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1

Fuel to Burn: Economics of Converting Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel to Burn: Economics of Converting Forest Thinnings to Energy Using BioMax in Southern Oregon E a small-scale (100-kW) BioMax without a subsidy or tax credit, even if fuel were delivered to the plant; Christensen, Glenn. 2005. Fuel to burn: Economics of converting forest thinnings to energy using Bio

Fried, Jeremy S.

2

NREL: ReFUEL Laboratory - Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities The Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is a world-class testing facility dedicated to advanced fuels and vehicles research. The lab features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Combustion Lab. Because the ReFUEL Laboratory is located in Denver, Colorado, it offers the additional capability of testing emissions and vehicle performance at high altitude. It also features an altitude simulation system to mimic results found at lower altitudes, including sea level.

3

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biofuel Blending Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blending Capability Requirements and Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section...

4

Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors. Therefore, the overriding motivation behind the FFC R&D program described in this plan is to foster closer integration between fuel design and fabrication to reduce programmatic risk. These motivating factors are all interrelated, and progress addressing one will aid understanding of the others. The FFC R&D needs fall into two principal categories, 1) baseline process optimization, to refine the existing fabrication technologies, and 2) manufacturing process alternatives, to evaluate new fabrication technologies that could provide improvements in quality, repeatability, material utilization, or cost. The FFC R&D Plan examines efforts currently under way in regard to coupon, foil, plate, and fuel element manufacturing, and provides recommendations for a number of R&D topics that are of high priority but not currently funded (i.e., knowledge gaps). The plan ties all FFC R&D efforts into a unified vision that supports the overall Convert Program schedule in general, and the fabrication schedule leading up to the MP-1 and FSP-1 irradiation experiments specifically. The fabrication technology decision gates and down-selection logic and schedules are tied to the schedule for fabricating the MP-1 fuel plates, which will provide the necessary data to make a final fuel fabrication process down-selection. Because of the short turnaround between MP-1 and the follow-on FSP-1 and MP-2 experiments, the suite of specimen types that will be available for MP-1 will be the same as those available for FSP-1 and MP-2. Therefore, the only opportunity to explore parameter space and alternative processing is between now and 2016 when the candidate processes are down-selected in preparation for the MP-1, FSP-1, and MP-2 plate manufacturing campaigns. A number of key risks identified by the FFC are discussed in this plan, with recommended mitigating actions for those activities within FFC, and identification of risks that are impacted by activities in other areas of the Convert Program. The R&D Plan does not include discussion of FFC initiatives related to production-scale manufacturing of fuel (e.g., establishment of the Pilot Line Production Facility), rather, the goal of this plan is to document the R&D activities needed ultimately to enable high-quality and cost-effective production of the fuel by the commercial fuel fabricator. The intent is for this R&D Plan to be a living document that will be reviewed and updated on a regular basis (e.g., annually) to ensure that FFC R&D activities remain properly aligned to the needs of the Convert Program. This version of the R&D Plan represents the first annual review and revision.

Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

5

Ignition and Burn in a Small Magnetized Fuel Target  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LASNEX calculations of a small magnetized target show high gain at a velocity significantly lower than needed for unmagnetized targets. Its cryogenic fuel layer appears to be raised to an equilibrium ignition temperature of about 2 keV by the radiation from the burning magnetized fuel.

Kirkpatrick, Ronald C

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Study of the burning capability of the los alamos ATW system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of calculations is to evaluate the evolution of the infinite multiplication factor (k inf) during the irradiation of minor actinides High Level Waste (HLW) and Plutonium. The most important results are independently verified with Monte Carlo calculations. The relative importance of the main parameters affecting the k inf was investigated by performing calculations with several minor actinide and plutonium concentrations as well as different 238U decontamination factors for HLW. The merit figure value for minor actinide alone considering a constant neutron flux indicates that the best results are reached for minor actinide concentration equal to PWR spent fuel. The best plutonium burning results are obtained for a concentration (50.23 g/l) equal to the half of PWR spent fuel one. The simulations lead to two different reactor concepts: one for HLW burning and the other for plutonium burning purposes. To burn the HLW the most suitable reactor is an homogeneous one. This kind of reactor can effectively be utilised to burn minor actinide in low concentration (namely the PWR spent fuel). On the other hand an heterogeneous reactor with channels filled by all actinides present in PWR spent fuel with the exclusion of U isotopes with a concentration of 50 g/l can be studied.

P. A. Landeyro; A. Buccafurni; A. Orazi

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

Hayes, A C; Nieto, Michael Martin; WIlson, W B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Theory of Antineutrino Monitoring of Burning MOX Plutonium Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This letter presents the physics and feasibility of reactor antineutrino monitoring to verify the burnup of plutonium loaded in the reactor as a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. It examines the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different MOX fuels, for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguards. The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium. Thus, antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, though verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

A. C. Hayes; H. R. Trellue; Michael Martin Nieto; W. B. WIlson

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

9

Rigorous HDD Emissions Capabilities of Shell GTL Fuel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rigorous HDD Emissions Capabilities of Shell GTL Fuel Ralph A. Cherrillo & Mary Ann Dahlstrom Shell Global Solutions (US) Inc. Richard H. Clark Shell Global Solutions (UK) 11 th...

10

Pellet Fueling Technology Development Leading to Efficient Fueling of ITER Burning Plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pellet injection is the primary fueling technique planned for central fueling of the ITER burning plasma, which is a requirement for achieving high fusion gain. Injection of pellets from the inner wall has been shown on present day tokamaks to provide efficient fueling and is planned for use on ITER [1,2]. Significant development of pellet fueling technology has occurred as a result of the ITER R&D process. Extrusion rates with batch extruders have reached more than 1/2 of the ITER design specification of 1.3 cm3/s [3] and the ability to fuel efficiently from the inner wall by injecting through curved guide tubes has been demonstrated on several fusion devices. Modeling of the fueling deposition from inner wall pellet injection has been done using the Parks et al. ExB drift model [4] shows that inside launched pellets of 3mm size and speeds of 300 m/s have the capability to fuel well inside the separatrix. Gas fueling on the other hand is calculated to have very poor fueling efficiency due to the high density and wide scrape off layer compared to current machines. Isotopically mixed D/T pellets can provide efficient tritium fueling that will minimize tritium wall loading when compared to gas puffing of tritium. In addition, the use of pellets as an ELM trigger has been demonstrated and continues to be investigated as an ELM mitigation technique. During the ITER CDA and EDA the U.S. was responsible for ITER fueling system design and R&D and is in good position to resume this role for the ITER pellet fueling system. Currently the performance of the ITER guide tube design is under investigation. A mockup is being built that will allow tests with different pellet sizes and repetition rates. The results of these tests and their implication for fueling efficiency and central fueling will be discussed. The ITER pellet injection technology developments to date, specified requirements, and remaining development issues will be presented along with a plan to reach the design goal in time for employment on ITER.

Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Combs, Stephen Kirk [ORNL; Jernigan, Thomas C [ORNL; Houlberg, Wayne A [ORNL; Maruyama, S. [ITER International Team, Garching, Germany; Owen, Larry W [ORNL; Parks, P. B. [General Atomics; Rasmussen, David A [ORNL

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels contributes far more to global warming Researchers ScienceDaily (July 30, 2010) -- Soot from the burning of fossil fuels and solid biofuels analyzed the impacts of soot from fossil fuels -- diesel, coal, gasoline, jet fuel -- and from solid

12

Transportation capabilities study of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates current capabilities for transporting spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy. Currently licensed irradiated fuel shipping packages that have the potential for shipping the spent nuclear fuel are identified and then matched against the various spent nuclear fuel types. Also included are the results of a limited investigation into other certified packages and new packages currently under development. This study is intended to support top-level planning for the disposition of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel inventory.

Clark, G.L.; Johnson, R.A.; Smith, R.W. [Packaging Technology, Inc., Tacoma, WA (United States); Abbott, D.G.; Tyacke, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Vehicle System Impacts of Fuel Cell System Power Response Capability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- 01 - 1959 - 01 - 1959 Vehicle System Impacts of Fuel Cell System Power Response Capability Tony Markel and Keith Wipke National Renewable Energy Laboratory Doug Nelson Virginia Polytechnic University and State Institute Copyright © 2002 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT The impacts of fuel cell system power response capability on optimal hybrid and neat fuel cell vehicle configurations have been explored. Vehicle system optimization was performed with the goal of maximizing fuel economy over a drive cycle. Optimal hybrid vehicle design scenarios were derived for fuel cell systems with 10 to 90% power transient response times of 0, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 40 seconds. Optimal neat fuel cell vehicles where generated for responses times of 0, 2, 5, and 7

14

Burning of Hydrocarbon Fuels Directly in a Water-Based Heat Carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A principal possibility of burning hydrocarbon fuels directly in a water-based heat carrier is demonstrated. The first experimental results are presented by an example of burning acetylene in water with initia...

V. S. Teslenko; V. I. Manzhalei; R. N. Medvedev…

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Design and Optimization of Future Aircraft for Assessing the Fuel Burn Trends of Commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aircraft R1 Maximum payload at maximum range SFC Engine specific fuel consumption Sref Reference area STADesign and Optimization of Future Aircraft for Assessing the Fuel Burn Trends of Commercial Francisco, CA 94104, U.S.A. Accurately predicting the fuel burn performance and CO2 emissions of future

Alonso, Juan J.

16

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new and improved stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel including a vertical feed combustion chamber for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack, a major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprising a water jacket for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid and for convection circulation of the fluid for confining the locus of wood fuel combustion to the bottom of the vertical gravity feed combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel extending from the laterally directed draft outlet affords delayed travel time in a high temperature environment to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air as an actively induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion and high temperature zone. Active sources of forced air and induced draft are included, multiple use and circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Vertical feed stick wood fuel burning furnace system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stove or furnace for efficient combustion of wood fuel includes a vertical feed combustion chamber (15) for receiving and supporting wood fuel in a vertical attitude or stack. A major upper portion of the combustion chamber column comprises a water jacket (14) for coupling to a source of water or heat transfer fluid for convection circulation of the fluid. The locus (31) of wood fuel combustion is thereby confined to the refractory base of the combustion chamber. A flue gas propagation delay channel (34) extending laterally from the base of the chamber affords delayed travel time in a high temperature refractory environment sufficient to assure substantially complete combustion of the gaseous products of wood burning with forced air prior to extraction of heat in heat exchanger (16). Induced draft draws the fuel gas and air mixture laterally through the combustion chamber and refractory high temperature zone to the heat exchanger and flue. Also included are active sources of forced air and induced draft, multiple circuit couplings for the recovered heat, and construction features in the refractory material substructure and metal component superstructure.

Hill, Richard C. (Orono, ME)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Transuranic Waste Burning Potential of Thorium Fuel in a Fast Reactor - 12423  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westinghouse Electric Company (referred to as 'Westinghouse' in the rest of this paper) is proposing a 'back-to-front' approach to overcome the stalemate on nuclear waste management in the US. In this approach, requirements to further the societal acceptance of nuclear waste are such that the ultimate health hazard resulting from the waste package is 'as low as reasonably achievable'. Societal acceptability of nuclear waste can be enhanced by reducing the long-term radiotoxicity of the waste, which is currently driven primarily by the protracted radiotoxicity of the transuranic (TRU) isotopes. Therefore, a transition to a more benign radioactive waste can be accomplished by a fuel cycle capable of consuming the stockpile of TRU 'legacy' waste contained in the LWR Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) while generating waste which is significantly less radio-toxic than that produced by the current open U-based fuel cycle (once through and variations thereof). Investigation of a fast reactor (FR) operating on a thorium-based fuel cycle, as opposed to the traditional uranium-based is performed. Due to a combination between its neutronic properties and its low position in the actinide chain, thorium not only burns the legacy TRU waste, but it does so with a minimal production of 'new' TRUs. The effectiveness of a thorium-based fast reactor to burn legacy TRU and its flexibility to incorporate various fuels and recycle schemes according to the evolving needs of the transmutation scenario have been investigated. Specifically, the potential for a high TRU burning rate, high U-233 generation rate if so desired and low concurrent production of TRU have been used as metrics for the examined cycles. Core physics simulations of a fast reactor core running on thorium-based fuels and burning an external TRU feed supply have been carried out over multiple cycles of irradiation, separation and reprocessing. The TRU burning capability as well as the core isotopic content have been characterized. Results will be presented showing the potential for thorium to reach a high TRU transmutation rate over a wide variety of fuel types (oxide, metal, nitride and carbide) and transmutation schemes (recycle or partition of in-bred U-233). In addition, a sustainable scheme has been devised to burn the TRU accumulated in the core inventory once the legacy TRU supply has been exhausted, thereby achieving long-term virtually TRU-free. A comprehensive 'back-to-front' approach to the fuel cycle has recently been proposed by Westinghouse which emphasizes achieving 'acceptable', low-radiotoxicity, high-level waste, with the intent not only to satisfy all technical constraints but also to improve public acceptance of nuclear energy. Following this approach, the thorium fuel cycle, due to its low radiotoxicity and high potential for TRU transmutation has been selected as a promising solution. Additional studies not shown here have shown significant reduction of decay heat. The TRU burning potential of the Th-based fuel cycle has been illustrated with a variety of fuel types, using the Toshiba ARR to perform the analysis, including scenarios with continued LWR operation of either uranium fueled or thorium fueled LWRs. These scenarios will afford overall reduction in actinide radiotoxicity, however when the TRU supply is exhausted, a continued U- 235 LWR operation must be assumed to provide TRU makeup feed. This scenario will never reach the characteristically low TRU content of a closed thorium fuel cycle with its associated potential benefits on waste radiotoxicity, as exemplified by the transition scenario studied. At present, the cases studied indicate ThC as a potential fuel for maximizing TRU burning, while ThN with nitrogen enriched to 95% N-15 shows the highest breeding potential. As a result, a transition scenario with ThN was developed to show that a sustainable, closed Th-cycle can be achieved starting from burning the legacy TRU stock and completing the transmutation of the residual TRU remaining in the core inventory after the legacy TRU external supply has been

Wenner, Michael; Franceschini, Fausto; Ferroni, Paolo [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC,Cranberry Township, PA, 16066 (United States); Sartori, Alberto; Ricotti, Marco [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Utilization of TRISO Fuel with LWR Spent Fuel in Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

HTRs use a high performance particulate TRISO fuel with ceramic multi-layer coatings due to the high burn up capability and very neutronic performance. TRISO fuel because of capable of high burn up and very neutr...

Adem Ac?r; Taner Altunok

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Current Capabilities of the Fuel Performance Modeling Code PARFUME  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The success of gas reactors depends upon the safety and quality of the coated particle fuel. A fuel performance modeling code (called PARFUME), which simulates the mechanical and physico-chemical behavior of fuel particles during irradiation, is under development at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Among current capabilities in the code are: 1) various options for calculating CO production and fission product gas release, 2) a thermal model that calculates a time-dependent temperature profile through a pebble bed sphere or a prismatic block core, as well as through the layers of each analyzed particle, 3) simulation of multi-dimensional particle behavior associated with cracking in the IPyC layer, partial debonding of the IPyC from the SiC, particle asphericity, kernel migration, and thinning of the SiC caused by interaction of fission products with the SiC, 4) two independent methods for determining particle failure probabilities, 5) a model for calculating release-to-birth (R/B) ratios of gaseous fission products, that accounts for particle failures and uranium contamination in the fuel matrix, and 6) the evaluation of an accident condition, where a particle experiences a sudden change in temperature following a period of normal irradiation. This paper presents an overview of the code.

G. K. Miller; D. A. Petti; J. T. Maki; D. L. Knudson

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fuel-Burn Impact of Re-Designing Future Aircraft with Changes in Mission Specifications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., with permission. AIAA SciTech #12;SA Single aisle aircraft SFC Engine specific fuel consumption Sref Reference.S.A. Over the past few years, pressure to reduce the overall fuel consumption of the commer- cial aircraftFuel-Burn Impact of Re-Designing Future Aircraft with Changes in Mission Specifications Anil

Alonso, Juan J.

22

Transverse liquid fuel jet breakup, burning, and ignition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analytical/numerical study of the breakup, burning, and ignition of liquid fuels injected transversely into a hot air stream is conducted. The non-reacting liquid jet breakup location is determined by the local sonic point criterion first proposed by Schetz, et al. (1980). Two models, one employing analysis of an elliptical jet cross-section and the other employing a two-dimensional blunt body to represent the transverse jet, have been used for sonic point calculations. An auxiliary criterion based on surface tension stability is used as a separate means of determining the breakup location. For the reacting liquid jet problem, a diffusion flame supported by a one-step chemical reaction within the gaseous boundary layer is solved along the ellipse surface in subsonic crossflow. Typical flame structures and concentration profiles have been calculated for various locations along the jet cross-section as a function of upstream Mach numbers. The integrated reaction rate along the jet cross-section is used to predict ignition position, which is found to be situated near the stagnation point. While a multi-step reaction is needed to represent the ignition process more accurately, the present calculation does yield reasonable predictions concerning ignition along a curved surface.

Li, H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Transverse liquid fuel jet breakup, burning, and ignition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An analytical/numerical study of the breakup, burning, and ignition of liquid fuels injected transversely into a hot air stream is conducted. The non-reacting liquid jet breakup location is determined by the local sonic point criterion first proposed by Schetz, et al. (1980). Two models, one employing analysis of an elliptical jet cross-section and the other employing a two-dimensional blunt body to represent the transverse jet, have been used for sonic point calculations. An auxiliary criterion based on surface tension stability is used as a separate means of determining the breakup location. For the reacting liquid jet problem, a diffusion flame supported by a one-step chemical reaction within the gaseous boundary layer is solved along the ellipse surface in subsonic crossflow. Typical flame structures and concentration profiles have been calculated for various locations along the jet cross-section as a function of upstream Mach numbers. The integrated reaction rate along the jet cross-section is used to predict ignition position, which is found to be situated near the stagnation point. While a multi-step reaction is needed to represent the ignition process more accurately, the present calculation does yield reasonable predictions concerning ignition along a curved surface.

Li, H.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

24

>Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis (NDP-058a) Prepared by Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Date Published: February 1998 (Revised for the Web: 2003) CONTENTS Abstract Documentation file for Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Abstract Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis. (March 1998) Antoinette L. Brenkert DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058.2003 This data package presents the gridded (one degree latitude by one degree longitude) summed emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement

25

Using Coupled Mesoscale Experiments and Simulations to Investigate High Burn-Up Oxide Fuel Thermal Conductivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear energy is a mature technology with a small carbon footprint. However, work is needed to make current reactor technology more accident tolerant and to allow reactor fuel to be burned in a reactor for longe...

Melissa C. Teague; Bradley S. Fromm; Michael R. Tonks; David P. Field

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cost–Performance Analysis and Optimization of Fuel-Burning Thermoelectric Power Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy cost analysis and optimization of thermoelectric (TE) power generators burning fossil fuel show a lower initial cost ... The produced heat generates electric power. Unlike waste heat recovery systems, the ...

Kazuaki Yazawa; Ali Shakouri

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Assessment of an Industrial Wet Oxidation System for Burning Waste and Low-Grade Fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Stone & Webster Engineering Corporation, under Department of Energy sponsorship, is developing a wet oxidation system to generate steam for industrial processes by burning industrial waste materials and low-grade fuels. The program involves...

Bettinger, J.; Koppel, P.; Margulies, A.

28

Method and apparatus for controlling fuel/air mixture in a lean burn engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The system for controlling the fuel/air mixture supplied to a lean burn engine when operating on natural gas, gasoline, hydrogen, alcohol, propane, butane, diesel or any other fuel as desired. As specific humidity of air supplied to the lean burn engine increases, the oxygen concentration of exhaust gas discharged by the engine for a given equivalence ratio will decrease. Closed loop fuel control systems typically attempt to maintain a constant exhaust gas oxygen concentration. Therefore, the decrease in the exhaust gas oxygen concentration resulting from increased specific humidity will often be improperly attributed to an excessive supply of fuel and the control system will incorrectly reduce the amount of fuel supplied to the engine. Also, the minimum fuel/air equivalence ratio for a lean burn engine to avoid misfiring will increase as specific humidity increases. A relative humidity sensor to allow the control system to provide a more enriched fuel/air mixture at high specific humidity levels. The level of specific humidity may be used to compensate an output signal from a universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor for changing oxygen concentrations at a desired equivalence ratio due to variation in specific humidity specific humidity. As a result, the control system will maintain the desired efficiency, low exhaust emissions and power level for the associated lean burn engine regardless of the specific humidity level of intake air supplied to the lean burn engine.

Kubesh, John Thomas (San Antonio, TX); Dodge, Lee Gene (San Antonio, TX); Podnar, Daniel James (San Antonio, TX)

1998-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

Global partitioning of NOx sources using satellite observations: Relative roles of fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion, biomass burning and soil emissions Lyatt Jaegle´ ,a Linda Steinberger,a Randall V. Martinbc anthropogenic emissions, mostly resulting from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning, are superimposed-CHEM chemical transport model. Top-down NOx sources are partitioned among fuel combustion (fossil fuel

Lyatt Jaeglé

30

Rigorous HDD Emissions Capabilities of Shell GTL Fuel | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

GTL Fuel 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005deercherillo.pdf More Documents & Publications Verification of Shell GTL Fuel...

31

Advanced Lean-Burn DI Spark Ignition Fuels Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

32

Advanced Lean-Burn DI Spark Ignition Fuels Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

33

Advanced Lean-Burn DI Spark Ignition Fuels Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

34

Final Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Project Report Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL Nuclear Engineering Education Research Program (grant # DE-FG07-99ID13767) Rodney C. Ewing (co-PI) Lumin Wang (co-PI) October 30,2002 For the Period of 07/01/1999 to 06/30/2002 Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 1 1. Background Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (239Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241Am, Cm and 237Np). In Europe, Canada and Japan studies have determined much improved efficiencies for burn- up of actinides using inert-matrix fuels. This innovative approach also considers the properties of the inert-matrix fuel as a nuclear waste form for direct disposal after one-

35

Performance assessment for the geological disposal of Deep Burn spent fuel using TTBX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of Deep Burn Modular High Temperature Reactor Spent Fuel (DBSF) is investigated in the Yucca Mountain geological repository (YMR) with respect to the annual dose (Sv/yr) delivered to the Reasonably Maximally Exposed Individual (RMEI) from the transport of radionuclides released from the graphite waste matrix. Transport calculations are performed with a novel computer code, TTBX which is capable of modeling transport pathways that pass through heterogeneous geological formations. TTBX is a multi-region extension of the existing single region TTB transport code. Overall the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is seen to be four orders of magnitude lower than the regulatory threshold for exposure, even under pessimistic scenarios. A number of factors contribute to the favorable performance of DBSF. A reduction of one order of magnitude in the peak annual dose received by the RMEI is observed for every order of magnitude increase in the waste matrix lifetime, highlighting the importance of the waste matrix durability and suggesting graphite's utility as a potential waste matrix for the disposal of high-level waste. Furthermore, we see that by incorporating a higher fidelity far-field model the peak annual dose calculated to be received by the RMEI is reduced by two orders of magnitude. By accounting for the heterogeneities of the far field we have simultaneously removed unnecessary conservatisms and improved the fidelity of the transport model. (authors)

Van den Akker, B.P.; Ahn, J. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

An assessment of waste fuel burning in operating circulating fluidized bed boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluidized bed combustion (FBC), today's fastest growing boiler technology, has the flexibility to burn a wide range of fuels, including many waste fuels, while satisfying all present and anticipated environmental regulations. The first generation of FBC--atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC)--concentrated on ''bubbling'' fluidized bed designs. These systems have inherent limitations and experienced several problems. In response to these problems, circulating fluidized bed (CFB) technology was developed.

Gendreau, R.J.; Raymond, D.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge burnup level, while retaining its inherent safety characteristics. Using generic pebble bed reactor cores, this task will perform physics calculations to evaluate the capabilities of the pebble bed reactor to perform utilization and destruction of LWR used-fuel transuranics. The task will use established benchmarked models, and will introduce modeling advancements appropriate to the nature of the fuel considered (high TRU content and high burn-up).

B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Stress Analysis of Coated Particle Fuel in the Deep-Burn Pebble Bed Reactor Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High fuel temperatures and resulting fuel particle coating stresses can be expected in a Pu and minor actinide fueled Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (400 MWth) design as compared to the ’standard’ UO2 fueled core. The high discharge burnup aimed for in this Deep-Burn design results in increased power and temperature peaking in the pebble bed near the inner and outer reflector. Furthermore, the pebble power in a multi-pass in-core pebble recycling scheme is relatively high for pebbles that make their first core pass. This might result in an increase of the mechanical failure of the coatings, which serve as the containment of radioactive fission products in the PBMR design. To investigate the integrity of the particle fuel coatings as a function of the irradiation time (i.e. burnup), core position and during a Loss Of Forced Cooling (LOFC) incident the PArticle STress Analysis code (PASTA) has been coupled to the PEBBED code for neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and depletion analysis of the core. Two deep burn fuel types (Pu with or without initial MA fuel content) have been investigated with the new code system for normal and transient conditions including the effect of the statistical variation of thickness of the coating layers.

B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Fuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

40

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this program were to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel and to develop a greater understanding of mercury oxidation across SCR catalysts in the form of a simple model. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH provided co-funding for this program. REI used a multicatalyst slipstream reactor to determine oxidation of mercury across five commercial SCR catalysts at a power plant that burned a blend of 87% subbituminous coal and 13% bituminous coal. The chlorine content of the blend was 100 to 240 {micro}g/g on a dry basis. Mercury measurements were carried out when the catalysts were relatively new, corresponding to about 300 hours of operation and again after 2,200 hours of operation. NO{sub x}, O{sub 2} and gaseous mercury speciation at the inlet and at the outlet of each catalyst chamber were measured. In general, the catalysts all appeared capable of achieving about 90% NO{sub x} reduction at a space velocity of 3,000 hr{sup -1} when new, which is typical of full-scale installations; after 2,200 hours exposure to flue gas, some of the catalysts appeared to lose NO{sub x} activity. For the fresh commercial catalysts, oxidation of mercury was in the range of 25% to 65% at typical full-scale space velocities. A blank monolith showed no oxidation of mercury under any conditions. All catalysts showed higher mercury oxidation without ammonia, consistent with full-scale measurements. After exposure to flue gas for 2,200 hours, some of the catalysts showed reduced levels of mercury oxidation relative to the initial levels of oxidation. A model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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41

Power Generation Capabilities of Microbial Fuel Cells with Different Oxygen Supplies in the Cathodic Chamber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two microbial fuel cells (MFCs) inoculated with activated sludge ... whereas it was obtained by the photosynthesis of algae in the other. Electrogenic capabilities of both ... power output than the one with photo...

Der-Fong Juang; Chao-Hsien Lee; Shu-Chun Hsueh…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

In-Situ Safeguards Verification of Low Burn-up Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel in-situ gross defect verification method for light water reactor spent fuel assemblies was developed and investigated by a Monte Carlo study. This particular method is particularly effective for old pressurized water reactor spent fuel assemblies that have natural uranium in their upper fuel zones. Currently there is no method or instrument that does verification of this type of spent fuel assemblies without moving the spent fuel assemblies from their storage positions. The proposed method uses a tiny neutron detector and a detector guiding system to collect neutron signals inside PWR spent fuel assemblies through guide tubes present in PWR assemblies. The data obtained in such a manner are used for gross defect verification of spent fuel assemblies. The method uses 'calibration curves' which show the expected neutron counts inside one of the guide tubes of spent fuel assemblies as a function of fuel burn-up. By examining the measured data in the 'calibration curves', the consistency of the operator's declaration is verified.

Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S; Park, I; Kim, J; Ahn, G

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

43

Interim Action Determination Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS), DOE/EIS-0283-S2. DOE is evaluating, among many other things, the environmental impacts of any design and operations changes to the MFFF, which is under construction at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE

44

Interim Action Determination Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) Flexible Manufacturing Capability for the Mixed Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) The Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SPD SEIS), DOE/EIS-0283-S2. DOE is evaluating, among many other things, the environmental impacts of any design and operations changes to the MFFF, which is under construction at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. DOE

45

Neutronics of accelerator-driven subcritical fission for burning transuranics in used nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the development of a conceptual design for accelerator-driven subcritical fission in a molten salt core (ADSMS). ADSMS is capable of destroying all of the transuranics at the same rate and proportion as they are produced in a conventional nuclear power plant. The ADSMS core is fueled solely by transuranics extracted from used nuclear fuel and reduces its radiotoxicity by a factor 10,000. ADSMS offers a way to close the nuclear fuel cycle so that the full energy potential in the fertile fuels uranium and thorium can be recovered.

Sattarov, A.; Assadi, S.; Badgley, K.; Baty, A.; Comeaux, J.; Gerity, J.; Kellams, J.; Mcintyre, P.; Pogue, N.; Sooby, E.; Tsvetkov, P.; Rosaire, G. [Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77845 (United States); Mann, T. [Argone National Laboratory, Argone, IL (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

46

Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring on a One Degree by One Degree Grid Cell Basis: 1950 to 1990 (NDP-058) data Data image ASCII Text Documentation PDF file PDF file Contributors R. J. Andres, G. Marland, I. Fung, and E. Matthews (contributors) DOI DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058 This data package presents data sets recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions.

47

Carbon nanotube (CNT) gas sensors for emissions from fossil fuel burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fossil fuels endow wide applications in industrial, transportation, and power generation sectors. However, smoke released by burning fossil fuels contains toxic gases, which pollutes the environment and severely affects human health. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are potential material for gas sensors due to their high structural porosity and high specific surface area. Defects present on the CNT sidewalls and end caps facilitate adsorption of gas molecules. The chemical procedures adopted to purify and disperse carbon nanotubes create various chemical groups on their surface, which further enhance the adsorption of gas molecules and thus improve the sensitivity of CNTs. Present review focuses on CNT chemiresistive gas sensing mechanisms, which make them suitable for the development of next generation sensor technology. The resistance of carbon nanotubes decreases when oxidizing gas molecules adsorb on their surface, whereas, adsorption of reducing gas molecules results in increasing the resistance of CNTs. Sensing ability of carbon nanotubes for the gases namely, NO, NO2, CO, CO2 and SO2, released on burning of fossil fuels is reviewed. This review provides basic understanding of sensing mechanisms, creation of adsorption sites by chemical processes and charge transfer between adsorbed gas molecules and surface of CNTs. In addition, useful current update on research and development of CNT gas sensors is provided.

M. Mittal; A. Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

R and D of Oxide Dispersion Strengthening Steels for High Burn-up Fuel Claddings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research and development of fuel clad materials for high burn-up operation of light water reactor and super critical water reactor (SCPWR) will be shown with focusing on the effort to overcome the requirements of material performance as the fuel clad. Oxide dispersion strengthening (ODS) steels are well known as a high temperature structural material. Recent irradiation experiments indicated that the steels were quite highly resistant to neutron irradiation embrittlement, showing hardening without accompanying loss of ductility. High Cr ODS steels whose chromium concentration was in the range from 15 to 19 wt% showed high resistance to corrosion in supercritical pressurized water (SCPW). As for the susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement of ODS steels, the critical hydrogen concentration required to hydrogen embrittlement is ranging 10{approx}12 wppm that is approximately one order of magnitude higher value than that of 9Cr reduced activation ferritic (RAF) steel. In the ODS steels, the fraction of helium desorption by bubble migration mechanism was smaller than that in the RAF steel, indicating that the ODS steels are also resistant to helium He bubble-induced embrittlement. Finally, it is demonstrated that the ODS steels are very promising for the fuel clad material for high burn-up operation of water-cooling reactors. (authors)

Kimura, A.; Cho, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Kasada, R. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Ukai, S. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tokai (Japan); Fujiwara, M. [Kobelco, Ltd, Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe (Japan)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Experimental observation of carbon dioxide reduction in exhaust gas from hydrocarbon fuel burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high-negative voltage at the cathode initiates a dark discharge resulting in a reduction of the carbon dioxide concentration in exhaust gas from the burning of hydrocarbon fuel. An experiment indicated that nearly 44% of the carbon dioxide in exhaust gas disappears after a high-voltage application to the cathode. The energy needed for the endothermic reaction of the carbon dioxidedissociation corresponding to this concentration reduction is provided mainly by the internal energy reduction of the discharge gas which is nearly 20 times the electrical energy for electron emission.

Han S. Uhm; Chul H. Kim

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Method of burning sulfur-containing fuels in a fluidized bed boiler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of burning a sulfur-containing fuel in a fluidized bed of sulfur oxide sorbent wherein the overall utilization of sulfur oxide sorbent is increased by comminuting the bed drain solids to a smaller average particle size, preferably on the order of 50 microns, and reinjecting the comminuted bed drain solids into the bed. In comminuting the bed drain solids, particles of spent sulfur sorbent contained therein are fractured thereby exposing unreacted sorbent surface. Upon reinjecting the comminuted bed drain solids into the bed, the newly-exposed unreacted sorbent surface is available for sulfur oxide sorption, thereby increasing overall sorbent utilization.

Jones, Brian C. (Windsor, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Transmutation Performance Analysis for Inert Matrix Fuels in Light Water Reactors and Computational Neutronics Methods Capabilities at INL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The urgency for addressing repository impacts has grown in the past few years as a result of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) accumulation from commercial nuclear power plants. One path that has been explored by many is to eliminate the transuranic (TRU) inventory from the SNF, thus reducing the need for additional long term repository storage sites. One strategy for achieving this is to burn the separated TRU elements in the currently operating U.S. Light Water Reactor (LWR) fleet. Many studies have explored the viability of this strategy by loading a percentage of LWR cores with TRU in the form of either Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuels or Inert Matrix Fuels (IMF). A task was undertaken at INL to establish specific technical capabilities to perform neutronics analyses in order to further assess several key issues related to the viability of thermal recycling. The initial computational study reported here is focused on direct thermal recycling of IMF fuels in a heterogeneous Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) bundle design containing Plutonium, Neptunium, Americium, and Curium (IMF-PuNpAmCm) in a multi-pass strategy using legacy 5 year cooled LWR SNF. In addition to this initial high-priority analysis, three other alternate analyses with different TRU vectors in IMF pins were performed. These analyses provide comparison of direct thermal recycling of PuNpAmCmCf, PuNpAm, PuNp, and Pu. The results of this infinite lattice assembly-wise study using SCALE 5.1 indicate that it may be feasible to recycle TRU in this manner using an otherwise typical PWR assembly without violating peaking factor limits.

Michael A. Pope; Samuel E. Bays; S. Piet; R. Ferrer; Mehdi Asgari; Benoit Forget

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Investigation of the behaviour of high burn-up PWR fuel under RIA conditions in the CABRI test reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Performance, reliability and economics are the goal criteria for fuel pin design and development. For steady state behaviour and operational transients, the demonstration is made worldwide that burn-up of more than 60 GWd/t can be reached reliably with improved PWR fuel. It has however not been demonstrated yet that safety criteria, related to design basis accident scenarios, are still respected at these high burn-up levels. In particular, for the reactivity initiated accident (RIA), resulting from a postulated, rapid removal of control rod elements, the amount of energy injection must be limited by design such that no severe damage to the core and its structures might occur.

Schmitz, F.; Papin, J.; Haessler, M.; Nervi, J.C. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (France); Permezel, P. [Electricite de France, Septen (France)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Comparison of electrogenic capabilities of microbial fuel cell with different light power on algae grown cathode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electricity generation capabilities of microbial fuel cell with different light power on algae grown cathode were compared. Results showed that microbial fuel cell with 6 and 12 W power of light always produced higher voltage and power density than with 18 and 26 W. Similarly, microbial fuel cell with 6 and 12 W of light power always displayed higher Coulombic efficiency and specific power than the one with 18 and 26 W. The results also showed that microbial fuel cell with covered anodic chamber always displayed higher voltage, power density, Coulombic efficiency and specific power than the one without covered anodic chamber. Binary quadratic equations can be used to express the relationships between the light power and the voltage, power density, Coulombic efficiency and specific power. Although lower power of light on algae grown cathode and covering anodic chamber will increase system’s electricity production, they will not significantly reduce its internal resistance.

D.F. Juang; C.H. Lee; S.C. Hsueh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500ºC to 600ºC) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion • Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment • Extrusion database on DU metal • Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys • Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys • Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys • Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment • Sintering database on DU metal • Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys • Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich outlining the beginning of the materials processing setup. Also included within this section is a thesis proposal by Jeff Hausaman. Appendix C contains the public papers and presentations introduced at the 2010 American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting. Appendix A—MSNE theses of David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich and proposal by Jeff Hausaman A.1 December 2009 Thesis by David Garnetti entitled “Uranium Powder Production Via Hydride Formation and Alpha Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications” A.2 September 2009 Presentation by David Garnetti (same title as document in Appendix B.1) A.3 December 2010 Thesis by Grant Helmreich entitled “Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications” A.4 October 2010 Presentation by Grant Helmreich (same title as document in Appendix B.3) A.5 Thesis Proposal by Jeffrey Hausaman entitled “Hot Extrusion of Alpha Phase Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors” Appendix B—External presentations introduced at the 2010 ANS Winter Meeting B.1 J.S. Hausaman, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, “Powder Metallurgy of Alpha Phase Uranium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors,” Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.2 PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.1 B.3 G.W. Helmreich, W.J. Sames, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, “Uranium Powder Production Using a Hydride-Dehydride Process,” Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.4. PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.3 B.5 Poster Presentation from C.3 Appendix C—Fuel cycle research and development undergraduate materials and poster presentation C.1 Poster entitled “Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys” presented at the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program Annual Meeting C.2 April 2011 Honors Undergraduate Thesis by William Sames, Research Fellow, entitled “Uranium Metal Powder Production, Particle Dis

Sean M. McDeavitt

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

55

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the seventh Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, a model of Hg oxidation across SCRs was formulated based on full-scale data. The model took into account the effects of temperature, space velocity, catalyst type and HCl concentration in the flue gas.

Constance Senior

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

56

OXIDATION OF MERCURY ACROSS SCR CATALYSTS IN COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS BURNING LOW RANK FUELS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the fifth Quarterly Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-03NT41728. The objective of this program is to measure the oxidation of mercury in flue gas across SCR catalyst in a coal-fired power plant burning low rank fuels using a slipstream reactor containing multiple commercial catalysts in parallel. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Argillon GmbH are providing co-funding for this program. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts. During this quarter, the available data from laboratory, pilot and full-scale SCR units was reviewed, leading to hypotheses about the mechanism for mercury oxidation by SCR catalysts.

Constance Senior

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

Cyclus fuel cycle simulation capabilities with the CYDER disposal system model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An algorithm and supporting database for rapid thermal repository loading calculation was implemented in CYDER. This algorithm employs a Specific Temperature Change (STC) method and has resulted from combining detailed spent nuclear fuel composition data with a detailed thermal repository performance analysis tool from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) campaign. By abstraction of and benchmarking against these detailed thermal models, CYDER captures the dominant physics of thermal phenomena affecting repository capacity in various geologic media and as a function of spent fuel composition. Abstraction based on detailed computational thermal repository performance calculations with the LLNL semi-analytic model has resulted in implementation of the STC estimation algorithm and a supporting reference dataset. This method is capable of rapid estimation of temperature increase near emplacement tunnels as a function of waste composition, limiting radius, waste package spacing, near field thermal conductivity and near field thermal diffusivity. The sensitivity analyses and validation efforts conducted in this work demonstrate the capability of the CYDER tool to provide repository capacity and performance metrics in the context of dynamic fuel cycle.

Huff, K.D. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Development of hot corrosion resistant coatings for gas turbines burning biomass and waste derived fuel gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide emission reductions are being sought worldwide to mitigate climate change. These need to proceed in parallel with optimisation of thermal efficiency in energy conversion systems on economic grounds to achieve overall sustainability. The use of renewable energy is one strategy being adopted to achieve these needs; with one route being the burning of biomass and waste derived fuels in the gas turbines of highly efficient, integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electricity generating units. A major factor to be taken into account with gas turbines using such fuels, compared with natural gas, is the potentially higher rates of hot corrosion caused by molten trace species which can be deposited on hot gas path components. This paper describes the development of hot corrosion protective coatings for such applications. Diffusion coatings were the basis for coating development, which consisted of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) trials, using aluminising and single step silicon-aluminising processes to develop new coating structures on two nickel-based superalloys, one conventionally cast and one single crystal (IN738LC and CMSX-4). These coatings were characterised using SEM/EDX analysis and their performance evaluated in oxidation and hot corrosion screening tests. A variant of the single step silicon-aluminide coating was identified as having sufficient oxidation/hot corrosion resistance and microstructural stability to form the basis for future coating optimisation.

A. Bradshaw; N.J. Simms; J.R. Nicholls

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of premixed burners capable of stably burning ultra-lean hydrogen-air fuel mixtures. Such burners couldAnalyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames Peer-Timo Bremer, Member demonstrate our approach by analyzing three numerical simulations of lean hydrogen flames subject to different

Pascucci, Valerio

60

ULTRA-CLEAN DIESEL FUEL: U.S. PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION CAPABILITY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

91 91 ULTRA-CLEAN DIESEL FUEL: U.S. PRODUCTION AND DISTRIBUTION CAPABILITY G.R. Hadder Center for Transportation Analysis Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN B.D. McNutt U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC August 2000 Prepared for Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 managed by UT-BATTELLE, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 ii iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF FIGURES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v LIST OF TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Steam thermolysis of discarded tires: testing and analysis of the specific fuel consumption with tail gas burning, steam generation, and secondary waste slime processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the process of steam thermolysis of shredded used tires for obtaining from them liquid fuel and technical carbon carried out in a screw reactor with heating due to the partial burning of obtai...

V. A. Kalitko; Morgan Chun Yao Wu…

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Development of Real-Time Fuel Management Capability at the Texas A&M Nuclear Science Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center reactor a fuel depletion code was created to develop real-time fuel management capability. This code package links MCNP8 and ORIGEN26 and is interfaced through a Visual Basic code. Microsoft Visual...

Parham, Neil A.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

63

High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis: Design Selection for the Prismatic Block Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Deep Burn (DB) Project is a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored feasibility study of Transuranic Management using high burnup fuel in the high temperature helium cooled reactor (HTR). The DB Project consists of seven tasks: project management, core and fuel analysis, spent fuel management, fuel cycle integration, TRU fuel modeling, TRU fuel qualification, and HTR fuel recycle. In the Phase II of the Project, we conducted nuclear analysis of TRU destruction/utilization in the HTR prismatic block design (Task 2.1), deep burn fuel/TRISO microanalysis (Task 2.3), and synergy with fast reactors (Task 4.2). The Task 2.1 covers the core physics design, thermo-hydraulic CFD analysis, and the thermofluid and safety analysis (low pressure conduction cooling, LPCC) of the HTR prismatic block design. The Task 2.3 covers the analysis of the structural behavior of TRISO fuel containing TRU at very high burnup level, i.e. exceeding 50% of FIMA. The Task 4.2 includes the self-cleaning HTR based on recycle of HTR-generated TRU in the same HTR. Chapter IV contains the design and analysis results of the 600MWth DB-HTR core physics with the cycle length, the average discharged burnup, heavy metal and plutonium consumptions, radial and axial power distributions, temperature reactivity coefficients. Also, it contains the analysis results of the 450MWth DB-HTR core physics and the analysis of the decay heat of a TRU loaded DB-HTR core. The evaluation of the hot spot fuel temperature of the fuel block in the DB-HTR (Deep-Burn High Temperature Reactor) core under full operating power conditions are described in Chapter V. The investigated designs are the 600MWth and 460MWth DB-HTRs. In Chapter VI, the thermo-fluid and safety of the 600MWth DB-HTRs has been analyzed to investigate a thermal-fluid design performance at the steady state and a passive safety performance during an LPCC event. Chapter VII describes the analysis results of the TRISO fuel microanalysis of the 600MWth and 450MWth DB-HTRs. The TRISO fuel microanalysis covers the gas pressure buildup in a coated fuel particle including helium production, the thermo-mechanical behavior of a CFP, the failure probabilities of CFPs, the temperature distribution in a CPF, and the fission product (FP) transport in a CFP and a graphite. In Chapter VIII, it contains the core design and analysis of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) with deep burn HTR reactor. It considers a synergistic combination of the DB-MHR and an SFR burner for a safe and efficient transmutation of the TRUs from LWRs. Chapter IX describes the design and analysis results of the self-cleaning (or self-recycling) HTR core. The analysis is considered zero and 5-year cooling time of the spent LWR fuels.

Francesco Venneri; Chang-Keun Jo; Jae-Man Noh; Yonghee Kim; Claudio Filippone; Jonghwa Chang; Chris Hamilton; Young-Min Kim; Ji-Su Jun; Moon-Sung Cho; Hong-Sik Lim; MIchael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Vincent Descotes; Brian Boer

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Evaluation of Nondestructive Assay/Nondestructive Examination Capabilities for Department of Energy Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes an evaluation of the potential use of nondestructive assay (NDA) and nondestructive examination (NDE) technologies on DOE spent nuclear fuel (SNF). It presents the NDA/NDE information necessary for the National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP) and the SNF storage sites to use when defining that role, if any, of NDA/NDE in characterization and certification processes. Note that the potential role for NDA/NDE includes confirmatory testing on a sampling basis and is not restricted to use as a primary, item-specific, data collection method. The evaluation does not attempt to serve as a basis for selecting systems for development or deployment. Information was collected on 27 systems being developed at eight DOE locations. The systems considered are developed to some degree, but are not ready for deployment on the full range of DOE SNF and still require additional development. The system development may only involve demonstrating performance on additional SNF, packaging the system for deployment, and developing calibration standards, or it may be as extensive as performing additional basic research. Development time is considered to range from one to four years. We conclude that NDA/NDE systems are capable of playing a key role in the characterization and certification of DOE SNF, either as the primary data source or as a confirmatory test. NDA/NDE systems will be able to measure seven of the nine key SNF properties and to derive data for the two key properties not measured directly. The anticipated performance goals of these key properties are considered achievable except for enrichment measurements on fuels near 20% enrichment. NDA/NDE systems can likely be developed to measure the standard canisters now being considered for co-disposal of DOE SNF. This ability would allow the preparation of DOE SNF for storage now and the characterization and certification to be finalize later.

Luptak, A.J.; Bulmahn, K.D.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fertile free fuels for plutonium and minor actinides burning in LWRs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The feasibility of using various uranium-free fuels for plutonium incineration in present light water reactors is investigated. Two major categories of inert matrix fuels are studied: composite ceramic fuel particles ...

Zhang, Yi, 1979-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Nonlinear control and online optimization of the burn condition in ITER via heating, isotopic fueling and impurity injection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ITER tokamak, the next experimental step toward the development of nuclear fusion reactors, will explore the burning plasma regime in which the plasma temperature is sustained mostly by fusion heating. Regulation of the fusion power through modulation of fueling and external heating sources, referred to as burn control, is one of the fundamental problems in burning plasma research. Active control will be essential for achieving and maintaining desired operating points, responding to changing power demands, and ensuring stable operation. Most existing burn control efforts use either non-model-based control techniques or designs based on linearized models. These approaches must be designed for particular operating points and break down for large perturbations. In this work, we utilize a spatially averaged (zero-dimensional) nonlinear model to synthesize a multi-variable nonlinear burn control strategy that can reject large perturbations and move between operating points. The controller uses all of the available actuation techniques in tandem to ensure good performance, even if one or more of the actuators saturate. Adaptive parameter estimation is used to improve the model parameter estimates used by the feedback controller in real-time and ensure asymptotic tracking of the desired operating point. In addition, we propose the use of a model-based online optimization algorithm to drive the system to a state that minimizes a given cost function, while respecting input and state constraints. A zero-dimensional simulation study is presented to show the performance of the adaptive control scheme and the optimization scheme with a cost function weighting the fusion power and temperature tracking errors.

Mark D Boyer; Eugenio Schuster

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Effect of air flow rate and fuel moisture on the burning behaviours of biomass and simulated municipal solid wastes in packed beds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combustion of biomass and municipal solid wastes is one of the key areas in the global cleaner energy strategy. But there is still a lack of detailed and systematically theoretical study on the packed bed burning of biomass and municipal solid wastes. The advantage of theoretical study lies in its ability to reveal features of the detailed structure of the burning process inside a solid bed, such as reaction zone thickness, combustion staging, rates of individual sub-processes, gas emission and char burning characteristics. These characteristics are hard to measure by conventional experimental techniques. In this paper, mathematical simulations as well as experiments have been carried out for the combustion of wood chips and the incineration of simulated municipal solid wastes in a bench-top stationary bed and the effects of primary air flow rate and moisture level in the fuel have been assessed over wide ranges. It is found that volatile release as well as char burning intensifies with an increase in the primary air flow until a critical point is reached where a further increase in the primary air results in slowing down of the combustion process; a higher primary airflow also reduces the char fraction burned in the final char-burning-only stage, shifts combustion in the bed to a more fuel-lean environment and reduces CO emission at the bed top; an increase in the moisture level in the fuel produces a higher flame front temperature in the bed at low primary air flow rates.

Y.B Yang; V.N Sharifi; J Swithenbank

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Cost of Adding E85 Fuel Capability to Existing Gasoline Stations: NREL Survey and Literature Search (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Cost of Adding E85 Fueling Capability to Existing Gasoline Stations: Cost of Adding E85 Fueling Capability to Existing Gasoline Stations: NREL Survey and Literature Search The cost of purchasing and installing E85 fueling equip- ment varies widely, yet station owners need to have an idea of what to expect when budgeting or reviewing bids for this upgrade. The purpose of this document is to provide a framework for station owners to assess what a reason- able cost would be. This framework was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) by surveying actual costs for stations, conducting a literature search, not- ing the major cost-affecting variables, addressing anomalies in the survey, and projecting changes in future costs. The findings of NREL's survey and literature search are shown in the table below. This table divides the study's

69

Willingness to pay function for two fuel treatments to reduce wildfire acreage burned: A scope test and comparison of White and Hispanic households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research uses the Contingent Valuation Method to test whether willingness to pay increases for larger reductions in acres of forests burned by wildfires across the states of California, Florida and Montana. This is known as a test of scope, a measure of internal validity of the contingent valuation method (CVM). The scope test is conducted separately for White households and Hispanic households to determine if cultural differences influences whether the scope test is passed. The public program to reduce acres burned involved prescribed burning and a mechanical fuel reduction program. The results of CVM logit regressions show that the acreage reduction variable is statistically significant at the 1% level for the two proposed fuel reduction programs, and the two types of households. The positive sign of this variable means that the more acreage reduction proposed in the survey the more likely people would pay for the fuel reduction program. Because of the significance of the acreage reduction variable in the willingness to pay function, this function can be used to evaluate the incremental benefits of different forest fire management plans that reduce acres burned by wildfires. These benefits would be part of the justification for prescribed burning and mechanical fire fuel reduction programs to protect forests from wildfires.

John B. Loomis; Le Trong Hung; Armando González-Cabán

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Leveraging National Lab Capabilities: 2014 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Sunita Satyapal, Fuel Cell Technologies Office, and Chris Ainscough, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, at the 2014 Fuel Cell Seminar and Energy Exposition, November 11, 2014, in Los Angeles, California.

71

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Lean-Burn DI Spark Ignition Fuels Research  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced lean...

72

Process for clean-burning fuel from low-rank coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for upgrading and stabilizing low-rank coal involving the sequential processing of the coal through three fluidized beds; first a dryer, then a pyrolyzer, and finally a cooler. The fluidizing gas for the cooler is the exit gas from the pyrolyzer with the addition of water for cooling. Overhead gas from pyrolyzing is likely burned to furnish the energy for the process. The product coal exits with a tar-like pitch sealant to enhance its safety during storage.

Merriam, Norman W. (Laramie, WY); Sethi, Vijay (Laramie, WY); Brecher, Lee E. (Laramie, WY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Determination of the optimum fuel burn-up and energy intensities of nuclear fuel by the method of cost calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report gives the procedure for determining the economical efficiency of the utilization of nuclear fuel in a reactor on the basis of calculated costs. The expression obtained for the fuet constituent of the

Yu. I. Koryakin; V. V. Batov; V. G. Smirnov

1964-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Emissions Characteristics of a Turbine Engine and Research Combustor Burning a Fischer?Tropsch Jet Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GTL and CTL technologies were discovered in Germany in the mid-1910s and further developed in 1923 by German scientists Drs. ... The Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory and the Fuels Branch of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/PRTG) established a collaborative research and development program in 2000 to study and demonstrate clean aviation fuels as part of the DOE Ultra Clean Transportation Fuels Initiative. ... 21 Gaseous emissions were quantified using an MKS MultiGas 2030 Fourier-transform infrared based gas analyzer and a flame ionization detector based total hydrocarbon analyzer. ...

Edwin Corporan; Matthew J. DeWitt; Vincent Belovich; Robert Pawlik; Amy C. Lynch; James R. Gord; Terrence R. Meyer

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hot corrosion tests on corrosion resistant coatings developed for gas turbines burning biomass and waste derived fuel gases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper reports on results of hot corrosion tests carried out on silicon–aluminide coatings developed for hot components of gas turbines burning biomass and waste derived fuel gases. The corrosion tests of the silicon–aluminide coatings, applied to superalloys IN738LC and CMSX-4, each consisted of five 100 h periods; at 700 °C for the type II tests and at 900 °C for the type I tests. Deposits of Cd + alkali and Pb + alkali were applied before each exposure. These deposits had been previously identified as being trace species produced from gasification of biomass containing fuels which after combustion had the potential to initiate hot corrosion in a gas turbine. Additionally, gases were supplied to the furnace to simulate the atmosphere anticipated post-combustion of these biomass derived fuel gases. Results of the type I hot corrosion tests showed that these novel coatings remained in the incubation stage for at least 300 h, after which some of the coating entered propagation. Mass change results for the first 100 h confirmed this early incubation stage. For the type II hot corrosion tests, differences occurred in oxidation and sulphidation rates between the two substrates; the incubation stages for CMSX-4 samples continued for all but the Cd + alkali high salt flux samples, whereas, for IN738LC, all samples exhibited consistent incubation rates. Following both the type I and type II corrosion tests, assessments using BSE/EDX results and XRD analysis confirmed that there has to be remnant coating, sufficient to grow a protective scale. In this study, the novel silicon–aluminide coating development was based on coating technology originally evolved for gas turbines burning natural gas and fossil fuel oils. So in this paper comparisons of performance have been made with three commercially available coatings; a CoCrAlY overlay, a platinum-aluminide diffusion, and triple layer nickel–aluminide/silicon–aluminide-diffusion coatings. These comparisons showed that the novel single-step silicon–aluminide coatings provide equal or superior type II hot corrosion resistance to the best of the commercial coatings.

A. Bradshaw; N.J. Simms; J.R. Nicholls

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Prescribed Range Burning in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and implement a prescribed burn, including predicting fire and weather behavior, topography, fuel, firing techniques, fire containment, safety precautions and costs. A graph illustrates factors that influence prescribed burning and a table shows the relationship...

White, Larry D.; Hanselka, C. Wayne

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

77

Burning syngas in a high swirl burner: Effects of fuel composition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Flame characteristics of swirling non-premixed H2/CO syngas fuel mixtures have been simulated using large eddy simulation and detailed chemistry. The selected combustor configuration is the TECFLAM burner which has been used for extensive experimental investigations for natural gas combustion. The large eddy simulation (LES) solves the governing equations on a structured Cartesian grid using a finite volume method, with turbulence and combustion modelling based on the localised dynamic Smagorinsky model and the steady laminar flamelet model respectively. The predictions for H2-rich and CO-rich flames show considerable differences between them for velocity and scalar fields and this demonstrates the effects of fuel variability on the flame characteristics in swirling environment. In general, the higher diffusivity of hydrogen in H2-rich fuel is largely responsible for forming a much thicker flame with a larger vortex breakdown bubble (VBB) in a swirling flame compare to the H2-lean but CO-rich syngas flames.

K.K.J. Ranga Dinesh; K.H. Luo; M.P. Kirkpatrick; W. Malalasekera

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Partnership, Research & Capabilities, Systems Analysis, Systems Engineering, Transportation Energy As hydrogen (H2) fuel cell...

79

Time-dependent inversion estimates of global biomass-burning CO emissions using Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel/biofuel combustion (FFBF), biomass burning (BIOM) andsource from fuel combustion as well as biomass burning of

Arellano, Avelino F; Kasibhatla, Prasad S; Giglio, Louis; van der Werf, Guido R; Randerson, James T; Collatz, G. James

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Multispecies Diffusion Capability For The AMP Nuclear Fuel Performance Code (LANL Milestone M31MS060301 Final Report)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work addresses only diffusion. The contact solver in AMP was not sufficiently developed this year to attempt treatment of species contact. A cylindrical tensor diffusion coefficient model was added to the AMP code, with the KHHS model [1] implemented into the AMP material library as a specific example. A cylindrical tensor diffusion operator manufactured solution verification example was coded. Before meeting the full text of the milestone task, it remains to: (1) code and run a cylindrical tensor diffusion solver manufactured solution (2) code and run the validation example of [1] (3) document results. These are dependent on developing new capabilities for the AMP code requiring close collaboration with the AMP team at ORNL. The model implemented provides a good intermediate first step toward a general multi-species solver. The multi-species capability of the AMP nuclear fuel code [2] is intended to allow the modeling of radiation-driven redistribution of various elements through solid metal nuclear reactor fuels. The initial model AMP provides for U-Pu-Zr fuels is based on the analysis of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) fuel development program experiment X419 post-irradiation data described in [1], referred to here as the KHHS model. This model may be specific to that experiment, but it was thought to provide a good start for the AMP code, because it (1) is formulated at the engineering scale, (2) decouples the species from each other, (3) predetermines the phase boundaries so that reference to a phase diagram is not needed, and (4) one of the authors (Hayes) was the NEAMS Fuels IPSC manager for FY11. The KHHS model is formulated for radial fluxes as little axial redistribution is seen experimentally. As U-Pu-Zr fuel is irradiated, the constituents migrate to form three annular regions. The center region is Zr-enriched and U-depleted, the middle region is Zr-depleted and U-enriched, and the outer region is Zr-enriched and U-depleted. The Pu concentration stays roughly constant throughout with slight enrichment in the center and depletion near the surface. Pu acts as a solvent for the mixture. The experiment was only run to 1.9% burnup, so the model is not at this time applicable to the high-burnup scenarios that the AMP code is intended to eventually model.

Dilts, Gary A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Acid rain: commentary on controversial issues and observations on the role of fuel burning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Even though much information has been accumulated on the subject of acid precipitation, lack of knowledge in certain technical areas precludes an adequate understanding of (1) how serious the acid precipitation problem really is and (2) what effect controlling sources of acid precipitation precursors would have in reducing acidification. It is nevertheless possible to draw some broad conclusions regarding the problem and to ascertain the direction that the required further work should take. This report presents the results of an investigation of various issues associated with acid rain. The following topics are addressed: occurrence of acid precipitation; effects of acid precipitation; sources of acid precipitation; transport, transformation, and deposition of acid pollutants; and fuel trend analysis. Recommendations for further research are included. (DMC)

Szabo, M.F.; Esposito, M.P.; Spaite, P.W.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Analysis of the Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be subcritical is indeed subcritical. KENO-VI and CENTRM have validation reports noting that the codes were validated using the 238-group ENDF/B-V library against critical experiments. A wide range of experiments were selected, which include high... fuel, the neutron steaming effects in a pebble-bed type HTR, and the effects of accidental water ingress (since HTR systems generally tend to be under moderated, an accident of this type can lead to large positive reactivity changes, in particular...

Pritchard, Megan; Tsvetkov, Pavel

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

Analysis of Pebble-Bed VHTR Spectrum Shifting Capabilities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of validation is to establish an acceptance criteria such that there is a high degree of confidence that a system is calculated to be subcritical is indeed subcritical. KENO-VI and CENTRM have validation reports noting that the codes were...-heterogeneity in LEU fuel, the neutron steaming effects in a pebble-bed type HTR, and the effects of accidental water ingress (since HTR systems generally tend to be under moderated, an accident of this type can lead to large positive reactivity changes...

Pritchard, Megan

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

84

Burns Prevention  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Burns Burns Burns can result from everyday things and activities in your home. The most common causes of burns are from scalds (steam, hot bath water, hot drinks and foods), fire, chemicals, electricity and overexposure to the sun. Some burns may be more serious than others. The severity of the burn is based on the depth of the burn. First degree burns are the least severe, and third degree burns are the most severe. Call 911 or seek medical attention if you are unsure of how severe your burn is. All burns are susceptible to tetanus (lockjaw). Get a tetanus shot every 10 years. If your last shot was 5 years ago, talk to your doctor - you may need a booster shot. Causes of Burns: Scalds Scalding injuries and burns are caused by hot tap water, hot beverages and food, and steam.

85

Response to “Comment on ‘Experimental observation of carbon dioxide reduction in exhaust gas from hydrocarbon fuel burning’ ” [Phys. Plasmas17, 014701 (2010)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A high-voltage cathode initiates an electron emission resulting in a reduction in the carbon dioxide concentration in exhaust gas from the burning of hydrocarbon fuel. Assuming that the observed carbon dioxide reduction is originated from the molecular decomposition the energy needed for the endothermic reaction of this carbon dioxide reduction may stem primarily from the internal energy reduction in the exhaust gas in accordance of the first law of the thermodynamics. An oxygen increase due to the reduction in carbon dioxide in a discharge gas was observed in real time.

Han S. Uhm; Chul H. Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Impact of natural gas fuel composition on criteria, toxic, and particle emissions from transit buses equipped with lean burn and stoichiometric engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigated the impacts of varying natural gas composition on the exhaust emissions from different technology transit buses. For this study, two CNG (compressed natural gas) buses equipped with lean burn combustion and \\{OCs\\} (oxidation catalysts), and one stoichiometric CNG bus equipped with a TWC (three-way catalyst) and EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) were tested on a chassis dynamometer over the CBD (Central Business District) cycle on six different gas blends each. The gases represented a range of compositions from gases with high levels of methane and correspondingly lower energy contents/WN (Wobbe number) to gases with higher levels of heavier hydrocarbons and correspondingly higher energy contents/WN. For the lean burn buses, gases with low methane contents exhibited higher \\{NOx\\} (nitrogen oxides) (19%–53%) and NMHC (non-methane hydrocarbon) (39%–102%) emissions, but lower emissions of THC (total hydrocarbon) (9%–24%), CH4 (methane) (23%–33%), and formaldehyde emissions (14%–45%). The stoichiometric engine bus with a TWC showed significantly reduced \\{NOx\\} and THC emissions compared to the lean burn buses, but did show higher levels of CO (carbon monoxide) and NH3 (ammonia). PM (particulate matter) mass emissions did not show any fuel effects, while PN (particle number) emissions exhibited some reductions for the higher WN gases.

Maryam Hajbabaei; Georgios Karavalakis; Kent C. Johnson; Linda Lee; Thomas D. Durbin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The Energy Institute Live Green, Burn Clean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion in a Cummins ISB 5.9L MY2000 turbodiesel engine Sources of the "Biodiesel NOx" effect Fuel quality turbodiesel engine Sources of the "Biodiesel NOx" effect Fuel quality issues and blending level question: B2The Energy Institute Live Green, Burn Clean: Advancing Engines for Renewable Fuels Live Green, Burn

Lee, Dongwon

88

ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLE (AFV) INFORMATION Over 98% of the U-M auto passenger fleet is flex fuel vehicles (FFV). A FFV is capable of operating on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALTERNATIVE FUEL VEHICLE (AFV) INFORMATION Over 98% of the U-M auto passenger fleet is flex fuel of both. FFV's are equipped with an engine and fuel system designed specifically to be compatible with ethanol's chemical properties. FFV's qualify as alternative fuel vehicles under the Energy Policy Act

Kirschner, Denise

89

Deep Burn: Development of Transuranic Fuel for High-Temperature Helium-Cooled Reactors- Monthly Highlights September 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DB Program monthly highlights report for August 2010, ORNL/TM-2010/184, was distributed to program participants by email on September 17. This report discusses: (1) Core and Fuel Analysis - (a) Core Design Optimization in the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) Prismatic Design (Logos), (b) Core Design Optimization in the HTR Pebble Bed Design (INL), (c) Microfuel analysis for the DB HTR (INL, GA, Logos); (2) Spent Fuel Management - (a) TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) repository behavior (UNLV), (b) Repository performance of TRISO fuel (UCB); (3) Fuel Cycle Integration of the HTR (high temperature helium-cooled reactor) - Synergy with other reactor fuel cycles (GA, Logos); (4) TRU (transuranic elements) HTR Fuel Qualification - (a) Thermochemical Modeling, (b) Actinide and Fission Product Transport, (c) Radiation Damage and Properties; (5) HTR Spent Fuel Recycle - (a) TRU Kernel Development (ORNL), (b) Coating Development (ORNL), (c) Characterization Development and Support, (d) ZrC Properties and Handbook; and (6) HTR Fuel Recycle - (a) Graphite Recycle (ORNL), (b) Aqueous Reprocessing, (c) Pyrochemical Reprocessing METROX (metal recovery from oxide fuel) Process Development (ANL).

Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Collins, Emory D [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Effects of microbial species, organic loading and substrate degradation rate on the power generation capability of microbial fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Four microbial fuel cells (MFCs) inoculated with different bacterial species...Pseudomonas putida, Comamonas testosteroni, Corynebacterium gultamicum, and Arthrobacter polychromogenes.... The MFCs were operated u...

Der-Fong Juang; Pi-Chiu Yang; Huei-Yin Chou; Ling-Jan Chiu

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Developing fuel management capabilities based on coupled Monte Carlo depletion in support of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pursuant to a 1986 NRC ruling, the MIT Reactor (MITR) is planning on converting from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for fuel. Prior studies have shown that the MITR will be able to ...

Romano, Paul K. (Paul Kollath)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Numerical and experimental study of soot formation in laminar diffusion flames burning simulated biogas fuels at elevated pressures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biogas fuels at elevated pressures Marc R.J. Charest , �mer L. Gülder, Clinton P.T. Groth University 18 April 2014 Available online 2 June 2014 Keywords: Soot formation High pressure combustion Biogas, and other chemical species that are harmful to human health and the environment. Gaseous biofuels, or biogas

Gülder, �mer L.

93

LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES WITH ADDITION OF ETHANOL P. Dirrenberger1 , P.A. Glaude*1 (2014) 162-169" DOI : 10.1016/j.fuel.2013.07.015 #12;2 LAMINAR BURNING VELOCITY OF GASOLINES, Sweden Abstract The adiabatic laminar burning velocities of a commercial gasoline and of a model fuel (n

Boyer, Edmond

94

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) capable of operating on natural gas or liquefied petroleum gas (propane), or bi-fuel vehicles capable of operating on conventional fuel or...

95

Actinide Burning in CANDU Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Actinide burning in CANDU reactors has been studied as a method of reducing the actinide content of spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors, and thereby decreasing the associated long term decay heat load. In this work simulations were performed of actinides mixed with natural uranium to form a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, and also mixed with silicon carbide to form an inert matrix (IMF) fuel. Both of these fuels were taken to a higher burnup than has previously been studied. The total transuranic element destruction calculated was 40% for the MOX fuel and 71% for the IMF. (authors)

Hyland, B.; Dyck, G.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Experimental Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

laser system. A major focus of NIF is a national effort to demonstrate ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. NIF also conducts a variety of experiments to study matter...

97

Emission characteristics of black carbon in anthropogenic and biomass burning plumes over California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel (FF) combustion and biomass burning (BB), respectively. The enhancements of BC and LSP in BBEmission characteristics of black carbon in anthropogenic and biomass burning plumes over. (2012), Emission characteristics of black carbon in anthropogenic and biomass burning plumes over

Jimenez, Jose-Luis

98

Room at the Mountain: Estimated Maximum Amounts of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Capable of Disposal in a Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present an initial analysis of the maximum amount of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) that could be emplaced into a geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis identifies and uses programmatic, material, and geological constraints and factors that affect this estimation of maximum amount of CSNF for disposal. The conclusion of this initial analysis is that the current legislative limit on Yucca Mountain disposal capacity, 63,000 MTHM of CSNF, is a small fraction of the available physical capacity of the Yucca Mountain system assuming the current high-temperature operating mode (HTOM) design. EPRI is confident that at least four times the legislative limit for CSNF ({approx}260,000 MTHM) can be emplaced in the Yucca Mountain system. It is possible that with additional site characterization, upwards of nine times the legislative limit ({approx}570,000 MTHM) could be emplaced. (authors)

Kessler, John H. [Electric Power Research Institute - EPRI, 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Kemeny, John [University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); King, Fraser [Integrity Corrosion Consulting, Ltd., 6732 Silverview Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ross, Alan M. [Alan M. Ross and Associates, 1061 Gray Fox Circle Pleasanton, CA 94566 (Canada); Ross, Benjamen [Disposal Safety, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Technology for the Recovery of Fuel and Adsorbent Carbons from Coal Burning Utility Ash Ponds and Landfills  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several sampling techniques were evaluated to recover representative core samples from the ash ponds at Western Kentucky Energy's Coleman Station. The most successful was a combination of continuous-flight augers and specially designed soft-sediment sampling tubes driven by a Hammerhead drill mounted on an amphibious ARGO vehicle. A total of 51 core samples were recovered and analyzed in 3 ft sections and it was determined that there are 1,354,974 tons of ash in Pond C. Of the over 1.35M tons of ash present, 14% or 190K tons can be considered as coarse (+100 mesh). Pond C contains approximately 88K tons of carbon, nearly half of which is coarse and potentially recoverable with spiral concentration while the fine carbon (-100 mesh) is recoverable with froth flotation. There are 1.27M tons of carbon-free ash, 12% of which is coarse and potentially usable as block sand. Spiral concentration testing on bulk samples showed that product grade of 30 to 38% C (4200 to 5500 Btu/lb) was obtainable. When this product was cleaned again in an additional stage of spiral concentration, the product grade was improved to 7200 to 8200 Btu/lb with an accompanying 13 to 29% decrease in yield. Release analysis of hydraulically classified pond ash showed that froth flotation could provide froth products with as high a grade as 9000 Btu/lb with a yield of 5%. Increasing yield to 10% reduced froth grade to 7000 Btu/lb. Batch flotation provided froth grades as high as 6500 Btu/lb with yields of 7% with 1.5 lb/ton SPP and 1 lb/ton frother. Column flotation test results were similar to those achieved in batch flotation in terms of both grade and yield, however, carbon recoveries were lower (<70%). High airflow rate was required to achieve >50% carbon recovery and using wash water improved froth grade. Bottom ash samples were recovered from each of the units at Coleman Station. Characterization confirmed that sufficient quantity and quality of material is generated to produce a marketable lightweight aggregate and recover a high-grade fuel product. Spiral concentration provided acceptable grade lightweight aggregate with yields of only 10 to 20%. Incorporating a sieve bend into the process to recover coarse, porous ash particles from the outside race of the spirals increased aggregate yield to as high as 75%, however, the carbon content of the aggregate also increased. An opening size of 28 mesh on the sieve bend appeared to be sufficient. Lightweight concrete blocks (28 to 32 lbs) were produced from bottom ash and results show that acceptable strength could be attained with a cement/concrete ratio as low as 1/4. A mobile Proof-of-Concept (POC) field unit was designed and fabricated to meet the processing objectives of the project. The POC plant consisted of two trailer-mounted modules and was completely self sufficient with respect to power and water requirements. The POC unit was hauled to Coleman Station and operated at a feed rate of 2 tph. Results showed that the spirals operated similarly to previous pilot-scale operations and a 500 lb composite sample of coarse carbon was collected with a grade of 51.7% C or 7279 Btu/lb. Flotation results compared favorably with release analysis and 500 lbs of composite froth product was collected with a grade of 35% C or 4925 Btu/lb. The froth product was dewatered to 39% moisture with vacuum filtration. Pan pelletization and briquetting were evaluated as a means of minimizing handling concerns. Rotary pan pelletization produced uniform pellets with a compressive strength of 4 lbf without the use of any binder. Briquettes were produced by blending the coarse and fine carbon products at a ratio of 1:10, which is the proportion that the two products would be produced in a commercial operation. Using 3% lime as a binder produced the most desirable briquettes with respect to strength, attrition and drop testing. Additionally, the POC carbon products compared favorably with commercial activated carbon when used for removal of mercury from simulated flue gas. A business model was generated to summarize anti

J.G. Groppo; T.L. Robl

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Microsoft Word - Deep-Burn awards news release _2_.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Department of Energy announced it has selected teams led by Idaho National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory to advance the technology of nuclear fuel "Deep-Burn," in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Capabilities Series  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities Series Capabilities Series www.emsl.pnl.gov Scientific Innovation Through Integration WHY USE EMSL'S MOLECULAR SCIENCE COMPUTING CAPABILITY? Ì Molecular Science Computing provides users with an integrated suite of computing hardware and software capabilities optimized for achieving the fastest time-to-solution for complex systems-level environmental molecular science simulations. Ì Expert staff members have extensive knowledge and experience in high-performance computing, as well as the operations, domain expertise, and scientific knowledge to support EMSL's users. Ì Substantial integration of transformational high-end computing simulations with experimental resources at EMSL provides a unique multidisciplinary research environment. The Molecular Science Computing capability at EMSL

102

Planning a Prescribed Burn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

drinks are best used when it?s over) Water or fire retardant in the ? pumpers Gasoline for the pumpers ? Diesel fuel and gas for the drip ? torches Lunch for the crew (a cooler with ? sandwich makings is handy) First aid kit ? Keys or combinations... in April with picloram to knock out my prickly pear.? Now you are heading in the right direction. Other reading Prescribed Range Burning in Texas. Texas AgriLife Extension Service. E-37. Acknowledgment The original manuscript on which...

Hanselka, C. Wayne

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Recommended surrogate PCB waste feed and fuel compositions to meet requirements given in Spec. K/D 5552 for test burns in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc. incinerator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste feed heats of combustion, principle organic hazardous constituents (POHCs), ash contents, and organic chlorine concentrations are specified in Table 3 of Spec. No. K/D-5552 for test burns 1 through 7 in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. incinerator. The first four tests are intended to demonstrate that the incinerator will meet RCRA emission standards, HCl removal efficiencies, and requirements for destruction of POHCs. A mix containing 1,2-dichloro-, 1,2,4-trichloro-, and 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzenes with a small amount of hexachlorobenzene is recommended as a PCB surrogate for test burns 5 and 6 to simulate the destructibility of PCBs in plant wastes. The mix would be diluted with appropriate amounts of dimethyl malonate and kerosene to obtain a homogeneous solution having the required heat of combustion and chlorine content for the liquid waste feeds. For test burn 7 the polychlorinated benzene mix would contain a small amount of hexachlorobenzene with larger amounts of 1,2,4,5-tetrachloro- and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzenes. The composition of the polychlorinated mixes is such that they should be comparable to Aroclor 1254 in overall destructibility by incineration, and achievement of a DRE for hexachlorobenzene greater than 99.99% in the test burns should provide assurance that the incinerator will be able to destroy PCBs in Aroclor 1260, which is the most refractory PCB mix present in plant wastes. If hexachlorobenzene is not available for these tests, hexachlorocyclopentadiene is recommended as a substitute for hexachlorobenzene in tests 5-7, which involve a PCB surrogate, and hexachloroethane is recommended as the alternative solid waste feed for test 4. Solutions containing kerosene and methanol are recommended as liquid fuels for tests 1 and 4 to achieve the required heats of combustion, while a dimethyl malonate-methanol solution is recommended to achieve the 7000 Btu/lb heat of combustion for test burn 2.

Anderson, R.W.

1984-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

104

Global burned area and biomass burning emissions from small fires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as agricultural waste burning or prescribed burning infield agricultural waste burning [e.g. , Yevich and Logan,

Randerson, J. T; Chen, Y.; van der Werf, G. R; Rogers, B. M; Morton, D. C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

CAMS Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CAMS Capabilities HVEC 10 MV Model FN Tandem Of the three accelerators CAMS utilizes the largest is the HVEC 10 MV Model FN Tandem, which was obtained from the University of...

106

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and gas, have caused a substantial increase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil-caused CO2 emissions and to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. 2.0 What is carbon sequestration? The term "carbon sequestration" is used to describe both natural and deliberate CARBON,INGIGATONSPERYEAR 1.5 Fossil

107

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities Capabilities A photo of a series of large metal tanks connected by a network of pipes. Only the top portion of the tanks is visible above the metal floor grate. Each tank has a round porthole on the top. Two men examine one of the tanks at the far end of the floor. Sugars are converted into ethanol in fermentation tanks. This ethanol is then separated, purified, and recovered for use as a transportation fuel. NREL biomass researchers and scientists have strong capabilities in many facets of biomass technology that support the cost-effective conversion of biomass to biofuels-capabilities that are in demand. The NREL biomass staff partners with other national laboratories, academic institutions, and commercial entities at every stage of the biomass-to-biofuels conversion process. For these partners, our biomass

109

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxford ; New York ; Oxford University Press. Fuel- Trac,Spent Fuel / Reprocessing, in Nuclear Industry Statusto Burn Non-Fissile Fuels. 2008. GA. Energy Multiplier

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

ENVIRONMENTAL CAPABILITIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Section 25 - Electrostatic Discharge Additional Capabilities: · RF Cable Insertion Loss and VSWR Testing to advance technologies. The Institute's clientele include many of the world's aerospace manufacturers, NASAEquipment·FAA ·Medical ·Electrical ·Automotive ·Mechanical ·RailRoad ·Pneumatic ·Nautical ·Hydraulic ·Metallic

111

Particle and Gas Emissions from a Simulated Coal-Burning Household Fire Pit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle and Gas Emissions from a Simulated Coal-Burning Household Fire Pit ... Chinese anthracite and bituminous coals produce different amounts of emissions when burned in a fire pit that simulates common rural household use of these fuels. ... Here we present emissions from burning 15 different fuels in a laboratory system designed to mimic the fire pits used in Xuan Wei County, China. ...

Linwei Tian; Donald Lucas; Susan L. Fischer; S. C. Lee; S. Katharine Hammond; Catherine P. Koshland

2008-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

112

Alternative fuels for industrial gas turbines (AFTUR)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmentally friendly, gas turbine driven co-generation plants can be located close to energy consumption sites, which can produce their own fuel such as waste process gas or biomass derived fuels. Since gas turbines are available in a large power range, they are well suited for this application. Current gas turbine systems that are capable of burning such fuels are normally developed for a single specific fuel (such as natural gas or domestic fuel oil) and use conventional diffusion flame technology with relatively high levels of \\{NOx\\} and partially unburned species emissions. Recently, great progress has been made in the clean combustion of natural gas and other fossil fuels through the use of dry low emission technologies based on lean premixed combustion, particularly with respect of \\{NOx\\} emissions. The objective of the AFTUR project is to extend this capability to a wider range of potentially commercial fuel types, including those of lower calorific value produced by gasification of biomass (LHV gas in line with the European Union targets) and hydrogen enriched fuels. The paper reports preliminary progress in the selection and characterisation of potential, liquid and gas, alternative fuels for industrial gas turbines. The combustion and emission characteristics of the selected fuels will be assessed, in the later phases of the project, both in laboratory and industrial combustion chambers.

Iskender Gökalp; Etienne Lebas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fuel Systems Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

company with divisions focusing on bringing cleaner-burning gaseous fuel (such as propane and natural gas) technology to various types of vehicles. References: Fuel Systems...

114

Sunrise Agri Fuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Agri Fuels Place: Bird Island, Minnesota Zip: 55310 Sector: Biomass Product: Manufacturer of Biomass Fuel Pellets for Pellet Burning Stoves. References: Sunrise Agri...

115

BNL | Biomass Burns  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burn Observation Project (BBOP) Aerosols from biomass burning are recognized to perturb Earth's climate through the direct effect (both scattering and absorption of incoming shortwave radiation), the semi-direct effect (evaporation of cloud drops due to absorbing aerosols), and indirect effects (by influencing cloud formation and precipitation. Biomass burning is an important aerosol source, providing an estimated 40% of anthropogenically influenced fine carbonaceous particles (Bond, et al., 2004; Andrea and Rosenfeld, 2008). Primary organic aerosol (POA) from open biomass burns and biofuel comprises the largest component of primary organic aerosol mass emissions at northern temperate latitudes (de Gouw and Jimenez, 2009). Data from the IMPROVE

116

Analyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- bly burning ultra-lean hydrogen-air fuel mixtures. Such burners could, for example, be used as oneAnalyzing and Tracking Burning Structures in Lean Premixed Hydrogen Flames P.-T. Bremer1, G. Weber2 of the temporal behavior. We demonstrate our approach by analyzing three numerical simulations of lean hydrogen

117

Uniform-burning matrix burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Wood would burn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Absract In view of the world-wide problem of energy sustainability and greenhouse gas production (carbon dioxide), it is timely to review the issues involved in generating heat and power from all fuels and especially new (to the UK) solid fuels, including high moisture fuels such as wood, SRF, oil shale, tar sands and brown coal, which will become major international fuels as oil and gas become depleted. The combustion properties of some of these materials are significantly different from traditional coal, oil and gas fuels, however the technology proposed herein is also applicable to these conventional fuels. This paper presents some innovative combustion system options and the associated technical factors that must be considered for their implementation. For clarity of understanding, the novel concepts will be largely presented in terms of a currently developing solid fuel market; biomass wood chips. One of the most important characteristics of many solid fuels to be used in the future (including oil shale and brown coal) is their high moisture content of up to 60%. This could be removed by utilising low grade waste heat that is widely available in industry to dry the fuel and thus reduce transport costs. Burning such dried wood for power generation also increases the energy available from combustion and thus acts as a thermal transformer by upgrading the low grade heat to heat available at combustion temperatures. The alternative approach presented here is to recover the latent heat by condensing the extrinsic moisture and the water formed during combustion. For atmospheric combustion, the temperature of the condensed combustion products is below the dew point at about 55–65 °C and is only suitable for recovery in an efficient district heating system. However, in order to generate power from the latent heat, the condensation temperature must be increased to the level where the heat can be used in the thermodynamic power cycle. This can be achieved by increasing the combustion pressure to above 80 bar, resulting in the recovered latent heat being available at more than 200 °C. It can then be used to increase the cycle efficiency by about 15% by pre-heating the boiler water and/or combustion air etc. A further advantage is that the high pressure of the combustion gases also reduces the superheater tube stress since it can balance the steam pressure. The key advantage of this high pressure flue gas is that it is above the pressure at which carbon dioxide ‘condenses’ to a liquid or supercritical gas at atmospheric temperature. Thus when used with oxy-fuel combustion, the carbon dioxide flue gas from which the moisture has been condensed can be cooled to atmospheric temperature and the supercritical CO2 can be fed directly into the pipes leading to the sequestration site. An important consideration of these strategies is to ensure that non-condensable gases in the exhaust, including oxygen and nitrogen, do not adversely affect the ‘condensation’ processes. When oxy-fuel combustion is used, the flame temperature must be moderated by a cool diluent. Recycled carbon dioxide is often proposed for this duty. However, since the latent heat is recovered, the moisture or even additional water can fulfil this role. This latter option may be advantageous since it is more efficient to pump wood chip fuel in water into the high pressure zone rather than feed solid wood particles. Surplus water can be simply drained and the wet wood chips are a good fuel when the latent heat of the moisture in the fuel gases is recovered into the power cycle. Bearing in mind that it is much more efficient to pump a liquid to high pressure than to compress the same material as a gas, indicates that cryogenic oxygen is a suitable material to use for an efficient power station that generates energy from biomass (or other fuels such as coal etc). Finally, combustion of the hydrogen from the water–gas reaction with oxygen allows the steam temperature in the turbine to be increased to the “gas-turbine engine” range of 1000–1400 °C an

Jim Swithenbank; Qun Chen; Xiaohui Zhang; Vida Sharifi; Mohamed Pourkashanian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Interannual variability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 to 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

F. : Retrieval of biomass combustion rates and totals fromM. C. : Fuel biomass and combustion factors associated within global biomass burning emissions combustion factor.

van der Werf, G. R; Randerson, J. T; Giglio, L.; Collatz, G. J; Kasibhatla, P. S; Arellano, A. F

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Prioritizing Burn-Injured Patients During a Disaster  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The U.S. government has mandated that, in a catastrophic event, metropolitan areas need to be capable of caring for 50 burn-injured patients per million population. In New York City, this corresponds to 400 patients. There are currently 140 burn beds ... Keywords: disaster planning, healthcare, triage

Carri W. Chan; Linda V. Green; Yina Lu; Nicole Leahy; Roger Yurt

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Oxidation of ketone groups in transported biomass burning aerosol from the 2008 Northern California Lightning Series fires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Ketone, Biomass burning, Fossil fuel combustion 1. Introduction Globally the two largest sources of primary organic aerosol are fossil fuel combustion (2-28 Tg C yr-1 ) and biomass burning (31-45 Tg C yr-1Oxidation of ketone groups in transported biomass burning aerosol from the 2008 Northern California

Russell, Lynn

122

Preparing limestone for burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Classification of limestone before burning can be done by the screening method ... enables us to use the heat of the waste gases from the calcination units.

V. I. Goncharov; T. P. Kirichenko

123

Burn Wound Infections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...described, noting areas of circumferential...of body surface area burned (252...protein-rich plasma into terminal...clinical effects of thermal inhalation injury...312). High-frequency ventilation may...standard of care for large thermal injuries...of the burned area is excised during...

Deirdre Church; Sameer Elsayed; Owen Reid; Brent Winston; Robert Lindsay

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Sandia National Laboratories: Widespread Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructu...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ClimateECResearch & CapabilitiesCapabilitiesWidespread Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Is the Goal of H2FIRST Project Widespread Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Is the Goal of...

125

Environmental Aspects of Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles: Parametric Modeling and Preliminary Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................... 10 2 Simplified schematic of the once-through open fuel cycle .................................. 12 3 Simplified schematic of the plutonium-burning fuel cycle .................................. 13 4 Simplified schematic of the actinide... ..................................................... 23 7 Material flow for the plutonium-burning fuel cycle, year 0 ................................. 24 8 Material flow for the plutonium-burning fuel cycle, year 40 ............................... 25 9 Material flow for the actinide-burning fuel...

Yancey, Kristina D.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

126

Capabilities Strategy: Science Pillars  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Innovation Capabilities Strategy: Science Pillars science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Capabilities Strategy: Science Pillars The Lab's four Science Pillars...

127

NETL: Research Capabilities and Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities and Facilities Research Capabilities and Facilities Onsite Research Research Capabilities and Facilities Lab Worker As the lead field center for the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's research and development program, NETL has established a strong onsite research program conducted by Federal scientists and engineers. Onsite R&D – managed by NETL's Office of Research and Development – makes important contributions to NETL's mission of implementing a research, development, and demonstration program to resolve the environmental, supply, and reliability constraints of producing and using fossil resources. With its expert research staff and state-of-the-art facilities, NETL has extensive experience in working with the technical issues related to fossil resources. Onsite researchers also participate with NETL's industrial partners to solve problems that become barriers to commercialization of power systems, fuels, and environmental and waste management. Onsite research capabilities are strengthened by collaborations with well-known research universities.

128

An Investigation of the Use of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Transuranic Waste Recycling in Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation of the utilization of TRistructural- ISOtropic (TRISO)-coated fuel particles for the burning of plutonium/neptunium (Pu/Np) isotopes in typical Westinghouse four-loop pressurized water reactors is presented. Though numerous studies have evaluated the burning of transuranic isotopes in light water reactors (LWRs), this work differentiates itself by employing Pu/Np-loaded TRISO particles embedded within a silicon carbide (SiC) matrix and formed into pellets, constituting the fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel concept that can be loaded into standard LWR fuel element cladding. This approach provides the capability of Pu/Np burning and, by virtue of the multibarrier TRISO particle design and SiC matrix properties, will allow for greater burnup of Pu/Np material, plus improved fuel reliability and thermal performance. In this study, a variety of heterogeneous assembly layouts, which utilize a mix of FCM rods and typical UO2 rods, and core loading patterns were analyzed to demonstrate the neutronic feasibility of Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel. The assembly and core designs herein reported are not fully optimized and require fine-tuning to flatten power peaks; however, the progress achieved thus far strongly supports the conclusion that with further rod/assembly/core loading and placement optimization, Pu/Np-loaded TRISO fuel and core designs that are capable of balancing Pu/Np production and destruction can be designed within the standard constraints for thermal and reactivity performance in pressurized water reactors.

Gentry, Cole A [ORNL] [ORNL; Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL] [ORNL; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL] [ORNL; Powers, Jeffrey J [ORNL] [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Sun tanning/burning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sun tanning/burning Sun tanning/burning Name: Richardo Cossyleon Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why doesn't the sun affect or burn people with dark pigment in their skin? Replies: Good question! The pigment, melanin, is more toward the surface of the upper skin layer and absorbs ultraviolet rays from the Sun or artificial sources. This absorption protects the lower layers from damage and inflammation (burning). A very dark skinned person may have over a 1000X the protection from UV compared to a fair skinned person. Fair skinned people should use sun-block lotions especially early in the warm season AND keep exposure to the sun, particularly at midday, to less than 30 min. Even if a person gets a good tan, the sun's UV will age the skin over time. It will get wrinkled and develop age lines, etc. after many years of exposure. Moderation is the key!

130

Surrogate Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements under normal and accident conditions as specified by federal regulations. During transportation, SNF experiences unique conditions and challenges to cladding integrity due to the vibrational and impact loading encountered during road or rail shipment. ORNL has been developing testing capabilities that can be used to improve our understanding of the impacts of vibration loading on SNF integrity, especially for high burn-up SNF in normal transportation operation conditions. This information can be used to meet nuclear industry and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs in the area of safety of SNF storage and transportation operations.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

Grimble, Ralph E. (Finleyville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Oxidation of ketone groups in transported biomass burning aerosol from the 2008 Northern California Lightning Series fires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., 2000), making SOA from fossil fuel combustion, biogenic, and biomass burning emissions a potentiallyOxidation of ketone groups in transported biomass burning aerosol from the 2008 Northern California in revised form 20 July 2010 Accepted 21 July 2010 Keywords: Organic carbon particles Ketone Biomass burning

Russell, Lynn

133

Assessment of uranium-free nitride fuels for spent fuel transmutation in fast reactor systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ....................................................................................... 18 Fig. 4. Standard PWR ¼ core model with fresh, once- and twice-burned fuel, and the location of MOX fuel assemblies with respect to original layout, 32% MOX loading................................................................................................................ 21 Fig. 5. Control rod locations......................................................................................... 21 Fig. 6. Net change of U, Pu and Am for PWR and 1/3 MOX fueled whole cores, 360 day burn...

Szakaly, Frank Joseph

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

134

NREL: Biomass Research - Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities Microalgal Biofuels Capabilities Research into producing microalgal biofuels for transportation has been revitalized at NREL. Because algae have the potential to produce the feedstock for a number of transportation fuels-biodiesel, "green" diesel and gasoline, and jet fuel-NREL has developed strong capabilities in producing biofuels from microalgae. Through standard procedures for microalgal biofuels analysis, NREL helps scientists and researchers understand more about the chemical composition of algae. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This video is a narrated animation that explains the microalgae-to-biofuels conversion process. NREL's capabilities in microalgal biofuels R&D include: Why is algal research important? Algae have the potential to produce the feedstock for transportation fuels.

135

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

graph illustrating three pathways (biofuel, hydrogen, and electric vehicle) to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Electric Vehicle Technologies & Targets 3-D...

136

Dual Fuel Conversion System for Diesel Engines: Inventions and Innovation Project Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project fact sheet written for the Inventions and Innovation Program about a new dual fuel conversion system allows diesel fuel switching with clean burning natural gas.

Wogsland, J.

2001-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

137

The spherically symmetric droplet burning characteristics of Jet-A and biofuels derived from camelina and tallow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spherically symmetric droplet burning characteristics of Jet-A and biofuels derived from the biofuels due to its higher aromatic content. " Droplet burning rates of camelina and tallow HRJ fuel Available online 1 March 2013 Keywords: Alternative jet fuel Hydroprocessed biofuel Spherically symmetric

Walter, M.Todd

138

13, 3226932289, 2013 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 13, 32269­32289, 2013 Biomass burning aerosol properties over the Northern Great Plains T (ACP). Please refer to the corresponding final paper in ACP if available. Biomass burning aerosol Geosciences Union. 32269 #12;ACPD 13, 32269­32289, 2013 Biomass burning aerosol properties over the Northern

Dong, Xiquan

139

7, 1733917366, 2007 Biomass burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA wet season experiment C. H. Mari a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Tracing biomass burning plumes from. Mari (marc@aero.obs-mip.fr) 17339 #12;ACPD 7, 17339­17366, 2007 Biomass burning plumes during the AMMA

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

140

Low NO/sub x/ heavy fuel combustor concept program. Final report, 23 Oct 1979 - Jul 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A gas turbine technology program to improve and optimize the staged rich lean low NOx combustor concept is described. Subscale combustor tests to develop the design information for optimization of the fuel preparation, rich burn, quick air quench, and lean burn steps of the combustion process were run. The program provides information for the design of high pressure full scale gas turbine combustors capable of providing environmentally clean combustion of minimally of minimally porcessed and synthetic fuels. It is concluded that liquid fuel atomization and mixing, rich zone stoichiometry, rich zone liner cooling, rich zone residence time, and quench zone stoichiometry are important considerations in the design and scale up of the rich lean combustor.

Russell, P.; Beal, G.; Hinton, B.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Cellular burning in lean premixed turbulent hydrogen-air flames: coupling experimental and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of burners, particularly for alternative fuels, depends on improving our understanding of basic flame. Beckner1, M. J. Lijewski1 1 Center for Computational Science and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National for burning the fuel-lean mixtures of hydrogen or hydrogen-rich syngas fuels obtained from the gasification

142

Urban air quality improvement by using a CNG lean burn engine for city buses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of compressed natural gas (CNG)-fuelled lean-burn city bus engines has a significant potential for air quality improvement in urban areas. Particularly important is the reduction of NOx, as well as particulate and non-regulated HC-emissions. For this reason, a CNG-fuelled, lean-bum, turbocharged, intercooled engine equipped with catalytic converter was developed. The basic engine is a 6-cylinder, heavy duty, serial production Hungarian diesel engine which complies with Euro-2 emissions limits. The objective of this development was to meet European emission limits forecast for the year 2005 (NOx fuel consumption capability of the engine are reported. Based on the evaluation of economical feasibility, the costs of CNG bus operation is additionally discussed. It can be concluded that CNG city bus operation is - compared to diesel operation - a promising way to improve economically the local air quality.

Tamas Meretei; Joep A.N. van Ling; Cornelis Havenith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Federal Technical Capability Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides requirements and responsibilities to ensure recruitment and hiring of technically capable personnel to retain critical technical capabilities within the Department at all times. Cancels DOE M 426.1-1. Canceled by DOE O 426.1.

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

144

NSTec Overview and Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes the history of the Nevada National Security Site (Nevada Test Site) Contract as well as current capabilities.

Meidinger, A.

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

145

NREL: Energy Storage - Laboratory Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities Photo of NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. NREL's Energy Storage Laboratory. Welcome to our Energy Storage Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado. Much of our testing is conducted at this state-of-the-art laboratory, where researchers use cutting-edge modeling and analysis tools to focus on thermal management systems-from the cell level to the battery pack or ultracapacitor stack-for electric, hybrid electric, and fuel cell vehicles (EVs, HEVs, and FCVs). In 2010, we received $2 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) to enhance and upgrade the NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility. The Energy Storage Laboratory houses two unique calorimeters, along with

146

23 Reformulated Fuels and Related Issues REFORMULATED FUELS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRODUCTION Reformulated gasoline (RFG) is a cleaner burning fuel than conventional gasoline that will significantly improve air quality by reducing emissions from all gasoline-burning motor vehicles and engines. The chapter also includes a description of CARB's Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline Advisory Committee and its

147

Fuel processor for fuel cell power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Springer, Thomas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Huff, James R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biochemical Conversion Capabilities Biochemical Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are working to improve the efficiency and economics of the biochemical conversion process by focusing on the most challenging steps in the process. Biochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels involves three basic steps: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock through: Pretreatment Conditioning and enzymatic hydrolysis Enzyme development. Fermenting these biomass-derived feedstocks using: Microorganisms for fermentation. Processing the fermentation product to produce fuel-grade ethanol and other fuels, chemicals, heat, and electricity by: Integrating the bioprocess. Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. This video is a narrated animation that explains the biochemical conversion

149

FUEL CELLS RALLY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

FUEL CELLS RALLY ... No, this car has composite tanks capable of storing 8 kg of hydrogen. ... It's General Motors' Sequel, a fuel-cell concept car unveiled earlier this month at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. ...

ALEXANDER H. TULLO

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

refund taxes paid on compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, and liquefied petroleum gas (propane) when the fuel is used to operate buses capable of carrying seven or...

151

Fuel Injector Holes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Prepare multi-sized orifices (e.g., 40 m and 145 m) on the same nozzle to maintain fuel flow capability and improve combustion - Detailed microstructural analysis ...

152

NREL: Transportation Research - Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities A Vision for Sustainable Transportation Line graph illustrating three pathways (biofuel, hydrogen, and electric vehicle) to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas...

153

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities FEI Titan Extreme Schottky-field emission gun (X-FEG) CEOS dodecapole probe (STEM) aberration corrector GIF Quantum with dual EELS and fast spectrum imaging...

154

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Events, Nuclear Energy, Research & Capabilities Yifeng Wang (Radiological Consequence Management and Response Technologies Dept.) has been selected by the Chinese Institute of...

155

Sandia National Laboratories: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Culture On March 7, 2013, in Capabilities, Climate, Global, Global, Global Climate & Energy, Global Climate & Energy, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Research...

156

Scientific Capabilities | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Microfabrication Mass Spectrometry Microscopy Molecular Science Computing NMR and EPR Spectroscopy and Diffraction Subsurface Flow and Transport Scientific Capabilities We...

157

Sierra/Fuego Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of existing capabilities in SierraFuego applied to modeling several aspects of grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) including: fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and fluid-structure...

158

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2017) TechniquesCapabilities LEAP Atom Probe Tomography Local electrode variant Crossed delay line, single atom sensitive detector 200 kHz high voltage pulse generator...

159

Comparing properties of coal ash and alternative-fuel ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of investigating ash produced in burning alternative kinds of fuel are discussed. Its impact on the environment is evaluated, and possibilities of recovering it are studied.

E. P. Dick; G. A. Ryabov; A. N. Tugov; A. N. Soboleva

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Moving North Texas Forward by Addressing Alternative Fuel Barriers...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MOVING NORTH TEXAS FORWARD BY ADDRESSING ALTERANATIVE FUEL BARRIERS Presenter: Pamela Burns North Central Texas Council of Governments June 20, 2014 P.I. Mindy Mize Project ID...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Federal Technical Capability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This directive defines requirements and responsibilities for meeting the Department of Energy (DOE) commitment to recruiting, deploying, developing, and retaining a technically competent workforce that will accomplish DOE missions in a safe and efficient manner through the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP). Cancels DOE M 426.1-1A, Federal Technical Capability Manual.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

162

Federal Technical Capability Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Federal Technical Capability Manual provides the process for the recruitment, deployment, development, and retention of Federal personnel with the demonstrated technical capability to safely accomplish the Departments missions and responsibilities at defense nuclear facilities. Canceled by DOE M 426.1-1A. Does not cancel other directives.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

163

NREL: Biomass Research - Thermochemical Conversion Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conversion Capabilities Conversion Capabilities NREL researchers are developing gasification and pyrolysis processes for the cost-effective thermochemical conversion of biomass to biofuels. Gasification-heating biomass with about one-third of the oxygen necessary for complete combustion-produces a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis-heating biomass in the absence of oxygen-produces a liquid bio-oil. Both syngas and bio-oil can be used directly or can be converted to clean fuels and other valuable chemicals. Areas of emphasis in NREL's thermochemical conversion R&D are: Gasification and fuel synthesis R&D Pyrolysis R&D Thermochemical process integration. Gasification and Fuel Synthesis R&D Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video.

164

Combustion aerosols formed during burning of radioactively contaminated materials: Experimental results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety assessments and environmental impact statements for nuclear fuel cycle facilities require an estimate of potential airborne releases. Radioactive aerosols generated by fires were investigated in experiments in which combustible solids and liquids were contaminated with radioactive materials and burned. Uranium in powder and liquid form was used to contaminate five fuel types: polychloroprene, polystyrene, polymethylmethacrylate, cellulose, and a mixture of 30% tributylphosphate (TBP) in kerosene. Heat flux, oxygen concentration, air flow, contaminant concentration, and type of ignition were varied in the experiments. The highest release (7.1 wt %) came from burning TBP/kerosene over contaminated nitric acid. Burning cellulose contaminated with uranyl nitrate hexahydrate liquid gave the lowest release (0.01 wt %). Rate of release and particle size distribution of airborne radioactive particles were highly dependent on the type of fuel burned.

Halverson, M.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Dennis, G.W.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Federal Energy Capabilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Federal Energy Capabilities Federal Energy Capabilities Federal Energy Capabilities MCKINSTRY'S CYCLE OF SERVICES PROGRAM SERVICES McKinstry is dedicated to excellence in design, construction, and facilities operation. We strive to develop innovative, cost effective facility solutions for you. Below are the services we can deliver under our energy services program: * Design-Build MEDP contracting * Energy savings performance contracting * Smart Building System integration * Demand response * Smart metering to Smart Grid solutions * Advanced metering services * Renewable energy systems * Cogeneration/combined heat power * Creative tax credit and green tags/white tags * ESCO preventative maintenance APPROACH * No premium for the energy services delivery * Open book pricing and guaranteed

166

Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from the commercial facilities. In support of the development of the CRWMS, OCRWM sponsored the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project. The objective of this project was to assess the capability of each commercial facility to handle various spent nuclear fuel shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. The project was conducted in two phases. During Phase I, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the data base for the project was created. During Phase II, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the data base was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed.

Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States); Pope, R.B. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Biomass burning and global change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The burning of living and dead biomass including forests savanna grasslands and agricultural wastes is much more widespread and extensive than previously believed and may consume as much as 8700 teragrams of dry biomass matter per year. The burning of this much biomass releases about 3940 teragrams of total carbon or about 3550 teragrams of carbon in the form of CO2 which is about 40% of the total global annual production of CO2. Biomass burning may also produce about 32% of the world’s annual production of CO 24% of the nonmethane hydrocarbons 20% of the oxides of nitrogen and biomass burn combustion products may be responsible for producing about 38% of the ozone in the troposphere. Biomass burning has increased with time and today is overwhelmingly human?initiated.

Joel S. Levine; Wesley R. Cofer III; Donald R. Cahoon Jr.; Edward L. Winsted; Brian J. Stocks

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SEM TechniquesCapabilities JEOL 6500F High current, 30kV FE gun SecondaryBS electron imaging Low voltage imaging Si drift detector for X-ray micro- analysis (Z>3) Fast EDS...

169

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electron Microsope TechniquesCapabilities Nion UltraSTEAM 60-100 Cold field emission gun 3rd generation C3C5 aberration corrector 60-100kV operation <1 spatial resolution at...

170

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TechniquesCapabilities Philips CM200 200-kV Schottky field-emission gun (FEG) Post-column Gatan imaging filter (GIF) for EFTEM and EELS EDAX R-TEM Si(Li) X-ray spectrometer...

171

Instruments/Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4000X HR) TechniquesCapabilities LEAP Atom Probe Tomography Laser and voltage pulsing 200 kHz high voltage pulse generator, 1 MHz laser Reflectron energy-compensating lens Crossed...

172

Dynamic stability, blowoff, and flame characteristics of oxy-fuel combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxy-fuel combustion is a promising technology to implement carbon capture and sequestration for energy conversion to electricity in power plants that burn fossil fuels. In oxy-fuel combustion, air separation is used to ...

Shroll, Andrew Philip

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

ARM - Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

March 2013 BNL BBOP Website Contacts Larry Kleinman, Lead Scientist Arthur Sedlacek Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) Biomass Burning Plants, trees, grass, brush, and...

174

Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Molecular Characterization of Biomass Burning Aerosols Using High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Abstract: Chemical...

175

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: The Application of High Energy Ignition and Boosting/Mixing Technology to Increase Fuel Economy in Spark Ignition Gasoline Engines by Increasing EGR Dilution Capability  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by General Motors LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the application of high...

176

Fuel effects in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Homogenous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) combustion is a new method of burning fuel in internal combustion (IC) engines. In an HCCI engine, the fuel and air are premixed prior to combustion, like in a spark-ignition ...

Angelos, John P. (John Phillip)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part I: Pebble Bed Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Deep-Burn (DB) concept [ ] focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor (LWR) fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into tri-isotopic (TRISO) coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400) [ ]. Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (FY) (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking, and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239Pu, 240Pu, and 241Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a standard, UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. Regarding the coated particle performance, the FY 2009 investigations showed that no significant failure is to be expected for the reference fuel particle during normal operation. It was found, however, that the sensitivity of the coating stress to the CO production in the kernel was large. The CO production is expected to be higher in DB fuel than in UO2 fuel, but its exact level has a high uncertainty. Furthermore, in the fuel performance analysis transient conditions were not yet taken into account. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge burnup level, while retaining its inherent safety characteristics. Using generic pebble bed reactor cores, this task will perform physics calculations to evaluate the capabilities of the pebble bed reactor to perform utilization and destruction of LWR used-fuel transuranics. The task will use established benchmarked models, and will introduce modeling advancements appropriate to the nature of the fuel considered (high transuranic [TRU] content and high burn-up). Accomplishments of this work include: •Core analysis of a HTR-MODULE design loaded with Deep-Burn fuel. •Core analysis of a HTR-MODULE design loaded with Deep-Burn fuel and Uranium. •Core analysis of a HTR-MODULE design loaded with Deep-Burn fuel and Modified Open Cycle Components. •Core analysis of a HTR-MODULE design loaded with Deep-Burn fuel and Americium targets.

Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Experiments related to the resuspension of aerosols during hydrogen burns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have performed seven ''add-on'' experiments in two large combustion facilities to investigate the capability of hydrogen burns to remove simulated structural and fission product aerosols previously deposited on small metal discs that have surfaces prototypical of those found in nuclear reactor containments. Our results suggest that hydrogen combustion provides an especially effective mechanism for removal (and, presumably, resuspension) of sedimented aerosols produced in a hypothetical nuclear reactor core-degradation or core-melting accident. The presence of condensing steam does not seem to assure adhesion of sedimented aerosols during hydrogen burns. Differences are exhibited between different surfaces as well as between types of aerosol. In-depth studies will be required to assess the impact exposure of sedimented aerosols to hydrogen burns might have on the radiological source term.

Nelson, L.S.; Guay, K.P.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

EMSL: Capabilities: Microscopy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microscopy Microscopy Additional Information Meet the Microscopy Experts Related EMSL User Projects Microscopy Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Watch the Microscopy capability video on EMSL's YouTube channel and read the transcript. Microscopy brochure Quiet Wing brochure EMSL hosts a variety of sophisticated microscopy instruments, including electron microscopes, optical microscopes, scanning probe microscopes, and computer-controlled microscopes for automated particle analysis. These tools are used to image a range of sample types with nanoscale-and even atomic-resolution with applications to surface, environmental, biogeochemical, atmospheric, and biological science. Each state-of-the-art instrument and customized capability is equipped with features for specific

180

Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for developing the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) to accept spent nuclear fuel from commercial facilities. The objective of the Facility Interface Capability Assessment (FICA) project was to assess the capability of each commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage facility, at which SNF is stored, to handle various SNF shipping casks. The purpose of this report is to present and analyze the results of the facility assessments completed within the FICA project. During Phase 1, the data items required to complete the facility assessments were identified and the database for the project was created. During Phase 2, visits were made to 122 facilities on 76 sites to collect data and information, the database was updated, and assessments of the cask-handling capabilities at each facility were performed. Each assessment of cask-handling capability contains three parts: the current capability of the facility (planning base); the potential enhanced capability if revisions were made to the facility licensing and/or administrative controls; and the potential enhanced capability if limited physical modifications were made to the facility. The main conclusion derived from the planning base assessments is that the current facility capabilities will not allow handling of any of the FICA Casks at 49 of the 122 facilities evaluated. However, consideration of potential revisions and/or modifications showed that all but one of the 49 facilities could be adapted to handle at least one of the FICA Casks. For this to be possible, facility licensing, administrative controls, and/or physical aspects of the facility would need to be modified.

Pope, R.B. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); MacDonald, R.R. [ed.] [Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System, Vienna, VA (United States); Viebrock, J.M.; Mote, N. [Nuclear Assurance Corp., Norcross, GA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Electronic Mail Analysis Capability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes the pilot program to test the Department of Energy (DOE) Electronic Mail Analysis Capability (EMAC), which will be used to monitor and analyze outgoing and incoming electronic mail (e-mail) from the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and DOE laboratories that are engaged in nuclear weapons design or work involving special nuclear material. No cancellation.

2001-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

182

Federal Technical Capability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To define requirements and responsibilities for meeting the Department of Energy (DOE) commitment to recruiting, deploying, developing, and retaining a technically competent workforce that will accomplish DOE missions in a safe and efficient manner through the Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP). Chg. 1 dated 9-20-11 Cancels DOE O 426.1. Cancels DOE P 426.1.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hydrogen and Gaseous Fuel Safety and Toxicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-traditional motor fuels are receiving increased attention and use. This paper examines the safety of three alternative gaseous fuels plus gasoline and the advantages and disadvantages of each. The gaseous fuels are hydrogen, methane (natural gas), and propane. Qualitatively, the overall risks of the four fuels should be close. Gasoline is the most toxic. For small leaks, hydrogen has the highest ignition probability and the gaseous fuels have the highest risk of a burning jet or cloud.

Lee C. Cadwallader; J. Sephen Herring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Category:Burns, OR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Burns, OR Burns, OR Jump to: navigation, search Go Back to PV Economics By Location Media in category "Burns, OR" The following 16 files are in this category, out of 16 total. SVFullServiceRestaurant Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVFullServiceRestauran... 71 KB SVHospital Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVHospital Burns OR Pa... 74 KB SVLargeHotel Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeHotel Burns OR ... 74 KB SVLargeOffice Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVLargeOffice Burns OR... 69 KB SVMediumOffice Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMediumOffice Burns O... 71 KB SVMidriseApartment Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVMidriseApartment Bur... 72 KB SVOutPatient Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png SVOutPatient Burns OR ... 69 KB SVPrimarySchool Burns OR PacifiCorp (Oregon).png

185

Federal Technical Capability Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Federal Technical Capability Federal Technical Capability Program (FTCP) Home About the FTCP FTCP Topics FTCP Meetings Performance Indicator Reports Guiding Documents Qualifying Official Training Approaches FTCP Plans, Reports & Issue Papers Workforce Analysis & Staffing Site Specific Information Nuclear Executive Leadership Training General Information 2004-1 FTCP Commitments FTCP Correspondence Site Map Contact Us Quick Reference Departmental Representative to the DNFSB Facility Representative Safety System Oversight DOE Integrated Safety Management National Training Center DOE Directives Program DOE Technical Standards Program DOE Phone Book HSS Logo FTCP FTCP Topics DOE Strategic Human Capital Plan (FY 2006 - 2011) New Directions in Learning: Building a DOE University System May 4, 2007, the Deputy Secretary memorandum designating Karen Boardman the FTCP Chairperson.

186

TMV Technology Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TMV Technology Capabilities TMV Technology Capabilities Brake Stroke Monitor Brake monitoring systems are proactive maintenance systems that provide instant identification of wheel specific, out-of-adjustment, non-functioning or dragging brake issues. AC Shore Power Since the TMV is equipped with DC power in-vehicle, shore power is needed to 1) charge the batteries that supply power to those outlets and 2) be used when running off battery power is not necessary FMCSA Laptop The laptop contains key software which helps enforcement officials perform inspections, look up information, etc. This computer also contains software for the USDOT # reader. Electronic On-Board Recorder EOBRs remove the need for paper logs by automatically recording duty status and location. EOBRs help

187

Advanced Simulation Capability for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Simulation Capability for Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of perfor- mance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activi- ties throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing pro- grams as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science, Fossil Energy, and Nuclear Energy. Challenge Current groundwater and soil remediation challenges that will continue to be addressed in the next decade include

188

Fuel Consumption and NOx Trade-offs on a Port-Fuel-Injected SI Gasoline Engine Equipped with a Lean-NOx Trap  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Lean-burn improves PFI fuel economy by ~3% relative to best stoichiometric VCT/EGR conditions, when used in combination with VCT & EGR.

189

Status of advanced fuel candidates for Sodium Fast Reactor within the Generation IV International Forum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main challenge for fuels for future Sodium Fast Reactor systems is the development and qualification of a nuclear fuel sub-assembly which meets the Generation IV International Forum goals. The Advanced Fuel project investigates high burn-up minor actinide bearing fuels as well as claddings and wrappers to withstand high neutron doses and temperatures. The R&D outcome of national and collaborative programs has been collected and shared between the AF project members in order to review the capability of sub-assembly material and fuel candidates, to identify the issues and select the viable options. Based on historical experience and knowledge, both oxide and metal fuels emerge as primary options to meet the performance and the reliability goals of Generation IV SFR systems. There is a significant positive experience on carbide fuels but major issues remain to be overcome: strong in-pile swelling, atmosphere required for fabrication as well as Pu and Am losses. The irradiation performance database for nitride fuels is limited with longer term R&D activities still required. The promising core material candidates are Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) and Oxide Dispersed Strengthened (ODS) steels.

F. Delage; J. Carmack; C. B. Lee; T. Mizuno; M. Pelletier; J. Somers

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Microsoft Word - Deep-Burn awardee team members _2_.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DEEP-BURN AWARDEES RECIPIENTS RECIPIENT TEAM MEMBERS Advanced Modeling and Simulation Capability R&D for $1 million University of Chicago Argonne Argonne National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Lawrence Livermore National Lab University of Michigan Transuranic Management Capabilities R&D for $6.3 million Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Idaho National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley University of Wisconsin University of Tennessee University of Nevada Las Vegas North Carolina State University Georgia Institute of Technology Pennsylvania State University Idaho State University Texas A&M University Logos Technologies

191

Miniature ceramic fuel cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zuppero, Anthony C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

192

CANDU fuel cycle flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High neutron economy, on-power refuelling, and a simple bundle design provide a high degree of flexibility that enables CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium; registered trademark) reactors to be fuelled with a wide variety of fuel types. Near-term applications include the use of slightly enriched uranium (SEU), and recovered uranium (RU) from reprocessed spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. Plutonium and other actinides arising from various sources, including spent LWR fuel, can be accommodated, and weapons-origin plutonium could be destroyed by burning in CANDU. In the DUPIC fuel cycle, a dry processing method would convert spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel to CANDU fuel. The thorium cycle remains of strategic interest in CANDU to ensure long-term resource availability, and would be of specific interest to those countries possessing large thorium reserves, but limited uranium resources.

Torgerson, D.F.; Boczar, P.G. [Chalk River Lab., Ontario (Canada); Dastur, A.R. [AECL CANDU, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

ORISE Science Education Programs: Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capabilities Science Education Programs Capabilities The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) connects the best and most diverse students and faculty members to...

194

The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR-II as part of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data, and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few minor actinide-bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MA’s. Of primary interest are the affect of the MA’s on fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction, and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995-1996, and currently represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior. This paper provides a summary of the X501 fabrication, characterization, irradiation, and post irradiation examination.

M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes; W. J. Carmack; H. Tsai

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR-II as part of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data, and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few minor actinide-bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MA’s. Of primary interest are the affect of the MA’s on fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction, and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995-1996, and currently represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior.

Jon Carmack; S. L. Hayes; M. K. Meyer; H. Tsai

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FEDERAL TECHNICAL CAPABILITY PROGRAM C C A A L L E E N N D D A A R R Y Y E E A A R R S S 2 2 0 0 1 1 1 1 - - 2 2 0 0 1 1 2 2 B B I I E E N N N N I I A A L L R R E E P P O O R R T T UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY November 2013 INTENTIONALLY BLANK FTCP 2011-2012 Biennial Report ~ 2 ~ Table of Contents Section Title Page 1.0 Purpose and Scope .......................................................................................... 3 2.0 2011/2012 Accomplishments.......................................................................... 3

197

Biomass Burning Observation Project Specifically,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Burning Observation Project Burning Observation Project Specifically, the aircraft will obtain measurements of the microphysical, chemical, hygroscopic, and optical properties of aerosols. Data captured during BBOP will help scientists better understand how aerosols combine and change at a variety of distances and burn times. Locations Pasco, Washington. From July through September, the G-1 will be based out of its home base in Washington. From this location, it can intercept and measure smoke plumes from naturally occurring uncontrolled fires across Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Northern California, and Western Montana. Smoke plumes aged 0-5 hours are the primary targets for this phase of the campaign. Memphis, Tennessee. In October, the plane moves to Tennessee to sample prescribed

198

Open Burning (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) Open Burning (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction General Public/Consumer Industrial Residential Program Info Start Date 2003 State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider New Mexico Environment Department The New Mexico Environment Department's Air Quality Bureau regulates the open burning rules established by the Environmental Improvement Board. These rules are established to protect public health and welfare by establishing controls on pollution produced by open burning. Open burning is allowed for recreational and ceremonial purposes, for barbecuing, for heating purposes in fireplaces, for the noncommercial cooking of food for human consumption and for warming by small wood fires at construction

199

Mercury Emissions from Biomass Burning in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because the burned area products from remote sensors with medium resolution often miss the crop burning in fields due to its small size, we used the official statistics data at the provincial level to estimate the mercury emissions from crop residues burning in fields and biofuel combustion in homes. ... Although the amount of crop residues burnt in fields in China could not be reflected accurately in burned area products (MCD45A1) because of their small size, they could be located by MODIS fire counts data. ... Frequently burning grasslands in Africa and Australia, and agricultural waste burning globally, contribute relatively little to the Hg budget. ...

Xin Huang; Mengmeng Li; Hans R. Friedli; Yu Song; Di Chang; Lei Zhu

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

200

Low emissions combustor development for an industrial gas turbine to utilize LCV fuel gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced coal-based power generation systems such as the British Coal Topping Cycle offer the potential for high-efficiency electricity generation with minimum environmental impact. An important component of the Topping cycle program is the gas turbine, for which development of a combustion system to burn low calorific value coal derived fuel gas, at a turbine inlet temperature of 1,260 C (2,300 F), with minimum pollutant emissions, is a key R and D issue. A phased combustor development program is underway burning low calorific value fuel gas (3.6--4.1 MJ/m[sup 3]) with low emissions, particularly NO[sub x] derived from fuel-bound nitrogen. The first phase of the combustor development program has now been completed using a generic tubo-annular, prototype combustor design. Tests were carried out at combustor loading and Mach numbers considerably greater than the initial design values. Combustor performance at these conditions was encouraging. The second phase of the program is currently in progress. This will assess, initially, an improved variant of the prototype combustor operating at conditions selected to represent a particular medium sized industrial gas turbine. This combustor will also be capable of operating using natural gas as an auxiliary fuel, to suite the start-up procedure for the Topping Cycle. The paper presents the Phase 1 test program results for the prototype combustor. Design of the modified combustor for Phase 2 of the development program is discussed, together with preliminary combustor performance results.

Kelsall, G.J.; Smith, M.A. (British Coal Corp., Glos (United Kingdom). Coal Research Establishment); Cannon, M.F. (European Gas Turbines Ltd., Lincoln (United Kingdom). Aero and Technology Products)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Long time experience with the development of HTR fuel elements in Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of spherical fuel elements for HTR-designs in Germany is discussed. Special attention is given to the development, production and characterization (incl. kernel and coatings) as well as to the irradiation and post-irradiation examination of the different coated particle systems. It has been demonstrated in various irradiation tests which were supplemented by heating tests that for a modular HTR power plant (with a thermal output of 200 MJ s?1) during the specified normal operation as well as in the case of incidents and even accidents, where the maximum fuel temperature will be below 1620 °C, the fission product release is very low. In this context, it must be mentioned that the present coated particle design has not yet been optimized for the combination of high burn-up and high temperature resistance under accident conditions. The TRISO fuel available is a result from fuel development for large HTR's with steam turbines in a time when the modular concept was not yet been invented although its capabilities inspired the design of modular reactors. Thus, there is still a huge potential for improvement of coated particles especially when plutonium or actinide burning is also taken into account.

H Nickel; H Nabielek; G Pott; A.W Mehner

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Ion kinetic effects on the ignition and burn in ICF Ion kinetic effects on the ignition and burn of ICF targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and burn of the thermonuclear fuel in inertial confinement fusion pellets at the ion kinetic level to treat fusion products (suprathermal -particles) in a self-consistent manner with the thermal bulk enhancement of fusion products leads to a significant reduction of the fusion yield. I. MOTIVATION AND CONTEXT

203

Actinide burning in the integral fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past few years, Argonne National Laboratory has been developing the integral fast reactor (IFR), an advanced liquid-metal reactor concept. In the IFR, the inherent properties of liquid-metal cooling are combined with a new metallic fuel and a radically different refining process to allow breakthroughs in passive safety, fuel cycle economics, and waste management. A key feature of the IFR concept is its unique pyroprocessing. Pyroprocessing has the potential to radically improve long-term waste management strategies by exploiting the following attributes: 1. Minor actinides accompany plutonium product stream; therefore, actinide recycling occurs naturally. Actinides, the primary source of long-term radiological toxicity, are removed from the waste stream and returned to the reactor for in situ burning, generating useful energy. 2. High-level waste volume from pyroprocessing call be reduced substantially as compared with direct disposal of spent fuel. 3. Decay heat loading in the repository can be reduced by a large factor, especially for the long-term burden. 4. Low-level waste generation is minimal. 5. Troublesome fission products, such as [sup 99]Tc, [sup 129]I, and [sup 14]C, are contained and immobilized. Singly or in combination, the foregoing attributes provide important improvements in long-term waste management in terms of the ease in meeting technical performance requirements (perhaps even the feasibility of demonstrating that technical performance requirements can be met) and perhaps also in ultimate public acceptance. Actinide recycling, if successfully developed, could well help the current repository program by providing an opportunity to enhance capacity utilization and by deferring the need for future repositories. It also represents a viable technical backup option in the event unforeseen difficulties arise in the repository licensing process.

Chang, Y.I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

Jean Ragusa; Karen Vierow

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Raymond Burns > Product Research Technologist - Exxon Mobile...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Raymond Burns Product Research Technologist - Exxon Mobile raymond.burns@gmail.com Formerly a member of the DiSalvo Group, Ray earned his PhD in August 2013...

206

Mobile systems capability plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan was prepared to initiate contracting for and deployment of these mobile system services. 102,000 cubic meters of retrievable, contact-handled TRU waste are stored at many sites around the country. Also, an estimated 38,000 cubic meters of TRU waste will be generated in the course of waste inventory workoff and continuing DOE operations. All the defense TRU waste is destined for disposal in WIPP near Carlsbad NM. To ship TRU waste there, sites must first certify that the waste meets WIPP waste acceptance criteria. The waste must be characterized, and if not acceptable, subjected to additional processing, including repackaging. Most sites plan to use existing fixed facilities or open new ones between FY1997-2006 to perform these functions; small-quantity sites lack this capability. An alternative to fixed facilities is the use of mobile systems mounted in trailers or skids, and transported to sites. Mobile systems will be used for all characterization and certification at small sites; large sites can also use them. The Carlsbad Area Office plans to pursue a strategy of privatization of mobile system services, since this offers a number of advantages. To indicate the possible magnitude of the costs of deploying mobile systems, preliminary estimates of equipment, maintenance, and operating costs over a 10-year period were prepared and options for purchase, lease, and privatization through fixed-price contracts considered.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

agency must select one that is capable of being powered by cleaner fuels, including electricity and natural gas, if the total lifecycle cost of ownership is less than or...

208

Making premium diesel fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For refiners, extra processing and blending is a practical, though not always easy, option for improving diesel fuel properties; however, it entails compromises. For example, ignition quality can be improved by including more paraffins, but this negatively impacts the required low-temperature operability properties. Another example is adding aromatics to increase the diesel`s Btu value, but aromatics burn poorly and tend to cause smoking. Due to these and other types of diametrical trade-offs, the scope of distillate processing and fuels blending at the refinery is often very limited. Therefore, fuel additives are rapidly becoming the only alternative for obtaining the superior quality necessary in a premium diesel fuel. If stabilizers, dispersants and other fuel additive components are used in the additive package, the product can be marketed as a premium diesel fuel additive. Engines using this additive-treated fuel will consistently have less emissions, produce optimum power from the fuel energy conversion process and perform to design specifications. And the user will truly have a premium diesel fuel. The paper discusses detergent additives, cetane or ignition improvers, fuel stabilizers, cold weather additives, and lubricity additives.

Pipenger, G. [Amalgamated Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A Blueprint for GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Startup Fuel Fabrication Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is to identify the requirements and issues associated with design of GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Fuel Facility. The report was prepared in support of providing data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives was to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu) -239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept was proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR was proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu was assumed to be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) was being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. It was estimated that the facility will provide the startup fuel for 10-15 years and would take 3 to 5 years to construct.

S. Khericha

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

LANL Analytical and Radiochemistry Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities.

Steiner, Robert E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Burns, Carol J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lamont, Stephen P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tandon, Lav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

211

New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Codes Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal New Computer Codes Unlock the Secrets of Cleaner Burning Coal March 29, 2012 | Tags: Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), Combustion, Franklin, Hopper Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 The Polk Power Station near Mulberry, Florida, is an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle gasification plant. It is capable of generating 313 megawatts of electricity - 250 megawatts of which are supplied to the electric grid. The plant's gas cleaning technology removes more than 98 percent of the sulfur in coal, converting it to a commercial product. Nitrogen oxide emissions are reduced by more than 90 percent. (Photo courtesy of DOE-NETL) Approximately half of all electricity used in the United States comes from

212

The burn bactericidal index: A bactericidal index specific for burn patients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The percentage of the body surface area burned together with the bactericidal capacity of polymorphs were found to have an influence on burned patients' resistance to infection. This new indicator of resistance to infection in burns, the Burn Bactericidal Index (BBI), was high in patients not susceptible to infection especially in patients vaccinated against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but low in patients with extensive burns and in patients with septicaemia and other acute clinical infections.

E.A. Roe

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Requirements For An Advanced Fueling System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supported by DOE grant No. DE-FG03-02ER54686 Supported by 1 #12;Reactor Fueling Requirements Not Adequately for current drive, a fueling system is all that a burning plasma system may be able to rely on to alter core density peaking via. core fuelling provides more flexibility to reach ignition 3Raman/FESAC/7Aug07 #12

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

214

Pulverized coal fuel injector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pulverized coal fuel injector contains an acceleration section to improve the uniformity of a coal-air mixture to be burned. An integral splitter is provided which divides the coal-air mixture into a number separate streams or jets, and a center body directs the streams at a controlled angle into the primary zone of a burner. The injector provides for flame shaping and the control of NO/NO.sub.2 formation.

Rini, Michael J. (Hebron, CT); Towle, David P. (Windsor, CT)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Sandia National Laboratories: Research & Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at the ASME 12th Fuel Cell Science, Engineering and Technology Conference in Boston, Massachusetts. One pathway for delivering H2 ... Combining 'Tinkertoy' Materials with...

216

Burn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stream that meanders through the cavern. My guide tells me the brook was once a roaring river, two hundred million years ago this site was covered by an inland sea. He points out salamander and raccoon tracks in the mud as we hike past Mirror... While Painting a Red Canna: A Rhapsody 52 IV. New Poems Halloween 54 Alabaster Caverns 55 Subterranean Red 57 Ten Seconds After the Gun 58 Rock Wall 59 Following the Red Hills home 60...

Johnson, Vivian Kathleen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

ETHANOL FROM CORN: CLEAN RENEWABLE FUEL FOR THE FUTURE, OR DRAIN ON OUR RESOURCES AND POCKETS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ETHANOL FROM CORN: CLEAN RENEWABLE FUEL FOR THE FUTURE, OR DRAIN ON OUR RESOURCES AND POCKETS? TAD as ethanol from corn. When this corn ethanol is burned as a gasoline additive or fuel, its use amounts that burn corn ethanol is halved. The wide- spread use of corn ethanol will cause manifold damage to air

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

218

On Building Inexpensive Network Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many deployed approaches for blocking unwanted traffic, either once it reaches the recipient's network, or closer to its point of origin. One of these schemes is based on the notion of traffic carrying capabilities that grant access to a network and/or end host. However, leveraging capabilities results in added complexity and additional steps in the communication process: Before communication starts a remote host must be vetted and given a capability to use in the subsequent communication. In this paper, we propose a lightweight mechanism that turns the answers provided by DNS name resolution---which Internet communication broadly depends on anyway---into capabilities. While not achieving an ideal capability system, we show the mechanism can be built from commodity technology and is therefore a pragmatic way to gain some of the key benefits of capabilities without requiring new infrastructure.

Shue, Craig A [ORNL; Kalafut, Prof. Andrew [Grand Valley State University (GVSU), Michigan; Allman, Mark [International Computer Science Institute (ICSI); Taylor, Curtis R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Fire-resistant pits: Reducing the probability of accidental plutonium dispersal from fuel fires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reductions in risk of Pu dispersal from hydrocarbon fuel fires were estimated using pool and spill fire data. Improvements in FRP temperature capabilities, on a system-independent basis, lead to the following estimated reductions in risk, using three probabilistic temperature distributions normalized to a temperature capability of 640[degree]C (the melting point of plutonium): 1OOO[degree]C - factor of 3 to 5; 11OO[degree]C - factor of 10 to 13; and 1200[degree]C - factor of 120 to 300. The above values would, of course, vary for a different normalization temperature. These values were derived to be as system-independent as possible. Incorporation of fuel fire durations or of longer time-averaging (than the two minutes employed in this study) would tend to increase these FRP improvement factors. Incorporation of propellant fires, burning metal or of combined impact/fire accidents would tend to decrease them. Further studies of fuel fire durations, particularly of a fuel fire duration model, is recommended, as is an uncertainty analysis of the temperature distributions.

Stephens, D.R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Sandia National Laboratories: NSTTF Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NSTTF Capabilities Sandia Researchers Win CSP:ELEMENTS Funding Award On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Sandia National Laboratories: Research & Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research & Capabilities, Solar, SunShot Sandia scientists have developed glitter-sized photovoltaic (PV) cells that have the potential to achieve the cost breakthrough necessary...

222

NREL: Buildings Research - Residential Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Residential Capabilities Photo showing a row of homes in the distance. The NREL Residential Buildings group is an innovative, multidisciplinary team focused on accelerating the...

223

Sandia National Laboratories: Research & Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

News & Events, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Systems Analysis, Wind Energy Wind-turbine wakes lead to lower power production and increased loading on downstream...

224

High-bandwidth Modulation of H2/Syngas Fuel to Control Combustion Dynamics in Micro-Mixing Lean Premix Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this program was to develop and demonstrate fuel injection technologies that will facilitate the development of cost-effective turbine engines for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, while improving efficiency and reducing emissions. The program involved developing a next-generation multi-point injector with enhanced stability performance for lean premix turbine systems that burn hydrogen (H2) or synthesis gas (syngas) fuels. A previously developed injector that demonstrated superior emissions performance was improved to enhance static flame stability through zone staging and pilot sheltering. In addition, piezo valve technology was implemented to investigate the potential for enhanced dynamic stability through high-bandwidth modulation of the fuel supply. Prototype injector and valve hardware were tested in an atmospheric combustion facility. The program was successful in meeting its objectives. Specifically, the following was accomplished: Demonstrated improvement of lean operability of the Parker multi-point injector through staging of fuel flow and primary zone sheltering; Developed a piezo valve capable of proportional and high-bandwidth modulation of gaseous fuel flow at frequencies as high as 500 Hz; The valve was shown to be capable of effecting changes to flame dynamics, heat release, and acoustic signature of an atmospheric combustor. The latter achievement indicates the viability of the Parker piezo valve technology for use in future adaptively controlled systems for the mitigation of combustion instabilities, particularly for attenuating combustion dynamics under ultra-lean conditions.

Jeff Melzak; Tim Lieuwen; Adel Mansour

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

NETL: Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Coal and Power Systems Fuel Cells SECA Logo Welcome to NETL's Fuel Cells Webpage. In partnership with private industry, educational institutions and national laboratories, we are leading the research, development, and demonstration of high efficiency, fuel flexible solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and coal-based SOFC power generation systems for stationary market large central power plants under the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA). The SECA cost reduction goal is to have SOFC systems capable of being manufactured at $400 per kilowatt by 2010. Concurrently, the scale-up, aggregation, and integration of the technology will progress in parallel leading to prototype validation of megawatt (MW)-class fuel flexible products by 2012 and 2015. The SECA coal-based systems goal is the development of large

226

Excision and Skin Grafting of Thermal Burns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as loss of hand function or facial deformity. There are often psychological sequelae in burned patients, including post-traumatic stress disorder and depression. Pathophysiology and the Effect of Therapy. The pathophysiology of thermal injury is related to the initial distribution of heat within... A 45-year-old man presents with extensive burns after a house fire. Excision and grafting are recommended for management of his burns. Depending on the depth and extent of the burn, early excision and grafting promote wound healing, reduce the risk of infection, and shorten hospitalization but increase the need for blood transfusion, as compared with conservative management.

Orgill D.P.

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

227

Pollution by cereal waste burning in Spain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the amount of cereal waste burned in Spain, which represents the most important source of biomass burning in this country, is estimated. During the period between 1980 and 1998, an average mass of 8 Tg of cereal waste was burned annually, with remaining 1 Tg of ash on the cereal fields after combustion. By using emission factors previously calculated by Ortiz de Zárate et al. [Ortiz de Zárate, I., Ezcurra, A., Lacaux, J.P., Van Dihn, P., 2000. Emission factor estimates of cereal waste burning in Spain. Atmos. Environ. 34, 3183–3193.], it is deduced that pollutant emissions linked to cereal waste-burning process reach values of 11 Tg CO2, 80 Gg of TPM and 23 Gg of \\{NOx\\} year?1 during the cereal-burning period. These emissions represent 46% of total CO2 and 23% \\{NOx\\} emitted in Spain during the burning period that lasts 1 month after harvesting. Therefore, the relative importance of cereal waste burning as pollutant source in Spain almost during fire period becomes evident. Finally, our study allows to deduce that the production of 1 kg of cereal crop implies that 410 g of carbon and 3.3 g of nitrogen are going to be introduced into the atmosphere by this pollutant process. We estimate a total gaseous emission of 3.3 Tg of C and 25 Gg N as different pollutants by cereal waste burning.

I. Ortiz de Zárate; A. Ezcurra; J.P. Lacaux; P. Van Dinh; J. Díaz de Argandoña

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

Witt, Jonathan L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM CAPABILITIES AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY (INL)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

--Idaho National Laboratory’s, Space Nuclear Systems and Technology Division established the resources, equipment and facilities required to provide nuclear-fueled, Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) to Department of Energy (DOE) Customers. RPSs are designed to convert the heat generated by decay of iridium clad, 238PuO2 fuel pellets into electricity that is used to power missions in remote, harsh environments. Utilization of nuclear fuel requires adherence to governing regulations and the INL provides unique capabilities to safely fuel, test, store, transport and integrate RPSs to supply power—supporting mission needs. Nuclear capabilities encompass RPS fueling, testing, handling, storing, transporting RPS nationally, and space vehicle integration. Activities are performed at the INL and in remote locations such as John F. Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station to support space missions. This paper will focus on the facility and equipment capabilities primarily offered at the INL, Material and Fuel Complex located in a security-protected, federally owned, industrial area on the remote desert site west of Idaho Falls, ID. Nuclear and non-nuclear facilities house equipment needed to perform required activities such as general purpose heat source (GPHS) module pre-assembly and module assembly using nuclear fuel; RPS receipt and baseline electrical testing, fueling, vibration testing to simulate the launch environment, mass properties testing to measure the mass and compute the moment of inertia, electro-magnetic characterizing to determine potential consequences to the operation of vehicle or scientific instrumentation, and thermal vacuum testing to verify RPS power performance in the vacuum and cold temperatures of space.

Kelly Lively; Stephen Johnson; Eric Clarke

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Lean burn limit and time to light characteristics of laser ignition in gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work details a study of laser ignition in a low pressure combustion test rig, representative of an industrial gas turbine (SGT-400, Siemens Industrial Turbomachinery Ltd.) and for the first time investigates the effect of air mass flow rate on combustion characteristics at air/fuel ratios at the lean burn limit. Both the lean burn limit and time taken to light are essential in determining the suitability of a specified air/fuel ratio, especially in multi-chamber ignition applications. Through extension of the lean burn limit and reduction of the time taken to light, the operating window for ignition with regards to the air/fuel ratio can be increased, leading to greater reliability and repeatability of ignition. Ignition of a natural gas and air mixture at atmospheric pressure was conducted using both a standard high energy igniter and a laser ignition system utilizing a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser source operating at 1064 nm wavelength. A detailed comparison of the lean burn limit and time taken to light for standard ignition and laser ignition is presented.

J. Griffiths; M. Riley; A. Kirk; A. Borman; J. Lawrence; C. Dowding

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Dynamically balanced fuel nozzle and method of operation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method of operation designed to reduce undesirably high pressure oscillations in lean premix combustion systems burning hydrocarbon fuels are provided. Natural combustion and nozzle acoustics are employed to generate multiple fuel pockets which, when burned in the combustor, counteract the oscillations caused by variations in heat release in the combustor. A hybrid of active and passive control techniques, the apparatus and method eliminate combustion oscillations over a wide operating range, without the use of moving parts or electronics.

Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Janus, Michael C. (Baltimore, MD); Robey, Edward H. (Westover, WV)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Overview of AREVA Logistics Business Unit Capabilities and Expertise  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Outline Outline Presentation Outline Overview of AREVA Logistics Business Unit capabilities and E ti Expertise Overview of Transnuclear Inc Transportation Capabilities in the United States Questions Quick Reminder of Fuel Cycle - p.2 AREVA Logistics Business Unit - p.3 Around 4 000 transports each year Around 4,000 transports each year More than 200 transports of used fuel (France and Europe), of vitrified and compacted waste (Europe and Japan) of vitrified and compacted waste (Europe and Japan) More than 150 MOX fuel transports More than 300 transports of low level waste More than 2,700 front-end transports More than 400 transports of heavy industrial equipment Around 150 transports for research reactors and laboratories - p.4 Around 150 transports for research reactors and laboratories Design, Testing and Licensing:

233

Conceptual development of a continuous burning system for oil spill remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or ocean environment. During the period from 1974 to 1977, an average of four mil- lion gallons of crude oil per year were discharged into open waters and this trend is expected to increase (Buist 1987). The situation where combustion of oil employed... requirement of initiating the burning safely. This is done with a automatic valve which regulates the fuel supply. The valve is operated by a radio signal sway from the zone of burning. 45 C. CHEMISTRY OF LIQUID PETROLEUM GASES In a Liquefied Hydrocarbon...

Venkataramaiah, Ramesh H.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

Sandia National Laboratories: fuel cell catalyst  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fuel cell catalyst ECIS and Compass Metals: Platinum Nanostructures for Enhanced Catalysis On March 29, 2013, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Capabilities, Energy, Energy...

235

Fuel reduction and coarse woody debris dynamics with early season and late season prescribed fire in a Sierra Nevada mixed conifer forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fire exclusion has led to an unnatural accumulation and greater spatial continuity of organic material on the ground in many forests. This material serves both as potential fuel for forest fires and habitat for a large array of forest species. Managers must balance fuel reduction to reduce wildfire hazard with fuel retention targets to maintain other forest functions. This study reports fuel consumption and changes to coarse woody debris attributes with prescribed burns ignited under different fuel moisture conditions. Replicated early season burn, late season burn, and unburned control plots were established in old-growth mixed conifer forest in Sequoia National Park that had not experienced fire for more than 120 years. Early season burns were ignited during June 2002 when fuels were relatively moist, and late season burns were ignited during September/October 2001 when fuels were dry. Fuel loading and coarse woody debris abundance, cover, volume, and mass were evaluated prior to and after the burns. While both types of burns reduced fuel loading, early season burns consumed significantly less of the total dead and down organic matter than late season burns (67% versus 88%). This difference in fuel consumption between burning treatments was significant for most all woody fuel components evaluated, plus the litter and duff layers. Many logs were not entirely consumed – therefore the number of logs was not significantly changed by fire – but burning did reduce log length, cover, volume, and mass. Log cover, volume, and mass were reduced to a lesser extent by early season burns than late season burns, as a result of higher wood moisture levels. Early season burns also spread over less of the ground surface within the burn perimeter (73%) than late season burns (88%), and were significantly patchier. Organic material remaining after a fire can dam sediments and reduce erosion, while unburned patches may help mitigate the impact of fire on fire-sensitive species by creating refugia from which these species can recolonize burned areas. Early season burns may be an effective means of moderating potential ecosystem damage when treating heavy and/or continuous fuels resulting from long periods of fire exclusion, if burning during this season is not detrimental to other forest functions.

Eric E. Knapp; Jon E. Keeley; Elizabeth A. Ballenger; Teresa J. Brennan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

HTR Fuel Development in Europe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the frame of the European Network HTR-TN and in the 5. EURATOM RTD Framework Programme (FP5) European programmes have been launched to consolidate advanced modular HTR technology in Europe. This paper gives an overall description and first results of this programme. The major tasks covered concern a complete recovery of the past experience on fuel irradiation behaviour in Europe, qualification of HTR fuel by irradiating of fuel elements in the HFR reactor, understanding of fuel behaviour with the development of a fuel particle code and finally a recover of the fuel fabrication capability. (authors)

Languille, Alain [CEA Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance BP1 (France); Conrad, R. [CEC/JRC/IE Petten (Netherlands); Guillermier, P. [Framatome-ANP/ Lyon (France); Nabielek, H. [FZJ/Juelich (Germany); Bakker, K. [NRG/Petten (Netherlands); Abram, T. [BNFL UK (United Kingdom); Haas, D. [JRC/ITU/Karlsruhe (Germany)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Assessment of Rich-Burn, Quick-Mix, Lean-Burn Trapped Vortex Combustor for Stationary Gas Turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the evaluation of an alternative combustion approach to achieve low emissions for a wide range of fuel types. This approach combines the potential advantages of a staged rich-burn, quick-mix, lean-burn (RQL) combustor with the revolutionary trapped vortex combustor (TVC) concept. Although RQL combustors have been proposed for low-Btu fuels, this paper considers the application of an RQL combustor for high-Btu natural gas applications. This paper will describe the RQL/TVC concept and experimental results conducted at 10 atm (1013 kPa or 147 psia) and an inlet-air temperature of 644 K (700°F). The results from a simple network reactor model using detailed kinetics are compared to the experimental observations. Neglecting mixing limitations, the simplified model suggests that NOx and CO performance below 10 parts per million could be achieved in an RQL approach. The CO levels predicted by the model are reasonably close to the experimental results over a wide range of operating conditions. The predicted NOx levels are reasonably close for some operating conditions; however, as the rich-stage equivalence ratio increases, the discrepancy between the experiment and the model increases. Mixing limitations are critical in any RQL combustor, and the mixing limitations for this RQL/TVC design are discussed.

Douglas L. Straub; Kent H. Casleton; Robie E. Lewis; Todd G. Sidwell; Daniel J. Maloney; George A. Richards

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

PHYSICS OF BURNING PHYSICS INACCESSIBLE TO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHYSICS OF BURNING PLASMAS: PHYSICS INACCESSIBLE TO PRESENT FACILITIES FIRE Physics Workshop May 2000 F. Perkins and N. Sauthoff Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory FIRE Workshop 1 May 2000 #12;OUTLINE · Introduction · Three Classes of Burning Plasma Physics inaccessable to contemporary tokamak

239

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Philadelphians protest ocean burning of waste ... A raucous, hostile crowd of Philadelphia residents shouted down Environmental Protection Agency officials last week at a public hearing on the agency's tentative decision to issue a research permit for an ocean burn of chemical wastes. ...

1986-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability Reorganization bolsters nuclear nonproliferation capability LANL has strengthened its capability in a key aspect of nuclear nonproliferation by combining two groups within its Global Security organization. June 27, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Sandia National Laboratories: Research & Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& Capabilities, Solar Sandia researchers have received a 1.2M award from the DOE's SunShot Initiative to develop a technique that they believe will significantly improve...

242

In Situ Measurement Technique for Simultaneous Detection of K, KCl, and KOH Vapors Released During Combustion of Solid Biomass Fuel in a Single Particle Reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A quantitative and simultaneous measurement of K, KCl, and KOH vapors from a burning fuel sample combusted in a single particle reactor was performed using collinear photofragmentation...

Sorvajärvi, Tapio; DeMartini, Nikolai; Rossi, Jussi; Toivonen, Juha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

SRC burn test in 700-hp oil-designed boiler. Annex Volume C. Boiler emission report. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solvent-Refined Coal (SRC) test burn program was conducted at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) located in Bruceton, Pa. One of the objectives of the study was to determine the feasibility of burning SRC fuels in boilers set up for fuel oil firing and to characterize emissions. Testing was conducted on the 700-hp oil-fired boiler used for research projects. No. 6 fuel oil was used for baseline data comparison, and the following SRC fuels were tested: SRC Fuel (pulverized SRC), SRC Residual Oil, and SRC-Water Slurry. Uncontrolled particulate emission rates averaged 0.9243 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Fuel, 0.1970 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC Residual Oil, and 0.9085 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu for SRC-Water Slurry. On a lb/10/sup 6/ Btu basis, emissions from SRC Residual Oil averaged 79 and 78%, respectively, lower than the SRC Fuel and SRC-Water Slurry. The lower SRC Residual Oil emissions were due, in part, to the lower ash content of the oil and more efficient combustion. The SRC Fuel had the highest emission rate, but only 2% higher than the SRC-Water Slurry. Each fuel type was tested under variable boiler operating parameters to determine its effect on boiler emissions. The program successfully demonstrated that the SRC fuels could be burned in fuel oil boilers modified to handle SRC fuels. This report details the particulate emission program and results from testing conducted at the boiler outlet located before the mobile precipitator take-off duct. The sampling method was EPA Method 17, which uses an in-stack filter.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Federal Technical Capability Program - Quarterly Performance Indicator  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports Quarterly Performance Indicator Reports 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 16, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability June 5, 2013 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 20, 2013 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 20, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 8, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 30, 2012 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability March 6, 2012 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability November 10, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability August 24, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability May 18, 2011 Quarterly Report on Federal Technical Capability February 23, 2011

245

Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Ethanol Effects on Lean-Burn and Stoichiometric GDI Emissions Characterized particulate emissions from U.S.-legal...

246

Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidificat...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon humidification: Roles of inorganically-induced hygroscopicity, Reduction in biomass burning aerosol light absorption upon...

247

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High...

248

Refueling machine with relative positioning capability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A refueling machine having relative positioning capability for refueling a nuclear reactor. The refueling machine includes a pair of articulated arms mounted on a refueling bridge. Each arm supports a respective telescoping mast. Each telescoping mast is designed to flex laterally in response to application of a lateral thrust on the end of the mast. A pendant mounted on the end of the mast carries an air-actuated grapple, television cameras, ultrasonic transducers and waterjet thrusters. The ultrasonic transducers are used to detect the gross position of the grapple relative to the bail of a nuclear fuel assembly in the fuel core. The television cameras acquire an image of the bail which is compared to a pre-stored image in computer memory. The pendant can be rotated until the television image and the pre-stored image match within a predetermined tolerance. Similarly, the waterjet thrusters can be used to apply lateral thrust to the end of the flexible mast to place the grapple in a fine position relative to the bail as a function of the discrepancy between the television and pre-stored images.

Challberg, Roy Clifford (Livermore, CA); Jones, Cecil Roy (Saratoga, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Effect of H2/CO ratio and N2/CO2 dilution rate on laminar burning velocity of syngas investigated by direct measurement and simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Laminar burning velocities of syngas/air premixed flames, varying with H2/CO ratio (from 5/95 to 75/25) and N2 or CO2 dilution rate (from 0% to 60%), were accurately measured using a Teflon coated Heat Flux burner and OH-PLIF based Bunsen flame method. Experiments were carried out at atmospheric pressure and room temperature, with fuel/air equivalence ratios ranging from fuel-lean to fuel-rich. Coupled with experimental data, three chemical kinetic mechanisms, namely GRI-Mech 3.0, USC Mech II and Davis H2–CO mechanism, were validated. The Davis H2–CO and USC Mech II mechanisms appear to provide a better prediction for the laminar burning velocity. The laminar burning velocity variations with H2 and dilution gas contents were systematically investigated. For given dilution gas fraction, the laminar burning velocity reduction rate was enhanced as H2/CO ratio increasing. Effects of the syngas components and equivalence ratio variation on the concentrations of radical H and OH were also studied. It appears that there is a strong linear correlation between the laminar burning velocity and the maximum concentration of the H radical in the reaction zone for syngas. This characteristic is exclusively different from that in methane air premixed flame. These findings indicated that the high thermal diffusivity of the H radical played an important role in the laminar burning velocity enhancement and affected the laminar burning velocity reduction rate under dilution condition.

Z.H. Wang; W.B. Weng; Y. He; Z.S. Li; K.F. Cen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Overview and Burning Technology Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

development and demonstra tion. These programs include: Energy From the Forest (ENFOR) , a contract research program dealing with forest oriented matters relating to raw material (feedstock) supply; Bioenergy Development Program (BOP), also a contract R... of the technology in that specific application. The most common and pervasive barrier to the deployment of bioenergy technologies in industry is economic. In the long term the barrier will disappear as non-renewable fuel prices increase relatively as well...

Waller, J.

251

Argonne CNM: Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities Nanobio Interfaces Capabilities Synthesis Synthesis of metal oxide, semiconducting, metallic, and magnetic nanoparticles Self-assembly of monodisperse nanoparticles into two- and three-dimensional crystals and binary superlattices Bioconjugation and biochemical techniques with a focus on the synthetic biology and recombinant DNA/protein techniques Peptide synthesis (CSBio CS136XT) Functionalization of nanocrystalline surfaces with biomolecules, such as DNA, peptides, proteins and antibodies, using biochemical, electrochemical, and photochemical techniques Equipment Centrifuges (Beckman Coulter Optima L-100 XP Ultracentrifuge and Avanti J-E Centrifuge) Biological safety cabinets [Labconco Purifier Delta Series (Class II, B2)] Glovebox (MBraun LabMaster 130)

252

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Benefits to Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Benefits and Considerations Also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), propane is a domestically produced, well-established, clean-burning fuel. Using propane as a vehicle fuel increases energy security, provides convenience and performance

253

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Basics to Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Production & Distribution Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Fuel Basics Propane dispenser Also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or autogas, propane is a clean-burning, high-energy alternative fuel that's been used for decades to

254

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Pollutants and Health on AddThis.com... Pollutants and Health Pollutants emitted from burning conventional and alternative fuels fall into two categories: Criteria and Non-Criteria pollutants. The Clean Air Act (CAA) requires the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

255

Economic Analysis of Various Reforming Techniques and Fuel Sources for Hydrogen Production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Hydrogen is emerging as a future replacement fuel for the traditional fossil fuels that will be capable of satisfying our energy needs. Hydrogen may enable… (more)

MCGLOCKLIN, KRISTIN

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

VOC identification and inter-comparison from laboratory biomass burning using PTR-MS and PIT-MS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from fires of biomass commonly found in the southeast and southwest U.S. were investigated with PTR-MS and PIT-MS, which are capable of fast measurements of a large number of VOCs. Both instruments were calibrated with gas standards and mass dependent calibration curves are determined. The sensitivity of the PIT-MS linearly increases with mass, because the ion trap mass spectrometer used in PIT-MS is more efficient for higher masses, whereas the quadrupole in PTR-MS is most efficient around 70 amu. The identification of \\{VOCs\\} in the complicated mix of the fire emissions was done by gas chromatographic pre separation and inter-comparison with other instrumentation: GC–MS, FTIR, and NI-PT-CIMS. With these state of the art identification methods only 50–75% of the mass detectable by PTR-MS or PIT-MS could be identified. The amount of identified material was dependent on the type of fuel used and the phase of the burns, more can be identified in the flaming stage of the fire. Compounds with masses above 100 amu contributed the largest fraction of the unidentified mass. Emission ratios with CO for all identified and unidentified compounds were determined. Small oxygenated \\{VOCs\\} had the highest emission ratios of the observed compounds.

C. Warneke; J.M. Roberts; P. Veres; J. Gilman; W.C. Kuster; I. Burling; R. Yokelson; J.A. de Gouw

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Research for new UAV capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses research for new Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) capabilities. Findings indicate that UAV performance could be greatly enhanced by modest research. Improved sensors and communications enhance near term cost effectiveness. Improved engines, platforms, and stealth improve long term effectiveness.

Canavan, G.H.; Leadabrand, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Measuring and Improving Cell Capability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring and Improving Cell Capability by Tom Bering Rate Parts / Hour Parts / Car Good Parts 1000 ppm defects/part 1 ppm defects/part 0.1 ppm defects/part 0.001 ppm defects/part 3600 Good Parts / Hour Defect Every 20 Min. Defect Every 2 Weeks Defect Every 20 Weeks Defect Every 40 Years 5000 Good Parts = 1

Bone, Gary

259

Table A57. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by" 7. Capability to Switch from Coal to Alternative Energy Sources by" " Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics, 1991 " " (Estimates in Thousand Short Tons)" " "," "," ", " "," "," Coal",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" " "," ","-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"Row" ,,"Consumed(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","LPG","Other","Factors"

260

Table A58. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy Sources by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy Sources by" 8. Capability to Switch from LPG to Alternative Energy Sources by" " Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics, 1991" " (Estimates in Thousand Barrels)" ,," LPG",,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,"-","-","-------------","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","RSE" ,,"Total"," ","Not","Electricity",,,,,,,"Row" ,,"Consumed(b)","Switchable","Switchable","Receipts(d)","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","and Breeze","Other(e)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Table A67. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Source  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources" 7. Capability to Switch from Electricity to Alternative Energy Sources" " by Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Selected Characteristics," " 1994: Part 1" " (Estimates in Million Kilowatthours)" ,,,"Electricity Receipts",,,," Alternative Types of Energy(b)" ,,,,,,,,,,"Coal Coke",,"RSE" "SIC"," ","Total"," ","Not","Natural","Distillate","Residual",,,"and",,"Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Receipts(c)","Switchable","Switchable","Gas","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil","Coal","LPG","Breeze","Other(d)","Factors"," "

262

Army urged to resume burning chemical arms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Army urged to resume burning chemical arms ... Under baseline, the weapon is disassembled into four components—the chemical agent, energetic materials, metal parts, and dunnage (waste)—with each incinerated separately. ...

1994-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

263

Wood-Burning Heating System Deduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute allows individual taxpayers a deduction for the purchase and installation of a wood-burning heating system. The deduction is equal to the total cost of purchase and installation for...

264

Steam reforming of fuel to hydrogen in fuel cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fuel cell is claimed capable of utilizing a hydrocarbon such as methane as fuel and having an internal dual catalyst system within the anode zone, the dual catalyst system including an anode catalyst supporting and in heat conducting relationship with a reforming catalyst with heat for the reforming reaction being supplied by the reaction at the anode catalyst.

Fraioli, A.V.; Young, J.E.

1984-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

265

Steam reforming of fuel to hydrogen in fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell capable of utilizing a hydrocarbon such as methane as fuel and having an internal dual catalyst system within the anode zone, the dual catalyst system including an anode catalyst supporting and in heat conducting relationship with a reforming catalyst with heat for the reforming reaction being supplied by the reaction at the anode catalyst.

Fraioli, Anthony V. (Hawthorne Woods, IL); Young, John E. (Woodridge, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Steam reforming of fuel to hydrogen in fuel cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell is described capable of utilizing a hydrocarbon such as methane as fuel and having an internal dual catalyst system within the anode zone, the dual catalyst system including an anode catalyst supporting and in heat conducting relationship with a reforming catalyst with heat for the reforming reaction being supplied by the reaction at the anode catalyst.

Young, J.E.; Fraioli, A.V.

1983-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

267

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Vehicle Technologies Office 2013 Merit Review: A University Consortium on Efficient and Clean High-Pressure, Lean Burn (HPLB) Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A presentation given by the University of Michigan at the 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about a university consortium to research efficient and clean high-pressure lean burn engines.

269

Feature Article Negative pressure dependence of mass burning rates of H2/CO/O2/diluent flames  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with predominantly CO, CO2, and H2O) as a fuel itself as synthetic gas or ``syngas" from coal or biomass gasification of burning rates, analysis of the key reactions and kinetic pathways, and modeling studies were performed and temperature dependence compared to Ar-diluted flames of the same flame temperature. Simulations were performed

Ju, Yiguang

270

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global observations of desert dust and biomass burning aerosols Martin de Graaf KNMI #12; Outline · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Theory · Absorbing Aerosol Index - Reality · Biomass burning.6 Biomass burning over Angola, 09 Sep. 2004 Absorbing Aerosol Index PMD image #12;biomass burning ocean

Graaf, Martin de

271

Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Microstructure of U-7Mo Alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an essential part of global nuclear non-proliferation effort, the RERTR program is developing low enriched U-Mo fuels (< 20% U-235) for use in research and test reactors that currently employ highly enriched uranium fuels. One type of fuel being developed is a dispersion fuel plate comprised of U-7Mo particles dispersed in Al alloy matrix. Recent TEM characterizations of the ATR irradiated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates include the samples with a local fission densities of 4.5, 5.2, 5.6 and 6.3 E+21 fissions/cm3 and irradiation temperatures of 101-136?C. The development of the irradiated microstructure of the U-7Mo fuel particles consists of fission gas bubble superlattice, large gas bubbles, solid fission product precipitates and their association to the large gas bubbles, grain subdivision to tens or hundreds of nanometer size, collapse of bubble superlattice, and amorphisation. This presentation will describe the observed microstructures specifically focusing on the U-7Mo fuel particles. The impact of the observed microstructure on the fuel performance and the comparison of the relevant features with that of the high burn-up UO2 fuels will be discussed.

Jian Gan; Brandon Miller; Dennis Keiser; Adam Robinson; James Madden; Pavel Medvedev; Daniel Wachs

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability-  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4-2023 4-2023 Idaho National Laboratory DOE-NE's National Nuclear Capability- Developing and Maintaining the INL Infrastructure TEN-YEAR SITE PLAN DOE/ID-11474 Final June 2012 Sustainable INL continues to exceed DOE goals for reduction in the use of petroleum fuels - running its entire bus fleet on biodiesel while converting 75% of its light-duty fleet to E85 fuel. The Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL), slated for completion this year, will be a state-of-the-art laboratory with high-bay lab space where leading bioenergy feedstock processing, advanced battery testing, and hybrid energy systems integration research will be conducted. The Advanced Test Reactor is the world's most advanced nuclear research capability - crucial to (1) the ongoing development of safe, efficient

274

Advanced atomization concept for CWF burning in small combustors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present project involves the second phase of research on a new concept in coal-water fuel (CWF) atomization that is applicable to burning in small combustors. It is intended to address the most important problem associated with CWF combustion; i.e., production of small spray droplets in an efficient manner by an atomization device. Phase 1 of this work was successfully completed with the development of an opposed-jet atomizer that met the goals of the first contract. Performance as a function of operating conditions was measured, and the technical feasibility of the device established in the Atlantic Research Atomization Test Facility employing a Malvern Particle Size Analyzer. Testing then proceeded to a combustion stage in a test furnace at a firing rate of 0.5 to 1.5 MMBtu/H.

Heaton, H.; McHale, E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Europe Europe » Poland Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends Carbon dioxide emissions from Poland's use of fossil-fuels and cement production climbed at a remarkably steady rate of 3.9% per year from 1800 until 1980, when they dropped abruptly (11.7%). Fossil-fuel CO2 emissions crept back up throughout the 1980s peaking in 1987 at 127 million metric tons of carbon. Since the 1987 high, CO2 emissions have plummeted 32% to early 1970s levels while per capita emissions have dropped to late 1960s levels. Poland is the world's ninth largest producer of coal and emissions are predominantly from coal burning: 97% in 1950 and 68% in 2008. The drop following 1980 is apparent in rates of liquid fuel burning but releases from consumption of petroleum products have returned and surpassed 1980s

276

On the Stability of Thermonuclear Burning Fronts in Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The propagation of cellularly stabilized thermonuclear flames is investigated by means of numerical simulations. In Type Ia supernova explosions the corresponding burning regime establishes at scales below the Gibson length. The cellular flame stabilization - which is a result of an interplay between the Landau-Darrieus instability and a nonlinear stabilization mechanism - is studied for the case of propagation into quiescent fuel as well as interaction with vortical fuel flows. Our simulations indicate that in thermonuclear supernova explosions stable cellular flames develop around the Gibson scale and that deflagration-to-detonation transition is unlikely to be triggered from flame evolution effects here.

F. K. Roepke; W. Hillebrandt

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

277

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel and Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

278

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

279

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Benefits to Benefits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Benefits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Benefits and Considerations Biodiesel is a domestically produced, clean-burning, renewable substitute for petroleum diesel. Using biodiesel as a vehicle fuel increases energy security, improves public health and the environment, and provides safety

280

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

AFDC » Case Studies AFDC » Case Studies Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Video Download Help on AddThis.com... Video Download Help Learn how to download, watch, burn, and share videos. Download Videos To download videos for a PC, right-click a Windows Media Video (WMV) link and select "Save Target As..." from the shortcut menu.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fuel processor for fuel cell power system. [Conversion of methanol into hydrogen  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

Vanderborgh, N.E.; Springer, T.E.; Huff, J.R.

1986-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

282

PPPL Scientific and Engineering Capabilities | Princeton Plasma...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PPPL Scientific and Engineering Capabilities The Off-Site University Research Program has access to PPPL's extensive scientific, engineering, technical, and safety capabilities. In...

283

PNNL Chemical Hydride Capabilities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chemical Hydride Capabilities PNNL Chemical Hydride Capabilities Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC....

284

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity...

285

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model v. 1.1. (February 2014) Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model v. 1.1. (February 2014) The...

286

THERMODYNAMIC MODEL FOR URANIUM DIOXIDE BASED NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many projects involving nuclear fuel rest on a quantitative understanding of the co-existing phases at various stages of burnup. Since the many fission products have considerably different abilities to chemically associate with oxygen, and the oxygen-to-metal molar ratio is slowly changing, the chemical potential of oxygen is a function of burnup. Concurrently, well-recognized small fractions of new phases such as inert gas, noble metals, zirconates, etc. also develop. To further complicate matters, the dominant UO2 fuel phase may be non-stoichiometric and most of the minor phases themselves have a variable composition dependent on temperature and possible contact with the coolant in the event of a sheathing breach. A thermodynamic fuel model to predict the phases in partially burned CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) nuclear fuel containing many major fission products has been under development. The building blocks of the model are the standard Gibbs energies of formation of the many possible compounds expressed as a function of temperature. To these data are added mixing terms associated with the appearance of the component species in particular phases. In operational terms, the treatment rests on the ability to minimize the Gibbs energy in a multicomponent system, in our case using the algorithms developed by Eriksson. The model is capable of handling non-stoichiometry in the UO2 fluorite phase, dilute solution behaviour of significant solute oxides, noble metal inclusions, a second metal solid solution U(Pd-Rh-Ru)3, zirconate, molybdate, and uranate solutions as well as other minor solid phases, and volatile gaseous species.

Thompson, Dr. William T. [Royal Military College of Canada; Lewis, Dr. Brian J [Royal Military College of Canada; Corcoran, E. C. [Royal Military College of Canada; Kaye, Dr. Matthew H. [Royal Military College of Canada; White, S. J. [Royal Military College of Canada; Akbari, F. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories; Higgs, Jamie D. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Point Lepreau; Thompson, D. M. [Praxair Inc.; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Vogel, S. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

EMSL: Capabilities: Deposition and Microfabrication  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deposition and Microfabrication Deposition and Microfabrication Additional Information Meet the Deposition and Microfabrication Experts Related EMSL User Projects Deposition and Microfabrication Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Deposition and Microfabrication brochure Designed to augment research important to a variety of disciplines, EMSL's Deposition and Microfabrication Capability tackles serious scientific challenges from a microscopic perspective. From deposition instruments that emphasize oxide films and interfaces to a state-of-the-art microfabrication suite, EMSL has equipment to tailor surfaces, as diverse as single-crystal thin films or nanostructures, or create the microenvironments needed for direct experimentation at micron scales. Users benefit from coupling deposition and microfabrication applications

288

Argonne CNM: Materials Synthesis Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Synthesis Facilities Materials Synthesis Facilities Capabilities biosynthesis View larger image. Biosynthesis Methods Peptide and DNA synthesis (E. Rozhkova, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Nanobio hybrid synthesis (T. Rajh, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Hierarchal assembly View larger image. Hierarchical Assembly Bottom-up polymeric and bio-templating as well as lithographically directed self-assembly (S. Darling, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group; E. Rozhkova, Nanobio Interfaces Group) Molecular beam epitaxy View high-resolution image. Molecular Beam Epitaxy Complex oxide nanoferroelectric and nanoferromagnetic materials and devices created using a DCA R450D Custom MBE instrument (A. Bhattacharya, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group) Nanoparticle synthesis

289

EMSL: Capabilities: Spectroscopy and Diffraction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy and Diffraction Spectroscopy and Diffraction Additional Information Meet the Spectroscopy and Diffraction Experts Related EMSL User Projects Spectroscopy and Diffraction Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Tutorial: XPS Tools for Surface Analysis Spectroscopy and Diffraction brochure EMSL's suite of spectroscopy and diffraction instruments allows users to study solid-, liquid-, and gas-phase sample structure and composition with remarkable resolution. Ideal for integrated studies, spectrometers and diffractometers are easily coupled with EMSL's computational and modeling capabilities, allowing users to apply a multifaceted research approach for experimental data interpretation and gain fundamental understanding of scientific problems. At EMSL, spectroscopy and diffraction instruments are

290

scalating jet fuel prices are bringing fresh interest in NASAled research into tech  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scalating jet fuel prices are bringing fresh interest in NASAled research into tech nologies that promise to reduce the amount of fuel needed to fly an airliner from gate to gate. Whether conservation to burn only half as much fuel by 2020 and at least 70% less by 2025, compared to one of today's most

291

Treatment of a severe alkali burn  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The case history of a 20-year-old male patient who sustained an 85 per cent total body surface area alkali burn to his skin, after falling into a caustic lime pit, is reported. Considerable problems regarding the correct estimate of burn wound depth, predominant location of the deepest burn on the posterior half of the body, appropriate wound coverage, and lack of sufficient skin graft donor sites required a complex treatment plan. Excisions to fascia and intradermal debridement were required to achieve an appropriate bed for wound closure. Five per cent mafenide acetate solution (Sulfamylon) was applied to prevent burn wound sepsis. Human allografts and Biobrane were used extensively to achieve temporary wound closure, to provide mechanical protection of freshly autografted wounds, and to prevent desiccation following application of cultured epidermal autografts on to debrided wounds and split thickness skin grafted donor sites. The case illustrates a number of problems associated with the evaluation and treatment of patients suffering severe alkali burns, and demonstrates the implementation of both established and evolving technologies in the management of these injuries.

D. Erdmann; J. Hussmann; J.O. Kucan

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Testing whether major innovation capabilities are systemic design capabilities: analyzing rule-renewal design capabilities in a case-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Testing whether major innovation capabilities are systemic design capabilities: analyzing rule-renewal design capabilities are positively related to new business development, whereas rule-reuse design-renewal design capabilities in a case- control study of historical new business developments. Authors: Pascal Le

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

293

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Gasoline Sprays  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasoline Sprays Gasoline Sprays Animated image of fuel emerging from a gasoline injector Animated image of fuel emerging from a gasoline injector (simulated environment). Some newer automobiles in the U.S. use gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. These advanced gasoline engines inject the fuel directly into the engine cylinder rather than into the intake port. These engines can achieve higher fuel efficiency, but they depend on a precise fuel/air mixture at the spark plug to initiate ignition. This leads to more stringent requirements on spray quality and reproducibility. GDI also enables new combustion strategies for gasoline engines such as lean burn engines that use less fuel and air. Lean burn engines may achieve efficiencies near those of diesels while producing low emissions. This

294

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

295

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal Paradigm Shift: Burning Coal to Geothermal" November 20, 2012 jlowe@bsu.edu 765.285.2805 Ball State University Ball State University Administration Building 1899 Ball State 1920s Ball State University Ball State University (4) Coal Fired Boilers Installed 1941/1955 (3) Natural Gas Fired Boilers Installed in the 1970s Heat and Chilled Water Plant Operations Heat Plant: 4 Coal Fired Boilers 3 Natural Gas Fired Boilers 320,000 Lbs/Hr nameplate 240,000 Lbs/Hr current 700,000,000 Lbs/Year Chilled Water Plant: 5 Electrical Centrifugal Chillers 9,300 ton capacity 25,000,000 Ton Hours/Year Pollutants Produced from Burning 36,000 tons of Coal * Carbon Dioxide 85,000 tons (Global Warming)

296

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Use Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

297

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

298

Argonne CNM: Proximal Probes Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proximal Probes Proximal Probes Capabilities Omicron VT-AFM XA microscope scanning tunneling microscope VIew high-resolution image. Variable-temperature, ultra-high-vacuum, atomic force microscope/scanning tunneling microscope: Omicron VT-AFM XA (N. Guisinger, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group) Measurement modes include: Contact and non-contact AFM Magnetic force microscopy (MFM) Scanning tunneling spectroscopy Preparation tools include: Resistive sample heating Direct current heating E-beam heating Sputter ion etching Gas dosing E-beam evaporation An analysis chamber contains combined four-grid LEED/Auger optics Omicron nanoprobe View high-resolution image Scanning probe/scanning electron microscopy: Omicron UHV Nanoprobe (N. Guisinger, Electronic & Magnetic Materials & Devices Group)

299

EMSL: Capabilities: Molecular Science Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Welcome to Chinook! Welcome to Chinook! Chinook Supercomputer Chinook is a supercluster with 2310 HP(tm) dual-socket, quad-core AMD(tm) nodes for computation. With 32 GB of memory per node, each processor-core has 4 GB available. Thus, Chinook is the only computer in its class capable of running certain chemical computations. The overall system has 74 TB of memory, 350 GB of local scratch disk per node, a 250 TB of global parallel file system, and a peak performance 163 teraFLOPs. Fast communication between nodes is obtained using single rail InfiniBand interconnect from Voltaire (switches) and Mellanox (network interface cards). Currently, Chinook's operating system is an EMSL modified version of a Red Hat's Scientific Linux. Node allocation is scheduled using Moab® and Simple

300

Core Capabilities | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Advanced Photon Source is one of the brightest sources of X-rays in the The Advanced Photon Source is one of the brightest sources of X-rays in the Western Hemisphere. Photons are accelerated to over 99% of the speed of light around its ring, which is the size of a baseball stadium. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. The Center for Nanoscale Materials at Argonne is a premier user facility, providing expertise, instruments, and infrastructure for interdisciplinary nanoscience and nanotechnology research. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Core Capabilities Argonne's vision is to lead the world in discovery science and engineering that provides technical solutions to the grand challenges of our time. Argonne's vision is to lead the world in discovery science and engineering that provides technical solutions to the grand challenges of our time:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EMSL: Capabilities: Molecular Science Computing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Graphics and Visualization Laboratory Graphics and Visualization Laboratory Photo of researcher in the Graphics and Visualization Laboratory EMSL's Graphics and Visualization Laboratory (GVL) helps researchers visualize and analyze complex experimental and computational data sets. GVL provides EMSL users with high-performance graphics systems as well as support staff who have capabilities in illustration and image editing, data modeling and image analysis, scene rendering and model creation, as well as audio/video compositing and editing. The GVL contains five high-performance graphics stations based on SGI technologies with high-speed connections to parallel computers and the database/archive system, a video system integrated with the workstations to facilitate the display and capture of scientific data, and video editing

302

Assessment of the effectiveness of mixed uranium-plutonium fuel in VVÉR  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An assessment of the cost-effectiveness of burning mixed uranium-plutonium fuel in VVÉR reactors is made as a function of the price of natural uranium. It is shown that for the present price structure, based on t...

N. N. Ponomarev-Stepnoi; V. F. Tsibul’skii

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Fluidic fuel feed system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the development and testing of a fluidic fuel injector for a coal-water slurry fueled diesel engine. The objective of this program was to improve the operating life of coal-water slurry fuel controls and injector components by using fluidic technology. This project addressed the application of fluidic devices to solve the problems of efficient atomization of coal-water slurry fuel and of injector component wear. The investigation of injector nozzle orifice design emphasized reducing the pressure required for efficient atomization. The effort to minimize injector wear includes the novel design of components allowing the isolation of the coal-water slurry from close-fitting injector components. Three totally different injectors were designed, fabricated, bench tested and modified to arrive at a final design which was capable of being engine tested. 6 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Badgley, P.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Core materials development for the fuel cycle R&D program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of burning minor actinides in a transmutation fuel. One of the challenges of achieving this goal is to develop fuels capable of reaching extreme burnup levels (e.g. 40%). To achieve such high burnup levels fast reactor core materials (cladding and duct) must be able to withstand very high doses (>300 dpa design goal) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. Thus, these materials must withstand radiation effects that promote low temperature embrittlement, radiation induced segregation, high temperature helium embrittlement, swelling, accelerated creep, corrosion with the coolant, and chemical interaction with the fuel (FCCI). To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Test specimens of ferritic/martensitic alloys (T91/HT-9) previously irradiated in the FFTF reactor up to 210 dpa at a temperature range of 350 750 C are presently being tested. This includes analysis of a duct made of HT-9 after irradiation to a total dose of 155 dpa at temperatures from 370 to 510 C. Compact tension, charpy and tensile specimens have been machined from this duct and mechanical testing as well as SANS and Mossbauer spectroscopy are currently being performed. Initial results from compression testing and Charpy testing reveal a strong increase in yield stress (400 MPa) and a large increase in DBTT (up to 230 C) for specimens irradiated at 383 C to a dose of 28 dpa. Less hardening and a smaller increase in DBTT was observed for specimens irradiated at higher temperatures up to 500 C. Advanced radiation tolerant materials are also being developed to enable the desired extreme fuel burnup levels. Specifically, coatings are being developed to minimize FCCI, and research is underway to fabricate large heats of radiation tolerant oxide dispersion steels with homogeneous oxide dispersions.

Toloczko, M [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Maloy, S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cole, James I. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Byun, Thak Sang [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Core Materials Development for the Fuel Cycle R&D Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Research and Development program is investigating methods of burning minor actinides in a transmutation fuel. One of the challenges of achieving this goal is to develop fuels capable of reaching extreme burnup levels (e.g. 40%). To achieve such high burnup levels fast reactor core materials (cladding and duct) must be able to withstand very high doses (greater than 300 dpa design goal) while in contact with the coolant and the fuel. Thus, these materials must withstand radiation effects that promote low temperature embrittlement, radiation induced segregation, high temperature helium embrittlement, swelling, accelerated creep, corrosion with the coolant, and chemical interaction with the fuel (FCCI). To develop and qualify materials to a total fluence greater than 200 dpa requires development of advanced alloys and irradiations in fast reactors to test these alloys. Test specimens of ferritic/martensitic alloys (T91/HT-9) previously irradiated in the FFTF reactor up to 210 dpa at a temperature range of 350-750 C are presently being tested. This includes analysis of a duct made of HT-9 after irradiation to a total dose of 155 dpa at temperatures from 370 to 510 C. Compact tension, charpy and tensile specimens have been machined from this duct and mechanical testing as well as SANS and Mossbauer spectroscopy are currently being performed. Initial results from compression testing and Charpy testing reveal a strong increase in yield stress ({approx}400 MPa) and a large increase in DBTT (up to 230 C) for specimens irradiated at 383 C to a dose of 28 dpa. Less hardening and a smaller increase in DBTT was observed for specimens irradiated at higher temperatures up to 500 C. Advanced radiation tolerant materials are also being developed to enable the desired extreme fuel burnup levels. Specifically, coatings are being developed to minimize FCCI, and research is underway to fabricate large heats of radiation tolerant oxide dispersion steels with homogeneous oxide dispersions.

S. A. Maloy; M. Toloczko; J. Cole; T. S. Byun

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Evaluating greenhouse gas emissions inventories for agricultural burning using satellite observations of active fires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulation of agricultural waste burning occurs at multipleexample, agricultural waste burning is managed by individualalso take agricultural waste- burning emissions into

Lin, Hsiao-Wen; Jin, Yufang; Giglio, Louis; Foley, Jonathan A; Randerson, James T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Do biomass burning aerosols intensify drought in equatorial Asia during El Niño?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fication of drought-induced biomass burning in Indonesiavariability in global biomass burning emissions from 1997 toChemistry and Physics Do biomass burning aerosols intensify

Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T; Zender, C. S; Flanner, M. G; Rasch, P. J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Biomass burning contribution to black carbon in the Western United States Mountain Ranges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the atmosphere from biomass burning, Climatic Change, 2,Chemistry and Physics Biomass burning contribution to black2011 Y. H. Mao et al. : Biomass burning contribution to

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Biomass burning and urban air pollution over the Central Mexican Plateau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. D. Crounse et al. : Biomass burning pollution overChemistry and Physics Biomass burning and urban airprimary anthropogenic and biomass burning organic aerosols

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

Eteman, Shahrokh

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Postirradiation examination of HTR fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel for the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) consists of 1 mm diameter coated particles uniformly distributed in a graphite matrix within a cold-molded 60 mm diameter spherical fuel element. Fuel performance demonstrations under simulated normal operation conditions are conducted in accelerated neutron environments available in Material Test Reactors and in real-time environments such as the Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) Juelich. Postirradiation examinations are then used to assess fuel element behavior and the detailed performance of the coated particles. The emphasis in postirradiation examination and accident testing is on assessment of the capability for fuel elements and individual coated particles to retain fission products and actinide fuel materials. To accomplish this task, techniques have been developed which measures fission product and fuel material distributions within or exterior to the particle: Hot Gas Chlorination - provides an accurate method to measure total fuel material concentration outside intact particles; Profile Electrolytic Deconsolidation - permits determination of fission product distribution along fuel element diameter and retrieval of fuel particles from positions within element; Gamma Spectrometry - provides nondestructive method to measure defect particle fractions based on retention of volatile metallic fission products; Particle Cracking - permits a measure of the partitioning of fission products between fuel kernel and particle coatings, and the derivation of diffusion parameters in fuel materials; Micro Gas Analysis - provides gaseous fission product and reactive gas inventory within free volume of single particles; and Mass-spectrometric Burnup Determination - utilizes isotope dilution for the measurement of heavy metal isotope abundances.

Nabielek, H.; Reitsamer, G.; Kania, M.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Global Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Fixed Format) Data graphic Data (ASCII, Comma-delimited) Trends Since 1751 approximately 337 billion metric tonnes of carbon have been released to the atmosphere from the consumption of fossil fuels and cement production. Half of these emissions have occurred since the mid 1970s. The 2007 global fossil-fuel carbon emission estimate, 8365 million metric tons of carbon, represents an all-time high and a 1.7% increase from 2006. Globally, liquid and solid fuels accounted for 76.3% of the emissions from fossil-fuel burning and cement production in 2007. Combustion of gas fuels (e.g., natural gas) accounted for 18.5% (1551 million metric tons of carbon) of the total emissions from fossil fuels in 2007 and reflects a gradually increasing global utilization of natural gas. Emissions from

313

India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

India India India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends India's 2008 total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions rose 8.1% over the 2007 level to 475 million metric tons of carbon. From 1950 to 2008, India experienced dramatic growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions averaging 5.7% per year and becoming the world's third largest fossil-fuel CO2-emitting country. Indian total emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement production have more than doubled since 1994. Fossil-fuel emissions in India continue to result largely from coal burning with India being the world's third largest producer of coal. Coal contributed 87% of the emissions in 1950 and 71% in 2008; at the same time, the oil fraction increased from 11% to 20%. Indian emissions data reveal little impact from the oil price increases that

314

Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

315

Quantitative IR Spectrum and Vibrational Assignments for Glycolaldehyde Vapor: Glycolaldehyde Measurements in Biomass Burning Plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glycolaldehyde (GA, 2-hydroxyethanal, C2H4O2) is a semi-volatile molecule of atmospheric importance, recently proposed as a precursor in the formation of aqueous-phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA). There are few methods to measure glycolaldehyde vapor, but infrared spectroscopy has been used successfully. Using vetted protocols we have completed the first assignment of all fundamental vibrational modes and derived quantitative IR absorption band strengths using both neat and pressure-broadened GA vapor. Even though GA is problematic due to its propensity to both dimerize and condense, our intensities agree well with the few previously published values. Using the reference ?10 band Q-branch at 860.51 cm-1, we have also determined GA mixing ratios in biomass burning plumes generated by field and laboratory burns of fuels from the southeastern and southwestern United States, including the first field measurements of glycolaldehyde in smoke. The GA emission factors were anti-correlated with modified combustion efficiency confirming release of GA from smoldering combustion. The GA emission factors (g of GA emitted per kg dry biomass burned on a dry mass basis) had a low dependence on fuel type consistent with the production mechanism being pyrolysis of cellulose. GA was emitted at 0.23 ± 0.13% of CO from field fires and we calculate that it accounts for ~18% of the aqueous-phase SOA precursors that we were able to measure.

Johnson, Timothy J.; Sams, Robert L.; Profeta, Luisa T.; Akagi, Sheryl; Burling, Ian R.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Williams, Stephen D.

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

ASSESSMENTOF BURNING-PLASMA PHENOMENA COMPACTIGNITION TOKAMAK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report+ on ASSESSMENTOF BURNING-PLASMA PHENOMENA . in a COMPACTIGNITION TOKAMAK presented-coil tokamak configurations that would achieve ignition under presently accepted scaling laws. Studies the extent to which these compact tokamak ignition experiments can resolve the technical issue of under

317

First Sustained Burning Plasma. Starts in 2019.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-T fusion power density is approximated by: Plasma pressure in atmospheres We need >1MWm-3 for an economic system -- need a few Atmospheres of plasma pressure. Can we hold it with a magnetic field? MagneticITER JET (to scale) JET (to scale) First Sustained Burning Plasma. Starts in 2019. BASIC PARAMETERS

318

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE BURNING OF BIOMASS Economy, Environment, Health Kees Kolff, MD, MPH April 21, 2012 #12;OUR TRUCKS OF BIOMASS/ DAY (Currently 82) #12;BAD FOR THE ECONOMY · Taxpayers will pay 50% - tax credits, etc · Not a cogen project so only 25% efficient · Biomass better for biofuels, not electricity · MILL JOBS

319

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report IV.D Fuel Cell Stack Subsystem and Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Tolerant PEM Fuel Cell Stack System Tim Rehg (Primary Contact), Nguyen Minh (Program Manager) Honeywell electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack system comprised of a PEM fuel cell stack and the supporting gas, thermal, and water management subsystems. The PEM fuel cell stack system will be capable of integration

320

Fuel pin  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

U S Burning Plasma Organization:U.S. Burning Plasma Organization: Supporting US Scientific Contributions to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Community (TTF,...) US Technology Community · USBPO mission is to coordinate US Burning Plasma related research to advance science USBPO Director, Jim Van Dam, also serves as US IPO Chief Scientist, assuring

322

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Digg

323

Fuel System and Fuel Measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fuel management provides optimal solutions to reduce fuel consumption. Merchant vessels, such as container ships, drive at a reduced speed to save fuel since the reduction of the speed from...?1 lowers consumption

Michael Palocz-Andresen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

The used nuclear fuel problem - can reprocessing and consolidated storage be complementary?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes our CISF (Consolidated Interim Storage Facilities) and Reprocessing Facility concepts and show how they can be combined with a geologic repository to provide a comprehensive system for dealing with spent fuels in the USA. The performance of the CISF was logistically analyzed under six operational scenarios. A 3-stage plan has been developed to establish the CISF. Stage 1: the construction at the CISF site of only a rail receipt interface and storage pad large enough for the number of casks that will be received. The construction of the CISF Canister Handling Facility, the Storage Cask Fabrication Facility, the Cask Maintenance Facility and supporting infrastructure are performed during stage 2. The construction and placement into operation of a water-filled pool repackaging facility is completed for Stage 3. By using this staged approach, the capital cost of the CISF is spread over a number of years. It also allows more time for a final decision on the geologic repository to be made. A recycling facility will be built, this facility will used the NUEX recycling process that is based on the aqueous-based PUREX solvent extraction process, using a solvent of tri-N-butyl phosphate in a kerosene diluent. It is capable of processing spent fuels at a rate of 5 MT per day, at burn-ups up to 50 GWD per ton of spent fuels and a minimum of 5 years out-of-reactor cooling.

Phillips, C.; Thomas, I. [EnergySolutions Federal EPC., 2345 Stevens Drive, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Co-combustion of refuse derived fuel and coal in a cyclone furnace at the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company, C. P. Crane Station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A co-combustion demonstration burn of coal and fluff refuse-derived fuel (RDF) was conducted by Teledyne National and Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. This utility has two B and W cyclone furnaces capable of generating 400 MW. The facility is under a prohibition order to convert from No. 6 oil to coal; as a result, it was desirable to demonstrate that RDF, which has a low sulfur content, can be burned in combination with coals containing up to 2% sulfur, thus reducing overall sulfur emissions without deleterious effects. Each furnace consists of four cyclones capable of generating 1,360,000 pounds per hour steam. The tertiary air inlet of one of the cyclones was modified with an adapter to permit fluff RDF to be pneumatically blown into the cyclone. At the same time, coal was fed into the cyclone furnace through the normal coal feeding duct, where it entered the burning chamber tangentially and mixed with the RDF during the burning process. Secondary shredded fluff RDF was prepared by the Baltimore County Resource Recovery Facility. The RDF was discharged into a receiving station consisting of a belt conveyor discharging into a lump breaker, which in turn, fed the RDF into a pneumatic line through an air-lock feeder. A total of 2316 tons were burned at an average rate of 5.6 tons per hour. The average heat replacement by RDF for the cyclone was 25%, based on Btu input for a period of forty days. The range of RDF burned was from 3 to 10 tons per hour, or 7 to 63% heat replacement. The average analysis of the RDF (39 samples) for moisture, ash, heat (HHV) and sulfur content were 18.9%, 13.4%, 6296 Btu/lb and 0.26% respectively. RDF used in the test was secondary shredded through 1-1/2 inch grates producing the particle size distribution of from 2 inches to .187 inches. Findings to date after inspection of the boiler and superheater indicate satisfactory results with no deleterious effects from the RDF.

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

EPA aide wary about burning waste at sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

EPA aide wary about burning waste at sea ... An Environmental Protection Agency official has cautioned that a proposal by Chemical Waste Management (CWM) to perform a research burn of chemical wastes at sea should be permitted only if stringent conditions are met. ... During 19 days of burns, EPA would conduct research to determine the incinerator emissions' composition, transport, and effect on marine life. ...

1986-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

327

Plasma Materials Interaction Issues For Burning Plasma Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma Materials Interaction Issues For Burning Plasma Experiments M. Ulrickson Presented · Introduction to Burning Plasmas · Plasma Materials Interaction Phenomena · Materials Issues · Summary #12;MAU 4 ­ Resistance to neutron damage #12;MAU 5 11/15/2001 The FIRE Burning Plasma Device · A compact high field

328

Transmutation Analysis of Enriched Uranium and Deep Burn High Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature reactors (HTRs) have been under consideration for production of electricity, process heat, and for destruction of transuranics for decades. As part of the transmutation analysis efforts within the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) campaign, a need was identified for detailed discharge isotopics from HTRs for use in the VISION code. A conventional HTR using enriched uranium in UCO fuel was modeled having discharge burnup of 120 GWd/MTiHM. Also, a deep burn HTR (DB-HTR) was modeled burning transuranic (TRU)-only TRU-O2 fuel to a discharge burnup of 648 GWd/MTiHM. For each of these cases, unit cell depletion calculations were performed with SCALE/TRITON. Unit cells were used to perform this analysis using SCALE 6.1. Because of the long mean free paths (and migration lengths) of neutrons in HTRs, using a unit cell to represent a whole core can be non-trivial. The sizes of these cells were first set by using Serpent calculations to match a spectral index between unit cell and whole core domains. In the case of the DB-HTR, the unit cell which was arrived at in this way conserved the ratio of fuel to moderator found in a single block of fuel. In the conventional HTR case, a larger moderator-to-fuel ratio than that of a single block was needed to simulate the whole core spectrum. Discharge isotopics (for 500 nuclides) and one-group cross-sections (for 1022 nuclides) were delivered to the transmutation analysis team. This report provides documentation for these calculations. In addition to the discharge isotopics, one-group cross-sections were provided for the full list of 1022 nuclides tracked in the transmutation library.

Michael A. Pope

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Radiotoxicity Characterization of Multi-Recycled Thorium Fuel - 12394  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As described in companion papers, Westinghouse is proposing the implementation of a thorium based fuel cycle to burn the transuranic (TRU) contained in the used nuclear fuel. The potential of thorium as a TRU burner is described in another paper presented at this conference. This paper analyzes the long-term impact of thorium on the front-end and backend of the fuel cycle. This is accomplished by an assessment of the isotopic make-up of Th in a closed cycle and its impact on representative metrics, such as radiotoxicity, decay heat and gamma heat. The behavior in both thermal and fast neutron energy ranges has been investigated. Irradiation in a Th fuel PWR has been assumed as representative of the thermal range, while a Th fuel fast reactor (FR) has been employed to characterize the behavior in the high-energy range. A comparison with a U-fuel closed-cycle FR has been undertaken in an attempt of a more comprehensive evaluation of each cycle's long-term potential. As the Th fuel undergoes multiple cycles of irradiation, the isotopic composition of the recycled fuel changes. Minor Th isotopes are produced; U-232 and Pa-231 build up; the U vector gradually shifts towards increasing amounts of U-234, U-235 etc., eventually leading to the production of non negligible amounts of TRU isotopes, especially Pu-238. The impact of the recycled fuel isotopic makeup on the in-core behavior is mild, and for some aspects beneficial, i.e. the reactivity swing during irradiation is reduced as the fertile characteristics of the fuel increase. On the other hand, the front and the back-end of the fuel cycle are negatively affected due to the presence of Th-228 and U-232 and the build-up of higher actinides (Pu-238 etc.). The presence of U-232 can also be seen as advantageous as it represents an obstacle to potential proliferators. Notwithstanding the increase in the short-term radiotoxicity and decay heat in the multi-recycled fuel, the Th closed cycle has some potentially substantial advantages compared to the U cycle, such as the smaller actinide radiotoxicity and decay heat for up to 25,000 years after irradiation. In order for these benefits to materialize, the capability to reprocess and remotely manufacture industrial amounts of recycled fuel appears to be the key. Westinghouse is proposing the implementation of a thorium based fuel cycle to burn the TRU contained in the current UNF. The general approach and the potential of thorium as TRU burner is described in other papers presented at this conference. The focus of this paper is to analyze the long-term potential of thorium, once the legacy TRU has been exhausted and the thorium reactor system will become self-sufficient. Therefore, a comparison of Th closed cycle, in fast and thermal neutron energy ranges, vs. U closed cycle, in the fast energy range, has been undertaken. The results presented focus on selected backend and front-end metrics: isotopic actinide composition and potential implications on ingested radiotoxicity, decay heat and gamma heat. The evaluation confirms potential substantial improvements in the backend of the fuel cycle by transitioning to a thorium closed cycle. These benefits are the result of a much lower TRU content, in particular Pu-241, Am-241 and Pu-240, characterizing the Th vs. U actinide inventories, and the ensuing process waste to be disposed. On the other hand, the larger gamma activity of Th recycled fuel, consisting predominantly of hard gammas from U-232's decay products, is a significant challenge for fuel handling, transportation and manufacturing but can be claimed as beneficial for the proliferation resistance of the fuel. It is worth remembering that in our perspective the Th closed cycle and the U closed cycle will follow a transmutation phase which will likely take place over several decades and dictate the technologies required. These will likely include remote fuel manufacturing, regardless of the specific system adopted for the transmutation, which could then be inherited for the ensuing closed cycles. Finally, specific data related to

Franceschini, F.; Wenner, M. [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Fiorina, C. [Polytechnic of Milano, Milan (Italy); Paul Sherrer Institute (Switzerland); Huang, M.; Petrovic, B. [Georgia Technology University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Krepel, J. [Paul Sherrer Institute (Switzerland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil Takes Fuel Efficient Cookstoves to Ethiopia |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil Takes Fuel Efficient Cookstoves to Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil Takes Fuel Efficient Cookstoves to Ethiopia Berkeley Lab's Ashok Gadgil Takes Fuel Efficient Cookstoves to Ethiopia February 8, 2011 - 1:21pm Addthis Darfuri woman using a Berkeley-Darfur cookstove | Courtesy of darfurstoves.org Darfuri woman using a Berkeley-Darfur cookstove | Courtesy of darfurstoves.org April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? Clean-burning cookstoves reduce the need for firewood in the developing world. Refugees are able to spend less time outside of the camps searching for fuel, therefore reducing the risk of violence and assault. By using less fuel, clean-burning cookstoves decrease deforestation and lessen greenhouse gas emissions. Researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National

331

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Cryogenic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mn(IV,IV) dimer acquired at 9.4 T. EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Cryogenic NMR and Advanced Electronic Structure Theory as a Unique EMSL Capability for Complex...

332

Cryogenic technology boosts linear accelerator capability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cryogenic technology boosts linear accelerator capability ... Two critical properties of matter at cryogenic temperatures—superconductivity and superfluidity—should open the way for a major advance in electron linear accelerator capability. ...

1968-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (February 2014) | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

(February 2014) The Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (C2M2) was derived from the Electricity Subsector Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (ES-C2M2) Version 1.1 by...

334

Why is fuel Economy Important?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Why Is Fuel Economy Important? Why Is Fuel Economy Important? Saves You Money Save as much as $1,700 in fuel costs each year by choosing the most efficient vehicle that meets your needs. See how much you can save! Photo of gasoline receipt on top of money Reduces Climate Change Carbon dioxide (CO2) from burning gasoline and diesel contributes to global climate change. You can do your part to reduce climate change by reducing your carbon footprint! Photo of Earth from space Reduces Oil Dependence Costs Our dependence on oil makes us vulnerable to oil market manipulation and price shocks. Find out how oil dependence hurts our economy! Chart showing annual cost of oil imports increasing from $21 billion per year in 1975 to approximately $330 billion in 2011 Increases Energy Sustainability

335

No Fossils in This Fuel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plan for Environmental Teaching Plan for Environmental Teaching GM Environmental Science Club No Fossils in This Fuel Your PlanET Sixth through Eighth Grades (Can be easily adapted to any elementary/middle school level) Ingredients: Yeast, sugar ... what are you making? Sweet rolls? Not in Science Class! You're blending these ingredients to make an innovative form of fuel! That's right ... when these two simple ingredients are mixed, the yeast  a simple, living organism  breaks the sugar down into ethyl alcohol, or ethanol, and carbon dioxide. While you won't be burning the fuel to prove its usefulness, you can share with your students how ethanol is being used right now to power some of today's vehicles! Students will be able to experiment with the activity, and they will see how the fermentation that occurs can blow up a

336

Hybrid Fuel Cell Technology Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the purpose of this STI product and unless otherwise stated, hybrid fuel cell systems are power generation systems in which a high temperature fuel cell is combined with another power generating technology. The resulting system exhibits a synergism in which the combination performs with an efficiency far greater than can be provided by either system alone. Hybrid fuel cell designs under development include fuel cell with gas turbine, fuel cell with reciprocating (piston) engine, and designs that combine different fuel cell technologies. Hybrid systems have been extensively analyzed and studied over the past five years by the Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and others. These efforts have revealed that this combination is capable of providing remarkably high efficiencies. This attribute, combined with an inherent low level of pollutant emission, suggests that hybrid systems are likely to serve as the next generation of advanced power generation systems.

None available

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

STAGING OF FUEL CELLS - PHASE II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TIAX has executed a laboratory-based development program aiming at the improvement of stationary fuel cell systems. The two-year long development program resulted in an improved understanding of staged fuel cells and inorganic proton conductors through evaluation of results from a number of laboratory tasks: (1) Development of a fuel cell modeling tool--Multi-scale model was developed, capable of analyzing the effects of materials and operating conditions; and this model allowed studying various ''what-if'' conditions for hypothetically staged fuel cells; (2) Study of new high temperature proton conductor--TIAX discovery of a new class of sulfonated inorganics capable of conducting protons when exposed to water; and study involved synthesis and conductivity measurements of novel compounds up to 140 C; (3) Electrochemical fuel cell measurements--the feasibility of staged fuel cells was tested in TIAX's fuel cell laboratories experimental design was based on results from modeling.

Per Onnerud; Suresh Sriramulu

2002-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

338

Dynamic capabilities in the software process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Software development is an important dynamic capability of a software-developing organisation. This paper explores product development in general and software development in particular from the viewpoint of the dynamic capabilities research stream ... Keywords: RBV, dynamic capabilities, inductive reasoning, product development, product innovation, resource transformation typology, resource-based view, software business, software development, software engineering, software process

Markus M. Makela; Nilay V. Oza; Jyrki Kontio

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel and Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions

340

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Motor Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax Effective January 1, 2014, a person who operates a commercial motor vehicle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 4): New Hanover County Airport Burn Pit Site, New Hanover County, Wilmington, NC. (First remedial action), September 1992. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Hanover site was located on Gardner Road approximately 500 feet west of the New Hanover County Airport terminal, New Hanover, North Carolina. From 1968 to 1979, the site was used for fire-fighter training purposes. During training exercises, jet fuel, gasoline, petroleum storage bottoms, fuel oil, kerosene, and sorbent materials from oil spill cleanup were burned in a pit. During its active years, water from the pit was allowed to flow onto land surfaces. Inspections conducted after the pit was abandoned showed that most of the standing liquid in the pit was water. In addition to the burn pit area, fire-fighting activities resulted in contamination at several other site areas, including an auto burn area; a railroad tank burn area; an aircraft mock-up area; a fuel tank and pipelines area; and two stained soil areas north of the burn pit. The ROD addressed restoration of the aquifer to drinking water quality as a final action for the site. The primary contaminants of concern that affect the soil and ground water were VOCs, including benzene; and metals, including chromium and lead.

Not Available

1992-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

342

Physical and Chemical Characterization of Particulate and Gas phase Emissions from Biomass Burning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the pile as waste. Waste burning is not permitted in manyagricultural residue/waste burning, residential wood

Hosseini, Seyedehsan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

AST Review, October 2010 The mission of the PSAAP Center at Stanford is to build and demonstrate computational capabilities for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

capabilities for the simulations of supersonic combustion engines (scramjet) of hypersonic the operability limit of the scramjet as the fuel flow rate is increased the scramjet performance. Quantification of Margins and Uncertainties (QMU) provides

Prinz, Friedrich B.

344

Comparing fuel reduction treatments for reducing wildfire size and intensity in a boreal forest landscape of northeastern China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparing fuel reduction treatments for reducing wildfire size and intensity in a boreal forest, Columbia, MO 65211, USA H I G H L I G H T S · Focusing on fuel load may ignore effects of other spatial controls on fire. · We used burn probability to combine effects of fuel load and other spatial controls

He, Hong S.

345

Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost and equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost gas instead of continuing to burn low-sulfur fuel oil, a report said. Switching to liquefied natural who switch from gasoline-powered vehicles to ones fueled by compressed natural gas could save as much

346

Microstructured Hydrogen Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micro fuel cells ; Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells ; Proton exchange membrane fuel cells ...

Luc G. Frechette

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Impact of Trash Burning on Air Quality in Mexico City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

designed to simulate waste generated by a "recycling" and a "nonrecycling" family in a 208-L (55-gal) burn barrel at the EPA's Open Burning Test Facility. ... Four test burns were made in which the amt. of waste placed in the barrel varied from 6.4 to 13.6 kg and the amt. ... The results of this study indicate that backyard burning emits more PCDDs/PCDFs on a mass of refuse burned basis than various types of municipal waste combustors (MWCs). ...

A. Hodzic; C. Wiedinmyer; D. Salcedo; J. L. Jimenez

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition The definition of an alternative fuel includes natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, electricity, hydrogen, fuel mixtures containing not less

349

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fueling Stations Photo of an ethanol fueling station. Thousands of ethanol fueling stations are available in the United States.

350

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Promotion The Missouri Alternative Fuels Commission (Commission) promotes the continued production and use of alternative transportation fuels in

351

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Fueling Stations Photo of a hydrogen fueling station. A handful of hydrogen fueling stations are available in the United States

352

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fueling Stations Photo of a biodiesel fueling station. Hundreds of biodiesel fueling stations are available in the United States.

353

EMSL: Science: Research and Capability Development Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intramural Research & Capability Development Program Intramural Research & Capability Development Program The EMSL Intramural Research and Capability Development Program facilitates development of new research tools and enables EMSL staff members to advance the important skills and expertise necessary to enhance the EMSL user program. These intramural projects are intended to increase the scientific visibility of EMSL staff in areas that promote the objectives of EMSL's three science themes- Biological Interactions and Dynamics, Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science, and Science of Interfacial Phenomena. Technical outcomes of this program include journal publications, scientific presentations, new capabilities or capability enhancements, and expertise to augment EMSL user activities and foster development of innovative

354

Alternative Fuel for Portland Cement Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of cement involves a combination of numerous raw materials, strictly monitored system processes, and temperatures on the order of 1500 °C. Immense quantities of fuel are required for the production of cement. Traditionally, energy from fossil fuels was solely relied upon for the production of cement. The overarching project objective is to evaluate the use of alternative fuels to lessen the dependence on non-renewable resources to produce portland cement. The key objective of using alternative fuels is to continue to produce high-quality cement while decreasing the use of non-renewable fuels and minimizing the impact on the environment. Burn characteristics and thermodynamic parameters were evaluated with a laboratory burn simulator under conditions that mimic those in the preheater where the fuels are brought into a cement plant. A drop-tube furnace and visualization method were developed that show potential for evaluating time- and space-resolved temperature distributions for fuel solid particles and liquid droplets undergoing combustion in various combustion atmospheres. Downdraft gasification has been explored as a means to extract chemical energy from poultry litter while limiting the throughput of potentially deleterious components with regards to use in firing a cement kiln. Results have shown that the clinkering is temperature independent, at least within the controllable temperature range. Limestone also had only a slight effect on the fusion when used to coat the pellets. However, limestone addition did display some promise in regards to chlorine capture, as ash analyses showed chlorine concentrations of more than four times greater in the limestone infused ash as compared to raw poultry litter. A reliable and convenient sampling procedure was developed to estimate the combustion quality of broiler litter that is the best compromise between convenience and reliability by means of statistical analysis. Multi-day trial burns were conducted at a full-scale cement plant with alternative fuels to examine their compatibility with the cement production process. Construction and demolition waste, woodchips, and soybean seeds were used as alternative fuels at a full-scale cement production facility. These fuels were co-fired with coal and waste plastics. The alternative fuels used in this trial accounted for 5 to 16 % of the total energy consumed during these burns. The overall performance of the portland cement produced during the various trial burns performed for practical purposes very similar to the cement produced during the control burn. The cement plant was successful in implementing alternative fuels to produce a consistent, high-quality product that increased cement performance while reducing the environmental footprint of the plant. The utilization of construction and demolition waste, woodchips and soybean seeds proved to be viable replacements for traditional fuels. The future use of these fuels depends on local availability, associated costs, and compatibility with a facilityâ??s production process.

Anton K. Schindler; Steve R. Duke; Thomas E. Burch; Edward W. Davis; Ralph H. Zee; David I. Bransby; Carla Hopkins; Rutherford L. Thompson; Jingran Duan; Vignesh Venkatasubramanian; Stephen Giles.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Definition: Available Transfer Capability | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transfer Capability Transfer Capability Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Available Transfer Capability A measure of the transfer capability remaining in the physical transmission network for further commercial activity over and above already committed uses. It is defined as Total Transfer Capability less existing transmission commitments (including retail customer service), less a Capacity Benefit Margin, less a Transmission Reliability Margin.[1] Related Terms transfer capability, transmission lines, transmission line, capacity benefit margin, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Available_Transfer_Capability&oldid=502496

356

Flexible-Fuel Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Flexible-Fuel Vehicle Basics Flexible-Fuel Vehicle Basics Flexible-Fuel Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:05am Addthis Photo of a gray van with 'E85 Ethanol' written on the side. Flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) are capable of operating on gasoline, E85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline), or a mixture of both. There are almost 8 million flexible fuel vehicles on U.S. roads today, but many FFV owners don't know their vehicle is one. Unlike natural gas vehicles and propane bi-fuel vehicles, flexible fuel vehicles contain one fueling system, which is made up of ethanol-compatible components and is set to accommodate the higher oxygen content of E85. E85 should only be used in ethanol-capable FFVs. For more information, read Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Powered by a Renewable American Fuel. Download Adobe Reader.

357

Emissions of Polychlorinated Dibenzodioxins and Dibenzofurans and Polychlorinated Biphenyls from Uncontrolled Burning of Garden and Domestic Waste (Backyard Burning)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Straw and plastic (polyethylene) film used for wrapping silage were included, since burnings of these wastes on agricultural fields is considered to be one of the most common types of uncontrolled waste combustions in Sweden. ... To obtain fundamental information on dioxin emissions from an open burning 8 wastes which were likely amenable to be burnt wildly or suspected to generate high levels of dioxins were subjected to an open burning simulation in a special adapted furnace. ... designed to simulate waste generated by a "recycling" and a "nonrecycling" family in a 208-L (55-gal) burn barrel at the EPA's Open Burning Test Facility. ...

Björn Hedman; Morgan Näslund; Calle Nilsson; Stellan Marklund

2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

358

A feasibility study of reactor-based deep-burn concepts.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic assessment of the General Atomics (GA) proposed Deep-Burn concept based on the Modular Helium-Cooled Reactor design (DB-MHR) has been performed. Preliminary benchmarking of deterministic physics codes was done by comparing code results to those from MONTEBURNS (MCNP-ORIGEN) calculations. Detailed fuel cycle analyses were performed in order to provide an independent evaluation of the physics and transmutation performance of the one-pass and two-pass concepts. Key performance parameters such as transuranic consumption, reactor performance, and spent fuel characteristics were analyzed. This effort has been undertaken in close collaborations with the General Atomics design team and Brookhaven National Laboratory evaluation team. The study was performed primarily for a 600 MWt reference DB-MHR design having a power density of 4.7 MW/m{sup 3}. Based on parametric and sensitivity study, it was determined that the maximum burnup (TRU consumption) can be obtained using optimum values of 200 {micro}m and 20% for the fuel kernel diameter and fuel packing fraction, respectively. These values were retained for most of the one-pass and two-pass design calculations; variation to the packing fraction was necessary for the second stage of the two-pass concept. Using a four-batch fuel management scheme for the one-pass DB-MHR core, it was possible to obtain a TRU consumption of 58% and a cycle length of 286 EFPD. By increasing the core power to 800 MWt and the power density to 6.2 MW/m{sup 3}, it was possible to increase the TRU consumption to 60%, although the cycle length decreased by {approx}64 days. The higher TRU consumption (burnup) is due to the reduction of the in-core decay of fissile Pu-241 to Am-241 relative to fission, arising from the higher power density (specific power), which made the fuel more reactivity over time. It was also found that the TRU consumption can be improved by utilizing axial fuel shuffling or by operating with lower material temperatures (colder core). Results also showed that the transmutation performance of the one-pass deep-burn concept is sensitive to the initial TRU vector, primarily because longer cooling time reduces the fissile content (Pu-241 specifically.) With a cooling time of 5 years, the TRU consumption increases to 67%, while conversely, with 20-year cooling the TRU consumption is about 58%. For the two-pass DB-MHR (TRU recycling option), a fuel packing fraction of about 30% is required in the second pass (the recycled TRU). It was found that using a heterogeneous core (homogeneous fuel element) concept, the TRU consumption is dependent on the cooling interval before the 2nd pass, again due to Pu-241 decay during the time lag between the first pass fuel discharge and the second pass fuel charge. With a cooling interval of 7 years (5 and 2 years before and after reprocessing) a TRU consumption of 55% is obtained. With an assumed ''no cooling'' interval, the TRU consumption is 63%. By using a cylindrical core to reduce neutron leakage, TRU consumption of the case with 7-year cooling interval increases to 58%. For a two-pass concept using a heterogeneous fuel element (and homogeneous core) with first and second pass volume ratio of 2:1, the TRU consumption is 62.4%. Finally, the repository loading benefits arising from the deep-burn and Inert Matrix Fuel (IMF) concepts were estimated and compared, for the same initial TRU vector. The DB-MHR concept resulted in slightly higher TRU consumption and repository loading benefit compared to the IMF concept (58.1% versus 55.1% for TRU consumption and 2.0 versus 1.6 for estimated repository loading benefit).

Kim, T. K.; Taiwo, T. A.; Hill, R. N.; Yang, W. S.

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

359

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in burning and non-burning coal waste piles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coal waste material that results from Douro Coalfield exploitation was analyzed by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC–MS) for the identification and quantification of the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), defined as priority pollutants. It is expected that the organic fraction of the coal waste material contains \\{PAHs\\} from petrogenic origin, and also from pyrolytic origin in burning coal waste piles. The results demonstrate some similarity in the studied samples, being phenanthrene the most abundant PAH followed by fluoranthene and pyrene. A petrogenic contribution of \\{PAHs\\} in unburned samples and a mixture of \\{PAHs\\} from petrogenic and pyrolytic sources in the burning/burnt samples were identified. The lowest values of the sum of the 16 priority \\{PAHs\\} found in burning/burnt samples and the depletion LMW \\{PAHs\\} and greater abundance of HMW \\{PAHs\\} from the unburned coal waste material relatively to the burning/burnt material demonstrate the thermal transformation attributed to the burning process. The potential environmental impact associated with the coal waste piles are related with the release of petrogenic and pyrolytic \\{PAHs\\} in particulate and gaseous forms to soils, sediments, groundwater, surface water, and biodiversity.

Joana Ribeiro; Tais Silva; Joao Graciano Mendonca Filho; Deolinda Flores

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com...

362

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on AddThis.com...

363

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on AddThis.com... More in this section...

364

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel and Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on AddThis.com...

365

Development of Computation Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computation Capabilities Computation Capabilities to Predict the Corrosion Wastage of Boiler Tubes in Advanced Combustion Systems Background Staged combustion is a method of reducing nitrogen oxide (NO x ) emissions in boilers by controlling the combustion mixture of air and fuel. Its process conditions are particularly corrosive to lower furnace walls. Superheaters and/or reheaters are often employed in the upper furnace to reuse hot combustion gasses to further raise the

366

An experimental investigation of the burning characteristics of water-oil emulsions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was conducted on the combustion characteristics of droplets of n-heptane, n-decane, n-dodecane, n-hexadecane and iso-octane emulsified with various amount of water and freely falling in a furnace of controlled temperature. Results demonstrate the intricate influences of water emulsification on the ignition, extinction and micro-explosion of the droplet response, and that the droplet burning time can be significantly reduced through judicious fuel blending so as to minimize the ignition delay and advance the onset of micro-explosion.

Wang, C.H.; Chen, J.T. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering] [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - ReFUEL Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development focuses on overcoming barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass, and improving vehicle efficiency. Using biofuels and improving vehicle efficiency reduces our dependence on imported petroleum and enhances our national energy security. The ReFUEL Laboratory houses the following specialized equipment: Heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with a simulation capability of 8,000 to 80,000 lbs for vehicle performance and emissions research Heavy-duty (up to 600 hp) and light-duty (up to 75 hp) engine

368

Chapter 7 - Gas Turbine Fuel Systems and Fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The basics of a gas turbine fuel system are similar for all turbines. The most common fuels are natural gas, LNG (liquid natural gas), and light diesel. With appropriate design changes, the gas turbine has proved to be capable of handling residual oil, pulverized coal, syngas from coal and various low BTU fluids, both liquid and gas, that may be waste streams of petrochemical processes or, for instance, gas from a steel (or other industry) blast furnace. Handling low BTU fuel can be a tricky operation, requiring long test periods and a willingness to trade the savings in fuel costs with the loss of turbine availability during initial prototype full load tests. This chapter covers gas turbine fuel systems and includes a case study (Case 5) on blast furnace gas in a combined cycle power plant (CCPP). “All truths are easy to understand once they are discovered, the point is to discover them.” —Plato

Claire Soares

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Definition: Transfer Capability | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transfer Capability Transfer Capability The measure of the ability of interconnected electric systems to move or transfer power in a reliable manner from one area to another over all transmission lines (or paths) between those areas under specified system conditions. The units of transfer capability are in terms of electric power, generally expressed in megawatts (MW). The transfer capability from 'Area A' to 'Area B' is not generally equal to the transfer capability from 'Area B' to 'Area A.'[1] Related Terms transmission lines, power, electricity generation, transmission line References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Transfer_Capability&oldid=480565"

370

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com...

371

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) ASCEM is being developed to provide a tool and approach to facilitate robust and standardized development of performance and risk assessments for cleanup and closure activities throughout the EM complex. The ASCEM team is composed of scientists from eight National Laboratories. This team is leveraging Department of Energy (DOE) investments in basic science and applied research including high performance computing codes developed through the Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Advanced Simulation & Computing programs as well as collaborating with the Offices of Science,

372

Enhancements to Generic Disposal System Modeling Capabilities...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

disposal system modeling and analysis capability that takes advantage of high-performance computing (HPC) environments to simulate the important multi-physics phenomena and...

373

Facilities and Capabilities | Neutron Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SHARE Facilities and Capabilities ORNL operates two of the world's most powerful neutron scattering user facilities: the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Spallation...

374

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

BNL Gas Storage Achievements, Research Capabilities, Interests, and Project Team Metal hydride gas storage Cryogenic gas storage Compressed gas storage Adsorbed gas storage...

375

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus on Carbon Fiber and Composites...

376

Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD) Industry Day...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Capability Technology Demonstration Industry Day Presentations Partnering with Utilities for Energy Efficiency & Security 2010 Smart Grid Peer Review Day Two Morning Presentations...

377

Sandia National Laboratories Test Capabilities Revitalization...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Test Capabilities Revitalization Phase 2 Project Completed On Time, Under Budget | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

378

Marketing capabilities, innovation and firm performance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The importance of marketing capabilities and innovation is widely acknowledged in strategic marketing literature. Yet, extant research has examined the importance of these strategic factors… (more)

Swaminathan, Arunachalam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

ELECTRICITY SUBSECTOR CYBERSECURITY CAPABILITY MATURITY MODEL...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of the electricity subsector. The program supports the ongoing development and measurement of cybersecurity capabilities within the electricity subsector, and the model can...

380

LANSCE | Lujan Center | Instruments | ASTERIX | Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and optical scattering. Neutron scattering capabilities: Specular and off-specular reflectometry Long wavelength neutron diffraction Grazing incidence small angle scattering...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Alliance Management Capability in Dutch Universities.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Over the past two decades alliances have become an important strategic element for organizations. Prior research has identified alliance management capability (AMC) as an important… (more)

Hanna, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Synthetic Fuel  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

383

Mastication: A fuel reduction and site preperation alternative* ~ e f f~albrook',Han-Sup an^: Russell T. ~raham',Theresa B. ~ a i n ~and Robert ~ e l i n e r ~  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mastication: A fuel reduction and site preperation alternative* ~ e f f~albrook',Han-Sup an piling/burning site preparation and fuel treatment alternatives. Keywords: mastication. activity fuels of mastication used to treat activity and standing live fuels. In this study, a rotary head masticator was used

Fried, Jeremy S.

384

Uncertainty Analyses of Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is developing technology, experimental protocols, computational methods, systems analysis software, and many other capabilities in order to advance the nuclear power infrastructure through the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFDI). Our project, is intended to facilitate will-informed decision making for the selection of fuel cycle options and facilities for development.

Laurence F. Miller; J. Preston; G. Sweder; T. Anderson; S. Janson; M. Humberstone; J. MConn; J. Clark

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fuel Cell Opportunities in Marine Corps Garrison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

% 315,343, 4% 1,585,200, 19% 5,937,358, 73% E85 CNG B100 Diesel Gasoline #12;1 3 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 FY01 fuel cell vehicle operations & maintenance · Partner with Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, TARDEC, General Motors (GMT800 pickup) · Temporary fueling capability Current Phase... Demonstrate

386

Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

E85 Use to someone by E85 Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: E85 Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type E85 Use As part of the Indiana Greening the Government Initiative, all fleet vehicles based in Indianapolis that are capable of using E85 must operate using E85 fuel whenever possible. Use of other biobased fuels and oils is also encouraged. (Reference Executive Order 05-21, 2005

387

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Solid Oxide Fuel Cells FE researchers at NETL have developed a unique test platform, called the multi-cell array (MCA), to rapidly test multiple fuel cells and determine how they degrade when contaminants exist in the fuel stream, such as might occur when using syngas from a coal gasifier. FE researchers at NETL have developed a unique test platform, called the multi-cell array (MCA), to rapidly test multiple fuel cells and determine how they degrade when contaminants exist in the fuel stream, such as might occur when using syngas from a coal gasifier. Fuel cells are an energy user's dream: an efficient, combustion-less, virtually pollution-free power source, capable of being sited in downtown urban areas or in remote regions that runs almost silently and has few

388

Renewable Fuels and Lubricants Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory at the U.S. Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development aims to improve vehicle efficiency and overcome barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass. The ReFUEL Laboratory features a chassis dynamometer for vehicle performance and emissions research, two engine dynamometer test cells for advanced fuels research, and precise emissions analysis equipment. As a complement to these capabilities, detailed studies of fuel properties, with a focus on ignition quality, are performed at NREL's Fuel Chemistry Laboratory.

Not Available

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Stars as thermonuclear reactors: their fuels and ashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atomic nuclei are transformed into each other in the cosmos by nuclear reactions inside stars: -- the process of nucleosynthesis. The basic concepts of determining nuclear reaction rates inside stars and how they manage to burn their fuel so slowly most of the time are discussed. Thermonuclear reactions involving protons in the hydrostatic burning of hydrogen in stars are discussed first. This is followed by triple alpha reactions in the helium burning stage and the issues of survival of carbon and oxygen in red giant stars connected with nuclear structure of oxygen and neon. Advanced stages of nuclear burning in quiescent reactions involving carbon, neon, oxygen and silicon are discussed. The role of neutron induced reactions in nucleosynthesis beyond iron is discussed briefly, as also the experimental detection of neutrinos from SN 1987A which confirmed broadly the ideas concerning gravitational collapse leading to a supernova.

A. Ray

2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Initial Estimates of Mercury Emissions to the Atmosphere from Global Biomass Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Frequently burning grasslands in Africa and Australia, and agricultural waste burning globally, contribute relatively little to the mercury budget. ... Savannas burn frequently (intentionally or by accident), typically annually or biannually, while boreal forest burns at 50?200 year time scales, and wet tropical forests rarely burn at all. ... Total C emissions tracked burning in forested areas (including deforestation fires in the tropics), whereas burned area was largely controlled by savanna fires which responded to different environmental and human factors. ...

H.R. Friedli; A.F. Arellano; S. Cinnirella; N. Pirrone

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Update of waste fuel firing experience in Foster Wheeler circulating fluidized bed boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As the costs and availability of more conventional fuels continue to escalate, more and more customers are investigating and choosing operation with lower cost waste or alternative fuels. Details of units firing waste or alternative fuels which have been in active service for many years are summarized, and the fuel analyses are given. This chapter gives a general overview of the projects that are or will be firing waste or alternative fuels, namely, the Mt. Carmel Manitowoc, NISCO and HUNOSA units. The experience of the four operating units has demonstrated that waste and alternative fuels can be successfully and economically burned in an atmosphere circulating fluidized bed unit while meeting permitted emission requirements.

Abdulally, I.F.; Reed, K.A.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

FORMULATION OF A SURROGATE FOR THE SIMULATION OF JET FUEL POOL FIRES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

City, Utah, USA The simulation of pool fires involving complex hydrocarbon fuels requires behavior to that of the jet fuel. The surrogate was shown to simulate the burn- ing rate, radiant heat flux provided by the University of Utah Research Fund. Ã? Address correspondence to eddings@che.utah.edu Combust

Utah, University of

393

Combustion characteristics of fuel droplets with addition of nano and micron-sized aluminum particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combustion characteristics of fuel droplets with addition of nano and micron-sized aluminum Aluminum nanoparticles Microexplosion Particle aggregation a b s t r a c t The burning characteristics of fuel droplets containing nano and micron-sized aluminum particles were investigated. Particle size

Qiao, Li

394

INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

395

Schoenberg, Chang, Keeley, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Critical Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik Schoenberg Research Center, Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks, Three Rivers, CA 93271. D Department of Ecology and wildfires in Los Angeles County, California from January 1976 to December 2000 reveals that although the BI

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

396

Schoenberg, Chang, Pompa, Woods, Xu. Burning Index. 1 RH: Burning index in Los Angeles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of the Burning Index in Los Angeles County, California Frederic Paik SchoenbergA,E , Chien Research Center, Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks, Three Rivers, CA 93271. D Department of Ecology and wildfires in Los Angeles County, California from January 1976 to December 2000 reveals that although the BI

Schoenberg, Frederic Paik (Rick)

397

Life Satisfaction Over the First Five Years Following Burn Injury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................................... 88 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION In the United States, approximately 500,000 individuals present annually for treatment of burns; about 40,000 of whom require hospitalization (Esselman, 2007). These individuals are typically men, ages 20... year after hospitalization is almost universally a time of high distress for individuals with burn injuries (Patterson & Ford, 2000). The psychological distress following burn injury is said to be the “most disabling of secondary complications...

Hoskins, Jessica Lynne

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

398

Veto likely on ocean burning of toxic wastes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Veto likely on ocean burning of toxic wastes ... Ocean incineration of toxic wastes has been under study for some time, and EPA has authorized test burns as far back as 1974. ... (where more than 6000 people showed up), and Mobile, Ala., where the issues of transporting the waste safely to the burn site and what advantages ocean incineration has over land incineration were hotly debated. ...

1984-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

399

Alkyl Amides and Nitriles as Novel Tracers for Biomass Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ammonia emissions into the atmosphere have been reported for numerous sources, as for example natural decay in soils, sewage treatment plants, livestock waste, and ammonia-based fertilizers (42, 43). ... Anal. of emissions from the burning of dried tropical grasses and agricultural wastes in a small-scale app. ... under the smoldering conditions of residential wood combustion, as compared to the active burning of forest fires and slash burns, incomplete combustion resulted in the preservation of high levels of the natural products. ...

Bernd R. T. Simoneit; A. I. Rushdi; M. R. bin Abas; B. M. Didyk

2002-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

400

Flame Stability of Methane and Syngas Oxy-fuel Steam Flames  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The scaling relation [gF = c(SL2/?)] for different burner diameters was obtained for various diameter burners. ... The fuels used for these experiments were methane and syngas (CO–H2), which were burned with oxidants O2 and recirculated CO2 and H2O. Research-grade fuel and oxidant were delivered to the burners from pressurized tanks. ... Narrower flammable regimes and lower laminar burning velocity under oxy-fuel combustion conditions may lead to new stability challenges in operating oxy-coal burners. ...

B. K. Dam; N. D. Love; A. R. Choudhuri

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Reactive capability limits of wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) technology can be classified into two main types: fixed speed and variable speed. Fixed speed WECS use an induction generator connected directly to the grid while variable speed WECS use a power converter to connect the generator to the grid. Fixed speed WECS require shunt capacitors for reactive power compensation, while variable speed WECS have reactive power capability. Under the Spanish grid code, wind farms have to operate in a range of power factor values. This paper determines the reactive power capability of wind farms equipped with both fixed and variable speed WECS. The reactive power capability can be represented as a reactive capability curve. In this paper, the reactive capability curve is used to calculate the additional reactive power compensation needed to meet the requirements of the Spanish grid code.

Alberto Rios Villacorta; Santiago Arnaltes Gomez; Jose Luis Rodriguez-Amenedo

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Definition: Dynamic Capability Rating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capability Rating Capability Rating Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Dynamic Capability Rating Dynamic capability rating can be achieved through real-time determination of an element's (e.g., line, transformer etc.) ability to carry load based on electrical and environmental conditions.[1] Related Terms rating References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Functions' An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Dynamic_Capability_Rating&oldid=506158" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

403

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fueling Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

404

Update on US High Density Fuel Fabrication Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Second generation uranium molybdenum fuel has shown excellent in-reactor irradiation performance. This metallic fuel type is capable of being fabricated at much higher loadings than any presently used research reactor fuel. Due to the broad range of fuel types this alloy system encompasses—fuel powder to monolithic foil and binary fuel systems to multiple element additions—significant amounts of research and development have been conducted on the fabrication of these fuels. This paper presents an update of the US RERTR effort to develop fabrication techniques and the fabrication methods used for the RERTR-9A miniplate test.

C.R. Clark; G.A. Moore; J.F. Jue; B.H. Park; N.P. Hallinan; D.M. Wachs; D.E. Burkes

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Geopolymeric Agent for Immobilization of Radioactive Ashes after Biomass Burning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solidification of low-level radioactive wastes obtained after biomass burning was studied. Two solidification modes using Portland...- 6 g cm- 2 day- 1.... Thus, su...

A. D. Chervonnyi; N. A. Chervonnaya

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Reflective Terahertz Imaging for early diagnosis of skin burn severity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the brand area is also visualized in the THz images of thebrand shape is discernible as early as the post burn THz image.

TEWARI, PRIYAMVADA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Emerging Fuels Emerging Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Emerging Alternative Fuels Several emerging alternative fuels are under development or already developed and may be available in the United States. These fuels may

408

Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be useful in defining a roadmap for what future capability needs to look like.

Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well as the space shuttle. Although fuel cells have been successfully used in such applications, they have proven difficult to make more cost-effective and durable for commercial applications, particularly for the rigors of daily transportation. Since the 1970s, scientists at Los Alamos have managed to make various scientific breakthroughs that have contributed to the development of modern fuel cell systems. Specific efforts include the following: * Finding alternative and more cost-effective catalysts than platinum. * Enhancing the durability of fuel cells by developing advanced materials and

410

Dual-fueling turbocharged diesels with ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spray addition and carburetion methods were tested for dual-fueling a turbocharged, 65 kW diesel tractor. Approximately 30 percent of the fuel energy for the tractor was supplied by spraying ethanol into the intake air and about 46 percent by carburetion with little affect on the engine thermal efficiency. Further substitution of diesel fuel with ethanol was limited by knock. As the amount of ethanol fed into the engine was increased, ignition apparently changed from the steady burning process which normally occurs in a diesel engine to a rapid explosion which caused knock. The best fuel for the spray approach was a 50 percent ethanol/water solution and with the carburetor it was an 80 percent ethanol/water solution. (Refs. 6).

Cruz, J.M.; Rotz, C.A.; Watson, D.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Dual-fueling turbocharged diesels with ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spray addition and carburetion methods were tested for dual-fueling a turbocharged, 65 kW diesel tractor. Approximately 30 percent of the fuel energy for the tractor was supplied by spraying ethanol into the intake air and about 46 percent by carburetion with little affect on the engine thermal efficiency. Further substitution of diesel fuel with ethanol was limited by knock. As the amount of ethanol fed into the engine was increased, ignition apparently changed from the steady burning process which normally occurs in a diesel engine to a rapid explosion which caused knock. The best fuel for the spray approach was a 50 percent ethanol/water solution and with the carburetor it was an 80 percent ethanol/water solution.

Cruz, J.M.; Rotz, C.A.; Watson, D.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Emissions from Open Burning of Simulated Military Waste from Forward Operating Bases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions from two different burning scenarios, so-called “burn piles/pits” and an air curtain burner/“burn box”, were compared using simulated FOB waste from municipal and commercial sources. ... Aerial- and ground-sampled emissions from three prescribed forest burns in the southeastern U.S. were compared to emissions from laboratory open burn tests using biomass from the same locations. ...

Johanna Aurell; Brian K. Gullett; Dirk Yamamoto

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

413

Experimental Diesel Particulate Filter Capabilities at PNNL  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck Programs.

414

EMSL: Capabilities: Cellular Isolation and Systems Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cell Isolation and Systems Analysis Cell Isolation and Systems Analysis Additional Information Related EMSL User Projects Cell Isolation & Systems Analysis Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Cell Isolation & Systems Analysis brochure CISA Capability Group movie series: CISA Read the transcript. The Cell Isolation & Systems Analysis (CISA) capability at EMSL includes techniques for isolating cells from complex cell populations or environmental samples for further 'omics and imaging analyses. EMSL specializes in quantitative live cell fluorescence imaging with single molecule sensitivity, super resolution fluorescence and electron microscopy techniques, and transcriptomics and proteomics analyses. These capabilities provide the foundation for attaining a molecular-level understanding of

415

Property:Wavemaking Capabilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wavemaking Capabilities Property Type String Pages using the property "Wavemaking Capabilities" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Yes + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + None + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + Yes + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + None + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None +

416

Property:Wind Capabilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capabilities Capabilities Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wind Capabilities Property Type String Pages using the property "Wind Capabilities" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + None + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + None + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None +

417

Property:Towing Capabilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Towing Capabilities Property Type String Pages using the property "Towing Capabilities" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + None + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + None + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + None + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None +

418

Overview of Capabilities Conversion System Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycles Heat exchanger design and optimization TES Material Integration & Optimization: Solar power plantOverview of Capabilities Conversion System Technology - Power System Demonstrations - Systems Conceptual Design/Trade Space Exploration - Simulation Modeling for Manufacturing - Hybrid Energy Systems

Lee, Dongwon

419

capabilitiesFlier_subsurfaceFlow_WEB  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

From the micron scale to the geographic scale, EMSL houses an integrated suite of capabilities to support EMSL offers users access to cutting-edge instruments and the in-house...

420

DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study Kristen Powers powers:................................................................................................................... 13 Calculation of Sensor Reaching Radiance Truth Values for Cloudless & Stratus Cloud Scenes and Atmospheric Database Creation for Stratus Cloud Scene & Calculation of Associated Sensor Reaching Radiance

Salvaggio, Carl

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Scientific Innovation Through Integration Capabilities Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? EMSL provides users the capability to focus on the application of fundamental physical chemistry and technological innovation in the environmental molecular sciences to support the needs of DOE and the nation

422

Coordination of Transmission Line Transfer Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coordination of Transmission Line Transfer Capabilities Final Project Report Power Systems since 1996 PSERC #12;Power Systems Engineering Research Center Coordination of Transmission Line Summary The maximum power that can be transferred over any transmission line, called the transfer capacity

423

Tropical biomass burning smoke plume size, shape, reflectance, and age based on 2001â??2009 MISR imagery of Borneo  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C. S. Zender et al. : Tropical biomass burning smoke plumeslaboratory measurements of biomass-burning emis- sions: 1.aerosol optical depth biomass burning events: a comparison

Zender, C. S; Krolewski, A. G; Tosca, M. G; Randerson, J. T

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Evaluation of soy based heavy fuel oil emulsifiers for energy efficiency and environmental improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is known that the emulsification of water into heavy fuel oil (No. 6) can result in improved atomization of the fuel in a combustion chamber, which results in several benefits. In this study, two soybean lecithin based emulsifiers were evaluated. The emulsifiers were added to the No. 6 fuel at 0.5% and 1 % levels and emulsions of 10% and 15% water were prepared and burned in a pilot scale combustion chamber. The results showed a significant decrease in NO{sub x} emissions, and a reduction in carbon particulates, as well as a decrease in the excess oxygen requirement when the emulsions were burned when compared to fuel oil alone and a fuel oil/water mixture without the emulsifier. It was concluded that the use of a soybean lecithin based emulsifier may be used to increase the burning efficiency of heavy fuel oils, reduce emissions and particulates, and reduce down time for cleaning. This can be very important in utility plants which burn large volumes of heavy fuel oil and are located near urban areas.

Lee, P.K.; Szuhaj, B.F. [Central Soya Company, Inc., Fort Wayne, IN (United States); Diego, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Commercial utilization of weapon grade plutonium as TRISO fuel in conventional CANDU reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large quantities of weapon grade (WG) plutonium have been accumulated in the nuclear warheads. Plutonium and heavy water moderator can give a good combination with respect to neutron economy. TRISO type fuel can withstand very high fuel burn up levels. The paper investigates the prospects of utilization of TRISO fuel made of WG-plutonium in CANDU reactors. Three different fuel compositions have been investigated: (1): 90% ThC + 10% PuC, (2): 70% ThC + 30% PuC and (3): 50% ThC + 50% PuC. The temporal variation of the criticality k? and the burn-up values of the reactor have been calculated by full power operation up to 17 years. Calculated startup criticalities for these fuel modes are k?,0 = 1.6403, 1.7228 and 1.7662, respectively. Attainable burn up values and reactor operation times without new fuel charge will be 94 700, 265 000 and 425 000 MW.D/MT and along with continuous operation periods of ?3.5, 10 and 17 years, respectively, for the corresponding modes. These high burn ups would reduce fuel fabrication costs and nuclear waste mass for final disposal per unit energy drastically.

Sümer ?ahin; Hac? Mehmet ?ahin; Adem Ac?r

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science » Materials Science » Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Melissa Fox Applied Energy Email Catherine Padro Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Fernando Garzon Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Piotr Zelenay Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Rod Borup Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Karen E. Kippen Experimental Physical Sciences Email Like a battery, a fuel cell consists of two electrodes separated by an electrolyte-in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, the separator is made of a thin polymeric membrane. Unlike a battery, a fuel cell does not need recharging-it continues to produce electricity as long as fuel flows

427

Analysis of Tracer Dispersion During a Prescribed Forest Burn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

become a method to manage forest health, while preventing uncontrolled wild land fire. Low intensity, prescribed burns release less carbon dioxide than wildfires of the same size and may be used as a strategy. The ultimate goal of the project is to use the data from the burn, along with modeling techniques to improve

Collins, Gary S.

428

UNCORRECTED 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNCORRECTED PROOF 2 Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial 3 and subsistence groups Biodiversity Science, Conservation International, 1919 M St., Washington, DC 20036, USA 7 c Energy as: Lisa Naughton-Treves et al., Burning biodiversity: Woody biomass use by commercial

Kammen, Daniel M.

429

Stellar Burning Falk Herwig, Alexander Heger, and Frank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

]. In these objects, a thermonuclear runaway of the helium shell on top of an electron-degenerate core (a young White implications for the production of neutron- rich elements. log Tlog Teffeff Figure 1-- A thermonuclear runaway stellar conditions. We will include a stellar equation of state as well as thermonuclear burning (TN burn

Herwig, Falk

430

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study of composite cement containing burned oil shale Julien Ston Supervisors : Prof. Karen properties. SCMs can be by-products from various industries or of natural origin, such as shale. Oil shale correctly, give a material with some cementitious properties known as burned oil shale (BOS). This study

Dalang, Robert C.

431

Process May Reduce Pollution From Burning Coal Refuse Piles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Process May Reduce Pollution From Burning Coal Refuse Piles ... The process uses a heavy liquid to separate marketable high-ash coal from nonburnable waste rock. ... Nearly 500 mountains of coal refuse, waste material from coal cleaning operations, are burning uncontrollably in 15 states in the U.S., according to a Bureau of Mines survey. ...

1965-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

432

Physics of fusion-fuel cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The evaluation of nuclear fusion fuels for a magnetic fusion economy must take into account the various technological impacts of the various fusion fuel cycles as well as the relative reactivity and the required ..beta..'s and temperatures necessary for economic steady-state burns. This paper will review some of the physics of the various fusion fuel cycles (D-T, catalyzed D-D, D-/sup 3/He, D-/sup 6/Li, and the exotic fuels: /sup 3/He/sup 3/He and the proton-based fuels such as P-/sup 6/Li, P-/sup 9/Be, and P-/sup 11/B) including such items as: (1) tritium inventory, burnup, and recycle, (2) neutrons, (3) condensable fuels and ashes, (4) direct electrical recovery prospects, (5) fissile breeding, etc. The advantages as well as the disadvantages of the different fusion fuel cycles will be discussed. The optimum fuel cycle from an overall standpoint of viability and potential technological considerations appears to be catalyzed D-D, which could also support smaller relatively clean, lean-D, rich-/sup 3/He satellite reactors as well as fission reactors.

McNally, J.R. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Vehicles Vehicles Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on AddThis.com... Fuel Prices As gasoline prices increase, alternative fuels appeal more to vehicle fleet managers and consumers. Like gasoline, alternative fuel prices can fluctuate based on location, time of year, and political climate. Alternative Fuel Price Report

434

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Fuel License to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel License Any person acting as an alternative fuels dealer must hold a valid alternative fuel license and certificate from the Wisconsin Department of Administration. Except for alternative fuels that a dealer delivers into a

435

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Fuel License to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel License Alternative fuel providers, bulk users, and retailers, or any person who fuels an alternative fuel vehicle from a private source that does not pay

436

Microsoft PowerPoint - burns.ppt  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Low Evaluation of Low Tank Level Mixing Technologies for DOE High Level Waste Tank Retrieval (10516) Heather Burns Andrew Fellinger and Richard Minichan Savannah River National Laboratory March 7 - 11, 2010 Phoenix, Arizona Waste Management Symposia 2010 SRNL-STI-2010-00139 2 W A S T E M A N A G E M E N T S Y M P O S I A 2 0 1 0 Agenda Overview Background Why a retrieval knowledge center Initial objectives / goals Low Level Mixing Addressing a challenge through technology demonstration Evaluation criteria Instrumentation Test matrix HOW DID WE GET THERE? WHERE DID WE GO? "Building a Foundation" The challenges that lead to gaps in retrieval Development and mock-up of retrieval technologies 3 W A S T E M A N A G E M E N T S Y M P O S I A 2 0 1 0 Background -

437

Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells The Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is responsible for coordinating Federal efforts to facilitate development of a commercially relevant and robust solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. Specific objectives include achieving an efficiency of greater than 60 percent, meeting a stack cost target of $175 per kW, and demonstrating lifetime performance degradation of less than 0.2 percent per

438

High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellant are required to design the base burn motor for a Raytheon weapon system. The results of these deflagration rate measurements will be key in assessing safety and performance of the system. In particular, the system may experience transient pressures on the order of 100's of MPa (10's kPSI). Previous studies on similar AP based materials demonstrate that low pressure (e.g. P < 10 MPa or 1500 PSI) burn rates can be quite different than the elevated pressure deflagration rate measurements (see References and HPP results discussed herein), hence elevated pressure measurements are necessary in order understand the deflagration behavior under relevant conditions. Previous work on explosives have shown that at 100's of MPa some explosives will transition from a laminar burn mechanism to a convective burn mechanism in a process termed deconsolidative burning. The resulting burn rates that are orders-of-magnitude faster than the laminar burn rates. Materials that transition to the deconsolidative-convective burn mechanism at elevated pressures have been shown to be considerably more violent in confined heating experiments (i.e. cook-off scenarios). The mechanisms of propellant and explosive deflagration are extremely complex and include both chemical, and mechanical processes, hence predicting the behavior and rate of a novel material or formulation is difficult if not impossible. In this work, the AP/HTPB based material, TAL-1503 (B-2049), was burned in a constant volume apparatus in argon up to 300 MPa (ca. 44 kPSI). The burn rate and pressure were measured in-situ and used to calculate a pressure dependent burn rate. In general, the material appears to burn in a laminar fashion at these elevated pressures. The experiment was reproduced multiple times and the burn rate law using the best data is B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} where B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is the pressure in units of MPa. Details of the experimental method, results and data analysis are discussed herein and briefly compared to other AP based materials that have been measured in this apparatus.

Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

439

Conditioning effects on La1-xSrxMnO3-Yttria stabilized Zirconia electrodes for thin-film solid oxide fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Thin-Film Solid Oxide Fuel Cells You-Kee Lee a, *, Jung-performance of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). LSM surfacethe development of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) capable of

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Alternative fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the preliminary results of a review, of the experiences of Brazil, Canada, and New Zealand, which have implemented programs to encourage the use of alternative motor fuels. It will also discuss the results of a separate completed review of the Department of Energy's (DOE) progress in implementing the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. The act calls for, among other things, the federal government to use alternative-fueled vehicles in its fleet. The Persian Gulf War, environmental concerns, and the administration's National Energy Strategy have greatly heightened interest in the use of alternative fuels in this country.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fuel Cells  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells The Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is responsible for coordinating Federal efforts to facilitate development of a commercially relevant and robust...

442

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Colloidal Petcoke-in-Water Suspensions as Fuels for Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Colloidal Petcoke-in-Water Suspensions as Fuels for Power Generation ... In this work, it is shown that, despite the low reactivity of petroleum coke (petcoke) and the presence of 40% water, a petcoke suspension having a large colloidal population burned with unprecedented high efficiencies (>99%) without a support fuel. ... Combustion tests of a typical heavy fuel oil (HFO) were carried out to produce baseline data for comparison to the colloidal petcoke in water suspension (CPW) performance. ...

Gustavo A. Núñez; María I. Briceño; Cebers Gómez; Takeshi Asa; Hamid Farzan; Shengteng Hu; Daniel D. Joseph

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

444

PYRO: New capability for isotopic mass tracking in pyroprocess simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new computational code package called PYRO has been developed to support the IFR fuel recycle demonstration project in the HFEF/S facility at ANL-W. The basic pyrochemical code PYRO1-1 models the atomic mass flows and phase compositions of 48 essential chemical elements involved in the pyroprocess. It has been extended to PYRO1-2 by linking with the ORIGEN code to track more than 1000 isotopic species, their radioactive decays, and related phenomena. This paper first describes the pyroprocess to be modeled and the pyrochemical capability that has been implemented in PYRO1-1, and then gives a full account on the algorithm of extending it to PYRO1-2 for isotopic mass tracking. Results from several scoping and simulation runs will be discussed to illustrate the significance of modeling in-process radioactive decays. 16 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Liaw, J.R.; Ackerman, J.P.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine has a housing within the casing of the gas turbine engine which housing defines a combustion chamber and at least one fuel burner secured to one end of the housing and extending into the combustion chamber. The other end of the fuel burner is arranged to slidably engage a fuel inlet connector extending radially inwardly from the engine casing so that fuel is supplied, from a source thereof, to the fuel burner. The fuel inlet connector and fuel burner coact to anchor the housing against axial movement relative to the engine casing while allowing relative radial movement between the engine casing and the fuel burner and, at the same time, providing fuel flow to the fuel burner. For dual fuel capability, a fuel injector is provided in said fuel burner with a flexible fuel supply pipe so that the fuel injector and fuel burner form a unitary structure which moves with the fuel burner.

Leto, Anthony (Franklin Lakes, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Catalyst Design for Urea-less Passive Ammonia SCR Lean-Burn SIDI Aftertreatment System Lean-burn SIDI...

447

MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport observations of organic tracers for biomass burning and intercontinental transport Introduction Suite - Oxford - September 2009 #12;MIPAS observations of organic tracers for biomass burning

448

Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and isomer ratios as tracers of biomass burning emissions in Northern India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emission from large-scale post-harvest agricultural-waste burning (paddy-residue burning during October–November and wheat-residue burning in April–May) is a conspicuous feature ... in northern India. The poor an...

Prashant Rajput; M. M. Sarin; Deepti Sharma…

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

E-Print Network 3.0 - american biomass burning Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

biomass burning Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: american biomass burning Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Recent biomass burning in the...

450

Control of SO{sub 2} and NOx emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants: Research and practice of TPRI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The generation of electric power in China has been dominated by coal for many years. By the end of 1990, total installed generating capacity reached 135 GW, of which fossil fuel-fired plants accounted for 74 percent. The total electricity generated reached 615 TWh, with fossil fuels accounting for 80.5 percent. About 276 million tons of raw coal are consumed in these fossil fuel-burning units per year, accounting for about 25 percent of the total output of the country. According to the government, by the year 2000, the total installed capacity of Chinese power systems should be at least 240 GW, of which fossil fuels will account for about 77 percent. The coal required for power generation will increase to about 530 million tons per year, accounting for about 38 percent of the total coal output. So, it is obvious that coal consumed in coal-fired power plants occupies a very important place in the national fuel balance. The current environmental protection standards, which are based on ground-level concentrations of pollutants, do not effectively lead to the control of pollution emission concentrations or total SO{sub 2} emissions. Due to the practical limitations of the Chinese economy, there is a limited capability to introduce advanced sulfur emission control technologies. Thus, except for the two 360 MW units imported from Japan for the Luohuang Power Plant in Shichuan province, all the other fossil fuel-fired units have not yet adopted any kind of SO{sub 2} removal measures. The Luohuang units are equipped with Mitsubishi limestone flue gas desulfurization systems. Because of the lack of effective pollution control technologies, large areas of the country have been seriously polluted by SO{sub 2}, and some of them even by acid rain.

Ming-Chuan Zhang

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Fuel Cells for Robots  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

For Robots For Robots Fuel Cells For Robots Pavlo Rudakevych iRobot Pavlo Rudakevych iRobot Product Needs Product Needs * Military/Police/Search and Rescue - PackBot - Gladiator - ThrowBot/UGCV * Industrial and Oil - CoWorker - MicroRig * Military/Police/Search and Rescue - PackBot - Gladiator - ThrowBot/UGCV * Industrial and Oil - CoWorker - MicroRig PackBot PackBot * Mission capable robots * Rugged, portable tools for minimal casualty engagements * Assisting behaviors * Small size and weight * Mission capable robots * Rugged, portable tools for minimal casualty engagements * Assisting behaviors * Small size and weight System Concept System Concept System Concept System Concept System Concept Continued System Concept Continued * Modular payload bays - 3 primary - 1 head - 4 side pods * Each payload socket supports - Ethernet

452

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Electricity Fuel Electricity Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Electricity Fuel Basics Photo of a plug-in hybrid vehicle fueling. Electricity is considered an alternative fuel under the Energy Policy Act

453

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition The following fuels are defined as alternative fuels by the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992: pure methanol, ethanol, and other alcohols; blends of

454

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax A state excise tax is imposed on the use of alternative fuels. Alternative fuels include liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane), compressed natural gas (CNG), and liquefied natural gas (LNG). The current tax rates are as

455

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard RFS Volumes by Year Enlarge illustration The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) is a federal program that requires transportation fuel sold in the U.S. to contain a minimum volume of

456

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuels Tax Alternative Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax Excise taxes on alternative fuels are imposed on a gasoline gallon equivalent basis. The tax rate for each alternative fuel type is based on the number of motor vehicles licensed in the state that use the specific

457

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Loans Fuel Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Loans The Oregon Department of Energy administers the State Energy Loan Program (SELP) which offers low-interest loans for qualified projects. Eligible alternative fuel projects include fuel production facilities, dedicated

458

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax Alternative fuels are subject to an excise tax at a rate of $0.205 per gasoline gallon equivalent, with a variable component equal to at least 5% of the average wholesale price of the fuel. (Reference Senate Bill 454,

459

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax The excise tax imposed on an alternative fuel distributed in New Mexico is $0.12 per gallon. Alternative fuels subject to the excise tax include liquefied petroleum gas (or propane), compressed natural gas, and liquefied

460

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax The Minnesota Department of Revenue imposes an excise tax on the first licensed distributor that receives E85 fuel products in the state and on distributors, special fuel dealers, or bulk purchasers of other alternative

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel burning capabilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Emissions to someone by E-mail Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Natural Gas Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Maintenance & Safety Laws & Incentives Natural Gas Vehicle Emissions Natural gas burns cleaner than conventional gasoline or diesel due to its

462

Fuel Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... FUEL research was discussed by Sir Harry McGowan, who succeeds Sir William Larke as president of the Institute of Fuel, in ... has a ragged front, and new knowledge is continually changing relative national positions. Sir Harry McGowan referred to the domestic use of raw coal, which is still preferred to ...

1934-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

463

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Power Plant and Industrial Fuel Use Act Self Certifications Title II of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (FUA), as amended (42 U.S.C. 8301 et seq.), provides that no new baseload electric powerplant may be constructed or operated without the capability to use coal or another alternate fuel as a primary energy source. In order to meet the requirement of coal capability, the owner or operator of such facilities proposing to use natural gas or petroleum as its primary energy source shall certify, pursuant to FUA section 201(d), and Section 501.60(a)(2) of DOE's regulations to the Secretary of Energy prior to construction, or prior to operation as a base load powerplant, that such powerplant has the capability to use coal or another alternate fuel.

464

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute burn patients Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

: Burns & Plastic Surgery Care for Adults and Paediatrics 12;Studying Nursing & Health Care at Glasgow... Certificate in Burns & Plastic Surgery Care for Adults and...

465

Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20–100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 × 10{sup 4} T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ?50%. The compressed field is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities.

Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Werner, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Verification of Unstructured Mesh Capabilities in MCNP6 for Reactor Physics Problems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New unstructured mesh capabilities in MCNP6 (developmental version during summer 2012) show potential for conducting multi-physics analyses by coupling MCNP to a finite element solver such as Abaqus/CAE[2]. Before these new capabilities can be utilized, the ability of MCNP to accurately estimate eigenvalues and pin powers using an unstructured mesh must first be verified. Previous work to verify the unstructured mesh capabilities in MCNP was accomplished using the Godiva sphere [1], and this work attempts to build on that. To accomplish this, a criticality benchmark and a fuel assembly benchmark were used for calculations in MCNP using both the Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) native to MCNP and the unstructured mesh geometry generated using Abaqus/CAE. The Big Ten criticality benchmark [3] was modeled due to its geometry being similar to that of a reactor fuel pin. The C5G7 3-D Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Assembly Benchmark [4] was modeled to test the unstructured mesh capabilities on a reactor-type problem.

Burke, Timothy P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martz, Roger L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

467

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. NREL's state-of-the-art Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory in the Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) supports NREL's fuel cell research and development projects through in-situ fuel cell testing. Current projects include various catalyst development projects, a system contaminant project, and the manufacturing project. Testing capabilities include but are not limited to single cell fuel cells and fuel cell stacks.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Definition: Blackstart Capability Plan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackstart Capability Plan Blackstart Capability Plan Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Blackstart Capability Plan A documented procedure for a generating unit or station to go from a shutdown condition to an operating condition delivering electric power without assistance from the electric system. This procedure is only a portion of an overall system restoration plan.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A black start is the process of restoring a power station to operation without relying on the external electric power transmission network. Normally, the electric power used within the plant is provided from the station's own generators. If all of the plant's main generators are shut down, station service power is provided by drawing power from the grid through the plant's transmission line. However, during a wide-area

469

NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Laboratory Capabilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory Capabilities Laboratory Capabilities To research, develop, and test a variety of concentrating solar power technologies, NREL features the following laboratory capabilities: High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) Large Payload Solar Tracker Advanced Optical Materials Laboratory Advanced Thermal Storage Materials Laboratory Optical Testing Laboratory and Beam Characterization System Receiver Test Laboratory Heat Collection Element (HCE) Temperature Survey Photo of NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace. High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) The power generated at NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) can be used to expose, test, and evaluate many components-such as receivers, collectors, and reflector materials-used in concentrating solar power systems. The 10-kilowatt HFSF consists of a tracking heliostat and 25 hexagonal

470

Freese-casting as a Novel Manufacturing Process for Fast Reactor Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced burner reactors are designed to reduce the amount of long-lived radioactive isotopes that need to be disposed of as waste. The input feedstock for creating advanced fuel forms comes from either recycle of used light water reactor fuel or recycle of fuel from a fast burner reactor. Fuel for burner reqctors requires novel fuel types based on new materials and designs that can acieve higher performance requirements (higher burn up, higher power, and greator margins to fuel melting) then yet achieved. One promising strategy to improved fuel performance is the manufacture of metal or ceramic scaffolds which are designed to allow for a welldefined placement of the fuel into the host, and this in a manner that permits greater control than that possible in the production of typical CERMET fuels.

Wegst, Ulrike G.K.; Allen, Todd; Sridharan, Kumar

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

471

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Assessment to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Assessment The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) prepared a report, Opportunities for DOD Use of Alternative and Renewable Fuels, on the use and potential use of

472

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Basics Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Blends Production & Distribution Specifications Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fuel Basics Related Information National Biofuels Action Plan Biodiesel is a domestically produced, renewable fuel that can be

473

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard At least 2% of all diesel fuel sold in Washington must be biodiesel or renewable diesel. This requirement will increase to 5% 180 days after the

474

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Biodiesel Fuel Use to Biodiesel Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Fuel Use The Iowa Department of Transportation (IDOT) may purchase biodiesel for use in IDOT vehicles through the biodiesel fuel revolving fund created in the state treasury. The fund consists of money received from the sale of Energy

475

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Tax Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax Special fuels, including biodiesel, biodiesel blends, biomass-based diesel, biomass-based diesel blends, and liquefied natural gas, have a reduced tax rate of $0.27 per gallon. Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane) and

476

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Special Fuel Tax to Special Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Special Fuel Tax Effective January 1, 2014, certain special fuels sold or used to propel motor vehicles are subject to a license tax. Liquefied natural gas is subject to a tax of $0.16 per diesel gallon equivalent. Compressed natural

477

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Fuel Basics to Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol