credit Repealed: 03/06/2009 The following was repealed by House Bill 2081, 2009: An income tax credit is available to Arkansas taxpayers to offset the costs of an Arkansas-based facility that designs, develops, or produces advanced technologies, including EV equipment and fuel cells. The credit is equal to 50% of the amount spent during the taxable year to purchase or construct the facility, including land acquisition, infrastructure improvements, renovation,

367

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The comment period is closed. Milestones and Documents The direct heating equipment, residential water heaters, and pool heaters standby and off mode test procedures...

368

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Certification of Commercial Heating, Ventilating, Air-Conditioning, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Equipment Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products...

369

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Amendments and Correction to Petitions for Waiver and Interim Waiver for Consumer Products and Commercial and Industrial Equipment Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for...

370

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Collection on Commercial Equipment Labeling Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy is seeking information...

371

Review of D-T Experiments Relevant to Burning Plasma lssues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enabled not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. TFTR and JET, in conjunction with the worldwide fusion effort, have studied a broad range of topics including magnetohydrodynamic stability, transport, wave-particle interactions, the confinement of energetic particles, and plasma boundary interactions. D-T experiments differ in three principal ways from previous experiments: isotope effects associated with the use of deuterium-tritium fuel, the presence of fusion-generated alpha particles, and technology issues associated with tritium handling and increased activation. The effect of deuterium-tritium fuel and the presence of alpha particles are reviewed and placed in the perspective of the much larger worldwide database using deuterium fuel and theoretical understanding. Both devices have contributed substantially in addressing the scientific and technical issues associated with burning plasmas. However, future burning plasma experiments will operate with larger ratios of alpha heating power to auxiliary power and will be able to access additional alpha-particle physics issues. The scientific opportunities for extending our understanding ofburning plasmas beyond that provided by current experiments are described. Keywords: deuterium-tritium, alpha-particle physics, isotope scaling, ICRF heating, JET, TFTR

Hawryluk R. J

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Projects NREL's vehicles and fuels projects focus on developing, evaluating, and demonstrating innovative technologies that reduce the nation's dependence on imported petroleum and improve air quality. We work in partnership with vehicle manufacturers, equipment suppliers, fuel providers, and others to develop and commercialize vehicle and fuel technologies that meet our nation's energy and environmental goals. Advanced Combustion and Fuels Biofuels Electric Vehicle Grid Integration Energy Storage Fleet Test and Evaluation Power Electronics ReFUEL Laboratory Secure Transportation Data Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction Vehicle Systems Analysis Printable Version Vehicles & Fuels Research Home Projects Advanced Combustion & Fuels Biofuels Electric Vehicle Grid Integration

373

EXAMINATION OF IRRADIATED EBWR CORE-1 FUEL ELEMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two fuel elements were removed from the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor and examined in a hot cell. The elements had maximum burn-ups of 0.11 and 0.39 at.%. Both were disassembled and sampled for the evaluation of the effects of in-pile operation and radiation damage to the fuel. The fuel elements were in gcod condition with no ruptured.cladding, core-clad nonbonds, or excessive fuel-plate swelling or warpage. Thin samples cut from the fuel plates in element ET-51 warped and cracked, suggesting a relieving of locked-in stresses and indicating that after 0.39 at.% burn-up the fuel cores were hard, brittle, and highly stressed. The rate of fuel-plate volume increase owing to the burn-up of uranium was 6 to 7% DELTA V per at.% burn-up. Hydrogen was picked up by the fuel plates under reactor operating conditions with the probable forraation of isolated areas of small announts of zirconiura hydride. Annealing studies on sections of fuel plate at 500 and 550 deg C indicated bulk volume increases of 1 to 2% and 5 to 10%, respectively, after 500 hr. A 600 deg C anneal resulted in a bulk volume increase of 17% after 45 hr. (auth)

Reinke, C.F.; Carlander, R.

1960-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits to Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Benefits and Considerations Also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), propane is a domestically produced, well-established, clean-burning fuel. Using propane as a vehicle fuel increases energy security, provides convenience and performance

375

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Basics to Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Production & Distribution Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Fuel Basics Propane dispenser Also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or autogas, propane is a clean-burning, high-energy alternative fuel that's been used for decades to

376

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

AFDC AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on AddThis.com... Pollutants and Health Pollutants emitted from burning conventional and alternative fuels fall into two categories: Criteria and Non-Criteria pollutants. The Clean Air Act (CAA) requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

377

World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Biomass Equipment & Materials Compensating Tax Deduction Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Biofuels...

379

Building Technologies Office: Appliance and Equipment Standards...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS APPLIANCE & EQUIPMENT STANDARDS BUILDING ENERGY CODES EERE Building Technologies Office Appliance & Equipment Standards...

380

Idling - cruising the fuel inefficiency highway.  

SciTech Connect

What is the purpose of idling? The scale of idling can be small, as when parents idle their vehicles while waiting for their children outside of school, or it can be large, as when ocean liners are in port. In many cases, the primary purpose for idling is to control the temperature of a passenger or freight compartment. Large line-haul trucks idle overnight to keep fuel and the engine warm, for the resting driver's comfort, to mask out noises and smells, and for safety. In addition, all classes of trucks idle during the workday at ports and terminals, busy delivery sites, border crossings, and other work sites. They may be idling to enable slow movement in a queue (creep idling) or to provide other services. Bus drivers also idle their vehicles while they wait for passengers and to warm up in the morning. Even locomotive engines are idled so they start, for hotel load, to keep the battery charged, to keep the toilet water from freezing, and for air brakes, or because the operator idles out of habit. Although this document focuses on long-haul trucks, much of the information applies to other vehicles as well. The impacts of idling are substantial, with as much as 6 billion gallons of fuel burned unnecessarily each year in the United States at a cost of over $20 billion. The extra hours of engine operation also cost the owners money for more frequent maintenance and overhauls. In addition, idling vehicles emit particulates (PM{sub 10}), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). These emissions, along with noise from idling vehicles, have led to many local and state restrictions on idling. Two main factors have combined to create a surge of interest in idling reduction (IR): (1) Increasing restrictions on idling for heavy vehicles and (2) The price of diesel fuel. Because stakeholders focus their efforts on improving different factors (air quality, fuel economy, noise level), they do not necessarily agree on the most advantageous technological alternatives to implement. In addition, although many equipment manufacturers have tried to educate customers and government agencies, they often provide conflicting claims about the comparative merits of different devices. This makes it difficult for truck owners to choose the right equipment for their needs. In this study, we present the first comparison of IR technologies with each other and with idling on the basis of both costs and full fuel-cycle emissions, for different locations, fuel prices, and idling patterns. The preferences described are for the technologies that reduce total emissions the most and cost truck owners the least. We also discuss how regulatory issues and legislation affect IR, what financial incentives help to promote IR, and how outreach and education approaches can be adopted to reduce the need to idle. Finally, we offer a prediction of how future research and development (R&D), regulations, and citizen involvement can help to improve fuel economy and clean the air.

Gaines, L.; Levinson, T. (Energy Systems); (DOE)

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A Long Term Field Emissions Study of Natural Gas Fueled Refuse Haulers in New York City  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New York City Department of Sanitation has operated natural gas fueled refuse haulers in a pilot study: a major goal of this study was to compare the emissions from these natural gas vehicles with their diesel counterparts. The vehicles were tandem axle trucks with GVW (gross vehicle weight) rating of 69,897 pounds. The primary use of these was for street collection and transporting the refuse to a landfill. West Virginia University Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratories have been engaged in monitoring the tailpipe emissions from these trucks for seven-years. In the later years of testing the hydrocarbons were speciated for non-methane and methane components. Six of these vehicles employed the older technology (mechanical mixer) Cummins L-10 lean burn natural gas engines. Five trucks were equipped with electronically controlled Detroit Diesel Series 50 lean burn engines, while another five were powered by Caterpillar stoichiometric burn 3306 natural gas engines, The Ca terpillar engines employed an exhaust oxygen sensor feedback and three way catalysts. Since the refuse haulers had automatic Allison transmissions, and since they were employed in stop-and-go city service, initial emissions measurements were made using the Central Business Cycle (SAE Jl376) for buses at 42,000 pound test weight. Some additional measurements were made using an ad hoc cycle that has been designed to be more representative of the real refuse hauler use that included several compaction cycles. The Cummins powered natural gas vehicles showed oxides of nitrogen and carbon monoxide emission variations typically associated with variable fuel mixer performance. In the first Year of testing, the stoichiometric Caterpillar engines yielded low emission levels, but in later years two of these refuse haulers had high carbon monoxide attributed to failure of the feedback system. For example, carbon monoxide on these two vehicles rose from 1.4 g/mile and 10 g/mile in 1995 to 144.9 g/mile and 57.8 g/mile in 1996. These stoichiometric engines were also less fuel efficient than their lean burn counterparts. The Detroit Diesel Series 50 powered refuse haulers produced high levels of oxides of nitrogen. However, it was found that changing the shifting patterns of the transmission lowered the oxides of nitrogen. All three engine types showed the potential for low emissions operation and the particulate matter reduction advantage offered by natural gas was evident from the results.

Nigel N. Clark; Byron l. Rapp; Mridul Gautam; Wenguang Wang; Donald W. Lyons

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

2004 Equipment Reliability Forum Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the proceedings of the EPRI 2004 Equipment Reliability Forum that was held September 13–14, 2004, in Kansas City, Missouri. This annual forum provides an opportunity for industry personnel involved in equipment reliability and related issues to exchange information and share experiences. It is structured to incorporate both formal presentations and open discussion.

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Equipment Risk and Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report introduces the basis for understanding, developing, and applying a new set of practical, condition-based risk models for substation equipment. Because of the great variety of risks encountered in the power delivery industry and the diversity in utility equipment and business practices, the focus at this stage of the project is at the conceptual level.

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

384

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal" November 20, 2012 jlowe@bsu.edu 765.285.2805 Ball State University Ball State University Administration Building 1899 Ball State 1920s Ball State University Ball State University (4) Coal Fired Boilers Installed 1941/1955 (3) Natural Gas Fired Boilers Installed in the 1970s Heat and Chilled Water Plant Operations Heat Plant: 4 Coal Fired Boilers 3 Natural Gas Fired Boilers 320,000 Lbs/Hr nameplate 240,000 Lbs/Hr current 700,000,000 Lbs/Year Chilled Water Plant: 5 Electrical Centrifugal Chillers 9,300 ton capacity 25,000,000 Ton Hours/Year Pollutants Produced from Burning 36,000 tons of Coal * Carbon Dioxide 85,000 tons (Global Warming)

385

Advanced technology options for industrial heating equipment research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents a strategy for a comprehensive program plan that is applicable to the Combustion Equipment Program of the DOE Office of Industrial Technologies (the program). The program seeks to develop improved heating equipment and advanced control techniques which, by improvements in combustion and beat transfer, will increase energy-use efficiency and productivity in industrial processes and allow the preferred use of abundant, low grade and waste domestic fuels. While the plan development strategy endeavors to be consistent with the programmatic goals and policies of the office, it is primarily governed by the needs and concerns of the US heating equipment industry. The program, by nature, focuses on energy intensive industrial processes. According to the DOE Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), the industrial sector in the US consumed about 21 quads of energy in 1988 in the form of coal, petroleum, natural gas and electricity. This energy was used as fuels for industrial boilers and furnaces, for agricultural uses, for construction, as feedstocks for chemicals and plastics, and for steel, mining, motors, engines and other industrial use over 75 percent of this energy was consumed to provide heat and power for manufacturing industries. The largest consumers of fuel energy were the primary metals, chemical and allied products, paper and allied products, and stone, clay and glass industry groups which accounted for about 60% of the total fuel energy consumed by the US manufacturing sector.

Jain, R.C.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Europe Europe » Poland Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends Carbon dioxide emissions from Poland's use of fossil-fuels and cement production climbed at a remarkably steady rate of 3.9% per year from 1800 until 1980, when they dropped abruptly (11.7%). Fossil-fuel CO2 emissions crept back up throughout the 1980s peaking in 1987 at 127 million metric tons of carbon. Since the 1987 high, CO2 emissions have plummeted 32% to early 1970s levels while per capita emissions have dropped to late 1960s levels. Poland is the world's ninth largest producer of coal and emissions are predominantly from coal burning: 97% in 1950 and 68% in 2008. The drop following 1980 is apparent in rates of liquid fuel burning but releases from consumption of petroleum products have returned and surpassed 1980s

387

The deposition and burning characteristics during slagging co-firing coal and wood: modeling and numerical simulation  

SciTech Connect

Numerical analysis was used to study the deposition and burning characteristics of combining co-combustion with slagging combustion technologies in this paper. The pyrolysis and burning kinetic models of different fuels were implanted into the WBSF-PCC2 (wall burning and slag flow in pulverized co-combustion) computation code, and then the slagging and co-combustion characteristics (especially the wall burning mechanism of different solid fuels and their effects on the whole burning behavior in the cylindrical combustor at different mixing ratios under the condition of keeping the heat input same) were simulated numerically. The results showed that adding wood powder at 25% mass fraction can increase the temperature at the initial stage of combustion, which is helpful to utilize the front space of the combustor. Adding wood powder at a 25% mass fraction can increase the reaction rate at the initial combustion stage; also, the coal ignitability is improved, and the burnout efficiency is enhanced by about 5% of suspension and deposition particles, which is helpful for coal particles to burn entirely and for combustion devices to minimize their dimensions or sizes. The results also showed that adding wood powder at a proper ratio is helpful to keep the combustion stability, not only because of the enhancement for the burning characteristics, but also because the running slag layer structure can be changed more continuously, which is very important for avoiding the abnormal slag accumulation in the slagging combustor. The theoretic analysis in this paper proves that unification of co-combustion and slagging combustion technologies is feasible, though more comprehensive and rigorous research is needed.

Wang, X.H.; Zhao, D.Q.; Jiang, L.Q.; Yang, W.B. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ghangzhou (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A pulverized coal fuel injector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO{sub 2} formation.

Rini, M.J.; Towle, D.P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Natural Gas as a Boiler Fuel of Choice in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas is abundant, clean burning, and cost competitive with other fuels. In addition to superior economic fundamentals, the expanded use of natural gas will be enhanced by political and industry leaders. Natural gas therefore will continue to be the boiler fuel choice for Texas electric generating companies.

Kmetz, W. J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Sales Tax Exemption for Hydrogen Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales Tax Exemption for Hydrogen Fuel Cells Sales Tax Exemption for Hydrogen Fuel Cells Sales Tax Exemption for Hydrogen Fuel Cells < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info Start Date 10/1/2007 State South Carolina Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% of sales tax Provider South Carolina Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Alliance South Carolina offers a sales tax exemption for "any device, equipment, or machinery operated by hydrogen or fuel cells, any device, equipment or machinery used to generate, produce, or distribute hydrogen and designated specifically for hydrogen applications or for fuel cell applications, and any device, equipment, or machinery used predominantly for the manufacturing of, or research and development involving hydrogen or fuel

391

Fossil fuels -- future fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ridesharing  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ridesharing to someone Ridesharing to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ridesharing on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ridesharing on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ridesharing on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ridesharing on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ridesharing on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ridesharing on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Ridesharing Mass Transit Active Transit Multi-Modal Transportation Telework Ridesharing Photo of people car pooling. Rideshare programs help people share vehicles to commute together. Also known as carpooling, ridesharing conserves fuel and reduces vehicle

393

AGR-2: The first irradiation of French HTR fuel in Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

AGR-2, the second irradiation of the US program for qualification of the NGNP fuel, is open to international participation within the scope of the Generation IV International Forum. In this frame, it includes in its multi-capsule irradiation rig an irradiation of French HTR fuel manufactured in the CAPRI line (GAIA facility at CEA/Cadarache and AREVA/CERCA compacting line at Romans). The AGR-2 irradiation is designed to place our first fabrications of HTR particles under operating conditions that are representative of ANTARES project while keeping close to the test range of the German fuel as much as possible, which is the reference in terms of irradiation behavior. A few batches of particles and 12 fuel compacts were produced and characterized in 2009 by CEA and CERCA. The fuel main characteristics are in conformity with our specifications and in compliance with INL requirements. The AGR-2 experiment is based on the design and devices used in the first experiment of the AGR program. The design makes it possible to monitor the irradiation conditions and in particular, the temperature, the power and the fission products released from fuel particles. The in pile equipment consists of a multi-capsule device designed to simultaneously irradiate six independent capsules with temperature control. The out-of-core part consists of the equipment for actively controlling temperature and measuring the fission products release on-line. The target conditions for the irradiation experiment were defined with the aim of comparing the results obtained under irradiation with German particles along with the objectives of reaching burn-up and fluence targets to validate the behavior of our fuel in a significant range (15% FIMA – 5 × 1025 n/m2 at 600 EFPD with centerline fuel temperature about 1100 degrees C). These conditions have to be representative of ANTARES project characteristics. These target conditions were compared with final results from neutron and thermal design studies performed by INL team, and preliminary thermal mechanical ATLAS calculations were carried out by CEA from this pre-design. Despite the mean burn-up achieved in approximately 600 EFPD being a little high (16.3% FIMA max. associated with a low fluence up to 2.85 × 1025 n/m2), this irradiation will nevertheless encompass the range of irradiation effects covered in our experimental objectives (maximum stress peak at start of irradiation then sign inversion of the stress in the SiC layer). In addition, the fluence and burn-up acceleration factors are very similar to those of the German reference experiments. This experimental irradiation began in July 2010 in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and first results have been acquired.

T. Lambert; B. Grover; P. Guillermier; D. Moulinier; F. Imbault Huart

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Methods to improve lubricity of fuels and lubricants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for providing lubricity in fuels and lubricants includes adding a boron compound to a fuel or lubricant to provide a boron-containing fuel or lubricant. The fuel or lubricant may contain a boron compound at a concentration between about 30 ppm and about 3,000 ppm and a sulfur concentration of less than about 500 ppm. A method of powering an engine to minimize wear, by burning a fuel containing boron compounds. The boron compounds include compound that provide boric acid and/or BO.sub.3 ions or monomers to the fuel or lubricant.

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL)

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laboratory measurements of biomass-burning emissions: 1.tar balls: Particles from biomass and biofuel burning, J.Eleuterio (2005), A review of biomass burning emissions part

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Niño?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fication of drought-induced biomass burning in Indonesiavariability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 toChemistry and Physics Do biomass burning aerosols intensify

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Flanner, M. G; Rasch, P. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Niño?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of drought-induced biomass burning in Indonesia since 1960,variability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 toand Physics Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Flanner, M. G; Rasch, P. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. Fig. 2 Comparisons of burning-velocity predictions withcurve), when an experimental burning velocity (points) of 53and calculated laminar burning velocities of lean hydrogen-

Grcar, Joseph F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Reactive burn models and ignition & growth concept  

SciTech Connect

Plastic-bonded explosives are heterogeneous materials. Experimentally, shock initiation is sensitive to small amounts of porosity, due to the formation of hot spots (small localized regions of high temperature). This leads to the Ignition and Growth concept, introduced by Lee and Tarver in 1980, as the basis for reactive burn models. A homogeneized burn rate needs to account for three mesoscale physical effects (i) the density of burnt hot spots, which depends on the lead shock strength; (ii) the growth of the burn fronts triggered by hot spots, which depends on the local deflagration speed; (iii) a geometric factor that accounts for the overlap of deflagration wavelets from adjacent hot spots. These effects can be combined and the burn model defined by specifying the reaction progress variable {lambda}(t) as a function of a dimensionless reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t)/{ell}{sub hs}, rather than by xpecifying an explicit burn rate. The length scale {ell}{sub hs} is the average distance between hot spots, which is proportional to [N{sub hs}(P{sub s})]{sup -1/3}, where N{sub hs} is the number density of hot spots activated by the lead shock. The reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t) = {line_integral}{sub 0}{sup t} D(P(t'))dt' is the distance the burn front propagates from a single hot spot, where D is the deflagration speed and t is the time since the shock arrival. A key implementation issue is how to determine the lead shock strength in conjunction with a shock capturing scheme. They have developed a robust algorithm for this purpose based on the Hugoniot jump condition for the energy. The algorithm utilizes the time dependence of density, pressure and energy within each cell. The method is independent of the numerical dissipation used for shock capturing. It is local and can be used in one or more space dimensions. The burn model has a small number of parameters which can be calibrated to fit velocity gauge data from shock initiation experiments.

Menikoff, Ralph S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shaw, Milton S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

"Quantum" Chaos and Stability Condition of Soliton-like Waves of Nuclear Burning in Neutron-Multiplicating Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the stability condition for the soliton-like wave of nuclear burning in neutron-multiplicating medium is determined in general by two conditions. The first condition (necessary) is determined by relationship between the equilibrium concentration and critical concentration of active (fissile) isotope, that is a consequence of the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition. The second condition (sufficient) is set by the so-called Wigner quantum statistics, or more accurately, by a ststistics of the Gaussian simplectic ensembles with respect to the parameter that describes the squared width of burning wave front of nuclear fuel active component.

Rusov, V D; Tarasov, V A; Zelentsova, T N; Sharf, I V; Chernezhenko, S A; Byegunova, O A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Factory Equipment Network Testing Framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and analyses for industrial networks that can provide figures of merit for real-time networking properties, similar to vehicle fuel economy. ...

2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

402

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits to Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Benefits and Considerations Biodiesel is a domestically produced, clean-burning, renewable substitute for petroleum diesel. Using biodiesel as a vehicle fuel increases energy security, improves public health and the environment, and provides safety

403

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

AFDC » Case Studies AFDC » Case Studies Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on AddThis.com... Video Download Help Learn how to download, watch, burn, and share videos. Download Videos To download videos for a PC, right-click a Windows Media Video (WMV) link and select "Save Target As..." from the shortcut menu.

404

Process development and fabrication for sphere-pac fuel rods. [PWR; BWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium fuel rods containing sphere-pac fuel have been fabricated for in-reactor tests and demonstrations. A process for the development, qualification, and fabrication of acceptable sphere-pac fuel rods is described. Special equipment to control fuel contamination with moisture or air and the equipment layout needed for rod fabrication is described and tests for assuring the uniformity of the fuel column are discussed. Fuel retainers required for sphere-pac fuel column stability and instrumentation to measure fuel column smear density are described. Results of sphere-pac fuel rod fabrication campaigns are reviewed and recommended improvements for high throughput production are noted.

Welty, R.K.; Campbell, M.H.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Laboratory Equipment Donation Program - Guidelines  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy, in accordance with its The United States Department of Energy, in accordance with its responsibility to encourage research and development in the energy area, awards grants of used energy-related laboratory equipment. Universities, colleges and other non-profit educational institutions of higher learning in the United States are eligible to apply for equipment to use in energy-oriented educational programs in the life, physical, and environmental sciences, and in engineering. The equipment listed in this database is available for grant; however, specific items may be recalled for DOE use and become unavailable through the program. Frequently Asked Questions Who is eligible to apply for equipment? Any non-profit, educational institution of higher learning, such as a middle school, high school, university, college, junior college, technical

406

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single Package Vertical Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Single Package Vertical Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Manufacturers have been required to comply with the Department of Energy's energy conservation standards for single package vertical air conditioners and heat pumps as a separate equipment class since 2008. Before 2010, this equipment was regulated under the broader scope of commercial air conditioning and heating equipment. Single package vertical air conditioners and heat pumps are commercial air conditioning and heating equipment with its main components arranged in a vertical fashion. They are mainly used in modular classrooms, modular office buildings, telecom shelters, and hotels, and are typically installed on the outside of an exterior wall or in a closet against an exterior wall but inside the building.

407

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Ancillary Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ancillary Equipment Ancillary Equipment For general questions, please contact the Lujan Center Sample Environments responsible: Victor Fanelli | vfanelli@lanl.gov | 505.667.8755 Sample and Equipment Shipping Instructions For questions regarding shipping procedures, contact Lujan Center Experiment Coordinator: Leilani Conradson | leilani@lanl.gov | 505.665.9505 Low Temperature Equipment Specifications Flight Path/Instrument Compatibility Responsible Displex closed-cycle refrigerators Tmin= 4 K to 12 K Tmax= 300 K to 340 K 11 - Asterix 04 - HIPPO 03 - HIPD 10 - LQD 02 - SMARTS Victor Fanelli vfanelli@lanl.gov Or particular instrument scientist Top loading closed-cycle refrigerator T = 10 K to 500 K option of in situ gas adsorption cell 07 - FDS Luke Daemon lld@lanl.gov Monika Hartl hartl@lanl.gov

408

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters Active Mode Test Procedures Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters Active Mode Test Procedures Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to amend the active mode test procedures for direct heating equipment and pool heaters. This rulemaking is mandated by the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA). Recent Updates | Public Meeting Information | Submitting Public Comments | Milestones and Documents | Related Rulemakings | Statutory Authority | Contact Information Recent Updates DOE published a notice of proposed rulemaking regarding active mode test procedures for direct heating equipment and pool heaters. 78 FR 63410 (October 24, 2013). The comment deadline is January 7, 2014. Public Meeting Information

409

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heaters, gas-fired and oil-fired instantaneous water heaters and hot water supply boilers, and unfired hot water storage tanks. Commercial water heating equipment is used to...

410

Commonwealth's Master Equipment Leasing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The [http://www.trs.virginia.gov/debt/MELP%20Guides.aspx Master Equipment Leasing Program] (MELP) ensures that all Commonwealth agencies, authorities and institutions obtain consistent and...

411

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for automatic commercial ice-making equipment cover maximum energy use and maximum condenser water use of cube ice machines with harvest rates between 50 and 2,500 lbs of ice...

412

Appliances and Commercial Equipment Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small, Large, and Very Large, Air-Cooled Commercial Air Conditioning and Heating Equipment Sign up for e-mail updates on regulations for this and other products Pursuant to Section...

413

Install Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces (English/Chinese) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Chinese translation of ITP fact sheet about installing Waste Heat Recovery Systems for Fuel-Fired Furnaces. For most fuel-fired heating equipment, a large amount of the heat supplied is wasted as exhaust or flue gases. In furnaces, air and fuel are mixed and burned to generate heat, some of which is transferred to the heating device and its load. When the heat transfer reaches its practical limit, the spent combustion gases are removed from the furnace via a flue or stack. At this point, these gases still hold considerable thermal energy. In many systems, this is the greatest single heat loss. The energy efficiency can often be increased by using waste heat gas recovery systems to capture and use some of the energy in the flue gas. For natural gas-based systems, the amount of heat contained in the flue gases as a percentage of the heat input in a heating system can be estimated by using Figure 1. Exhaust gas loss or waste heat depends on flue gas temperature and its mass flow, or in practical terms, excess air resulting from combustion air supply and air leakage into the furnace. The excess air can be estimated by measuring oxygen percentage in the flue gases.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Biomass Burning and the Production of Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning is a source of greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. In addition, biomass burning is a source of chemically active gases, including carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and nitric oxide. These gases, along ...

Levine J. S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Reflective Terahertz Imaging for early diagnosis of skin burn severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

97 Fig 7.3 ‘Cross shaped’ brass brand used for burnFig 7.21 3-D drawing of the brass brand used for controlledfor imaging burns[10]. A brass brand heated to 315°C was

TEWARI, PRIYAMVADA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

NETL: Releases & Briefs - Laser ignition for lean-burn engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Technology Laboratory have successfully operated a laser-spark lean-burn natural gas reciprocating engine. Development of lean-burn engines is driven by demand for higher...

417

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

418

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

419

Equipment Maintenance Optimization Manual Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of Equipment Maintenance Optimization Manuals (EMOMs) that include procedures and troubleshooting supported by broad-based utility experience. EMOMs for critical generating station equipment allows power generating plants to replace existing maintenance practices with the latest industry best practices. Using this information as a benchmark, current practices can be validated or adjusted for more optimum performance of the overall maintenance process. In addition, the EMOMs c...

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

420

Equipment Maintenance Optimization Manual Prototypes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides detailed information to assist plant staff in performing recommended equipment maintenance tasks. It is a compilation of equipment maintenance optimization manual (EMOM) prototypes that include procedures and trouble shooting supported by broad-based utility experience. The EMOMs enable utility generation stations to: minimize operation and maintenance costs, including parts and labor; assist in maintenance planning, scheduling, and parts strategy; develop comprehensive maintenance m...

1999-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning equipment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Water-Using Equipment: Domestic  

SciTech Connect

Water management is an important aspect of energy engineering. This article addresses water-using equipment primarily used for household purposes, including faucets, showers, toilets, urinals, dishwashers, and clothes washers, and focuses on how the equipment can be optimized to save both water and energy. Technology retrofits and operation and maintenance changes are the primary methods discussed for water and energy conservation. Auditing to determine current consumption rates is also described for each technology.

Solana, Amy E.; McMordie-Stoughton, Katherine L.

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

422

Impacts of Water Quality on Residential Water Heating Equipment  

SciTech Connect

Water heating is a ubiquitous energy use in all residential housing, accounting for 17.7% of residential energy use (EIA 2012). Today, there are many efficient water heating options available for every fuel type, from electric and gas to more unconventional fuel types like propane, solar, and fuel oil. Which water heating option is the best choice for a given household will depend on a number of factors, including average daily hot water use (total gallons per day), hot water draw patterns (close together or spread out), the hot water distribution system (compact or distributed), installation constraints (such as space, electrical service, or venting accommodations) and fuel-type availability and cost. While in general more efficient water heaters are more expensive than conventional water heating technologies, the savings in energy use and, thus, utility bills can recoup the additional upfront investment and make an efficient water heater a good investment over time in most situations, although the specific payback period for a given installation will vary widely. However, the expected lifetime of a water heater in a given installation can dramatically influence the cost effectiveness and savings potential of a water heater and should be considered, along with water use characteristics, fuel availability and cost, and specific home characteristics when selecting the optimum water heating equipment for a particular installation. This report provides recommendations for selecting and maintaining water heating equipment based on local water quality characteristics.

Widder, Sarah H.; Baechler, Michael C.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fuel consolidation demonstration: Consolidation concept development  

SciTech Connect

EPRI, Northeast utilities Service Company (NUSCO), DOE, Baltimore Gas Electric Company, and Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) are engaged in a program to develop a system for consolidating spent fuel, in which the consolidated fuel will be licensable by NRC for storage in the spent-fuel storage pool. Fuel consolidation offers a means of substantially increasing the capacity of spent-fuel storage pools. Consolidation equipment design, development, construction, and testing are being performed by C-E in Windsor, Connecticut. Seismic and structural evaluation of the capability of the Millstone Unit 2 spent-fuel pool and building to accommodate the increased fuel capacity is being conducted by NUSCO. NUSCO plans to obtain a license to store consolidated fuel in the Millstone-2 spent-fuel storage pool. NUSCO also plans to perform a hot demonstration of the integrated consolidation system with spent fuel at Millstone-2. This report describes the consolidation system design that forms the basis for the detailed design of the equipment comprising the system, including information on the fabrication and testing of the equipment. Appendix B describes an evaluation of the ability of the system under development to consolidate LWR spent-fuel assemblies other than the 14 {times} 14 fuel of C-E design stored at Millstone-2. A comparison was made of fuel-assembly designs on the basis of information available in open literature. It was concluded that with appropriate dimensional modifications the spent-fuel consolidation system equipment design is applicable to almost all PWR fuel-assembly configurations. 8 refs., 20 figs.

Not Available

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Fuel processor for fuel cell power system. [Conversion of methanol into hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

Vanderborgh, N.E.; Springer, T.E.; Huff, J.R.

1986-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

425

Small-scale alcohol fuel production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report of a project to demonstrate the feasibility of small-scale alcohol fuel production. A list of equipment and costs incurred in contracting the still are included. No experimental results are presented. (DMC)

Evans, J.; McQueary, J.

1983-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

426

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Transportation System Transportation System Efficiency to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Transportation System Efficiency on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Ridesharing Mass Transit Active Transit Multi-Modal Transportation Telework

427

Wood as a fuel. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the availability, combustion aspects, economics, and feasibility of using wood as fuel. Topics include wood-fuel power plants, wood waste fuels, district heating systems, wood burning furnaces and appliances, and wood waste generators. (Contains a minimum of 128 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Possible use of polyaphronated hydrocarbons at jet fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Air Force is interested in low cost missile propulsion systems which meet the need for increased stand off range and can fly at high speeds at both low and high altitudes. Due to their high performance capabilities, liquid fueled ramjets are important candidates for these missions. They tend to perform well when the combustor length is long enough to enable all of the fuel to be burned before being lost through the exhaust nozzle. When a combustor has to be shortened due to size limitations, liquid fuel performance drops as a result of not burning all of the injected fuel. Proper fuel injection and atomization are essential factors in obtaining high performance in all liquid fueled ramjets and other air breathing combustion systems. Poor fuel atomization results in low combustion efficiency, contributes to combustion instability, and aids in the formation of pollutants. Very fine fuel atomization requires complex fuel control injection systems which are impractical for ramjet applications. The recent developments in the colloid system, polyaphrons, opens up the possibility that fuels prepared in this way may increase the performance of ramjet propulsion systems, particularly those which are limited in combustion efficiency due to short evaporation and residence times, such as is the case for the very compact swirl combustor configurations. Polyaphrons have the potential to induce better atomization thereby decreasing residence times required for individual droplet burning.

Sebba, F.; Schetz, J.A. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA)); Neff, R.B. (Aero Propulsion Lab., Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH (USA))

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Fuel Cell Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to promote clean energy projects and aid in the commercialization of new fuel cell technologies the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) initiated a Fuel Cell Demonstration Program in 1999 with six month deployments of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) non-commercial Beta model systems at partnering sites throughout Long Island. These projects facilitated significant developments in the technology, providing operating experience that allowed the manufacturer to produce fuel cells that were half the size of the Beta units and suitable for outdoor installations. In 2001, LIPA embarked on a large-scale effort to identify and develop measures that could improve the reliability and performance of future fuel cell technologies for electric utility applications and the concept to establish a fuel cell farm (Farm) of 75 units was developed. By the end of October of 2001, 75 Lorax 2.0 fuel cells had been installed at the West Babylon substation on Long Island, making it the first fuel cell demonstration of its kind and size anywhere in the world at the time. Designed to help LIPA study the feasibility of using fuel cells to operate in parallel with LIPA's electric grid system, the Farm operated 120 fuel cells over its lifetime of over 3 years including 3 generations of Plug Power fuel cells (Lorax 2.0, Lorax 3.0, Lorax 4.5). Of these 120 fuel cells, 20 Lorax 3.0 units operated under this Award from June 2002 to September 2004. In parallel with the operation of the Farm, LIPA recruited government and commercial/industrial customers to demonstrate fuel cells as on-site distributed generation. From December 2002 to February 2005, 17 fuel cells were tested and monitored at various customer sites throughout Long Island. The 37 fuel cells operated under this Award produced a total of 712,635 kWh. As fuel cell technology became more mature, performance improvements included a 1% increase in system efficiency. Including equipment, design, fuel, maintenance, installation, and decommissioning the total project budget was approximately $3.7 million.

Gerald Brun

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Burning Thermals in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Thermals in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1 , J. B. Bell1 , S. Dong2 , and S. E. Woosley2 ABSTRACT We develop a one-dimensional theoretical model for thermals burning in Type Ia supernovae based for the burning and for the expansion of the thermal due to changes in the background stratification found

Bell, John B.

431

Burning Plasma Physics Technical Subgroup of the Magnetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Burning Plasma Physics Technical Subgroup of the Magnetic Fusion Concepts Working Group 1999 Woolley, Stewart Zweben. #12;2 Contents 1. Introduction 3 2. Burning Plasma Physics Issues 8 2.1 Energetic and physics integration 22 3. Technical Readiness for a Burning Plasma Experiment 26 3.1 Background

432

A Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Fusion). ARIES Group #12;Advanced Toroidal Physics Fusion Plasma Conditions Burning Plasma Physics 1.0 0.5 Alpha Energy #12;Magnetic Fusion Science Issues - Strongly Coupled in a Fusion (Burning) Plasma Improved

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Presented at UFA Burning Plasma Science Workshop II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRE D. Meade Presented at UFA Burning Plasma Science Workshop II General Atomics San Diego, CA May for a Next Step Experiment in Magnetic Fusion · Compact High Field Approach - General Parameters · Burning, Madison, WI · Charge for First and Second meetings Scientific value of a Burning Plasma experiment

434

Guanine tautomerism revealed by UVUV and IRUV hole burning spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guanine tautomerism revealed by UV­UV and IR­UV hole burning spectroscopy E. Nir Department spectroscopy. 1-methylguanine, in which the Keto­Enol tautomerism is blocked, shows hole burning spectra from hole burning SHB by using two counter- propagating dye laser pulses with a delay of about 150 ns

de Vries, Mattanjah S.

435

Stellar Burning Falk Herwig, Alexander Heger, and Frank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stellar Burning and Mixing Falk Herwig, Alexander Heger, and Frank Timmes (T-6); and Rob Hueckstaedt and Rob Coker (X-2); fherwig@lanl.gov D uring most phases of stellar evolution, nuclear burning nuclear burning in convective regions in which mixing and nuclear energy release proceeds on comparable

Herwig, Falk

436

Electromagnetically induced transparency over spectral hole-burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electromagnetically induced transparency over spectral hole-burning temperature in a rare the spectral hole-burning temperature. The transmission of the probe laser beam is increased by a factor of exp over the spectral hole-burning temperature in a rare-earth­doped solid represents important progress

Shahriar, Selim

437

Supercritical Burning of Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Droplet with Detailed Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supercritical Burning of Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Droplet with Detailed Chemistry J. DAOU,* P with diameter less than I pm vaporize before burning. A quasi-steady-like diffusion flame is then established is considered; temperature and pressure in the combustion chamber have a weak influence on the burning time

Heil, Matthias

438

Burning of high Tc bridges M. E. Gaevski,a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning of high Tc bridges M. E. Gaevski,a) T. H. Johansen, Yu. Galperin,a) and H. Bratsberg February 1997; accepted for publication 24 September 1997 Burning of superconducting thin film bridges containing extended defects magneto-optic investigation is sufficient to locate the incipient burning region

Johansen, Tom Henning

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December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT@nmsu.edu #12;i HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT OF BROOM both burning and spraying with herbicide. However, the broom snakeweed was not eradicated, and numbers

Johnson, Eric E.

440

Hot Bottom Burning in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hot Bottom Burning in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars By J OHN C. LATTANZ I O 1 , CHERYL A. FROST 1 state of knowledge about the phenomenon of Hot Bottom Burning as seen in Asymptotic Giant Branch stars. This is illustrated with some results from new 6M fi stellar models. 1. Introduction and Motivation Hot Bottom Burning

Lattanzio, John

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441

Burning Plasma Science Workshop Astrophysics and Laboratory Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Science Workshop Astrophysics and Laboratory Plasmas Robert Rosner The University of Chicago Dec. 12, 2000 Austin, TX (http://flash.uchicago.edu) #12;Burning Plasma Science Workshop Austin ¥ Plasma conditions ¥ Overview of plasma physics issues for astrophysics ¥ Specific examples #12;Burning

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Greyscale Photograph Geometry Informed by Dodging and Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greyscale Photograph Geometry Informed by Dodging and Burning Carlos Phillips and Kaleem Siddiqi the same negative may vary in inten- sity values due, in part, to the liberal use of dodging and burning to linear dodging and burning. 1 Introduction Photographs are often used as test data in the computer vision

Siddiqi, Kaleem

443

Prescribed Burning in the Kings River Ecosystems Project Area: Lessons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prescribed Burning in the Kings River Ecosystems Project Area: Lessons Learned1 David S. Mc burning was initiated in 1994 in two 32,000-acre watersheds in the Kings River District of the Sierra various effects of these fires. Approximately 11,900 acres of prescription burns were completed by the end

Standiford, Richard B.