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1

Fuels Technology - Capabilities - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities Fuels Technology Advanced petroleum-based fuels Fuel-borne reductants On-board reforming Alternative fuels...

2

Clean Burn Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

developer planning to build a 60m gallons per year (227.12m litres per year) bioethanol plant in Raeford, North Carolina. References Clean Burn Fuels LLC1 LinkedIn...

3

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is a world-class testing facility dedicated to advanced fuels and vehicles research. The lab features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Combustion Lab. Because the ReFUEL Laboratory is located in Denver, Colorado, it offers the additional capability of testing emissions and vehicle performance at high altitude. It also features an altitude simulation system to mimic results found at lower altitudes, including sea level.

4

Advanced Nuclear Fuel Concepts for Minor Actinide Burning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, New fuel cycle strategies entail advanced nuclear fuel concepts. This especially applies for the burning of minor actinides in a fast reactor cycle ...

5

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Photo of a demonstration with a small photovoltaic cell used with a light to produce electricity. The small light is being powered from the energy stored in the fuel...

6

Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

7

Fuel Performance Analysis Capability in FALCON  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Analysis and Licensing Code -- New (FALCON) is being developed as a state-of-the-art light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance analysis and modeling code validated to high burnup. Based on a robust finite-element numerical structure, it is capable of analyzing both steady-state and transient fuel behaviors with a seamless transition between the two modes. EPRI plans to release a fully benchmarked and validated beta version of FALCON in 2003.

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

8

Modeling Deep Burn TRISO Particle Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the DOE Deep Burn program TRISO fuel is being investigated as a fuel form for consuming plutonium and minor actinides, and for greater efficiency in uranium utilization. The result will thus be to drive TRISO particulate fuel to very high burn-ups. In the current effort the various phenomena in the TRISO particle are being modeled using a variety of techniques. The chemical behavior is being treated utilizing thermochemical analysis to identify phase formation/transformation and chemical activities in the particle, including kernel migration. First principles calculations are being used to investigate the critical issue of fission product palladium attack on the SiC coating layer. Density functional theory is being used to understand fission product diffusion within the plutonia oxide kernel. Kinetic Monte Carlo techniques are shedding light on transport of fission products, most notably silver, through the carbon and SiC coating layers. The diffusion of fission products through an alternative coating layer, ZrC, is being assessed via DFT methods. Finally, a multiscale approach is being used to understand thermal transport, including the effect of radiation damage induced defects, in a model SiC material.

Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Samolyuk, German D [ORNL; Schuck, Paul C [ORNL; Rudin, Sven [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wills, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Wirth, Brian D. [University of California, Berkeley; Kim, Sungtae [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Morgan, Dane [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Szlufarska, Izabela [University of Wisconsin, Madison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Manufacturing fuel-switching capability, 1988  

SciTech Connect

Historically, about one-third of all energy consumed in the United States has been used by manufacturers. About one-quarter of manufacturing energy is used as feedstocks and raw material inputs that are converted into nonenergy products; the remainder is used for its energy content. During 1988, the most recent year for which data are available, manufacturers consumed 15.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of energy to produce heat and power and to generate electricity. The manufacturing sector also has widespread capabilities to switch from one fuel to another for either economic or emergency reasons. There are numerous ways to define fuel switching. For the purposes of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), fuel switching is defined as the capability to substitute one energy source for another within 30 days with no significant modifications to the fuel-consuming equipment, while keeping production constant. Fuel-switching capability allows manufacturers substantial flexibility in choosing their mix of energy sources. The consumption of a given energy source can be maximized if all possible switching into that energy source takes place. The estimates in this report are based on data collected on the 1988 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS), Forms 846 (A through C). The EIA conducts this national sample survey of manufacturing energy consumption on a triennial basis. The MECS is the only comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries. The MECS was first conducted in 1986 to collect data for 1985. This report presents information on the fuel-switching capabilities of manufacturers in 1988. This report is the second of a series based on the 1988 MECS. 8 figs., 31 tabs.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuel Blending Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section...

11

Thermal regimes of high burn-up nuclear fuel rod  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature distribution in the nuclear fuel rods for high burn-up is studied. We use the numerical and analytical approaches. It is shown that the time taken to have the stationary thermal regime of nuclear fuel rod is less than one minute. We can make the inference that the behavior of the nuclear fuel rod can be considered as a stationary task. Exact solutions of the temperature distribution in the fuel rods in the stationary case are found. Thermal regimes of high burn-up the nuclear fuel rods are analyzed.

Kudryashov, Nikolai A; Chmykhov, Mikhail A; 10.1016/j.cnsns.2009.05.063

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Production of CO2 from Fossil Fuel Burning by Fuel Type, 1860...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Historical Global Estimates Production of CO2 from Fossil Fuel Burning by Fuel Type, 1860-1982 (NDP-006) DOI: 10.3334CDIACffe.ndp006 image Data image...

13

Local Burn-Up Effects in the NBSR Fuel Element  

SciTech Connect

This study addresses the over-prediction of local power when the burn-up distribution in each half-element of the NBSR is assumed to be uniform. A single-element model was utilized to quantify the impact of axial and plate-wise burn-up on the power distribution within the NBSR fuel elements for both high-enriched uranium (HEU) and low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. To validate this approach, key parameters in the single-element model were compared to parameters from an equilibrium core model, including neutron energy spectrum, power distribution, and integral U-235 vector. The power distribution changes significantly when incorporating local burn-up effects and has lower power peaking relative to the uniform burn-up case. In the uniform burn-up case, the axial relative power peaking is over-predicted by as much as 59% in the HEU single-element and 46% in the LEU single-element with uniform burn-up. In the uniform burn-up case, the plate-wise power peaking is over-predicted by as much as 23% in the HEU single-element and 18% in the LEU single-element. The degree of over-prediction increases as a function of burn-up cycle, with the greatest over-prediction at the end of Cycle 8. The thermal flux peak is always in the mid-plane gap; this causes the local cumulative burn-up near the mid-plane gap to be significantly higher than the fuel element average. Uniform burn-up distribution throughout a half-element also causes a bias in fuel element reactivity worth, due primarily to the neutronic importance of the fissile inventory in the mid-plane gap region.

Brown N. R.; Hanson A.; Diamond, D.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

Hayes, A C; Nieto, Michael Martin; WIlson, W B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

A. C. Hayes; H. R. Trellue; Michael Martin Nieto; W. B. WIlson

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Fuel Fabrication Capability and Uranium-molybdenum Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global ...

17

Storage of burned PWR and BWR fuel  

SciTech Connect

In the last few years, credit for fuel burnup has been allowed in the design and criticality safety analysis of high-density spent-fuel storage racks. Design and operating philosophies, however, differ significantly between pressurized water reactor (PWR)- and boiling water reactor (BWR)-type plants because: (1) PWR storage pools generally use soluble boron, which provides backup criticality control under accident conditions; and (2) BWR fuel generally contains gadolinium burnable poison, which results in a characteristically peaked burnup-dependent reactivity variation. In PWR systems, the reactivity decreases monotonically with burnup in a nearly linear fashion (excluding xenon effects), and a two-region concept is feasible. In BWR systems, the reactivity is initially low, increases as fuel burnup progresses, and reaches a maximum at a burnup where the gadolinium is nearly depleted. In any spent-fuel storage rack design, uncertainties due to manufacturing tolerances and in calculational methods must be included to assure that the highest reactivity (k/sub eff/) is less than the 0.95 US Nuclear Regulatory Commission limit. In the absence of definitive critical experiment data with spent fuel, the uncertainty due to depletion calculations must be assumed on the basis of judgment. High-density spent-fuel storage racks may be designed for both PWR and BWR plants with credit for burnup. However, the design must be tailored to each plant with appropriate consideration of the preferences/specifications of the utility operating staff.

Turner, S.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility: Overview of STF capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill Test Facility (STF) constructed at the Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site is a basic research tool for studying the dynamics of accidental releases of various hazardous liquids. This Facility is designed to (1) discharge, at a controlled rate, a measured volume of hazardous test liquid on a prepared surface of a dry lake bed (Frenchman Lake); (2) monitor and record process operating data, close-in and downwind meteorological data, and downwind gaseous concentration levels; and (3) provide a means to control and monitor these functions from a remote location. The STF will accommodate large and small-scale testing of hazardous test fluid release rates up to 28,000 gallons per minute. Spill volumes up to 52,800 gallons are achievable. Generic categories of fluids that can be tested are cryogenics, isothermals, aerosol-forming materials, and chemically reactive. The phenomena that can be studied include source definition, dispersion, and pool fire/vapor burning. Other capabilities available at the STF include large-scale wind tunnel testing, a small test cell for exposing personnel protective clothing, and an area for developing mitigation techniques.

Gray, H.E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone; this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe; swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone; this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Fuel injection staged sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is described. The combustor comprises a plurality of individual combustor chambers. Each combustor chamber has a main burning zone and a pilot burning zone. A pipe for the low-BTU coal gas is connected to the upstream end of the pilot burning zone: this pipe surrounds a liquid fuel source and is in turn surrounded by an air supply pipe: swirling means are provided between the liquid fuel source and the coal gas pipe and between the gas pipe and the air pipe. Additional preheated air is provided by counter-current coolant air in passages formed by a double wall arrangement of the walls of the main burning zone communicating with passages of a double wall arrangement of the pilot burning zone: this preheated air is turned at the upstream end of the pilot burning zone through swirlers to mix with the original gas and air input (and the liquid fuel input when used) to provide more efficient combustion. One or more fuel injection stages (second stages) are provided for direct input of coal gas into the main burning zone. The countercurrent air coolant passages are connected to swirlers surrounding the input from each second stage to provide additional oxidant.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Transportation capabilities study of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates current capabilities for transporting spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy. Currently licensed irradiated fuel shipping packages that have the potential for shipping the spent nuclear fuel are identified and then matched against the various spent nuclear fuel types. Also included are the results of a limited investigation into other certified packages and new packages currently under development. This study is intended to support top-level planning for the disposition of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel inventory.

Clark, G.L.; Johnson, R.A.; Smith, R.W. [Packaging Technology, Inc., Tacoma, WA (United States); Abbott, D.G.; Tyacke, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Vehicle System Impacts of Fuel Cell System Power Response Capability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- 01 - 1959 - 01 - 1959 Vehicle System Impacts of Fuel Cell System Power Response Capability Tony Markel and Keith Wipke National Renewable Energy Laboratory Doug Nelson Virginia Polytechnic University and State Institute Copyright © 2002 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT The impacts of fuel cell system power response capability on optimal hybrid and neat fuel cell vehicle configurations have been explored. Vehicle system optimization was performed with the goal of maximizing fuel economy over a drive cycle. Optimal hybrid vehicle design scenarios were derived for fuel cell systems with 10 to 90% power transient response times of 0, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 40 seconds. Optimal neat fuel cell vehicles where generated for responses times of 0, 2, 5, and 7

23

A compact breed and burn fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel blanket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-life breed-and-burn (B and B) type fast reactor has been investigated from the neutronics points of view. The B and B reactor has the capability to breed the fissile fuels and use the bred fuel in situ in the same reactor. In this work, feasibility of a compact sodium-cooled B and B fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel as blanket material has been studied. In order to derive a compact B and B fast reactor, a tight fuel lattice and relatively large fuel pin are used to achieve high fuel volume fraction. The core is initially loaded with an LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) fuel and a metallic fuel is used in the core. The Monte Carlo depletion has been performed for the core to see the long-term behavior of the B and B reactor. Several important parameters such as reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron generation lifetime, fission power, and fast neutron fluence, are analyzed through Monte Carlo reactor analysis. Evolution of the core fuel composition is also analyzed as a function of burnup. Although the long-life small B and B fast reactor is found to be feasible from the neutronics point of view, it is characterized to have several challenging technical issues including a very high fast neutron fluence of the structural materials. (authors)

Hartanto, D.; Kim, Y. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Coated Particle and Deep Burn Fuels Monthly Highlights December 2010  

SciTech Connect

During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for November 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/323, was distributed to program participants on December 9, 2010. The final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU (transuranic elements) Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing (ORNL); (4) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling (ORNL).

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and improved stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel including a vertical feed combustion chamber for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack, a major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprising a water jacket for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid and for convection circulation of the fluid for confining the locus of wood fuel combustion to the bottom of the vertical gravity feed combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel extending from the laterally directed draft outlet affords delayed travel time in a high temperature environment to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air as an actively induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion and high temperature zone. Active sources of forced air and induced draft are included, multiple use and circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel includes a vertical feed combustion chamber (15) for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack. A major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprises a water jacket (14) for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid for convection circulation of the fluid. The locus (31) of wood fuel combustion is thereby confined to the refractory base of the combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel (34) extending laterally from the base of the chamber affords delayed travel time in a high temperature refractory environment sufficient to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air prior to extraction of heat in heat exchanger (16). Induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion chamber and refractory high temperature zone to the heat exchanger and flue. Also included are active sources of forced air and induced draft, multiple circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global warming Researchers ScienceDaily (July 30, 2010) -- Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels biofuels, such as wood, manure, dung, and other solid biomass used for home heating and cooking in many

28

Sectoral combustor for burning low-BTU fuel gas  

SciTech Connect

A high-temperature combustor for burning low-BTU coal gas in a gas turbine is disclosed. The combustor includes several separately removable combustion chambers each having an annular sectoral cross section and a double-walled construction permitting separation of stresses due to pressure forces and stresses due to thermal effects. Arrangements are described for air-cooling each combustion chamber using countercurrent convective cooling flow between an outer shell wall and an inner liner wall and using film cooling flow through liner panel grooves and along the inner liner wall surface, and for admitting all coolant flow to the gas path within the inner liner wall. Also described are systems for supplying coal gas, combustion air, and dilution air to the combustion zone, and a liquid fuel nozzle for use during low-load operation. The disclosed combustor is fully air-cooled, requires no transition section to interface with a turbine nozzle, and is operable at firing temperatures of up to 3000.degree. F. or within approximately 300.degree. F. of the adiabatic stoichiometric limit of the coal gas used as fuel.

Vogt, Robert L. (Schenectady, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

High Burn-Up Properties of the Fuel Variants Irradiated in IFA-649  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The "standard product" uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel pellet has remained unchanged for many years and provides excellent performance in all but the most extreme reactor operation. The requirement to prolong fuel residence in commercial reactors, thus increasing discharge levels of burn-up, has led to a need for detailed measurements of high burn-up properties under a variety of normal and off-normal conditions. The changes in fuel material properties, such as density and swelling, ...

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

>Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis (NDP-058a) Prepared by Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Date Published: February 1998 (Revised for the Web: 2003) CONTENTS Abstract Documentation file for Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Abstract Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis. (March 1998) Antoinette L. Brenkert DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058.2003 This data package presents the gridded (one degree latitude by one degree longitude) summed emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement

31

General analysis of breed-and-burn reactors and limited-separations fuel cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new theoretical framework is introduced, the "neutron excess" concept, which is useful for analyzing breed-and-burn (B&B) reactors and their fuel cycles. Based on this concept, a set of methods has been developed which ...

Petroski, Robert C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Fossil Fuel and Biomass Burning Effect on Climate—Heating or Cooling?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emission from burning of fossil fuels and biomass (associated with deforestation) generates a radiative forcing on the atmosphere and a possible climate chaw. Emitted trace gases heat the atmosphere through their greenhouse effect, while ...

Yoram J. Kaufman; Robert S. Fraser; Robert L. Mahoney

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Method and apparatus for controlling fuel/air mixture in a lean burn engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The system for controlling the fuel/air mixture supplied to a lean burn engine when operating on natural gas, gasoline, hydrogen, alcohol, propane, butane, diesel or any other fuel as desired. As specific humidity of air supplied to the lean burn engine increases, the oxygen concentration of exhaust gas discharged by the engine for a given equivalence ratio will decrease. Closed loop fuel control systems typically attempt to maintain a constant exhaust gas oxygen concentration. Therefore, the decrease in the exhaust gas oxygen concentration resulting from increased specific humidity will often be improperly attributed to an excessive supply of fuel and the control system will incorrectly reduce the amount of fuel supplied to the engine. Also, the minimum fuel/air equivalence ratio for a lean burn engine to avoid misfiring will increase as specific humidity increases. A relative humidity sensor to allow the control system to provide a more enriched fuel/air mixture at high specific humidity levels. The level of specific humidity may be used to compensate an output signal from a universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor for changing oxygen concentrations at a desired equivalence ratio due to variation in specific humidity specific humidity. As a result, the control system will maintain the desired efficiency, low exhaust emissions and power level for the associated lean burn engine regardless of the specific humidity level of intake air supplied to the lean burn engine.

Kubesh, John Thomas (San Antonio, TX); Dodge, Lee Gene (San Antonio, TX); Podnar, Daniel James (San Antonio, TX)

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

Apparatus and method for burning a lean, premixed fuel/air mixture with low NOx emission  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for enabling a burner to stably burn a lean fuel/air mixture. The burner directs the lean fuel/air mixture in a stream. The apparatus comprises an annular flame stabilizer; and a device for mounting the flame stabilizer in the fuel/air mixture stream. The burner may include a body having an internal bore, in which case, the annular flame stabilizer is shaped to conform to the cross-sectional shape of the bore, is spaced from the bore by a distance greater than about 0.5 mm, and the mounting device mounts the flame stabilizer in the bore. An apparatus for burning a gaseous fuel with low NOx emissions comprises a device for premixing air with the fuel to provide a lean fuel/air mixture; a nozzle having an internal bore through which the lean fuel/air mixture passes in a stream; and a flame stabilizer mounted in the stream of the lean fuel/air mixture. The flame stabilizer may be mounted in the internal bore, in which case, it is shaped and is spaced from the bore as just described. In a method of burning a lean fuel/air mixture, a lean fuel/air mixture is provided, and is directed in a stream; an annular eddy is created in the stream of the lean fuel/air mixture; and the lean fuel/air mixture is ignited at the eddy.

Kostiuk, Larry W. (Edmonton, CA); Cheng, Robert K. (Kensington, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

REPORT: Inert-Matrix Fuel: Actinide ''Burning'' and Direct ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2007 ... Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241 Am ...

36

Fuel Cell Vehicles Enhance NREL Hydrogen Research Capabilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

four Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle-Advanced (FCHV-adv) sport utility vehicles on loan from Toyota. Over the next two years the lab will use the FCHVs, also known as fuel cell electric...

37

Final Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Project Report Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL Nuclear Engineering Education Research Program (grant # DE-FG07-99ID13767) Rodney C. Ewing (co-PI) Lumin Wang (co-PI) October 30,2002 For the Period of 07/01/1999 to 06/30/2002 Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 1 1. Background Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (239Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241Am, Cm and 237Np). In Europe, Canada and Japan studies have determined much improved efficiencies for burn- up of actinides using inert-matrix fuels. This innovative approach also considers the properties of the inert-matrix fuel as a nuclear waste form for direct disposal after one-

38

Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge burnup level, while retaining its inherent safety characteristics. Using generic pebble bed reactor cores, this task will perform physics calculations to evaluate the capabilities of the pebble bed reactor to perform utilization and destruction of LWR used-fuel transuranics. The task will use established benchmarked models, and will introduce modeling advancements appropriate to the nature of the fuel considered (high TRU content and high burn-up).

B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Development of Real-Time Fuel Management Capability at the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center reactor a fuel depletion code was created to develop real-time fuel management capability. This code package links MCNP8 and ORIGEN26 and is interfaced through a Visual Basic code. Microsoft Visual Basic was used to create a user interface and for pre-and post-processing of MCNP and ORIGEN2 output. MCNP was used to determine the flux for all fuel and control rods within the core while ORIGEN2 used this flux along with the power history to calculate buildup and depletion for tracking the fuel isotopic evolution through time. A comparison of MCNP calculated fluxes and measured flux values were used to confirm the validity of the MCNP model. A comparison to Monteburns was used to add confidence to the correctness of the calculated fuel isotopics. All material isotopics were stored in a Microsoft Access database for integration with the Visual Basic code to allow for isotopics report generation for the Nuclear Science Center staff. This fuel management code performs its function with reasonable accuracy. It gathers minimal information from the user and burns the core over daily operation. After execution it stores all material data to the database for further use within NSCRFM or for isotopic report generation.

Parham, Neil A.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

K Basins floor sludge retrieval system knockout pot basket fuel burn accident  

SciTech Connect

The K Basins Sludge Retrieval System Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report (HNF-2676) identified and categorized a series of potential accidents associated with K Basins Sludge Retrieval System design and operation. The fuel burn accident was of concern with respect to the potential release of contamination resulting from a runaway chemical reaction of the uranium fuel in a knockout pot basket suspended in the air. The unmitigated radiological dose to an offsite receptor from this fuel burn accident is calculated to be much less than the offsite risk evaluation guidelines for anticipated events. However, because of potential radiation exposure to the facility worker, this accident is precluded with a safety significant lifting device that will prevent the monorail hoist from lifting the knockout pot basket out of the K Basin water pool.

HUNT, J.W.

1998-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Effect of Fuel Fraction on Small Modified CANDLE Burn-up Based Gas Cooled Fast Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE Burn-up has been performed. The objective of this research is to get optimal design parameters of such type reactors. The parameters of nuclear design including the critical condition, conversion ratio, and burn-up level were compared. These parameters are calculated by variation in the fuel fraction 47.5% up to 70%. Two dimensional full core multi groups diffusion calculations was performed by CITATION code. Group constant preparations are performed by using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library. In this design the reactor cores with cylindrical cell two dimensional R-Z core models are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The placement of fuel in core arranged so that the result of plutonium from natural uranium can be utilized optimally for 10 years reactor operation. Modified CANDLE burn-up was established successfully in a core radial width 1.4 m. Total thermal power output for reference core is 550 MW. Study on the effect of fuel to coolant ratio shows that effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) is in almost linear relations with the change of the fuel volume to coolant ratio.

Ariani, Menik [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Physics Department, Sriwijaya University, Kampus Indralaya, Ogan Ilir, Sumatera Selatan (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Asiah, Nur [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Shafii, M. Ali [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Physics Department, Andalas University, Kampus Limau Manis, Padang, Sumatera Barat (Indonesia); Khairurrijal

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

42

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Advanced Fuel/Cladding Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials under reactor operating conditions in the United States is limited. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the newly expanded post-irradiation examination (PIE) capability at the ORNL Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory provide unique support for this type of advanced fuel/cladding development effort. The wide breadth of ORNL's fuels and materials research divisions provides all the necessary fuel development capabilities in one location. At ORNL, facilities are available from test fuel fabrication, to irradiation in HFIR under either thermal or fast reactor conditions, to a complete suite of PIEs, and to final product disposal. There are very few locations in the world where this full range of capabilities exists. New testing capabilities at HFIR have been developed that allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic operating conditions (i.e., for both fast-spectrum conditions and light-water-reactor conditions). This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiment that begins this year.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Results of emissions testing while burning densified refuse derived fuel, Dordt College, Sioux Center, Iowa  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Environmental Services, Inc. provided engineering and source testing services to the Council of Great Lake Governors to support their efforts in promoting the development and utilization of densified refuse derived fuels (d-RDF) and pelletized wastepaper fuels in small steam generating facilities. The emissions monitoring program was designed to provide a complete air emissions profile while burning various refuse derived fuels. The specific goal of this test program was to conduct air emissions tests at Dordt College located in Sioux Center, Iowa and to identify a relationship between fuel types and emission characteristics. The sampling protocol was carried out June 12 through June 20, 1989 on boiler {number sign}4. This unit had been previously modified to burn d-RDF. The boiler was not equipped with any type of air pollution control device so the emissions samples were collected from the boiler exhaust stack on the roof of the boilerhouse. The emissions that were sampled included: particulates; PM{sub 10} particulates; hydrochloric acid; dioxins; furans; polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB); metals and continuous monitors for CO, CO{sub 2}O{sub 2}SO{sub x}NO{sub x} and total hydrocarbons. Grab samples of the fuels were collected, composited and analyzed for heating value, moisture content, proximate and ultimate analysis, ash fusion temperature, bulk density and elemental ash analysis. Grab samples of the boiler ash were also collected and analyzed for total hydrocarbons total dioxins, total furans, total PCBs and heavy metals. 77 figs., 20 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Vortex combustor for low NOX emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

Steele, Robert C; Edmonds, Ryan G; Williams, Joseph T; Baldwin, Stephen P

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

46

Vortex combustor for low NOx emissions when burning lean premixed high hydrogen content fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A trapped vortex combustor. The trapped vortex combustor is configured for receiving a lean premixed gaseous fuel and oxidant stream, where the fuel includes hydrogen gas. The trapped vortex combustor is configured to receive the lean premixed fuel and oxidant stream at a velocity which significantly exceeds combustion flame speed in a selected lean premixed fuel and oxidant mixture. The combustor is configured to operate at relatively high bulk fluid velocities while maintaining stable combustion, and low NOx emissions. The combustor is useful in gas turbines in a process of burning synfuels, as it offers the opportunity to avoid use of diluent gas to reduce combustion temperatures. The combustor also offers the possibility of avoiding the use of selected catalytic reaction units for removal of oxides of nitrogen from combustion gases exiting a gas turbine.

Steele, Robert C. (Woodinville, WA); Edmonds, Ryan G. (Renton, WA); Williams, Joseph T. (Kirkland, WA); Baldwin, Stephen P. (Winchester, MA)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

48

Interim Action Determination Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS), DOE/EIS-0283-S2. DOE is evaluating, among many other things, the environmental impacts of any design and operations changes to the MFFF, which is under construction at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE

49

Advanced LWR Fuel Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new test capability for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is being developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) operating conditions in less time than it takes in other research reactors. This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiments currently planned to start in late 2008.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Interim Action Determination Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS), DOE/EIS-0283-S2. DOE is evaluating, among many other things, the environmental impacts of any design and operations changes to the MFFF, which is under construction at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE

51

Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights January 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for December 2010, ORNL/TM-2011/10, was distributed to program participants on January 12, 2011. As reported last month, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights February 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for January 2010, ORNL/TM-2011/30, was distributed to program participants on February 8, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; and (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights March 2011  

SciTech Connect

During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for February 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/71, was distributed to program participants on March 8, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Thermomechanical Behavior, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (d) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; and (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Long-term tradeoffs between nuclear- and fossil-fuel burning  

SciTech Connect

A global energy/economics/environmental (E{sup 3}) model has been adapted with a nuclear energy/materials model to understand better {open_quotes}top-level{close_quotes}, long-term trade offs between civilian nuclear power, nuclear-weapons proliferation, fossil-fuel burning, and global economic welfare. Using a {open_quotes}business-as-usual{close_quotes} (BAU) point-of-departure case, economic, resource, proliferation-risk implications of plutonium recycle in LAIRs, greenhouse-gas-mitigating carbon taxes, and a range of nuclear energy costs (capital and fuel) considerations have been examined. After describing the essential elements of the analysis approach being developed to support the Los Alamos Nuclear Vision Project, preliminary examples of parametric variations about the BAU base-case scenario are presented. The results described herein represent a sampling from more extensive results collected in a separate report. The primary motivation here is: (a) to compare the BAU basecase with results from other studies; (b) to model on a regionally resolved global basis long-term (to year {approximately}2100) evolution of plutonium accumulation in a variety of forms under a limited range of fuel-cycle scenarios; and (c) to illustrate a preliminary connectivity between risks associated with nuclear proliferation and fossil-fuel burning (e.g., greenhouse-gas accumulations).

Krakowski, R.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

Deep Burn Fuel Cycle Integration: Evaluation of Two-Tier Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a deep burn strategy using VHTRs (or DB-MHR), as a means of burning transuranics produced by LWRs, was compared to performing this task with LWR MOX. The spent DB-MHR fuel was recycled for ultimate final recycle in fast reactors (ARRs). This report summarizes the preliminary findings of the support ratio (in terms of MWth installed) between LWRs, DB-MHRs and ARRs in an equilibrium “two-tier” fuel cycle scenario. Values from literature were used to represent the LWR and DB-MHR isotopic compositions. A reactor physics simulation of the ARR was analyzed to determine the effect that the DB-MHR spent fuel cooling time on the ARR transuranic consumption rate. These results suggest that the cooling time has some but not a significant impact on the ARRs conversion ratio and transuranic consumption rate. This is attributed to fissile worth being derived from non-fissile or “threshold-fissioning” isotopes in the ARR’s fast spectrum. The fraction of installed thermal capacity of each reactor in the DB-MHR 2-tier fuel cycle was compared with that of an equivalent MOX 2-tier fuel cycle, assuming fuel supply and demand are in equilibrium. The use of DB-MHRs in the 1st-tier allows for a 10% increase in the fraction of fleet installed capacity of UO2-fueled LWRs compared to using a MOX 1st-tier. Also, it was found that because the DB-MHR derives more power per unit mass of transuranics charged to the fresh fuel, the “front-end” reprocessing demand is less than MOX. Therefore, more fleet installed capacity of DB-MHR would be required to support a given fleet of UO2 LWRs than would be required of MOX plants. However, the transuranic deep burn achieved by DB-MHRs reduces the number of fast reactors in the 2nd-tier to support the DB-MHRs “back-end” transuranic output than if MOX plants were used. Further analysis of the relative costs of these various types of reactors is required before a comparative study of these options could be considered complete.

S. Bays; H. Zhang; M. Pope

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring on a One Degree by One Degree Grid Cell Basis: 1950 to 1990 (NDP-058) data Data image ASCII Text Documentation PDF file PDF file Contributors R. J. Andres, G. Marland, I. Fung, and E. Matthews (contributors) DOI DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058 This data package presents data sets recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions.

57

Residential wood burning: Energy modeling and conventional fuel displacement in a national sample  

SciTech Connect

This research studied the natural, built, and behavioral factors predictive of energy consumption for residential space heating with wood or conventional fuels. This study was a secondary analysis of survey data from a nationwide representative sample of 5,682 households collected DOE in the 1984-1985 REC survey. Included were: weather, census division and utility data, interviewer-supplied dwelling measurements and respondent-reported energy-related family behaviors. Linear-regression procedures were used to develop a model that identified key determinants accounting for the variability in wood consumption. A nonlinear-regression model was employed to estimate the amount of conventional fuels used for space heating. The model was also used to estimate the amount of conventional fuels being displaced by wood-heating systems. There was a significant (p {le} .05) linear relationship between the dependent variable, square root of cords burned, various independent variables.

Warsco, K.S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Production of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel burning by fuel type, 1860-1982  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide emission calculations resulting from fossil fuel useage for the years 1860-1982 are presented.

Rotty, R.M.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States). Institute for Energy Analysis

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights May 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for April 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/125, was distributed to program participants on May 10, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Fuel Performance Modeling - Fuel Performance Analysis; (2) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Thermomechanical Modeling, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport; (3) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; and (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights June 2011  

SciTech Connect

During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for May 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/126, was distributed to program participants on June 9, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Fuel Performance Modeling - Fuel Performance Analysis; (2) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Behavior, (b) Thermomechanical Modeling, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport; (3) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; and (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Cellular Burning Regime in Type Ia Supernova Explosions - I. Flame Propagation into Quiescent Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a numerical investigation of the cellular burning regime in Type Ia supernova explosions. This regime holds at small scales (i.e. below the Gibson scale), which are unresolved in large-scale Type Ia supernova simulations. The fundamental effects that dominate the flame evolution here are the Landau-Darrieus instability and its nonlinear stabilization, leading to a stabilization of the flame in a cellular shape. The flame propagation into quiescent fuel is investigated addressing the dependence of the simulation results on the specific parameters of the numerical setup. Furthermore, we investigate the flame stability at a range of fuel densities. This is directly connected to the questions of active turbulent combustion (a mechanism of flame destabilization and subsequent self-turbulization) and a deflagration-to-detonation transition of the flame. In our simulations we find no substantial destabilization of the flame when propagating into quiescent fuels of densities down to ~10^7 g/cm^3, corroborating fundamental assumptions of large-scale SN Ia explosion models. For these models, however, we suggest an increased lower cutoff for the flame propagation velocity to take the cellular burning regime into account.

F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

62

Method of burning sulfur-containing fuels in a fluidized bed boiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of burning a sulfur-containing fuel in a fluidized bed of sulfur oxide sorbent wherein the overall utilization of sulfur oxide sorbent is increased by comminuting the bed drain solids to a smaller average particle size, preferably on the order of 50 microns, and reinjecting the comminuted bed drain solids into the bed. In comminuting the bed drain solids, particles of spent sulfur sorbent contained therein are fractured thereby exposing unreacted sorbent surface. Upon reinjecting the comminuted bed drain solids into the bed, the newly-exposed unreacted sorbent surface is available for sulfur oxide sorption, thereby increasing overall sorbent utilization.

Jones, Brian C. (Windsor, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Coated Particle Fuel and Deep Burn Program Monthly Highlights April 2011  

SciTech Connect

The baseline change proposal BCP-FCRD-11026 submitted to change the due date for M21AF080202 'Demonstrate fabrication of Transuranic kernels of Plutonium-239/3.5at%Neptunium-237 using newly installed glove box facilities in ORNL 7930 hot cell complex' from 4/25/11 to 3/30/12 was approved this month. During FY 2011 the CP & DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for March 2011, ORNL/TM-2011/96, was distributed to program participants on April 8, 2011. As reported previously, the final Quarterly for FY 2010, Deep Burn Program Quarterly Report for July - September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/301, was announced to program participants and posted to the website on December 28, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Thermomechanical Behavior, (c) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (d) Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) Advanced TRISO Applications - Metal Matrix Fuels for LWR; (4) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing; (5) Fuel Performance and Analytical Analysis - Fuel Performance Modeling; and (6) ZrC Properties and Handbook - Properties of ZrC.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Analysis of the Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been receiving specific attention for Generation IV possibilities due to desired characteristics such as relatively low cost, short construction period, and inherent safety. Attractive inherent characteristics include an inert, single phase helium coolant, refractory coated fuel with high temperature capability and low fission product release, and graphite moderator with high temperature stability and long response times. The passively safe design has a relatively low power density, annular core, large negative temperature coefficient, and passive decay heat removal system. The objective of the U.S. DOE NERI Project is to assess the possibility, advantages and limitations of achieving ultra-long life VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) configurations by utilizing minor actinides as a fuel component. The present analysis takes into consideration and compares capabilities of pebble-bed core designs with various core and reflector configuration to allow spectrum shifting for advanced actinide fuels. Whole-core 3D models for pebble-bed design with multi-heterogeneity treatments in SCALE 5.0 are developed to compare computational results with experiments. Obtained results are in agreement with the available HTR-10 data. By altering the moderator to fuel ratio, a shift in the spectrum is observed. The use of minor actinides as fuel components relies on spectrum shifting capabilities. Actinide fueled VHTR configurations reveal promising performance. With an optimized pebble-bed model, the spectrum shifting abilities are apparent and effects of altered moderator to fuel ratio, and Dancoff factor are investigated. This will lead to a facilitated development of new fuel cycles in support of future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems.

Pritchard, Megan; Tsvetkov, Pavel

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

65

Analysis of Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas-cooled nuclear reactors have been receiving specific attention for Generation IV possibilities due to desired characteristics such as relatively low cost, short construction period, and inherent safety. Attractive inherent characteristics include an inert, single phase helium coolant, refractory coated fuel with high temperature capability and low fission product release, and graphite moderator with high temperature stability and long response times. The passively safe design has a relatively low power density, annular core, large negative temperature coefficient, and passive decay heat removal system. The objective of the U.S. DOE NERI Project is to assess the possibility, advantages and limitations of achieving ultra-long life VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) configurations by utilizing minor actinides as a fuel component. The present analysis takes into consideration and compares capabilities of pebble-bed core designs with various core and reflector configuration to allow spectrum shifting for advanced actinide fuels. Whole-core 3D models for pebble-bed design with multi-heterogeneity treatments in SCALE 5.0 are developed to compare computational results with experiments. Obtained results are in agreement with the available HTR-10 data. By altering the moderator to fuel ratio, a shift in the spectrum is observed. The use of minor actinides as fuel components relies on spectrum shifting capabilities. Actinide fueled VHTR configurations reveal promising performance. With an optimized pebble-bed model, the spectrum shifting abilities are apparent and effects of altered moderator to fuel ratio, and Dancoff factor are investigated. This will lead to a facilitated development of new fuel cycles in support of future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems.

Pritchard, Megan

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

66

Spent nuclear fuel shipping cask handling capabilities of commercial light water reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an evaluation of the cask handling capabilities of those reactors which are operating or under construction. A computerized data base that includes cask handling information was developed with information from the literature and utility-supplied data. The capability of each plant to receive and handle existing spent fuel shipping casks was then evaluated. Modal fractions were then calculated based on the results of these evaluations and the quantities of spent fuel projected to be generated by commercial nuclear power plants through 1998. The results indicated that all plants are capable of receiving and handling truck casks. Up to 118 out of 130 reactors (91%) could potentially handle the larger and heavier rail casks if the maximum capability of each facility is utilized. Design and analysis efforts and physical modifications to some plants would be needed to achieve this high rail percentage. These modifications would be needed to satisfy regulatory requirements, increase lifting capabilities, develop rail access, or improve other deficiencies. The remaining 12 reactors were determined to be capable of handling only the smaller truck casks. The percentage of plants that could receive and handle rail casks in the near-term would be reduced to 64%. The primary reason for a plant to be judged incapable of handling rail casks in the near-term was a lack of rail access. The remaining 36% of the plants would be limited to truck shipments. The modal fraction calculations indicated that up to 93% of the spent fuel accumulated by 1998 could be received at federal storage or disposal facilities via rail (based on each plant's maximum capabilities). If the near-term cask handling capabilities are considered, the rail percentage is reduced to 62%.

Daling, P.M.; Konzek, G.J.; Lezberg, A.J.; Votaw, E.F.; Collingham, M.I.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the available data from laboratory, pilot and full-scale SCR units was reviewed, leading to hypotheses about the mechanism for mercury oxidation by SCR catalysts.

Constance Senior

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500ºC to 600ºC) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion • Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment • Extrusion database on DU metal • Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys • Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys • Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys • Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment • Sintering database on DU metal • Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys • Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich outlining the beginning of the materials processing setup. Also included within this section is a thesis proposal by Jeff Hausaman. Appendix C contains the public papers and presentations introduced at the 2010 American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting. Appendix A—MSNE theses of David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich and proposal by Jeff Hausaman A.1 December 2009 Thesis by David Garnetti entitled “Uranium Powder Production Via Hydride Formation and Alpha Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications” A.2 September 2009 Presentation by David Garnetti (same title as document in Appendix B.1) A.3 December 2010 Thesis by Grant Helmreich entitled “Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications” A.4 October 2010 Presentation by Grant Helmreich (same title as document in Appendix B.3) A.5 Thesis Proposal by Jeffrey Hausaman entitled “Hot Extrusion of Alpha Phase Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors” Appendix B—External presentations introduced at the 2010 ANS Winter Meeting B.1 J.S. Hausaman, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, “Powder Metallurgy of Alpha Phase Uranium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors,” Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.2 PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.1 B.3 G.W. Helmreich, W.J. Sames, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, “Uranium Powder Production Using a Hydride-Dehydride Process,” Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.4. PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.3 B.5 Poster Presentation from C.3 Appendix C—Fuel cycle research and development undergraduate materials and poster presentation C.1 Poster entitled “Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys” presented at the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program Annual Meeting C.2 April 2011 Honors Undergraduate Thesis by William Sames, Research Fellow, entitled “Uranium Metal Powder Production, Particle Dis

Sean M. McDeavitt

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Cellular Burning Regime in Type Ia Supernova Explosions - II. Flame Propagation into Vortical Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the interaction of thermonuclear flames in Type Ia supernova explosions with vortical flows by means of numerical simulations. In our study, we focus on small scales, where the flame propagation is no longer dominated by the turbulent cascade originating from large-scale effects. Here, the flame propagation proceeds in the cellular burning regime, resulting from a balance between the Landau-Darrieus instability and its nonlinear stabilization. The interaction of a cellularly stabilized flame front with a vortical fuel flow is explored applying a variety of fuel densities and strengths of the velocity fluctuations. We find that the vortical flow can break up the cellular flame structure if it is sufficiently strong. In this case the flame structure adapts to the imprinted flow field. The transition from the cellularly stabilized front to the flame structure dominated by vortices of the flow proceeds in a smooth way. The implications of the results of our simulations for Type Ia Supernova explosion models are discussed.

F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt; J. C. Niemeyer

2003-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

70

Reactivity loss validation of high burn-up PWR fuels with pile-oscillation experiments in MINERVE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ALIX experimental program relies on the experimental validation of the spent fuel inventory, by chemical analysis of samples irradiated in a PWR between 5 and 7 cycles, and also on the experimental validation of the spent fuel reactivity loss with bum-up, obtained by pile-oscillation measurements in the MINERVE reactor. These latter experiments provide an overall validation of both the fuel inventory and of the nuclear data responsible for the reactivity loss. This program offers also unique experimental data for fuels with a burn-up reaching 85 GWd/t, as spent fuels in French PWRs never exceeds 70 GWd/t up to now. The analysis of these experiments is done in two steps with the APOLLO2/SHEM-MOC/CEA2005v4 package. In the first one, the fuel inventory of each sample is obtained by assembly calculations. The calculation route consists in the self-shielding of cross sections on the 281 energy group SHEM mesh, followed by the flux calculation by the Method Of Characteristics in a 2D-exact heterogeneous geometry of the assembly, and finally a depletion calculation by an iterative resolution of the Bateman equations. In the second step, the fuel inventory is used in the analysis of pile-oscillation experiments in which the reactivity of the ALIX spent fuel samples is compared to the reactivity of fresh fuel samples. The comparison between Experiment and Calculation shows satisfactory results with the JEFF3.1.1 library which predicts the reactivity loss within 2% for burn-up of {approx}75 GWd/t and within 4% for burn-up of {approx}85 GWd/t. (authors)

Leconte, P.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Eschbach, R.; Di-Salvo, J.; Antony, M.; Pepino, A. [CEA, DEN, DER, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams.

Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Conversion to Dual Fuel Capability in Combustion Turbine Plants: Addition of Distillate Oil Firing for Combined Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During development of combined cycle projects, key assumptions and estimates regarding markets and technology on which the project is based may change. With fuel costs of combined cycle plants representing over 90 percent of annual operating cost, sudden changes in fuel pricing demand attention and re-evaluation. Conversion from natural gas fuel only to dual fuel capability with the addition of distillate oil firing systems is a technical response to market conditions that may have long-term as well as s...

2001-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

73

ULTRA-CLEAN DIESEL FUEL: U.S. PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION CAPABILITY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

91 91 ULTRA-CLEAN DIESEL FUEL: U.S. PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION CAPABILITY G.R. Hadder Center for Transportation Analysis Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN B.D. McNutt U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC August 2000 Prepared for Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 ii iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

74

High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

Francesco Venneri; Chang-Keun Jo; Jae-Man Noh; Yonghee Kim; Claudio Filippone; Jonghwa Chang; Chris Hamilton; Young-Min Kim; Ji-Su Jun; Moon-Sung Cho; Hong-Sik Lim; MIchael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Vincent Descotes; Brian Boer

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor and New Advanced Fuel Testing Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was originally designed (in the 1960s) primarily as a part of the overall program to produce transuranic isotopes for use in the heavy-element research program of the United States. Today, the reactor is a highly versatile machine, producing medical and transuranic isotopes and performing materials test experimental irradiations and neutron-scattering experiments. The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials in a thermal neutron spectrum in the United States is limited, and a fast-spectrum irradiation facility does not currently exist in this country. The HFIR has a distinct advantage for consideration as a fuel/cladding irradiation facility because of the extremely high neutron fluxes that this reactor provides over the full thermal- to fast-neutron energy range. New test capabilities have been developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials in the HFIR under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) and fast-reactor (FR) operating conditions.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment, Burn-up and Cooling Time of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument  

SciTech Connect

An outline of this presentation of what a Differential Die-Away (DDA) instrument can do are: (1) Principle of operation of DDA instrument; (2) Determination of initial enrichment (IE) ({sigma} < 5%); (3) Determination of burn up (BU) ({sigma} {approx} 6%); (4) Determination of cooling time (CT) ({sigma} {approx} 20-50%); and (5) DDA instrument as a standalone device. DDA response (fresh fuel vs. spent fuel) is: (1) Fresh fuel => DDA response increases (die-away time is longer) with increasing fissile content; and (2) Spent fuel => DDA response decreases (die-away time is shorter) with higher burn-up (i.e. more neutron absorbers present).

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

77

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect

This is the third Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the second set of mercury measurements was made after the catalysts had been exposed to flue gas for about 2,000 hours. There was good agreement between the Ontario Hydro measurements and the SCEM measurements. Carbon trap measurements of total mercury agreed fairly well with the SCEM. There did appear to be some loss of mercury in the sampling system toward the end of the sampling campaign. NO{sub x} reductions across the catalysts ranged from 60% to 88%. Loss of total mercury across the commercial catalysts was not observed, as it had been in the March/April test series. It is not clear whether this was due to aging of the catalyst or to changes in the sampling system made between March/April and August. In the presence of ammonia, the blank monolith showed no oxidation. Two of the commercial catalysts showed mercury oxidation that was comparable to that in the March/April series. The other three commercial catalysts showed a decrease in mercury oxidation relative to the March/April series. Oxidation of mercury increased without ammonia present. Transient experiments showed that when ammonia was turned on, mercury appeared to desorb from the catalyst, suggesting displacement of adsorbed mercury by the ammonia.

Constance Senior; Temi Linjewile

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fertile free fuels for plutonium and minor actinides burning in LWRs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feasibility of using various uranium-free fuels for plutonium incineration in present light water reactors is investigated. Two major categories of inert matrix fuels are studied: composite ceramic fuel particles ...

Zhang, Yi, 1979-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment and Burn-up of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument  

SciTech Connect

A key objective of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is to utilize non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques to determine the elemental plutonium (Pu) content in a commercial-grade nuclear spent fuel assembly (SFA). In the third year of the NGSI Spent Fuel NDA project, the research focus is on the integration of a few NDA techniques. One of the reoccurring challenges to the accurate determination of Pu content has been the explicit dependence of the measured signal on the presence of neutron absorbers which build up in the assembly in accordance with its operating and irradiation history. The history of any SFA is often summarized by the parameters of burn-up (BU), initial enrichment (IE) and cooling time (CT). While such parameters can typically be provided by the operator, the ability to directly measure and verify them would significantly enhance the autonomy of the IAEA inspectorate. Within this paper, we demonstrate that an instrument based on a Differential Die-Away technique is in principle capable of direct measurement of IE and, should the CT be known, also the BU.

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

Apparatus and method for burning a lean, premixed fuel/air ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Cost of Adding E85 Fuel Capability to Existing Gasoline Stations: NREL Survey and Literature Search (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cost of Adding E85 Fueling Capability to Existing Gasoline Stations: Cost of Adding E85 Fueling Capability to Existing Gasoline Stations: NREL Survey and Literature Search The cost of purchasing and installing E85 fueling equip- ment varies widely, yet station owners need to have an idea of what to expect when budgeting or reviewing bids for this upgrade. The purpose of this document is to provide a framework for station owners to assess what a reason- able cost would be. This framework was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) by surveying actual costs for stations, conducting a literature search, not- ing the major cost-affecting variables, addressing anomalies in the survey, and projecting changes in future costs. The findings of NREL's survey and literature search are shown in the table below. This table divides the study's

82

Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal  

SciTech Connect

A process for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage.

Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Sethi, Vijay (Laramie, WY); Brecher, Lee E. (Laramie, WY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Deep Burn Develpment of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors - July 2010  

SciTech Connect

The DB Program Quarterly Progress Report for April - June 2010, ORNL/TM/2010/140, was distributed to program participants on August 4. This report discusses the following: (1) TRU (transuranic elements) HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Fuel Modeling - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) 5.3 Radiation Damage and Properties; (2) TRU HTR Fuel Qualification - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development, (c) ZrC Properties and Handbook; and (3) HTR Fuel Recycle - (a) Recycle Processes, (b) Graphite Recycle, (c) Pyrochemical Reprocessing - METROX (metal recovery from oxide fuel) Process Development.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

P2-03: 3D Characterization of High Burn-up MOX Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently fast reactor performance is largely defined by the limitations of the materials involved in reactors, especially the metallic or mixed oxide ((U, Pu)O2) fuel ...

85

Design and construction of a prototype advanced on-line fuel burn-up monitoring system for the modular pebble bed reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) is a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear power reactor currently under study as a next generation reactor system. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multi-pass fuel circulation in which the fuel pebbles are randomly loaded and continuously cycled through the core until they reach their prescribed End-of-Life burn-up limit. Unlike the situation with a conventional light water reactor, depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management for MPBR will be highly inaccurate. An on-line measurement system is needed to accurately assess whether a given pebble has reached its End-of-Life burn-up limit and thereby provide an on-line, automated go/no-go decision on fuel disposition on a pebble-by-pebble basis. This project investigated approaches to analyzing fuel pebbles in real time using gamma spectroscopy and possibly using passive neutron counting of spontaneous fission neutrons to provide the speed, accuracy, and burn-up range required for burnup determination of MPBR. It involved all phases necessary to develop and construct a burn-up monitor, including a review of the design requirements of the system, identification of detection methodologies, modeling and development of potential designs, and finally, the construction and testing of an operational detector system. Based upon the research work performed in this project, the following conclusions are made. In terms of using gamma spectrometry, two possible approaches were identified for burnup assay. The first approach is based on the measurement of the absolute activity of Cs-137. However, due to spectral interference and the need for absolute calibration of the spectrometer, the uncertainty in burnup determination using this approach was found to range from {approx} {+-}40% at beginning of life to {approx} {+-}10% at the discharge burnup. An alternative approach is to use a relative burnup indicator. In this case, a self-calibration method was developed to obtain the spectrometer's relative efficiency curve based upon gamma lines emitted from {sup 140}La. It was found that the ratio of {sup 239}Np/{sup 132}I can be used in burnup measurement with an uncertainty of {approx} {+-}3% throughout the pebble's lifetime. In addition, by doping the fuel with {sup 60}Co, the use of the {sup 60}Co/{sup 134}Cs and {sup 239}Np/{sup 132}I ratios can simultaneously yield the enrichment and burnup of each pebble. A functional gamma-ray spectrometry measurement system was constructed and tested with light water reactor fuels. Experimental results were observed to be consistent with the predictions. On using the passive neutron counting method for the on-line burnup measurement, it was found that neutron emission rate of an irradiated pebble is sensitive to its burnup history and the spectral-averaged cross sections used in the depletion calculations; thus a large uncertainty exists in the correlation between neutron emission and burnup. At low burnup levels, the uncertainty in the neutron emission/burnup correlation is too high and neutron emission rate is too low so that it is impossible to determine a pebble's burnup by on-line neutron counting. At high burnup levels, due to the decreasing of the uncertainty in neutron emission rate and the super-linear feature of the correlation, the uncertainty in burnup determination was found to be {approx}7% at the discharge burnup, which is acceptable for determining whether a pebble should be discharged or not. In terms of neutron detection, because an irradiated pebble is a weak neutron source and a much stronger gamma source, neutron detector system should have high neutron detection efficiency and strong gamma discrimination capability. Of all the commonly used neutron detectors, the He-3 and BF3 detector systems were found to be able to satisfy the requirement on detection efficiency; but their gamma discrimination capability is only marginal for this on-line application. Even with thick gamma shielding, these two types of detectors sha

Su, Bingjing; Hawari, Ayman, I.

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

The closed cycle gas turbine, the most efficient turbine burning any fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are two types of gas turbines. The open cycle is very well known as, for example, the JET. The closed cycle in the U.S.A. is just starting to be well known. In Europe, the closed cycle gas turbine has been used in power plants, especially in Germany, and have been very efficient in burning coal. Concentrated in this paper is the Closed Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) as it is the most efficient type of turbine. There are the following sections in this paper: closed cycle gas turbine in more detail; various advantages of the CCGT; Nuclear power; and three comments.

Sawyer, R.T.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage. 1 fig.

Merriam, N.W.; Sethi, V.; Brecher, L.E.

1994-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

88

Deep Burn: Development of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors- Monthly Highlights November 2010  

SciTech Connect

During FY 2011 the DB Program will report Highlights on a monthly basis, but will no longer produce Quarterly Progress Reports. Technical details that were previously included in the quarterly reports will be included in the appropriate Milestone Reports that are submitted to FCRD Program Management. These reports will also be uploaded to the Deep Burn website. The Monthly Highlights report for October 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/300, was distributed to program participants on November 29, 2010. This report discusses the following: (1) Thermochemical Data and Model Development; (2) TRU (transuranic elements) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) Development - (a) TRU Kernel Development, (b) Coating Development; (3) LWR Fully Ceramic Fuel - (a) FCM Fabrication Development, (b) FCM Irradiation Testing.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

DEMONSTRATION OF LONG-TERM STORAGE CAPABILITY FOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL IN L BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy decisions for the ultimate disposition of its inventory of used nuclear fuel presently in, and to be received and stored in, the L Basin at the Savannah River Site, and schedule for project execution have not been established. A logical decision timeframe for the DOE is following the review of the overall options for fuel management and disposition by the Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future (BRC). The focus of the BRC review is commercial fuel; however, the BRC has included the DOE fuel inventory in their review. Even though the final report by the BRC to the U.S. Department of Energy is expected in January 2012, no timetable has been established for decisions by the U.S. Department of Energy on alternatives selection. Furthermore, with the imminent lay-up and potential closure of H-canyon, no ready path for fuel disposition would be available, and new technologies and/or facilities would need to be established. The fuel inventory in wet storage in the 3.375 million gallon L Basin is primarily aluminum-clad, aluminum-based fuel of the Materials Test Reactor equivalent design. An inventory of non-aluminum-clad fuel of various designs is also stored in L Basin. Safe storage of fuel in wet storage mandates several high-level 'safety functions' that would be provided by the Structures, Systems, and Components (SSCs) of the storage system. A large inventory of aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel, and other nonaluminum fuel owned by the U.S. Department of Energy is in wet storage in L Basin at the Savannah River Site. An evaluation of the present condition of the fuel, and the Structures, Systems, or Components (SSCs) necessary for its wet storage, and the present programs and storage practices for fuel management have been performed. Activities necessary to validate the technical bases for, and verify the condition of the fuel and the SSCs under long-term wet storage have also been identified. The overall conclusion is that the fuel can be stored in L Basin, meeting general safety functions for fuel storage, for an additional 50 years and possibly beyond contingent upon continuation of existing fuel management activities and several augmented program activities. It is concluded that the technical bases and well-founded technologies have been established to store spent nuclear fuel in the L Basin. Methodologies to evaluate the fuel condition and characteristics, and systems to prepare fuel, isolate damaged fuel, and maintain water quality storage conditions have been established. Basin structural analyses have been performed against present NPH criteria. The aluminum fuel storage experience to date, supported by the understanding of the effects of environmental variables on materials performance, demonstrates that storage systems that minimize degradation and provide full retrievability of the fuel up to and greater than 50 additional years will require maintaining the present management programs, and with the recommended augmented/additional activities in this report.

Sindelar, R.; Deible, R.

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

90

Second-Generation Fuel Cell Stack Durability and Freeze Capability from National FCV Learning Demonstration (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation provides information about the objectives and partners of the National Fuel Cell Vehicle Learning Demonstration, the status of vehicle and station deployment, and results of vehicle and infrastructure analysis.

Wipke, K.; Sprik, S.; Kurtz, J.; Ramsden, T.; Garbak, J.

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

91

Ultra-Clean Diesel Fuel: U.S. Production and Distribution Capability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel engines have potential for use in a large number of future vehicles in the US. However, to achieve this potential, proponents of diesel engine technologies must solve diesel's pollution problems, including objectionable levels of emissions of particulates and oxides of nitrogen. To meet emissions reduction goals, diesel fuel quality improvements could enable diesel engines with advanced aftertreatment systems to achieve the necessary emissions performance. The diesel fuel would most likely have to be reformulated to be as clean as low sulfur gasoline. This report examines the small- and large-market extremes for introduction of ultra-clean diesel fuel in the US and concludes that petroleum refinery and distribution systems could produce adequate low sulfur blendstocks to satisfy small markets for low sulfur (30 parts per million) light duty diesel fuel, and deliver that fuel to retail consumers with only modest changes. Initially, there could be poor economic returns on under-utilized infrastructure investments. Subsequent growth in the diesel fuel market could be inconsistent with U.S. refinery configurations and economics. As diesel fuel volumes grow, the manufacturing cost may increase, depending upon how hydrodesulfurization technologies develop, whether significantly greater volumes of the diesel pool have to be desulfurized, to what degree other properties like aromatic levels have to be changed, and whether competitive fuel production technologies become economic. Low sulfur (10 parts per million) and low aromatics (10 volume percent) diesel fuel for the total market could require desulfurization, dearomatization, and hydrogen production investments amounting to a third of current refinery market value. The refinery capital cost component alone would be 3 cents per gallon of diesel fuel. Outside of refineries, the gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant investment cost would be 3 to 6 cents per gallon. With total projected investments of $11.8 billion (6 to 9 cents per gallon) for the U.S. Gulf Coast alone, financing, engineering, and construction and material availability are major issues that must be addressed, for both refinery and GTL investments.

Hadder, G.R.

2001-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Burns Prevention  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burns Burns Burns can result from everyday things and activities in your home. The most common causes of burns are from scalds (steam, hot bath water, hot drinks and foods), fire, chemicals, electricity and overexposure to the sun. Some burns may be more serious than others. The severity of the burn is based on the depth of the burn. First degree burns are the least severe, and third degree burns are the most severe. Call 911 or seek medical attention if you are unsure of how severe your burn is. All burns are susceptible to tetanus (lockjaw). Get a tetanus shot every 10 years. If your last shot was 5 years ago, talk to your doctor - you may need a booster shot. Causes of Burns: Scalds Scalding injuries and burns are caused by hot tap water, hot beverages and food, and steam.

93

Feasibility of burning refuse derived fuel in institutional size oil-fired boilers. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates the feasibility of retrofitting existing oil-fired boilers of institutional size, approximately 3.63 to 36.3 Mg steam/h (8000 to 80,000 lbs steam/h) for co-firing with refuse-derived fuel (RDF). Relevant quantities describing mixtures of oil and RDF and combustion products for various levels of excess air are computed. Savings to be realized from the use of RDF are derived under several assumptions and allowable costs for a retrofit are estimated. An extensive survey of manufacturers of burners, boilers, and combustion systems showed that no hardware or proven design is yet available for such retrofit. Approaches with significant promises are outlined: the slagging burner, and a dry ash double vortex burner for low heat input from RDF. These two systems, and an evaluation of a small separate RDF dedicated combustor in support of the oil-fired boiler, are recommended as topics for future study.

None

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Multispecies Diffusion Capability For The AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance Code (LANL Milestone M31MS060301 Final Report)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work addresses only diffusion. The contact solver in AMP was not sufficiently developed this year to attempt treatment of species contact. A cylindrical tensor diffusion coefficient model was added to the AMP code, with the KHHS model [1] implemented into the AMP material library as a specific example. A cylindrical tensor diffusion operator manufactured solution verification example was coded. Before meeting the full text of the milestone task, it remains to: (1) code and run a cylindrical tensor diffusion solver manufactured solution (2) code and run the validation example of [1] (3) document results. These are dependent on developing new capabilities for the AMP code requiring close collaboration with the AMP team at ORNL. The model implemented provides a good intermediate first step toward a general multi-species solver. The multi-species capability of the AMP nuclear fuel code [2] is intended to allow the modeling of radiation-driven redistribution of various elements through solid metal nuclear reactor fuels. The initial model AMP provides for U-Pu-Zr fuels is based on the analysis of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel development program experiment X419 post-irradiation data described in [1], referred to here as the KHHS model. This model may be specific to that experiment, but it was thought to provide a good start for the AMP code, because it (1) is formulated at the engineering scale, (2) decouples the species from each other, (3) predetermines the phase boundaries so that reference to a phase diagram is not needed, and (4) one of the authors (Hayes) was the NEAMS Fuels IPSC manager for FY11. The KHHS model is formulated for radial fluxes as little axial redistribution is seen experimentally. As U-Pu-Zr fuel is irradiated, the constituents migrate to form three annular regions. The center region is Zr-enriched and U-depleted, the middle region is Zr-depleted and U-enriched, and the outer region is Zr-enriched and U-depleted. The Pu concentration stays roughly constant throughout with slight enrichment in the center and depletion near the surface. Pu acts as a solvent for the mixture. The experiment was only run to 1.9% burnup, so the model is not at this time applicable to the high-burnup scenarios that the AMP code is intended to eventually model.

Dilts, Gary A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

95

High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor With Results from FY-2011 Activities  

SciTech Connect

The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

Michael A. Pope

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

1 Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols outflow from India and 2 Arabia: Biomass/biofuel burning and fossil fuel combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Characterization of carbonaceous aerosols outflow from India and 2 Arabia: Biomass/biofuel tracer for biomass/biofuel burning, 16 number concentration of submicrometer carbon-containing particles and biomass/biofuel 22 burning are subject to long-range transport, thereby contributing to anthropogenic 23

Dickerson, Russell R.

97

Conceptual engineering design and economic evaluation of the burn-acid- leach aqueous process and of the burn-fluoride-volatility process for recovering spent Rover fuel at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

Declassified 24 Sep 1973. Two detailed, conceptual process, equipment, and plant designs were prepared for facilities for recovering spent Rover fuel (highly enriched uranium-graphite) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plart. The results of the study indicate that the fluoridevolatility process is preferred on both economic and technical grounds. Both processes employ a comnion fuel shipping, storage, and charging system and use continuous, fluidized-bed oxidation of the fuel as the first step of the head-end operation. Subsequent operations in the aqueous process include batch leaching the ash with 5 M HF--10 M HNO/sub 3/ in two parallel lines of Teflon-lined leaching and feed-preparation equipment, followed by solvent extraction to decontaminate and recover the uranium as uranyl nitrate. Post-burning operations in the fluoride-volatiiity process include the continuous fluidized-bed and moving-bed fluorination of the ash followed by partial condensation to remove niobium pentafluoride and passage of the UF/sub 6/ through heated sodium fluoride pellets to completely decontaminate the uranium. The uranium is recovered as uranium hexafluoride. (auth)

Nicholson, E.L.

1965-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Deep Burn: Development of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors- Monthly Highlights October 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DB Program monthly highlights report for September 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/252, was distributed to program participants by email on October 26. This report discusses: (1) Core and Fuel Analysis; (2) Spent Fuel Management; (3) Fuel Cycle Integration of the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor); (4) TRU (transuranic elements) HTR Fuel Qualification; (5) HTR Spent Fuel Recycle - (a) TRU Kernel Development (ORNL), (b) Coating Development (ORNL), (c) Characterization Development and Support, (d) ZrC Properties and Handbook; and (6) HTR Fuel Recycle.

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Estimates of global, regional, and national annual CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring: 1950--1992  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the compilation, content, and format of the most comprehensive C0{sub 2}-emissions database currently available. The database includes global, regional, and national annual estimates of C0{sub 2} emissions resulting from fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing, and gas flaring in oil fields for 1950--92 as well as the energy production, consumption, and trade data used for these estimates. The methods of Marland and Rotty (1983) are used to calculate these emission estimates. For the first time, the methods and data used to calculate CO, emissions from gas flaring are presented. This C0{sub 2}-emissions database is useful for carbon-cycle research, provides estimates of the rate at which fossil-fuel combustion has released C0{sub 2} to the atmosphere, and offers baseline estimates for those countries compiling 1990 C0{sub 2}-emissions inventories.

Boden, T.A.; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Andres, R.J. [University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Deep Burn: Development of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors- Monthly Highlights September 2010  

SciTech Connect

The DB Program monthly highlights report for August 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/184, was distributed to program participants by email on September 17. This report discusses: (1) Core and Fuel Analysis - (a) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Prismatic Design (Logos), (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Microfuel analysis for the DB HTR (INL, GA, Logos); (2) Spent Fuel Management - (a) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) repository behavior (UNLV), (b) Repository performance of TRISO fuel (UCB); (3) Fuel Cycle Integration of the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) - Synergy with other reactor fuel cycles (GA, Logos); (4) TRU (transuranic elements) HTR Fuel Qualification - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (5) HTR Spent Fuel Recycle - (a) TRU Kernel Development (ORNL), (b) Coating Development (ORNL), (c) Characterization Development and Support, (d) ZrC Properties and Handbook; and (6) HTR Fuel Recycle - (a) Graphite Recycle (ORNL), (b) Aqueous Reprocessing, (c) Pyrochemical Reprocessing METROX (metal recovery from oxide fuel) Process Development (ANL).

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Analysis of the capabilities of domestic auto-manufacturers to improve corporate average fuel economy (information current as of November 1985)  

SciTech Connect

Since 1978, the Department of Energy (DOE) has conducted periodic reviews of the ability of domestic automobile manufacturers to improve their corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) values. This work has allowed DOE to develop a detailed understanding of manufacturer technological capabilities and to forecast the cost, fuel economy improvement, and rate of introduction of individual technologies over a ten-year horizon. DOE uses these forecasts to fulfill its responsibilities under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA), to support its forecasts of energy demand and to conduct policy analyses relevant to automobile and energy production industries. Chapters are given for the following areas: (1) review of 1985 CAFE, (2) analysis of current capabilities, (3) modifications of the Technology Cost Segment Model (TCSM), (4) review of market share forecasts, and (5) forecasts of CAFE using the TCSM.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Developing fuel management capabilities based on coupled Monte Carlo depletion in support of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pursuant to a 1986 NRC ruling, the MIT Reactor (MITR) is planning on converting from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for fuel. Prior studies have shown that the MITR will be able to ...

Romano, Paul K. (Paul Kollath)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Capability of the MIMAS process to convert the stockpiles of separated plutonium into MOX fuel for use in LWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term storage of plutonium separated from fission products is not a good solution according to the current non-proliferation criteria as well as from an economic point of view. This material has thus to be converted to the equivalent of the “spent fuel standard.” Only one technique has so far reached the industrial maturity necessary to convert the important existing plutonium stockpiles: it is the use of plutonium to manufacture and irradiate mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel.

Paul Deramaix; Yvon Vanderborck; Werner Couwenbergh

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Development of coupled SCALE4.2/GTRAN2 computational capability for advanced MOX fueled assembly designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An advanced assembly code system that can efficiently and accurately analyze various designs (current and advanced) proposed for plutonium disposition is being developed by {open_quotes}marrying{close_quotes} two existing state-of-the-art methodologies-GTRAN2 and SCALE 4.2. The resulting code system, GT-SCALE, posses several unique characteristics: exact 2D representation of a complete fuel assembly, while preserving the heterogeniety of each of its pin cells; flexibility in the energy group structure, the present upper limit being 218 groups; a comprehensive cross-section library and material data base; and accurate burnup calculations. The resulting GT-SCALE is expected to be very useful for a wide variety of applications, including the analysis of very heterogeneous UO{sub 2} fueled LWR fuel assemblies; of hexagonal shaped fuel assemblies as of the Russian LWRs; of fuel assemblies for HTGRs; as well as for the analysis of criticality safety and for calculation of the source term of spent fuel.

Vujic, J.; Greenspan, E.; Slater, Postma, T.; Casher, G.; Soares, I. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Leal, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 (2014) 162-169" DOI : 10.1016/j.fuel.2013.07.015 #12;2 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES, Sweden Abstract The adiabatic laminar burning velocities of a commercial gasoline and of a model fuel (n

106

Actinide Burning in CANDU Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actinide burning in CANDU reactors has been studied as a method of reducing the actinide content of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, and thereby decreasing the associated long term decay heat load. In this work simulations were performed of actinides mixed with natural uranium to form a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and also mixed with silicon carbide to form an inert matrix (IMF) fuel. Both of these fuels were taken to a higher burnup than has previously been studied. The total transuranic element destruction calculated was 40% for the MOX fuel and 71% for the IMF. (authors)

Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

How much carbon dioxide is produced by burning gasoline and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much carbon dioxide is produced by burning gasoline and diesel fuel? About 19.64 pounds of carbon dioxide (CO 2) are produced from burning a gallon of gasoline ...

108

Hydrogen Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

explored as a fuel for passenger vehicles. It can be used in fuel cells to power electric motors or burned in internal combustion engines (ICEs). It is an environmentally...

109

The burning bush  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ISSN 1948-6596 The burning bush Fire in Mediterraneandiscussion. Pre- scription burning is used in many forest

Schwilk, Dylan W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal of mercury from simulated flue gas. A business model was generated to summarize anti

J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

111

Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills  

SciTech Connect

Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (<70%). High airflow rate was required to achieve >50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal of mercury from simulated flue gas. A business model was generated to summarize anti

J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

112

Lightweighting Automotive Materials for Increased Fuel Efficiency and Delivering Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capabilities to U.S. Manufacturers  

SciTech Connect

Abstract The National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), to bring together research and development (R&D) collaborations to develop and accelerate the knowledgebase and infrastructure for lightweighting materials and manufacturing processes for their use in structural and applications in the automotive sector. The purpose/importance of this DOE program: • 2016 CAFÉ standards. • Automotive industry technology that shall adopt the insertion of lightweighting material concepts towards manufacturing of production vehicles. • Development and manufacture of advanced research tools for modeling and simulation (M&S) applications to reduce manufacturing and material costs. • U.S. competitiveness that will help drive the development and manufacture of the next generation of materials. NCMS established a focused portfolio of applied R&D projects utilizing lightweighting materials for manufacture into automotive structures and components. Areas that were targeted in this program: • Functionality of new lightweighting materials to meet present safety requirements. • Manufacturability using new lightweighting materials. • Cost reduction for the development and use of new lightweighting materials. The automotive industry’s future continuously evolves through innovation, and lightweight materials are key in achieving a new era of lighter, more efficient vehicles. Lightweight materials are among the technical advances needed to achieve fuel/energy efficiency and reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions: • Establish design criteria methodology to identify the best materials for lightweighting. • Employ state-of-the-art design tools for optimum material development for their specific applications. • Match new manufacturing technology to production volume. • Address new process variability with new production-ready processes.

Hale, Steve

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

113

Capabilities Series  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Series Capabilities Series www.emsl.pnl.gov Scientific Innovation Through Integration WHY USE EMSL'S MOLECULAR SCIENCE COMPUTING CAPABILITY? Ì Molecular Science Computing provides users with an integrated suite of computing hardware and software capabilities optimized for achieving the fastest time-to-solution for complex systems-level environmental molecular science simulations. Ì Expert staff members have extensive knowledge and experience in high-performance computing, as well as the operations, domain expertise, and scientific knowledge to support EMSL's users. Ì Substantial integration of transformational high-end computing simulations with experimental resources at EMSL provides a unique multidisciplinary research environment. The Molecular Science Computing capability at EMSL

114

Burning plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The fraction of fusion-reaction energy that is released in energetic charged ions, such as the alpha particles of the D-T reaction, can be thermalized within the reacting plasma and used to maintain its temperature. This mechanism facilitates the achievement of very high energy-multiplication factors Q, but also raises a number of new issues of confinement physics. To ensure satisfactory reaction operation, three areas of energetic-ion interaction need to be addressed: single-ion transport in imperfectly symmetric magnetic fields or turbulent background plasmas; energetic-ion-driven (or stabilized) collective phenomena; and fusion-heat-driven collective phenomena. The first of these topics is already being explored in a number of tokamak experiments, and the second will begin to be addressed in the D-T-burning phase of TFTR and JET. Exploration of the third topic calls for high-Q operation, which is a goal of proposed next-generation plasma-burning projects. Planning for future experiments must take into consideration the full range of plasma-physics and engineering R D areas that need to be addressed on the way to a fusion power demonstration.

Furth, H.P.; Goldston, R.J.; Zweben, S.J. (Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.); Sigmar, D.J. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Considerations for Prescribed Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Considerations for Prescribed Burning NEW M EX ICO S TAE U N I V E R SI T YT Cooperative Extension prescribed burns ...................... 1 Fire effects ................................................ 3 Justification for burning ......................................... 3 Reclamation versus

Castillo, Steven P.

116

Fuel Analysis and Licensing Code: FALCON MOD01: Volume 3: Verification and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FALCON Mod01 software and accompanying three-volume documentation are being released as the state-of-the-art light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance analysis and modeling code validated to high burn-up. Based on a robust finite element numerical structure, FALCON is capable of analyzing both steady state and transient fuel behavior with a seamless transition between the two modes. FALCON is the culmination of focused developmental activities since 1996 (with its origins in EPRI's two historic fuel per...

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

117

Fuel Analysis and Licensing Code: FALCON MOD01: Volume 1: Theoretical and Numerical Bases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FALCON Mod01 software and accompanying three-volume documentation are being released as the state-of-the-art light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance analysis and modeling code validated to high burn-up. Based on a robust finite element numerical structure, FALCON is capable of analyzing both steady state and transient fuel behavior with a seamless transition between the two modes. FALCON is the culmination of focused developmental activities since 1996 (with its origins in EPRI's two historic fuel per...

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

118

Possible use of polyaphronated hydrocarbons at jet fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Air Force is interested in low cost missile propulsion systems which meet the need for increased stand off range and can fly at high speeds at both low and high altitudes. Due to their high performance capabilities, liquid fueled ramjets are important candidates for these missions. They tend to perform well when the combustor length is long enough to enable all of the fuel to be burned before being lost through the exhaust nozzle. When a combustor has to be shortened due to size limitations, liquid fuel performance drops as a result of not burning all of the injected fuel. Proper fuel injection and atomization are essential factors in obtaining high performance in all liquid fueled ramjets and other air breathing combustion systems. Poor fuel atomization results in low combustion efficiency, contributes to combustion instability, and aids in the formation of pollutants. Very fine fuel atomization requires complex fuel control injection systems which are impractical for ramjet applications. The recent developments in the colloid system, polyaphrons, opens up the possibility that fuels prepared in this way may increase the performance of ramjet propulsion systems, particularly those which are limited in combustion efficiency due to short evaporation and residence times, such as is the case for the very compact swirl combustor configurations. Polyaphrons have the potential to induce better atomization thereby decreasing residence times required for individual droplet burning.

Sebba, F.; Schetz, J.A. (Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State Univ., Blacksburg (USA)); Neff, R.B. (Aero Propulsion Lab., Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH (USA))

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Neutronic Analysis of the Burning of Transuranics in Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Tri-Isotropic Particle-Fuel in a PWR  

SciTech Connect

Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU) – only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO2 and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO2 and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior is dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint.

Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou; Brian Boer

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities A photo of a series of large metal tanks connected by a network of pipes. Only the top portion of the tanks is visible above the metal floor grate. Each tank has a round porthole on the top. Two men examine one of the tanks at the far end of the floor. Sugars are converted into ethanol in fermentation tanks. This ethanol is then separated, purified, and recovered for use as a transportation fuel. NREL biomass researchers and scientists have strong capabilities in many facets of biomass technology that support the cost-effective conversion of biomass to biofuels-capabilities that are in demand. The NREL biomass staff partners with other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities at every stage of the biomass-to-biofuels conversion process. For these partners, our biomass

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: coupling experimental and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: coupling experimental for burning the fuel-lean mixtures of hydrogen or hydrogen-rich syngas fuels obtained from the gasification, including those burning lean hydrogen at both at atmospheric and elevated pressures [6]. The low

Bell, John B.

122

Geographic patterns of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring on a one degree by one degree grid cell basis: 1950 to 1990  

SciTech Connect

Data sets of one degree latitude by one degree longitude carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon (C) per year from anthropogenic sources have been produced for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO{sub 2} emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions. Global, regional and national annual estimates for 1950 through 1992 were published previously. Those national, annual CO{sub 2} emission estimates were based on statistics on fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing and gas flaring in oil fields as well as energy production, consumption and trade data, using the methods of Marland and Rotty. The national annual estimates were combined with gridded one-degree data on political units and 1984 human populations to create the new gridded CO{sub 2} emission data sets. The same population distribution was used for each of the years as proxy for the emission distribution within each country. The implied assumption for that procedure was that per capita energy use and fuel mix is uniform over a political unit. The consequence of this first-order procedure is that the spatial changes observed over time are solely due to changes in national energy consumption and nation-based fuel mix. Increases in emissions over time are apparent for most areas.

Brenkert, A.L. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Andres, R.J. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Fung, I. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies; Matthews, E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Spring Cleaning. Calorie Burning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spring Cleaning. Calorie Burning. Laundry: 73 Dusting: 85 Mopping the Floor: 153 Washing the Car Painting: 161 (Estimate based on 150 lb person per 30 minutes, more calories burned if weigh more, fewer calories burned if weigh less) Allergy Sufferers' Survival Guide > Wash your hair before bed to avoid

Acton, Scott

124

Sunrise Agri Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 55310 Sector Biomass Product Manufacturer of Biomass Fuel Pellets for Pellet Burning Stoves. References Sunrise Agri Fuels1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

125

Fuel Systems Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

company with divisions focusing on bringing cleaner-burning gaseous fuel (such as propane and natural gas) technology to various types of vehicles. References Fuel Systems...

126

NREL: Advanced Power Electronics - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Key to making hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles practical is the development of low-cost, high-power integrated power electronics devices. The research...

127

BNL | Biomass Burns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Aerosols from biomass burning are recognized to perturb Earth's climate through the direct effect (both scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave radiation), the semi-direct effect (evaporation of cloud drops due to absorbing aerosols), and indirect effects (by influencing cloud formation and precipitation. Biomass burning is an important aerosol source, providing an estimated 40% of anthropogenically influenced fine carbonaceous particles (Bond, et al., 2004; Andrea and Rosenfeld, 2008). Primary organic aerosol (POA) from open biomass burns and biofuel comprises the largest component of primary organic aerosol mass emissions at northern temperate latitudes (de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Data from the IMPROVE

128

California Fuel Cell Partnership Alternative Fuels Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and maintenance are both important. Propane and CNG are NOT "cleaner burning". RSD is a very good tool but ... Measured grams pollutant per kg of fuel from RSD -quantifiable uncertainty Fuel sales from tax department inventories · Only need one week of work and fuel sales to get fuel based emissions inventories · RSD

129

Uniform-burning matrix burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Bittersweet and Burning Bush  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bittersweet and Burning Bush Nature Bulletin No. 250 December 25, 1982 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation...

131

A COMPARISON OF THE NUCLEAR DEFENSE CAPABILITIES ON NUCLEAR AND COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS. FUEL COST STUDY VARIOUS REACTORS AT 100 AND 300 Mwe  

SciTech Connect

Appendices C and D may further be identified as SL1925 and CF-61-12- 20(Rev.), respectively. A comparative report is presented in which the economics and feasibility of plant protection from nuclear attack by plant hardening, remote siting, and utilization of optional fueling concepts for the coal-fired plant are evaluated. (J.R.D.)

Gift, E.H.

1962-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

132

Prescribed Burning Costs: Trends and Influences in the National Forest System1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prescribed Burning Costs: Trends and Influences in the National Forest System1 David A. Cleaves,2 Service's National Forest System prescribed burning activity and costs are examined. Fuels management officers from 95 National Forests reported costs and acreage burned for 4 types of prescribed fire

Standiford, Richard B.

133

Fuel Switching on a Dime -- Boiler Capabilities of Electric Utilities and Industrial Companies: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities play an unusual and important role in the natural gas market because so much of their ongoing gas demand is price sensitive. This report, which focuses on the pattern of this demand, tracks how switching between gas and alternative fuels by major users affects the overall market. Events over the past four years and new plant-specific data have changed our understanding of this phenomenon.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interannual variations in fossil fuel emissions. J. Geophys.Treat CO 2 from fossil fuel burning: global distribution ofdioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement

Gurney, Kevin R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Assessment and development of an industrial wet oxidation system for burning waste and low upgrade fuels. Final report, Phase 2B: Pilot demonstration of the MODAR supercritical water oxidation process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation is Project Manager for the Development and Demonstration of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Wastes and Low Grade Fuel. This program has been ongoing through a Cooperative Agreement sponsored by the Department of Energy, initiated in June 1988. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the results of the demonstration project conducted under this cooperative agreement with the overall goal of advancing the state-of-the-art in the practice of Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO). In recognition of the Government`s support of this project, we have endeavored to include all material and results that are not proprietary in as much detail as possible while still protecting MODAR`s proprietary technology. A specific example is in the discussion of materials of construction where results are presented while, in some cases, the specific materials are not identified. The report presents the results chronologically. Background material on the earlier phases (Section 2) provide an understanding of the evolution of the program, and bring all reviewers to a common starting point. Section 3 provides a discussion of activities from October 1991 through July 1992, during which the pilot plant was designed; and various studies including computational fluid dynamic modeling of the reactor vessel, and a process HAZOP analyses were conducted. Significant events during fabrication are presented in Section 4. The experimental results of the test program (December 1992--August 1993) are discussed in Section 5.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Upgrading of TREAT experimental capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TREAT facility at the Argonne National Laboratory site in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is being upgraded to provide capabilities for fast-reactor-safety transient experiments not possible at any other experimental facility. Principal TREAT Upgrade (TU) goal is provision for 37-pin size experiments on energetics of core-disruptive accidents (CDA) in fast breeder reactor cores with moderate sodium void coefficients. this goal requires a significant enhancement of the capabilities of the TREAT facility, specifically including reactor control, hardened neutron spectrum incident on the test sample, and enlarged building. The upgraded facility will retain the capability for small-size experiments of the types currently being performed in TREAT. Reactor building and crane upgrading have been completed. TU schedules call for the components of the upgraded reactor system to be finished in 1984, including upgraded TREAT fuel and control system, and expanded coverage by the hodoscope fuel-motion diagnostics system.

Dickerman, C.E.; Rose, D.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Enabling the Use of Hydrogen as a Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... While the burning of fossil fuels produces carbon ... powerful, efficient, and durable fuel-cell designs ... consensus standards that support model building ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

138

Wood Burning Combined Cycle Power Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined cycle power plant utilizing wood waste products as a fuel has been designed. This plant will yield a 50% efficiency improvement compared to conventional wood-fueled steam power plants. The power plant features an externally-fired gas turbine combined cycle system that obtains its heat input from a high temperature, high pressure ceramic air heater burning wood waste products as a fuel. This paper presents the results of the design study including the cycle evaluation and a description of the major components of the power plant. The cycle configuration is based on maximum fuel efficiency with minimum capital equipment risk. The cycle discussion includes design point performance of the power plant. The design represents a significant step forward in wood-fueled power plants.

Culley, J. W.; Bourgeois, H. S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Sun tanning/burning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sun tanning/burning Sun tanning/burning Name: Richardo Cossyleon Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why doesn't the sun affect or burn people with dark pigment in their skin? Replies: Good question! The pigment, melanin, is more toward the surface of the upper skin layer and absorbs ultraviolet rays from the Sun or artificial sources. This absorption protects the lower layers from damage and inflammation (burning). A very dark skinned person may have over a 1000X the protection from UV compared to a fair skinned person. Fair skinned people should use sun-block lotions especially early in the warm season AND keep exposure to the sun, particularly at midday, to less than 30 min. Even if a person gets a good tan, the sun's UV will age the skin over time. It will get wrinkled and develop age lines, etc. after many years of exposure. Moderation is the key!

140

Open Burning Permit Events Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open Burning Permit Events Management Form Revision Date: 09/29/2010 OpenBurningPermit.docx A Use being burned: (check all that apply) [ ] Small logs (less than 16 in. long) [ ] Finished Lumber________________________________ As the individual responsible for this event, I have read the attached Regulations for Open Burning. The sponsoring

Manning, Sturt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NETL: Research Capabilities and Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities and Facilities Research Capabilities and Facilities Onsite Research Research Capabilities and Facilities Lab Worker As the lead field center for the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's research and development program, NETL has established a strong onsite research program conducted by Federal scientists and engineers. Onsite R&D – managed by NETL's Office of Research and Development – makes important contributions to NETL's mission of implementing a research, development, and demonstration program to resolve the environmental, supply, and reliability constraints of producing and using fossil resources. With its expert research staff and state-of-the-art facilities, NETL has extensive experience in working with the technical issues related to fossil resources. Onsite researchers also participate with NETL's industrial partners to solve problems that become barriers to commercialization of power systems, fuels, and environmental and waste management. Onsite research capabilities are strengthened by collaborations with well-known research universities.

142

Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavy-water-moderated, light-water-moderated and liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors fueled with natural or low-enriched uranium and containing thorium mixed with the uranium or in separate target channels. U-232 decays with a 69-year half-life through 1.9-year half-life Th-228 to Tl-208, which emits a 2.6 MeV gamma ray upon decay. We find that pressurized light-water-reactors fueled with LEU-thorium fuel at high burnup (70 MWd/kg) produce U-233 with U-232 contamination levels of about 0.4 percent. At this contamination level, a 5 kg sphere of U-233 would produce a gammaray dose rate of 13 and 38 rem/hr at 1 meter one and ten years after chemical purification respectively. The associated plutonium contains 7.5 percent of the undesirable heat-generating 88-year half-life isotope Pu-238. However, just as it is possible to produce weapon-grade plutonium in low-burnup fuel, it is also practical to use heavy-water reactors to produce U-233 containing only a few ppm of U-232 if the thorium is segregated in “target ” channels and discharged a few times more frequently than the natural-uranium “driver ” fuel. The dose rate from a 5-kg solid sphere of U-233 containing 5 ppm U-232 could be reduced by a further factor of 30, to about 2 mrem/hr, with a close-fitting lead sphere weighing about 100 kg. Thus the proliferation resistance of thorium fuel cycles depends very much upon how they are implemented. The original version of this manuscript was received by Science & Global Security on

Jungmin Kang A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Turbulent burning rates of methane and methane-hydrogen mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methane and methane-hydrogen (10%, 20% and 50% hydrogen by volume) mixtures have been ignited in a fan stirred bomb in turbulence and filmed using high speed cine schlieren imaging. Measurements were performed at 0.1 MPa (absolute) and 360 K. A turbulent burning velocity was determined for a range of turbulence velocities and equivalence ratios. Experimental laminar burning velocities and Markstein numbers were also derived. For all fuels the turbulent burning velocity increased with turbulence velocity. The addition of hydrogen generally resulted in increased turbulent and laminar burning velocity and decreased Markstein number. Those flames that were less sensitive to stretch (lower Markstein number) burned faster under turbulent conditions, especially as the turbulence levels were increased, compared to stretch-sensitive (high Markstein number) flames. (author)

Fairweather, M. [School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Ormsby, M.P.; Sheppard, C.G.W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Woolley, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Transuranic Burning Issues Related to a Second Geologic Repository  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report defines issues that need to be addressed by a development program recently initiated to establish the viability of a transuranic burning concept application that would achieve a substantial delay to the need date for a second geologic repository. The visualized transuranic burning concept application is one in which spent fuel created after a date in the 2010 time frame or later would be processed and the separated plutonium used to start up liquid metal reactors (LMRs).

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

5, 27912831, 2005 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 2791­2831, 2005 Biomass burning emissions P. Guyon et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction measurements of trace gas and aerosol particle emissions from biomass burning in Amazonia P. Guyon1 , G. Frank1. 2791 #12;ACPD 5, 2791­2831, 2005 Biomass burning emissions P. Guyon et al. Title Page Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

146

Smoke Management for Prescribed Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smoke Management for Prescribed Burning E-1008 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Division of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources Oklahoma State University Smoke Management for Prescribed Burning Extension #12;#12;Smoke Management for Prescribed Burning John R. Weir Research Associate Natural Resource

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

147

Burning Plasma Developments Presented to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Developments Dale Meade Presented to VLT Program Advisory Committee UCLA December 4 and Burning Plasma Issues · NSO PAC Activities First Meeting July 20-21, 2001 at GA Action Items and Status Second Meeting January 17-18, 2001 at MIT Agenda items · FuSAC Recommendation on a burning plasma

148

7, 1733917366, 2007 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA wet season experiment C. H. Mari a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tracing biomass burning plumes from. Mari (marc@aero.obs-mip.fr) 17339 #12;ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

149

NREL: Biomass Research - Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities Research into producing microalgal biofuels for transportation has been revitalized at NREL. Because algae have the potential to produce the feedstock for a number of transportation fuels-biodiesel, "green" diesel and gasoline, and jet fuel-NREL has developed strong capabilities in producing biofuels from microalgae. Through standard procedures for microalgal biofuels analysis, NREL helps scientists and researchers understand more about the chemical composition of algae. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This video is a narrated animation that explains the microalgae-to-biofuels conversion process. NREL's capabilities in microalgal biofuels R&D include: Why is algal research important? Algae have the potential to produce the feedstock for transportation fuels.

150

An Interactive Simulation Framework for Burning Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a simulation framework to integrate several aspects of the combustion and burning process in a unified and modular manner. A simple three gas flame model is used to simulate a combustion process, while air motion is simulated as a single moving fluid. Solid objects inside the simulation domain can catch fire and start burning. Heat information is transferred from the fluid simulator to a solid simulator, while the solid simulator injects fuel into the fluid simulation. We also present a simple yet effective method for modeling of object decomposition under combustion using level set methods. The interaction between modules is presented as well as a discussion of fluid-solid coupling. All simulation modules run together at interactive rates, enabling the user to tweak the simulation parameters and setup for desired behavior 1. 1

Zeki Melek; John Keyser

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

Grimble, R.E.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

Grimble, Ralph E. (Finleyville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Dual Fuel Conversion System for Diesel Engines: Inventions and Innovation Project Fact Sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project fact sheet written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new dual fuel conversion system allows diesel fuel switching with clean burning natural gas.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

154

NSTec Overview and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect

This presentation describes the history of the Nevada National Security Site (Nevada Test Site) Contract as well as current capabilities.

Meidinger, A.

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Capabilities for information flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a capability-based mechanism for permissive yet secure enforcement of information-flow policies. Language capabilities have been studied widely, and several popular implementations, such as Caja and Joe-E, are available. By making ... Keywords: capabilities, information flow control

Arnar Birgisson; Alejandro Russo; Andrei Sabelfeld

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Nuclear fuel cycles for mid-century development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparative analysis of nuclear fuel cycles was carried out. Fuel cycles reviewed include: once-through fuel cycles in LWRs, PHWRs, HTGRs, and fast gas cooled breed and burn reactors; single-pass recycle schemes: plutonium ...

Parent, Etienne, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Effect of inactive impurities on the burning of ICF targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of thermonuclear burning of the spherical deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets in the presence of low-Z impurities (such as lithium, carbon, or beryllium) with arbitrary concentrations is investigated. The effect of impurities produced due to the mixing of the thermonuclear fuel with the material of the structural elements of the target during its compression on the process of target burning is studied, and the possibility of using solid noncryogenic thermonuclear fuels in ICF targets is analyzed. Analytical dependences of the ignition energy and target thermonuclear gain on the impurity concentration are obtained. The models are constructed for homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas for the case in which the burning is initiated in the central heated region of the target and then propagates into the surrounding relatively cold fuel. Two possible configurations of an inhomogeneous plasma, namely, an isobaric configuration formed in the case of spark ignition of the target and an isochoric configuration formed in the case of fast ignition, are considered. The results of numerical simulations of the burning of the DT plasma of ICF targets in a wide range of impurity concentrations are presented. The simulations were performed using the TEPA one-dimensional code, in which the thermonuclear burning kinetics is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the strongest negative effect related to the presence of impurities is an increase in the energy of target ignition. It is substantiated that the most promising solid noncryogenic fuel is DT hydride of beryllium (BeDT). The requirements to the plasma parameters at which BeDT can be used as a fuel in noncryogenic ICF targets are determined. Variants of using noncryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel are proposed.

Gus'kov, S. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Engineering Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

On burning regimes and long duration X-ray bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrogen and helium accreted onto a neutron star undergo thermonuclear burning. Explosive burning is observed as a type I X-ray burst. We describe the different burning regimes and focus on some of the current inconsistencies between theory and observations. Of special interest are the rare kinds of X-ray bursts such as carbon-fueled superbursts and helium-fueled intermediately long X-ray bursts. These bursts are thought to originate deeper in the neutron star envelope, such that they are probes of the thermal properties of the crust. We investigate the possibility of observing superbursts with the wide-field instruments INTEGRAL-ISGRI and Swift-BAT. We find that only the brightest bursts are detectable.

L. Keek; J. J. M. in 't Zand

2008-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

159

NREL: Energy Storage - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities Photo of NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. Welcome to our Energy Storage Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Much of our testing is conducted at this state-of-the-art laboratory, where researchers use cutting-edge modeling and analysis tools to focus on thermal management systems-from the cell level to the battery pack or ultracapacitor stack-for electric, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles (EVs, HEVs, and FCVs). In 2010, we received $2 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to enhance and upgrade the NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility. The Energy Storage Laboratory houses two unique calorimeters, along with

160

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SELECTIVE NOx RECIRCULATION FOR STATIONARY LEAN-BURN NATURAL GAS ENGINES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research program conducted at the West Virginia University Engine and Emissions Research Laboratory (EERL) is working towards the verification and optimization of an approach to remove nitric oxides from the exhaust gas of lean burn natural gas engines. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under contract number: DE-FC26-02NT41608. Selective NOx Recirculation (SNR) involves three main steps. First, NOx is adsorbed from the exhaust stream, followed by periodic desorption from the aftertreatment medium. Finally the desorbed NOx is passed back into the intake air stream and fed into the engine, where a percentage of the NOx is decomposed. This reporting period focuses on the NOx decomposition capability in the combustion process. Although researchers have demonstrated NOx reduction with SNR in other contexts, the proposed program is needed to further understand the process as it applies to lean burn natural gas engines. SNR is in support of the Department of Energy goal of enabling future use of environmentally acceptable reciprocating natural gas engines through NOx reduction under 0.1 g/bhp-hr. The study of decomposition of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) during combustion in the cylinder was conducted on a 1993 Cummins L10G 240 hp lean burn natural gas engine. The engine was operated at different air/fuel ratios, and at a speed of 800 rpm to mimic a larger bore engine. A full scale dilution tunnel and analyzers capable of measuring NOx, CO{sub 2}, CO, HC concentrations were used to characterize the exhaust gas. Commercially available nitric oxide (NO) was used to mimic the NOx stream from the desorption process through a mass flow controller and an injection nozzle. The same quantity of NOx was injected into the intake and exhaust line of the engine for 20 seconds at various steady state engine operating points. NOx decomposition rates were obtained by averaging the peak values at each set point minus the baseline and finding the ratio between the injected NO amounts. It was observed that the air/fuel ratio, injected NO quantity and engine operating points affected the NOx decomposition rates of the natural gas engine. A highest NOx decomposition rate of 27% was measured from this engine. A separate exploratory tests conducted with a gasoline engine with a low air/fuel ratio yielded results that suggested, that high NOx decomposition rates may be possible if a normally lean burn engine were operated at conditions closer to stoichiometric, with high exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) for a brief period of time during the NOx decomposition phase and with a wider range of air/fuel ratios. Chemical kinetic model predictions using CHEMKIN were performed to relate the experimental data with the established rate and equilibrium models. NOx decomposition rates from 35% to 42% were estimated using the CHEMKIN software. This provided insight on how to maximize NOx decomposition rates for a large bore engine. In the future, the modeling will be used to examine the effect of higher NO{sub 2}/NO ratios that are associated with lower speed and larger bore lean burn operation.

Nigel Clark; Gregory Thompson; Richard Atkinson; Chamila Tissera; Matt Swartz; Emre Tatli; Ramprabhu Vellaisamy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Capabilities Biochemical Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are working to improve the efficiency and economics of the biochemical conversion process by focusing on the most challenging steps in the process. Biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels involves three basic steps: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock through: Pretreatment Conditioning and enzymatic hydrolysis Enzyme development. Fermenting these biomass-derived feedstocks using: Microorganisms for fermentation. Processing the fermentation product to produce fuel-grade ethanol and other fuels, chemicals, heat, and electricity by: Integrating the bioprocess. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This video is a narrated animation that explains the biochemical conversion

163

NREL: Geothermal Technologies - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Geothermal Technologies Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Capabilities The...

164

Instruments/Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities FEI Titan Extreme Schottky-field emission gun (X-FEG) CEOS dodecapole probe (STEM) aberration corrector GIF Quantum with dual EELS and fast spectrum imaging...

165

PNNL: ASGC - Research Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities Platform for Regional Integrated Modeling and Analysis (PRIMA) The PRIMA Initiative is developing a modeling framework to address regional human-environmental...

166

PNNL: Capability Replacement Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

history. But it is much more than bricks, mortar, and scientific instrumentation. These facilities are essential to retaining capabilities and expertise developed and nurtured...

167

GIS Capability.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GIS. ORNL's Capabilities Facilities and infrastructure management tools for space, maintenance, security, and use management. Route planning and analysis tools for...

168

Dynamic Optimization of Lean Burn Engine Aftertreatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The competition to deliver fuel e#cient and environmentally friendly vehicles is driving the 1 2 Submitted to Journal of Dynamics Systems, Measurement, & Control automotive industry to consider ever more complex powertrain systems. Adequate performance of these new highly interactive systems can no longer be obtained through traditional approaches, which are intensive in hardware use and #nal control software calibration. This paper explores the use of Dynamic Programming to make model-based design decisions for a lean burn, direct injection spark ignition engine, in combination with a three way catalyst and an additional threeway catalyst, often referred to as a lean NOx trap. The primary contribution is the development ofavery rapid method to evaluate the tradeo#s in fuel economy and emissions for this novel powertrain system, as a function of design parameters and controller structure, over a standard emission test cycle. 1 Introduction Designing a powertrain system to m...

Jun-Mo Kang; Ilya Kolmanovsky; J. W. Grizzle

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

57USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-158. 1995. Abstract: Despite a quarter of a century of prescribed burning by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of prescribed burning by the National Park Service (NPS) in California, there is reason to believe that the fuels situation is getting worse rather than better. The area burned in the past 10 years has declined by 42 percent compared to the previous 10 years. The total area burned per year from wildfire

Standiford, Richard B.

170

Fuel processor for fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Springer, Thomas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Huff, James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Bending Burning Matches and Crumpling Burning Paper Texas A&M University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bending Burning Matches and Crumpling Burning Paper Zeki Melek Texas A&M University Department burning. Specifically, we can simulate the bending of burning matches, and the folding of burning paper interactively. 1 Introduction We present a simple method to increase the realism of the simu- lation of burning

Keyser, John

172

BLM Burns District Office | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burns District Office Jump to: navigation, search Name BLM Burns District Office Place Hines, Oregon References BLM Burns District Office1 This article is a stub. You can help...

173

INHIBITION EFFECTS ON EXTINCTION OF POLYMER BURNING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON EXTINCTION OF POLYMER BURNING* W.J. Pitz R.F. SawyerQuantitative determinations of burning rates, extinctionlayer at the surface of a burning polymer. The char l ayer

Pitz, W.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Federal Energy Capabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Energy Capabilities Federal Energy Capabilities Federal Energy Capabilities MCKINSTRY'S CYCLE OF SERVICES PROGRAM SERVICES McKinstry is dedicated to excellence in design, construction, and facilities operation. We strive to develop innovative, cost effective facility solutions for you. Below are the services we can deliver under our energy services program: * Design-Build MEDP contracting * Energy savings performance contracting * Smart Building System integration * Demand response * Smart metering to Smart Grid solutions * Advanced metering services * Renewable energy systems * Cogeneration/combined heat power * Creative tax credit and green tags/white tags * ESCO preventative maintenance APPROACH * No premium for the energy services delivery * Open book pricing and guaranteed

175

Instruments/Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

characterization Li-ion battery research and in-situ testing Fuel cell materials research Thermoelectric materials research Contact: Karren More, morelk1@ornl.gov (865) 574-7788...

176

Electrochemical CO2 Capture and Instant Conversion into Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, burning fossil fuels produces CO2, emission of which to atmosphere causes global warming and climate change. A near-term realistic solution to ...

177

Real-Time Fuel Gas Composition Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal  

... is that the composition of the gas from these sources varies widely. Fuel burns differently with differing ratios of methane, propane, and other combustible gases.

178

NREL: About NREL - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Photo of a large, modern lab building. The Energy Systems Integration Facility, a U.S. Department of Energy user facility, is designed to support grid integration of...

179

The Cooperative Engagement Capability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

picture as well as the ability to engage targets that may not be seen locally, a new level of capability may be attained. This ability is precisely what the Cooperative Engagement Capability (CEC) provides for a network of combatants. Recent tests demonstrated that from older, short-range systems such as NATO Sea Sparrow through the latest Aegis baselines, CEC can provide greater defensive capabilities and even provide new types of capabilities to a battle force. However, CEC does not obviate the need for advances in sensors, fire control, and interceptors. Rather, CEC allows the INTRODUCTION Operation in the littoral theater is a principal Navy 1990s scenario with complexities never considered in the Cold War era. For theater air defense, the complexities include the natural environment and its effects on sensor range. For example, desensitization by clutter from propagation ducting and rough terrain, as well as blockage by coastal mountains and clif

Apl

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Instruments/Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities: Hitachi NB-5000 FEG scanning electron microscope with STEM detector High-milling-rate Ga ion column W or C deposition Hitachi nanomanipulator for specimen lift-out...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mound Laboratory: Analytical Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Laboratory Analytical Capability report is intended to fulfill a customer need for basic information concerning Mound Laboratory's analytical instrumentation and techniques.

Hendrickson, E. L.

1955-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

NREL: Biomass Research - Thermochemical Conversion Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conversion Capabilities Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are developing gasification and pyrolysis processes for the cost-effective thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. Gasification-heating biomass with about one-third of the oxygen necessary for complete combustion-produces a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis-heating biomass in the absence of oxygen-produces a liquid bio-oil. Both syngas and bio-oil can be used directly or can be converted to clean fuels and other valuable chemicals. Areas of emphasis in NREL's thermochemical conversion R&D are: Gasification and fuel synthesis R&D Pyrolysis R&D Thermochemical process integration. Gasification and Fuel Synthesis R&D Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video.

183

Assessment of Possible Cycle Lengths for Fully-Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel-Based Light Water Reactor Concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel developed for High Temperature reactors is known for its extraordinary fission product retention capabilities [1]. Recently, the possibility of extending the use of TRISO particle fuel to Light Water Reactor (LWR) technology, and perhaps other reactor concepts, has received significant attention [2]. The Deep Burn project [3] currently focuses on once-through burning of transuranic fissile and fissionable isotopes (TRU) in LWRs. The fuel form for this purpose is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the TRISO fuel particle design from high temperature reactor technology, but uses SiC as a matrix material rather than graphite. In addition, FCM fuel may also use a cladding made of a variety of possible material, again including SiC as an admissible choice. The FCM fuel used in the Deep Burn (DB) project showed promising results in terms of fission product retention at high burnup values and during high-temperature transients. In the case of DB applications, the fuel loading within a TRISO particle is constituted entirely of fissile or fissionable isotopes. Consequently, the fuel was shown to be capable of achieving reasonable burnup levels and cycle lengths, especially in the case of mixed cores (with coexisting DB and regular LWR UO2 fuels). In contrast, as shown below, the use of UO2-only FCM fuel in a LWR results in considerably shorter cycle length when compared to current-generation ordinary LWR designs. Indeed, the constraint of limited space availability for heavy metal loading within the TRISO particles of FCM fuel and the constraint of low (i.e., below 20 w/0) 235U enrichment combine to result in shorter cycle lengths compared to ordinary LWRs if typical LWR power densities are also assumed and if typical TRISO particle dimensions and UO2 kernels are specified. The primary focus of this summary is on using TRISO particles with up to 20 w/0 enriched uranium kernels loaded in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies. In addition to consideration of this 'naive' use of TRISO fuel in LWRs, several refined options are briefly examined and others are identified for further consideration including the use of advanced, high density fuel forms and larger kernel diameters and TRISO packing fractions. The combination of 800 {micro}m diameter kernels of 20% enriched UN and 50% TRISO packing fraction yielded reactivity sufficient to achieve comparable burnup to present-day PWR fuel.

R. Sonat Sen; Michael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

EVermont Renewable Hydrogen Production and Transportation Fueling System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A great deal of research funding is being devoted to the use of hydrogen for transportation fuel, particularly in the development of fuel cell vehicles. When this research bears fruit in the form of consumer-ready vehicles, will the fueling infrastructure be ready? Will the required fueling systems work in cold climates as well as they do in warm areas? Will we be sure that production of hydrogen as the energy carrier of choice for our transit system is the most energy efficient and environmentally friendly option? Will consumers understand this fuel and how to handle it? Those are questions addressed by the EVermont Wind to Wheels Hydrogen Project: Sustainable Transportation. The hydrogen fueling infrastructure consists of three primary subcomponents: a hydrogen generator (electrolyzer), a compression and storage system, and a dispenser. The generated fuel is then used to provide transportation as a motor fuel. EVermont Inc., started in 1993 by then governor Howard Dean, is a public-private partnership of entities interested in documenting and advancing the performance of advanced technology vehicles that are sustainable and less burdensome on the environment, especially in areas of cold climates, hilly terrain and with rural settlement patterns. EVermont has developed a demonstration wind powered hydrogen fuel producing filling system that uses electrolysis, compression to 5000 psi and a hydrogen burning vehicle that functions reliably in cold climates. And that fuel is then used to meet transportation needs in a hybrid electric vehicle whose internal combustion engine has been converted to operate on hydrogen Sponsored by the DOE EERE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies (HFC&IT) Program, the purpose of the project is to test the viability of sustainably produced hydrogen for use as a transportation fuel in a cold climate with hilly terrain and rural settlement patterns. Specifically, the project addresses the challenge of building a renewable transportation energy capable system. The prime energy for this project comes from an agreement with a wind turbine operator.

Garabedian, Harold T.

2008-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities NREL's solar radiation research staff provides expertise in renewable energy measurement and instrumentation. Major capabilities include solar resource measurement,...

186

Burning Plasma Support Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning Plasma Support Research Program on Alcator C-Mod Presented by: Stephen M. Wolfe Alcator C-Mod Five Year Proposal Review MIT Plasma Science & Fusion Center Cambridge, MA May...

187

EMSL: Capabilities: Microscopy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microscopy Microscopy Additional Information Meet the Microscopy Experts Related EMSL User Projects Microscopy Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Watch the Microscopy capability video on EMSL's YouTube channel and read the transcript. Microscopy brochure Quiet Wing brochure EMSL hosts a variety of sophisticated microscopy instruments, including electron microscopes, optical microscopes, scanning probe microscopes, and computer-controlled microscopes for automated particle analysis. These tools are used to image a range of sample types with nanoscale-and even atomic-resolution with applications to surface, environmental, biogeochemical, atmospheric, and biological science. Each state-of-the-art instrument and customized capability is equipped with features for specific

188

Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFD) For Fuel Assembly Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron sensors capable of real-time measurement of thermal flux, fast flux, and temperature in a single miniaturized probe are needed in irradiation tests required to demonstrate the performance of candidate new fuels, and cladding materials. In-core ceramic-based miniature neutron detectors or “Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors” (MPFDs) have been studied at Kansas State University (KSU). The first MPFD prototypes were tested in various neutron fields at the KSU TRIGA research reactor with successful results. Currently, a United States Department of Energy-sponsored joint KSU/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) effort is underway to develop a high-temperature, high-pressure version of the MPFD using radiation-resistant, high temperature materials, which would be capable of withstanding irradiation test conditions in high performance material and test reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, this more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, existing and advanced reactor designs, high performance MTRs, and transient test reactors has the potential to lead to higher accuracy and resolution data from irradiation testing, more detailed core flux measurements and enhanced fuel assembly processing. Prior evaluations by KSU indicate that these sensors could also be used to monitor burn-up of nuclear fuel. If integrated into nuclear fuel assemblies, MPFDs offer several advantages to current spent fuel management systems.

Troy Unruh; Michael Reichenberger; Phillip Ugorowski

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Category:Burns, OR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burns, OR Burns, OR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Burns, OR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVHospital Burns OR Pa... 74 KB SVLargeHotel Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeHotel Burns OR ... 74 KB SVLargeOffice Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeOffice Burns OR... 69 KB SVMediumOffice Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMediumOffice Burns O... 71 KB SVMidriseApartment Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMidriseApartment Bur... 72 KB SVOutPatient Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVOutPatient Burns OR ... 69 KB SVPrimarySchool Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png

190

Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote Heterogeneity Patch Burning: Integrating Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Oklahoma State University June 2013 #12;#12;Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote Heterogeneity Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

191

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health Kees Kolff, MD, MPH April 21, 2012 #12;OUR #12;PT COGENERATION LLC A wood-burning cogeneration power plant - Generates electricity (for sale off paper making process, black and white liquor , sludge #12;SLASH BURNING Slash burned in 2008: Jefferson

192

FROM YEARNING TO BURNING Marshall Rosenbluth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FROM YEARNING TO BURNING Marshall Rosenbluth Possible broad-brush guidelines for "burning plasma" thinking December 6, 2000 The "yearn to burn" is well motivated. Most of us came into the fusion program for many years, the point at which science and the fusion energy goal converge is in a burning plasma

193

Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote Heterogeneity Patch Burning: Integrating Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service Oklahoma State University September 2007 #12;#12;Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote Heterogeneity Patch Burning: Integrating Fire and Grazing to Promote

Debinski, Diane M.

194

MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES · Static and cyclic testing (ASTM and non-standard) · Impact drop testing · Slow-cycle fatigue testing · High temperature testing to 2500°F · ASTM/ Boeing/ SACMA standard testing · Ability to design and fabricate non-standard test fixtures and perform non-standard tests

195

Dynamic stability, blowoff, and flame characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxy-fuel combustion is a promising technology to implement carbon capture and sequestration for energy conversion to electricity in power plants that burn fossil fuels. In oxy-fuel combustion, air separation is used to ...

Shroll, Andrew Philip

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

SUBCHAPTER D. OUTDOOR BURNING Sec. 352.081. REGULATION OF OUTDOOR BURNING. (a) In this  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SUBCHAPTER D. OUTDOOR BURNING Sec. 352.081. REGULATION OF OUTDOOR BURNING. (a) In this section measurement that takes into consideration the burning index, spread component, or ignition component court of a county by order may prohibit or restrict outdoor burning in general or outdoor burning

197

FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT TANK TO WHEELS EMISSIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

important. Propane and CNG are NOT "cleaner burning". RSD is a very good tool for emissions inventory. #12 pollutant per kg of fuel from RSD -quantifiable uncertainty Fuel sales from tax department -quite precise

198

Fuel effects in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homogenous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) combustion is a new method of burning fuel in internal combustion (IC) engines. In an HCCI engine, the fuel and air are premixed prior to combustion, like in a spark-ignition ...

Angelos, John P. (John Phillip)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

TMV Technology Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TMV Technology Capabilities TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor Brake monitoring systems are proactive maintenance systems that provide instant identification of wheel specific, out-of-adjustment, non-functioning or dragging brake issues. AC Shore Power Since the TMV is equipped with DC power in-vehicle, shore power is needed to 1) charge the batteries that supply power to those outlets and 2) be used when running off battery power is not necessary FMCSA Laptop The laptop contains key software which helps enforcement officials perform inspections, look up information, etc. This computer also contains software for the USDOT # reader. Electronic On-Board Recorder EOBRs remove the need for paper logs by automatically recording duty status and location. EOBRs help

200

Advanced Simulation Capability for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simulation Capability for Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of perfor- mance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activi- ties throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing pro- grams as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science, Fossil Energy, and Nuclear Energy. Challenge Current groundwater and soil remediation challenges that will continue to be addressed in the next decade include

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Federal Technical Capability Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Technical Capability Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) Home About the FTCP FTCP Topics FTCP Meetings Performance Indicator Reports Guiding Documents Qualifying Official Training Approaches FTCP Plans, Reports & Issue Papers Workforce Analysis & Staffing Site Specific Information Nuclear Executive Leadership Training General Information 2004-1 FTCP Commitments FTCP Correspondence Site Map Contact Us Quick Reference Departmental Representative to the DNFSB Facility Representative Safety System Oversight DOE Integrated Safety Management National Training Center DOE Directives Program DOE Technical Standards Program DOE Phone Book HSS Logo FTCP FTCP Topics DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2006 - 2011) New Directions in Learning: Building a DOE University System May 4, 2007, the Deputy Secretary memorandum designating Karen Boardman the FTCP Chairperson.

202

Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project is a Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored real-time emergency response service available for use by both federal and state agencies in case of a potential or actual atmospheric release of nuclear material. The project, initiated in 1972, is currently evolving from the research and development phase to full operation. Plans are underway to expand the existing capability to continuous operation by 1984 and to establish a National ARAC Center (NARAC) by 1988. This report describes the ARAC system, its utilization during the past two years, and plans for its expansion during the next five to six years. An integral part of this expansion is due to a very important and crucial effort sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency to extend the ARAC service to approximately 45 Department of Defense (DOD) sites throughout the continental US over the next three years.

Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.; Sullivan, T.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Employing the EPRI Vista Program for Test Burn Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The drive to use fuel switching as a means to meet more stringent SO2 and NOX emissions requirements has in many cases led to both a reduction in power station efficiency and a poorer net plant heat rate (NPHR) at the power station, as well as significant reductions in operating margins and increases in the risk of unit derates. One excellent method to manage or mitigate this risk is a comprehensive test burn for fuels under consideration. The objectives of this technical report are to demonstrate how th...

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

204

Energy Conversion Devices Fuel Cell Electrocatalyst Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell(tm) Texaco Ovonic Fuel Cell Company, LLC non-precious metal catalysts regenerative braking energy absorption capability wide temperature range instant...

205

Hydrogen Burning on Magnetar Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compute the rate of diffusive nuclear burning for hydrogen on the surface of a "magnetar" (Soft Gamma-Ray Repeater or Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar). We find that hydrogen at the photosphere will be burned on an extremely rapid timescale of hours to years, depending on composition of the underlying material. Improving on our previous studies, we explore the effect of a maximally thick "inert" helium layer, previously thought to slow down the burning rate. Since hydrogen diffuses faster in helium than through heavier elements, we find this helium buffer actually increases the burning rate for magnetars. We compute simple analytic scalings of the burning rate with temperature and magnetic field for a range of core temperature. We conclude that magnetar photospheres are very unlikely to contain hydrogen. This motivates theoretical work on heavy element atmospheres that are needed to measure effective temperature from the observed thermal emission and constrains models of AXPs that rely on magnetar cooling through thick light element envelopes.

P. Chang; P. Arras; L. Bildsten

2004-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

206

Fire safety for your wood-burning appliance: tips for proper installation, operation, and maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dramatic increase in house fires caused by wood-burning appliances has accompanied the rediscovery of wood as an alternative heating fuel. The National Bureau of Standards attributed the majority of these fires to conditions related to the installation, operation or maintenance of the appliances rather than malfunctions or construction defects. This publication presents guidelines for the proper installation, use, and maintenance of wood-burning appliances in the home. (DMC)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Microsoft Word - Deep-Burn awardee team members _2_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DEEP-BURN AWARDEES RECIPIENTS RECIPIENT TEAM MEMBERS Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capability R&D for $1 million University of Chicago Argonne Argonne National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Lab University of Michigan Transuranic Management Capabilities R&D for $6.3 million Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Idaho National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley University of Wisconsin University of Tennessee University of Nevada Las Vegas North Carolina State University Georgia Institute of Technology Pennsylvania State University Idaho State University Texas A&M University Logos Technologies

208

Biomass Burning Observation Project Specifically,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning Observation Project Burning Observation Project Specifically, the aircraft will obtain measurements of the microphysical, chemical, hygroscopic, and optical properties of aerosols. Data captured during BBOP will help scientists better understand how aerosols combine and change at a variety of distances and burn times. Locations Pasco, Washington. From July through September, the G-1 will be based out of its home base in Washington. From this location, it can intercept and measure smoke plumes from naturally occurring uncontrolled fires across Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Northern California, and Western Montana. Smoke plumes aged 0-5 hours are the primary targets for this phase of the campaign. Memphis, Tennessee. In October, the plane moves to Tennessee to sample prescribed

209

FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM C C A A L L E E N N D D A A R R Y Y E E A A R R S S 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 - - 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 B B I I E E N N N N I I A A L L R R E E P P O O R R T T UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2013 INTENTIONALLY BLANK FTCP 2011-2012 Biennial Report ~ 2 ~ Table of Contents Section Title Page 1.0 Purpose and Scope .......................................................................................... 3 2.0 2011/2012 Accomplishments.......................................................................... 3

210

Improved energy sealing capability  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In response to the need for tapping national energy resources, an improved high temperature sealing material has been developed through the sponsorship of the Department of Energy. Parker Seal was selected as one of the technology transferees from L'Garde Inc. and has optimized this transferred technology for further improved performance capabilities and acceptable plant processing. This paper summarizes Parker Seal's testing and evaluation efforts on L'Garde's Y267 transferred technology for a new geothermal and stream service material. This new product, Parker's E962-85 is described in this paper.

Barsoumian, Jerry L.

1982-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

211

ORISE Science Education Programs: Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Science Education Programs Capabilities The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) connects the best and most diverse students and faculty members to...

212

Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Open Burning (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Program Info Start Date 2003 State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department The New Mexico Environment Department's Air Quality Bureau regulates the open burning rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board. These rules are established to protect public health and welfare by establishing controls on pollution produced by open burning. Open burning is allowed for recreational and ceremonial purposes, for barbecuing, for heating purposes in fireplaces, for the noncommercial cooking of food for human consumption and for warming by small wood fires at construction

214

FLAMES IN TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA: DEFLAGRATION-DETONATION TRANSITION IN THE OXYGEN-BURNING FLAME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flame in a Type Ia supernova is a conglomerate structure that, depending on density, may involve separate regions of carbon, oxygen, and silicon burning, all propagating in a self-similar, subsonic front. The separation between these three burning regions increases as the density declines until eventually, below about 2 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}, only carbon burning remains active, the other two burning phases having 'frozen out' on stellar scales. Between 2 and 3 x 10{sup 7} g cm{sup -3}, however, there remains an energetic oxygen-burning region that trails the carbon burning by an amount that is sensitive to the turbulence intensity. As the carbon flame makes a transition to the distributed regime (Karlovitz number {approx}> 10), the characteristic separation between the carbon- and oxygen-burning regions increases dramatically, from a fraction of a meter to many kilometers. The oxygen-rich mixture between the two flames is created at a nearly constant temperature, and turbulence helps to maintain islands of well-mixed isothermal fuel as the temperature increases. The delayed burning of these regions can be supersonic and could initiate a detonation.

Woosley, S. E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kerstein, A. R. [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Aspden, A. J., E-mail: woosley@ucolick.org, E-mail: arkerst@sandia.gov, E-mail: ajaspden@lbl.gov [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

215

CO-FIRING COAL: FEEDLOT AND LITTER BIOMASS FUELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been observed from the review that very limited experimental study has been conducted on using FB as re-burn fuel and there exists no model using FB as re-burn fuel. The objective of the current research is to develop a simplified numerical model for NOx reduction process with FB volatiles as the re-burn fuel and compare results with experimental data. In order to satisfy the objective, the proposed work has been divided into 4 tasks. (1) Modeling the combustion process involving the main fuel, ammonia mixture in the main burner. (2) Developing of a simple mixing model of main gases with reburn jet. (3) Selection of a suitable overall global mechanism of reactions for the re-burn fuels, coupling the reaction model with the mixing model and thereby developing the complete re-burn model. (4) Comparing the simulation results with the experimental results obtained from TAMU combustion facility.

Dr. Kalyan Annamalai; Dr. John Sweeten; Dr. Saqib Mukhtar; Soyuz Priyadarsan, Ph.D.; Arunvel Thangamani, ME

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal 20121120ballstatepresentation.pdf More Documents...

217

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects on cellular burning structures in lean premixedAnalyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixedthe turbulence of the burning process with the distribution

Bremer, Peer-Timo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Practical tip: Precooling topical calcineurin inhibitors tube; reduces burning sensation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inhibitors tube; reduces burning sensation Sultan Al-salkhenaizan@hotmail.com Abstract Burning sensation at theuse, does reduce the burning sensation and enable most

Al-Khenaizan, Sultan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Fuel Synthesis Catalysis Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Fuel Synthesis Catalysis Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Fuel Synthesis Catalysis Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides information about Fuel Synthesis Catalysis Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

Not Available

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Biomass Burning: A Driver for Global Change!  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning includes the burning of the world''s vegetation---forests, savannas, and agricultural lands---to clear the land and change its use. Only in the past decade have researchers realized the important contributions of biomass burning to the ...

Levine J. S.; III W. R. Cofer; Jr D. R. Cahoon; Winstead E. L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

7, 80178033, 2007 burning-tropopause  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 8017­8033, 2007 Biomass burning-tropopause mixing J. Brioude et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Mixing between a stratospheric intrusion and a biomass burning plume J. Brioude1 , O. R. Cooper1.brioude@noaa.gov) 8017 #12;ACPD 7, 8017­8033, 2007 Biomass burning-tropopause mixing J. Brioude et al. Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

223

MFE Burning Plasmas Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICCs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MFE Burning Plasmas and Innovative Confinement Concepts (ICCs) Bick Hooper LLNL Presentation power requires: · A burning plasma experiment · An advancing portfolio of ICCs · Plasma physics unified Improved Configurations Magnetic Configurations Knowledge Base Burning Plasma Phys. & Tech. Knowledge Base

224

TQ2. Global Biomass Burning What is the impact of global biomass burning on the terrestrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TQ2. Global Biomass Burning What is the impact of global biomass burning on the terrestrial and land use. MODIS active fire detections 2000-2006 for Southern California 2001-2004 mean annual burned (bottom), expressed as fraction of grid cell that burns each year. From Giglio et al. (2005), Atmos. Chem

Christian, Eric

225

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik SchoenbergA,E , Chien: The effectiveness of the Burning Index (BI) in predicting wildfire ac- tivity is assessed using 25 years of area

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

226

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik Schoenberg: The effectiveness of the Burning Index (BI) in predicting wildfire ac- tivity is assessed using 25 years of area

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

227

Mobile systems capability plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Fuel Supply Investigation for an Externally Fired Microturbine based Micro CHP System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Sudden change on earth’s climate, which is a result of an increase in CO2 in the atmosphere, is mainlycaused by burning of fossil fuels… (more)

Aga, Aboma Emiru

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Why are the retail pump prices for gasoline and diesel fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much carbon dioxide is produced by burning gasoline and diesel fuel? When was the last refinery built in the United States?

231

Approximate Dynamic Programming Solutions for Lean Burn Engine Aftertreatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The competition to deliver fuel e#cient and environmentally friendly vehicles is driving the automotive industry to consider ever more complex powertrain systems. Adequate performance of these new highly interactive systems can no longer be obtained through traditional approaches, which are intensive in hardware use and #nal control software calibration. This paper explores the use of dynamic programming to make model-based design decisions for a lean burn, direct injection spark ignition engine, in combination with a three way catalyst and lean NOx trap aftertreatment system. The primary contribution is the development ofavery rapid method to evaluate the tradeo#s in fuel economy and emissions for this novel powertrain system, as a function of design parameters and controller structure, over a standard emission test cycle. 1 Introduction Designing a powertrain system to meet drivability, fuel economy and emissions performance requirements is a complicated task. There are many tradeo...

Jun-Mo Kang; Ilya Kolmanovsky; J.W. Grizzle

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Affordable Near-term Burning-plasma Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Fusion energy is a potential energy source for the future with plentiful fuel supplies and is expected to have benign environmental impact. The issue with fusion energy has been the scientific feasibility, and recently the cost of this approach. The key technical milestone for fusion is the achievement of a self-sustained fusion fire, ignition, in the laboratory. Despite 40 years of research and the expenditure of almost $20B worldwide, a self-sustained fusion fire has not yet been produced in the laboratory. The fusion program needs a test bed, preferably more than one, where the dynamics of a burning plasma can be studied, optimized and understood so that the engineering requirements for an engineering test reactor can be determined. Engineering and physics concepts must be developed within the next decade that will lead to an Affordable Burning Plasma Experiment if fusion is going to be perceived as making progress toward a potential long-range energy source.

D.M. Meade; R.D. Wooley

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Energy Basics: Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Flexible Fuel Vehicles Photo of a gray van with 'E85 Ethanol' written on the side. Flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) are capable of operating on gasoline, E85 (85%...

234

Miniature ceramic fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zuppero, Anthony C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

235

New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal March 29, 2012 | Tags: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), Combustion, Franklin, Hopper Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 The Polk Power Station near Mulberry, Florida, is an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle gasification plant. It is capable of generating 313 megawatts of electricity - 250 megawatts of which are supplied to the electric grid. The plant's gas cleaning technology removes more than 98 percent of the sulfur in coal, converting it to a commercial product. Nitrogen oxide emissions are reduced by more than 90 percent. (Photo courtesy of DOE-NETL) Approximately half of all electricity used in the United States comes from

236

Test Burns of Torrefied Wood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass fuel is an important option for mitigating the production of carbon dioxide emissions from generating units that are designed to fire conventional fossil fuels. The key attraction of biomass fuels is that they are carbon neutralthe carbon dioxide released by combustion was fixed or removed from the atmosphere by photosynthesis, so its return does not provide a net carbon addition. Utilities in the United States and Canada are considering options both for co-firing biomass with coal and for comple...

2010-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

237

Relational Contracts and Organizational Capabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A large literature identifies unique organizational capabilities as a potent source of competitive advantage, yet our knowledge of why capabilities fail to diffuse more rapidly—particularly in situations in which competitors ...

Gibbons, Robert S.

238

LANL Analytical and Radiochemistry Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities.

Steiner, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burns, Carol J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamont, Stephen P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

239

Preliminary Design Study of Medium Sized Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input  

SciTech Connect

In this study a feasibility design study of medium sized (1000 MWt) gas cooled fast reactors which can utilize natural uranium as fuel cycle input has been conducted. Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is among six types of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants. GFR with its hard neuron spectrum is superior for closed fuel cycle, and its ability to be operated in high temperature (850 deg. C) makes various options of utilizations become possible. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input, modified CANDLE burn-up scheme[1-6] is adopted this GFR system by dividing the core into 10 parts of equal volume axially. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. As an optimization results, a design of 1000 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input is discussed. The average discharge burn-up is about 280 GWd/ton HM. Enough margin for criticality was obtained for this reactor.

Meriyanti; Su'ud, Zaki; Rijal, K. [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Zuhair; Ferhat, A. [National Nuclear Energ Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) (Indonesia); Sekimoto, H. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

240

PML Develops Graphene Fabrication Capability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PML Develops Graphene Fabrication Capability. October 3, 2011. ... That further limits the growth of the graphene, we think. ...

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Development of a closed-loop, lean-burn natural gas engine control system. Final report, February 1993-December 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project was to develop a closed-loop, lean-burn control system for medium and heavy duty, lean-burn, gaseous fueled engines. The closed-loop F/A ratio control system was designed to provide diesel engine-like performance and fuel economy, and take advantage of the emissions benefits of a gaseous fueled engine. The control system was designed to have the processing power and I/O capacity to accommodate the engine Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM`s).

Morris, D.A.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Stabilized fuel with silica support structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes a stabilized fuel which is supported by a silica support structure. The silica support structure provides a low density, high porosity vehicle for safely carrying hydrocarbon fuels. The silica support structure for hydrocarbon fuel does not produce toxic material residues on combustion which would pose environmentally sensitive disposal problems. The silica stabilized fuel composition is useful as a low temperature, continuous burning fire starter for wood or charcoal.

Poco, J.F.; Hrubesh, L.W.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Deep burn strategy for the optimized incineration of reactor waste plutonium in pebble bed high temperature gas–cooled reactors / Serfontein D.E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis advanced fuel cycles for the incineration, i.e. deep–burn, of weapons–grade plutonium, reactor–grade plutonium from pressurised light water reactors and reactor–grade plutonium +… (more)

Serfontein, Dawid Eduard.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

On Building Inexpensive Network Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many deployed approaches for blocking unwanted traffic, either once it reaches the recipient's network, or closer to its point of origin. One of these schemes is based on the notion of traffic carrying capabilities that grant access to a network and/or end host. However, leveraging capabilities results in added complexity and additional steps in the communication process: Before communication starts a remote host must be vetted and given a capability to use in the subsequent communication. In this paper, we propose a lightweight mechanism that turns the answers provided by DNS name resolution---which Internet communication broadly depends on anyway---into capabilities. While not achieving an ideal capability system, we show the mechanism can be built from commodity technology and is therefore a pragmatic way to gain some of the key benefits of capabilities without requiring new infrastructure.

Shue, Craig A [ORNL; Kalafut, Prof. Andrew [Grand Valley State University (GVSU), Michigan; Allman, Mark [International Computer Science Institute (ICSI); Taylor, Curtis R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Effects of different fuels on a turbocharged, direct injection, spark ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following pages describe the experimentation and analysis of two different fuels in GM's high compression ratio, turbocharged direct injection (TDI) engine. The focus is on a burn rate analysis for the fuels - gasoline ...

Negrete, Justin E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A Blueprint for GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Startup Fuel Fabrication Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this article is to identify the requirements and issues associated with design of GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Fuel Facility. The report was prepared in support of providing data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives was to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept was proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR was proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu was assumed to be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) was being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. It was estimated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and would take 3 to 5 years to construct.

S. Khericha

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

PRELIMINARY DATA CALL REPORT ADVANCED BURNER REACTOR START UP FUEL FABRICATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives is to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept has been proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR is proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu will be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) is being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. This report is provided in response to ‘Data Call’ for the construction of startup fuel fabrication facility. It is anticipated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and will take to 3 to 5 years to construct.

S. T. Khericha

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

In Situ Burning of Oil Spills  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... burns, the Teflon filters were weighed and sealed in Petri dishes, while the ... terrain, solar heating and surface friction creates a tur- bulent wind field ...

2001-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Performance Culture of Burning Man.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Theatre in the United States for the last twenty years has been evolving in scope by way of a cultural phenomenon known as Burning Man.… (more)

Clupper, Wendy Ann

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Vista Program Capabilities for Analysis of Biomass Co-Firing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ever-increasing focus on greenhouse gas emissions reductions is of critical importance to coal-fired power plants, as they produce a large amount of the total anthropogenic CO2 emissions. One commonly considered method of reducing the net CO2 emissions of a coal-fired power plant is by burning renewable biomass to generate heat and power. Although biomass is the oldest combustible fuel, knowledge of the effects that co-firing biomass will have on a coal-fired boiler is sometimes lacking at power plan...

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

251

HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same pressure that results from a more gradual increase. This disagrees with experiments, where

Reaugh, J E

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

252

HERMES: A Model to Describe Deformation, Burning, Explosion, and Detonation  

SciTech Connect

HERMES (High Explosive Response to MEchanical Stimulus) was developed to fill the need for a model to describe an explosive response of the type described as BVR (Burn to Violent Response) or HEVR (High Explosive Violent Response). Characteristically this response leaves a substantial amount of explosive unconsumed, the time to reaction is long, and the peak pressure developed is low. In contrast, detonations characteristically consume all explosive present, the time to reaction is short, and peak pressures are high. However, most of the previous models to describe explosive response were models for detonation. The earliest models to describe the response of explosives to mechanical stimulus in computer simulations were applied to intentional detonation (performance) of nearly ideal explosives. In this case, an ideal explosive is one with a vanishingly small reaction zone. A detonation is supersonic with respect to the undetonated explosive (reactant). The reactant cannot respond to the pressure of the detonation before the detonation front arrives, so the precise compressibility of the reactant does not matter. Further, the mesh sizes that were practical for the computer resources then available were large with respect to the reaction zone. As a result, methods then used to model detonations, known as {beta}-burn or program burn, were not intended to resolve the structure of the reaction zone. Instead, these methods spread the detonation front over a few finite-difference zones, in the same spirit that artificial viscosity is used to spread the shock front in inert materials over a few finite-difference zones. These methods are still widely used when the structure of the reaction zone and the build-up to detonation are unimportant. Later detonation models resolved the reaction zone. These models were applied both to performance, particularly as it is affected by the size of the charge, and to situations in which the stimulus was less than that needed for reliable performance, whether as a result of accident, hazard, or a fault in the detonation train. These models describe the build-up of detonation from a shock stimulus. They are generally consistent with the mesoscale picture of ignition at many small defects in the plane of the shock front and the growth of the resulting hot-spots, leading to detonation in heterogeneous explosives such as plastic-bonded explosives (PBX). The models included terms for ignition, and also for the growth of reaction as tracked by the local mass fraction of product gas, {lambda}. The growth of reaction in such models incorporates a form factor that describes the change of surface area per unit volume (specific surface area) as the reaction progresses. For unimolecular crystalline-based explosives, the form factor is consistent with the mesoscale picture of a galaxy of hot spots burning outward and eventually interacting with each other. For composite explosives and propellants, where the fuel and oxidizer are segregated, the diffusion flame at the fuel-oxidizer interface can be interpreted with a different form factor that corresponds to grains burning inward from their surfaces. The form factor influences the energy release rate, and the amount of energy released in the reaction zone. Since the 19th century, gun and cannon propellants have used perforated geometric shapes that produce an increasing surface area as the propellant burns. This helps maintain the pressure as burning continues while the projectile travels down the barrel, which thereby increases the volume of the hot gas. Interior ballistics calculations use a geometric form factor to describe the changing surface area precisely. As a result, with a suitably modified form factor, detonation models can represent burning and explosion in damaged and broken reactant. The disadvantage of such models in application to accidents is that the ignition term does not distinguish between a value of pressure that results from a shock, and the same pressure that results from a more gradual increase. This disagrees with experiments, where

Reaugh, J E

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

253

2009 Fuel Cell Market Report, November 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Interim results: development of a head-end process for recovering uranium and thorium from crushed Fort St. Vrain fuel  

SciTech Connect

Development of processes and equipment for recovering uranium and thorium from crushed Ft. St. Vrain fuel is described. Primary burning, particle classification, particle breaking, secondary burning, and aqueous processing were studied. Interim pilot-plant results show that: (1) graphite can be burned at the plant equivalent rate of 35 kgC/hr-ft$sup 2$ in the primary burner and that fines can be consumed by recycle to the primary burner; (2) separation to greater than 95 percent pure fissile and 85 percent pure fertile particles can be effected by a gas classifier; (3) gas jets are capable of breaking silicon carbide coatings at rates compatible with plant requirements; gas utilization efficiencies are sufficiently great that off-gas generated by the jets is less than 5 percent of the off-gas generated by the process equipment; (4) an artificial inert bed is not required for secondary burning and the carbon content of the bed can easily be reduced to less than 2 percent in the secondary burner; (5) corrosion rates of thorex solution on 304 L stainless steel are sufficiently low to allow the dissolver to be constructed of 304 L stainless steel; and, (6) solids--liquid separation efficiencies using a continuous solid-bowl centrifuge are sufficiently high to process the dissolver product in a pulse-column extractor. Basic data on the process materials and conditions germane to the safety analysis for the process are also given. (JGB)

Hogg, G.W.; Rindfleisch, J.A.; Palmer, W.B.; Anderson, D.L.; Vavruska, J.S.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Joint demilitarization technology test and demonstration capabilities  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a review of the two components of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Demilitarization test and demonstration capabilities. Part one is a general discussion of the NTS and the many assets it offers to the Demilitarization community; and more specifically, a discussion of the NTS Open Burn/Open Detonation (OB/OD) test facility. The NTS Joint Demilitarization Technology (JDT) OB/OD Test Chamber is located at the X Tunnel facility which as been designed and constructed to contain and characterize the effluent from demilitarization activities. X Tunnel consists of a large test chamber capable of withstanding a 3,000 pound net explosive weight detonation or up to a static pressure of well over 100 pounds per square inch. The test chamber is fully instrumented to measure and collect gas and particulate samples as well as to monitor shock phenomenology. Part two is a discussion of the NTS Tactical Demilitarization Demonstration (TaDD) program currently planned for the Area 11 Technical Facility. This project will produce equipment that can dispose of unneeded tactical military rocket motors in a safe, environmentally-friendly, and timely fashion. The initial effort is the development of a demilitarization system for the disposal of excess Shillelagh missiles at the Anniston Army Depot. The prototype for this system will be assembled at the Area 11 facility taking advantage of the inherent infrastructure and proximity to numerous existing structures. Upon completion of testing, the prototype facility will become the test bed for future tactical disposal development activities. It is expected that the research and development techniques, prototype testing and production processes, and expertise developed during the Shillelagh disposal program will be applicable to follow-on tactical missile disposal programs, but with significant cost and schedule advantages.

Williams, S.M. [Bechtel Nevada, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Byrd, E.R. [Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space (United States); Decker, M.W. [Naval Air Warfare Center, Warminster, PA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Pulverized coal fuel injector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO.sub.2 formation.

Rini, Michael J. (Hebron, CT); Towle, David P. (Windsor, CT)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cybersecurity Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model Electricity Advisory Committee...

258

AIAA 2001-0339 INTERMITTENT BURNING AND ITS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AIAA 2001-0339 INTERMITTENT BURNING AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO PLATEAU BURNING OF COMPOSITE and Astronautics, Inc. with permission. INTERMITTENT BURNING AND ITS CONTRIBUTION TO PLATEAU BURNING OF COMPOSITE; Fellow AIAA §Senior Research Engineer Abstract The plateau burning behavior of composite solid

Seitzman, Jerry M.

259

Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Inorganic ions determined by ion chromatography...Barium Pyrophosphate Cobalt Chloride Borate Calcium Silicate Copper Cyanide Bromide Cesium Tripolyphosphate Gold Iodide Carbonate Lithium lridium Sulfide Chlorate Magnesium Iron(II,III) Chlorite Rubidium Lead Chromate Sodium Mercury Dithionite Strontium Nickel Fluoride Platinum Iodate Zinc Iodide...

260

Testing of the Burns-Milwaukee's Sun Oven  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Burns-Milwaukee Sun Oven was tested at Sandia's Solar Thermal Test Facility. It was instrumented with five type K thermocouples to determine warm-up rates when empty and when a pot containing two liters of water was placed inside. It reached inside air temperatures above 160 o C (320 o F). It heated two liters of water from room temperature to 80 o C, (175 o F), in 75 minutes. Observations were also made on the cooling and reheating rates during a cloud passage. The adverse effects of wind on operation of the solar oven was also noted. ii 1 The Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) at Sandia National Laboratories evaluated a Sun Oven from Burns-Milwaukee at Sandia's Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque NM. It was designed for single family household cooking. It is targeting developing countries' alternative energy markets where conventional fuels are not available and wood is the primary fuel used for cooking. Because of the wide variety and types of solar...

Moss Solar Thermal; T. A. Moss

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Crude Glycerol as Cost-Effective Fuel for Combined Heat and Power to Replace Fossil Fuels, Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of this work can be summed into two major categories. Firstly, the fundamentals of the combustion of glycerol (in both a refined and unrefined form) were to be investigated, with emphasis of the development of a system capable of reliably and repeatedly combusting glycerol as well as an analysis of the emissions produced during glycerol combustion. Focus was placed on quantifying common emissions in comparison to more traditional fuels and this work showed that the burner developed was able to completely combust glycerol within a relatively wide range of operating conditions. Additionally, focus was placed on examining specific emissions in more detail, namely interesting NOx emissions observed in initial trials, acrolein and other volatile organic emissions, and particulate and ash emissions. This work showed that the combustion of crude glycerol could result in significantly reduced NOx emissions as a function of the high fuel bound oxygen content within the glycerol fuel. It also showed that when burned properly, the combustion of crude glycerol did not result in excessive emissions of acrolein or any other VOC compared to the combustion from more traditional fuels. Lastly however, this work has shown that in any practical application in which glycerol is being burned, it will be necessary to explore ash mitigation techniques due to the very high particulate matter concentrations produced during glycerol combustion. These emissions are comparable to unfiltered coal combustion and are directly tied to the biodiesel production method. The second focus of this work was directed to developing a commercialization strategy for the use of glycerol as a fuel replacement. This strategy has identified a 30 month plan for the scaling up of the laboratory scale burner into a pre-pilot scale system. Additionally, financing options were explored and an assessment was made of the economics of replacing a traditional fuel (namely natural gas) with crude glycerol from biodiesel production. This analysis showed that the cost of replacing natural gas with crude glycerol requires a strong function of the market price per unit of energy for the traditional fuel. However, the economics can be improved through the inclusion of a federal tax credit for the use of a renewable fuel. The conclusion of this analysis also shows that the ideal customer for energy replacement via crude glycerol is biodiesel producers who are located in remote regions, where the cost of energy is higher and the cost of crude glycerol is lowest. Lastly, the commercialization strategy analyzed competing technologies, namely traditional natural gas and electric heaters, as well as competing glycerol burners, and concludes with a discussion of the requirements for a pilot demonstration.

William L. ROberts

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) are capable of operating on gasoline, E85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline), or a mixture of both. There are almost 8 million flexible fuel vehicles on U.S. roads today, but many FFV owners don't know their vehicle is one.

263

Review of Transmutation Fuel Studies  

SciTech Connect

The technology demonstration element of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is aimed at demonstrating the closure of the fuel cycle by destroying the transuranic (TRU) elements separated from spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Multiple recycle through fast reactors is used for burning the TRU initially separated from light-water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel. For the initial technology demonstration, the preferred option to demonstrate the closed fuel cycle destruction of TRU materials is a sodium-cooled fast reactor (FR) used as burner reactor. The sodium-cooled fast reactor represents the most mature sodium reactor technology available today. This report provides a review of the current state of development of fuel systems relevant to the sodium-cooled fast reactor. This report also provides a review of research and development of TRU-metal alloy and TRU-oxide composition fuels. Experiments providing data supporting the understanding of minor actinide (MA)-bearing fuel systems are summarized and referenced.

Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) oversees the efforts to ensure nuclear energy remains a viable option for the United States. A significant portion of these efforts are related to post-irradiation examinations (PIE) of highly activated fuel and materials that are subject to the extreme environment inside a nuclear reactor. As the lead national laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a rich history, experience, workforce and capabilities for performing PIE. However, new advances in tools and techniques for performing PIE now enable understanding the performance of fuels and materials at the nano-scale and smaller level. Examination at this level is critical since this is the scale at which irradiation damage occurs. The INL is on course to adopt these advanced tools and techniques to develop a comprehensive nuclear fuels and materials characterization capability that is unique in the world. Because INL has extensive PIE capabilities currently in place, a strong foundation exist to build upon as new capabilities are implemented and work load increases. In the recent past, INL has adopted significant capability to perform advanced PIE characterization. Looking forward, INL is planning for the addition of two facilities that will be built to meet the stringent demands of advanced tools and techniques for highly activated fuels and materials characterization. Dubbed the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) and Advanced Post Irradiation Examination Capability , these facilities are next generation PIE laboratories designed to perform the work of PIE that cannot be performed in current DOE facilities. In addition to physical capabilities, INL has recently added two significant contributors to the Advanced Test Reactor-National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF), Oak Ridge National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley.

J. L. Schulthess; K. E. Rosenberg

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Biodiesel: The clean, green fuel for diesel engines (fact sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Natural, renewable resources such as vegetable oils and recycled restaurant greases can be chemically transformed into clean-burning biodiesel fuels. As its name implies, biodiesel is like diesel fuel except that it's organically produced. It's also safe for the environment, biodegradable, and produces significantly less air pollution than diesel fuel.

Tyson, K.S.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

266

The Effect of Operational Voltage on a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Operating on Coal Syngas Containing Trace Amounts of Phosphine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electrolyte-supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells have been proven capable of generating usable electricity when supplied with various fuels, including a synthetic fuel (syngas) generated from… (more)

Kaufman, Brian A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Back End of the Fuel Cycle Moves Front and Center  

SciTech Connect

For many years, the commercial nuclear business has remained relatively stable in many ways. The introduction of new plants, the spread to new countries, and the development of key elements of the fuel cycle such as enrichment, reprocessing and waste disposal have been quite modest. That is unlikely to be the case in the coming years. A number of events and trends are becoming increasingly apparent and are cause for both opportunity and caution: (1) New nuclear power plant orders are likely to grow and spread, particularly in the developing world, e.g. China and India. (2) The growing recognition that the developing world will be a major competitor for limited energy resources is raising awareness in the developed world regarding concerns for future energy security. (3) Clearer evidence of the effects of greenhouse gas emissions on global warming, largely from the burning of fossil fuels, is creating more attention on the environmental benefits of nuclear power. (4) The last decade has shown unequivocal evidence of countries lying, cheating on their NPT obligation, and covertly carrying out nuclear weapons-related activities. Some have suggested their presumed need for a domestic nuclear fuel cycle as a rationale to pursue enrichment and/or reprocessing capabilities, which would move them to the doorstep of being nuclear weapons capable. The DPRK even took the action to abrogate the NPT to hold on to its nuclear weapons program. (5) 9/11 and other evidence have made it undeniable that terrorist groups would like to obtain weapons of mass destruction, particularly nuclear weapons, and would use them if they could. A number of initiatives have been proposed recently to allow for the growth and spread of nuclear power while limiting the justifications for additional countries to pursue the acquisition of enrichment or reprocessing capabilities. Most of these initiatives have fresh fuel assurance as a central component. The rationale is simple; if a country can have assurance that it will receive all the fresh fuel it needs for the lifetime of its nuclear power plants, there should be no reason for it to pursue the difficult and costly capability to enrich the fuel itself or to reprocess its spent fuel to recover the produced plutonium for recycle as a fuel in its reactors. However, such offers are unlikely to be fully persuasive if they are not connected to complementary offers for management of the spent nuclear fuel that is created during power production. In this paper, we discuss the complexity of the linkage to spent fuel take-back and the challenges and opportunities this present to nations repository programs.

Isaacs, T; Choi, J

2006-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

268

Visualizing Buoyant Burning Bubbles in Type Ia Supernovae at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning in Supernovae Buoyant Burning Bubbles in Type Ia Supernovae bubble-s.jpeg Flame ignition in type Ia supernovae leads to isolated bubbles of burning buoyant fluid. As a...

269

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of nuclear nonproliferation by combining two groups within its Global Security organization. June 27, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

270

High-bandwidth Modulation of H2/Syngas Fuel to Control Combustion Dynamics in Micro-Mixing Lean Premix Systems  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this program was to develop and demonstrate fuel injection technologies that will facilitate the development of cost-effective turbine engines for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, while improving efficiency and reducing emissions. The program involved developing a next-generation multi-point injector with enhanced stability performance for lean premix turbine systems that burn hydrogen (H2) or synthesis gas (syngas) fuels. A previously developed injector that demonstrated superior emissions performance was improved to enhance static flame stability through zone staging and pilot sheltering. In addition, piezo valve technology was implemented to investigate the potential for enhanced dynamic stability through high-bandwidth modulation of the fuel supply. Prototype injector and valve hardware were tested in an atmospheric combustion facility. The program was successful in meeting its objectives. Specifically, the following was accomplished: Demonstrated improvement of lean operability of the Parker multi-point injector through staging of fuel flow and primary zone sheltering; Developed a piezo valve capable of proportional and high-bandwidth modulation of gaseous fuel flow at frequencies as high as 500 Hz; The valve was shown to be capable of effecting changes to flame dynamics, heat release, and acoustic signature of an atmospheric combustor. The latter achievement indicates the viability of the Parker piezo valve technology for use in future adaptively controlled systems for the mitigation of combustion instabilities, particularly for attenuating combustion dynamics under ultra-lean conditions.

Jeff Melzak; Tim Lieuwen; Adel Mansour

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Clean-Burning Motor Fuel or Electric Vehicle Personal Credit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), methanol, and electricity. These credits expire January 2009. (Reference...

272

Clean-Burning Motor Fuel or Electric Vehicle Corporate Credit...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), methanol, and electricity. These credits expire January 2009. (Reference...

273

Effects of actinide burning on waste disposal at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

Release rates of 15 radionuclides from waste packages expected to result from partitioning and transmutation of Light-Water Reactor (LWR) and Actinide-Burning Liquid-Metal Reactor (ALMR) spent fuel are calculated and compared to release rates from standard LWR spent fuel packages. The release rates are input to a model for radionuclide transport from the proposed geologic repository at Yucca Mountain to the water table. Discharge rates at the water table are calculated and used in a model for transport to the accessible environment, defined to be five kilometers from the repository edge. Concentrations and dose rates at the accessible environment from spent fuel and wastes from reprocessing, with partitioning and transmutation, are calculated. Partitioning and transmutation of LWR and ALMR spent fuel reduces the inventories of uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium and curium in the high-level waste by factors of 40 to 500. However, because release rates of all of the actinides except curium are limited by solubility and are independent of package inventory, they are not reduced correspondingly. Only for curium is the repository release rate much lower for reprocessing wastes.

Hirschfelder, J. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Laws and Incentives for...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

a strategy to replace at least 50% of commonwealth motor fleet light-duty vehicles with energy-efficient vehicles including hybrid electric, advanced lean burn, fuel cell, and...

275

Overview of AREVA Logistics Business Unit Capabilities and Expertise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outline Outline Presentation Outline Overview of AREVA Logistics Business Unit capabilities and E ti Expertise Overview of Transnuclear Inc Transportation Capabilities in the United States Questions Quick Reminder of Fuel Cycle - p.2 AREVA Logistics Business Unit - p.3 Around 4 000 transports each year Around 4,000 transports each year More than 200 transports of used fuel (France and Europe), of vitrified and compacted waste (Europe and Japan) of vitrified and compacted waste (Europe and Japan) More than 150 MOX fuel transports More than 300 transports of low level waste More than 2,700 front-end transports More than 400 transports of heavy industrial equipment Around 150 transports for research reactors and laboratories - p.4 Around 150 transports for research reactors and laboratories Design, Testing and Licensing:

276

REMOTE SENSING OF BURN SEVERITY AND THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BURN SEVERITY, TOPOGRAPHY AND VEGETATION IN INTERIOR ALASKA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REMOTE SENSING OF BURN SEVERITY AND THE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN BURN SEVERITY, TOPOGRAPHY likely to change vegetation type. Finally, vegetation recovery, estimated using a remotely-sensed................................................................................6 Chapter 2. Mapping Burn Severity Using Satellite Remote Sensing..........................8

Ruess, Roger W.

277

FESAC Panel on Burning Plasmas 1.What scientific issues should be addressed by a burning plasma physics experiment and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FESAC Panel on Burning Plasmas Charge 1.What scientific issues should be addressed by a burning of using various magnetic confinement concepts in studying burning plasma physics? As a part of your

278

New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal March 29, 2012 | Tags: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR),...

279

The QSE-Reduced Nuclear Reaction Network for Silicon Burning.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Iron and neighboring nuclei are formed by silicon burning in massive stars before core collapse and during supernova outbursts. Complete and incomplete silicon burning is… (more)

Parete-Koon, Suzanne T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

OLIGOMERIZATION OF LEVOGLUCOSAN IN PROXIES OF BIOMASS BURNING AEROSOLS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass burning aerosols play an important role in the chemistry and physics of the atmosphere and therefore, affect global climate. Biomass burning aerosols are generally… (more)

Holmes, Bryan J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

UNCORRECTED 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UNCORRECTED PROOF 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial 3 and subsistence groups as: Lisa Naughton-Treves et al., Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial

Kammen, Daniel M.

282

Neutronic fuel element fabrication  

SciTech Connect

This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure by encompassing the sides of the fuel element between the header plates.

Korton, George (Cincinnati, OH)

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

283

Final assessment of MOX fuel performance experiment with Japanese PWR specification fuel in the HBWR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to obtain high burn-up MOX fuel irradiation performance data, SBR and MIMAS MOX fuel rods with Pu-fissile enrichment of about 6 wt% had been irradiated in the HBWR from 1995 to 2006. The peak burn-up of MOX pellet achieved 72 GWd/tM. In this test, fuel centerline temperature, rod internal pressure, stack length and cladding length were measured for MOX fuel and UO{sub 2} fuel as reference. MOX fuel temperature is confirmed to have no significant difference in comparison with UO{sub 2}, taking into account of adequate thermal conductivity degradation due to PuO{sub 2} addition and burn-up development. And the measured fuel temperature agrees well with FINE code calculation up to high burn-up region. Fission gas release of MOX is possibly greater than UO{sub 2} based on temperature and pressure assessment. No significant difference is confirmed between SBR and MIMAS MOX on FGR behavior. MOX fuel swelling rate agrees well with solid swelling rate in the literature. Cladding elongation data shows onset of PCMI in high power region. (authors)

Fujii, Hajime; Teshima, Hideyuki; Kanasugi, Katsumasa [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., 1-1, Wadasaki-cho 1-chome, Hyogo-ku, Kobe 652-8585 (Japan); Kosaka, Yuji [Nuclear Development Corporation, 622-12 Funaishikawa, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1111 (Japan); Arakawa, Yasushi [The Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., 8 Yokota, 13 Goichi, Mihama-cho, Mikata-gun, Fukui, 919-1141 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Accelerator and electrodynamics capability review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses capability reviews to assess the science, technology and engineering (STE) quality and institutional integration and to advise Laboratory Management on the current and future health of the STE. Capability reviews address the STE integration that LANL uses to meet mission requirements. The Capability Review Committees serve a dual role of providing assessment of the Laboratory's technical contributions and integration towards its missions and providing advice to Laboratory Management. The assessments and advice are documented in reports prepared by the Capability Review Committees that are delivered to the Director and to the Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology and Engineering (PADSTE). Laboratory Management will use this report for STE assessment and planning. LANL has defined fifteen STE capabilities. Electrodynamics and Accelerators is one of the seven STE capabilities that LANL Management (Director, PADSTE, technical Associate Directors) has identified for review in Fiscal Year (FY) 2010. Accelerators and electrodynamics at LANL comprise a blend of large-scale facilities and innovative small-scale research with a growing focus on national security applications. This review is organized into five topical areas: (1) Free Electron Lasers; (2) Linear Accelerator Science and Technology; (3) Advanced Electromagnetics; (4) Next Generation Accelerator Concepts; and (5) National Security Accelerator Applications. The focus is on innovative technology with an emphasis on applications relevant to Laboratory mission. The role of Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) in support of accelerators/electrodynamics will be discussed. The review provides an opportunity for interaction with early career staff. Program sponsors and customers will provide their input on the value of the accelerator and electrodynamics capability to the Laboratory mission.

Jones, Kevin W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Dynamically balanced fuel nozzle and method of operation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method of operation designed to reduce undesirably high pressure oscillations in lean premix combustion systems burning hydrocarbon fuels are provided. Natural combustion and nozzle acoustics are employed to generate multiple fuel pockets which, when burned in the combustor, counteract the oscillations caused by variations in heat release in the combustor. A hybrid of active and passive control techniques, the apparatus and method eliminate combustion oscillations over a wide operating range, without the use of moving parts or electronics.

Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Janus, Michael C. (Baltimore, MD); Robey, Edward H. (Westover, WV)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Molecular Characterization of Nitrogen Containing Organic Compounds in Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although nitrogen-containing organic compounds (NOC) are important components of atmospheric aerosols, little is known about their chemical compositions. Here we present detailed characterization of the NOC constituents of biomass burning aerosol (BBA) samples using high resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS). Accurate mass measurements combined with MS/MS fragmentation experiments of selected ions were used to assign molecular structures to individual NOC species. Our results indicate that N-heterocyclic alkaloid compounds - species naturally produced by plants and living organisms - comprise a substantial fraction of NOC in BBA samples collected from test burns of five biomass fuels. High abundance of alkaloids in test burns of ponderosa pine - a widespread tree in the western U.S. areas frequently affected by large scale fires - suggests that N-heterocyclic alkaloids in BBA can play a significant role in dry and wet deposition of fixed nitrogen in this region.

Laskin, Alexander; Smith, Jeffrey S.; Laskin, Julia

2009-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

287

Association between severity of prescribed burns and subsequent activity of conifer-infesting beetles in stands of longleaf pine  

SciTech Connect

A randomized complete block experiment was performed to measure the effect of prescribed, dormant-season burns of three different levels of severity (measured as fuel consumption and soil surface heating) on subsequent insect infestation and mortality of mature longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.). Multiple-funnel traps baited with a low release rate of turpentine and ethanol were used to monitor activity of certain coniferophagous beetles. Non-aggressive species, including the root beetles Hylastes salebrosus Eichhoff and H. tenuis Eichhoff, the ambrosia beetle Xyleborus pubescens Zimmermann, the reproduction weevil Pachylobius picivorus (Germar), and buprestid borers, were attracted to burned plots in numbers that correlated positively with burn severity. Beetle attraction to burned sites was greatest in the first weeks post-burn and disappeared by the second year. Two potential tree-killing bark beetles, Dendroctonus terebrans (Olivier) and Ips grandicollis (Eichhoff), were trapped in significant numbers but exhibited no attraction to burned plots. Tree mortality correlated significantly with the severity of the burns and amounted to 5% of stems in the hottest burn treatment after 3 years. The majority of the mortality was observed in the second and third years post-burn. Attacks of Ips and Dendroctonus bark beetles were apparent on nearly all dead or dying trees, and evidence suggested that root pathogens may have contributed to tree susceptibility to beetle attack and mortality. Our data indicate that selection of burn regimes that reduce or eliminate consumption of duff (e.g., favoring heading fires over backing fires) could significantly reduce mortality of longleaf pine managed for long rotations Published by Elsevier B.V.

Sullivan, Brian, T; Fettig, C. J.; Otrosina, William, J.; Dalusky, Mark, J.; Berrisford, C.W.

2003-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

288

The role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor in the future of nuclear power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment is made of the potential role of actinide burning and the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) in the future of nuclear power. The development of a usable actinide burning strategy could be an important factor in the acceptance and implementation of a next generation of nuclear power. First, the need for nuclear generating capacity is established through the analysis of energy and electricity demand forecasting models which cover the spectrum of bias from anti-nuclear to pro-nuclear. The analyses take into account the issues of global warming and the potential for technological advances in energy efficiency. We conclude, as do many others, that there will almost certainly be a need for substantial nuclear power capacity in the 2000--2030 time frame. We point out also that any reprocessing scheme will open up proliferation-related questions which can only be assessed in very specific contexts. The focus of this report is on the fuel cycle impacts of actinide burning. Scenarios are developed for the deployment of future nuclear generating capacity which exploit the advantages of actinide partitioning and actinide burning. Three alternative reactor designs are utilized in these future scenarios: The Light Water Reactor (LWR); the Modular Gas-Cooled Reactor (MGR); and the Integral Fast Reactor (FR). Each of these alternative reactor designs is described in some detail, with specific emphasis on their spent fuel streams and the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Four separation and partitioning processes are utilized in building the future nuclear power scenarios: Thermal reactor spent fuel preprocessing to reduce the ceramic oxide spent fuel to metallic form, the conventional PUREX process, the TRUEX process, and pyrometallurgical reprocessing.

Hollaway, W.R.; Lidsky, L.M.; Miller, M.M.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

NETL: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Coal and Power Systems Fuel Cells SECA Logo Welcome to NETL's Fuel Cells Webpage. In partnership with private industry, educational institutions and national laboratories, we are leading the research, development, and demonstration of high efficiency, fuel flexible solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and coal-based SOFC power generation systems for stationary market large central power plants under the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA). The SECA cost reduction goal is to have SOFC systems capable of being manufactured at $400 per kilowatt by 2010. Concurrently, the scale-up, aggregation, and integration of the technology will progress in parallel leading to prototype validation of megawatt (MW)-class fuel flexible products by 2012 and 2015. The SECA coal-based systems goal is the development of large

290

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Annex Volume C. Boiler emission report. Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC) test burn program was conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) located in Bruceton, Pa. One of the objectives of the study was to determine the feasibility of burning SRC fuels in boilers set up for fuel oil firing and to characterize emissions. Testing was conducted on the 700-hp oil-fired boiler used for research projects. No. 6 fuel oil was used for baseline data comparison, and the following SRC fuels were tested: SRC Fuel (pulverized SRC), SRC Residual Oil, and SRC-Water Slurry. Uncontrolled particulate emission rates averaged 0.9243 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Fuel, 0.1970 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Residual Oil, and 0.9085 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC-Water Slurry. On a lb/10/sup 6/ Btu basis, emissions from SRC Residual Oil averaged 79 and 78%, respectively, lower than the SRC Fuel and SRC-Water Slurry. The lower SRC Residual Oil emissions were due, in part, to the lower ash content of the oil and more efficient combustion. The SRC Fuel had the highest emission rate, but only 2% higher than the SRC-Water Slurry. Each fuel type was tested under variable boiler operating parameters to determine its effect on boiler emissions. The program successfully demonstrated that the SRC fuels could be burned in fuel oil boilers modified to handle SRC fuels. This report details the particulate emission program and results from testing conducted at the boiler outlet located before the mobile precipitator take-off duct. The sampling method was EPA Method 17, which uses an in-stack filter.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Federal Technical Capability Program - Quarterly Performance Indicator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 16, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability June 5, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 20, 2013 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 20, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 8, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 30, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability March 6, 2012 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 10, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 24, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 18, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 23, 2011

292

Functional capability of piping systems  

SciTech Connect

General Design Criterion I of Appendix A to Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations requires, in part, that structures, systems, and components important to safety be designed to withstand the effects of earthquakes without a loss of capability to perform their safety function. ne function of a piping system is to convey fluids from one location to another. The functional capability of a piping system might be lost if, for example, the cross-sectional flow area of the pipe were deformed to such an extent that the required flow through the pipe would be restricted. The objective of this report is to examine the present rules in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, and potential changes to these rules, to determine if they are adequate for ensuring the functional capability of safety-related piping systems in nuclear power plants.

Terao, D.; Rodabaugh, E.C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Catalysts for improved fuel processing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers our technical progress on fuel processing catalyst characterization for the specific purpose of hydrogen production for proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cells. These development efforts support DOE activities in the development of compact, transient capable reformers for on-board hydrogen generation starting from candidate fuels. The long-term objective includes increased durability and lifetime, in addition to smaller volume, improved performance, and other specifications required meeting fuel processor goals. The technical barriers of compact fuel processor size, transient capability, and compact, efficient thermal management all are functions of catalyst performance. Significantly, work at LANL now tests large-scale fuel processors for performance and durability, as influenced by fuels and fuel constituents, and complements that testing with micro-scale catalyst evaluation which is accomplished under well controlled conditions.

Borup, R.L.; Inbody, M.A. [and others

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Partnering: Designated Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnerships Research Partnering Designated Capabilities The "Physical, Chemical, and Nano Sciences Designated Capabilities" 'umbrella' agreement, approved by the Department of...

295

Argonne CNM: Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities Synthesis Synthesis of metal oxide, semiconducting, metallic, and magnetic nanoparticles Self-assembly of monodisperse nanoparticles into two- and three-dimensional crystals and binary superlattices Bioconjugation and biochemical techniques with a focus on the synthetic biology and recombinant DNA/protein techniques Peptide synthesis (CSBio CS136XT) Functionalization of nanocrystalline surfaces with biomolecules, such as DNA, peptides, proteins and antibodies, using biochemical, electrochemical, and photochemical techniques Equipment Centrifuges (Beckman Coulter Optima L-100 XP Ultracentrifuge and Avanti J-E Centrifuge) Biological safety cabinets [Labconco Purifier Delta Series (Class II, B2)] Glovebox (MBraun LabMaster 130)

296

Wood-Burning Heating System Deduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute allows individual taxpayers a deduction for the purchase and installation of a wood-burning heating system. The deduction is equal to the total cost of purchase and installation for...

297

Fuel Effects on a Low-Swirl Injector for Lean Premixed Gas Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments have been conducted to investigate the fuel effects on the turbulent premixed flames produced by a gas turbine low-swirl injector (LSI). The lean-blow off limits and flame emissions for seven diluted and undiluted hydrocarbon and hydrogen fuels show that the LSI is capable of supporting stable flames that emit < 5 ppm NO{sub x} ({at} 15% O{sub 2}). Analysis of the velocity statistics shows that the non-reacting and reacting flowfields of the LSI exhibit similarity features. The turbulent flame speeds, S{sub T}, for the hydrocarbon fuels are consistent with those of methane/air flames and correlate linearly with turbulence intensity. The similarity feature and linear S{sub T} correlation provide further support of an analytical model that explains why the LSI flame position does not change with flow velocity. The results also show that the LSI does not need to undergo significant alteration to operate with the hydrocarbon fuels but needs further studies for adaptation to burn diluted H{sub 2} fuels.

Littlejohn, David; Littlejohn, David; Cheng, R.K.

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

298

Sizing and burn time measurements of micron-sized metal powders  

SciTech Connect

Detailed ignition and combustion mechanisms are needed to develop optimized propellant and energetic formulations using micron-sized metal powders, such as aluminum. Combustion researchers have traditionally used relatively coarse metal particles to characterize the burn time dependence on particle size. However, measurements of burn times for particles below 10 {mu}m in diameter are still needed for aluminum powders and other metal fuels. The apparatus described here sizes the particles just before the ignition event, providing a direct correlation between individual particle size and its burn time. Two lasers were utilized: a 785 nm laser diode for sizing the particles and a 125 W CO{sub 2} laser for particle ignition. The particles crossed the 785 nm laser beam just before crossing the CO{sub 2} laser beam. The particle size was determined from the amplitude of the scattered 785 nm light pulse. The burn time was determined from the duration of the visible light emission produced from the ignited particle. The in situ measured particle size distributions compared well with the size distributions measured for the same powders by a commercial instrument using low angle laser light scattering. Our measurements with two nominally spherical aluminum powders, suggest that the burn times increase from 0.5 to {approx}2.5 ms as the particle diameters increase from 3 to 8 {mu}m.

Gill, Robert J.; Mohan, Salil; Dreizin, Edward L. [New Jersey Institute of Technology Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Conceptual Design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor With Modified CANDLE Burn-up Scheme  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, conceptual design study of Small Long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input has been performed. In this study Gas Cooled Fast Reactor is slightly modified by employing modified CANDLE burn-up scheme so that it can use Natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Due to their hard spectrum, GCFR in this study showed very good performance in converting U-238 to plutonium in order to maintain the operation condition requirement of long-life reactors. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. With such condition we got an optimal design of 325 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input. The average discharge burn-up is about 290 GWd/ton HM.

Nur Asiah, A.; Su'ud, Zaki [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Ferhat, A. [National Nuclear Energ Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) (Indonesia); Sekimoto, H. [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology (Japan)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

300

The influence of temperature in the gas emissions by using mixtures of diesel & olive seed oil as fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air pollution is any gas or particulate that originates from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Anthropogenic sources mostly related to burning different kinds of fuel for energy. Moreover, the exhaust from burning fuels in automobiles, homes and ... Keywords: gas emissions, olive seed oil

Charalampos Arapatsakos; Dimitrios Christoforidis; Anastasios Karkanis

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Advanced Post-Irradiation Examination Capabilities Alternatives Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect

An alternatives analysis was performed for the Advanced Post-Irradiation Capabilities (APIEC) project in accordance with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order DOE O 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets”. The Alternatives Analysis considered six major alternatives: ? No Action ? Modify Existing DOE Facilities – capabilities distributed among multiple locations ? Modify Existing DOE Facilities – capabilities consolidated at a few locations ? Construct New Facility ? Commercial Partnership ? International Partnerships Based on the alternatives analysis documented herein, it is recommended to DOE that the advanced post-irradiation examination capabilities be provided by a new facility constructed at the Materials and Fuels Complex at the Idaho National Laboratory.

Jeff Bryan; Bill Landman; Porter Hill

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Simulation of a Burning Plasma C. Kessel, PPPL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simulation of a Burning Plasma Experiment C. Kessel, PPPL UFA Workshop on Burning Plasma Science, December 11-13, 2000 #12;FIRE Burning Plasma Discharge Simulation with TSC ELMy H-mode, N, R=2.0 m, Ip=6.5 MA #12;Burning Plasma Experiment Simultaneously Needs · L-H mode transition · Non

303

BURNING PLASMA NEXT STEPS: DISCUSSION OF KEY DEVELOPMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BURNING PLASMA NEXT STEPS: DISCUSSION OF KEY DEVELOPMENTS Gerald A. Navratil Columbia University/FESAC Burning Plasma Strategy Dec 2002 NRC/NAS Interim Report on Burning Plasmas Jan 30, 2003 DOE of the physics of burning plasma, advance fusion technology, and contribute to the development of fusion energy

304

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames P.-T. Bremer1, G. Weber2 flames subject to different levels of tur- bulence. Due to their unstable nature, lean flames burn to quantitatively correlate the turbulence of the burning process with the distribution of burning regions, properly

305

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

306

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames Peer-Timo Bremer, Member levels of turbulence. Due to their unstable nature, lean flames burn in cells separated by locally the turbulence of the burning process with the distribution of burning regions, properly segmented and selected

Pascucci, Valerio

307

Effects of Range Burning on Kansas Flint Hills Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Range Burning on Kansas Flint Hills Soil CLENTON E. OWENSBY AND JOHN BRUCE WYRILL, III Highlight: Two tallgrass prairie areas burned annually for 20 (grazed) nnd 48 (un. grazed) years ar-spring burned ungrared plots were generally higher in soil pH, organic ma~fer, and K than late-spring burned

Owensby, Clenton E.

308

Tailoring the plateau burning rates of composite propellants by the use of nanoscale additives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composite propellants are composed of a solid oxidizer that is mixed into a hydrocarbon binder that when polymerized results in a solid mass capable of self-sustained combustion after ignition. Plateau propellants exhibit burning rate curves that do not follow the typical linear relationship between burning rate and pressure when plotted on a log-log scale, and because of this deviation their burning behavior is classified as anomalous burning. It is not unusual for solid-particle additives to be added to propellants in order to enhance burning rate or other properties. However, the effect of nano-size solid additives in these propellants is not fully understood or agreed upon within the research community. The current project set out to explore what possible variables were creating this result and to explore new additives. This thesis contains a literature review chronicling the last half-century of research to better understand the mechanisms that govern anomalous burning and to shed light on current research into plateau and related propellants. In addition to the review, a series of experiments investigating the use of nanoscale TiO2-based additives in AP-HTPB composite propellants was performed. The baseline propellant consisted of either 70% or 80% monomodal AP (223 ?m) and 30% or 20% binder composed of IPDI-cured HTPB with Tepanol. Propellants’ burning rates were tested using a strand bomb between 500 and 2500 psi (34.0-170.1 atm). Analysis of the burning rate data shows that the crystal phase and synthesis method of the TiO2 additive are influential to plateau tailoring and to the apparent effectiveness of the additive in altering the burning rate of the composite propellant. Some of the discrepancy in the literature regarding the effectiveness of TiO2 as a tailoring additive may be due to differences in how the additive was produced. Doping the TiO2 with small amounts of metallic elements (Al, Fe, or Gd) showed additional effects on the burning rate that depend on the doping material and the amount of the dopant.

Stephens, Matthew Aaron

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

TAILORING THE PLATEAU BURNING RATES OF COMPOSITE PROPELLANTS BY THE USE OF NANOSCALE ADDITIVES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composite propellants are composed of a solid oxidizer that is mixed into a hydrocarbon binder that when polymerized results in a solid mass capable of selfsustained combustion after ignition. Plateau propellants exhibit burning rate curves that do not follow the typical linear relationship between burning rate and pressure when plotted on a log-log scale, and because of this deviation their burning behavior is classified as anomalous burning. It is not unusual for solid-particle additives to be added to propellants in order to enhance burning rate or other properties. However, the effect of nano-size solid additives in these propellants is not fully understood or agreed upon within the research community. The current project set out to explore what possible variables were creating this result and to explore new additives. This thesis contains a literature review chronicling the last half-century of research to better understand the mechanisms that govern anomalous burning and to shed light on current research into plateau and related propellants. In addition to the review, a series of experiments investigating the use of nanoscale TiO2-based additives in AP-HTPB composite propellants was performed. The baseline propellant consisted of either 70% or 80% monomodal AP (223 ?m) and 30% or 20% binder composed of IPDI-cured HTPB with Tepanol. Propellants’ burning rates were tested using a strand bomb between 500 and 2500 psi (34.0-170.1 atm). Analysis of the burning rate data shows that the crystal phase and synthesis method of the TiO2 additive are influential to plateau tailoring and to the apparent effectiveness of the additive in altering the burning rate of the composite propellant. Some of the discrepancy in the literature regarding the effectiveness of TiO2 as a tailoring additive may be due to differences in how the additive was produced. Doping the TiO2 with small amounts of metallic elements (Al, Fe, or Gd) showed additional effects on the burning rate that depend on the doping material and the amount of the dopant.

Stephens, Matthew

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

HTR Fuel Development in Europe  

SciTech Connect

In the frame of the European Network HTR-TN and in the 5. EURATOM RTD Framework Programme (FP5) European programmes have been launched to consolidate advanced modular HTR technology in Europe. This paper gives an overall description and first results of this programme. The major tasks covered concern a complete recovery of the past experience on fuel irradiation behaviour in Europe, qualification of HTR fuel by irradiating of fuel elements in the HFR reactor, understanding of fuel behaviour with the development of a fuel particle code and finally a recover of the fuel fabrication capability. (authors)

Languille, Alain [CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance BP1 (France); Conrad, R. [CEC/JRC/IE Petten (Netherlands); Guillermier, P. [Framatome-ANP/ Lyon (France); Nabielek, H. [FZJ/Juelich (Germany); Bakker, K. [NRG/Petten (Netherlands); Abram, T. [BNFL UK (United Kingdom); Haas, D. [JRC/ITU/Karlsruhe (Germany)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

New fuels for old  

SciTech Connect

A combination of price, availability, and government policies is forcing electric utilities to look to non-oil fuels even though only a small percentage of the conversions will be uncomplicated. Even those plants that originally burned coal will require extensive modifications to meet present pollution regulations and to restore their coal preparation and handling equipment. Hybrid fuels, such as coal-oil and coal-water, offer the flexibility of oil at a lower cost, but many utilities lack the capital to gamble on non-traditional alternatives. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) programs that can provide the information that utilities need to make fuel decisions include work on coal and oil or water mixtures, municipal solid wastes, peat, and wood residues. The information EPRI gathers will allow utilities to identify the alternative best suited to their existing equipment, financial position, environment, and location. (DCK)

Lihach, N.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

A Review of Materials for Gas Turbines Firing Syngas Fuels  

SciTech Connect

Following the extensive development work carried out in the 1990's, gas turbine combined-cycle (GTCC) systems burning natural gas represent a reliable and efficient power generation technology widely used in many parts of the world. A critical factor was that, in order to operate at the high turbine entry temperatures required for high efficiency operation, aero-engine technology, i.e., single-crystal blades, thermal barrier coatings, and sophisticated cooling techniques had to be rapidly scaled up and introduced into these large gas turbines. The problems with reliability that resulted have been largely overcome, so that the high-efficiency GTCC power generation system is now a mature technology, capable of achieving high levels of availability. The high price of natural gas and concern about emission of greenhouse gases has focused attention on the desirability of replacing natural gas with gas derived from coal (syngas) in these gas turbine systems, since typical systems analyses indicate that IGCC plants have some potential to fulfil the requirement for a zero-emissions power generation system. In this review, the current status of materials for the critical hot gas path parts in large gas turbines is briefly considered in the context of the need to burn syngas. A critical factor is that the syngas is a low-Btu fuel, and the higher mass flow compared to natural gas will tend to increase the power output of the engine. However, modifications to the turbine and to the combustion system also will be necessary. It will be shown that many of the materials used in current engines will also be applicable to units burning syngas but, since the combustion environment will contain a greater level of impurities (especially sulfur, water vapor, and particulates), the durability of some components may be prejudiced. Consequently, some effort will be needed to develop improved coatings to resist attack by sulfur-containing compounds, and also erosion.

Gibbons, Thomas [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

A Review of Materials for Gas Turbines Firing Syngas Fuels  

SciTech Connect

Following the extensive development work carried out in the 1990's, gas turbine combined-cycle (GTCC) systems burning natural gas represent a reliable and efficient power generation technology widely used in many parts of the world. A critical factor was that, in order to operate at the high turbine entry temperatures required for high efficiency operation, aero-engine technology, i.e., single-crystal blades, thermal barrier coatings, and sophisticated cooling techniques had to be rapidly scaled up and introduced into these large gas turbines. The problems with reliability that resulted have been largely overcome, so that the high-efficiency GTCC power generation system is now a mature technology, capable of achieving high levels of availability. The high price of natural gas and concern about emission of greenhouse gases has focused attention on the desirability of replacing natural gas with gas derived from coal (syngas) in these gas turbine systems, since typical systems analyses indicate that IGCC plants have some potential to fulfil the requirement for a zero-emissions power generation system. In this review, the current status of materials for the critical hot gas path parts in large gas turbines is briefly considered in the context of the need to burn syngas. A critical factor is that the syngas is a low-Btu fuel, and the higher mass flow compared to natural gas will tend to increase the power output of the engine. However, modifications to the turbine and to the combustion system also will be necessary. It will be shown that many of the materials used in current engines will also be applicable to units burning syngas but, since the combustion environment will contain a greater level of impurities (especially sulfur, water vapor, and particulates), the durability of some components may be prejudiced. Consequently, some effort will be needed to develop improved coatings to resist attack by sulfur-containing compounds, and also erosion.

Gibbons, Thomas [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Review of D-T Experiments Relevant to Burning Plasma lssues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Progress in the performance of tokamak devices has enabled not only the production of significant bursts of fusion energy from deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European Torus (JET) but, more importantly, the initial study of the physics of burning magnetically confined plasmas. TFTR and JET, in conjunction with the worldwide fusion effort, have studied a broad range of topics including magnetohydrodynamic stability, transport, wave-particle interactions, the confinement of energetic particles, and plasma boundary interactions. D-T experiments differ in three principal ways from previous experiments: isotope effects associated with the use of deuterium-tritium fuel, the presence of fusion-generated alpha particles, and technology issues associated with tritium handling and increased activation. The effect of deuterium-tritium fuel and the presence of alpha particles are reviewed and placed in the perspective of the much larger worldwide database using deuterium fuel and theoretical understanding. Both devices have contributed substantially in addressing the scientific and technical issues associated with burning plasmas. However, future burning plasma experiments will operate with larger ratios of alpha heating power to auxiliary power and will be able to access additional alpha-particle physics issues. The scientific opportunities for extending our understanding ofburning plasmas beyond that provided by current experiments are described. Keywords: deuterium-tritium, alpha-particle physics, isotope scaling, ICRF heating, JET, TFTR

Hawryluk R. J

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

EXAMINATION OF IRRADIATED EBWR CORE-1 FUEL ELEMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two fuel elements were removed from the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor and examined in a hot cell. The elements had maximum burn-ups of 0.11 and 0.39 at.%. Both were disassembled and sampled for the evaluation of the effects of in-pile operation and radiation damage to the fuel. The fuel elements were in gcod condition with no ruptured.cladding, core-clad nonbonds, or excessive fuel-plate swelling or warpage. Thin samples cut from the fuel plates in element ET-51 warped and cracked, suggesting a relieving of locked-in stresses and indicating that after 0.39 at.% burn-up the fuel cores were hard, brittle, and highly stressed. The rate of fuel-plate volume increase owing to the burn-up of uranium was 6 to 7% DELTA V per at.% burn-up. Hydrogen was picked up by the fuel plates under reactor operating conditions with the probable forraation of isolated areas of small announts of zirconiura hydride. Annealing studies on sections of fuel plate at 500 and 550 deg C indicated bulk volume increases of 1 to 2% and 5 to 10%, respectively, after 500 hr. A 600 deg C anneal resulted in a bulk volume increase of 17% after 45 hr. (auth)

Reinke, C.F.; Carlander, R.

1960-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Table A57. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by" 7. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by" " Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics, 1991 " " (Estimates in Thousand Short Tons)" " "," "," ", " "," "," Coal",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" " "," ","-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other","Factors"

317

Table A58. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy Sources by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy Sources by" 8. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy Sources by" " Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics, 1991" " (Estimates in Thousand Barrels)" ,," LPG",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,"-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity",,,,,,,"Row" ,,"Consumed(b)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

318

Table A67. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Source  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources" 7. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources" " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," " 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,"Electricity Receipts",,,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "SIC"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Receipts(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"," "

319

World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits to Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Benefits and Considerations Also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), propane is a domestically produced, well-established, clean-burning fuel. Using propane as a vehicle fuel increases energy security, provides convenience and performance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Basics to Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Production & Distribution Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Fuel Basics Propane dispenser Also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or autogas, propane is a clean-burning, high-energy alternative fuel that's been used for decades to

322

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

AFDC AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on AddThis.com... Pollutants and Health Pollutants emitted from burning conventional and alternative fuels fall into two categories: Criteria and Non-Criteria pollutants. The Clean Air Act (CAA) requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

323

Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-2023 4-2023 Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure TEN-YEAR SITE PLAN DOE/ID-11474 Final June 2012 Sustainable INL continues to exceed DOE goals for reduction in the use of petroleum fuels - running its entire bus fleet on biodiesel while converting 75% of its light-duty fleet to E85 fuel. The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL), slated for completion this year, will be a state-of-the-art laboratory with high-bay lab space where leading bioenergy feedstock processing, advanced battery testing, and hybrid energy systems integration research will be conducted. The Advanced Test Reactor is the world's most advanced nuclear research capability - crucial to (1) the ongoing development of safe, efficient

324

Argonne CNM: Materials Synthesis Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Synthesis Facilities Materials Synthesis Facilities Capabilities biosynthesis View larger image. Biosynthesis Methods Peptide and DNA synthesis (E. Rozhkova, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Nanobio hybrid synthesis (T. Rajh, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Hierarchal assembly View larger image. Hierarchical Assembly Bottom-up polymeric and bio-templating as well as lithographically directed self-assembly (S. Darling, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group; E. Rozhkova, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Molecular beam epitaxy View high-resolution image. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Complex oxide nanoferroelectric and nanoferromagnetic materials and devices created using a DCA R450D Custom MBE instrument (A. Bhattacharya, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group) Nanoparticle synthesis

325

EMSL: Capabilities: Spectroscopy and Diffraction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy and Diffraction Spectroscopy and Diffraction Additional Information Meet the Spectroscopy and Diffraction Experts Related EMSL User Projects Spectroscopy and Diffraction Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Tutorial: XPS Tools for Surface Analysis Spectroscopy and Diffraction brochure EMSL's suite of spectroscopy and diffraction instruments allows users to study solid-, liquid-, and gas-phase sample structure and composition with remarkable resolution. Ideal for integrated studies, spectrometers and diffractometers are easily coupled with EMSL's computational and modeling capabilities, allowing users to apply a multifaceted research approach for experimental data interpretation and gain fundamental understanding of scientific problems. At EMSL, spectroscopy and diffraction instruments are

326

EMSL: Capabilities: Deposition and Microfabrication  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deposition and Microfabrication Deposition and Microfabrication Additional Information Meet the Deposition and Microfabrication Experts Related EMSL User Projects Deposition and Microfabrication Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Deposition and Microfabrication brochure Designed to augment research important to a variety of disciplines, EMSL's Deposition and Microfabrication Capability tackles serious scientific challenges from a microscopic perspective. From deposition instruments that emphasize oxide films and interfaces to a state-of-the-art microfabrication suite, EMSL has equipment to tailor surfaces, as diverse as single-crystal thin films or nanostructures, or create the microenvironments needed for direct experimentation at micron scales. Users benefit from coupling deposition and microfabrication applications

327

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal" November 20, 2012 jlowe@bsu.edu 765.285.2805 Ball State University Ball State University Administration Building 1899 Ball State 1920s Ball State University Ball State University (4) Coal Fired Boilers Installed 1941/1955 (3) Natural Gas Fired Boilers Installed in the 1970s Heat and Chilled Water Plant Operations Heat Plant: 4 Coal Fired Boilers 3 Natural Gas Fired Boilers 320,000 Lbs/Hr nameplate 240,000 Lbs/Hr current 700,000,000 Lbs/Year Chilled Water Plant: 5 Electrical Centrifugal Chillers 9,300 ton capacity 25,000,000 Ton Hours/Year Pollutants Produced from Burning 36,000 tons of Coal * Carbon Dioxide 85,000 tons (Global Warming)

328

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Program Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Program Electricity...

329

NREL: Process Development and Integration Laboratory - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities The process development and integration approach used within the Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL) provides numerous capabilities for scientific...

330

Sandia SAR Capabilities -- Sandia National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities Sandia National Laboratories offers state-of-the-art capability in the design and development of Synthetic Aperture Radars, from system design through system...

331

The deposition and burning characteristics during slagging co-firing coal and wood: modeling and numerical simulation  

SciTech Connect

Numerical analysis was used to study the deposition and burning characteristics of combining co-combustion with slagging combustion technologies in this paper. The pyrolysis and burning kinetic models of different fuels were implanted into the WBSF-PCC2 (wall burning and slag flow in pulverized co-combustion) computation code, and then the slagging and co-combustion characteristics (especially the wall burning mechanism of different solid fuels and their effects on the whole burning behavior in the cylindrical combustor at different mixing ratios under the condition of keeping the heat input same) were simulated numerically. The results showed that adding wood powder at 25% mass fraction can increase the temperature at the initial stage of combustion, which is helpful to utilize the front space of the combustor. Adding wood powder at a 25% mass fraction can increase the reaction rate at the initial combustion stage; also, the coal ignitability is improved, and the burnout efficiency is enhanced by about 5% of suspension and deposition particles, which is helpful for coal particles to burn entirely and for combustion devices to minimize their dimensions or sizes. The results also showed that adding wood powder at a proper ratio is helpful to keep the combustion stability, not only because of the enhancement for the burning characteristics, but also because the running slag layer structure can be changed more continuously, which is very important for avoiding the abnormal slag accumulation in the slagging combustor. The theoretic analysis in this paper proves that unification of co-combustion and slagging combustion technologies is feasible, though more comprehensive and rigorous research is needed.

Wang, X.H.; Zhao, D.Q.; Jiang, L.Q.; Yang, W.B. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ghangzhou (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Europe Europe » Poland Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends Carbon dioxide emissions from Poland's use of fossil-fuels and cement production climbed at a remarkably steady rate of 3.9% per year from 1800 until 1980, when they dropped abruptly (11.7%). Fossil-fuel CO2 emissions crept back up throughout the 1980s peaking in 1987 at 127 million metric tons of carbon. Since the 1987 high, CO2 emissions have plummeted 32% to early 1970s levels while per capita emissions have dropped to late 1960s levels. Poland is the world's ninth largest producer of coal and emissions are predominantly from coal burning: 97% in 1950 and 68% in 2008. The drop following 1980 is apparent in rates of liquid fuel burning but releases from consumption of petroleum products have returned and surpassed 1980s

333

Natural Gas as a Boiler Fuel of Choice in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas is abundant, clean burning, and cost competitive with other fuels. In addition to superior economic fundamentals, the expanded use of natural gas will be enhanced by political and industry leaders. Natural gas therefore will continue to be the boiler fuel choice for Texas electric generating companies.

Kmetz, W. J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A pulverized coal fuel injector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO{sub 2} formation.

Rini, M.J.; Towle, D.P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Correlations between Optical, Chemical and Physical Properties of Biomass Burn Aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

laboratory measurements of biomass-burning emissions: 1.tar balls: Particles from biomass and biofuel burning, J.Eleuterio (2005), A review of biomass burning emissions part

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Niño?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fication of drought-induced biomass burning in Indonesiavariability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 toChemistry and Physics Do biomass burning aerosols intensify

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Flanner, M. G; Rasch, P. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Niño?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of drought-induced biomass burning in Indonesia since 1960,variability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 toand Physics Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Flanner, M. G; Rasch, P. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A Hypothetical Burning-Velocity Formula for Very Lean Hydrogen-Air Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

K. Fig. 2 Comparisons of burning-velocity predictions withcurve), when an experimental burning velocity (points) of 53and calculated laminar burning velocities of lean hydrogen-

Grcar, Joseph F

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Steam reforming of fuel to hydrogen in fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell capable of utilizing a hydrocarbon such as methane as fuel and having an internal dual catalyst system within the anode zone, the dual catalyst system including an anode catalyst supporting and in heat conducting relationship with a reforming catalyst with heat for the reforming reaction being supplied by the reaction at the anode catalyst.

Fraioli, Anthony V. (Hawthorne Woods, IL); Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Steam reforming of fuel to hydrogen in fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell is described capable of utilizing a hydrocarbon such as methane as fuel and having an internal dual catalyst system within the anode zone, the dual catalyst system including an anode catalyst supporting and in heat conducting relationship with a reforming catalyst with heat for the reforming reaction being supplied by the reaction at the anode catalyst.

Young, J.E.; Fraioli, A.V.

1983-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Methods to improve lubricity of fuels and lubricants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for providing lubricity in fuels and lubricants includes adding a boron compound to a fuel or lubricant to provide a boron-containing fuel or lubricant. The fuel or lubricant may contain a boron compound at a concentration between about 30 ppm and about 3,000 ppm and a sulfur concentration of less than about 500 ppm. A method of powering an engine to minimize wear, by burning a fuel containing boron compounds. The boron compounds include compound that provide boric acid and/or BO.sub.3 ions or monomers to the fuel or lubricant.

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL)

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

Argonne CNM: Proximal Probes Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proximal Probes Proximal Probes Capabilities Omicron VT-AFM XA microscope scanning tunneling microscope VIew high-resolution image. Variable-temperature, ultra-high-vacuum, atomic force microscope/scanning tunneling microscope: Omicron VT-AFM XA (N. Guisinger, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group) Measurement modes include: Contact and non-contact AFM Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) Scanning tunneling spectroscopy Preparation tools include: Resistive sample heating Direct current heating E-beam heating Sputter ion etching Gas dosing E-beam evaporation An analysis chamber contains combined four-grid LEED/Auger optics Omicron nanoprobe View high-resolution image Scanning probe/scanning electron microscopy: Omicron UHV Nanoprobe (N. Guisinger, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group)

343

EMSL: Capabilities: Molecular Science Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Welcome to Chinook! Welcome to Chinook! Chinook Supercomputer Chinook is a supercluster with 2310 HP(tm) dual-socket, quad-core AMD(tm) nodes for computation. With 32 GB of memory per node, each processor-core has 4 GB available. Thus, Chinook is the only computer in its class capable of running certain chemical computations. The overall system has 74 TB of memory, 350 GB of local scratch disk per node, a 250 TB of global parallel file system, and a peak performance 163 teraFLOPs. Fast communication between nodes is obtained using single rail InfiniBand interconnect from Voltaire (switches) and Mellanox (network interface cards). Currently, Chinook's operating system is an EMSL modified version of a Red Hat's Scientific Linux. Node allocation is scheduled using Moab® and Simple

344

Core Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Advanced Photon Source is one of the brightest sources of X-rays in the The Advanced Photon Source is one of the brightest sources of X-rays in the Western Hemisphere. Photons are accelerated to over 99% of the speed of light around its ring, which is the size of a baseball stadium. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. The Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne is a premier user facility, providing expertise, instruments, and infrastructure for interdisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology research. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Core Capabilities Argonne's vision is to lead the world in discovery science and engineering that provides technical solutions to the grand challenges of our time. Argonne's vision is to lead the world in discovery science and engineering that provides technical solutions to the grand challenges of our time:

345

EMSL: Capabilities: Molecular Science Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphics and Visualization Laboratory Graphics and Visualization Laboratory Photo of researcher in the Graphics and Visualization Laboratory EMSL's Graphics and Visualization Laboratory (GVL) helps researchers visualize and analyze complex experimental and computational data sets. GVL provides EMSL users with high-performance graphics systems as well as support staff who have capabilities in illustration and image editing, data modeling and image analysis, scene rendering and model creation, as well as audio/video compositing and editing. The GVL contains five high-performance graphics stations based on SGI technologies with high-speed connections to parallel computers and the database/archive system, a video system integrated with the workstations to facilitate the display and capture of scientific data, and video editing

346

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

"Quantum" Chaos and Stability Condition of Soliton-like Waves of Nuclear Burning in Neutron-Multiplicating Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the stability condition for the soliton-like wave of nuclear burning in neutron-multiplicating medium is determined in general by two conditions. The first condition (necessary) is determined by relationship between the equilibrium concentration and critical concentration of active (fissile) isotope, that is a consequence of the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization condition. The second condition (sufficient) is set by the so-called Wigner quantum statistics, or more accurately, by a ststistics of the Gaussian simplectic ensembles with respect to the parameter that describes the squared width of burning wave front of nuclear fuel active component.

Rusov, V D; Tarasov, V A; Zelentsova, T N; Sharf, I V; Chernezhenko, S A; Byegunova, O A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Crosswalk of Target Capabilities to Core Capabilities The following table maps the target capabilities outlined in the former Target Capabilities List (TCL) version  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capabilities outlined in the former Target Capabilities List (TCL) version 2.0, released in September 2007 was performed such that all thirty-seven target capabilities from the TCL were mapped; and each target target capability in the TCL. This crosswalk was created to support the transition that states

Harms, Kyle E.

349

Project Development and Finance: Capabilities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Capabilities overview of NREL's Project Finance and Development Group within the Deployment and Market Transformation Directorate.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop  

SciTech Connect

This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Heated transportable fuel cell cartridges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell stack protective system is made where a plurality of fuel cells, each containing liquid electrolyte subject to crystallization, is enclosed by a containing vessel, and where at least one electric heater is placed in the containing vessel and is capable of preventing electrolyte crystallization.

Lance, Joseph R. (N. Huntingdon, PA); Spurrier, Francis R. (Whitehall, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Reactive burn models and ignition & growth concept  

SciTech Connect

Plastic-bonded explosives are heterogeneous materials. Experimentally, shock initiation is sensitive to small amounts of porosity, due to the formation of hot spots (small localized regions of high temperature). This leads to the Ignition and Growth concept, introduced by Lee and Tarver in 1980, as the basis for reactive burn models. A homogeneized burn rate needs to account for three mesoscale physical effects (i) the density of burnt hot spots, which depends on the lead shock strength; (ii) the growth of the burn fronts triggered by hot spots, which depends on the local deflagration speed; (iii) a geometric factor that accounts for the overlap of deflagration wavelets from adjacent hot spots. These effects can be combined and the burn model defined by specifying the reaction progress variable {lambda}(t) as a function of a dimensionless reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t)/{ell}{sub hs}, rather than by xpecifying an explicit burn rate. The length scale {ell}{sub hs} is the average distance between hot spots, which is proportional to [N{sub hs}(P{sub s})]{sup -1/3}, where N{sub hs} is the number density of hot spots activated by the lead shock. The reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t) = {line_integral}{sub 0}{sup t} D(P(t'))dt' is the distance the burn front propagates from a single hot spot, where D is the deflagration speed and t is the time since the shock arrival. A key implementation issue is how to determine the lead shock strength in conjunction with a shock capturing scheme. They have developed a robust algorithm for this purpose based on the Hugoniot jump condition for the energy. The algorithm utilizes the time dependence of density, pressure and energy within each cell. The method is independent of the numerical dissipation used for shock capturing. It is local and can be used in one or more space dimensions. The burn model has a small number of parameters which can be calibrated to fit velocity gauge data from shock initiation experiments.

Menikoff, Ralph S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shaw, Milton S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits to Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Benefits and Considerations Biodiesel is a domestically produced, clean-burning, renewable substitute for petroleum diesel. Using biodiesel as a vehicle fuel increases energy security, improves public health and the environment, and provides safety

354

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

AFDC » Case Studies AFDC » Case Studies Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on AddThis.com... Video Download Help Learn how to download, watch, burn, and share videos. Download Videos To download videos for a PC, right-click a Windows Media Video (WMV) link and select "Save Target As..." from the shortcut menu.

355

Fossil fuels -- future fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Integrated fuel processor development challenges.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the absence of a hydrogen-refueling infrastructure, the success of the fuel cell system in the market will depend on fuel processors to enable the use of available fuels, such as gasoline, natural gas, etc. The fuel processor includes several catalytic reactors, scrubbers to remove chemical species that can poison downstream catalysts or the fuel cell electrocatalyst, and heat exchangers. Most fuel cell power applications seek compact, lightweight hardware with rapid-start and load- following capabilities. Although packaging can partially address the size and volume, balancing the performance parameters while maintaining the fuel conversion (to hydrogen) efficiency requires careful integration of the unit operations and processes. Argonne National Laboratory has developed integrated fuel processors that are compact and light, and that operate efficiently. This paper discusses some of the difficulties encountered in the development process, focusing on the factors/components that constrain performance, and areas that need further research and development.

Ahmed, S.; Pereira, Lee, S. H. D.; Kaun, T.; Krumpelt, M.

2002-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

357

Reflective Terahertz Imaging for early diagnosis of skin burn severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

97 Fig 7.3 ‘Cross shaped’ brass brand used for burnFig 7.21 3-D drawing of the brass brand used for controlledfor imaging burns[10]. A brass brand heated to 315°C was

TEWARI, PRIYAMVADA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Biomass Burning and the Production of Greenhouse Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass burning is a source of greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. In addition, biomass burning is a source of chemically active gases, including carbon monoxide, nonmethane hydrocarbons, and nitric oxide. These gases, along ...

Levine J. S.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

NETL: Releases & Briefs - Laser ignition for lean-burn engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Technology Laboratory have successfully operated a laser-spark lean-burn natural gas reciprocating engine. Development of lean-burn engines is driven by demand for higher...

360

Fuel processor for fuel cell power system. [Conversion of methanol into hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

Vanderborgh, N.E.; Springer, T.E.; Huff, J.R.

1986-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Wood as a fuel. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the availability, combustion aspects, economics, and feasibility of using wood as fuel. Topics include wood-fuel power plants, wood waste fuels, district heating systems, wood burning furnaces and appliances, and wood waste generators. (Contains a minimum of 128 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

NEUTRONICS STUDIES OF URANIUM-BASED FULLY CERAMIC MICRO-ENCAPSULATED FUEL FOR PWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the core neutronics and fuel cycle characteristics that result from employing uranium-based fully ceramic micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Specific PWR bundle designs with FCM fuel have been developed, which by virtue of their TRISO particle based elements, are expected to safely reach higher fuel burnups while also increasing the tolerance to fuel failures. The SCALE 6.1 code package, developed and maintained at ORNL, was the primary software employed to model these designs. Analysis was performed using the SCALE double-heterogeneous (DH) fuel modeling capabilities. For cases evaluated with the NESTLE full-core three-dimensional nodal simulator, because the feature to perform DH lattice physics branches with the SCALE/TRITON sequence is not yet available, the Reactivity-Equivalent Physical Transformation (RPT) method was used as workaround to support the full core analyses. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a color-set array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In addition, a parametric study was performed by varying the various TRISO particle design features; such as kernel diameter, coating layer thicknesses, and packing fractions. Also, other features such as the selection of matrix material (SiC, Zirconium) and fuel rod dimensions were perturbed. After evaluating different uranium-based fuels, the higher physical density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, as the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design will need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. Neutronically, the FCM fuel designs evaluated maintain acceptable design features in the areas of fuel lifetime, temperature coefficients of reactivity, as well as pin cell and assembly peaking factors. Key Words: FCM, TRISO, Uranium Mononitride, PWR

George, Nathan M [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

364

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

365

OPSAID improvements and capabilities report.  

SciTech Connect

Process Control System (PCS) and Industrial Control System (ICS) security is critical to our national security. But there are a number of technological, economic, and educational impediments to PCS owners implementing effective security on their systems. Sandia National Laboratories has performed the research and development of the OPSAID (Open PCS Security Architecture for Interoperable Design), a project sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE/OE), to address this issue. OPSAID is an open-source architecture for PCS/ICS security that provides a design basis for vendors to build add-on security devices for legacy systems, while providing a path forward for the development of inherently-secure PCS elements in the future. Using standardized hardware, a proof-of-concept prototype system was also developed. This report describes the improvements and capabilities that have been added to OPSAID since an initial report was released. Testing and validation of this architecture has been conducted in another project, Lemnos Interoperable Security Project, sponsored by DOE/OE and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL).

Halbgewachs, Ronald D.; Chavez, Adrian R.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

Dobranich, Dean D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Burning Thermals in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Thermals in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden1 , J. B. Bell1 , S. Dong2 , and S. E. Woosley2 ABSTRACT We develop a one-dimensional theoretical model for thermals burning in Type Ia supernovae based for the burning and for the expansion of the thermal due to changes in the background stratification found

Bell, John B.

368

Burning Plasma Physics Technical Subgroup of the Magnetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Burning Plasma Physics Technical Subgroup of the Magnetic Fusion Concepts Working Group 1999 Woolley, Stewart Zweben. #12;2 Contents 1. Introduction 3 2. Burning Plasma Physics Issues 8 2.1 Energetic and physics integration 22 3. Technical Readiness for a Burning Plasma Experiment 26 3.1 Background

369

A Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Next Step Burning Plasma Experiment Dale M. Meade Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Fusion). ARIES Group #12;Advanced Toroidal Physics Fusion Plasma Conditions Burning Plasma Physics 1.0 0.5 Alpha Energy #12;Magnetic Fusion Science Issues - Strongly Coupled in a Fusion (Burning) Plasma Improved

370

Presented at UFA Burning Plasma Science Workshop II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRE D. Meade Presented at UFA Burning Plasma Science Workshop II General Atomics San Diego, CA May for a Next Step Experiment in Magnetic Fusion · Compact High Field Approach - General Parameters · Burning, Madison, WI · Charge for First and Second meetings Scientific value of a Burning Plasma experiment

371

Guanine tautomerism revealed by UVUV and IRUV hole burning spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Guanine tautomerism revealed by UV­UV and IR­UV hole burning spectroscopy E. Nir Department spectroscopy. 1-methylguanine, in which the Keto­Enol tautomerism is blocked, shows hole burning spectra from hole burning SHB by using two counter- propagating dye laser pulses with a delay of about 150 ns

de Vries, Mattanjah S.

372

Stellar Burning Falk Herwig, Alexander Heger, and Frank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stellar Burning and Mixing Falk Herwig, Alexander Heger, and Frank Timmes (T-6); and Rob Hueckstaedt and Rob Coker (X-2); fherwig@lanl.gov D uring most phases of stellar evolution, nuclear burning nuclear burning in convective regions in which mixing and nuclear energy release proceeds on comparable

Herwig, Falk

373

Electromagnetically induced transparency over spectral hole-burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electromagnetically induced transparency over spectral hole-burning temperature in a rare the spectral hole-burning temperature. The transmission of the probe laser beam is increased by a factor of exp over the spectral hole-burning temperature in a rare-earth­doped solid represents important progress

Shahriar, Selim

374

Supercritical Burning of Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Droplet with Detailed Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supercritical Burning of Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Droplet with Detailed Chemistry J. DAOU,* P with diameter less than I pm vaporize before burning. A quasi-steady-like diffusion flame is then established is considered; temperature and pressure in the combustion chamber have a weak influence on the burning time

Heil, Matthias

375

Burning of high Tc bridges M. E. Gaevski,a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning of high Tc bridges M. E. Gaevski,a) T. H. Johansen, Yu. Galperin,a) and H. Bratsberg February 1997; accepted for publication 24 September 1997 Burning of superconducting thin film bridges containing extended defects magneto-optic investigation is sufficient to locate the incipient burning region

Johansen, Tom Henning

376

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

December 2010 HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT@nmsu.edu #12;i HYDROLOGIC AND VEGETAL RESPONSES TO PRESCRIBED BURNING AND HERBICIDAL TREATMENT OF BROOM both burning and spraying with herbicide. However, the broom snakeweed was not eradicated, and numbers

Johnson, Eric E.

377

Hot Bottom Burning in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hot Bottom Burning in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars By J OHN C. LATTANZ I O 1 , CHERYL A. FROST 1 state of knowledge about the phenomenon of Hot Bottom Burning as seen in Asymptotic Giant Branch stars. This is illustrated with some results from new 6M fi stellar models. 1. Introduction and Motivation Hot Bottom Burning

Lattanzio, John

378

Burning Plasma Science Workshop Astrophysics and Laboratory Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Science Workshop Astrophysics and Laboratory Plasmas Robert Rosner The University of Chicago Dec. 12, 2000 Austin, TX (http://flash.uchicago.edu) #12;Burning Plasma Science Workshop Austin ¥ Plasma conditions ¥ Overview of plasma physics issues for astrophysics ¥ Specific examples #12;Burning

379

Greyscale Photograph Geometry Informed by Dodging and Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greyscale Photograph Geometry Informed by Dodging and Burning Carlos Phillips and Kaleem Siddiqi the same negative may vary in inten- sity values due, in part, to the liberal use of dodging and burning to linear dodging and burning. 1 Introduction Photographs are often used as test data in the computer vision

Siddiqi, Kaleem

380

Prescribed Burning in the Kings River Ecosystems Project Area: Lessons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prescribed Burning in the Kings River Ecosystems Project Area: Lessons Learned1 David S. Mc burning was initiated in 1994 in two 32,000-acre watersheds in the Kings River District of the Sierra various effects of these fires. Approximately 11,900 acres of prescription burns were completed by the end

Standiford, Richard B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Burning Plasma Physics -The Next Frontier Three Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burning Plasma Physics - The Next Frontier Three Options (same scale) ITER-FEATFIRE IGNITOR US in Magnetic Fusion · Burning Plasma Performance Considerations · Compact High Field Approach - General for strengthening the base fusion sciences program 2. Directs DOE to submit a plan for a U.S. Burning Plasma

382

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Gasoline Sprays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasoline Sprays Gasoline Sprays Animated image of fuel emerging from a gasoline injector Animated image of fuel emerging from a gasoline injector (simulated environment). Some newer automobiles in the U.S. use gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. These advanced gasoline engines inject the fuel directly into the engine cylinder rather than into the intake port. These engines can achieve higher fuel efficiency, but they depend on a precise fuel/air mixture at the spark plug to initiate ignition. This leads to more stringent requirements on spray quality and reproducibility. GDI also enables new combustion strategies for gasoline engines such as lean burn engines that use less fuel and air. Lean burn engines may achieve efficiencies near those of diesels while producing low emissions. This

383

Experiments for the Measurement of LNG Mass Burning Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) is a commonly used flammable fuel that has safety concerns associated with vapor dispersion and radiation emitted from pool fires. The main objective of this effort is to advance the knowledge of pool fires and to expand the data that is commonly used to validate semi-empirical models. This includes evaluation of the methods that are utilized to obtain experimental values of mass burning rates, which are used in models where semi-empirical correlations cannot be applied. A total of three small-size experiments designed to study the radiative characteristics of LNG pool fires were carried out at Texas A & M University's Brayton Fire Training Field (BFTF). This set of experiments was designed to study how the heat feedback from the fire to the pool surface is subsequently distributed through the liquid volume and the validity of different methods for measuring burning rates. In this work, a number of semi-empirical correlations were used to predict the characteristics of the flame and examine the predictive accuracy of these correlations when compared to the values obtained experimentally. In addition, the heat transferred from the energy received at the pool's surface to the surroundings was investigated. Finally, the parameters that influenced the measurement of radiative head feedback to the liquid pool were analyzed to investigate potential causes of calibration drift in the instrumentation. The results of this work provided information regarding the validity of certain techniques for the measurement of mass burning rates and the use of correlations to predict the characteristics of an LNG pool fire on a small-scale. The findings from this work indicate that the energy received at the liquid surface was used entirely for evaporation and no indications of transmission to the surroundings were observed. Lastly, it was found that during the experiments, the sink temperature of the sensor was not constant, and therefore, the readings of the radiative heat were unreliable. This was due to the insufficient cooling effect of the water circulated. It was later shown in the laboratory that through a series of qualitative tests, a change of 20°C in the cooling water resulted in a calibration drift.

Herrera Gomez, Lady Carolina

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

B. Gonalves, Workshop on "Burning Plasma" Physics and Simulation Tarragona, 3-4 July, 2005 Burning Plasma Diagnostics on JET  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Gonçalves, Workshop on "Burning Plasma" Physics and Simulation Tarragona, 3-4 July, 2005 Burning;B. Gonçalves, Workshop on "Burning Plasma" Physics and Simulation Tarragona, 3-4 July, 2005 on "Burning Plasma" Physics and Simulation Tarragona, 3-4 July, 2005 3.5 MeV n 14 MeV DT 3.5 MeV n 14 MeV DT

385

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 1: Technical Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Manufacture of Corn Ethanol. St. Louis, National CornWetcake” is a form of corn ethanol co-product that requiresTypical dry-grind corn ethanol facilities burn fossil fuels

Farrell, Alexander E.; Sperling, Dan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

387

MA Transmutation Performance Simulation and Accompanied Burning-up Analysis for C-ADS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accelerator-driven subcritical reactor functions well in incinerating high-level radiotoxic waste (HLW) as well as providing energy. China is on his way to establish such a facility to transmutate the annual 1000 tons of HLW. A neutronic analysis has been performed for a reference core with a special task of burning minor actinides 237Np, 241Am, 243Am and 244Cm. Instant operation parameters are determined, including neutron energy spectra, thermal power distribution and transmutation validation. Burning-up analysis is carried out to further confirm the incineration efficiency. The core parameters optimized in this work will be applied to simulate in-core fuel behavior in future research.

Ji-Lang Miao; Zi-Chen Zhao; Zhen-Qi Chang

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

Fundamental Studies of Irradiation-Induced Defect Formation and Fission Product Dynamics in Oxide Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research program is to address major nuclear fuels performance issues for the design and use of oxide-type fuels in the current and advanced nuclear reactor applications. Fuel performance is a major issue for extending fuel burn-up which has the added advantage of reducing the used fuel waste stream. It will also be a significant issue with respect to developing advanced fuel cycle processes where it may be possible to incorporate minor actinides in various fuel forms so that they can be 'burned' rather than join the used fuel waste stream. The potential to fission or transmute minor actinides and certain long-lived fission product isotopes would transform the high level waste storage strategy by removing the need to consider fuel storage on the millennium time scale.

Stubbins, James

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

389

Role of Fusion Product Measurements in Physics Understanding of a Burning Plasma (A25955)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of Int. Workshop On Burning Plasma Diagnostics, Varenna, Italy, 2007International Workshop on Burning Plasma Diagnostics Varenna, IT, 2007999614195

Boivin, R.L.

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

390

Distributed Generation Capabilities National Energy Modeling System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1.4 Case 4: 40% Fuel Cell and PV Tax Credit with Advanced Technology Costs ........ 16 3.1.5 Case 5: 40% Fuel Cell Tax Credit with Advanced Technology Costs ..................... 17 3.1.6 Case 6: 40% Tax cooling. The average electricity and hot water consumption is used to determine building fuel demand

391

Transmutation Analysis of Enriched Uranium and Deep Burn High Temperature Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been under consideration for production of electricity, process heat, and for destruction of transuranics for decades. As part of the transmutation analysis efforts within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) campaign, a need was identified for detailed discharge isotopics from HTRs for use in the VISION code. A conventional HTR using enriched uranium in UCO fuel was modeled having discharge burnup of 120 GWd/MTiHM. Also, a deep burn HTR (DB-HTR) was modeled burning transuranic (TRU)-only TRU-O2 fuel to a discharge burnup of 648 GWd/MTiHM. For each of these cases, unit cell depletion calculations were performed with SCALE/TRITON. Unit cells were used to perform this analysis using SCALE 6.1. Because of the long mean free paths (and migration lengths) of neutrons in HTRs, using a unit cell to represent a whole core can be non-trivial. The sizes of these cells were first set by using Serpent calculations to match a spectral index between unit cell and whole core domains. In the case of the DB-HTR, the unit cell which was arrived at in this way conserved the ratio of fuel to moderator found in a single block of fuel. In the conventional HTR case, a larger moderator-to-fuel ratio than that of a single block was needed to simulate the whole core spectrum. Discharge isotopics (for 500 nuclides) and one-group cross-sections (for 1022 nuclides) were delivered to the transmutation analysis team. This report provides documentation for these calculations. In addition to the discharge isotopics, one-group cross-sections were provided for the full list of 1022 nuclides tracked in the transmutation library.

Michael A. Pope

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Secure Facilities & Capabilities | National Security | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Events and Conferences Supporting Organizations National Security Home | Science & Discovery | National Security | Facilities SHARE Secure Facilities and Capabilities...

393

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management  

Multi-Process High Performance Computing Simulator Modular simulation capability for barrier and waste form degradation, multiphase flow and reactive ...

394

Los Alamos Lab: Bioscience Division: Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Division Capabilities Biomaterials Cell Biology Computational Biology Environmental Microbiology Genomic Science Measurement Science and Diagnostics Metabolomics Molecular...

395

Project Development and Finance: Capabilities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Capabilities overview of NREL's Project Finance and Development Group within the Deployment and Market Transformation Directorate.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Operation Redwing. Project 4. 1. Chorioretinal burns  

SciTech Connect

This Redwing project was designed to furnish supplemental information on the requirements for protection against retinal burns, using both rabbits and monkeys as experimental animals. Chorioretinal burns were produced by various segments of the thermal pulse. This was accomplished by two series of time-fractionating shutters. The first group, the early closing shutters, were open at time zero and closed at increasing intervals of time. The second series, the delayed-opening shutters, were closed at time zero and subsequently opened for preselected time increments during the flash. The feasibility of protection by fixed-density optical filters was explored. Two types of protective electronic shutters were field tested. Additional objectives were to: (1) determine whether blink reflexes would prevent chorioretinal burns; (2) ascertain which portions of the time-intensity pulse can produce thermal injury to the retina and choroid of the eye; (3) determine the time required for blink reflex in rabbits and monkeys exposed to the extreme light intensity of the nuclear detonations; (4) explore the feasibility of ocular protection by means of fixed-density optical filters or combinations of filters; and (5) tests, under field conditions, protective shutter devices that are in the developmental state and are designed to close more rapidly than the blink reflex.

Fixott, R.; Pickering, J.E.; Williams, D.B.; Brown, D.V.L.; Rose, H.W.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

U.S. BURNING PLASMA ORGANIZATION ACTIVITIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The national U.S. Burning Plasma Organization (USBPO) was formed to provide an umbrella structure in the U.S. fusion science research community. Its main purpose is the coordination of research activities in the U.S. program relevant to burning plasma science and preparations for participation in the international ITER experiment. This grant provided support for the continuing development and operations of the USBPO in its first years of existence. A central feature of the USBPO is the requirement for broad community participation in and governance of this effort. We concentrated on five central areas of activity of the USBPO during this grant period. These included: 1) activities of the Director and support staff in continuing management and development of the USBPO activity; 2) activation of the advisory Council; 3) formation and initial research activities of the research community Topical Groups; 4) formation of Task Groups to perform specific burning plasma related research and development activities; 5) integration of the USBPO community with the ITER Project Office as needed to support ITER development in the U.S.

Raymond J. Fonck

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

398

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): New Hanover County Airport Burn Pit Site, New Hanover County, Wilmington, NC. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The New Hanover site was located on Gardner Road approximately 500 feet west of the New Hanover County Airport terminal, New Hanover, North Carolina. From 1968 to 1979, the site was used for fire-fighter training purposes. During training exercises, jet fuel, gasoline, petroleum storage bottoms, fuel oil, kerosene, and sorbent materials from oil spill cleanup were burned in a pit. During its active years, water from the pit was allowed to flow onto land surfaces. Inspections conducted after the pit was abandoned showed that most of the standing liquid in the pit was water. In addition to the burn pit area, fire-fighting activities resulted in contamination at several other site areas, including an auto burn area; a railroad tank burn area; an aircraft mock-up area; a fuel tank and pipelines area; and two stained soil areas north of the burn pit. The ROD addressed restoration of the aquifer to drinking water quality as a final action for the site. The primary contaminants of concern that affect the soil and ground water were VOCs, including benzene; and metals, including chromium and lead.

Not Available

1992-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

399

Investigation and demonstration of a rich combustor cold-start device for alcohol-fueled engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have completed a study in which they investigated the use of a rich combustor to aid in cold starting spark-ignition engines fueled with either neat ethanol or neat methanol. The rich combustor burns the alcohol fuel outside the engine under fuel-rich conditions to produce a combustible product stream that is fed to the engine for cold starting. The rich combustor approach significantly extends the cold starting capability of alcohol-fueled engines. A design tool was developed that simulates the operation of the combustor and couples it to an engine/vehicle model. This tool allows the user to determine the fuel requirements of the rich combustor as the vehicle executes a given driving mission. The design tool was used to design and fabricate a rich combustor for use on a 2.8 L automotive engine. The system was tested using a unique cold room that allows the engine to be coupled to an electric dynamometer. The engine was fitted with an aftermarket engine control system that permitted the fuel flow to the rich combustor to be programmed as a function of engine speed and intake manifold pressure. Testing indicated that reliable cold starts were achieved on both neat methanol and neat ethanol at temperatures as low as {minus}20 C. Although starts were experienced at temperatures as low as {minus}30 C, these were erratic. They believe that an important factor at the very low temperatures is the balance between the high mechanical friction of the engine and the low energy density of the combustible mixture fed to the engine from the rich combustor.

Hodgson, J.W.; Irick, D.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

402

LANL capabilities towards bioenergy and biofuels programs  

SciTech Connect

LANL invented technology for increasing growth and productivity of photosysnthetic organisms, including algae and higher plants. The technology has been extensively tested at the greenhouse and field scale for crop plants. Initial bioreactor testing of its efficacy on algal growth has shown promising results. It increases algal growth rates even under optimwn nutrient supply and careful pH control with CO{sub 2} continuously available. The technology uses a small organic molecule, applied to the plant surfaces or added to the algal growth medium. CO{sub 2} concentration is necessary to optimize algal production in either ponds or reactors. LANL has successfully designed, built and demonstrated an effective, efficient technology using DOE funding. Such a system would be very valuable for capitalizing on local inexpensive sources of CO{sub 2} for algal production operations. Furthermore, our protein engineering team has a concept to produce highly stable carbonic anhydyrase (CA) enzyme, which could be very useful to assure maximum utilization of the CO{sub 2} supply. Stable CA could be used either imnlobilized on solid supports or engineered into the algal strain. The current technologies for harvesting the algae and obtaining the lipids do not meet the needs for rapid, low cost separations for high volumes of material. LANL has obtained proof of concept for the high volume flowing stream concentration of algae, algal lysis and separation of the lipid, protein and water fractions, using acoustic platforms. This capability is targeted toward developing biosynthetics, chiral syntheses, high throughput protein expression and purification, organic chemistry, recognition ligands, and stable isotopes geared toward Bioenergy applications. Areas of expertise include stable isotope chemistry, biomaterials, polymers, biopolymers, organocatalysis, advanced characterization methods, and chemistry of model compounds. The ultimate realization of the ability to design and synthesize materials that mimic or are inspired by natural systems will lead to entirely new applications in the bioenergy areas. In addition, there are new developments in this capability that involve development of catalytic methods for the production of carbon chains from the most abundant carbohydrate on the planet, glucose. These carbon chains will be useful in the production of high density fuels which defined characteristics. In addition, these methods/capabilities will be used to generate feedstocks for industrial processes. LANL is the second largest partner institution of the Department of Energy's Joint Genome Institute (DOE-JGI), and specializes in high throughput genome finishing and analysis in support of DOE missions in energy, bioremediation and carbon sequestration. This group is comprised of molecular biology labs and computational staff who together focus on the high-throughput DNA sequencing of whole microbial genomes, computational finishing and bioinformatics. The applications team focuses on the use of new sequencing technologies to address questions in environmental science. In addition to supporting the DOE mission, this group supports the Nation's national security mission by sequencing critical pathogens and near neighbors in support of relevent application areas.

Olivares, Jose A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Min S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Unkefer, Clifford J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradbury, Andrew M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

BIOMASS BURNING IN THE AMAZON: LINKS BETWEEN BURNING, SCIAMACHY TRACE GASES, AND AEROSOL AND SURFACE PROPERTIES FROM THE ORAC-AATSR RETRIEVAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS BURNING IN THE AMAZON: LINKS BETWEEN BURNING, SCIAMACHY TRACE GASES, AND AEROSOL@atm.ox.ac.uk AEROSOL AND GAS PROPERTIESSEASONALITY OF BURNING Biomass burning in the Amazon shows strong seasonal counts are generally highest up to 3 months after the burning of ground. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ESA

404

Global Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited) Trends Since 1751 approximately 337 billion metric tonnes of carbon have been released to the atmosphere from the consumption of fossil fuels and cement production. Half of these emissions have occurred since the mid 1970s. The 2007 global fossil-fuel carbon emission estimate, 8365 million metric tons of carbon, represents an all-time high and a 1.7% increase from 2006. Globally, liquid and solid fuels accounted for 76.3% of the emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement production in 2007. Combustion of gas fuels (e.g., natural gas) accounted for 18.5% (1551 million metric tons of carbon) of the total emissions from fossil fuels in 2007 and reflects a gradually increasing global utilization of natural gas. Emissions from

405

India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

India India India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends India's 2008 total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions rose 8.1% over the 2007 level to 475 million metric tons of carbon. From 1950 to 2008, India experienced dramatic growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions averaging 5.7% per year and becoming the world's third largest fossil-fuel CO2-emitting country. Indian total emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement production have more than doubled since 1994. Fossil-fuel emissions in India continue to result largely from coal burning with India being the world's third largest producer of coal. Coal contributed 87% of the emissions in 1950 and 71% in 2008; at the same time, the oil fraction increased from 11% to 20%. Indian emissions data reveal little impact from the oil price increases that

406

2000 Annual Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Technologies Fiscal Year (FY) 2000 Annual Progress Report for the Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines and Fuel Cells Program highlights progress achieved during FY 2000 and comprises 22 summaries of industry and National Laboratory projects that were conducted. The report provides an overview of the exciting work being conducted to tackle the tough technical challenges associated with developing clean burning fuels that will enable meeting the performance goals of the Emission Control R and D for Advanced CIDI Engines and the Transportation Fuel Cell Power Systems Programs. The summaries cover the effects of CIDI engine emissions and fuel cell power system performance, the effects of lubricants on engine emissions, the effects of fuel and consumed lubricants on exhaust emission control devices and the health and safety, materials compatibility, and economics of advanced petroleum-based fuels.

Chalk, S.

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

407

Co-combustion of refuse derived fuel and coal in a cyclone furnace at the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, C. P. Crane Station  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A co-combustion demonstration burn of coal and fluff refuse-derived fuel (RDF) was conducted by Teledyne National and Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. This utility has two B and W cyclone furnaces capable of generating 400 MW. The facility is under a prohibition order to convert from No. 6 oil to coal; as a result, it was desirable to demonstrate that RDF, which has a low sulfur content, can be burned in combination with coals containing up to 2% sulfur, thus reducing overall sulfur emissions without deleterious effects. Each furnace consists of four cyclones capable of generating 1,360,000 pounds per hour steam. The tertiary air inlet of one of the cyclones was modified with an adapter to permit fluff RDF to be pneumatically blown into the cyclone. At the same time, coal was fed into the cyclone furnace through the normal coal feeding duct, where it entered the burning chamber tangentially and mixed with the RDF during the burning process. Secondary shredded fluff RDF was prepared by the Baltimore County Resource Recovery Facility. The RDF was discharged into a receiving station consisting of a belt conveyor discharging into a lump breaker, which in turn, fed the RDF into a pneumatic line through an air-lock feeder. A total of 2316 tons were burned at an average rate of 5.6 tons per hour. The average heat replacement by RDF for the cyclone was 25%, based on Btu input for a period of forty days. The range of RDF burned was from 3 to 10 tons per hour, or 7 to 63% heat replacement. The average analysis of the RDF (39 samples) for moisture, ash, heat (HHV) and sulfur content were 18.9%, 13.4%, 6296 Btu/lb and 0.26% respectively. RDF used in the test was secondary shredded through 1-1/2 inch grates producing the particle size distribution of from 2 inches to .187 inches. Findings to date after inspection of the boiler and superheater indicate satisfactory results with no deleterious effects from the RDF.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Gas Turbine Combustor Performance on Synthetic Fuels, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume presents a summary of a project to determine the effects of burning currently available coal-derived and shale-derived synthetic liquid fuels in state-of-the-art gas turbine combustors. It describes the fuels tested, the effects of NO emission and of smoke formation and reduction, and a comparison of surrogate and synthetic fuels. The project concluded that a number of selected coal and shale oil fuels can be used in current turbines as soon as these fuels become available.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel...

410

EMSL: Science: Research and Capability Development Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intramural Research & Capability Development Program Intramural Research & Capability Development Program The EMSL Intramural Research and Capability Development Program facilitates development of new research tools and enables EMSL staff members to advance the important skills and expertise necessary to enhance the EMSL user program. These intramural projects are intended to increase the scientific visibility of EMSL staff in areas that promote the objectives of EMSL's three science themes- Biological Interactions and Dynamics, Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science, and Science of Interfacial Phenomena. Technical outcomes of this program include journal publications, scientific presentations, new capabilities or capability enhancements, and expertise to augment EMSL user activities and foster development of innovative

411

Fluidic fuel feed system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the development and testing of a fluidic fuel injector for a coal-water slurry fueled diesel engine. The objective of this program was to improve the operating life of coal-water slurry fuel controls and injector components by using fluidic technology. This project addressed the application of fluidic devices to solve the problems of efficient atomization of coal-water slurry fuel and of injector component wear. The investigation of injector nozzle orifice design emphasized reducing the pressure required for efficient atomization. The effort to minimize injector wear includes the novel design of components allowing the isolation of the coal-water slurry from close-fitting injector components. Three totally different injectors were designed, fabricated, bench tested and modified to arrive at a final design which was capable of being engine tested. 6 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Badgley, P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Definition: Available Transfer Capability | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transfer Capability Transfer Capability Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Available Transfer Capability A measure of the transfer capability remaining in the physical transmission network for further commercial activity over and above already committed uses. It is defined as Total Transfer Capability less existing transmission commitments (including retail customer service), less a Capacity Benefit Margin, less a Transmission Reliability Margin.[1] Related Terms transfer capability, transmission lines, transmission line, capacity benefit margin, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Available_Transfer_Capability&oldid=502496

413

Interim Status Closure Plan Open Burning Treatment Unit Technical Area 16-399 Burn Tray  

SciTech Connect

This closure plan describes the activities necessary to close one of the interim status hazardous waste open burning treatment units at Technical Area (TA) 16 at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Facility), hereinafter referred to as the 'TA-16-399 Burn Tray' or 'the unit'. The information provided in this closure plan addresses the closure requirements specified in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 265, Subparts G and P for the thermal treatment units operated at the Facility under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act. Closure of the open burning treatment unit will be completed in accordance with Section 4.1 of this closure plan.

Vigil-Holterman, Luciana R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

414

The Energy Institute Live Green, Burn Clean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute Topics CoveredTopics Covered Biodiesel Introduction to Biodiesel Some observations of biodiesel combustion in a Cummins ISB 5.9L MY2000 turbodiesel engine Sources of the "Biodiesel NOx" effect Fuel quality none of the fuel quality concerns associated with biodiesel Ethanol Efficiency and performance issues

Lee, Dongwon

415

Present status and development of PWR fuel in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the nuclear power plant fuel design, manufacture and R and D capability in Republic of China; the progress condition of Qinshan fuel assemblies and preparatory work for Guandong and other PWR's fuel assemblies; and the program of research and development of high performance fuel.

Shouhui, D.; Yinian, Z; Dingcang, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A feasibility study of reactor-based deep-burn concepts.  

SciTech Connect

A systematic assessment of the General Atomics (GA) proposed Deep-Burn concept based on the Modular Helium-Cooled Reactor design (DB-MHR) has been performed. Preliminary benchmarking of deterministic physics codes was done by comparing code results to those from MONTEBURNS (MCNP-ORIGEN) calculations. Detailed fuel cycle analyses were performed in order to provide an independent evaluation of the physics and transmutation performance of the one-pass and two-pass concepts. Key performance parameters such as transuranic consumption, reactor performance, and spent fuel characteristics were analyzed. This effort has been undertaken in close collaborations with the General Atomics design team and Brookhaven National Laboratory evaluation team. The study was performed primarily for a 600 MWt reference DB-MHR design having a power density of 4.7 MW/m{sup 3}. Based on parametric and sensitivity study, it was determined that the maximum burnup (TRU consumption) can be obtained using optimum values of 200 {micro}m and 20% for the fuel kernel diameter and fuel packing fraction, respectively. These values were retained for most of the one-pass and two-pass design calculations; variation to the packing fraction was necessary for the second stage of the two-pass concept. Using a four-batch fuel management scheme for the one-pass DB-MHR core, it was possible to obtain a TRU consumption of 58% and a cycle length of 286 EFPD. By increasing the core power to 800 MWt and the power density to 6.2 MW/m{sup 3}, it was possible to increase the TRU consumption to 60%, although the cycle length decreased by {approx}64 days. The higher TRU consumption (burnup) is due to the reduction of the in-core decay of fissile Pu-241 to Am-241 relative to fission, arising from the higher power density (specific power), which made the fuel more reactivity over time. It was also found that the TRU consumption can be improved by utilizing axial fuel shuffling or by operating with lower material temperatures (colder core). Results also showed that the transmutation performance of the one-pass deep-burn concept is sensitive to the initial TRU vector, primarily because longer cooling time reduces the fissile content (Pu-241 specifically.) With a cooling time of 5 years, the TRU consumption increases to 67%, while conversely, with 20-year cooling the TRU consumption is about 58%. For the two-pass DB-MHR (TRU recycling option), a fuel packing fraction of about 30% is required in the second pass (the recycled TRU). It was found that using a heterogeneous core (homogeneous fuel element) concept, the TRU consumption is dependent on the cooling interval before the 2nd pass, again due to Pu-241 decay during the time lag between the first pass fuel discharge and the second pass fuel charge. With a cooling interval of 7 years (5 and 2 years before and after reprocessing) a TRU consumption of 55% is obtained. With an assumed ''no cooling'' interval, the TRU consumption is 63%. By using a cylindrical core to reduce neutron leakage, TRU consumption of the case with 7-year cooling interval increases to 58%. For a two-pass concept using a heterogeneous fuel element (and homogeneous core) with first and second pass volume ratio of 2:1, the TRU consumption is 62.4%. Finally, the repository loading benefits arising from the deep-burn and Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF) concepts were estimated and compared, for the same initial TRU vector. The DB-MHR concept resulted in slightly higher TRU consumption and repository loading benefit compared to the IMF concept (58.1% versus 55.1% for TRU consumption and 2.0 versus 1.6 for estimated repository loading benefit).

Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Hill, R. N.; Yang, W. S.

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fuel pin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

418

Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil Takes Fuel Efficient Cookstoves to Ethiopia |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil Takes Fuel Efficient Cookstoves to Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil Takes Fuel Efficient Cookstoves to Ethiopia Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil Takes Fuel Efficient Cookstoves to Ethiopia February 8, 2011 - 1:21pm Addthis Darfuri woman using a Berkeley-Darfur cookstove | Courtesy of darfurstoves.org Darfuri woman using a Berkeley-Darfur cookstove | Courtesy of darfurstoves.org April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Clean-burning cookstoves reduce the need for firewood in the developing world. Refugees are able to spend less time outside of the camps searching for fuel, therefore reducing the risk of violence and assault. By using less fuel, clean-burning cookstoves decrease deforestation and lessen greenhouse gas emissions. Researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National

419

2008-2009 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Ronald Reagan Building...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Trade Center More Documents & Publications Clark Atlanta Universities (CAU) Energy Related Research Capabilities 2008-2009 Winter Fuels Outlook Conference Ronald Reagan...

420

Current Projects for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis > Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis > Current Projects Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Seed-Blanket Unit Duplex Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the greatest challenges facing the nuclear power industry is the final disposition of nuclear waste. To meet the needs of the nuclear power industry, a new fuel assembly design, called DUPLEX, has been developed which provides higher fuel burnups, burns transuranic waste while reducing minor actinides, reduces the long term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel, and was developed for use in current light water reactors. The DUPLEX design considered in this thesis is based on a seed and blanket unit (SBU) configuration, where the seed region contains standard UO2 fuel, and the blanket region contains an inert matrix (Pu,Np,Am)O2-MgO-ZrO2 fuel. The research efforts of this thesis are first to consider the higher burnup effects on DUPLEX assembly thermal-hydraulic performance and thermal safety margin over the assembly’s expected operational lifetime. In order to accomplish this, an existing burnup-dependent thermal-hydraulic methodology for conventional homogeneous fuel assemblies has been updated to meet the modeling needs specific to SBU-type assemblies. The developed framework dramatically expands the capabilities of the latest thermal-hydraulic evaluation framework such that the most promising and unique DUPLEX fuel design can be evaluated. As part of this updated methodology, the posed DUPLEX design is evaluated with respect to the minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio, peak fuel temperatures for both regions, and the peak cladding temperatures, under ANS Condition I, II, and III transient events with the thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-01. Due to difficulty in the fabrication and handling of minor actinide dioxides, documented thermal conductivity values for the considered IMF design are unavailable. In order to develop a representative thermal conductivity model for use in VIPRE-01, an extensive literature survey on the thermal conductivity of (Pu,Np,Am)O2-MgO-ZrO2 component materials and a comprehensive review of combinatory models was performed. Using the updated methodology, VIPRE-01 is used to perform steady-state and transient thermal hydraulic analyses for the DUPLEX fuel assembly. During loss-of-flow accident scenarios, the DUPLEX design is shown to meet imposed safety criteria. However, using the most conservative thermal conductivity modeling approach for (Pu,Np,Am)O2-MgO-ZrO2, the blanket region fuel temperatures remain only slightly below the design limit.

McDermott, Patrick 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Why is fuel Economy Important?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why Is Fuel Economy Important? Why Is Fuel Economy Important? Saves You Money Save as much as $1,700 in fuel costs each year by choosing the most efficient vehicle that meets your needs. See how much you can save! Photo of gasoline receipt on top of money Reduces Climate Change Carbon dioxide (CO2) from burning gasoline and diesel contributes to global climate change. You can do your part to reduce climate change by reducing your carbon footprint! Photo of Earth from space Reduces Oil Dependence Costs Our dependence on oil makes us vulnerable to oil market manipulation and price shocks. Find out how oil dependence hurts our economy! Chart showing annual cost of oil imports increasing from $21 billion per year in 1975 to approximately $330 billion in 2011 Increases Energy Sustainability

423

No Fossils in This Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan for Environmental Teaching Plan for Environmental Teaching GM Environmental Science Club No Fossils in This Fuel Your PlanET Sixth through Eighth Grades (Can be easily adapted to any elementary/middle school level) Ingredients: Yeast, sugar ... what are you making? Sweet rolls? Not in Science Class! You're blending these ingredients to make an innovative form of fuel! That's right ... when these two simple ingredients are mixed, the yeast  a simple, living organism  breaks the sugar down into ethyl alcohol, or ethanol, and carbon dioxide. While you won't be burning the fuel to prove its usefulness, you can share with your students how ethanol is being used right now to power some of today's vehicles! Students will be able to experiment with the activity, and they will see how the fermentation that occurs can blow up a

424

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Digg

425

Neutrino-Accelerated Hot Hydrogen Burning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the effects of significant electron anti-neutrino fluxes on hydrogen burning. Specifically, we find that the bottleneck weak nuclear reactions in the traditional pp-chain and the hot CNO cycle can be accelerated by anti-neutrino capture, increasing the energy generation rate. We also discuss how anti-neutrino capture reactions can alter the conditions for break out into the rp-process. We speculate on the impact of these considerations for the evolution and dynamics of collapsing very- and super- massive compact objects.

Chad T. Kishimoto; George M. Fuller

2006-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

426

Definition: Transfer Capability | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transfer Capability Transfer Capability The measure of the ability of interconnected electric systems to move or transfer power in a reliable manner from one area to another over all transmission lines (or paths) between those areas under specified system conditions. The units of transfer capability are in terms of electric power, generally expressed in megawatts (MW). The transfer capability from 'Area A' to 'Area B' is not generally equal to the transfer capability from 'Area B' to 'Area A.'[1] Related Terms transmission lines, power, electricity generation, transmission line References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Transfer_Capability&oldid=480565"

427

2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general business strategy and market focus, as well as, financial information for select publicly-traded companies.

DOE

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Spent fuel characteristics & disposal considerations  

SciTech Connect

The fuel used in commercial nuclear power reactors is uranium, generally in the form of an oxide. The gas-cooled reactors developed in England use metallic uranium enclosed in a thin layer of Magnox. Since this fuel must be processed into a more stable form before disposal, we will not consider the characteristics of the Magnox spent fuel. The vast majority of the remaining power reactors in the world use uranium dioxide pellets in Zircaloy cladding as the fuel material. Reactors that are fueled with uranium dioxide generally use water as the moderator. If ordinary water is used, the reactors are called Light Water Reactors (LWR), while if water enriched in the deuterium isotope of hydrogen is used, the reactors are called Heavy Water reactors. The LWRs can be either pressurized reactors (PWR) or boiling water reactors (BWR). Both of these reactor types use uranium that has been enriched in the 235 isotope to about 3.5 to 4% total abundance. There may be minor differences in the details of the spent fuel characteristics for PWRs and BWRs, but for simplicity we will not consider these second-order effects. The Canadian designed reactor (CANDU) that is moderated by heavy water uses natural uranium without enrichment of the 235 isotope as the fuel. These reactors run at higher linear power density than LWRs and produce spent fuel with lower total burn-up than LWRs. Where these difference are important with respect to spent fuel management, we will discuss them. Otherwise, we will concentrate on spent fuel from LWRs.

Oversby, V.M.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

User Facilities and Technical Capabilities | Biosciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Facilities and Technical Capabilities BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About...

430

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of performance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activities throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing programs as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science,

431

Argonne CNM: Theory and Modeling Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

aid in the design of functional nanoscale systems. Our primary facility is a high-performance computing cluster accommodating parallel computer-intensive applications. Capabilities...

432

Additive manufacturing capabilities expanding | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Additive manufacturing capabilities expanding January 01, 2013 Large-scale polymer additive manufacturing equipment located at the Manufacturing Demonstration Facility. Additive...

433

Dynamic System Identification Toolbox Capabilities Update Frank...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capabilities Update Frank Tuffner Pacific Northwest National Laboratory francis.tuffner@pnnl.gov 27 June 2013 Washington, DC DOEOE Transmission Reliability Program Project...

434

Microsoft Word - Objective Supply Capability Adaptive Redesign...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impact The National Guard Bureau (NGB) requires capabilities beyond the scope of standard army systems in order to increase the efficiency and cost effectiveness of its...

435

ORISE: Helping Strengthen Emergency Response Capabilities for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps strengthen government agencies' emergency response capabilities through a variety of exercises, from tabletop training to...

436

Airborne measurements of carbonaceous aerosols in southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Particulate matter collected aboard the University of Washington's Convair-580 research aircraft over southern Africa during the dry, biomass burning season was analyzed for total carbon, organic carbon, and black carbon contents using thermal and optical methods. Samples were collected in smoke plumes of burning savanna and in regional haze. A known artifact, produced by the adsorption of organic gases on the quartz filter substrates used to collect the particulate matter samples, comprised a significant portion of the total carbon collected. Consequently, conclusions derived from the data are greatly dependent on whether or not organic carbon concentrations are corrected for this artifact. For example, the estimated aerosol co-albedo (1 - single scattering albedo), which is a measure of aerosol absorption, of the biomass smoke samples is 60 percent larger using corrected organic carbon concentrations. Thus, the corrected data imply that the biomass smoke is 60 percent more absorbing than do the uncorrected data. The black carbon to (corrected) organic carbon mass ratio (BC/OC) of smoke plume samples (0.18/2610.06) is lower than that of samples collected in the regional haze (0.25/2610.08). The difference may be due to mixing of biomass smoke with background air characterized by a higher BC/OC ratio. A simple source apportionment indicates that biomass smoke contributes about three-quarters of the aerosol burden in the regional haze, while other sources (e.g., fossil fuel burning) contribute the remainder.

Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Novakov, T.; Hobbs, Peter V.; Magi, Brian

2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

437

Development of Computation Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computation Capabilities Computation Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems Background Staged combustion is a method of reducing nitrogen oxide (NO x ) emissions in boilers by controlling the combustion mixture of air and fuel. Its process conditions are particularly corrosive to lower furnace walls. Superheaters and/or reheaters are often employed in the upper furnace to reuse hot combustion gasses to further raise the

438

Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing  

SciTech Connect

The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facilityâ??s production process.

Anton K. Schindler; Steve R. Duke; Thomas E. Burch; Edward W. Davis; Ralph H. Zee; David I. Bransby; Carla Hopkins; Rutherford L. Thompson; Jingran Duan; Vignesh Venkatasubramanian; Stephen Giles.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

Hybrid Fuel Cell Technology Overview  

SciTech Connect

For the purpose of this STI product and unless otherwise stated, hybrid fuel cell systems are power generation systems in which a high temperature fuel cell is combined with another power generating technology. The resulting system exhibits a synergism in which the combination performs with an efficiency far greater than can be provided by either system alone. Hybrid fuel cell designs under development include fuel cell with gas turbine, fuel cell with reciprocating (piston) engine, and designs that combine different fuel cell technologies. Hybrid systems have been extensively analyzed and studied over the past five years by the Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and others. These efforts have revealed that this combination is capable of providing remarkably high efficiencies. This attribute, combined with an inherent low level of pollutant emission, suggests that hybrid systems are likely to serve as the next generation of advanced power generation systems.

None available

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

440

'Live Burns' in Spartanburg, SC, Will Benefit Research and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in Spartanburg, SC, battle a 'test burn' of an abandoned house in an ... organizations will turn abandoned wood-frame, single-family houses near ...

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Burns Harbor, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Burns Harbor, Indiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

442

C. Langton1, D. Kosson2 and H. Burns1  

G. Flach, R. Seitz, S. Marra, H. Burns, SRNL DOE-EM Project Manager: Pramod Mallick CBP Project Support Provided by EM-30 Contact Information

443

Biomass burning : particle emissions, characteristics, and airborne measurements.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biomass burning started to attract attention since the last decade because of its impacts on the atmosphere and the environmental air quality, as well as… (more)

Wardoyo, Arinto Yudi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Burning Man: Transforming Community through Countercultural Ritual Process.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis will examine the countercultural event called Burning Man through the lens of the ritual process. Through the personal narratives of six main collaborators… (more)

McCaffrey, Jessica

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Reflective Terahertz Imaging for early diagnosis of skin burn severity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of injuries caused by flame/flash burns[23, 24]. OtherDeep partial IIb° Deep III° Flame, chemical, electrical, hotliquids with high viscosity Flame, electrical, chemical,

TEWARI, PRIYAMVADA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

STAGING OF FUEL CELLS - PHASE II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

TIAX has executed a laboratory-based development program aiming at the improvement of stationary fuel cell systems. The two-year long development program resulted in an improved understanding of staged fuel cells and inorganic proton conductors through evaluation of results from a number of laboratory tasks: (1) Development of a fuel cell modeling tool--Multi-scale model was developed, capable of analyzing the effects of materials and operating conditions; and this model allowed studying various ''what-if'' conditions for hypothetically staged fuel cells; (2) Study of new high temperature proton conductor--TIAX discovery of a new class of sulfonated inorganics capable of conducting protons when exposed to water; and study involved synthesis and conductivity measurements of novel compounds up to 140 C; (3) Electrochemical fuel cell measurements--the feasibility of staged fuel cells was tested in TIAX's fuel cell laboratories experimental design was based on results from modeling.

Per Onnerud; Suresh Sriramulu

2002-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

447

General Circulation Model Calculations of the Direct Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Sulfate and Fossil-Fuel Soot Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new radiation code within a general circulation model is used to assess the direct solar and thermal radiative forcing by sulfate aerosol of anthropogenic origin and soot aerosol from fossil-fuel burning. The radiative effects of different ...

J. M. Haywood; D. L. Roberts; A. Slingo; J. M. Edwards; K. P. Shine

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Mechanistic Reactive Burn Modeling of Solid Explosives  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a computational framework for reactive burn modeling of solid explosives and the development of a test case where physical mechanisms represent RDX or RDX-based materials. The report is a sequel to LA-13794-MS, ''A Unifying Framework for Hot Spots and the Ignition of Energetic Materials,'' where we proposed a new approach to the building of a general purpose model that captures the essential features of the three primary origins of hot-spot formation: void collapse, shear banding, friction. The purpose of the present report is to describe the continuing task of coupling the unifying hot-spot model to hydrodynamic calculations to develop a mechanistic reactive burn model. The key components of the coupling include energy localization, the growth of hot spots, overall hot-spot behavior, and a phase-averaged mixture equation of state (EOS) in a Mie-Grueneisen form. The nucleation and growth of locally heated regions is modeled by a phenomenological treatment as well as a statistical model based on an exponential size distribution. The Mie-Grueneisen form of the EOS is one of many possible choices and is not a critical selection for implementing the model. In this report, model calculations are limited to proof-of-concept illustrations for shock loading. Results include (1) shock ignition and growth-to-detonation, (2) double shock ignition, and (3) quenching and reignition. A comparative study of Pop-plots is discussed based on the statistical model.

Y.Horie; Y.Hamate; D.Greening

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Impact of biomass burning on the atmosphere  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fire has played an important part in biogeochemical cycling throughout most of the history of our planet. Ice core studies have been very beneficial in paleoclimate studies and constraining the budgets of biogeochemical cycles through the past 160,000 years of the Vostok ice core. Although to date there has been no way of determining cause and effect, concentration of greenhouse gases directly correlates with temperature in ice core analyses. Recent ice core studies on Greenland have shown that significant climate change can be very rapid on the order of a decade. This chapter addresses the coupled evolution of our planet`s atmospheric composition and biomass burning. Special attention is paid to the chemical and climatic impacts of biomass burning on the atmosphere throughout the last century, specifically looking at the cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. Information from ice core measurements may be useful in understanding the history of fire and its historic affect on the composition of the atmosphere and climate.

Dignon, J.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data