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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Cooling assembly for fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cooling assembly for fuel cells having a simplified construction whereby coolant is efficiently circulated through a conduit arranged in serpentine fashion in a channel within a member of such assembly. The channel is adapted to cradle a flexible, chemically inert, conformable conduit capable of manipulation into a variety of cooling patterns without crimping or otherwise restricting of coolant flow. The conduit, when assembled with the member, conforms into intimate contact with the member for good thermal conductivity. The conduit is non-corrodible and can be constructed as a single, manifold-free, continuous coolant passage means having only one inlet and one outlet.

Kaufman, Arthur (West Orange, NJ); Werth, John (Princeton, NJ)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Implementation of vented fuel assemblies in the supercritical CO?-cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis has been undertaken to investigate the utilization of fuel assembly venting in the reference design of the gas-cooled fast reactor under study as part of the larger research effort at MIT under Gen-IV NERI Project ...

McKee, Stephanie A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

K-infinite trends with burnup, enrichment, and cooling time for BWR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the work performed by ORNL for the Yucca Mountain project (YMP) M and O contractor, Framatome Cogema Fuels. The goal of this work was to obtain k{sub inf} values for infinite arrays of flooded boiling-water-reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies as a function of various burnup/enrichment and cooling-time combinations. These scenarios simulate expected limiting criticality loading conditions (for a given assembly type) for drift emplacements in a repository. Upon consultation with the YMP staff, a Quad Cities BWR fuel assembly was selected as a baseline assembly. This design consists of seven axial enrichment zones, three of which contain natural uranium oxide. No attempt was made to find a bounding or even typical assembly design due to the wide variety in fuel assembly designs necessary for consideration. The current work concentrates on establishing a baseline analysis, along with a small number of sensitivity studies which can be expected later if desired. As a result of similar studies of this nature, several effects are known to be important in the determination of the final k{sub inf} for spent fuel in a cask-like geometry. For a given enrichment there is an optimal burnup: for lower burnups, excess energy (and corresponding excess reactivity) is present in the fuel assembly; for larger burnups, the assembly is overburned and essentially driven by neighboring fuel assemblies. The majority of the burnup/enrichment scenarios included in this study were for some near-optimum burnup/enrichment combinations as determined from Energy Information Administration (EIA) data. Several calculations were performed for under- and over-burned fuel to show these effects.

Broadhead, B.L.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

BWR Fuel Assembly BWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

BWR Fuel Assembly BWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly The PWR 17x17 assembly is approximately 160 inches long (13.3 feet), 8 inches across, and weighs 1,500 lbs....

5

Fuel assembly transfer basket for pool type nuclear reactor vessels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel assembly transfer basket for a pool type, liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a side access loading and unloading port for receiving and relinquishing fuel assemblies during transfer.

Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Ramsour, Nicholas L. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Fuel nozzle assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel nozzle assembly is provided. The assembly includes an outer nozzle body having a first end and a second end and at least one inner nozzle tube having a first end and a second end. One of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel plenum and a fuel passage extending therefrom, while the other of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel injection hole slidably aligned with the fuel passage to form a fuel flow path therebetween at an interface between the body and the tube. The nozzle body and the nozzle tube are fixed against relative movement at the first ends of the nozzle body and nozzle tube, enabling the fuel flow path to close at the interface due to thermal growth after a flame enters the nozzle tube.

Johnson, Thomas Edward (Greer, SC); Ziminsky, Willy Steve (Simpsonville, SC); Lacey, Benjamin Paul (Greer, SC); York, William David (Greer, SC); Stevenson, Christian Xavier (Inman, SC)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Evaluation of storing Shippingport Core II spent blanket fuel assemblies in the T Plant PWR Core II fuel pool without active cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PWR Core II fuel pool chiller-off test was conducted because it appeared possible that acceptable pool-water temperatures could be maintained without operating the chillers, thus saving hundreds of thousands of dollars in maintenance and replacement costs. Test results showed that the water-cooling capability is no longer needed to maintain pool temperature below 38{degrees}C (100{degrees}F).

Gilbert, E.R.; Lanning, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Dana, C.M.; Hedengren, D.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Spiral cooled fuel nozzle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel nozzle for delivery of fuel to a gas turbine engine. The fuel nozzle includes an outer nozzle wall and a center body located centrally within the nozzle wall. A gap is defined between an inner wall surface of the nozzle wall and an outer body surface of the center body for providing fuel flow in a longitudinal direction from an inlet end to an outlet end of the fuel nozzle. A turbulating feature is defined on at least one of the central body and the inner wall for causing at least a portion of the fuel flow in the gap to flow transverse to the longitudinal direction. The gap is effective to provide a substantially uniform temperature distribution along the nozzle wall in the circumferential direction.

Fox, Timothy; Schilp, Reinhard

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

9

FUEL ASSEMBLY SHAKER TEST SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the modeling of a PWR fuel assembly under dynamic shock loading in support of the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) shaker test campaign. The focus of the test campaign is on evaluating the response of used fuel to shock and vibration loads that a can occur during highway transport. Modeling began in 2012 using an LS-DYNA fuel assembly model that was first created for modeling impact scenarios. SNL’s proposed test scenario was simulated through analysis and the calculated results helped guide the instrumentation and other aspects of the testing. During FY 2013, the fuel assembly model was refined to better represent the test surrogate. Analysis of the proposed loads suggested the frequency band needed to be lowered to attempt to excite the lower natural frequencies of the fuel assembly. Despite SNL’s expansion of lower frequency components in their five shock realizations, pretest predictions suggested a very mild dynamic response to the test loading. After testing was completed, one specific shock case was modeled, using recorded accelerometer data to excite the model. Direct comparison of predicted strain in the cladding was made to the recorded strain gauge data. The magnitude of both sets of strain (calculated and recorded) are very low, compared to the expected yield strength of the Zircaloy-4 material. The model was accurate enough to predict that no yielding of the cladding was expected, but its precision at predicting micro strains is questionable. The SNL test data offers some opportunity for validation of the finite element model, but the specific loading conditions of the testing only excite the fuel assembly to respond in a limited manner. For example, the test accelerations were not strong enough to substantially drive the fuel assembly out of contact with the basket. Under this test scenario, the fuel assembly model does a reasonable job of approximating actual fuel assembly response, a claim that can be verified through direct comparison of model results to recorded test results. This does not offer validation for the fuel assembly model in all conceivable cases, such as high kinetic energy shock cases where the fuel assembly might lift off the basket floor to strike to basket ceiling. This type of nonlinear behavior was not witnessed in testing, so the model does not have test data to be validated against.a basis for validation in cases that substantially alter the fuel assembly response range. This leads to a gap in knowledge that is identified through this modeling study. The SNL shaker testing loaded a surrogate fuel assembly with a certain set of artificially-generated time histories. One thing all the shock cases had in common was an elimination of low frequency components, which reduces the rigid body dynamic response of the system. It is not known if the SNL test cases effectively bound all highway transportation scenarios, or if significantly greater rigid body motion than was tested is credible. This knowledge gap could be filled through modeling the vehicle dynamics of a used fuel conveyance, or by collecting acceleration time history data from an actual conveyance under highway conditions.

Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Sanborn, Scott E.; Adkins, Harold E.; Hanson, Brady D.

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

Berta, Victor T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

Berta, V.T.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

12

Internal reforming fuel cell assembly with simplified fuel feed  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell assembly in which fuel cells adapted to internally reform fuel and fuel reformers for reforming fuel are arranged in a fuel cell stack. The fuel inlet ports of the fuel cells and the fuel inlet ports and reformed fuel outlet ports of the fuel reformers are arranged on one face of the fuel cell stack. A manifold sealing encloses this face of the stack and a reformer fuel delivery system is arranged entirely within the region between the manifold and the one face of the stack. The fuel reformer has a foil wrapping and a cover member forming with the foil wrapping an enclosed structure.

Farooque, Mohammad (Huntington, CT); Novacco, Lawrence J. (Brookfield, CT); Allen, Jeffrey P. (Naugatuck, CT)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Locking support for nuclear fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A locking device for supporting and locking a nuclear fuel assembly within a cylindrical bore formed by a support plate, the locking device including a support and locking sleeve having upwardly extending fingers forming wedge shaped contact portions arranged for interaction between an annular tapered surface on the fuel assembly and the support plate bore as well as downwardly extending fingers having wedge shaped contact portions arranged for interaction between an annularly tapered surface on the support plate bore and the fuel assembly whereby the sleeve tends to support and lock the fuel assembly in place within the bore by its own weight while facilitating removal and/or replacement of the fuel assembly.

Ledin, Eric (San Diego, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

LMFBR fuel assembly design for HCDA fuel dispersal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel assembly for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor having an upper axial blanket region disposed in a plurality of zones within the fuel assembly. The characterization of a zone is dependent on the height of the axial blanket region with respect to the active fuel region. The net effect of having a plurality of zones is to establish a dispersal flow path for the molten materials resulting during a core meltdown accident. Upward flowing molten material can escape from the core region and/or fuel assembly without solidifying on the surface of fuel rods due to the heat sink represented by blanket region pellets.

Lacko, Robert E. (North Huntingdon, PA); Tilbrook, Roger W. (Monroeville, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Modular fuel-cell stack assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell assembly having a plurality of fuel cells arranged in a stack. An end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at an end of said stack. The end plate assembly has an inlet area adapted to receive an exhaust gas from the stack, an outlet area and a passage connecting the inlet area and outlet area and adapted to carry the exhaust gas received at the inlet area from the inlet area to the outlet area. A further end plate assembly abuts the fuel cell at a further opposing end of the stack. The further end plate assembly has a further inlet area adapted to receive a further exhaust gas from the stack, a further outlet area and a further passage connecting the further inlet area and further outlet area and adapted to carry the further exhaust gas received at the further inlet area from the further inlet area to the further outlet area.

Patel, Pinakin (Danbury, CT)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

16

A classification scheme for LWR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With over 100 light water nuclear reactors operating nationwide, representing designs by four primary vendors, and with reload fuel manufactured by these vendors and additional suppliers, a wide variety of fuel assembly types are in existence. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, both the Systems Integration Program and the Characteristics Data Base project required a classification scheme for these fuels. This scheme can be applied to other areas and is expected to be of value to many Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management programs. To develop the classification scheme, extensive information on the fuel assemblies that have been and are being manufactured by the various nuclear fuel vendors was compiled, reviewed, and evaluated. It was determined that it is possible to characterize assemblies in a systematic manner, using a combination of physical factors. A two-stage scheme was developed consisting of 79 assembly types, which are grouped into 22 assembly classes. The assembly classes are determined by the general design of the reactor cores in which the assemblies are, or were, used. The general BWR and PWR classes are divided differently but both are based on reactor core configuration. 2 refs., 15 tabs.

Moore, R.S.; Williamson, D.A.; Notz, K.J.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Fail-safe storage rack for irradiated fuel rod assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fail-safe storage rack is provided for interim storage of spent but radioactive nuclear fuel rod assemblies. The rack consists of a checkerboard array of substantially square, elongate receiving tubes fully enclosed by a double walled container, the outer wall of which is imperforate for liquid containment and the inner wall of which is provided with perforations for admitting moderator liquid flow to the elongate receiving tubes, the liquid serving to take up waste heat from the stored nuclear assemblies and dissipate same to the ambient liquid reservoir. A perforated cover sealing the rack facilitates cooling liquid entry and dissipation.

Lewis, Donald R. (Pocatello, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Recent experience measuring breeder fresh fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is required to conduct independent on-site verification of nuclear material held under safeguards agreements with member states. The nuclear material contained in liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR) fresh fuel assemblies presents unique safeguards and measurement problems. Since LMFBR fresh fuel may contain uranium of various enrichments, plutonium, or mixtures of uranium and plutonium, a combination of nondestructive assay (NDA) methods and equipment must be used to achieve independent verification of the nuclear material contained in LMFBR fresh fuel assemblies. During 1985 and 1986, a number of measurements were carried out at the BOR-60 LMFBR facility near Dimitrovgrad, USSR to train IAEA inspectors in the use of standard NDA equipment and measurement procedures that can be employed to verify the nuclear material content of LMFBR fresh fuel. Since these measurements were conducted at an operation LMFBR facility, agency inspectors had an opportunity to receive training under actual field conditions. These activities also presented the first opportunity for the agency to test NDA measurement methods on LMFBR fresh fuel of the BOR-60 design. The measurements conducted at the BOR-60 site established that standard agency NDA equipment and procedures can be employed to independently verify the nuclear material content of LMFBR fresh fuel assemblies.

Rizhikov, V.; Fager, J.; Menlove, H.O.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Bore tube assembly for steam cooling a turbine rotor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An axial bore tube assembly for a turbine is provided to supply cooling steam to hot gas components of the turbine wheels and return the spent cooling steam. A pair of inner and outer tubes define a steam supply passage concentric about an inner return passage. The forward ends of the tubes communicate with an end cap assembly having sets of peripheral holes communicating with first and second sets of radial tubes whereby cooling steam from the concentric passage is supplied through the end cap holes to radial tubes for cooling the buckets and return steam from the buckets is provided through the second set of radial tubes through a second set of openings of the end cap into the coaxial return passage. A radial-to-axial flow transitioning device, including anti-swirling vanes is provided in the end cap. A strut ring adjacent the aft end of the bore tube assembly permits axial and radial thermal expansion of the inner tube relative to the outer tube.

DeStefano, Thomas Daniel (Ballston Lake, NY); Wilson, Ian David (Clifton Park, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

An evolutionary fuel assembly design for high power density BWRs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An evolutionary BWR fuel assembly design was studied as a means to increase the power density of current and future BWR cores. The new assembly concept is based on replacing four traditional assemblies and large water gap ...

Karahan, Aydin

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Advanced membrane electrode assemblies for fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of preparing advanced membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) for use in fuel cells. A base polymer is selected for a base membrane. An electrode composition is selected to optimize properties exhibited by the membrane electrode assembly based on the selection of the base polymer. A property-tuning coating layer composition is selected based on compatibility with the base polymer and the electrode composition. A solvent is selected based on the interaction of the solvent with the base polymer and the property-tuning coating layer composition. The MEA is assembled by preparing the base membrane and then applying the property-tuning coating layer to form a composite membrane. Finally, a catalyst is applied to the composite membrane.

Kim, Yu Seung; Pivovar, Bryan S

2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

22

Manifold seal for fuel cell stack assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An assembly for sealing a manifold to a stack of fuel cells includes a first resilient member for providing a first sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. A second resilient member provides a second sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. The first and second resilient members are retained in such a manner as to define an area therebetween adapted for retaining a sealing composition.

Schmitten, Phillip F. (N. Huntingdon, PA); Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

FUEL ASSEMBLY SHAKER AND TRUCK TEST SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study continues the modeling support of the SNL shaker table task from 2013 and includes analysis of the SNL 2014 truck test campaign. Detailed finite element models of the fuel assembly surrogate used by SNL during testing form the basis of the modeling effort. Additional analysis was performed to characterize and filter the accelerometer data collected during the SNL testing. The detailed fuel assembly finite element model was modified to improve the performance and accuracy of the original surrogate fuel assembly model in an attempt to achieve a closer agreement with the low strains measured during testing. The revised model was used to recalculate the shaker table load response from the 2013 test campaign. As it happened, the results remained comparable to the values calculated with the original fuel assembly model. From this it is concluded that the original model was suitable for the task and the improvements to the model were not able to bring the calculated strain values down to the extremely low level recorded during testing. The model needs more precision to calculate strains that are so close to zero. The truck test load case had an even lower magnitude than the shaker table case. Strain gage data from the test was compared directly to locations on the model. Truck test strains were lower than the shaker table case, but the model achieved a better relative agreement of 100-200 microstrains (or 0.0001-0.0002 mm/mm). The truck test data included a number of accelerometers at various locations on the truck bed, surrogate basket, and surrogate fuel assembly. This set of accelerometers allowed an evaluation of the dynamics of the conveyance system used in testing. It was discovered that the dynamic load transference through the conveyance has a strong frequency-range dependency. This suggests that different conveyance configurations could behave differently and transmit different magnitudes of loads to the fuel even when travelling down the same road at the same speed. It is recommended that the SNL conveyance system used in testing be characterized through modal analysis and frequency response analysis to provide context and assist in the interpretation of the strain data that was collected during the truck test campaign.

Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Sanborn, Scott E.; Hanson, Brady D.

2014-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

24

Natural convection heat transfer within horizontal spent nuclear fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural convection heat transfer is experimentally investigated in an enclosed horizontal rod bundle, which characterizes a spent nuclear fuel assembly during dry storage and/or transport conditions. The basic test section consists of a square array of sixty-four stainless steel tubular heaters enclosed within a water-cooled rectangular copper heat exchanger. The heaters are supplied with a uniform power generation per unit length while the surrounding enclosure is maintained at a uniform temperature. The test section resides within a vacuum/pressure chamber in order to subject the assembly to a range of pressure statepoints and various backfill gases. The objective of this experimental study is to obtain convection correlations which can be used in order to easily incorporate convective effects into analytical models of horizontal spent fuel systems, and also to investigate the physical nature of natural convection in enclosed horizontal rod bundles in general. The resulting data consist of: (1) measured temperatures within the assembly as a function of power, pressure, and backfill gas; (2) the relative radiative contribution for the range of observed temperatures; (3) correlations of convective Nusselt number and Rayleigh number for the rod bundle as a whole; and (4) correlations of convective Nusselt number as a function of Rayleigh number for individual rods within the array.

Canaan, R.E.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Fuel Cell Assembly Process Flow for High Productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Cell Assembly Process Flow for High Productivity Problem Presenter Ram Ramanan Bloom Energy: Introduction Bloom Energy manufactures power modules based on fuel cell technology. These are built up their possible placement within a cell assembly. Currently, these rules for assembling the basic components

Edwards, David A.

26

Natural circulation in simulated LMFBR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural circulation experiments have been performed using simulated liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel assemblies in the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety (THORS) facility, an engineering-scale sodium loop. Objective of these tests has been to provide experimental data under conditions that might be encountered during a partial or total loss of the shutdown heat removal system (SHRS) in a reactor. The experiments have included single- and two-phase tests under quasi-steady and transient conditions, at both nominal and non-nominal system conditions. Results from these test indicate that the potential for reactor damage during degraded SHRS operation is extremely slight, and that natural circulation can be a major contributor to safe operation of the system in both single- and two-phase flow during such operation.

Levin, A.E.; Carbajo, J.J.; Lloyd, D.B.; Montgomery, B.H.; Rose, S.D.; Wantland, J.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Synthetic and Jet Fuels Pyrolysis for Cooling and Combustion Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phenomenon (heat and mass transfers, pyrolysis, combustion) in a cooling channel surrounding a SCRamjet regeneratively cooled SCRamjet is provided to get a large vision of the fuel nature impact on the system of supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRamjet) [1]. For such high velocity, the total temperature of external air

Boyer, Edmond

28

Combustor with two stage primary fuel assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combustor for a gas turbine having first and second passages for pre-mixing primary fuel and air supplied to a primary combustion zone. The flow of fuel to the first and second pre-mixing passages is separately regulated using a single annular fuel distribution ring having first and second row of fuel discharge ports. The interior portion of the fuel distribution ring is divided by a baffle into first and second fuel distribution manifolds and is located upstream of the inlets to the two pre-mixing passages. The annular fuel distribution ring is supplied with fuel by an annular fuel supply manifold, the interior portion of which is divided by a baffle into first and second fuel supply manifolds. A first flow of fuel is regulated by a first control valve and directed to the first fuel supply manifold, from which the fuel is distributed to first fuel supply tubes that direct it to the first fuel distribution manifold. From the first fuel distribution manifold, the first flow of fuel is distributed to the first row of fuel discharge ports, which direct it into the first pre-mixing passage. A second flow of fuel is regulated by a second control valve and directed to the second fuel supply manifold, from which the fuel is distributed to second fuel supply tubes that direct it to the second fuel distribution manifold. From the second fuel distribution manifold, the second flow of fuel is distributed to the second row of fuel discharge ports, which direct it into the second pre-mixing passage.

Sharifi, Mehran (Winter Springs, FL); Zolyomi, Wendel (Oviedo, FL); Whidden, Graydon Lane (Orlando, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Method and apparatus for close packing of nuclear fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus of the present invention is a plate of neutron absorbing material. The plate may have a releasable locking feature permitting the plate to be secured within a nuclear fuel assembly between nuclear fuel rods during storage or transportation then removed for further use or destruction. The method of the present invention has the step of placing a plate of neutron absorbing material between nuclear fuel rods within a nuclear fuel assembly, preferably between the two outermost columns of nuclear fuel rods. Additionally, the plate may be releasably locked in place.

Newman, D.F.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Method and apparatus for close packing of nuclear fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus of the present invention is a plate of neutron absorbing material. The plate may have a releasable locking feature permitting the plate to be secured within a nuclear fuel assembly between nuclear fuel rods during storage or transportation then removed for further use or destruction. The method of the present invention has the step of placing a plate of neutron absorbing material between nuclear fuel rods within a nuclear fuel assembly, preferably between the two outermost columns of nuclear fuel rods. Additionally, the plate may be releasably locked in place.

Newman, Darrell F. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Current conducting end plate of fuel cell assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell assembly has a current conducting end plate with a conductive body formed integrally with isolating material. The conductive body has a first surface, a second surface opposite the first surface, and an electrical connector. The first surface has an exposed portion for conducting current between a working section of the fuel cell assembly and the electrical connector. The isolating material is positioned on at least a portion of the second surface. The conductive body can have support passage(s) extending therethrough for receiving structural member(s) of the fuel cell assembly. Isolating material can electrically isolate the conductive body from the structural member(s). The conductive body can have service passage(s) extending therethrough for servicing one or more fluids for the fuel cell assembly. Isolating material can chemically isolate the one or more fluids from the conductive body. The isolating material can also electrically isolate the conductive body from the one or more fluids.

Walsh, Michael M. (Fairfield, CT)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A comparison of spent fuel assembly control instruments: The Cadarache PYTHON and the Los Alamos Fork  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Devices to monitor spent fuel assemblies while stored under water with nondestructive assay methods, have been developed in France and in the United States. Both devices are designed to verify operator's declared values of exposures and cooling-time but the applications and thus the designs of the systems differ. A study, whose results are presented in this paper, has been conducted to compare the features and the performances of the two instruments. 4 refs., 9 figs.

Bignan, G.; Capsie, J.; Romeyer-Dherbey, J. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Reacteurs Nucleaires); Rinard, P. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Cooling/fuel system for hypersonic flight  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described of simultaneously providing a heat sink and reactive fuel factions production from hydrocarbons having an average molecular weight of between 100 and 1,000 in hypersonic propulsion applications comprising: (i) in a hypersonic vehicle having high heat flux structural regions, causing a hydrocarbon exposure to a high heat flux structural region and imparting a temperature increase to the hydrocarbon; (ii) reducing temperature gradients of the high heat flux structural region by heat transfer from the high flux structural region to the hydrocarbon such that a portion of the hydrocarbon pyrolyzes into olefinic fractions; and (iii) utilizing the olefinic fractions as a fuel in hypersonic propulsion in a hypersonic vehicle.

Lander, H.R.; Schnurstein, R.E.

1993-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

34

Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocationDiurnalCommitteeDurable Fuel Cell Membrane

35

Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

potential benefits and have prevented fuel cells from entering the mainstream automobile, portable electronics, and power generation markets in which customers are price...

36

A critical review of cooling techniques in proton exchange membrane fuel cell stacks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review A critical review of cooling techniques in proton exchange membrane fuel cell stacks of a cooling system. To promote the development of effective cooling strategies, cooling techniques reported, challenges and progress of various cooling techniques, including (i) cooling with heat spreaders (using high

Kandlikar, Satish

37

Hydrogen storage and integrated fuel cell assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogen is stored in materials that absorb and desorb hydrogen with temperature dependent rates. A housing is provided that allows for the storage of one or more types of hydrogen-storage materials in close thermal proximity to a fuel cell stack. This arrangement, which includes alternating fuel cell stack and hydrogen-storage units, allows for close thermal matching of the hydrogen storage material and the fuel cell stack. Also, the present invention allows for tailoring of the hydrogen delivery by mixing different materials in one unit. Thermal insulation alternatively allows for a highly efficient unit. Individual power modules including one fuel cell stack surrounded by a pair of hydrogen-storage units allows for distribution of power throughout a vehicle or other electric power consuming devices.

Gross, Karl J. (Fremont, CA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

Detachable connection for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A locking connection for releasably attaching a handling socket to the duct tube of a fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor. The connection comprises a load pad housing mechanically attached to the duct tube and a handling socket threadably secured within the housing. A retaining ring is interposed between the housing and the handling socket and is formed with a projection and depression engageable within a cavity and groove of the housing and handling socket, respectively, to form a detachable interlocked connection assembly.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel burner and combustor assembly for a gas turbine engine has a housing within the casing of the gas turbine engine which housing defines a combustion chamber and at least one fuel burner secured to one end of the housing and extending into the combustion chamber. The other end of the fuel burner is arranged to slidably engage a fuel inlet connector extending radially inwardly from the engine casing so that fuel is supplied, from a source thereof, to the fuel burner. The fuel inlet connector and fuel burner coact to anchor the housing against axial movement relative to the engine casing while allowing relative radial movement between the engine casing and the fuel burner and, at the same time, providing fuel flow to the fuel burner. For dual fuel capability, a fuel injector is provided in said fuel burner with a flexible fuel supply pipe so that the fuel injector and fuel burner form a unitary structure which moves with the fuel burner.

Leto, Anthony (Franklin Lakes, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

DISSOLUTION OF IRRADIATED MURR FUEL ASSEMBLIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature survey on the dissolution of spent nuclear fuel from the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has been performed. This survey encompassed both internal and external literature sources for the dissolution of aluminum-clad uranium alloy fuels. The most limiting aspect of dissolution in the current facility configuration involves issues related to the control of the flammability of the off-gas from this process. The primary conclusion of this work is that based on past dissolution of this fuel in H-Canyon, four bundles of this fuel (initial charge) may be safely dissolved in a nitric acid flowsheet catalyzed with 0.002 M mercuric nitrate using a 40 scfm purge to control off-gas flammability. The initial charge may be followed by a second charge of up to five bundles to the same dissolver batch depending on volume and concentration constraints. The safety of this flowsheet relies on composite lower flammability limits (LFL) estimated from prior literature, pilot-scale work on the dissolution of site fuels, and the proposed processing flowsheet. Equipment modifications or improved LFL data offer the potential for improved processing rates. The fuel charging sequence, as well as the acid and catalyst concentrations, will control the dissolution rate during the initial portion of the cycle. These parameters directly impact the hydrogen and off-gas generation and, along with the purge flowrate determine the number of bundles that may be charged. The calculation approach within provides Engineering a means to determine optimal charging patterns. Downstream processing of this material should be similar to that of recent processing of site fuels requiring only minor adjustments of the existing flowsheet parameters.

Kyser, E.

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Spacer grid for reducing bowing in a nuclear fuel assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A bi-metallic spacer grid having a zircaloy perimeter strip consisting of oppositely facing, thin walled metal plates for closely surrounding the array of fuel rods. A rigid, stainless steel cross member extends between internal surfaces of the oppositely facing perimeter plates. In the preferred embodiment, the perimeter plates have cantilevered portions extending above and below the main body of the perimeter strip. The cross members interact with the enlarged portion by urging them outward relative to the perimeter strip as the fuel assembly heats up during operation. The outwardly projecting interface surfaces of each assembly mechanically interact with the interface surfaces of adjacent assemblies providing a mechanical restraint which limits bowing of the assembly. The effectiveness of the spacer grids in limiting bowing is therefore not dependent upon controlling the mechanisms responsible for causing bow. When the reactor is in a cold condition such as during refueling , the exterior dimensions of the spacer grids are the same as those of the other zircaloy grids, which assures adequate clearance for insertion and withdrawal of individual fuel assemblies.

Wohlsen, W.D.

1982-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

42

Evaluation of Effect of Fuel Assembly Loading Patterns on Thermal and Shielding Performance of a Spent Fuel Storage/Transportation Cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The licensing of spent fuel storage casks is generally based on conservative analyses that assume a storage system being uniformly loaded with design basis fuel. The design basis fuel typically assumes a maximum assembly enrichment, maximum burn up, and minimum cooling time. These conditions set the maximum decay heat loads and radioactive source terms for the design. Recognizing that reactor spent fuel pools hold spent fuel with an array of initial enrichments, burners, and cooling times, this study was performed to evaluate the effect of load pattern on peak cladding temperature and cask surface dose rate. Based on the analysis, the authors concluded that load patterns could be used to reduce peak cladding temperatures in a cask without adversely impacting the surface dose rates.

Cuta, Judith M.; Jenquin, Urban P.; McKinnon, Mikal A.

2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

43

An experiment to simulate the heat transfer properties of a dry, horizontal spent nuclear fuel assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear power reactors generate highly radioactive spent fuel assemblies. Initially, the spent fuel assemblies are stored for a period of several years in an on-site storage facility to allow the radioactivity levels of ...

Lovett, Phyllis Maria

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Cooled electrical terminal assembly and device incorporating same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A terminal structure provides interfacing with power electronics circuitry and external circuitry. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the terminal structure and the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Phillips, Mark G.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

45

Cooled electrical terminal assembly and device incorporating same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A terminal structure provides interfacing with power electronics circuitry and external circuitry. The thermal support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the terminal structure and the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

Beihoff, Bruce C.; Radosevich, Lawrence D.; Phillips, Mark G.; Kehl, Dennis L.; Kaishian, Steven C.; Kannenberg, Daniel G.

2006-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

46

Pressurized water reactor fuel assembly subchannel void fraction measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The void fraction measurement experiment of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies has been conducted since 1987 under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry as a Japanese national project. Two types of test sections are used in this experiment. One is a 5 x 5 array rod bundle geometry, and the other is a single-channel geometry simulating one of the subchannels in the rod bundle. Wide gamma-ray beam scanners and narrow gamma-ray beam computed tomography scanners are used to measure the subchannel void fractions under various steady-state and transient conditions. The experimental data are expected to be used to develop a void fraction prediction model relevant to PWR fuel assemblies and also to verify or improve the subchannel analysis method. The first series of experiments was conducted in 1992, and a preliminary evaluation of the data has been performed. The preliminary results of these experiments are described.

Akiyama, Yoshiei [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama (Japan). Nuclear Fuel and Core Engineering Dept.; Hori, Keiichi [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Hyougo (Japan); Miyazaki, Keiji [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Mishima, Kaichiro [Kyoto Univ., Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.; Sugiyama, Shigekazu [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Fuel Dept.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Sodium boiling dryout correlation for LMFBR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under certain postulated accident conditions for a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR), such as the failure of the shutdown heat removal system (SHRS), sodium boiling and clad dryout might occur in the fuel assemblies. It is important to predict the time from boiling inception to dryout, since sustained clad dryout will result in core damage. In this paper a dryout correlation is presented. This correlation is based on 21 boiling tests which resulted in dryout from the THORS BUNDLE 6A, a 19-pin full-length simulated LMFBR fuel assembly and from the THORS Bundle 9, a 61-pin full-length simulated LMFBR fuel assembly. All these tests were performed as follows: for each specified bundle power, an initial steady-state high sodium flow was established, for which sodium boiling did not occur in the bundle. The temperature at the outlet of the test section was approx. 700/sup 0/C. Then, using a programmable pump control system, the flow was reduced to a low value and boiling occurred.

Carbajo, J.J.; Rose, S.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFD) For Fuel Assembly Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutron sensors capable of real-time measurement of thermal flux, fast flux, and temperature in a single miniaturized probe are needed in irradiation tests required to demonstrate the performance of candidate new fuels, and cladding materials. In-core ceramic-based miniature neutron detectors or “Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors” (MPFDs) have been studied at Kansas State University (KSU). The first MPFD prototypes were tested in various neutron fields at the KSU TRIGA research reactor with successful results. Currently, a United States Department of Energy-sponsored joint KSU/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) effort is underway to develop a high-temperature, high-pressure version of the MPFD using radiation-resistant, high temperature materials, which would be capable of withstanding irradiation test conditions in high performance material and test reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, this more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, existing and advanced reactor designs, high performance MTRs, and transient test reactors has the potential to lead to higher accuracy and resolution data from irradiation testing, more detailed core flux measurements and enhanced fuel assembly processing. Prior evaluations by KSU indicate that these sensors could also be used to monitor burn-up of nuclear fuel. If integrated into nuclear fuel assemblies, MPFDs offer several advantages to current spent fuel management systems.

Troy Unruh; Michael Reichenberger; Phillip Ugorowski

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

SOURCE OF BURNUP VALUES FOR COMMERCIAL SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste packages are loaded with commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that satisfies the minimum burnup requirements of a criticality loading curve. The burnup value assigned by the originating nuclear utility to each SNF assembly (assigned burnup) is used to load waste packages in compliance with a criticality loading curve. The burnup provided by a nuclear utility has uncertainties, so conservative calculation methods are used to characterize those uncertainties for incorporation into the criticality loading curves. Procedural safety controls ensure that the correct assembly is loaded into each waste package to prevent a misload that could create a condition affecting the safety margins. Probabilistic analyses show that procedural safety controls can minimize the chance of a misload but can not completely eliminate the possibility. Physical measurements of burnup with instrumentation in the surface facility are not necessary due to the conservative calculation methods used to produce the criticality loading curves. The reactor records assigned burnup of a commercial SNF assembly contains about two percent uncertainty, which is increased to five-percent to ensure conservatism. This five-percent uncertainty is accommodated by adjusting the criticality loading curve. Also, the record keeping methods of nuclear utilities are not uniform and the level of detail required by the NRC has varied over the last several decades. Thus, some SNF assemblies may have assigned burnups that are averages for a batch of assemblies with similar characteristics. Utilities typically have access to more detailed core-follow records that allow the batch average burnup to be changed to an assembly specific burnup. Alternatively, an additional safety margin is incorporated into the criticality loading curve to accommodate SNF assemblies with batch average burnups or greater uncertainties due to the methodology used by the nuclear utility. The utility records provide the assembly identifier, initial {sup 235}U enrichment, and time of discharge from the reactor as well as the assigned burnup, but the distribution. of burnup axially along the assembly length is not provided. The axial burnup profile is maintained within acceptable bounds by the operating conditions of the nuclear reactor and is calculated during preparations to reload a reactor, but the actual burnup profile is not measured. The axial burnup profile is important to the determination of the reactivity of a waste package, so a conservative evaluation of the calculated axial profiles for a large database of SNF has been performed. The product of the axial profile evaluation is a profile that is conservative. Thus, there is no need for physical measurement of the axial profile. The assembly identifier is legible on each SNF assembly and the utility records provide the associated characteristics of the assembly. The conservative methodologies used to determine the criticality loading curve for a waste package provide sufficient margin so that criticality safety is assured for preclosure operations even in the event of a misload. Consideration of misload effects for postclosure time periods is provided by the criticality Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) analysis. The conservative approaches used to develop and apply the criticality loading curve are thus sufficiently robust that the utility assigned burnup is an adequate source of burnup values, and additional means of verification of assigned burnup through physical measurements are not needed.

BSC

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Inactive end cell assembly for fuel cells for improved electrolyte management and electrical contact  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An assembly for storing electrolyte in a carbonate fuel cell is provided. The combination of a soft, compliant and resilient cathode current collector and an inactive anode part including a foam anode in each assembly mitigates electrical contact loss during operation of the fuel cell stack. In addition, an electrode reservoir in the positive end assembly and an electrode sink in the negative end assembly are provided, by which ribbed and flat cathode members inhibit electrolyte migration in the fuel cell stack.

Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT); Farooque, Mohammad (Danbury, CT); Johnsen, Richard (New Fairfield, CT)

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

Tentner, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

52

Simplified process for leaching precious metals from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The membrane electrode assemblies of fuel cells are recycled to recover the catalyst precious metals from the assemblies. The assemblies are cryogenically embrittled and pulverized to form a powder. The pulverized assemblies are then mixed with a surfactant to form a paste which is contacted with an acid solution to leach precious metals from the pulverized membranes.

Shore, Lawrence (Edison, NJ); Matlin, Ramail (Berkeley Heights, NJ)

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

Gradient isolator for flow field of fuel cell assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Isolator(s) include isolating material and optionally gasketing material strategically positioned within a fuel cell assembly. The isolating material is disposed between a solid electrolyte and a metal flow field plate. Reactant fluid carried by flow field plate channel(s) forms a generally transverse electrochemical gradient. The isolator(s) serve to isolate electrochemically a portion of the flow field plate, for example, transversely outward from the channel(s), from the electrochemical gradient. Further, the isolator(s) serve to protect a portion of the solid electrolyte from metallic ions.

Ernst, William D. (Troy, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Gradient isolator for flow field of fuel cell assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Isolator(s) include isolating material and optionally gasketing material strategically positioned within a fuel cell assembly. The isolating material is disposed between a solid electrolyte and a metal flow field plate. Reactant fluid carried by flow field plate channel(s) forms a generally transverse electrochemical gradient. The isolator(s) serve to isolate electrochemically a portion of the flow field plate, for example, transversely outward from the channel(s), from the electrochemical gradient. Further, the isolator(s) serve to protect a portion of the solid electrolyte from metallic ions. 4 figs.

Ernst, W.D.

1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

55

High Energy Absorption Top Nozzle For A Nuclaer Fuel Assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high energy absorption top nozzle for a nuclear fuel assembly that employs an elongated upper tubular housing and an elongated lower tubular housing slidable within the upper tubular housing. The upper and lower housings are biased away from each other by a plurality of longitudinally extending springs that are restrained by a longitudinally moveable piston whose upward travel is limited within the upper housing. The energy imparted to the nozzle by a control rod scram is mostly absorbed by the springs and the hydraulic affect of the piston within the nozzle.

Sparrow, James A. (Irmo, SC); Aleshin, Yuriy (Columbia, SC); Slyeptsov, Aleksey (Columbia, SC)

2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fuel Breeding and Core Behavior Analyses on In Core Fuel Management of Water Cooled Thorium Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thorium fuel cycle with recycled U-233 has been widely recognized having some contributions to improve the water-cooled breeder reactor program which has been shown by a feasible area of breeding and negative void reactivity which confirms that fissile of 233U contributes to better fuel breeding and effective for obtaining negative void reactivity coefficient as the main fissile material. The present study has the objective to estimate the effect of whole core configuration as well as burnup effects to the reactor core profile by adopting two dimensional model of fuel core management. About more than 40 months of cycle period has been employed for one cycle fuel irradiation of three batches fuel system for large water cooled thorium reactors. All position of fuel arrangement contributes to the total core conversion ratio which gives conversion ratio less than unity of at the BOC and it contributes to higher than unity (1.01) at the EOC after some irradiation process. Inner part and central part give the important part of breeding contribution with increasing burnup process, while criticality is reduced with increasing the irradiation time. Feasibility of breeding capability of water-cooled thorium reactors for whole core fuel arrangement has confirmed from the obtained conversion ratio which shows higher than unity. Whole core analysis on evaluating reactivity change which is caused by the change of voided condition has been employed for conservative assumption that 100% coolant and moderator are voided. It obtained always a negative void reactivity coefficient during reactor operation which shows relatively more negative void coefficient at BOC (fresh fuel composition), and it becomes less negative void coefficient with increasing the operation time. Negative value of void reactivity coefficient shows the reactor has good safety properties in relation to the reactivity profile which is the main parameter in term of criticality safety analysis. Therefore, this evaluation has confirmed that breeding condition and negative coefficient can be obtained simultaneously for water-cooled thorium reactor obtains based on the whole core fuel arrangement.

Permana, Sidik [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-17, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1-N1-17, O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Waris, Abdul; Subhki, Muhamad Nurul [Department of Physics, Bandung Institute of Technology, Gedung Fisika, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Ismail, [BAPETEN (Indonesia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

57

Control assembly for controlling a fuel cell system during shutdown and restart  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell system and method in which the fuel cell system receives and an input oxidant gas and an input fuel gas, and in which a fuel processing assembly is provided and is adapted to at least humidify the input fuel gas which is to be supplied to the anode of the fuel cell of the system whose cathode receives the oxidant input gas via an anode oxidizing assembly which is adapted to couple the output of the anode of the fuel cell to the inlet of the cathode of the fuel cell during normal operation, shutdown and restart of the fuel cell system, and in which a control assembly is further provided and is adapted to respond to shutdown of the fuel cell system during which input fuel gas and input oxidant gas cease to be received by the fuel cell system, the control assembly being further adapted to, when the fuel cell system is shut down: control the fuel cell system so as to enable a purging gas to be able to flow through the fuel processing assembly to remove humidified fuel gas from the processing assembly and to enable a purging gas to be able to flow through the anode of the fuel cell.

Venkataraman, Ramki; Berntsen, George; Carlson, Glenn L.; Farooque, Mohammad; Beachy, Dan; Peterhans, Stefan; Bischoff, Manfred

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic fuel assembly Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

assembly ... Source: DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Collection: Energy Storage, Conversion...

59

LWR fuel assembly designs for the transmutation of LWR Spent Fuel TRU with FCM and UO{sub 2}-ThO{sub 2} Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, transmutation of transuranic (TRU) nuclides from LWR spent fuels is studied by using LWR fuel assemblies which consist of UO{sub 2}-ThO{sub 2} fuel pins and FCM (Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated) fuel pins. TRU from LWR spent fuel is loaded in the kernels of the TRISO particle fuels of FCM fuel pins. In the FCM fuel pins, the TRISO particle fuels are distributed in SiC matrix having high thermal conductivity. The loading patterns of fuel pins and the fuel compositions are searched to have high transmutation rate and feasible neutronic parameters including pin power peaking, temperature reactivity coefficients, and cycle length. All studies are done only in fuel assembly calculation level. The results show that our fuel assembly designs have good transmutation performances without multi-recycling and without degradation of the safety-related neutronic parameters. (authors)

Bae, G.; Hong, S. G. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, KyungHee University, 1732 Deokyoungdaero, Giheung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do, 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

In-Situ Safeguards Verification of Low Burn-up Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel in-situ gross defect verification method for light water reactor spent fuel assemblies was developed and investigated by a Monte Carlo study. This particular method is particularly effective for old pressurized water reactor spent fuel assemblies that have natural uranium in their upper fuel zones. Currently there is no method or instrument that does verification of this type of spent fuel assemblies without moving the spent fuel assemblies from their storage positions. The proposed method uses a tiny neutron detector and a detector guiding system to collect neutron signals inside PWR spent fuel assemblies through guide tubes present in PWR assemblies. The data obtained in such a manner are used for gross defect verification of spent fuel assemblies. The method uses 'calibration curves' which show the expected neutron counts inside one of the guide tubes of spent fuel assemblies as a function of fuel burn-up. By examining the measured data in the 'calibration curves', the consistency of the operator's declaration is verified.

Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S; Park, I; Kim, J; Ahn, G

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

An Investigation of Different Methods of Fabricating Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Methanol Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methanol fuel cells are electrochemical conversion devices that produce electricity from methanol fuel. The current process of fabricating membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is tedious and if it is not sufficiently ...

Hall, Kwame (Kwame J.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Methods for disassembling, replacing and assembling parts of a steam cooling system for a gas turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The steam cooling circuit for a gas turbine includes a bore tube assembly supplying steam to circumferentially spaced radial tubes coupled to supply elbows for transitioning the radial steam flow in an axial direction along steam supply tubes adjacent the rim of the rotor. The supply tubes supply steam to circumferentially spaced manifold segments located on the aft side of the 1-2 spacer for supplying steam to the buckets of the first and second stages. Spent return steam from these buckets flows to a plurality of circumferentially spaced return manifold segments disposed on the forward face of the 1-2 spacer. Crossover tubes couple the steam supply from the steam supply manifold segments through the 1-2 spacer to the buckets of the first stage. Crossover tubes through the 1-2 spacer also return steam from the buckets of the second stage to the return manifold segments. Axially extending return tubes convey spent cooling steam from the return manifold segments to radial tubes via return elbows. The bore tube assembly, radial tubes, elbows, manifold segments and crossover tubes are removable from the turbine rotor and replaceable.

Wilson, Ian D. (Mauldin, SC); Wesorick, Ronald R. (Albany, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced electrode configurations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treating refinery wastewaters in microbial fuel cells using separator electrode assembly or spaced 2013 Available online 5 November 2013 Keywords: Microbial fuel cells Refinery wastewater Biodegradability Separator electrode assembly a b s t r a c t The effectiveness of refinery wastewater (RW

64

Transmutation of Transuranic Elements in Advanced MOX and IMF Fuel Assemblies Utilizing Multi-recycling Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nuclear power plants worldwide. To do so efficiently, several new fuel assembly designs are proposed in this Thesis: these include (1) Mixed Oxide Fuel (MOX), (2) MOX fuel with Americium coating, (3) Inert-Matrix Fuel (IMF) with UOX as inner zone, and (4...

Zhang, Yunhuang

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

65

Operating experience feedback report: Assessment of spent fuel cooling. Volume 12  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of an independent assessment by a team from the Office of Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data of spent-fuel-pool (SFP) cooling in operating nuclear power plants. The team assessed the likelihood and consequences of an extended loss of SFP cooling and suggested corrective actions, based on their findings.

Ibarra, J.G.; Jones, W.R.; Lanik, G.F.; Ornstein, H.L.; Pullani, S.V.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Development of a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor TRISO-coated particle fuel chemistry model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first portion of this work is a comprehensive analysis of the chemical environment in a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor TRISO fuel particle. Fission product inventory versus burnup is calculated. Based on those ...

Diecker, Jane T

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Modeling the transient operation of an endothermic fuel cooling system for high Mach number vehicle missions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A computer model was developed to simulate the transient operation of a hypothetical endothermic fuel cooling system. The model simulated the performance of a cross-flow, shell and tube heat exchanger. This model was applied to a representative...

Williams, Mark Robert

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A feasibility study of internal evaporative cooling for proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of using the technique of ultrasonic nebulization of water into the anode gas stream for evaporative cooling of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The basic concept of this form...

Snyder, Loren E

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

69

Fuel assembly for the production of tritium in light water reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear fuel assembly is described for producing tritium in a light water moderated reactor. The assembly consists of two intermeshing arrays of subassemblies. The first subassemblies comprise concentric annular elements of an outer containment tube, an annular target element, an annular fuel element, and an inner neutron spectrums shifting rod. The second subassemblies comprise an outer containment tube and an inner rod of either fuel, target, or neutron spectrum shifting neutral.

Cawley, William E. (Richland, WA); Trapp, Turner J. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fuel assembly for the production of tritium in light water reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear fuel assembly is described for producing tritium in a light water moderated reactor. The assembly consists of two intermeshing arrays of subassemblies. The first subassemblies comprise concentric annular elements of an outer containment tube, an annular target element, an annular fuel element, and an inner neutron spectrums shifting rod. The second subassemblies comprise an outer containment tube and an inner rod of either fuel, target, or neutron spectrum shifting neutral.

Cawley, W.E.; Trapp, T.J.

1983-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

71

Thermal analysis for fuel handling system for sodium cooled reactor considering minor actinide-bearing metal fuel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) is one of the components of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) used to close the fuel cycle. ABR is a sodium-cooled fast reactor that is used to consume transuranic elements resulting from the reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel. ABR-1000 [1000 MW(thermal)] is a fast reactor concept created at Argonne National Laboratory to be used as a reference concept for various future trade-offs. ABR-1000 meets the GNEP goals although it uses what is considered base sodium fast reactor technology for its systems and components. One of the considerations of any fast reactor plant concept is the ability to perform fuel-handling operations with new and spent fast reactor fuel. The transmutation fuel proposed as the ABR fuel has a very little experience base, and thus, this paper investigates a fuel-handling concept and potential issues of handling fast reactor fuel containing minor actinides. In this study, two thermal analyses supporting a conceptual design study on the ABR-1000 fuel-handling system were carried out. One analysis investigated passive dry spent fuel storage, and the other analysis investigated a fresh fuel shipping cask. Passive dry storage can be made suitable for the ABR-1000 spent fuel storage with sodium-bonded metal fuel. The thermal analysis shows that spent fast reactor fuel with a decay heat of 2 kW or less can be stored passively in a helium atmosphere. The 2-kW value seems to be a reasonable and practical level, and a combination of reasonably-sized in-sodium storage followed by passive dry storage could be a candidate for spent fuel storage for the next-generation sodium-cooled reactor with sodium-bonded metal fuel. Requirements for the shipping casks for minor actinide-bearing fuel with a high decay heat level are also discussed in this paper. The shipping cask for fresh sodium-cooled-reactor fuel should be a dry type to reduce the reaction between residual moisture on fresh fuel and the sodium coolant. The cladding temperature requirement is maintained below the creep temperature limit to avoid any damage before core installation. The thermal analysis shows that a helium gas-filled cask can accommodate ABR-1000 fresh minor actinide-bearing fuel with 700-W decay heat. The above analysis results revealed the overall requirement for minor actinide-bearing metal fuel handling. The information is thought to be helpful in the design of the ABR-1000 and future sodium-cooled-reactor fuel-handling system.

Chikazawa, Y.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Monte Carlo simulations of a differential die-away instrument for determination of fissile content in spent fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The differential die-away (DDA) technique has been simulated by using the MCNPX code to quantify its capability to measure the fissile content in spent fuel assemblies, For 64 different spent fuel cases of various initial enrichment, burnup and cooling time, the count rate and signal to background ratios of the DDA system were obtained, where neutron backgrounds are mainly coming from the {sup 244}Cm of the spent fuel. To quantify the total fissile mass of spent fuel, a concept of the effective {sup 239}Pu mass was introduced by weighting the relative contribution to the signal of {sup 235}U and {sup 241}Pu compared to {sup 239}Pu and the calibration curves of DDA count rate vs. {sup 239}Pu{sub eff} were obtained by using the MCNPX code. With a deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator of 10{sup 9} n/s strength, signal to background ratios of sufficient magnitude are acquired for a DDA system with the spent fuel assembly in water.

Lee, Taehoon [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Pwr fuel assembly optimization using adaptive simulated annealing coupled with translat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assembly to be used in an operating nuclear power reactor. The two main cases of optimization are: one that finds the optimal 235U enrichment layout of the fuel pins in the assembly and another that finds both the optimal 235U enrichments where gadolinium...

Rogers, Timothy James

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Assemblies with both target and fuel pins in an isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target material is placed in pins adjacent to fuel pins in order to increase the tritium production rate.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

75

Method of cooling gas only nozzle fuel tip  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A diffusion flame nozzle gas tip is provided to convert a dual fuel nozzle to a gas only nozzle. The nozle tip diverts compressor discharge air from the passage feeding the diffusion nozzle air swirl vanes to a region vacated by removal of the dual fuel components, so that the diverted compressor discharge air can flow to and through effusion holes in the end cap plate of the nozzle tip. In a preferred embodiment, the nozzle gas tip defines a cavity for receiving the compressor discharge air from a peripheral passage of the nozzle for flow through the effusion openings defined in the end cap plate.

Bechtel, William Theodore (Scotia, NY); Fitts, David Orus (Ballston Spa, NY); DeLeonardo, Guy Wayne (Glenville, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Impact of Fission Products Impurity on the Plutonium Content of Metal- and Oxide- Fuels in Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This short report presents the neutronic analysis to evaluate the impact of fission product impurity on the Pu content of Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) metal- and oxide- fuel fabrication. The similar work has been previously done for PWR MOX fuel [1]. The analysis will be performed based on the assumption that the separation of the fission products (FP) during the reprocessing of UOX spent nuclear fuel assemblies is not perfect and that, consequently, a certain amount of FP goes into the Pu stream used to fabricate SFR fuels. Only non-gaseous FPs have been considered (see the list of 176 isotopes considered in the calculations in Appendix 1 of Reference 1). Throughout of this report, we define the mixture of Pu and FPs as PuFP. The main objective of this analysis is to quantify the increase of the Pu content of SFR fuels necessary to maintain the same average burnup at discharge independently of the amount of FP in the Pu stream, i.e. independently of the PuFP composition. The FP losses are considered element-independent, i.e., for example, 1% of FP losses mean that 1% of all non-gaseous FP leak into the Pu stream.

Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Fuel Assembly Shaker Test for Determining Loads on a PWR Assembly...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

current approach of long-term storage at its nuclear power plants and independent spent fuel storage installation, and deferred transportation of used nuclear fuel (UNF), along...

78

Development of a Safeguards Verification Method and Instrument to Detect Pin Diversion from Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Spent Fuel Assemblies Phase I Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel methodology to detect diversion of spent fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has been developed in order to address a long unsolved safeguards verification problem for international safeguards community such as International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM). The concept involves inserting tiny neutron and gamma detectors into the guide tubes of a spent fuel assembly and measuring the signals. The guide tubes form a quadrant symmetric pattern in the various PWR fuel product lines and the neutron and gamma signals from these various locations are processed to obtain a unique signature for an undisturbed fuel assembly. Signatures based on the neutron and gamma signals individually or in a combination can be developed. Removal of fuel pins from the assembly will cause the signatures to be visibly perturbed thus enabling the detection of diversion. All of the required signal processing to obtain signatures can be performed on standard laptop computers. Monte Carlo simulation studies and a set of controlled experiments with actual commercial PWR spent fuel assemblies were performed and validated this novel methodology. Based on the simulation studies and benchmarking measurements, the methodology developed promises to be a powerful and practical way to detect partial defects that constitute 10% or more of the total active fuel pins. This far exceeds the detection threshold of 50% missing pins from a spent fuel assembly, a threshold defined by the IAEA Safeguards Criteria. The methodology does not rely on any operator provided data like burnup or cooling time and does not require movement of the fuel assembly from the storage rack in the spent fuel pool. A concept was developed to build a practical field device, Partial Defect Detector (PDET), which will be completely portable and will use standard radiation measuring devices already in use at the IAEA. The use of the device will not require any information provided by the operator or any prior knowledge of the spent fuel assembly. The device can also be operated without any movement of the spent fuel from its storage position. Based on parametric studies conducted via computer simulation, the device should be able to detect diversion of as low as ten percent of the missing or replaced fuel from an assembly regardless of the location of the missing fuel within the assembly, of the cooling time, initial fuel enrichment or burnup levels. Conditions in the spent fuel pool such as clarity of the water or boron content are also not issues for this device. The shape of the base signature is principally dependent on the layout of the guide tubes in the various types of PWR fuel assemblies and perturbations in the form of replaced fuel pins will distort this signature. These features of PDET are all unique and overcome limitation and disadvantages presented by currently used devices such as the Fork detector or the Cerenkov Viewing Device. Thus, this device when developed and tested could fill an important need in the safeguards area for partial defect detection, a technology that the IAEA has been seeking for the past few decades.

Ham, Y S; Sitaraman, S

2008-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

79

Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) - Energy Innovation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocationDiurnalCommitteeDurable Fuel Cell

80

Fuel Assembly Shaker Test for Determining Loads on a PWR Assembly under  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional ElectricalEnergy Frozen Telescope Looks to Ends

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this evaluation was compiled from References 1 and 2, reports on subsequent experiments in the series , and the experimental logbook, and from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

Margaret A. Marshall

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.”(Reference 1) The experiment studied in this evaluation was the first of the series and had the fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, , and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configurations are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4 and 1.7, respectively. Information for this evaluation was compiled from References 1 and 2, reports on subsequent experiments in the series , and the experimental logbook, and from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

Margaret A. Marshall

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Nuclear fuel scoping: implementation of a four node per assembly algorithm as the neutronic module for microscope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, . APPENDIX B INPUT FOR TEST CASES . SAMPLE INPUT FOR ONE NODE PER ASSEMBLY. . . . SAMPLE INPUT FOR FOUR NODES PER ASSEMBLY. . . APPENDIX C OUTPUT FOR TEST CASES SAMPLE OUTPUT FOR ONE NODE PER ASSEMBLY. . . SAMPLE OUTPUT FOR FOUR NODES PER ASSEMBLY... on which to simulate and test out some of his ideas or intuitions regarding ways of enhancing fuel procurement and bumup. It allows him to easily and cheaply experiment with the decision variables associated with fuel procurement and burnup, and to see...

Shofolu, Babatunde Olayemi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Sensitivity Analysis of Reprocessing Cooling Times on Light Water Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of variations of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fast reactor reprocessing cooling time on a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) assuming a single-tier fuel cycle scenario. The results from this study show the effects of different cooling times on the SFR’s transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) and transuranic fuel enrichment. Also, the decay heat, gamma heat and neutron emission of the SFR’s fresh fuel charge were evaluated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale SFR design was selected as the baseline in this study. Both metal and oxide CR=0.50 SFR designs are investigated.

R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Process for recycling components of a PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of a PEM fuel cell can be recycled by contacting the MEA with a lower alkyl alcohol solvent which separates the membrane from the anode and cathode layers of the assembly. The resulting solution containing both the polymer membrane and supported noble metal catalysts can be heated under mild conditions to disperse the polymer membrane as particles and the supported noble metal catalysts and polymer membrane particles separated by known filtration means.

Shore, Lawrence (Edison, NJ)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

86

On the impact of variability and assembly on turbine blade cooling flow and oxidation life  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The life of a turbine blade is dependent on the quantity and temperature of the cooling flow sup- plied to the blade. The focus of this thesis is the impact of variability on blade cooling flow and, subsequently, its impact ...

Sidwell, Carroll Vincent, 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Passive cooling system for top entry liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a top entry loop joined satellite assembly with a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This satellite type reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary cooling system when rendered inoperative.

Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Cupertino, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

OXIDATION OF FUELS IN THE COOL FLAME REGIME FOR COMBUSTION AND REFORMING FOR FUEL CELLS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THE REVIEW INTEGRATES RECENT INVESTIGATIONS ON AUTO OXIDATION OF FUEL OILS AND THEIR REFORMING INTO HYDROGEN RICH GAS THAT COULD SERVE AS A FEED FOR FUEL CELLS AND COMBUSTION SYSTEMS.

NAIDJA,A.; KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.; MAHAJAN,D.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

High conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly for current generation of PWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a preliminary design of a high conversion Th-U{sup 233} fuel assembly applicable for current generation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWRs). The considered fuel assembly has a typical 17 x 17 PWR lattice. However in order to increase the conversion of Th{sup 232} to U{sup 233}, the assembly was subdivided into the two regions called seed and blanket. The central seed region has a higher than blanket U{sup 233} content and acts as a neutron source for the peripheral blanket region. The latest acts as a U{sup 233} breeder. While the seed fuel pins have a standard dimensions the blanket fuel radius was increased in order to reduce the moderation and to facilitate the resonance neutron absorption in blanket Th{sup 232}. The U{sup 233} content in the seed and blanket regions was optimized to achieve maximal initial to discharged fissile inventory ratio (FIR) taking into account the target fuel cycle length of 12 months with 3-batch reloading scheme. In this study the neutronic calculations were performed on the fuel assembly level using Helios deterministic lattice transport code. The fuel cycle length and the core k{sub eff} were estimated by applying the Non Linear Reactivity Model. The applicability of the HELIOS code for the analysis of the Th-based high conversion designs was confirmed with the help of continuous-energy Monte-Carlo code SERPENT. The results of optimization studies show that for the heterogeneous seed and blanket (SB) fuel assembly the FIR of about 0.95 can be achieved. (authors)

Baldova, D.; Fridman, E. [Reactor Safety Div., Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, POB 510119, Dresden, 01314 (Germany)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

LLNL MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}), typically containing 95% or more UO{sub 2}. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. LLNL has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. This includes receipt and storage of PuO{sub 2} powder, fabrication of MOX fuel pellets, assembly of fuel rods and bundles, and shipping of the packaged fuel to a commercial reactor site. Support activities will take place within a Category 1 area. Building 332 will be used to receive and store the bulk PuO{sub 2} powder, fabricate MOX fuel pellets, and assemble fuel rods. Building 334 will be used to assemble, store, and ship fuel bundles. Only minor modifications would be required of Building 332. Uncontaminated glove boxes would need to be removed, petition walls would need to be removed, and minor modifications to the ventilation system would be required.

O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

LANL MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. LANL has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. This includes receipt and storage of PuO{sub 2} powder, fabrication of MOX fuel pellets, assembly of fuel rods and bundles, and shipping of the packaged fuel to a commercial reactor site. Support activities will take place within both Category 1 and 2 areas. Technical Area (TA) 55/Plutonium Facility 4 will be used to store the bulk PuO{sub 2} powder, fabricate MOX fuel pellets, assemble rods, and store fuel bundles. Bundles will be assembled at a separate facility, several of which have been identified as suitable for that activity. The Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building (at TA-3) will be used for analytical chemistry support. Waste operations will be conducted in TA-50 and TA-54. Only very minor modifications will be needed to accommodate the LA program. These modifications consist mostly of minor equipment upgrades. A commercial reactor operator has not been identified for the LA irradiation. Postirradiation examination (PIE) of the irradiated fuel will take place at either Oak Ridge National Laboratory or ANL-W. The only modifications required at either PIE site would be to accommodate full-length irradiated fuel rods. Results from this program are critical to the overall plutonium distribution schedule.

Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R.; Ludwig, S.B. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Analysis of Advanced Fuel Assemblies and Core Designs for the Current and Next Generations of LWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to design and analyze advanced fuel assemblies for use in current and future light water reactors and to assess their ability to reduce the inventory of transuranic elements, while preserving operational safety. The reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel can delay or avoid the need for a second geological repository in the US. Current light water reactor fuel assembly designs under investigation could reduce the plutonium inventory of reprocessed fuel. Nevertheless, these designs are not effective in stabilizing or reducing the inventory of minor actinides. In the course of this project, we developed and analyzed advanced fuel assembly designs with improved thermal transmutation capability regarding transuranic elements and especially minor actinides. These designs will be intended for use in thermal spectrum (e.g., current and future fleet of light water reactors in the US). We investigated various fuel types, namely high burn-up advanced mixed oxides and inert matrix fuels, in various geometrical designs that are compliant with the core internals of current and future light water reactors. Neutronic/thermal hydraulic effects were included. Transmutation efficiency and safety parameters were used to rank and down-select the various designs.

Jean Ragusa; Karen Vierow

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Development of an internally cooled annular fuel bundle for pressurized heavy water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of preliminary studies have been conducted at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited to explore the potential of using internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) in CANDU reactors including finite element thermo-mechanical modelling, reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, fabrication and mechanical design. The most compelling argument for this design compared to the conventional solid-rod design is the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperature for equivalent LERs (linear element ratings). This feature presents the potential for power up-rating or higher burnup and a decreased defect probability due to in-core power increases. The thermal-mechanical evaluation confirmed the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperatures for ICAF fuel compared to solid-rod fuel for equivalent LER. The maximum fuel temperature increase as a function of LER increase is also significantly less for ICAF fuel. As a result, the sheath stress induced by an equivalent power increase is approximately six times less for ICAF fuel than solid-rod fuel. This suggests that the power-increase thresholds to failure (due to stress-corrosion cracking) for ICAF fuel should be well above those for solid-rod fuel, providing improvement in operation flexibility and safety.

Hamilton, H.; Armstrong, J.; Kittmer, A.; Zhuchkova, A.; Xu, R.; Hyland, B.; King, M.; Nava-Dominguez, A.; Livingstone, S.; Bergeron, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Welding fixture for nuclear fuel pin cladding assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A welding fixture for locating a driver sleeve about the open end of a nuclear fuel pin cladding. The welding fixture includes a holder provided with an open cavity having shoulders for properly positioning the driver sleeve, the end cap, and a soft, high temperature resistant plastic protective sleeve that surrounds a portion of the end cap stem. Ejected contaminant particles spewed forth by closure of the cladding by pulsed magnetic welding techniques are captured within a contamination trap formed in the holder for ultimate removal and disposal of contaminating particles along with the holder.

Oakley, David J. (Richland, WA); Feld, Sam H. (West Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods for manufacturing porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's). Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, a thin coating of nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made, for example, of reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, Brian E. (Pocoima, CA); Benander, Robert E. (Pacoima, CA)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

96

Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

Youchison, Dennis L. (Albuquerque, NM); Williams, Brian E. (Pacoima, CA); Benander, Robert E. (Pacoima, CA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

98

Technical basis for extending storage of the UK's advanced gas-cooled reactor fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UK Nuclear Decommissioning Agency has recently declared a date for cessation of reprocessing of oxide fuel from the UK's Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGRs). This will fundamentally change the management of AGR fuel: from short term storage followed by reprocessing to long term fuel storage followed, in all likelihood, by geological disposal. In terms of infrastructure, the UK has an existing, modern wet storage asset that can be adapted for centralised long term storage of dismantled AGR fuel under the required pond water chemistry. No AGR dry stores exist, although small quantities of fuel have been stored dry as part of experimental programmes in the past. These experimental programmes have shown concerns about corrosion rates.

Hambley, D.I. [National Nuclear Laboratory, Sellafield, Seascale, Cumbria, CA20 1PG (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Proposed subcritical measurements for fresh and spent highly enriched plate type fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A collaborative experimental research program has been established between industry and university partners to evaluate the subcritical behavior of fresh and spent highly enriched fuel assemblies at the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR). This proposed program will involve a series of subcritical measurements using the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed {sup 252}Cf source-driven noise technique. Measurements evaluating the subcritical behavior of simple arrays of fresh MURR assemblies will be performed for evaluating the spectral effects of materials typically found in shipping casks such as lead, steel, aluminum, and boron. Also, measurements will be performed on spent assemblies to characterize physics parameters which may be useful in determining the subcritical behavior of fuels for reactivity credit of actinide burnup and fission product poisoning.

Zino, J.F.; Williamson, T.G. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, Aiken, SC (United States); Mihalczo, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) results from subprompt critical experiments with uranyl fluoride fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments were performed to measure a variety of parameters for SHEBA: behavior of the facility during transient and steady-state operation; characteristics of the SHEBA fuel; delayed-critical solution height vs solution temperature; initial reactor period and reactivity vs solution height; calibration of power level vs reactor power instrumentation readings; flux profile in SHEBA; radiation levels and neutron spectra outside the assembly for code verification and criticality alarm and dosimetry purposes; and effect on reactivity of voids in the fuel.

Cappiello, C.C.; Butterfield, K.B.; Sanchez, R.G.; Bounds, J.A.; Kimpland, R.H.; Damjanovich, R.P.; Jaegers, P.J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

MELCOR model for an experimental 17x17 spent fuel PWR assembly.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A MELCOR model has been developed to simulate a pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack cell undergoing severe accident conditions. To the extent possible, the MELCOR model reflects the actual geometry, materials, and masses present in the experimental arrangement for the Sandia Fuel Project (SFP). The report presents an overview of the SFP experimental arrangement, the MELCOR model specifications, demonstration calculation results, and the input model listing.

Cardoni, Jeffrey

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

Armstrong, J.; Hamilton, H.; Hyland, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Relative Unidirectional Translation in an Artificial Molecular Assembly Fueled by Light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relative Unidirectional Translation in an Artificial Molecular Assembly Fueled by Light Hao Li*, Department of Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center of Chemistry, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130012, PR China Materials and Process

Goddard III, William A.

104

Decay Heat Calculations for PWR and BWR Assemblies Fueled with Uranium and Plutonium Mixed Oxide Fuel using SCALE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In currently operating commercial nuclear power plants (NPP), there are two main types of nuclear fuel, low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, and mixed-oxide uranium-plutonium (MOX) fuel. The LEU fuel is made of pure uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2} or UOX) and has been the fuel of choice in commercial light water reactors (LWRs) for a number of years. Naturally occurring uranium contains a mixture of different uranium isotopes, primarily, {sup 235}U and {sup 238}U. {sup 235}U is a fissile isotope, and will readily undergo a fission reaction upon interaction with a thermal neutron. {sup 235}U has an isotopic concentration of 0.71% in naturally occurring uranium. For most reactors to maintain a fission chain reaction, the natural isotopic concentration of {sup 235}U must be increased (enriched) to a level greater than 0.71%. Modern nuclear reactor fuel assemblies contain a number of fuel pins potentially having different {sup 235}U enrichments varying from {approx}2.0% to {approx}5% enriched in {sup 235}U. Currently in the United States (US), all commercial nuclear power plants use UO{sub 2} fuel. In the rest of the world, UO{sub 2} fuel is still commonly used, but MOX fuel is also used in a number of reactors. MOX fuel contains a mixture of both UO{sub 2} and PuO{sub 2}. Because the plutonium provides the fissile content of the fuel, the uranium used in MOX is either natural or depleted uranium. PuO{sub 2} is added to effectively replace the fissile content of {sup 235}U so that the level of fissile content is sufficiently high to maintain the chain reaction in an LWR. Both reactor-grade and weapons-grade plutonium contains a number of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes, with the fraction of fissile and non-fissile plutonium isotopes being dependent on the source of the plutonium. While only RG plutonium is currently used in MOX, there is the possibility that WG plutonium from dismantled weapons will be used to make MOX for use in US reactors. Reactor-grade plutonium in MOX fuel is generally obtained from reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuel, whereas weapons-grade plutonium is obtained from decommissioned nuclear weapons material and thus has a different plutonium (and other actinides) concentration. Using MOX fuel instead of UOX fuel has potential impacts on the neutronic performance of the nuclear fuel and the design of the nuclear fuel must take these differences into account. Each of the plutonium sources (RG and WG) has different implications on the neutronic behavior of the fuel because each contains a different blend of plutonium nuclides. The amount of heat and the number of neutrons produced from fission of plutonium nuclides is different from fission of {sup 235}U. These differences in UOX and MOX do not end at discharge of the fuel from the reactor core - the short- and long-term storage of MOX fuel may have different requirements than UOX fuel because of the different discharged fuel decay heat characteristics. The research documented in this report compares MOX and UOX fuel during storage and disposal of the fuel by comparing decay heat rates for typical pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies with and without weapons-grade (WG) and reactor-grade (RG) MOX fuel.

Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Destruction of plutonium using non-uranium fuels in pressurized water reactor peripheral assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This thesis examines and confirms the feasibility of using non-uranium fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) radial blanket to eliminate plutonium of both weapons and civilian origin. In the equilibrium cycle, the periphery of the PWR is loaded with alternating fresh and once burned non-uranium fuel assemblies, with the interior of the core comprised of conventional three batch UO{sub 2} assemblies. Plutonium throughput is such that there is no net plutonium production: production in the interior is offset by destruction in the periphery. Using this approach a 50 MT WGPu inventory could be eliminated in approximately 400 reactor years of operation. Assuming all other existing constraints were removed, the 72 operating US PWRs could disposition 50 MT of WGPu in 5.6 years. Use of a low fissile loading plutonium-erbium inert-oxide-matrix composition in the peripheral assemblies essentially destroys 100% of the {sup 239}Pu and {ge}90% {sub total}Pu over two 18 month fuel cycles. Core radial power peaking, reactivity vs EFPD profiles and core average reactivity coefficients were found to be comparable to standard PWR values. Hence, minimal impact on reload licensing is anticipated. Examination of potential candidate fuel matrices based on the existing experience base and thermo-physical properties resulted in the recommendation of three inert fuel matrix compositions for further study: zirconia, alumina and TRISO particle fuels. Objective metrics for quantifying the inherent proliferation resistance of plutonium host waste and fuel forms are proposed and were applied to compare the proposed spent WGPu non-uranium fuel to spent WGPu MOX fuels and WGPu borosilicate glass logs. The elimination disposition option spent non-uranium fuel product was found to present significantly greater barriers to proliferation than other plutonium disposal products.

Chodak, P. III

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Start-up fuel and power flattening of sodium-cooled candle core  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hard neutron spectrum and unique power shape of CANDLE enable its distinctive performances such as achieving high burnup more than 30% and exempting necessity of both enrichment and reprocessing. On the other hand, they also cause several challenging problems. One is how the initial fuel can be prepared to start up the first CANDLE reactor because the equilibrium fuel composition that enables stable CANDLE burning is complex both in axial and radial directions. Another prominent problem is high radial power peaking factor that worsens averaged burnup, namely resource utilization factor in once-through mode and shorten the life time of structure materials. The purposes of this study are to solve these two problems. Several ideas for core configurations and startup fuel using single enrichment uranium and iron as a substitute of fission products are studied. As a result, it is found that low enriched uranium is applicable to ignite the core but all concepts examined here exceeded heat limits. Adjustment in enrichment and height of active and burnt zone is opened for future work. Sodium duct assemblies and thorium fuel assemblies loaded in the center region are studied as measures to reduce radial power peaking factor. Replacing 37 fuels by thorium fuel assemblies in the zeroth to third row provides well-balanced performance with flattened radial power distribution. The CANDLE core loaded with natural uranium in the outer and thorium in the center region achieved 35.6% of averaged burnup and 7.0 years of cladding life time owing to mitigated local fast neutron irradiation at the center. Using thorium with natural or depleted uranium in CANDLE reactor is also beneficial to diversifying fission resource and extending available term of fission energy without expansion of needs for enrichment and reprocessing.

Takaki, Naoyuki; Sagawa, Yu; Umino, Akitake [Department of Nuclear Safety Engineering, Tokyo City University 1-28-1 Tamazutsumi, Setagaya, Tokyo 158-8557 (Japan); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fuel Cycle System Analysis Implications of Sodium-Cooled Metal-Fueled Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If advanced fuel cycles are to include a large number of fast reactors (FRs), what should be the transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR)? The nuclear energy era started with the assumption that they should be breeder reactors (CR > 1), but the full range of possible CRs eventually received attention. For example, during the recent U.S. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, the proposal was burner reactors (CR < 1). Yet, more recently, Massachusetts Institute of Technology's "Future of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle" proposed CR [approximately] 1. Meanwhile, the French company EDF remains focused on breeders. At least one of the reasons for the differences of approach is different fuel cycle objectives. To clarify matters, this paper analyzes the impact of TRU CR on many parameters relevant to fuel cycle systems and therefore spans a broad range of topic areas. The analyses are based on a FR physics parameter scan of TRU CR from 0 to [approximately]1.8 in a sodium-cooled metal-fueled FR (SMFR), in which the fuel from uranium-oxide-fueled light water reactors (LWRs) is recycled directly to FRs and FRs displace LWRs in the fleet. In this instance, the FRs are sodium cooled and metal fueled. Generally, it is assumed that all TRU elements are recycled, which maximizes uranium ore utilization for a given TRU CR and waste radiotoxicity reduction and is consistent with the assumption of used metal fuel separated by electrochemical means. In these analyses, the fuel burnup was constrained by imposing a neutron fluence limit to fuel cladding to the same constant value. This paper first presents static, time-independent measures of performance for the LWR [right arrow] FR fuel cycle, including mass, heat, gamma emission, radiotoxicity, and the two figures of merit for materials for weapon attractiveness developed by C. Bathke et al. No new fuel cycle will achieve a static equilibrium in the foreseeable future. Therefore, additional analyses are shown with dynamic, time-dependent measures of performance including uranium usage, TRU inventory, and radiotoxicity to evaluate the complex impacts of transition from the current uranium-fueled LWR system, and other more realistic impacts that may not be intuited from the time-independent steady-state conditions of the end-state fuel cycle. These analyses were performed using the Verifiable Fuel Cycle Simulation Model VISION. Compared with static calculations, dynamic results paint a different picture of option space and the urgency of starting a FR fleet. For example, in a static analysis, there is a sharp increase in uranium utilization as CR exceeds 1.0 (burner versus breeder). However, in dynamic analyses that examine uranium use over the next 1 to 2 centuries, behavior as CR crosses the 1.0 threshold is smooth, and other parameters such as the time required outside of reactors to recycle fuel become important. Overall, we find that there is no unambiguously superior value of TRU CR; preferences depend on the relative importance of different fuel cycle system objectives.

Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ryan Clement; David W. Gerts

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps.

Corletti, Michael M. (New Kensington, PA); Lau, Louis K. (Monroeville, PA); Schulz, Terry L. (Murrysville Boro, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Combined cooling and purification system for nuclear reactor spent fuel pit, refueling cavity, and refueling water storage tank  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The spent fuel pit of a pressured water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant has sufficient coolant capacity that a safety rated cooling system is not required. A non-safety rated combined cooling and purification system with redundant branches selectively provides simultaneously cooling and purification for the spent fuel pit, the refueling cavity, and the refueling water storage tank, and transfers coolant from the refueling water storage tank to the refueling cavity without it passing through the reactor core. Skimmers on the suction piping of the combined cooling and purification system eliminate the need for separate skimmer circuits with dedicated pumps. 1 figures.

Corletti, M.M.; Lau, L.K.; Schulz, T.L.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

110

Evaluation of FSV-1 cask for the transport of LWR irradiated fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Model FSV-1 spent fuel shipping cask was designed by General Atomic Company (GA) to service the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) nuclear generating station, a High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) owned and operated by Public Service Company of Colorado (PSC). This report presents an evaluation of the suitability of the FSV-1 cask for the transport of irradiated Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel assemblies from both Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). The FSV-1 cask evaluation parameters covered a wide spectrum of LWR fuel assemblies, based on burnup in Megawatt Days/Metric Ton of Heavy Metal (MWD/MTHM) and years of decay since irradiation. The criteria for suitability included allowable radiation dose rates, cask surface and interior temperatures and the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) of the complete shipping system.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Method for recovering catalytic elements from fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for recovering catalytic elements from a fuel cell membrane electrode assembly is provided. The method includes converting the membrane electrode assembly into a particulate material, wetting the particulate material, forming a slurry comprising the wetted particulate material and an acid leachate adapted to dissolve at least one of the catalytic elements into a soluble catalytic element salt, separating the slurry into a depleted particulate material and a supernatant containing the catalytic element salt, and washing the depleted particulate material to remove any catalytic element salt retained within pores in the depleted particulate material.

Shore, Lawrence (Edison, NJ); Matlin, Ramail (Berkeley Heights, NJ); Heinz, Robert (Ludwigshafen, DE)

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

Verification of plutonium content in spent fuel assemblies using neutron self-interrogation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The large amounts of plutonium in reactor spent fuel assemblies has led to increased research directed toward the measurement of the plutonium for safeguards verification. The high levels of fission product gamma-ray activity and curium neutron backgrounds have made the plutonium measurement difficult. We have developed a new technique that can directly measure both the {sup 235}U concentration and the plutonium fissile concentration using the intrinsic neutron emission fronl the curium in the fuel assembly. The passive neutron albedo reactivity (PNAR) method has been described previously where the curium neutrons are moderated in the surrounding water and reflect back into the fuel assembly to induce fissions in the fissile material in the assembly. The cadmium (Cd) ratio is used to separate the spontaneous fission source neutrons from the reflected thermal neutron fission reactions. This method can measure the sum of the {sup 235}U and the plutonium fissile mass, but not the separate components. Our new differential die-away self-interrogation method (DDSI) can be used to separate the {sup 235}U from the {sup 239}Pu. The method has been applied to both fuel rods and full assemblies. For fuel rods the epi-thermal neutron reflection method filters the reflected neutrons through thin Cd filters so that the reflected neutrons are from the epi-cadmium energy region. The neutron fission energy response in the epi-cadmium region is distinctly different for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. We are able to measure the difference between {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu by sampling the neutron induced fission rate as a function of time and multiplicity after the initial fission neutron is detected. We measure the neutron fission rate using list-mode data collection that stores the time correlations between all of the counts. The computer software can select from the data base the time correlations that include singles, doubles, and triples. The die-away time for the doubles distribution is distinctly different for {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. The {sup 239}Pu has a higher fission cross-section in the epi-cadmium neutron region and larger induced fission moments than {sup 235}U, so the measured die-away time can provide the relative amounts of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U. This paper will present the Monte Carlo simulations for the detector and sample configurations for both fuel pins and full fuel assemblies.

Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Apencer H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Fuel cell system including a unit for electrical isolation of a fuel cell stack from a manifold assembly and method therefor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell system with improved electrical isolation having a fuel cell stack with a positive potential end and a negative potential, a manifold for use in coupling gases to and from a face of the fuel cell stack, an electrical isolating assembly for electrically isolating the manifold from the stack, and a unit for adjusting an electrical potential of the manifold such as to impede the flow of electrolyte from the stack across the isolating assembly.

Kelley; Dana A. (New Milford, CT), Farooque; Mohammad (Danbury, CT), Davis; Keith (Southbury, CT)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

114

Spent nuclear fuel characterization for a bounding reference assembly for the receiving basin for off-site fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) for the Receiving Basin for Off-Site Fuel (RBOF) facility at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) nuclear materials production complex, developed in accordance with draft DOE-STD-0019-93, required a hazard categorization for the safety analysis section as outlined in DOE-STD-1027-92. The RBOF facility was thus established as a Category-2 facility (having potential for significant on-site consequences from a radiological release) as defined in DOE 5480.23. Given the wide diversity of spent nuclear fuel stored in the RBOF facility, which made a detailed assessment of the total nuclear inventory virtually impossible, the categorization required a conservative calculation based on the concept of a hypothetical, bounding reference fuel assembly integrated over the total capacity of the facility. This scheme not only was simple but also precluded a potential delay in the completion of the BIO.

Kahook, S.D.; Garrett, R.L.; Canas, L.R.; Beckum, M.J. [Westinghouse Savannah River, Aiken, SC (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors and the Pyro-Process: Conversion of Nuclear Waste into a Fuel Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors and the Pyro-Process: Conversion of Nuclear Waste into a Fuel Source. Belanger Chair, Department of Physics #12;2 Abstract A review of the sodium cooled fast reactor........................................................................................23 1.3.5 Reactor Startup

Belanger, David P.

116

The design and evaluation of a water delivery system for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation was performed to demonstrate system design for the delivery of water required for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The water delivery system uses spray nozzles capable of injecting water directly...

Al-Asad, Dawood Khaled Abdullah

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

117

Preventing fuel failure for a beyond design basis accident in a fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) combines high-temperature coated-particle fuel with a high-temperature salt coolant for a reactor with unique market and safety characteristics. This combination can ...

Minck, Matthew J. (Matthew Joseph)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

A Qualitative Assessment of Thorium-Based Fuels in Supercritical Pressure Water Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The requirements for the next generation of reactors include better economics and safety, waste minimization (particularly of the long-lived isotopes), and better proliferation resistance (both intrinsic and extrinsic). A supercritical pressure water cooled reactor has been chosen as one of the lead contenders as a Generation IV reactor due to the high thermal efficiency and compact/simplified plant design. In addition, interest in the use of thorium-based fuels for Generation IV reactors has increased based on the abundance of thorium, and the minimization of transuranics in a neutron flux; as plutonium (and thus the minor actinides) is not a by-product in the thorium chain. In order to better understand the possibility of the combination of these concepts to meet the Generation IV goals, the qualitative burnup potential and discharge isotopics of thorium and uranium fuel were studied using pin cell analyses in a supercritical pressure water cooled reactor environment. Each of these fertile materials were used in both nitride and metallic form, with light water reactor grade plutonium and minor actinides added. While the uranium-based fuels achieved burnups that were 1.3 to 2.7 times greater than their thorium-based counterparts, the thorium-based fuels destroyed 2 to 7 times more of the plutonium and minor actinides. The fission-to-capture ratio is much higher in this reactor as compared to PWR’s and BWR’s due to the harder neutron spectrum, thus allowing more efficient destruction of the transuranic elements. However, while the uranium-based fuels do achieve a net depletion of plutonium and minor actinides, the breeding of these isotopes limits this depletion; especially as compared to the thorium-based fuels.

Weaver, Kevan Dean; Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Two dimensional, two fluid model for sodium boiling in LMFBR fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A two dimensional numerical model for the simulation of sodium boiling transient was developed using the two fluid set of conservation equations. A semiimplicit numerical differencing scheme capable of handling the problems associated with the ill-posedness implied by the complex characteristic roots of the two fluid problems was used, which took advantage of the dumping effect of the exchange terms. Of particular interest in the development of the model was the identification of the numerical problems caused by the strong disparity between the axial and radial dimensions of fuel assemblies. A solution to this problem was found which uses the particular geometry of fuel assemblies to accelerate the convergence of the iterative technique used in the model. Three sodium boiling experiments were simulated with the model, with good agreement between the experimental results and the model predictions.

Granziera, M.R.; Kazimi, M.S.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct-tube-to-inlet-nozzle attachment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reusable system for removably attaching the lower end 21 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct tube to an upper end 11 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly inlet nozzle. The duct tube's lower end 21 has sides terminating in locking tabs 22 which end in inwardly-extending flanges 23. The flanges 23 engage recesses 13 in the top section 12 of the inlet nozzle's upper end 11. A retaining collar 30 slides over the inlet nozzle's upper end 11 to restrain the flanges 23 in the recesses 13. A locking nut 40 has an inside threaded portion 41 which engages an outside threaded portion 15 of the inlet nozzle's upper end 11 to secure the retaining collar 30 against protrusions 24 on the duct tube's sides.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Bob G. (Kennewick, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Comparative analysis of thorium and uranium fuel for transuranic recycle in a sodium cooled Fast Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present paper compares the reactor physics and transmutation performance of sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (FRs) for TRansUranic (TRU) burning with thorium (Th) or uranium (U) as fertile materials. The 1000 MWt Toshiba-Westinghouse Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) conceptual core has been used as benchmark for the comparison. Both burner and breakeven configurations sustained or started with a TRU supply, and assuming full actinide homogeneous recycle strategy, have been developed. State-of-the-art core physics tools have been employed to establish fuel inventory and reactor physics performances for equilibrium and transition cycles. Results show that Th fosters large improvements in the reactivity coefficients associated with coolant expansion and voiding, which enhances safety margins and, for a burner design, can be traded for maximizing the TRU burning rate. A trade-off of Th compared to U is the significantly larger fuel inventory required to achieve a breakeven design, which entails additional blankets at the detriment of core compactness as well as fuel manufacturing and separation requirements. The gamma field generated by the progeny of U-232 in the U bred from Th challenges fuel handling and manufacturing, but in case of full recycle, the high contents of Am and Cm in the transmutation fuel impose remote fuel operations regardless of the presence of U-232.

C. Fiorina; N. E. Stauff; F. Franceschini; M. T. Wenner; A. Stanculescu; T. K. Kim; A. Cammi; M. E. Ricotti; R. N. Hill; T. A. Taiwo; M. Salvatores

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

PEM fuel cell cost minimization using ``Design For Manufacture and Assembly`` techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells fueled with direct hydrogen have demonstrated substantial technical potential to replace Internal Combustion Engines (ICE`s) in light duty vehicles. Such a transition to a hydrogen economy offers the potential of substantial benefits from reduced criteria and greenhouse emissions as well as reduced foreign fuel dependence. Research conducted for the Ford Motor Co. under a US Department of Energy contract suggests that hydrogen fuel, when used in a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), can achieve a cost per vehicle mile less than or equal to the gasoline cost per mile when used in an ICE vehicle. However, fuel cost parity is not sufficient to ensure overall economic success: the PEM fuel cell power system itself must be of comparable cost to the ICE. To ascertain if low cost production of PEM fuel cells is feasible, a powerful set of mechanical engineering tools collectively referred to as Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) has been applied to several representative PEM fuel cell designs. The preliminary results of this work are encouraging, as presented.

Lomax, F.D. Jr.; James, B.D. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Mooradian, R.P. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

A CFD M&S PROCESS FOR FAST REACTOR FUEL ASSEMBLIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A CFD modeling and simulation process for large-scale problems using an arbitrary fast reactor fuel assembly design was evaluated. Three dimensional flow distributions of sodium for several fast reactor fuel assembly pin spacing configurations were simulated on high performance computers using commercial CFD software. This research focused on 19-pin fuel assembly “benchmark” geometry, similar in design to the Advanced Burner Test Reactor, where each pin is separated by helical wire-wrap spacers. Several two-equation turbulence models including the k-e and SST (Menter) k-? were evaluated. Considerable effort was taken to resolve the momentum boundary layer, so as to eliminate the need for wall functions and reduce computational uncertainty. High performance computers were required to generate the hybrid meshes needed to predict secondary flows created by the wire-wrap spacers; computational meshes ranging from 65 to 85 million elements were common. A general validation methodology was followed, including mesh refinement and comparison of numerical results with empirical correlations. Predictions for velocity, temperature, and pressure distribution are shown. The uncertainty of numerical models, importance of high fidelity experimental data, and the challenges associated with simulating and validating large production-type problems are presented.

Kurt D. Hamman; Ray A. Berry

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Options for treating high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel for repository disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the options that can reasonably be considered for disposal of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel in a repository. The options include whole-block disposal, disposal with removal of graphite (either mechanically or by burning), and reprocessing of spent fuel to separate the fuel and fission products. The report summarizes what is known about the options without extensively projecting or analyzing actual performance of waste forms in a repository. The report also summarizes the processes involved in convert spent HTGR fuel into the various waste forms and projects relative schedules and costs for deployment of the various options. Fort St. Vrain Reactor fuel, which utilizes highly-enriched {sup 235}U (plus thorium) and is contained in a prismatic graphite block geometry, was used as the baseline for evaluation, but the major conclusions would not be significantly different for low- or medium-enriched {sup 235}U (without thorium) or for the German pebble-bed fuel. Future US HTGRs will be based on the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) fuel form. The whole block appears to be a satisfactory waste form for disposal in a repository and may perform better than light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. From the standpoint of process cost and schedule (not considering repository cost or value of fuel that might be recycled), the options are ranked as follows in order of increased cost and longer schedule to perform the option: (1) whole block, (2a) physical separation, (2b) chemical separation, and (3) complete chemical processing.

Lotts, A.L.; Bond, W.D.; Forsberg, C.W.; Glass, R.W.; Harrington, F.E.; Micheals, G.E.; Notz, K.J.; Wymer, R.G.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

COBRA-SFS predictions of single assembly spent fuel heat transfer data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study reported here is one of several efforts to evaluate and qualify the COBRA-SFS computer code for use in spent fuel storage system thermal analysis. The ability of COBRA-SFS to predict the thermal response of two single assembly spent fuel heat transfer tests was investigated through comparisons of predictions with experimental test data. From these comparisons, conclusions regarding the computational treatment of the physical phenomena occurring within a storage system can be made. This objective was successfully accomplished as reasonable agreement between predictions and data were obtained for the 21 individual test cases of the two experiments.

Lombardo, N.J.; Michener, T.E.; Wheeler, C.L.; Rector, D.R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

CERCA LEU fuel assemblies testing in Maria Reactor - safety analysis summary and testing program scope.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presented paper contains neutronic and thermal-hydraulic (for steady and unsteady states) calculation results prepared to support annex to Safety Analysis Report for MARIA reactor in order to obtain approval for program of testing low-enriched uranium (LEU) lead test fuel assemblies (LTFA) manufactured by CERCA. This includes presentation of the limits and operational constraints to be in effect during the fuel testing investigations. Also, the scope of testing program (which began in August 2009), including additional measurements and monitoring procedures, is described.

Pytel, K.; Mieleszczenko, W.; Lechniak, J.; Moldysz, A.; Andrzejewski, K.; Kulikowska, T.; Marcinkowska, A.; Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Institute of Atomic Energy (Poland)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) results from subprompt critical experiments with uranyl fluoride fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Solution High-Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA) was originally constructed during 1980 and was designed to be a clean free-field geometry, right-circular, cylindrically symmetric critical assembly employing U(5%)O{sub 2}F{sub 2} solution as fuel. A second version of SHEBA, employing the same fuel but equipped with a fuel pump and shielding pit, was commissioned in 1993. This report includes data and operating experience for the 1993 SHEBA only. Solution-fueled benchmark work focused on the development of experimental measurements of the characterization of SHEBA; a summary of the results are given. A description of the system and the experimental results are given in some detail in the report. Experiments were designed to: (1) study the behavior of nuclear excursions in a low-enrichment solution, (2) evaluate accidental criticality alarm detectors for fuel-processing facilities, (3) provide radiation spectra and dose measurements to benchmark radiation transport calculations on a low-enrichment solution system similar to centrifuge enrichment plants, and (4) provide radiation fields to calibrate personnel dosimetry. 15 refs., 37 figs., 10 tabs.

Cappiello, C.C.; Butterfield, K.B.; Sanchez, R.G. [and others

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Analysis and Development of A Robust Fuel for Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this effort was on the development of an advanced fuel for gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) applications. This composite design is based on carbide fuel kernels dispersed in a ZrC matrix. The choice of ZrC is based on its high temperature properties and good thermal conductivity and improved retention of fission products to temperatures beyond that of traditional SiC based coated particle fuels. A key component of this study was the development and understanding of advanced fabrication techniques for GFR fuels that have potential to reduce minor actinide (MA) losses during fabrication owing to their higher vapor pressures and greater volatility. The major accomplishments of this work were the study of combustion synthesis methods for fabrication of the ZrC matrix, fabrication of high density UC electrodes for use in the rotating electrode process, production of UC particles by rotating electrode method, integration of UC kernels in the ZrC matrix, and the full characterization of each component. Major accomplishments in the near-term have been the greater characterization of the UC kernels produced by the rotating electrode method and their condition following the integration in the composite (ZrC matrix) following the short time but high temperature combustion synthesis process. This work has generated four journal publications, one conference proceeding paper, and one additional journal paper submitted for publication (under review). The greater significance of the work can be understood in that it achieved an objective of the DOE Generation IV (GenIV) roadmap for GFR Fuel—namely the demonstration of a composite carbide fuel with 30% volume fuel. This near-term accomplishment is even more significant given the expected or possible time frame for implementation of the GFR in the years 2030 -2050 or beyond.

Knight, Travis W

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Evaluation of the magnitude and effects of bundle duct interaction in fuel assemblies at developmental plant conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose of this evaluation is to estimate the magnitude and effects of irradiation and creep induced fuel bundle deformations in the developmental plant. This report focuses on the trends of the results and the ability of present models to evaluate the assembly temperatures in the presence of bundle deformation. Although this analysis focuses on the developmental plant, the conclusions are applicable to LMFBR fuel assemblies in general if they have wire spacers.

Serell, D.C.; Kaplan, S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Thermally Simulated 32kW Direct-Drive Gas-Cooled Reactor: Design, Assembly, and Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the power systems under consideration for nuclear electric propulsion is a direct-drive gas-cooled reactor coupled to a Brayton cycle. In this system, power is transferred from the reactor to the Brayton system via a circulated closed loop gas. To allow early utilization, system designs must be relatively simple, easy to fabricate, and easy to test using non-nuclear heaters to closely mimic heat from fission. This combination of attributes will allow pre-prototypic systems to be designed, fabricated, and tested quickly and affordably. The ability to build and test units is key to the success of a nuclear program, especially if an early flight is desired. The ability to perform very realistic non-nuclear testing increases the success probability of the system. In addition, the technologies required by a concept will substantially impact the cost, time, and resources required to develop a successful space reactor power system. This paper describes design features, assembly, and test matrix for the testing of a thermally simulated 32kW direct-drive gas-cooled reactor in the Early Flight Fission - Test Facility (EFF-TF) at Marshall Space Flight Center. The reactor design and test matrix are provided by Los Alamos National Laboratories.

Godfroy, Thomas J.; Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, TD40, Huntsville, Alabama, 35812 (United States); University of Michgan, Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States); Kapernick, Richard J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

131

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling D.J. Wood,AND TECHNOLOGY CHOICE IN HOME HEATING AND COOLING* David J.nology choices in home heating and cooling is presented. We

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Emergency core cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

Schenewerk, William E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Glasgow, Lyle E. (Westlake Village, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Measurements on spent-fuel assemblies at Arkansas Nuclear One using the Fork system. Final report, January 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fork measurement system has been used to examine spent-fuel assemblies at the two reactors of Arkansas Nuclear One, operated by Entergy Operations, Inc. The Unit 1 reactor is a Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) design, and the Unit 2 reactor is a Combustion Engineering (CE) design. The neutron and gamma-ray emissions from individual spent-fuel assemblies were measured in the storage pools by raising each assembly pathway out of the storage rack and performing a measurement near the center of the assembly. The overall accuracy of the measurements after corrections is about 2%. Thirty-four assemblies were examined at Unit 1, and forty-one assemblies at Unit 2. The average deviation of the burnup measurements from the calibration was 3.0% at Unit 1 and 3.5% at Unit 2, indicating 2 to 3% random variation among the reactor records. There was no indication of clearly anomalous assemblies. Axial Scans of the variation in neutron and gamma ray emission were obtained by collecting data at several locations along the length of three assemblies at Unit 2. Two of these assemblies were nonstandard in that each contained a small neutron source. The sources were detected by the axial scans. The test program was a cooperative effort involving Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Entergy Operations, Inc., the Electric Power Research Institute, and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy.

Ewing, R.I.; Bronowski, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bosler, G.E.; Siebelist, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Priore, J.; Hansford, C.H.; Sullivan, S. [Entergy Operations, Inc., Russellville, AR (United States). Arkansas Nuclear One

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hanford MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. Six initial site combinations were proposed: (1) Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) with support from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), (2) Hanford, (3) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with support from Pantex, (4) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (5) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and (6) Savannah River Site (SRS). After further analysis by the sites and DOE-MD, five site combinations were established as possible candidates for producing MOX LAs: (1) ANL-W with support from INEEL, (2) Hanford, (3) LANL, (4) LLNL, and (5) SRS. Hanford has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. An alternate approach would allow fabrication of fuel pellets and assembly of fuel rods in an S and S Category 1 facility. In all, a total of three LA MOX fuel fabrication options were identified by Hanford that could accommodate the program. In every case, only minor modification would be required to ready any of the facilities to accept the equipment necessary to accomplish the LA program.

O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Steady state temperature profiles in two simulated liquid metal reactor fuel assemblies with identical design specifications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Temperature data from steady state tests in two parallel, simulated liquid metal reactor fuel assemblies with identical design specifications have been compared to determine the extent to which they agree. In general, good agreement was found in data at low flows and in bundle-center data at higher flows. Discrepancies in the data wre noted near the bundle edges at higher flows. An analysis of bundle thermal boundary conditions showed that the possible eccentric placement of one bundle within the housing could account for these discrepancies.

Levin, A.E.; Carbajo, J.J.; Lloyd, D.B.; Montgomery, B.H.; Rose, S.D.; Wantland, J.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

SRS MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. Six initial site combinations were proposed: (1) Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) with support from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), (2) Hanford, (3) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with support from Pantex, (4) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (5) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and (6) Savannah River Site(SRS). After further analysis by the sites and DOE-MD, five site combinations were established as possible candidates for producing MOX LAs: (1) ANL-W with support from INEEL, (2) Hanford, (3) LANL, (4) LLNL, and (5) SRS. SRS has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. An alternate approach would allow fabrication of fuel pellets and assembly of fuel rods in an S and S Category 2 or 3 facility with storage of bulk PuO{sub 2} and assembly, storage, and shipping of fuel bundles in an S and S Category 1 facility. The total Category 1 approach, which is the recommended option, would be done in the 221-H Canyon Building. A facility that was never in service will be removed from one area, and a hardened wall will be constructed in another area to accommodate execution of the LA fuel fabrication. The non-Category 1 approach would require removal of process equipment in the FB-Line metal production and packaging glove boxes, which requires work in a contamination area. The Immobilization Hot Demonstration Program equipment in the Savannah River Technology Center would need to be removed to accommodate pellet fabrication. This work would also be in a contaminated area.

O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Depletion Analysis of Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Loaded with LEU/Thorium Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thorium based fuel has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (Thorium is more widely available when compared to Uranium). The fertile isotope of Thorium (Th-232) can be converted to fissile isotope U-233 by neutron capture during the operation of a suitable nuclear reactor such as High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). However, the fertile Thorium needs a fissile supporter to start and maintain the conversion process such as U-235 or Pu-239. This report presents the results of a study that analyzed the thorium utilization in a prismatic HTGR, namely Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) that was designed by General Atomics (GA). The collected for the modeling of this design come from Chapter 4 of MHTGR Preliminary Safety Information Document that GA sent to Department of Energy (DOE) on 1995. Both full core and unit cell models were used to perform this analysis using SCALE 6.1 and Serpent 1.1.18. Because of the long mean free paths (and migration lengths) of neutrons in HTRs, using a unit cell to represent a whole core can be non-trivial. The sizes of these cells were set to match the spectral index between unit cell and full core domains. It was found that for the purposes of this study an adjusted unit cell model is adequate. Discharge isotopics and one-group cross-sections were delivered to the transmutation analysis team. This report provides documentation for these calculations

Sonat Sen; Gilles Youinou

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Hydraulically actuated fuel injector including a pilot operated spool valve assembly and hydraulic system using same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to hydraulic systems including hydraulically actuated fuel injectors that have a pilot operated spool valve assembly. One class of hydraulically actuated fuel injectors includes a solenoid driven pilot valve that controls the initiation of the injection event. However, during cold start conditions, hydraulic fluid, typically engine lubricating oil, is particularly viscous and is often difficult to displace through the relatively small drain path that is defined past the pilot valve member. Because the spool valve typically responds slower than expected during cold start due to the difficulty in displacing the relatively viscous oil, accurate start of injection timing can be difficult to achieve. There also exists a greater difficulty in reaching the higher end of the cold operating speed range. Therefore, the present invention utilizes a fluid evacuation valve to aid in displacement of the relatively viscous oil during cold start conditions.

Shafer, Scott F. (Morton, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Container for reprocessing and permanent storage of spent nuclear fuel assemblies  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single canister process container is described for reprocessing and permanent storage of spent nuclear fuel assemblies comprising zirconium-based cladding and fuel, which process container comprises a collapsible container, having side walls that are made of a high temperature alloy and an array of collapsible support means wherein the container is capable of withstanding temperature necessary to oxidize the zirconium-based cladding and having sufficient ductility to maintain integrity when collapsed under pressure. The support means is also capable of maintaining its integrity at a temperature necessary to oxidize the zirconium-based cladding. The process container also has means to introduce and remove fluids to and from the container. 10 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

140

Combustor assembly for use in a turbine engine and methods of assembling same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel nozzle assembly for use with a turbine engine is described herein. The fuel nozzle assembly includes a plurality of fuel nozzles positioned within an air plenum defined by a casing. Each of the plurality of fuel nozzles is coupled to a combustion liner defining a combustion chamber. Each of the plurality of fuel nozzles includes a housing that includes an inner surface that defines a cooling fluid plenum and a fuel plenum therein, and a plurality of mixing tubes extending through the housing. Each of the mixing tubes includes an inner surface defining a flow channel extending between the air plenum and the combustion chamber. At least one mixing tube of the plurality of mixing tubes including at least one cooling fluid aperture for channeling a flow of cooling fluid from the cooling fluid plenum to the flow channel.

Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Supplemental information for a notice of construction for the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ''Notice of Construction'' has been submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (P.O. Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352), pursuant to WAC 402-80-070, for three new sources of radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State (Figure 1). The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS) the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA) will be located in one facility, the Fuels and materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post- irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were cancelled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies to be used in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building, stack, and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, to the extent possible, these systems will be dealt with separately. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Application for approval for construction of the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following ''Application for Approval of Construction'' is being submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office, pursuant to 40 CFR 61.07, for three new sources of airborne radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS), the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF), and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA), will be located in one facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post-irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were canceled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies to be used in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building and stack and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, these systems will be dealt with separately to the extent possible. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex. 2 refs., 16 figs., 12 tabs.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Prevention of significant deterioration permit application for the Fueled Clad Fabrication System, the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility, and the Fuel Assembly Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This New Source Review'' has been submitted by the US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office (PO Box 550, Richland, Washington 99352), pursuant to WAC 173-403-050 and in compliance with the Department of Ecology Guide to Processing A Prevention Of Significant Deterioration (PSD) Permit'' for three new sources of radionuclide emissions at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The three new sources, the Fueled Clad Fabrication System (FCFS), the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF), and the Fuel Assembly Area (FAA), will be located in one facility, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) of the 400 Area. The FMEF was originally designed to provide for post-irradiation examination and fabrication of breeder reactor fuels. These FMEF missions were cancelled before the introduction of any fuel materials or any irradiated material. The current plans are to use the facility to fabricate power supplies for use in space applications and to produce Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will produce materials and assemblies for application in space. The FAA project will produce FFTF fuel and target assemblies. The FCFS and the RPSF will share the same building, stack, and, in certain cases, the same floor space. Given this relationship, these systems will be dealt with separately to the extent possible. The FAA is a comparatively independent operation though it will share the FMEF complex.

Not Available

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Expert System analysis of non-fuel assembly hardware and spent fuel disassembly hardware: Its generation and recommended disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Almost all of the effort being expended on radioactive waste disposal in the United States is being focused on the disposal of spent Nuclear Fuel, with little consideration for other areas that will have to be disposed of in the same facilities. one area of radioactive waste that has not been addressed adequately because it is considered a secondary part of the waste issue is the disposal of the various Non-Fuel Bearing Components of the reactor core. These hardware components fall somewhat arbitrarily into two categories: Non-Fuel Assembly (NFA) hardware and Spent Fuel Disassembly (SFD) hardware. This work provides a detailed examination of the generation and disposal of NFA hardware and SFD hardware by the nuclear utilities of the United States as it relates to the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. All available sources of data on NFA and SFD hardware are analyzed with particular emphasis given to the Characteristics Data Base developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the characterization work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratories and Rochester Gas & Electric. An Expert System developed as a portion of this work is used to assist in the prediction of quantities of NFA hardware and SFD hardware that will be generated by the United States` utilities. Finally, the hardware waste management practices of the United Kingdom, France, Germany, Sweden, and Japan are studied for possible application to the disposal of domestic hardware wastes. As a result of this work, a general classification scheme for NFA and SFD hardware was developed. Only NFA and SFD hardware constructed of zircaloy and experiencing a burnup of less than 70,000 MWD/MTIHM and PWR control rods constructed of stainless steel are considered Low-Level Waste. All other hardware is classified as Greater-ThanClass-C waste.

Williamson, D.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Scintillator spent fuel monitor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A monitor for rapidly measuring the gross gamma-ray flux immediately above spent fuel assemblies in underwater storage racks has been developed. It consists of a plastic scintillator, photomultiplier, collimator, and a small battery-powered electronics package. The crosstalk from an isolated fuel assembly to an adjacent void is only about 2%. The mean difference between the measured gamma-ray flux and the flux estimated from the declared burnup and cooling time with a simple formula is 22%.

Moss, C.E.; Nixon, K.V.; Bernard, W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Characterization of candidate DOE sites for fabricating MOX fuel for lead assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) of the Department of Energy (DOE) is directing the program to disposition US surplus weapons-usable plutonium. For the reactor option for disposition of this surplus plutonium, MD is seeking to contract with a consortium, which would include a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabricator and a commercial US reactor operator, to fabricate and burn MOX fuel in existing commercial nuclear reactors. This option would entail establishing a MOX fuel fabrication facility under the direction of the consortium on an existing DOE site. Because of the lead time required to establish a MOX fuel fabrication facility and the need to qualify the MOX fuel for use in a commercial reactor, MD is considering the early fabrication of lead assemblies (LAs) in existing DOE facilities under the technical direction of the consortium. The LA facility would be expected to produce a minimum of 1 metric ton heavy metal per year and must be operational by June 2003. DOE operations offices were asked to identify candidate sites and facilities to be evaluated for suitability to fabricate MOX fuel LAs. Savannah River Site, Argonne National Laboratory-West, Hanford, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory were identified as final candidates to host the LA project. A Site Evaluation Team (SET) worked with each site to develop viable plans for the LA project. SET then characterized the suitability of each of the five plans for fabricating MOX LAs using 28 attributes and documented the characterization to aid DOE and the consortium in selecting the site for the LA project. SET concluded that each option has relative advantages and disadvantages in comparison with other options; however, each could meet the requirements of the LA project as outlined by MD and SET.

Holdaway, R.F.; Miller, J.W.; Sease, J.D.; Moses, R.J.; O`Connor, D.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carrell, R.D. [Technical Resources International, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Jaeger, C.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thompson, M.L.; Strasser, A.A. [Delta-21 Resources, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Development of a Safeguards Verification Method and Instrument to Detect Pin Diversion from Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Spent Fuel Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technical safeguards challenge has remained for decades for the IAEA to identify possible diversion of nuclear fuel pins from Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent fuel assemblies. In fact, as modern nuclear power plants are pushed to higher power levels and longer fuel cycles, fuel failures (i.e., ''leakers'') as well as the corresponding fuel assembly repairs (i.e., ''reconstitutions'') are commonplace occurrences within the industry. Fuel vendors have performed hundreds of reconstitutions in the past two decades, thus, an evolved know-how and sophisticated tools exist to disassemble irradiated fuel assemblies and replace damaged pins with dummy stainless steel or other type rods. Various attempts have been made in the past two decades to develop a technology to identify a possible diversion of pin(s) and to determine whether some pins are missing or replaced with dummy or fresh fuel pins. However, to date, there are no safeguards instruments that can detect a possible pin diversion scenario to the requirements of the IAEA. The FORK detector system [1-2] can characterize spent fuel assemblies using operator declared data, but it is not sensitive enough to detect missing pins from spent fuel assemblies. Likewise, an emission computed tomography system [3] has been used to try to detect missing pins from a spent fuel assembly, which has shown some potential for identifying possible missing pins but this capability has not yet been fully demonstrated. The use of such a device in the future would not be envisaged, especially in an inexpensive, easy to handle setting for field applications. In this article, we describe a concept and ongoing research to help develop a new safeguards instrument for the detection of pin diversions in a PWR spent fuel assembly. The proposed instrument is based on one or more very thin radiation detectors that could be inserted within the guide tubes of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assembly. Ultimately, this work could lead to the development of a detector cluster and corresponding high-precision driving system to collect radiation signatures inside PWR spent fuel assemblies. The data obtained would provide the spatial distribution of the neutron and gamma flux fields within the spent fuel assembly, while the data analysis would be used to help identify missing or replaced pins. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed to help validate this concept using a realistic 17 x 17 PWR spent fuel assembly [4-5]. The initial results of this study show that neutron profile in the guide tubes, when obtained in the presence of missing pins, can be identifiably different from the profiles obtained without missing pins, Our latest simulations have focused upon a specific type of fission chamber that could be tested for this application.

Ham, Y S; Maldonado, G I; Burdo, J; He, T

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

Cleaning residual NaK in the fast flux test facility fuel storage cooling system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation, is a liquid metal-cooled test reactor. The FFTF was constructed to support the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The bulk of the alkali metal (sodium and NaK) has been drained and will be stored onsite prior to final disposition. Residual NaK needed to be removed from the pipes, pumps, heat exchangers, tanks, and vessels in the Fuel Storage Facility (FSF) cooling system. The cooling system was drained in 2004 leaving residual NaK in the pipes and equipment. The estimated residual NaK volume was 76 liters in the storage tank, 1.9 liters in the expansion tank, and 19-39 liters in the heat transfer loop. The residual NaK volume in the remainder of the system was expected to be very small, consisting of films, droplets, and very small pools. The NaK in the FSF Cooling System was not radiologically contaminated. The portions of the cooling system to be cleaned were divided into four groups: 1. The storage tank, filter, pump, and associated piping; 2. The heat exchanger, expansion tank, and associated piping; 3. Argon supply piping; 4. In-vessel heat transfer loop. The cleaning was contracted to Creative Engineers, Inc. (CEI) and they used their superheated steam process to clean the cooling system. It has been concluded that during the modification activities (prior to CEI coming onsite) to prepare the NaK Cooling System for cleaning, tank T-914 was pressurized relative to the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and NaK was pushed from the tank back into the Cooler and that on November 6, 2005, when the gas purge through the In-Vessel NaK Cooler was increased from 141.6 slm to 283.2 slm, NaK was forced from the In-Vessel NaK Cooler and it contacted water in the vent line and/or scrubber. The gases from the reaction then traveled back through the vent line coating the internal surface of the vent line with NaK and NaK reaction products. The hot gases also exited the scrubber through the stack and due to the temperature of the gas, the hydrogen auto ignited when it mixed with the oxygen in the air. There was no damage to equipment, no injuries, and no significant release of hazardous material. Even though the FSF Cooling System is the only system at FFTF that contains residual NaK, there are lessons to be learned from this event that can be applied to future residual sodium removal activities. The lessons learned are: - Before cleaning equipment containing residual alkali metal the volume of alkali metal in the equipment should be minimized to the extent practical. As much as possible, reconfirm the amount and location of the alkali metal immediately prior to cleaning, especially if additional evolutions have been performed or significant time has passed. This is especially true for small diameter pipe (<20.3 centimeters diameter) that is being cleaned in place since gas flow is more likely to move the alkali metal. Potential confirmation methods could include visual inspection (difficult in all-metal systems), nondestructive examination (e.g., ultrasonic measurements) and repeating previous evolutions used to drain the system. Also, expect to find alkali metal in places it would not reasonably be expected to be. - Staff with an intimate knowledge of the plant equipment and the bulk alkali metal draining activities is critical to being able to confirm the amount and locations of the alkali metal residuals and to safely clean the residuals. - Minimize the potential for movement of alkali metal during cleaning or limit the distance and locations into which alkali metal can move. - Recognize that when working with alkali metal reactions, occasional pops and bangs are to be anticipated. - Pre-plan emergency responses to unplanned events to assure responses planned for an operating reactor are appropriate for the deactivation phase.

Burke, T.M.; Church, W.R. [Fluor Hanford, PO Box 1000, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States); Hodgson, K.M. [Fluor Government Group, PO Box 1050, Richland, Washington, 99352 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Examination of stainless steel-clad Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly S004 after storage in borated water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly (S004) was tested nondestructively and destructively. It was concluded that no obvious degradation of the 304L stainless steel-clad spent fuel from assembly S004 occurred during 5 y of storage in borated water. Furthermore, no obvious degradation due to the pool environment occurred on 304 stainless steel-clad rods in assemblies H07 and G11, which were stored for shorter periods but contained operationally induced cladding defects. The seam welds in the cladding on fuel rods from assembly S004, H07, and G11 were similar in that they showed a wrought microstructure with grains noticeably smaller than those in the cladding base metal. The end cap welds showed a dendritically cored structure, typical of rapidly quenched austenitic weld metal. Some intergranular melting may have occurred in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in the cladding adjacent to the end cap welds in rods from assemblies S004 and H07. However, the weld areas did not show evidence of corrosion-induced degradation.

Langstaff, D.C.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Landow, M.P.; Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R.W.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Micro Cooling, Heating, and Power (Micro-CHP) and Bio-Fuel Center, Mississippi State University  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initially, most micro-CHP systems will likely be designed as constant-power output or base-load systems. This implies that at some point the power requirement will not be met, or that the requirement will be exceeded. Realistically, both cases will occur within a 24-hour period. For example, in the United States, the base electrical load for the average home is approximately 2 kW while the peak electrical demand is slightly over 4 kW. If a 3 kWe micro- CHP system were installed in this situation, part of the time more energy will be provided than could be used and for a portion of the time more energy will be required than could be provided. Jalalzadeh-Azar [6] investigated this situation and presented a comparison of electrical- and thermal-load-following CHP systems. In his investigation he included in a parametric analysis addressing the influence of the subsystem efficiencies on the total primary energy consumption as well as an economic analysis of these systems. He found that an increase in the efficiencies of the on-site power generation and electrical equipment reduced the total monthly import of electricity. A methodology for calculating performance characteristics of different micro-CHP system components will be introduced in this article. Thermodynamic cycles are used to model each individual prime mover. The prime movers modeled in this article are a spark-ignition internal combustion engine (Otto cycle) and a diesel engine (Diesel cycle). Calculations for heat exchanger, absorption chiller, and boiler modeling are also presented. The individual component models are then linked together to calculate total system performance values. Performance characteristics that will be observed for each system include maximum fuel flow rate, total monthly fuel consumption, and system energy (electrical, thermal, and total) efficiencies. Also, whether or not both the required electrical and thermal loads can sufficiently be accounted for within the system specifications is observed. Case study data for various micro-CHP system configurations have been discussed and compared. Comparisons are made of the different prime mover/fuel combinations. Also, micro- CHP monthly energy cost results are compared for each system configuration to conventional monthly utility costs for equivalent monthly building power, heating, and cooling requirements.

Louay Chamra

2008-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

151

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

joint probability of a household choosing each particular heating/cooling technology combination is a function of the capital and operating

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Enhancement of water retention in the membrane electrode assembly for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to achieve the neat-methanol operation is to passively transport the water produced at the cathode throughEnhancement of water retention in the membrane electrode assembly for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu, T.S. Zhao*, R. Chen, W.W. Yang Department of Mechanical Engineering

Zhao, Tianshou

153

Gas-cooled reactor programs. Fuel-management positioning and accounting module: FUELMANG Version V1. 11, September 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the code module FUELMANG for fuel management of a reactor. This code may be used to position fuel during the calculation of a reactor history, maintain a mass balance history of the fuel movement, and calculate the unit fuel cycle component of the electrical generation cost. In addition to handling fixed feed fuel without recycle, provision has been made for fuel recycle with various options applied to the recycled fuel. A continuous fueling option is also available with the code. A major edit produced by the code is a detailed summary of the mass balance history of the reactor and a fuel cost analysis of that mass balance history. This code is incorporated in the system containing the VENTURE diffusion theory neutronics code for routine use. Fuel movement according to prescribed instructions is performed without the access of additional user input data during the calculation of a reactor operating history. Local application has been primarily for analysis of the performance of gas-cooled thermal reactor core concepts.

Medlin, T.W.; Hill, K.L.; Johnson, G.L.; Jones, J.E.; Vondy, D.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mono-container fuel cell generator contains a layer of interior insulation, a layer of exterior insulation and a single housing between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation in the interior of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650 C, where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling. 7 figs.

Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

155

Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mono-container fuel cell generator (10) contains a layer of interior insulation (14), a layer of exterior insulation (16) and a single housing (20) between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation (14) in the interior (12) of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650.degree. C., where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing (20) below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling.

Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Pulse superimposition calculational methodology for estimating the subcritcality level of nuclear fuel assemblies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the subcriticality level of a nuclear fuel assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology simulating the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the experimental and analytical reaction rates and the obtained subcriticality levels. In this methodology, the reaction rate is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the delayed fission neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction rate is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is then superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The analytical results of this new calculation methodology have shown an excellent agreement with the experimental data available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. This methodology can be used to calculate Bell and Glasstone spatial correction factor.

Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Rabiti, C.; Aliberti, G.; Kondev, F.; Smith, D.; Zhong, Z.; Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.; Serafimovich, I. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (INL); (Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research-Sosny)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Nuclear reactor fuel assembly duct-tube-to-handling-socket attachment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A reusable system for removably attaching the upper end 10of a nuclear reactor duct tube to the lower end 30 of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly handling socket. A transition ring 20, fixed to the duct tube's upper end 10, has an interior-threaded section 22 with a first locking hole segment 24. An adaptor ring 40, fixed to the handling socket's lower end 30 has an outside-threaded section 42 with a second locking hole segment 44. The inside 22 and outside 42 threaded sections match and can be joined so that the first 24 and second 44 locking hole segments can be aligned to form a locking hole. A locking ring 50, with a locking pin 52, slides over the adaptor ring 40 so that the locking pin 52 fits in the locking hole. A swage lock 60 or a cantilever finger lock 70 is formed from the locking cup collar 26 to fit in a matching groove 54 or 56 in the locking ring 50 to prevent the locking ring's locking pin 52 from backing out of the locking hole.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Bob G. (Kennewick, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Cost-Effective Gas-Fueled Cooling Systems for Commercial/Industrial Buildings and Process Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the system absorption machinery, increasing the efficiency by design was modified considerably. 40%. The manufacturers of the absorption cooling equipment, including Hitachi, Yazakt, and Sanyo, The current design consists of: a 454 cubic have teamed...

Lindsay, B. B.

159

A FEASIBILITY AND OPTIMIZATION STUDY TO DETERMINE COOLING TIME AND BURNUP OF ADVANCED TEST REACTOR FUELS USING A NONDESTRUCTIVE TECHNIQUE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method for ATR applications the technique was tested using one-isotope, multi-isotope and fuel simulated sources. Burnup calibrations were perfomed using convoluted and deconvoluted data. The calibrations results showed burnup prediction by this method improves using deconvolution. The final stage of the deconvolution method development was to perform an irradiation experiment in order to create a surrogate fuel source to test the deconvolution method using experimental data. A conceptual design of the fuel scan system is path forward using the rugged LaBr3 detector in an above the water configuration and deconvolution algorithms.

Jorge Navarro

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Stator and method of assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present application provides a stator. The stator may include a number of poles and a stator tip and cooling assembly. The stator tip and cooling assembly may include a number of stator tips with a number of cooling tubes adjacent thereto such that the stator tips align with the poles and the cooling tubes cool the poles.

Alexander, James Pellegrino; El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Shen, Xiaochun

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Improvement of the thermal margins in the Swedish Ringhals-3 PWR by introducing new fuel assemblies with thorium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thorium is a fertile material and most of the past research has focused on breeding thorium to fissile material. In this paper, the focus is on using thorium to improve the thermal margins by homogeneously distributing thorium in the fuel pellets. A proposed uranium-thorium-based fuel assembly is simulated for the Swedish Ringhals-3 PWR core in a realistic demonstration. All the key safety parameters, such as isothermal temperature coefficient of reactivity, Doppler temperature of reactivity, boron worth, shutdown margins and fraction of delayed neutrons are studied in this paper, and are within safety limits for the new core design using the uranium-thorium-based fuel assemblies. The calculations were performed by the two-dimensional transport code CASMO-4E and the two group steady-state three dimensional nodal code SIMULATE-3 from Studsvik Scandpower. The results showed that the uranium-thorium-based fuel assembly improves the thermal margins, both in the pin peak power and the local power (Fq). The improved thermal margins would allow more flexible core designs with less neutron leakage or could be used in power uprates to offer efficient safety margins. (authors)

Lau, C. W.; Demaziere, C. [Dept. of Applied Physics, Div. of Nuclear Engineering, Chalmers Univ. of Technology, 412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); Nylen, H.; Sandberg, U. [Ringhals AB, 432 85 Vaeroebacka (Sweden)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

PNNL Helps the Navy Stay Cool and Conserve Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »Exchange VisitorsforDepartment ofNoOrganizationDustyDepartment

163

Fuels for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors: U.S. Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. experience with mixed oxide, metal, and mixed carbide fuels is substantial, comprised of irradiation of over 50,000 MOX rods, over 130,000 metal rods, and 600 mixed carbide rods, in EBR-II and FFTF alone. All three types have all been demonstrated capable of fuel utilization at or above 200 GWd/MTHM. To varying degrees, life-limiting phenomena for each type have been identified and investigated, and there are no disqualifying safety-related fuel behaviors. All three fuel types appear capable of meeting SFR fuel requirements, with reliability of MOX and metal fuel well established. Improvements in irradiation performance of cladding and duct alloys has been a key development in moving these fuel designs toward higher-burnup potential. Selection of one fuel system over another will depend on circumstances particular to the application and on issues other than fuel performance, such as fabrication cost or overall system safety performance.

Douglas C. Crawford; Douglas L. Porter; Steven L. Hayes

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Critical Configuration and Physics Mesaurements for Graphite Reflected Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.27-CM Pitch)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950's efforts were made to study 'power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles'. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in FY 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program's effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments served as a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated 253 stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. 'The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.' The experiment studied within this evaluation was the first of the series and had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank. Two critical configurations were found by varying the amount of graphite reflector (References 1 and 2). Information for this evaluation was compiled from Reference 1 and 2, reports on subsequent experiments in the series, and the experimental logbook as well as from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

Margaret A. Marshall

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Critical Configuration and Physics Measurements for Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm Pitch)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were completed from 1962–1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL’s) Critical Experiments Facility (CEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950s, efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.”(a) The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless-steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967.a The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of unmoderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, relative fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector” (see Reference 1). The experiment studied in this evaluation was the second of the series and had the fuel rods in a 1.506-cm-triangular pitch. One critical configuration was found (see Reference 3). Once the critical configuration had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U,bc and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements performed on the critical configuration are described in Sections 1.3, 1.4, and 1.7, respectively.

Margaret A. Marshall

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

An integrated performance model for high temperature gas cooled reactor coated particle fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The performance of coated fuel particles is essential for the development and deployment of High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) systems for future power generation. Fuel performance modeling is indispensable for understanding ...

Wang, Jing, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Assessment of the impacts of spent fuel disassembly alternatives on the Nuclear Waste Isolation System. [Preparing and packaging spent fuel assemblies for geologic disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report was to evaluate four possible alternative methods of preparing and packaging spent fuel assemblies for geologic disposal against the Reference Process of unmodified spent fuel. The four alternative processes were: (1) End fitting removal, (2) Fission gas venting and resealing, (3) Fuel bundle disassembly and close packing of fuel pins, and (4) Fuel shearing and immobilization. Systems analysis was used to develop a basis of comparison of the alternatives. Conceptual processes and facility layouts were devised for each of the alternatives, based on technology deemed feasible for the purpose. Assessments were made of 15 principal attributes from the technical, operational, safety/risk, and economic considerations related to each of the alternatives, including both the surface packaging and underground repository operations. Specific attributes of the alternative processes were evaluated by assigning a number for each that expressed its merit relative to the corresponding attribute of the Reference Process. Each alternative process was then ranked by summing the numbers for attributes in each of the four assessment areas and collectively. Fuel bundle disassembly and close packing of fuel pins was ranked the preferred method of disposal of spent fuel. 63 references, 46 figures, 46 tables.

Not Available

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

models require accurate estimates of how the market shares of different fuel choices (electricity, gas, or oil)

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Dose Rates for Various Loading Patterns of Spent Fuel Assemblies in a Dry Cask  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shielding calculations were performed to assess the impact of loading various combinations of spent fuel on dose rates and fuel temperature in a dry storage cask.

Jenquin, Urban P. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

CRITICAL CONFIGURATION FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950’s efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles”. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of 253 unmoderated stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.” The first two experiments in the series were evaluated in HEU-COMP-FAST-001 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-001) and HEU-COMP-FAST-002 (SCCA-FUND-EXP-002). The first experiment had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank (References 1 and 2). The second experiment in the series, performed in early 1963, had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice in a 25.96 cm OD core tank and graphite reflectors on all sides. The third set of experiments in the series, performed in mid-1963, which is studied in this evaluation, used beryllium reflectors. The beryllium reflected system was the preferred reactor configuration for this application because of the small thickness of the reflector. The two core configurations had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice and arranged in 7-tube clusters. The experiments have been determined to represent acceptable benchmark experiments. Information for this evaluation was compiled from published reports on all three parts of the experimental series (Reference 1-5) and the experimental logbook as well as from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

Margaret A. Marshall

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Fuel cell integral bundle assembly including ceramic open end seal and vertical and horizontal thermal expansion control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plurality of integral bundle assemblies contain a top portion with an inlet fuel plenum and a bottom portion containing a base support, the base supports a dense, ceramic air exhaust manifold having four supporting legs, the manifold is below and connects to air feed tubes located in a recuperator zone, the air feed tubes passing into the center of inverted, tubular, elongated, hollow electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells having an open end above a combustion zone into which the air feed tubes pass and a closed end near the inlet fuel plenum, where the open end of the fuel cells rest upon and within a separate combination ceramic seal and bundle support contained in a ceramic support casting, where at least one flexible cushion ceramic band seal located between the recuperator and fuel cells protects and controls horizontal thermal expansion, and where the fuel cells operate in the fuel cell mode and where the base support and bottom ceramic air exhaust manifolds carry from 85% to all of the weight of the generator.

Zafred, Paolo R. (Murrysville, PA); Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

172

ASSEMBLY TRANSFER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Assembly Transfer System (ATS) receives, cools, and opens rail and truck transportation casks from the Carrier/Cask Handling System (CCHS). The system unloads transportation casks consisting of bare Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) assemblies, single element canisters, and Dual Purpose Canisters (DPCs). For casks containing DPCs, the system opens the DPCs and unloads the SNF. The system stages the assemblies, transfer assemblies to and from fuel-blending inventory pools, loads them into Disposal Containers (DCs), temporarily seals and inerts the DC, decontaminates the DC and transfers it to the Disposal Container Handling System. The system also prepares empty casks and DPCs for off-site shipment. Two identical Assembly Transfer System lines are provided in the Waste Handling Building (WHB). Each line operates independently to handle the waste transfer throughput and to support maintenance operations. Each system line primarily consists of wet and dry handling areas. The wet handling area includes a cask transport system, cask and DPC preparation system, and a wet assembly handling system. The basket transport system forms the transition between the wet and dry handling areas. The dry handling area includes the dry assembly handling system, assembly drying system, DC preparation system, and DC transport system. Both the wet and dry handling areas are controlled by the control and tracking system. The system operating sequence begins with moving transportation casks to the cask preparation area. The cask preparation operations consist of cask cavity gas sampling, cask venting, cask cool-down, outer lid removal, and inner shield plug lifting fixture attachment. Casks containing bare SNF (no DPC) are filled with water and placed in the cask unloading pool. The inner shield plugs are removed underwater. For casks containing a DPC, the cask lid(s) is removed, and the DPC is penetrated, sampled, vented, and cooled. A DPC lifting fixture is attached and the cask is placed into the cask unloading pool. In the cask unloading pool the DPC is removed from the cask and placed in an overpack and the DPC lid is severed and removed. Assemblies are removed from either an open cask or DPC and loaded into assembly baskets positioned in the basket staging rack in the assembly unloading pool. A method called ''blending'' is utilized to load DCs with a heat output of less than 11.8 kW. This involves combining hotter and cooler assemblies from different baskets. Blending requires storing some of the hotter fuel assemblies in fuel-blending inventory pools until cooler assemblies are available. The assembly baskets are then transferred from the basket staging rack to the assembly handling cell and loaded into the assembly drying vessels. After drying, the assemblies are removed from the assembly drying vessels and loaded into a DC positioned below the DC load port. After installation of a DC inner lid and temporary sealing device, the DC is transferred to the DC decontamination cell where the top area of the DC, the DC lifting collar, and the DC inner lid and temporary sealing device are decontaminated, and the DC is evacuated and backfilled with inert gas to prevent prolonged clad exposure to air. The DC is then transferred to the Disposal Container Handling System for lid welding. In another cask preparation and decontamination area, lids are replaced on the empty transportation casks and DPC overpacks, the casks and DPC overpacks are decontaminated, inspected, and transferred to the Carrier/Cask Handling System for shipment off-site. All system equipment is designed to facilitate manual or remote operation, decontamination, and maintenance. The system interfaces with the Carrier/Cask Handling System for incoming and outgoing transportation casks and DPCs. The system also interfaces with the Disposal Container Handling System, which prepares the DC for loading and subsequently seals the loaded DC. The system support interfaces are the Waste Handling Building System and other internal WHB support systems.

B. Gorpani

2000-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

173

Gas-cooled fast breeder reactor fuel element thermal-hydraulic investigations : final report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental and analytical work was performed to determine the influence of rod surface roughening on the thermal-hydraulic behavior of rod array type, nuclear fuel elements. Experimental data was obtained using a ...

Eaton, Thomas Eldon

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Investigation of the Performance of D2O-Cooled High-Conversion Reactors for Fuel Cycle Calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents FY13 activities for the analysis of D2O cooled tight-pitch High-Conversion PWRs (HCPWRs) with U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores aiming at break-even or near breeder conditions while retaining the negative void reactivity. The analyses are carried out from several aspects which could not be covered in FY12 activities. SCALE 6.1 code system is utilized, and a series of simple 3D fuel pin-cell models are developed in order to perform Monte Carlo based criticality and burnup calculations. The performance of U-Pu fueled cores with axial and internal blankets is analyzed in terms of their impact on the relative fissile Pu mass balance, initial Pu enrichment, and void coefficient. In FY12, Pu conversion performances of D2O-cooled HCPWRs fueled with MOX were evaluated with small sized axial/internal DU blankets (approximately 4cm of axial length) in order to ensure the negative void reactivity, which evidently limits the conversion performance of HCPWRs. In this fiscal year report, the axial sizes of DU blankets are extended up to 30 cm in order to evaluate the amount of DU necessary to reach break-even and/or breeding conditions. Several attempts are made in order to attain the milestone of the HCPWR designs (i.e., break-even condition and negative void reactivity) by modeling of HCPWRs under different conditions such as boiling of D2O coolant, MOX with different 235U enrichment, and different target burnups. A similar set of analyses are performed for Th-U fueled cores. Several promising characteristics of 233U over other fissile like 239Pu and 235U, most notably its higher fission neutrons per absorption in thermal and epithermal ranges combined with lower ___ in the fast range than 239Pu allows Th-U cores to be taller than MOX ones. Such an advantage results in 4% higher relative fissile mass balance than that of U-Pu fueled cores while retaining the negative void reactivity until the target burnup of 51 GWd/t. Several other distinctions between U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores are identified by evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of keff, mass balance, and void coefficient. The effect of advanced iron alloy cladding (i.e., FeCrAl) on the performance of Pu conversion in MOX fueled cores is studied instead of using standard stainless-steel cladding. Variations in clad thickness and coolant-to-fuel volume ratio are also exercised. The use of FeCrAl instead of SS as a cladding alloy reduces the required Pu enrichment and improves the Pu conversion rate primarily due to the absence of nickel in the cladding alloy that results in the reduction of the neutron absorption. Also the difference in void coefficients between SS and FeCrAl alloys is nearly 500 pcm over the entire burnup range. The report also shows sensitivity and uncertainty analyses in order to characterize D2O cooled HCPWRs from different aspects. The uncertainties of integral parameters (keff and void coefficient) for selected reactor cores are evaluated at different burnup points in order to find similarities and trends respect to D2O-HCPWR.

Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Optimization of combined delayed neutron and differential die-away prompt neutron signal detection for characterization of spent nuclear fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has funded multiple laboratories and universities to develop a means to accurately quantify the Plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies and ways to also detect potential diversion of fuel pins. Delayed Neutron (DN) counting provides a signature somewhat more sensitive to {sup 235}U than Pu while Differential Die-Away (DDA) is complementary in that it has greater sensitivity to Pu. The two methods can, with care, be combined into a single instrument which also provides passive neutron information. Individually the techniques cannot robustly quantify the Pu content but coupled together the information content in the signatures enables Pu quantification separate to the total fissile content. The challenge of merging DN and DDA, prompt neutron (PN) signal, capabilities in the same design is the focus of this paper. Other possibilities also suggest themselves, such as a direct measurement of the reactivity (multiplication) by either the boost in signal obtained during the active interrogation itself or by the extension of the die-away profile. In an early study, conceptual designs have been modeled using a neutron detector comprising fission chambers or 3He proportional counters and a {approx}14 MeV neutron Deuterium-Tritium (DT) generator as the interrogation source. Modeling was performed using the radiation transport code Monte Carlo N-Particles eXtended (MCNPX). Building on this foundation, the present paper quantifies the capability of a new design using an array of {sup 3}He detectors together with fission chambers to optimize both DN and PN detections and active characterization, respectively. This new design was created in order to minimize fission in {sup 238}U (a nuisance DN emitter), to use a realistic neutron generator, to reduce the cost and to achieve near spatial interrogation and detection of the DN and PN, important for detection of diversion, all within the constraints of a single practical instrument. Both DN and PN detections are active techniques using the signal from the most prominent fissile isotopes of spent nuclear fuel that respond the best to a slow neutron interrogation, {sup 235}U, {sup 239}U and {sup 241}PU. The performance is characterized against a library of 64 assemblies and 40 diversion scenarios at different burnup (BU), cooling-time (CT) and initial enrichment (IE) in fresh water.

Blanc, Pauline [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, T [NON LANL

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

176

CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR GRAPHITE REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of critical experiments were completed in 1962-1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. In the late 1950’s efforts were made to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles”. The MPRE program was a part of those efforts and studied the feasibility of a stainless steel system, boiling potassium 1 MW(t), or about 140 kW(e), reactor. The program was carried out in [fiscal years] 1964, 1965, and 1966. A summary of the program’s effort was compiled in 1967. The delayed critical experiments were a mockup of a small, potassium-cooled space power reactor for validation of reactor calculations and reactor physics methods. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of 253 unmoderated stainless steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were made to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. Subsequent experiments used beryllium reflectors and also measured the reactivity for various materials placed in the core. “The [assemblies were built] on [a] vertical assembly machine so that the movable part was the core and bottom reflector.” The first experiment in the series was evaluated in HEU-COMP-FAST-001. It had the 253 fuel tubes packed tightly into a 22.87 cm outside diameter (OD) core tank (References 1 and 2). The second experiment in the series, performed in early 1963, which is studied in this evaluation, had the 253 fuel tubes at a 1.506-cm triangular lattice in a 25.96 cm OD core tank and graphite reflectors on all sides. The experiment has been determined to represent an acceptable benchmark experiment. Information for this evaluation was compiled from published reports on all three parts of the experimental series (Reference 1-5) and the experimental logbook as well as from communication with the experimenter, John T. Mihalczo.

Margaret A. Marshall

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Multi-Recycling of Transuranic Elements in a Modified PWR Fuel Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production/destruction, and radiotoxicity reduction as compared to a UOX and MOX assembly. It is found that the most beneficial recycling strategy is the one where all of the transuranics are recycled. The inclusion of Cm reduces the required U-235...

Chambers, Alex

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

178

Fuel Summary for Peach Bottom Unit 1 High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fuel summary report contains background and summary information for the Peach Bottom Unit 1, High-Temperature, Gas-Cooled Reactor Cores 1 and 2. This report contains detailed information about the fuel in the two cores, the Peach Bottom Unit 1 operating history, nuclear parameters, physical and chemical characteristics, and shipping and storage canister related data. The data in this document have been compiled from a large number of sources and are not qualified beyond the qualification of the source documents. This report is intended to provide an overview of the existing data pertaining to spent fuel management and point to pertinent reference source documents. For design applications, the original source documentation must be used. While all referenced sources are available as records or controlled documents at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), some of the sources were marked as informal or draft reports. This is noted where applicable. In some instances, source documents are not consistent. Where they are known, this document identifies those instances and provides clarification where possible. However, as stated above, this document has not been independently qualified and such clarifications are only included for information purposes. Some of the information in this summary is available in multiple source documents. An effort has been made to clearly identify at least one record document as the source for the information included in this report.

Karel I. Kingrey

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Development of Thin Film Membrane Assemblies with Novel Nanostructured Electrocatalyst for Next Generation Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the largest amount of the catalyst in PEM fuel cells due to its lower activity. This problem needs for reformate/air operation for a PEM Fuel cell are 0.4 A/cm2 at 0.8 V and 0.1 A/cm2 at 0.85 V. The hydrogen-air fuel cell based on Nafion- related membranes is a potential technology but sourcing the hydrogen

Popov, Branko N.

180

Optimizing membrane electrode assembly of direct methanol fuel cells for portable power.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) for portable power applications require high power density, high-energy conversion efficiency and compactness. These requirements translate to fundamental properties of… (more)

Liu, Fuqiang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ANL-W MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement (EIS). This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}), typically containing 95% or more UO{sub 2}. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. The paper describes the following: Site map and the LA facility; process descriptions; resource needs; employment requirements; wastes, emissions, and exposures; accident analysis; transportation; qualitative decontamination and decommissioning; post-irradiation examination; LA fuel bundle fabrication; LA EIS data report assumptions; and LA EIS data report supplement.

O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

PEM fuel cellstack development based on membrane-electrode assemblies of ultra-low platinum loadings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Attempt is made to scale-up single cell technology, based on ultra-low platinum loadings, to develop a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack for stationary power generation.

Zawodzinski, C.; Wilson, M.S.; Gottesfeld, S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Criticality safety considerations in the geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Features of geologic disposal which hamper the demonstration that criticality cannot occur therein include possible changes of shape and form, intrusion of water as a neutron moderator, and selective leaching of spent fuel constituents. If the criticality safety of spent fuel disposal depends on burnup, independent measurements verifying the burnup should be performed prior to disposal. The status of nondestructive analysis method which might provide such verification is discussed. Calculations were performed to assess the potential for increasing the allowed size of a spent fuel disposal canister if potential water intrusion were limited by close-packing the enclosed rods. Several factors were identified which severely limited the potential of this application. The theoretical limit of hexagonal close-packing cannot be achieved due to fuel rod bowing. It is concluded that disposal canisters should be sized on the basis of assumed optimum moderation. Several topics for additional research were identified during this limited study.

Gore, B.F.; McNair, G.W.; Heaberlin, S.W.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Development of thin CsHSO4 membrane electrode assemblies for electrolysis and fuel cell applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this work the use of the solid acid CsHSO4 as an electrolyte in a hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell or the disassociation of water into hydrogen… (more)

Ecklund-Mitchell, Lars E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Advanced Mixed-Oxide Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

depletion and core reshuffling, and fuel material thermal-physical properties. Additionally, a text-based coupling method is developed to facilitate the exchange of information between the neutronic code DRAGON and thermal-hydraulic code VIPRE-01. The new...

Bingham, Adam R.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

186

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Seed-Blanket Unit Duplex Fuel Assemblies with VIPRE-01  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nucleate boiling ratio EFIT European Facility for Industrial Transmutation EMT Effective Medium Theory EOL end-of-life EURO-TRANS EUROpean research program for the TRANSmutation of high level nuclear waste in ADS EPRI Electric Power Research... MA minor actinides ME Maxwell-Eucken viii MDNBR minimum departure from nucleate boiling ratio MNFI modified Nuclear Fuels Industries Mo molybdenum MOX mixed-oxide M-R multi-recycling NFI Nuclear Fuels Industries Np neptunium NPP nuclear...

McDermott, Patrick 1987-

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Oxidation of Zircaloy Fuel Cladding in Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our work involved the continued development of the theory of passivity and passivity breakdown, in the form of the Point Defect Model, with emphasis on zirconium and zirconium alloys in reactor coolant environments, the measurement of critically-important parameters, and the development of a code that can be used by reactor operators to actively manage the accumulation of corrosion damage to the fuel cladding and other components in the heat transport circuits in both BWRs and PWRs. In addition, the modified boiling crevice model has been further developed to describe the accumulation of solutes in porous deposits (CRUD) on fuel under boiling (BWRs) and nucleate boiling (PWRs) conditions, in order to accurately describe the environment that is contact with the Zircaloy cladding. In the current report, we have derived expressions for the total steady-state current density and the partial anodic and cathodic current densities to establish a deterministic basis for describing Zircaloy oxidation. The models are “deterministic” because the relevant natural laws are satisfied explicitly, most importantly the conversation of mass and charge and the equivalence of mass and charge (Faraday’s law). Cathodic reactions (oxygen reduction and hydrogen evolution) are also included in the models, because there is evidence that they control the rate of the overall passive film formation process. Under open circuit conditions, the cathodic reactions, which must occur at the same rate as the zirconium oxidation reaction, are instrumental in determining the corrosion potential and hence the thickness of the barrier and outer layers of the passive film. Controlled hydrodynamic methods have been used to measure important parameters in the modified Point Defect Model (PDM), which is now being used to describe the growth and breakdown of the passive film on zirconium and on Zircaloy fuel sheathing in BWRs and PWRs coolant environments. The modified PDMs recognize the existence of a thick oxide outer layer over a thin barrier layer. From thermodynamic analysis, it is postulated that a hydride barrier layer forms under PWR coolant conditions whereas an oxide barrier layer forms under BWR primary coolant conditions. Thus, the introduction of hydrogen into the solution lowers the corrosion potential of zirconium to the extent that the formation of ZrH2 is predicted to be spontaneous rather than the ZrO2. Mott-Schottky analysis shows that the passive film formed on zirconium is n-type, which is consistent with the PDM, corresponding to a preponderance of oxygen/hydrogen vacancies and/or zirconium interstitials in the barrier layer. The model parameter values were extracted from electrochemical impedance spectroscopic data for zirconium in high temperature, de-aerated and hydrogenated environments by optimization. The results indicate that the corrosion resistance of zirconium is dominated by the porosity and thickness of the outer layer for both cases. The impedance model based on the PDM provides a good account of the growth of the bi-layer passive films described above, and the extracted model parameter values might be used, for example, for predicting the accumulation of general corrosion damage to Zircaloy fuel sheath in BWR and PWR operating environments. Transients in current density and film thickness for passive film formation on zirconium in dearated and hydrogenated coolant conditions have confirmed that the rate law afforded by the Point Defect Model (PDM) adequately describes the growth and thinning of the passive film. The experimental results demonstrate that the kinetics of oxygen or hydrogen vacancy generation at the metal/film interface control the rate of film growth, when the potential is displaced in the positive direction, whereas the kinetics of dissolution of the barrier layer at the barrier layer/solution interface control the rate of passive film thinning when the potential is stepped in the negative direction. In addition, the effects of second phase particles (SPPs) on the electrochemistry of passive zirconium in the

Digby Macdonald; Mirna Urquidi-Macdonald; Yingzi Chen; Jiahe Ai; Pilyeon Park; Han-Sang Kim

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

189

Review of the SIMMER-II analyses of liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor core-disruptive accident fuel escape  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Early fuel removal from the active core of a liquid-metal-cooled fast breeder reactor undergoing a core-disruptive accident may reduce the potential for large energetics resulting from recriticalities. This paper presents a review of analyses with the SIMMER-II computer program of the effectiveness of possible fuel escape paths. Where possible, how SIMMER-II compares with or is validated against experiments that simulated the escape paths also is discussed.

DeVault, G.P.; Bell, C.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Cooled snubber structure for turbine blades  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine blade assembly in a turbine engine. The turbine blade assembly includes a turbine blade and a first snubber structure. The turbine blade includes an internal cooling passage containing cooling air. The first snubber structure extends outwardly from a sidewall of the turbine blade and includes a hollow interior portion that receives cooling air from the internal cooling passage of the turbine blade.

Mayer, Clinton A; Campbell, Christian X; Whalley, Andrew; Marra, John J

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Membrane module assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A membrane module assembly is described which is adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation. 2 figures.

Kaschemekat, J.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

End-to-end calculation of the radiation characteristics of VVER-1000 spent fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of end-to-end calculation of the radiation characteristics of VVER-1000 spent nuclear fuel are presented. Details of formation of neutron and gamma-radiation sources are analyzed. Distributed sources of different types of radiation are considered. A comparative analysis of calculated radiation characteristics is performed with the use of nuclear data from different ENDF/B and EAF files and ANSI/ANS and ICRP standards.

Linge, I. I.; Mitenkova, E. F., E-mail: mit@ibrae.ac.ru; Novikov, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Nuclear Safety Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Effects of a potential drop of a shipping cask, a waste container, and a bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates the effects of potential drops of a typical shipping cask, waste container, and bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations at the prospective Yucca Mountain Repository. The waste-handling process (one stage, no consolidation configuration) is examined to estimate the maximum loads imposed on typical casks and containers as they are handled by various pieces of equipment during waste-handling operations. Maximum potential drop heights for casks and containers are also evaluated for different operations. A nonlinear finite-element model is employed to represent a hybrid spent fuel container subject to drop heights of up to 30 ft onto a reinforced concrete floor. The impact stress, strain, and deformation are calculated, and compared to the failure criteria to estimate the limiting (maximum permissible) drop height for the waste container. A typical Westinghouse 17 {times} 17 PWR fuel assembly is analyzed by a simplified model to estimate the energy absorption by various parts of the fuel assembly during a 30 ft drop, and to determine the amount of kinetic energy in a fuel pin at impact. A nonlinear finite-element analysis of an individual fuel pin is also performed to estimate the amount of fuel pellet fracture due to impact. This work was completed on May 1990.

Wu, C.L.; Lee, J.; Lu, D.L.; Jardine, L.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique and Three Types of Gamma-ray Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique1 Rahmat Aryaeinejad, Jorge Navarro, and David W Nigg Idaho National Laboratory Abstract Effective and efficient Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel management require state of the art core modeling tools. These new tools will need isotopic and burnup validation data before they are put into production. To create isotopic, burn up validation libraries and to determine the setup for permanent fuel scanner system a feasibility study was perform. The study consisted in measuring short and long cooling time fuel elements at the ATR canal. Three gamma spectroscopy detectors (HPGe, LaBr3, and HPXe) and two system configurations (above and under water) were used in the feasibility study. The first stage of the study was to investigate which detector and system configuration would be better suited for different scenarios. The second stage of the feasibility study was to create burnup and cooling time calibrations using experimental isotopic data collected and ORIGEN 2.2 burnup data. The results of the study establish that a better spectra resolution is achieve with an above the water configuration and that three detectors can be used in the permanent fuel scanner system for different situations. In addition it was conclude that a number of isotopic ratios and absolute measurements could be used to predict ATR fuel burnup and cooling times. 1This work was supported by the U.S. Depart¬ment of Energy (DOE) under Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Contract No. DE-AC07-05ID14517.

Jorge Navarro; Rahmat Aryaeinejad,; David W. Nigg

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

ADONIS, high count-rate HP-Ge {gamma} spectrometry algorithm: Irradiated fuel assembly measurement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ADONIS is a digital system for gamma-ray spectrometry, developed by CEA. This system achieves high count-rate gamma-ray spectrometry with correct dynamic dead-time correction, up to, at least, more than an incoming count rate of 3.10{sup 6} events per second. An application of such a system at AREVA NC's La Hague plant is the irradiated fuel scanning facility before reprocessing. The ADONIS system is presented, then the measurement set-up and, last, the measurement results with reference measurements. (authors)

Pin, P. [AREVA NC La Hague - Nuclear Measurement Team, 50444 Beaumont-Hague Cedex (France); Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T. [CEA - Saclay, LIST, Electronics and Signal Processing Laboratory, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Normand, S. [CEA - Saclay, LIST, Sensors and Electronic Architectures Laboratory, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Cool Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOffice ofConversionCool

197

Flywheel Cooling: A Cooling Solution for Non Air-Conditioned Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Flywheel Cooling" utillzes the natural cooling processes of evaporation, ventilation and air circulation. These systems are providing low-cost cooling for distribution centers, warehouses, and other non air-conditioned industrial assembly plants...

Abernethy, D.

198

Neutronic fuel element fabrication  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure by encompassing the sides of the fuel element between the header plates.

Korton, George (Cincinnati, OH)

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

199

A feasibility study to determine cooling time and burnup of ATR fuel using a nondestructive technique and three types of gamma-ray detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this work was to perform a feasibility study and establish measurement techniques to determine the burnup of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuels at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Three different detectors of high purity germanium (HPGe), lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}), and high pressure xenon (HPXe) in two detection system configurations of below and above the water pool were used in this study. The last two detectors were used for the first time in fuel burnup measurements. The results showed that a better quality spectra can be achieved with the above the water pool configuration. Both short and long cooling time fuels were investigated in order to determine which measurement technique, absolute or fission product ratio, is better suited in each scenario and also to establish what type of detector should be used in each case for the best burnup measurement. The burnup and cooling time calibrations were established using experimental absolute activities or isotopic ratios and ORIGEN burnup calculations. A method was developed to do burnup and cooling time calibrations using fission isotopes activities without the need to know the exact geometry. (authors)

Navarro, J.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Nigg, D.W. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Materials testing and development of functionally graded composite fuel cladding and piping for the Lead-Bismuth cooled nuclear reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study has extended the development of an exciting technology which promises to enable the Pb-Bi eutectic cooled reactors to operate at temperatures up to 650-700°C. This new technology is a functionally graded composite ...

Fray, Elliott Shepard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Inlet nozzle assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Knight, R.C.; Precechtel, D.R.; Smith, B.G.

1985-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

202

Inlet nozzle assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA); Precechtel, Donald R. (Richland, WA); Smith, Bob G. (Richland, WA); Knight, Ronald C. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Design, Feasibility, and Testing of Instrumented Rod Bundles to Improve Heat Transfer Knowledge in PWR Fuel Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two 5 x 5 test rod bundles mimicking the PWR fuel assembly have been adapted into two suitable test loop facilities, respectively, to carry out sufficiently detailed hydraulic and thermal measurements in identical geometric configuration. The objective is to investigate heat transfer phenomena in single-phase as well as with onset of nucleate boiling (ONB). The accuracy and reproducibility of the temperature measurements using the sliding-traversing thermocouple device under typical PWR conditions has been demonstrated in the thermal test facility. In the hydraulic loop, a Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) system to precisely scan the local axial velocity component in each sub-channel has been implemented. The approach is to utilize mean sub-channel axial velocity distributions and pressure drop data from the hydraulic loop and the global boundary conditions (Pressure, Temperature, flow rate) from the thermal loop to simulate sub-channels in appropriate T/H codes. This permits computation of sub-channel averaged fluid temperatures (as well as mass velocity) in various subchannels within the test bundle. Subsequently, in conjunction with the wall temperatures and applied heat flux values from the thermal loop, it is possible to develop a complete map of heat transfer coefficients along the 9 instrumented central heater rods. Locations downstream of spacer grids would be of special interest. Depending on pressure, mass velocity and heat flux conditions of a given test, the inlet temperature will be a parameter to be varied so that the ONB boundary can be observed within the bundle. Detailed designs of the test section, required loop modifications, and adaptation of specialized instrumentation and data acquisition systems have been accomplished in both test loops. Further we have established that based on such detailed rod surface temperature and sub-channel axial velocity measurements, it is possible to achieve sufficient accuracy in the temperature measurements to meet the objective of improving the heat transfer correlations applicable to PWR cores. (authors)

Bergeron, A. [CEA, Saclay (France); Chataing, T.; Garnier, J. [CEA, Genoble (France); Decossin, E.; Peturaud, P. [EDF/R and D, Chatou (France); Yagnik, S.K. [Electric Power Research Institute - EPRI (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Conceptual design study on very small long-life gas cooled fast reactor using metallic natural Uranium-Zr as fuel cycle input  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual design study of very small 350 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactors with Helium coolant has been performed. In this study Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was implemented to create small and long life fast reactors with natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Such system can utilize natural Uranium resources efficiently without the necessity of enrichment plant or reprocessing plant. The core with metallic fuel based was subdivided into 10 regions with the same volume. The fresh Natural Uranium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh Natural Uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all axial regions. The reactor discharge burn-up is 31.8% HM. From the neutronic point of view, this design is in compliance with good performance.

Monado, Fiber, E-mail: fiber.monado@gmail.com [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia and Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sriwijaya University (Indonesia); Ariani, Menik [Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Sriwijaya University (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Permana, Sidik [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Dept. of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung (Indonesia); Aziz, Ferhat [National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) (Indonesia); Sekimoto, Hiroshi [CRINES, Tokyo Institute of Technology, O-okoyama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

205

Power electronics cooling apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

Sanger, Philip Albert (Monroeville, PA); Lindberg, Frank A. (Baltimore, MD); Garcen, Walter (Glen Burnie, MD)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Power electronics cooling apparatus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

Sanger, P.A.; Lindberg, F.A.; Garcen, W.

2000-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

207

Laser bottom hole assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is provided for laser bottom hole assembly for providing a high power laser beam having greater than 5 kW of power for a laser mechanical drilling process to advance a borehole. This assembly utilizes a reverse Moineau motor type power section and provides a self-regulating system that addresses fluid flows relating to motive force, cooling and removal of cuttings.

Underwood, Lance D; Norton, Ryan J; McKay, Ryan P; Mesnard, David R; Fraze, Jason D; Zediker, Mark S; Faircloth, Brian O

2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

208

ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240} PU core : a cylindrical assemby with mixed (PU, U)-oxide fuel and a central high {sup 240} PU zone.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over a period of 30 years more than a hundred Zero Power Reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed at Argonne National Laboratory. The ZPR facilities, ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR, were all fast critical assembly facilities. The ZPR critical assemblies were constructed to support fast reactor development, but data from some of these assemblies are also well suited to form the basis for criticality safety benchmarks. Of the three classes of ZPR assemblies, engineering mockups, engineering benchmarks and physics benchmarks, the last group tends to be most useful for criticality safety. Because physics benchmarks were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, they were as simple as possible in geometry and composition. The principal fissile species was {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu. Fuel enrichments ranged from 9% to 95%. Often there were only one or two main core diluent materials, such as aluminum, graphite, iron, sodium or stainless steel. The cores were reflected (and insulated from room return effects) by one or two layers of materials such as depleted uranium, lead or stainless steel. Despite their more complex nature, a small number of assemblies from the other two classes would make useful criticality safety benchmarks because they have features related to criticality safety issues, such as reflection by soil-like material. The term 'benchmark' in a ZPR program connotes a particularly simple loading aimed at gaining basic reactor physics insight, as opposed to studying a reactor design. In fact, the ZPR-6/7 Benchmark Assembly (Reference 1) had a very simple core unit cell assembled from plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U3O8, and plutonium. The ZPR-6/7 core cell-average composition is typical of the interior region of liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs) of the era. It was one part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program,a which provided integral experiments characterizing the important features of demonstration-size LMFBRs. As a benchmark, ZPR-6/7 was devoid of many 'real' reactor features, such as simulated control rods and multiple enrichment zones, in its reference form. Those kinds of features were investigated experimentally in variants of the reference ZPR-6/7 or in other critical assemblies in the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program.

Lell, R. M.; Schaefer, R. W.; McKnight, R. D.; Tsiboulia, A.; Rozhikhin, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The feasibility study of small long-life gas cooled fast reactor with mixed natural Uranium/Thorium as fuel cycle input  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme has been performed. In this study, design GCFR with Helium coolant which can be continuously operated by supplying mixed Natural Uranium/Thorium without fuel enrichment plant or fuel reprocessing plant. The active reactor cores are divided into two region, Thorium fuel region and Uranium fuel region. Each fuel core regions are subdivided into ten parts (region-1 until region-10) with the same volume in the axial direction. The fresh Natural Uranium and Thorium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh natural Uranium/Thorium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions in both cores area, i.e. shifted the core of i{sup th} region into i+1 region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. For the next cycles, we will add only Natural Uranium and Thorium on each region-1. The calculation results show the reactivity reached by mixed Natural Uranium/Thorium with volume ratio is 4.7:1. This reactor can results power thermal 550 MWth. After reactor start-up the operation, furthermore reactor only needs Natural Uranium/Thorium supply for continue operation along 100 years.

Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khairurrijal,; Monado, Fiber; Sekimoto, Hiroshi [Department of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134, Physics Department, Sriwijaya University, Kampus Indralaya, Ogan Ilir, Sumatera Selatan (Indonesia); Department of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Department of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134, Physics Department, Sriwijaya University, Kampus Indralaya, Ogan Ilir, Sumatera Selatan (Indonesia); Reserach of Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152 (Japan)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

210

High-Areal-Density Fuel Assembly in Direct-Drive Cryogenic Implosions T. C. Sangster, V. N. Goncharov, P. B. Radha, V. A. Smalyuk, R. Betti, R. S. Craxton,* J. A. Delettrez, D. H. Edgell,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-Areal-Density Fuel Assembly in Direct-Drive Cryogenic Implosions T. C. Sangster, V. N-relevant areal-density deuterium from implosions of capsules with cryogenic fuel layers at ignition 7 mg=cm2 (corresponding to estimated peak fuel densities in excess of 100 g=cm3 ) were inferred

211

A strategy for transition from a uranium fueled, open cycle SFR to a transuranic fueled, closed cycle sodium cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reactors utilizing a highly energetic neutron spectrum, often termed fast reactors, offer large fuel utilization improvements over the thermal reactors currently used for nuclear energy generation. Conventional fast reactor ...

Richard, Joshua (Joshua Glenn)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Cool Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cool Links Explore Science Explore Explore these Topics Activities Videos Cool Links Favorite Q&A invisible utility element Cool Links Los Alamos National Laboratory links Los...

213

ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240}Pu core experiments : a fast reactor core with mixed (Pu,U)-oxide fuel and a centeral high{sup 240}Pu zone.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ZPR-6 Assembly 7 (ZPR-6/7) encompasses a series of experiments performed at the ZPR-6 facility at Argonne National Laboratory in 1970 and 1971 as part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program (Reference 1). Assembly 7 simulated a large sodium-cooled LMFBR with mixed oxide fuel, depleted uranium radial and axial blankets, and a core H/D near unity. ZPR-6/7 was designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, so configurations in the Assembly 7 program were as simple as possible in terms of geometry and composition. ZPR-6/7 had a very uniform core assembled from small plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and Pu-U-Mo alloy loaded into stainless steel drawers. The steel drawers were placed in square stainless steel tubes in the two halves of a split table machine. ZPR-6/7 had a simple, symmetric core unit cell whose neutronic characteristics were dominated by plutonium and {sup 238}U. The core was surrounded by thick radial and axial regions of depleted uranium to simulate radial and axial blankets and to isolate the core from the surrounding room. The ZPR-6/7 program encompassed 139 separate core loadings which include the initial approach to critical and all subsequent core loading changes required to perform specific experiments and measurements. In this context a loading refers to a particular configuration of fueled drawers, radial blanket drawers and experimental equipment (if present) in the matrix of steel tubes. Two principal core configurations were established. The uniform core (Loadings 1-84) had a relatively uniform core composition. The high {sup 240}Pu core (Loadings 85-139) was a variant on the uniform core. The plutonium in the Pu-U-Mo fuel plates in the uniform core contains 11% {sup 240}Pu. In the high {sup 240}Pu core, all Pu-U-Mo plates in the inner core region (central 61 matrix locations per half of the split table machine) were replaced by Pu-U-Mo plates containing 27% {sup 240}Pu in the plutonium component to construct a central core zone with a composition closer to that in an LMFBR core with high burnup. The high {sup 240}Pu configuration was constructed for two reasons. First, the composition of the high {sup 240}Pu zone more closely matched the composition of LMFBR cores anticipated in design work in 1970. Second, comparison of measurements in the ZPR-6/7 uniform core with corresponding measurements in the high {sup 240}Pu zone provided an assessment of some of the effects of long-term {sup 240}Pu buildup in LMFBR cores. The uniform core version of ZPR-6/7 is evaluated in ZPR-LMFR-EXP-001. This document only addresses measurements in the high {sup 240}Pu core version of ZPR-6/7. Many types of measurements were performed as part of the ZPR-6/7 program. Measurements of criticality, sodium void worth, control rod worth and reaction rate distributions in the high {sup 240}Pu core configuration are evaluated here. For each category of measurements, the uncertainties are evaluated, and benchmark model data are provided.

Lell, R. M.; Morman, J. A.; Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

214

STOCHASTIC COOLING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Stochastic Cooling i n ICE, IEEE Transaction's in Nucl. SICE studies firmly establishing the stochastic cooling

Bisognano, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Spent nuclear fuel project cold vacuum drying facility tempered water and tempered water cooling system design description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the System Design Description (SDD) for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) Tempered Water (TW) and Tempered Water Cooling (TWC) System . The SDD was developed in conjunction with HNF-SD-SNF-SAR-002, Safety Analysis Report for the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, Phase 2, Supporting Installation of Processing Systems (Garvin 1998), The HNF-SD-SNF-DRD-O02, 1998, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Design Requirements, and the CVDF Design Summary Report. The SDD contains general descriptions of the TW and TWC equipment, the system functions, requirements and interfaces. The SDD provides references for design and fabrication details, operation sequences and maintenance. This SOD has been developed for the SNFP Operations Organization and shall be updated, expanded, and revised in accordance with future design, construction and startup phases of the CVDF until the CVDF final ORR is approved.

IRWIN, J.J.

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

216

Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

217

Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for the GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP) includes a program element for the development and construction of an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor to demonstrate the burning (transmutation) of significant quantities of minor actinides obtained from a separations process and fabricated into a transuranic bearing fuel assembly. To demonstrate and qualify transuranic (TRU) fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype is needed. The ABR would necessarily be started up using conventional metal alloy or oxide (U or U, Pu) fuel. Startup fuel is needed for the ABR for the first 2 to 4 core loads of fuel in the ABR. Following start up, a series of advanced TRU bearing fuel assemblies will be irradiated in qualification lead test assemblies in the ABR. There are multiple options for this startup fuel. This report provides a description of the possible startup fuel options as well as possible fabrication alternatives available to the program in the current domestic and international facilities and infrastructure.

Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171); David Alberstein

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Application of curium measurements for safeguarding at reprocessing plants. Study 1: High-level liquid waste and Study 2: Spent fuel assemblies and leached hulls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In large-scale reprocessing plants for spent fuel assemblies, the quantity of plutonium in the waste streams each year is large enough to be important for nuclear safeguards. The wastes are drums of leached hulls and cylinders of vitrified high-level liquid waste. The plutonium amounts in these wastes cannot be measured directly by a nondestructive assay (NDA) technique because the gamma rays emitted by plutonium are obscured by gamma rays from fission products, and the neutrons from spontaneous fissions are obscured by those from curium. The most practical NDA signal from the waste is the neutron emission from curium. A diversion of waste for its plutonium would also take a detectable amount of curium, so if the amount of curium in a waste stream is reduced, it can be inferred that there is also a reduced amount of plutonium. This report studies the feasibility of tracking the curium through a reprocessing plant with neutron measurements at key locations: spent fuel assemblies prior to shearing, the accountability tank after dissolution, drums of leached hulls after dissolution, and canisters of vitrified high-level waste after separation. Existing pertinent measurement techniques are reviewed, improvements are suggested, and new measurements are proposed. The authors integrate these curium measurements into a safeguards system.

Rinard, P.M.; Menlove, H.O.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Final Assembly and Initial Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing.1,2 The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the first experiment test train (designated AGR-1) as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation were completed in 2006. The experiment was inserted in the ATR in December 2006, and will serve as a shakedown test of the multi-capsule experiment design that will be used in the subsequent irradiations as well as a test of the early variants of the fuel produced under this program. The experiment test train as well as the monitoring, control, and data collection systems are discussed.

S. B. Grover

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field there between for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells. 11 figs.

Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Zawodzinski, Christine (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Fuel cell with metal screen flow-field  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is provided with electrodes supplied with a reactant on each side of a catalyzed membrane assembly (CMA). The fuel cell includes a metal mesh defining a rectangular flow-field pattern having an inlet at a first corner and an outlet at a second corner located on a diagonal from the first corner, wherein all flow paths from the inlet to the outlet through the square flow field pattern are equivalent to uniformly distribute the reactant over the CMA. In a preferred form of metal mesh, a square weave screen forms the flow-field pattern. In a particular characterization of the present invention, a bipolar plate electrically connects adjacent fuel cells, where the bipolar plate includes a thin metal foil having an anode side and a cathode side; a first metal mesh on the anode side of the thin metal foil; and a second metal mesh on the cathode side of the thin metal foil. In another characterization of the present invention, a cooling plate assembly cools adjacent fuel cells, where the cooling plate assembly includes an anode electrode and a cathode electrode formed of thin conducting foils; and a metal mesh flow field therebetween for distributing cooling water flow over the electrodes to remove heat generated by the fuel cells.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Zawodzinski, Christine (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

High energy X-ray diffraction measurement of residual stresses in a monolithic aluminum clad uranium–10 wt% molybdenum fuel plate assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual stresses are expected in monolithic, aluminum clad uranium 10 wt% molybdenum (U–10Mo) nuclear fuel plates because of the large mismatch in thermal expansion between the two bonded materials. The full residual stress tensor of the U–10Mo foil in a fuel plate assembly was mapped with 0.1 mm resolution using high-energy (86 keV) X-ray diffraction. The in-plane stresses in the U–10Mo foil are strongly compressive, roughly -250 MPa in the longitudinal direction and -140 MPa in the transverse direction near the center of the fuel foil. The normal component of the stress is weakly compressive near the center of the foil and tensile near the corner. The disparity in the residual stress between the two in-plane directions far from the edges and the tensile normal stress suggest that plastic deformation in the aluminum cladding during fabrication by hot isostatic pressing also contributes to the residual stress field. A tensile in-plane residual stress is presumed to be present in the aluminum cladding to balance the large in-plane compressive stresses in the U–10Mo fuel foil, but cannot be directly measured with the current technique due to large grain size.

D. W. Brown; M. A. Okuniewski; J. D. Almer; L. Balogh; B. Clausen; J. S. Okasinski; B. H. Rabin

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Neutronics, steady-state, and transient analyses for the Poland MARIA reactor for irradiation testing of LEU lead test fuel assemblies from CERCA : ANL independent verification results.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MARIA reactor at the Institute of Atomic Energy (IAE) in Swierk (30 km SE of Warsaw) in the Republic of Poland is considering conversion from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies (FA). The FA design in MARIA is rather unique; a suitable LEU FA has never been designed or tested. IAE has contracted with CERCA (the fuel supply portion of AREVA in France) to supply 2 lead test assemblies (LTA). The LTAs will be irradiated in MARIA to burnup level of at least 40% for both LTAs and to 60% for one LTA. IAE may decide to purchase additional LEU FAs for a full core conversion after the test irradiation. The Reactor Safety Committee within IAE and the National Atomic Energy Agency in Poland (PAA) must approve the LTA irradiation process. The approval will be based, in part, on IAE submitting revisions to portions of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) which are affected by the insertion of the LTAs. (A similar process will be required for the full core conversion to LEU fuel.) The analysis required was established during working meetings between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and IAE staff during August 2006, subsequent email correspondence, and subsequent staff visits. The analysis needs to consider the current high-enriched uranium (HEU) core and 4 core configurations containing 1 and 2 LEU LTAs in various core positions. Calculations have been performed at ANL in support of the LTA irradiation. These calculations are summarized in this report and include criticality, burn-up, neutronics parameters, steady-state thermal hydraulics, and postulated transients. These calculations have been performed at the request of the IAE staff, who are performing similar calculations to be used in their SAR amendment submittal to the PAA. The ANL analysis has been performed independently from that being performed by IAE and should only be used as one step in the verification process.

Garner, P. L.; Hanan, N. A. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

225

Spent-fuel dry-storage testing at E-MAD (March 1978-March 1982)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From March 1978 through March 1982, spent fuel dry storage tests were conducted at the Engine Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility on the Nevada Test Site to confirm that commercial reactor spent fuel could be encapsulated and passively stored in one or more interim dry storage cell concepts. These tests were: electrically heated drywell, isolated and adjacent drywell, concrete silo, fuel assembly internal temperature measurement, and air-cooled vault. This document presents the test data and results as well as results from supporting test operations (spent fuel calorimetry and canister gas sampling).

Unterzuber, R.; Milnes, R.D.; Marinkovich, B.A.; Kubancsek, G.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

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227

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControls onPolymersCookingCoolCool

228

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControlsCool MagneticCool Magnetic

229

Fuel cell cooler-humidifier plate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cooler-humidifier plate for use in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack assembly is provided. The cooler-humidifier plate combines functions of cooling and humidification within the fuel cell stack assembly, thereby providing a more compact structure, simpler manifolding, and reduced reject heat from the fuel cell. Coolant on the cooler side of the plate removes heat generated within the fuel cell assembly. Heat is also removed by the humidifier side of the plate for use in evaporating the humidification water. On the humidifier side of the plate, evaporating water humidifies reactant gas flowing over a moistened wick. After exiting the humidifier side of the plate, humidified reactant gas provides needed moisture to the proton exchange membranes used in the fuel cell stack assembly. The invention also provides a fuel cell plate that maximizes structural support within the fuel cell by ensuring that the ribs that form the boundaries of channels on one side of the plate have ends at locations that substantially correspond to the locations of ribs on the opposite side of the plate.

Vitale, Nicholas G. (Albany, NY); Jones, Daniel O. (Glenville, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

STOCHASTIC COOLING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the stochastic cooling technique. This work directly led tol . . Physics and Techniques o f Stochastic Cooling, PhysicsCooling o f Momentum Spread by F i l t e r Techniques, CERN-

Bisognano, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

232

Downhole steam generator with improved preheating/cooling features  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for downhole steam generation employing dual-stage preheaters for liquid fuel and for the water. A first heat exchange jacket for the fuel surrounds the fuel/oxidant mixing section of the combustor assembly downstream of the fuel nozzle and contacts the top of the combustor unit of the combustor assembly, thereby receiving heat directly from the combustion of the fuel/oxidant. A second stage heat exchange jacket surrounds an upper portion of the oxidant supply line adjacent the fuel nozzle receiving further heat from the compression heat which results from pressurization of the oxidant. The combustor unit includes an inner combustor sleeve whose inner wall defines the combustion zone. The inner combustor sleeve is surrounded by two concentric water channels, one defined by the space between the inner combustor sleeve and an intermediate sleeve, and the second defined by the space between the intermediate sleeve and an outer cylindrical housing. The channels are connected by an annular passage adjacent the top of the combustor assembly and the countercurrent nature of the water flow provides efficient cooling of the inner combustor sleeve. An annular water ejector with a plurality of nozzles is provided to direct water downwardly into the combustor unit at the boundary of the combustion zone and along the lower section of the intermediate sleeve.

Donaldson, A. Burl (Albuquerque, NM); Hoke, Donald E. (Albuquerque, NM); Mulac, Anthony J. (Tijeras, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Horizontal modular dry irradiated fuel storage system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A horizontal, modular, dry, irradiated fuel storage system (10) includes a thin-walled canister (12) for containing irradiated fuel assemblies (20), which canister (12) can be positioned in a transfer cask (14) and transported in a horizontal manner from a fuel storage pool (18), to an intermediate-term storage facility. The storage system (10) includes a plurality of dry storage modules (26) which accept the canister (12) from the transfer cask (14) and provide for appropriate shielding about the canister (12). Each module (26) also provides for air cooling of the canister (12) to remove the decay heat of the irradiated fuel assemblies (20). The modules (26) can be interlocked so that each module (26) gains additional shielding from the next adjacent module (26). Hydraulic rams (30) are provided for inserting and removing the canisters (12) from the modules (26).

Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); McInnes, Ian D. (San Jose, CA); Massey, John V. (San Jose, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Experimental validation of 3D reconstructed pin-power distributions in full-scale BWR fuel assemblies with partial length rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total fission rate measurements have been performed on full-size BWR fuel assemblies of type SVEA-96 Optima2 in the framework of Phase III of the LWR-PROTEUS experimental program at the Paul Scherrer Inst.. This paper presents comparisons of calculated, nodal reconstructed, pin-wise total-fission rate distributions with experimental results. Radial comparisons have been performed for the three sections of the assembly (96, 92 and 84 fuel pins), while three-dimensional effects have been investigated at pellet-level for the two transition regions, i.e. the tips of the short (1/3) and long (2/3) partial length rods. The test zone has been modeled using two different code systems: HELIOS/PRESTO-2 and CASMO-5/SIMULATE-5. The first is presently used for core monitoring and design at the Leibstadt Nuclear Power Plant (KKL). The second represents the most recent generation of the widely applied CASMO/SIMULATE system. For representing the PROTEUS test-zone boundaries, Partial Current Ratios (PCRs) - derived from a 3D MCNPX model of the entire reactor - have been applied to the PRESTO-2 and SIMULATE-5 models in the form of 2- and 5-group diagonal albedo matrices, respectively. The MCNPX results have also served as a reference, high-order transport solution in the calculation/experiment comparisons. It is shown that the performance of the nodal methodologies in predicting the global distribution of the total-fission rate is very satisfactory. Considering the various radial comparisons, the standard deviations of the calculated/experimental (C/E) distributions do not exceed 1.9% for any of the three methodologies - PRESTO-2, SIMULATE-5 and MCNPX. For the three-dimensional comparisons at pellet-level, the corresponding standard deviations are 2.7%, 2.0% and 2.1%, respectively. (authors)

Giust, F. D. [Axpo Kernenergie, Parkstrasse 23, CH-5401 Baden (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Grimm, P. [Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Chawla, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Inst. of Technology (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel assembly Inward thermal bow Flux shape Rigid support (High-gradient assembly Outward thermal bow Core center Low-gradient assembly Outward thermal bow Flux shape Rigid

Qvist, Staffan Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsin’s 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature up to 800ºC.

Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Direct cooled power electronics substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure describes directly cooling a three-dimensional, direct metallization (DM) layer in a power electronics device. To enable sufficient cooling, coolant flow channels are formed within the ceramic substrate. The direct metallization layer (typically copper) may be bonded to the ceramic substrate, and semiconductor chips (such as IGBT and diodes) may be soldered or sintered onto the direct metallization layer to form a power electronics module. Multiple modules may be attached to cooling headers that provide in-flow and out-flow of coolant through the channels in the ceramic substrate. The modules and cooling header assembly are preferably sized to fit inside the core of a toroidal shaped capacitor.

Wiles, Randy H [Powell, TN; Wereszczak, Andrew A [Oak Ridge, TN; Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN) [Kingston, TN; Lowe, Kirk T. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

2010-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

Low pressure cooling seal system for a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low pressure cooling system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids at low pressure, such as at ambient pressure, through at least one cooling fluid supply channel and into a cooling fluid mixing chamber positioned immediately downstream from a row of turbine blades extending radially outward from a rotor assembly to prevent ingestion of hot gases into internal aspects of the rotor assembly. The low pressure cooling system may also include at least one bleed channel that may extend through the rotor assembly and exhaust cooling fluids into the cooling fluid mixing chamber to seal a gap between rotational turbine blades and a downstream, stationary turbine component. Use of ambient pressure cooling fluids by the low pressure cooling system results in tremendous efficiencies by eliminating the need for pressurized cooling fluids for sealing this gap.

Marra, John J

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Feasibility Study For Use Of Commercial Cask Vendor Dry Transfer Systems To Unload Used Fuel Assemblies In L-Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to determine whether a commercial dry transfer system (DTS) could be used for loading or unloading used nuclear fuel (UNF) in L-Basin and to determine if a DTS pool adapter could be made for L-Basin Transfer Pit #2 that could accommodate a variety of DTS casks and fuel baskets or canisters up to 24” diameter.[1, 2] This study outlines the technical feasibility of accommodating different vendor dry transfer systems in the L-Basin Transfer Bay with a general work scope. It identifies equipment needing development, facility modifications, and describes the needed analyses and calculations. After reviewing the L-Basin Transfer Bay area layout and information on the only DTS system currently in use for the Nuclear Assurance Corporation Legal Weight Truck cask (NAC LWT), the authors conclude that use of a dry transfer cask is feasible. AREVA was contacted and acknowledged that they currently do not have a design for a dry transfer cask for their new Transnuclear Long Cask (TN-LC) cask. Nonetheless, this study accounted for a potential future DTS from AREVA to handle fuel baskets up to 18” in diameter. Due to the layout of the Transfer Bay, it was determined that a DTS cask pool adapter designed specifically for spanning Pit #2 and placed just north of the 70 Ton Cask lid lifting superstructure would be needed. The proposed pool adapter could be used to transition a fuel basket up to 24” in diameter and ~11 feet long from a dry transfer cask to the basin. The 18” and 24” applications of the pool adapter are pending vendor development of dry transfer casks that accommodate these diameters. Once a fuel basket has been lowered into Pit #2 through a pool adapter, a basket cart could be used to move the basket out from under the pool adapter for access by the 5 Ton Crane. The cost to install a dry transfer cask handling system in L-Area capable of handling multiple vendor provided transport and dry transfer casks and baskets with different diameters and lengths would likely be on the same order of magnitude as the Basin Modifications project. The cost of a DTS capability is affected by the number of design variations of different vendor transport and dry transfer casks to be considered for design input. Some costs would be incurred for each vendor DTS to be handled. For example, separate analyses would be needed for each dry transfer cask type such as criticality, shielding, dropping a dry transfer cask and basket, handling and auxiliary equipment, procedures, operator training, readiness assessments, and operational readiness reviews. A DTS handling capability in L-Area could serve as a backup to the Shielded Transfer System (STS) for unloading long casks and could support potential future missions such as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Exchange or transferring UNF from wet to dry storage.

Krementz, Dan; Rose, David; Dunsmuir, Mike

2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

240

Biofilm assembly | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

A STUDY OF AGGREGATION BIAS IN ESTIMATING THE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating the Market for Home Heating and Cooling EquipmentFuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling," LBLTHE MARKET FOR HOME HEATING AND COOLING EQUIPMENT* David

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Improved water-cooled cyclone constructions in CFBs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of CFB boilers has advanced in comparison with early designs. One improvement has been the use of water or steam cooled cyclones, which allows the use of thin refractories and minimizes maintenance needs. Cooled cyclones are also tolerant of wide load variations when the main fuel is biologically based, and coal or some other fuel is used as a back-up. With uncooled cyclones, load changes with high volatile fuels can mean significant temperature transients in the refractory, due to post-combustion phenomena in the cyclone. Kvaerner's development of water-cooled cyclones for CFBs began in the early 1980s. The first boiler with this design was delivered in 1985 in Sweden. Since then, Kvaerner Pulping has delivered over twenty units with cooled cyclones, in capacity ranging from small units up to 400 MW{sub th}. Among these units, Kvaerner has developed unconventional solutions for CFBs, in order to simplify the constructions and to increase the reliability for different applications. The first of them was CYMIC{reg{underscore}sign}, which has its water-cooled cyclone built inside the boiler furnace. There are two commercial CYMIC boilers in operation and one in project stages. The largest CYMIC in operation is a 185 MW{sub th} industrial boiler burning various fuels. For even larger scale units Kvaerner developed the Integrated Cylindrical Cyclone and Loopseal (ICCL) assembly. One of these installations is in operation in USA, having steaming capacity of over 500 t/h. The design bases of these new solutions are quite different in comparison with conventional cyclones. Therefore, an important part of the development has been cold model testing and mathematical modeling of the cyclones. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in water-cooled cyclone construction. The new solutions, their full-scale experience, and a comparison of the actual experience with the preliminary modeling work are introduced.

Alliston, M.G.; Luomaharju, T.; Kokko, A.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Computation of neutron fluxes in clusters of fuel pins arranged in hexagonal assemblies (2D and 3D)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For computations of fluxes, we have used Carvik's method of collision probabilities. This method requires tracking algorithms. An algorithm to compute tracks (in 2D and 3D) has been developed for seven hexagonal geometries with cluster of fuel pins. This has been implemented in the NXT module of the code DRAGON. The flux distribution in cluster of pins has been computed by using this code. For testing the results, they are compared when possible with the EXCELT module of the code DRAGON. Tracks are plotted in the NXT module by using MATLAB, these plots are also presented here. Results are presented with increasing number of lines to show the convergence of these results. We have numerically computed volumes, surface areas and the percentage errors in these computations. These results show that 2D results converge faster than 3D results. The accuracy on the computation of fluxes up to second decimal is achieved with fewer lines. (authors)

Prabha, H.; Marleau, G. [Institut de Genie Nucleaire, Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Stn. CV, P.O. Box 6079, Montreal, QC H3C 3A7 (Canada)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with burnup of a depleted-uranium fueled sodium-cooled B&Bwith burnup of a depleted-uranium fueled sodium-cooled B&Bbalance integral of a depleted-uranium fueled sodium-cooled

Qvist, Staffan Alexander

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Two-Phase Cooling Technology for Power Electronics with Novel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Two-Phase Cooling Technology for Power Electronics with Novel Coolants Two-Phase Cooling Technology for Power Electronics with Novel Coolants 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

246

Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with application to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power by Thomas Schmeister B.Sc., University to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power by Thomas Schmeister B.Sc., University of Colorado, 1991 cells as a heat and electrical power source for residential combined heat and power (CHP

Victoria, University of

247

Methanation assembly using multiple reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

248

CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH AND 7-TUBE CLUSTERS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one NaI scintillator and the other foil on the other NaI detector and the activities measured simultaneously. The activation of a particular foil was compared to that of the normalization foil by dividing the count rate for each foil by that of the normalization foil. To correct for the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors, the normalization foil was counted in Detector 1 simultaneously with the foil at position x in Detector 2, and then the normalization foil was counted simultaneously in Detector 2 with the foil from position x in Counter 1. The activity of the foil from position x was divided by the activity of the normalization foil counted simultaneously. This resulted in obtaining two values of the ratio that were then averaged. This procedure essentially removed the effect of the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors. Differing efficiencies of 10% resulted in errors in the ratios measured to less than 1%. The background counting rates obatined with the foils used for the measurements on the NaI detectors before their irradiation measurement were subtracted from all count rates. The results of the cadmium ratio measurements are given in Table 1.3-1 and Figure 1.3-1. “No correction has been made for self shielding in the foils” (Reference 3).

Margaret A. Marshall

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

CRITICAL CONFIGURATION AND PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS FOR BERYLLIUM REFLECTED ASSEMBLIES OF U(93.15)O2 FUEL RODS (1.506-CM PITCH)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cadmium ratios were measured with enriched uranium metal foils at various locations in the assembly with the fuel tube at the 1.506-cm spacing. They are described in the following subsections. The experiment configuration was the same as the first critical configuration described in HEU-COMP-FAST-004 (Case 1). The experimenter placed 0.75-cm-diameter × 0.010-cm-thick 93.15%-235U-enriched uranium metal foils with and without 0.051-cm-thick cadmium covers at various locations in the core and top reflector. One part of the cadmium cover was cupshape and contained the uranium foil. The other part was a lid that fit over the exposed side of the foil when it was in the cup shaped section of the cover. As can be seen in the logbook, two runs were required to obtain all the measurements necessary for the cadmium ratio. The bare foil measurements within the top reflector were run first as part of the axial foil activation measurements. The results of this run are used for both the axial activation results and the cadmium ratios. Cadmium covered foils were then placed at the same location through the top reflector in a different run. Three pairs of bare and cadmium covered foils were also placed through the core tank. One pair was placed at the axial center of a fuel tube 11.35 cm from the center of the core. Two pairs of foils were placed on top of fuel tubes 3.02 and 12.06 cm from the center of the core. The activation of the uranium metal foils was measured after removal from the assembly using two lead shielded NaI scintillation detectors as follows. The NaI scintillators were carefully matched and had detection efficiencies for counting delayed-fission-product gamma rays with energies above 250 KeV within 5%. In all foil activation measurements, one foil at a specific location was used as a normalizing foil to remove the effects of the decay of fission products during the counting measurements with the NaI detectors. The normalization foil was placed on one NaI scintillator and the other foil on the other NaI detector and the activities measured simultaneously. The activation of a particular foil was compared to that of the normalization foil by dividing the count rate for each foil by that of the normalization foil. To correct for the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors, the normalization foil was counted in Detector 1 simultaneously with the foil at position x in Detector 2, and then the normalization foil was counted simultaneously in Detector 2 with the foil from position x in Counter 1. The activity of the foil from position x was divided by the activity of the normalization foil counted simultaneously. This resulted in obtaining two values of the ratio that were then averaged. This procedure essentially removed the effect of the differing efficiencies of the two NaI detectors. Differing efficiencies of 10% resulted in errors in the ratios measured to less than 1%. The background counting rates obatined with the foils used for the measurements on the NaI detectors before their irradiation measurement were subtracted from all count rates. The results of the cadmium ratio measurements are given in Table 1.3-1 and Figure 1.3-1. “No correction has been made for self shielding in the foils” (Reference 3).

Margaret A. Marshall

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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251

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControls onPolymersCookingCool

252

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControlsCool Magnetic Molecules

253

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControlsCool Magnetic

254

Air Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergy Information LightningAiken Electric CoopCooling: Air cooling

255

DOE Hydrogen & Fuel Cell Overview  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Power Heat + Cooling Electricity Cooling Natural Gas Natural Gas or Biogas Fuel Cell H Excess power generated by the fuel cell is fed to the grid National...

256

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Case Study: Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)/hour/ton of cooling capacity. The absorption chillers' internal pumps consume approximately 0.07 kW (supplied-switching generate significant heat during operation and must be kept cool to maintain reliable phone connectivity through March), cooling water conveys waste heat from the fuel cells to an unfired furnace for space

257

Sustained Recycle in Light Water and Sodium-Cooled Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain recycle of used fuel in either thermal or fast reactors. This paper examines multi-recycle potential performance by considering three recycling approaches and calculating several fuel cycle parameters, including heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; radiotoxicity of waste; and uranium utilization. The first recycle approach is homogeneous mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies in a light water reactor (LWR). The transuranic portion of the MOX was varied among Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. (All-TRU means all isotopes through Cf-252.) The Pu case was allowed to go to 10% Pu in fresh fuel, but when the minor actinides were included, the transuranic enrichment was kept below 8% to satisfy the expected void reactivity constraint. The uranium portion of the MOX was enriched uranium. That enrichment was increased (to as much as 6.5%) to keep the fuel critical for a typical LWR irradiation. The second approach uses heterogeneous inert matrix fuel (IMF) assemblies in an LWR - a mix of IMF and traditional UOX pins. The uranium-free IMF fuel pins were Pu, NpPu, NpPuAm, or all-TRU. The UOX pins were limited to 4.95% U-235 enrichment. The number of IMF pins was set so that the amount of TRU in discharged fuel from recycle N (from both IMF and UOX pins) was made into the new IMF pins for recycle N+1. Up to 60 of the 264 pins in a fuel assembly were IMF. The assembly-average TRU content was 1-6%. The third approach uses fast reactor oxide fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor with transuranic conversion ratio of 0.50 and 1.00. The transuranic conversion ratio is the production of transuranics divided by destruction of transuranics. The FR at CR=0.50 is similar to the CR for the MOX case. The fast reactor cases had a transuranic content of 33-38%, higher than IMF or MOX.

Steven J. Piet; Samuel E. Bays; Michael A. Pope; Gilles J. Youinou

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Indirect passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA); Hui, Marvin M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Berglund, Robert C. (Saratoga, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCool MagneticCool

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Electron CoolingElectron Cooling Sergei Nagaitsev  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron CoolingElectron Cooling Sergei Nagaitsev FNAL - AD April 28, 2005 #12;Electron Cooling methods must "get around the theorem" e.g. by pushing phase-space around. #12;Electron Cooling - Nagaitsev 3 TodayToday''s Menus Menu What is cooling? Types of beam cooling Electron cooling Conclusions #12

Fermilab

262

Cooled railplug  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

Weldon, William F. (Austin, TX)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Refueling Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very High-Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The liquid-salt-cooled very high-temperature reactor (LS-VHTR), also called the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR), is a new reactor concept that combines in a novel way four established technologies: (1) coated-particle graphite-matrix nuclear fuels, (2) Brayton power cycles, (3) passive safety systems and plant designs previously developed for liquid-metal-cooled fast reactors, and (4) low-pressure liquid-salt coolants. Depending upon goals, the peak coolant operating temperatures are between 700 and 1000 deg. C, with reactor outputs between 2400 and 4000 MW(t). Several fluoride salt coolants that are being evaluated have melting points between 350 and 500 deg. C, values that imply minimum refueling temperatures between 400 and 550 deg. C. At operating conditions, the liquid salts are transparent and have physical properties similar to those of water. A series of refueling studies have been initiated to (1) confirm the viability of refueling, (2) define methods for safe rapid refueling, and (3) aid the selection of the preferred AHTR design. Three reactor cores with different fuel element designs (prismatic, pebble bed, and pin-type fuel assembly) are being evaluated. Each is a liquid-salt-cooled variant of a graphite-moderated high-temperature reactor. The refueling studies examined applicable refueling experience from high-temperature reactors (similar fuel element designs) and sodium-cooled fast reactors (similar plant design with liquid coolant, high temperatures, and low pressures). The findings indicate that refueling is viable, and several approaches have been identified. The study results are described in this paper. (authors)

Forsberg, Charles W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Peterson, Per F. [Nuclear Engineering Department, University of California at Berkeley, 6124a Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cahalan, James E. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Enneking, Jeffrey A. [Areva NP (United States); Phil MacDonald [Consultant, Cedar Hill, TX (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Swelling-resistant nuclear fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear fuel according to one embodiment includes an assembly of nuclear fuel particles; and continuous open channels defined between at least some of the nuclear fuel particles, wherein the channels are characterized as allowing fission gasses produced in an interior of the assembly to escape from the interior of the assembly to an exterior thereof without causing significant swelling of the assembly. Additional embodiments, including methods, are also presented.

Arsenlis, Athanasios (Hayward, CA); Satcher, Jr., Joe (Patterson, CA); Kucheyev, Sergei O. (Oakland, CA)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

265

Downhole steam generator with improved preheating/cooling features. [Patent application  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is described for downhole steam generation employing dual-stage preheaters for liquid fuel and for the water. A first heat exchange jacket for the fuel surrounds the fuel/oxidant mixing section of the combustor assembly downstream of the fuel nozzle and contacts the top of the combustor unit of the combustor assembly, thereby receiving heat directly from the combustion of the fuel/oxidant. A second stage heat exchange jacket surrounds an upper portion of the oxidant supply line adjacent the fuel nozzle receiving further heat from the compression heat which results from pressurization of the oxidant. The combustor unit includes an inner combustor sleeve whose inner wall defines the combustion zone. The inner combustor sleeve is surrounded by two concentric water channels, one defined by the space between the inner combustor sleeve and an intermediate sleeve, and the second defined by the space between the intermediate sleeve and an outer cylindrical housing. The channels are connected by an annular passage adjacent the top of the combustor assembly and the countercurrent nature of the water flow provides efficient cooling of the inner combustor sleeve. An annular water ejector with a plurality of nozzles is provided to direct water downwardly into the combustor unit at the boundary of the combustion zone and along the lower section of the intermediate sleeve.

Donaldson, A.B.; Hoke, D.E.; Mulac, A.J.

1980-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

Ventilative cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis evaluates the performance of daytime and nighttime passive ventilation cooling strategies for Beijing, Shanghai and Tokyo. A new simulation method for cross-ventilated wind driven airflow is presented . This ...

Graça, Guilherme Carrilho da, 1972-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

An Evaluation of the Annular Fuel and Bottle-Shaped Fuel Concepts for Sodium Fast Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two innovative fuel concepts, the internally and externally cooled annular fuel and the bottle-shaped fuel, were investigated with the goal of increasing the power density and reduce the pressure drop in the sodium-cooled ...

Memmott, Matthew

268

Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

Ren; Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

269

Miniature ceramic fuel cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zuppero, Anthony C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

On the Criticality Safety of Transuranic Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Transport Casks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work addresses the neutronic performance and criticality safety issues of transport casks for fuel pertaining to low conversion ratio sodium cooled fast reactors, conventionally known as Advanced Burner Reactors. The criticality of a one, three, seven and 19-assembly cask capacity is presented. Both dry “helium” and flooded “water” filled casks are considered. No credit for fuel burnup or fission products was assumed. As many as possible of the conservatisms used in licensing light water reactor universal transport casks were incorporated into this SFR cask criticality design and analysis. It was found that at 7-assemblies or more, adding moderator to the SFR cask increases criticality margin. Also, removal of MAs from the fuel increases criticality margin of dry casks and takes a slight amount of margin away for wet casks. Assuming credit for borated fuel tube liners, this design analysis suggests that as many as 19 assemblies can be loaded in a cask if limited purely by criticality safety. If no credit for boron is assumed, the cask could possibly hold seven assemblies if low conversion ratio fast reactor grade fuel and not breeder reactor grade fuel is assumed. The analysis showed that there is a need for new cask designs for fast reactors spent fuel transportation. There is a potential of modifying existing transportation cask design as the starting point for fast reactor spent fuel transportation.

Samuel Bays; Ayodeji Alajo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

System and method for controlling a combustor assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for controlling a combustor assembly are disclosed. The system includes a combustor assembly. The combustor assembly includes a combustor and a fuel nozzle assembly. The combustor includes a casing. The fuel nozzle assembly is positioned at least partially within the casing and includes a fuel nozzle. The fuel nozzle assembly further defines a head end. The system further includes a viewing device configured for capturing an image of at least a portion of the head end, and a processor communicatively coupled to the viewing device, the processor configured to compare the image to a standard image for the head end.

York, William David; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

272

Cooled railplug  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

Weldon, W.F.

1996-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

274

IRRADIATION PERFORMANCE OF U-Mo MONOLITHIC FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-performance research reactors require fuel that operates at high specific power to high fission density, but at relatively low temperatures. Research reactor fuels are designed for efficient heat rejection, and are composed of assemblies of thin-plates clad in aluminum alloy. The development of low-enriched fuels to replace high-enriched fuels for these reactors requires a substantially increased uranium density in the fuel to offset the decrease in enrichment. Very few fuel phases have been identified that have the required combination of very-high uranium density and stable fuel behavior at high burnup. UMo alloys represent the best known tradeoff in these properties. Testing of aluminum matrix U-Mo aluminum matrix dispersion fuel revealed a pattern of breakaway swelling behavior at intermediate burnup, related to the formation of a molybdenum stabilized high aluminum intermetallic phase that forms during irradiation. In the case of monolithic fuel, this issue was addressed by eliminating, as much as possible, the interfacial area between U-Mo and aluminum. Based on scoping irradiation test data, a fuel plate system composed of solid U-10Mo fuel meat, a zirconium diffusion barrier, and Al6061 cladding was selected for development. Developmental testing of this fuel system indicates that it meets core criteria for fuel qualification, including stable and predictable swelling behavior, mechanical integrity to high burnup, and geometric stability. In addition, the fuel exhibits robust behavior during power-cooling mismatch events under irradiation at high power.

M.K. Meyer; J. Gan; J.-F. Jue; D.D. Keiser; E. Perez; A. Robinson; D.M. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G.L. Hofman; Y.-S. Kim

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

CoolEarth formerly Cool Earth Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) | OpenMinor PermitControllingCook, Minnesota:CoolEarth

276

BWR Assembly Optimization for Minor Actinide Recycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Primary objective of the proposed project is to apply and extend the latest advancements in LWR fuel management optimization to the design of advanced boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies specifically for the recycling of minor actinides (MAs).

G. Ivan Maldonado; John M. Christenson; J.P. Renier; T.F. Marcille; J. Casal

2010-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

277

Cool Roofs | Y-12 National Security Complex  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCool MagneticCoolCool

278

A Technical Review of Non-Destructive Assay Research for the Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel Assemblies Being Conducted Under the US DOE NGSI - 11544  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NA-24), National Nuclear Security Administration, U.S.nuclear energy together with the emergence of alternative fuel cycles. Introduction Energy security

Croft, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Method for passive cooling liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors, and system thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Busboom, Herbert J. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Mathematical modeling of evaporative cooling of moisture bearing epoxy composite plates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Composite Materials. 2 EVAPORATIVE COOLING Evaporative cooling is deemed to be an appropriate alternative mechanism for the cooling of stealth aircraft due to its simplicity, as well as its success as a cooling mechanism in other applications... Element Assembly 34 Boundary Conditions 36 viii CHAPTER Page Convective Heat Transfer Coefficients 46 Convective Mass Transfer Coefficients 50 Material Properties 52 Time Step Approximations 54...

Payette, Gregory Steven

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Evaluation of Cadmium Ratio and Foil Activation Measurements For Beryllium Reflected Assemblies of U(93.15)O2 Fuel Rods (1.506-cm pitch and 7-tube clusters)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were completed from 1962 to 1965 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in support of the Medium-Power Reactor Experiments (MPRE) program. Initial experiments, performed in November and December of 1962, consisted of a core of un-moderated stainless-steel tubes, each containing 26 UO2 fuel pellets, surrounded by a graphite reflector. Measurements were performed to determine critical reflector arrangements, fission-rate distributions, and cadmium ratio distributions. The graphite reflectors were then changed to beryllium reflectors. For the beryllium reflected assemblies, the fuel was in 1.506-cm-triangular and 7-tube clusters leading to two critical configurations. Once the critical configurations had been achieved, various measurements of reactivity, relative axial and radial activation rates of 235U, and cadmium ratios were performed. The cadmium ratio, reactivity, and activation rate measurements, performed on the 1.506-cm-array critical configuration, have been evaluated and are described in this paper.

Margaret A. Marshall

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Art (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Lambert, John (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Hayes, Steven (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting. Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Idaho Falls, ID); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler 18 and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor 24 where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap 50 which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator 26 and then out to a multiplicity of holes 52 to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber 58 to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole 62 also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator 68 from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe 66 to the suction plenum 64 and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum 64.

English, William A. (Murrysville, PA); Young, Robert R. (Murrysville, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Oil cooled, hermetic refrigerant compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hermetic refrigerant compressor having an electric motor and compressor assembly in a hermetic shell is cooled by oil which is first cooled in an external cooler and is then delivered through the shell to the top of the motor rotor where most of it is flung radially outwardly within the confined space provided by the cap which channels the flow of most of the oil around the top of the stator and then out to a multiplicity of holes to flow down to the sump and provide further cooling of the motor and compressor. Part of the oil descends internally of the motor to the annular chamber to provide oil cooling of the lower part of the motor, with this oil exiting through vent hole also to the sump. Suction gas with entrained oil and liquid refrigerant therein is delivered to an oil separator from which the suction gas passes by a confined path in pipe to the suction plenum and the separated oil drops from the separator to the sump. By providing the oil cooling of the parts, the suction gas is not used for cooling purposes and accordingly increase in superheat is substantially avoided in the passage of the suction gas through the shell to the suction plenum. 3 figs.

English, W.A.; Young, R.R.

1985-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

Automatically closing swing gate closure assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A swing gate closure assembly for nuclear reactor tipoff assembly wherein the swing gate is cammed open by a fuel element or spacer but is reliably closed at a desired closing rate primarily by hydraulic forces in the absence of a fuel charge.

Chang, Shih-Chih (Richland, WA); Schuck, William J. (Richland, WA); Gilmore, Richard F. (Kennewick, WA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Interim status report on lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) research and development.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the status of Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) research and development carried out during the first half of FY 2008 under the U.S. Department of Energy Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor research and development has recently been transferred from Generation IV to the Reactor Campaign of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Another status report shall be issued at the end of FY 2008 covering all of the LFR activities carried out in FY 2008 for both Generation IV and GNEP. The focus of research and development in FY 2008 is an initial investigation of a concept for a LFR Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) Technology Pilot Plant (TPP)/demonstration test reactor (demo) incorporating features and operating conditions of the European Lead-cooled SYstem (ELSY) {approx} 600 MWe lead (Pb)-cooled LFR preconceptual design for the transmutation of waste and central station power generation, and which would enable irradiation testing of advanced fuels and structural materials. Initial scoping core concept development analyses have been carried out for a 100 MWt core composed of sixteen open-lattice 20 by 20 fuel assemblies largely similar to those of the ELSY preconceptual fuel assembly design incorporating fuel pins with mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, central control rods in each fuel assembly, and cooled with Pb coolant. For a cycle length of three years, the core is calculated to have a conversion ratio of 0.79, an average discharge burnup of 108 MWd/kg of heavy metal, and a burnup reactivity swing of about 13 dollars. With a control rod in each fuel assembly, the reactivity worth of an individual rod would need to be significantly greater than one dollar which is undesirable for postulated rod withdrawal reactivity insertion events. A peak neutron fast flux of 2.0 x 10{sup 15} (n/cm{sup 2}-s) is calculated. For comparison, the 400 MWt Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) achieved a peak neutron fast flux of 7.2 x 10{sup 15} (n/cm{sup 2}-s) and the initially 563 MWt PHENIX reactor attained 2.0 x 10{sup 15} (n/cm{sup 2}-s) before one of three intermediate cooling loops was shut down due to concerns about potential steam generator tube failures. The calculations do not assume a test assembly location for advanced fuels and materials irradiation in place of a fuel assembly (e.g., at the center of the core); the calculations have not examined whether it would be feasible to replace the central assembly by a test assembly location. However, having only fifteen driver assemblies implies a significant effect due to perturbations introduced by the test assembly. The peak neutron fast flux is low compared with the fast fluxes previously achieved in FFTF and PHENIX. Furthermore, the peak neutron fluence is only about half of the limiting value (4 x 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2}) typically used for ferritic steels. The results thus suggest that a larger power level (e.g., 400 MWt) and a larger core would be better for a TPP based upon the ELSY fuel assembly design and which can also perform irradiation testing of advanced fuels and materials. In particular, a core having a higher power level and larger dimensions would achieve a suitable average discharge burnup, peak fast flux, peak fluence, and would support the inclusion of one or more test assembly locations. Participation in the Generation IV International Forum Provisional System Steering Committee for the LFR is being maintained throughout FY 2008. Results from the analysis of samples previously exposed to flowing lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) in the DELTA loop are summarized and a model for the oxidation/corrosion kinetics of steels in heavy liquid metal coolants was applied to systematically compare the calculated long-term (i.e., following several years of growth) oxide layer thicknesses of several steels.

Tzanos, C. P.; Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Smith, C. F.; de Caro, M.; Halsey, W. G.; Li, N.; Hosemann, P.; Zhang, J.; Bolind, A.; LLNL; LANL; Univ. of Illinois

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

287

Passive cooling system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with backup coolant flow path  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal cooled nuclear fission reactor plant having a passive auxiliary safety cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. This reactor plant is enhanced by a backup or secondary passive safety cooling system which augments the primary passive auxiliary cooling system when in operation, and replaces the primary system when rendered inoperable.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Seal assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A seal assembly that seals a gap formed by a groove comprises a seal body, a biasing element, and a connection that connects the seal body to the biasing element to form the seal assembly. The seal assembly further comprises a concave-shaped center section and convex-shaped contact portions at each end of the seal body. The biasing element is formed from an elastic material and comprises a convex-shaped center section and concave-shaped biasing zones that are opposed to the convex-shaped contact portions. The biasing element is adapted to be compressed to change a width of the seal assembly from a first width to a second width that is smaller than the first width. In the compressed state, the seal assembly can be disposed in the groove. After release of the compressing force, the seal assembly expands. The contact portions will move toward a surface of the groove and the biasing zones will move into contact with another surface of the groove. The biasing zones will bias the contact portions of the seal body against the surface of the groove.

Johnson, Roger Neal (Hagaman, NY); Longfritz, William David (Fonda, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Air Cooling R&D | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Cooling R&D Air Cooling R&D 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ape019lustbader2013o.pd...

290

AFCI Transmutation Fuel Processes and By-Products Planning: Interim Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program are to reduce high-level waste volume, reduce long-lived and radiotoxic elements, and reclaim valuable energy content of spent nuclear fuel. The AFCI chartered the Fuel Development Working Group (FDWG) to develop advanced fuels in support of the AFCI goals. The FDWG organized a phased strategy of fuel development that is designed to match the needs of the AFCI program: Phase 1 - High-burnup fuels for light-water reactors (LWRs) and tri-isotopic (TRISO) fuel for gas-cooled reactors Phase 2 – Mixed oxide fuels with minor actinides for LWRs, Am transmutation targets for LWRs, inert matrix fuels for LWRs, and TRISO fuel containing Pu and other transuranium for gas-cooled reactors Phase 3 – Fertile free or low-fertile metal, ceramic, ceramic dispersed in a metal matrix (CERMET), and ceramics dispersed in a ceramic matrix (CERCER) that would be used primarily in fast reactors. Development of advanced fuels requires the fabrication, assembly, and irradiation of prototypic fuel under bounding reactor conditions. At specialized national laboratory facilities small quantities of actinides are being fabricated into such fuel for irradiation tests. Fabrication of demonstration quantities of selected fuels for qualification testing is needed but not currently feasible, because existing manual glovebox fabrication approaches result in significant radiation exposures when larger quantities of actinides are involved. The earliest demonstration test fuels needed in the AFCI program are expected to be variants of commercial mixed oxide fuel for use in an LWR as lead test assemblies. Manufacture of such test assemblies will require isolated fabrication lines at a facility not currently available in the U.S. Such facilities are now being planned as part of an Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). Adequate planning for and specification of actinide fuel fabrication facilities capable of producing transmutation fuels dictates the need for detailed process flows, mass balances, batch size data, and radiological dose estimates. Full definition of the materials that will need to be handled in the facility as feed material inputs, in-process fuel, scrap recycle, scrap requiring recovery, and by-product wastes is required. The feed material for demonstrating transmutation fuel fabrication will need to come from the separations of actinides from spent nuclear fuel processed in the same AFCF.

Eric L. Shaber

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

E-Print Network 3.0 - autonomous liquid metal-cooled Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Engineering 12 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS Summary: , Heavy metal-cooled, Gas-cooled, Molten salt-cooled, Liquid- core and Gas-core l Assessed...

292

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced gas cooled Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARIES Program Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 37 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS Summary: , Heavy metal-cooled, Gas-cooled, Molten salt-cooled, Liquid- core and...

293

Microscale Thermoelectric Cooling Elements (TECs) are being proposed to cool down an integrated circuit to maintain its performance. The maximum cooling power of microscale TECs is significantly reduced by the interfacial resistance. For our  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICT 2008 1 Abstract Microscale Thermoelectric Cooling Elements (TECs) are being proposed to cool performance characteristics that relate the cooling power density to other control variables and material act as a good guideline for two-dimensional analysis and assembly of TECs. Key Words - Thermoelectric

294

Performance of Transuranic-Loaded Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel in LWRs Final Report, Including Void Reactivity Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current focus of the Deep Burn Project is on once-through burning of transuranics (TRU) in light-water reactors (LWRs). The fuel form is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle design from high-temperature reactor technology. In the Deep Burn LWR (DB-LWR) concept, these fuel particles are pressed into compacts using SiC matrix material and loaded into fuel pins for use in conventional LWRs. The TRU loading comes from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Unit cell and assembly calculations have been performed using the DRAGON-4 code to assess the physics attributes of TRU-only FCM fuel in an LWR lattice. Depletion calculations assuming an infinite lattice condition were performed with calculations of various reactivity coefficients performed at each step. Unit cells and assemblies containing typical UO2 and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel were analyzed in the same way to provide a baseline against which to compare the TRU-only FCM fuel. Then, assembly calculations were performed evaluating the performance of heterogeneous arrangements of TRU-only FCM fuel pins along with UO2 pins.

Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Ventilation Systems for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTankless or Demand-Type WaterTravelVentilation Systems for Cooling

296

Evaporative Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTanklessDOJExamination Laboratory -Evaporative Cooling Basics

297

Bartholomew Heating and Cooling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation,and Cooling Jump to:

298

Western Cooling Efficiency Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:SeadovCooperative Jump to: navigation,Western Cooling Efficiency Center Place: Davis, CA

299

Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor plant system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting for fuel decay during reactor shutdown, or heat produced during a mishap. The reactor system is enhanced with sealing means for excluding external air from contact with the liquid metal coolant leaking from the reactor vessel during an accident. The invention also includes a silo structure which resists attack by leaking liquid metal coolant, and an added unique cooling means.

Hunsbedt, Anstein (Los Gatos, CA); Boardman, Charles E. (Saratoga, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Measurement of Spent Fuel Assemblies - Overview of the Status of the Technology for Initiating Discussion at NATIONAL RESEARCH CENTRE KURCHATOV INSTITUTE June 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of the status of the technology for the measurement of the fissile material content of spent nuclear reactor fuel. The emphasis is on how the needs of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency are met by the available technology and what more needs to be done in this area.

SISKIND B.; N /A

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials in United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been engaged in an effort to develop and qualify next generation LWR fuel with enhanced performance and safety and reduced waste generation since 2010. This program, which has emphasized collaboration between the DOE, U.S. national laboratories and nuclear industry, was refocused from enhanced performance to enhanced accident tolerance following the events at Fukushima in 2011. Accident tolerant fuels have been specifically described as fuels that, in comparison with standard UO2-Zircaloy, can tolerate loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period (depending on the LWR system and accident scenario) while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, as well as design-basis and beyond design-basis events. The program maintains an ambitious goal to insert a lead test assembly (LTA) of the new design into a commercial power reactor by 2022 .

Daniel M. Wachs

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Impact of Fuel Failure on Criticality Safety of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Commercial used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the United States is expected to remain in storage for considerably longer periods than originally intended (e.g., <40 years). Extended storage (ES) time and irradiation of nuclear fuel to high-burnup values (>45 GWd/t) may increase the potential for fuel failure during normal and accident conditions involving storage and transportation. Fuel failure, depending on the severity, can result in changes to the geometric configuration of the fuel, which has safety and regulatory implications. The likelihood and extent of fuel reconfiguration and its impact on the safety of the UNF is not well understood. The objective of this work is to assess and quantify the impact of fuel reconfiguration due to fuel failure on criticality safety of UNF in storage and transportation casks. This effort is primarily motivated by concerns related to the potential for fuel degradation during ES periods and transportation following ES. The criticality analyses consider representative UNF designs and cask systems and a range of fuel enrichments, burnups, and cooling times. The various failed-fuel configurations considered are designed to bound the anticipated effects of individual rod and general cladding failure, fuel rod deformation, loss of neutron absorber materials, degradation of canister internals, and gross assembly failure. The results quantify the potential impact on criticality safety associated with fuel reconfiguration and may be used to guide future research, design, and regulatory activities. Although it can be concluded that the criticality safety impacts of fuel reconfiguration during transportation subsequent to ES are manageable, the results indicate that certain configurations can result in a large increase in the effective neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}. Future work to inform decision making relative to which configurations are credible, and therefore need to be considered in a safety evaluation, is recommended.

Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Cooling system for a bearing of a turbine rotor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a gas turbine, a bore tube assembly radially inwardly of an aft bearing conveys cooling steam to the buckets of the turbine and returns the cooling steam to a return. To cool the bearing and thermally insulate the bearing from the cooling steam paths, a radiation shield is spaced from the bore tube assembly by a dead air gap. Additionally, an air passageway is provided between the radiation shield and the inner surface of an aft shaft forming part of the rotor. Air is supplied from an inlet for flow along the passage and radially outwardly through bores in the aft shaft disk to cool the bearing and insulate it from transfer of heat from the cooling steam.

Schmidt, Mark Christopher (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Latch assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing.

Frederickson, James R. (Richland, WA); Harper, William H. (Richland, WA); Perez, Raymond (Lynnwood, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Latch assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A latch assembly for releasably securing an article in the form of a canister within a container housing. The assembly includes a cam pivotally mounted on the housing wall and biased into the housing interior. The cam is urged into a disabled position by the canister as it enters the housing and a latch release plate maintains the cam disabled when the canister is properly seated in the housing. Upon displacement of the release plate, the cam snaps into latching engagement against the canister for securing the same within the housing. 2 figs.

Frederickson, J.R.; Harper, W.H.; Perez, R.

1984-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

306

Viral Assembly | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assembly Viral Assembly Current HIV research moves forward with help from EMSL HIV-1 CA protein assemblies are amenable to structural studies: This transmission electron...

307

A Monte Carlo based spent fuel analysis safeguards strategy assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safeguarding nuclear material involves the detection of diversions of significant quantities of nuclear materials, and the deterrence of such diversions by the risk of early detection. There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium in spent fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthening the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies ability to safeguards nuclear facilities, shipper/receiver difference, input accountability at reprocessing facilities and burnup credit at repositories. Many NDA techniques exist for measuring signatures from spent fuel; however, no single NDA technique can, in isolation, quantify elemental plutonium and other actinides of interest in spent fuel. A study has been undertaken to determine the best integrated combination of cost effective techniques for quantifying plutonium mass in spent fuel for nuclear safeguards. A standardized assessment process was developed to compare the effective merits and faults of 12 different detection techniques in order to integrate a few techniques and to down-select among the techniques in preparation for experiments. The process involves generating a basis burnup/enrichment/cooling time dependent spent fuel assembly library, creating diversion scenarios, developing detector models and quantifying the capability of each NDA technique. Because hundreds of input and output files must be managed in the couplings of data transitions for the different facets of the assessment process, a graphical user interface (GUI) was development that automates the process. This GUI allows users to visually create diversion scenarios with varied replacement materials, and generate a MCNPX fixed source detector assessment input file. The end result of the assembly library assessment is to select a set of common source terms and diversion scenarios for quantifying the capability of each of the 12 NDA techniques. We present here the generalized assessment process, the techniques employed to automate the coupled facets of the assessment process, and the standard burnup/enrichment/cooling time dependent spent fuel assembly library. We also clearly define the diversion scenarios that will be analyzed during the standardized assessments. Though this study is currently limited to generic PWR assemblies, it is expected that the results of the assessment will yield an adequate spent fuel analysis strategy knowledge that will help the down-select process for other reactor types.

Fensin, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Nathan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Furnace assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of and apparatus for heating test specimens to desired elevated temperatures for irradiation by a high energy neutron source. A furnace assembly is provided for heating two separate groups of specimens to substantially different, elevated, isothermal temperatures in a high vacuum environment while positioning the two specimen groups symmetrically at equivalent neutron irradiating positions.

Panayotou, Nicholas F. (Kennewick, WA); Green, Donald R. (Richland, WA); Price, Larry S. (Pittsburg, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Development of Nanofluids for Cooling Power Electronics for Hybrid...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Hybrid Electric Vehicles Development of Nanofluids for Cooling Power Electronics for Hybrid Electric Vehicles 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

310

Compliant fuel cell system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell assembly comprising at least one metallic component, at least one ceramic component and a structure disposed between the metallic component and the ceramic component. The structure is configured to have a lower stiffness compared to at least one of the metallic component and the ceramic component, to accommodate a difference in strain between the metallic component and the ceramic component of the fuel cell assembly.

Bourgeois, Richard Scott (Albany, NY); Gudlavalleti, Sauri (Albany, NY)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Cooled turbine vane with endcaps  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine vane assembly which includes an outer endcap having a plurality of generally straight passages and passage segments therethrough, an inner endcap having a plurality of passages and passage segments therethrough, and a vane assembly having an outer shroud, an airfoil body, and an inner shroud. The outer shroud, airfoil body and inner shroud each have a plurality of generally straight passages and passage segments therethrough as well. The outer endcap is coupled to the outer shroud so that outer endcap passages and said outer shroud passages form a fluid circuit. The inner endcap is coupled to the inner shroud so that the inner end cap passages and the inner shroud passages from a fluid circuit. Passages in the vane casting are in fluid communication with both the outer shroud passages and the inner shroud passages. Passages in the outer endcap may be coupled to a cooling system that supplies a coolant and takes away the heated exhaust.

Cunha, Frank J. (Avon, CT); Schiavo, Jr., Anthony L. (Ovideo, FL); Nordlund, Raymond Scott (Orlando, FL); Malow, Thomas (Oviedo, FL); McKinley, Barry L. (Chuluota, FL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Sandia National Laboratories: Cool Earth Solar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0EnergySandia Involves Wind-FarmCool Earth Solar Cool Earth Solar

313

Analysis of conventional and plutonium recycle unit-assemblies for the Yankee (Rowe) PWR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis and comparison of Unit Conventional UO2 Fuel-Assemblies and proposed Plutonium Recycle Fuel Assemblies for the Yankee (Rowe) Reactor has been made. The influence of spectral effects, at the watergaps -and ...

Mertens, Paul Gustaaf

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Cutter assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A drill bit with multiple fluid jet cutting nozzles designed so that the drill bit workface including the cutters is a separate piece from the drill bit body that houses the fluid jet nozzle orifice mounts. The cutter assembly protects the nozzle housing from rapid wear and it can be easily removed from the nozzle housing without disturbing or removing any of the nozzle orifice mounts.

O'Hanlon, T. A.

1985-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

Dump assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough.

Goldmann, Louis H. (Benton City, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Cooling Dry Cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication discusses the effects of heat stress on dairy cows, methods of cooling cows, and research on the effects of cooling cows in the dry period....

Stokes, Sandra R.

2000-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

317

Performance of Trasuranic-Loaded Fully Ceramic Micro-Encapsulated Fuel in LWRs Interim Report, Including Void Reactivity Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current focus of the Deep Burn Project is on once-through burning of transuranice (TRU) in light water reactors (LWRs). The fuel form is called Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel, a concept that borrows the tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle design from high-temperature reactor technology. In the Deep Burn LWR (DB-LWR) concept, these fuel particles would be pressed into compacts using SiC matrix material and loaded into fuel pins for use in conventional LWRs. The TRU loading comes from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Unit cell calculations have been performed using the DRAGON-4 code in order assess the physics attributes of TRU-only FCM fuel in an LWR lattice. Depletion calculations assuming an infinite lattice condition were performed with calculations of various reactivity coefficients performed at each step. Unit cells containing typical UO2 and MOX fuel were analyzed in the same way to provide a baseline against which to compare the TRU-only FCM fuel. Loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into a pin without significant quantities of uranium challenges the design from the standpoint of several key reactivity parameters, particularly void reactivity, and to some degree, the Doppler coefficient. These unit cells, while providing an indication of how a whole core of similar fuel would behave, also provide information of how individual pins of TRU-only FCM fuel would influence the reactivity behavior of a heterogeneous assembly. If these FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly with LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance of the TRU-only FCM fuel pins may be preserved. A configuration such as this would be similar to CONFU assemblies analyzed in previous studies. Analogous to the plutonium content limits imposed on MOX fuel, some amount of TRU-only FCM pins in an otherwise-uranium fuel assembly may give acceptable reactivity performance. Assembly calculations will be performed in future work to explore the design options for heterogeneous assemblies of this type and their impact on reactivity coefficients.

Michael A. Pope; Brian Boer; Gilles Youinou; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Microchannel heat sink assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a microchannel heat sink with a thermal range from cryogenic temperatures to several hundred degrees centigrade. The heat sink can be used with a variety of fluids, such as cryogenic or corrosive fluids, and can be operated at a high pressure. The heat sink comprises a microchannel layer preferably formed of silicon, and a manifold layer preferably formed of glass. The manifold layer comprises an inlet groove and outlet groove which define an inlet manifold and an outlet manifold. The inlet manifold delivers coolant to the inlet section of the microchannels, and the outlet manifold receives coolant from the outlet section of the microchannels. In one embodiment, the manifold layer comprises an inlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the inlet manifold, and an outlet hole extending through the manifold layer to the outlet manifold. Coolant is supplied to the heat sink through a conduit assembly connected to the heat sink. A resilient seal, such as a gasket or an O-ring, is disposed between the conduit and the hole in the heat sink in order to provide a watertight seal. In other embodiments, the conduit assembly may comprise a metal tube which is connected to the heat sink by a soft solder. In still other embodiments, the heat sink may comprise inlet and outlet nipples. The present invention has application in supercomputers, integrated circuits and other electronic devices, and is suitable for cooling materials to superconducting temperatures. 13 figs.

Bonde, W.L.; Contolini, R.J.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

Flashback resistant pre-mixer assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pre-mixer assembly associated with a fuel supply system for mixing of air and fuel upstream from a main combustion zone in a gas turbine engine. The pre-mixer assembly includes a swirler assembly disposed about a fuel injector of the fuel supply system and a pre-mixer transition member. The swirler assembly includes a forward end defining an air inlet and an opposed aft end. The pre-mixer transition member has a forward end affixed to the aft end of the swirler assembly and an opposed aft end defining an outlet of the pre-mixer assembly. The aft end of the pre-mixer transition member is spaced from a base plate such that a gap is formed between the aft end of the pre-mixer transition member and the base plate for permitting a flow of purge air therethrough to increase a velocity of the air/fuel mixture exiting the pre-mixer assembly.

Laster, Walter R. (Oviedo, FL); Gambacorta, Domenico (Oviedo, FL)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

320

High pressure low heat rate phosphoric acid fuel cell stack  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high pressure phosphoric acid fuel cell stack assembly is described comprising: (a) a stack of fuel cells for producing electricity, the stack including cathode means, anode means, and heat exchange means; (b) means for delivering pressurized air to the cathode means; (c) means for delivering a hydrogen rich fuel gas to the anode means for electrochemically reacting with oxygen in the pressurized air to produce electricity and water; (d) first conduit means connected to the cathode means for exhausting a mixture of oxygen-depleted air and reaction water from the cathode means; (e) second conduit means connected to the first conduit means for delivering a water fog to the first conduit means for entrainment in the mixture of oxygen-depleted air and reaction water to form a two phase coolant having a gaseous air phase and an entrained water droplet phase; (f) means for circulating the coolant to the heat exchange means to cool the stack solely through vaporization of the water droplet phase in the heat exchange means whereby a mixed gas exhaust of air and water vapor is exhausted from the heat exchange means; and (g) means for heating the mixed gas exhaust and delivering the heated mixed gas exhaust at reformer reaction temperatures to an autothermal reformer in the stack assembly for autothermal reaction with a raw fuel to form the hydrogen rich fuel.

Wertheim, R.J.

1987-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Shingle assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A barrier, such as a PV module, is secured to a base by a support to create a shingle assembly with a venting region defined between the barrier and base for temperature regulation. The first edge of one base may be interengageable with the second edge of an adjacent base to be capable of resisting first and second disengaging forces oriented perpendicular to the edges and along planes oriented parallel to and perpendicular to the base. A deflector may be used to help reduce wind uplift forces.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L.

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

Pushrod assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pushrod assembly including a carriage mounted on a shaft for movement therealong and carrying a pushrod engageable with a load to be moved. A magnet is mounted on a supporting bracket for movement along such shaft. Means are provided for adjustably spacing said magnet away from said carriage to obtain a selected magnetic attractive or coupling force therebetween. Movement of the supporting bracket and the magnet carried thereby pulls the carriage along with it until the selected magnetic force is exceeded by a resistance load acting on the carriage.

Potter, Jerry D. (Kennewick, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Dump assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This is a claim for a dump assembly having a fixed conduit and a rotatable conduit provided with overlapping plates, respectively, at their adjacent ends. The plates are formed with openings, respectively, normally offset from each other to block flow. The other end of the rotatable conduit is provided with means for securing the open end of a filled container thereto. Rotation of the rotatable conduit raises and inverts the container to empty the contents while concurrently aligning the conduit openings to permit flow of material therethrough. 4 figs.

Goldmann, L.H.

1984-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

324

Development of a neutronics calculation method for designing commercial type Japanese sodium-cooled fast reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the R and D project to improve the modeling accuracy for the design of fast breeder reactors the authors are developing a neutronics calculation method for designing a large commercial type sodium- cooled fast reactor. The calculation method is established by taking into account the special features of the reactor such as the use of annular fuel pellet, inner duct tube in large fuel assemblies, large core. The Verification and Validation, and Uncertainty Qualification (V and V and UQ) of the calculation method is being performed by using measured data from the prototype FBR Monju. The results of this project will be used in the design and analysis of the commercial type demonstration FBR, known as the Japanese Sodium fast Reactor (JSFR). (authors)

Takeda, T.; Shimazu, Y.; Hibi, K.; Fujimura, K. [Research Inst. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Fukui, 1cho-me 2gaiku 4, Kanawa-cho, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui 914-0055 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Housing assembly for electric vehicle transaxle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a drive assembly (10) for an electrically powered vehicle (12). The assembly includes a transaxle (16) having a two-speed transmission (40) and a drive axle differential (46) disposed in a unitary housing assembly (38), an oil-cooled prime mover or electric motor (14) for driving the transmission input shaft (42), an adapter assembly (24) for supporting the prime mover on the transaxle housing assembly, and a hydraulic system (172) providing pressurized oil flow for cooling and lubricating the electric motor and transaxle and for operating a clutch (84) and a brake (86) in the transmission to shift between the two-speed ratios of the transmission. The adapter assembly allows the prime mover to be supported in several positions on the transaxle housing. The brake is spring-applied and locks the transmission in its low-speed ratio should the hydraulic system fail. The hydraulic system pump is driven by an electric motor (212) independent of the prime mover and transaxle.

Kalns, Ilmars (Northville, MI)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

USCAR FUEL CELL TECH TEAM CELL COMPONENT ACCELERATED STRESS TEST PROTOCOLS FOR PEM FUEL CELLS (Electrocatalysts, Supports, Membranes, and Membrane Electrode Assemblies) Revised May...

327

Turbine combustor with fuel nozzles having inner and outer fuel circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combustor cap assembly for a turbine engine includes a combustor cap and a plurality of fuel nozzles mounted on the combustor cap. One or more of the fuel nozzles would include two separate fuel circuits which are individually controllable. The combustor cap assembly would be controlled so that individual fuel circuits of the fuel nozzles are operated or deliberately shut off to provide for physical separation between the flow of fuel delivered by adjacent fuel nozzles and/or so that adjacent fuel nozzles operate at different pressure differentials. Operating a combustor cap assembly in this fashion helps to reduce or eliminate the generation of undesirable and potentially harmful noise.

Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Kim, Kwanwoo

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

328

Micromanifold assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A micromanifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device can employ a ferrule/capillary assembly that includes: (a) a ferrule comprising an elongated member and having a bore traversing from a proximal end to a distal end of the member, wherein the bore has an inner surface and wherein the distal end of the ferrule has a tapered, threaded exterior surface, and (b) a capillary that is positioned within the bore wherein the capillary's outer surface is in direct contact with the bore's inner surface. No mating sleeve is required for the one-piece ferrule. Alternatively, the capillaries can be bonded to channels that traverse the manifold and therefore obviate the need for a ferrule.

Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA); Ferko, Scott M. (Livermore, CA)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

329

Micromanifold assembly  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A micromanifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device can employ a ferrule/capillary assembly that includes: (a) a ferrule comprising an elongated member and having a bore traversing from a proximal end to a distal end of the member, wherein the bore has an inner surface and wherein the distal end of the ferrule has a tapered, threaded exterior surface, and (b) a capillary that is positioned within the bore wherein the capillary's outer surface is in direct contact with the bore's inner surface. No mating sleeve is required for the one-piece ferrule. Alternatively, the capillaries can be bonded to channels that traverse the manifold and therefore obviate the need for a ferrule.

Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracey, CA); Ferko, Scott (Livermore, CA)

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fuel cell gas management system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell gas management system including a cathode humidification system for transferring latent and sensible heat from an exhaust stream to the cathode inlet stream of the fuel cell; an anode humidity retention system for maintaining the total enthalpy of the anode stream exiting the fuel cell equal to the total enthalpy of the anode inlet stream; and a cooling water management system having segregated deionized water and cooling water loops interconnected by means of a brazed plate heat exchanger.

DuBose, Ronald Arthur (Marietta, GA)

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

331

Secondary fuel delivery system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A secondary fuel delivery system for delivering a secondary stream of fuel and/or diluent to a secondary combustion zone located in the transition piece of a combustion engine, downstream of the engine primary combustion region is disclosed. The system includes a manifold formed integral to, and surrounding a portion of, the transition piece, a manifold inlet port, and a collection of injection nozzles. A flowsleeve augments fuel/diluent flow velocity and improves the system cooling effectiveness. Passive cooling elements, including effusion cooling holes located within the transition boundary and thermal-stress-dissipating gaps that resist thermal stress accumulation, provide supplemental heat dissipation in key areas. The system delivers a secondary fuel/diluent mixture to a secondary combustion zone located along the length of the transition piece, while reducing the impact of elevated vibration levels found within the transition piece and avoiding the heat dissipation difficulties often associated with traditional vibration reduction methods.

Parker, David M. (Oviedo, FL); Cai, Weidong (Oviedo, FL); Garan, Daniel W. (Orlando, FL); Harris, Arthur J. (Orlando, FL)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

332

NDA safeguards techniques for LMFBR assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The significant safeguards concerns for liquid-metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), and for the LMFBR fuel handling systems are the accountability, surveillance, and identification of fuel and blanket assemblies. The introduction of fuel assemblies with a high content of Pu into the receiving and shipping areas of the LMFBR fuel cycle does allow a more direct near-real-time assay profile of the disposition of Pu. Isotope correlations and neutron assay methods have been investigated and implemented for determining plutonium and burnup in fresh and spent LMFBR fuel assemblies. The methods are based on active and passive neutron coincidence counting (NCC) techniques. Preliminary studies on neutron yield rates from the spontaneous fission of plutonium and curium isotopes have indicated that the NCC system is a most effective measure in the verification of nuclear material flow in assembly form for the entire reactor fuel handling cycle, i.e., from the fresh- to the spent-fuel stage. A consequence of the high plutonium concentration level throughout the fuel irradiation period in an LMFBR, is that the spontaneous fission neutron yield from the 242-curium and 244-curium does not dominate the spontaneous fission neutron yield from the plutonium isotopes in the spent fuel stage.

Persiani, P.J.; Gundy, M.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Flexible Assembly Solar Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assembly Solar Technology BrightSource DE-EE0005792 | February 15, 2013 | Toister * The proposed assembly process is based on small, cost-effective assembly cells (to be designed...

334

Self assembling magnetic tiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self assembly is an emerging technology in the field of manufacturing. Inspired by nature's ability to self assembly proteins from amino acids, this thesis attempts to demonstrate self assembly on the macro-scale. The ...

Rabl, Jessica A. (Jessica Ann)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Cool Roofs Lead to Cooler Cities | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControlsCool MagneticCoolCool

336

Simulation of radiant cooling performance with evaporative cooling sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy sources of cooling supply water and an aggressiveas the primary source of cooling supply water. The analysisthermal mass to the cooling supply water source, nighttime

Moore, Timothy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Cool Earth Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:Information New YorkGeothermal AreaJump to:Cool

338

Cool Farm Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:Information New YorkGeothermal AreaJump to:CoolFarm

339

Cooling Water System Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During summer months, many manufacturing plants have to cut back in rates because the cooling water system is not providing sufficient cooling to support higher production rates. There are many low/no-cost techniques available to improve tower...

Aegerter, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Method of fabricating a cooled electronic system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of fabricating a liquid-cooled electronic system is provided which includes an electronic assembly having an electronics card and a socket with a latch at one end. The latch facilitates securing of the card within the socket. The method includes providing a liquid-cooled cold rail at the one end of the socket, and a thermal spreader to couple the electronics card to the cold rail. The thermal spreader includes first and second thermal transfer plates coupled to first and second surfaces on opposite sides of the card, and thermally conductive extensions extending from end edges of the plates, which couple the respective transfer plates to the liquid-cooled cold rail. The extensions are disposed to the sides of the latch, and the card is securable within or removable from the socket using the latch without removing the cold rail or the thermal spreader.

Chainer, Timothy J; Gaynes, Michael A; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Schultz, Mark D; Simco, Daniel P; Steinke, Mark E

2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

"Hot" for Warm Water Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

points for maximum cooling liquid supply temperatures thatLiquid cooling guidelines may include: Supply temperatureliquid supply temperature for liquid cooling guidelines. Due

Coles, Henry

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Description of Axial Detail for ROK Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the purpose of NDA simulations of the ROK fuel assemblies, we have developed an axial burnup distribution to represent the pins themselves based on gamma scans of rods in the G23 assembly. For the purpose of modeling the G23 assembly (both at ORNL and LANL), the pin-by-pin burnup map as simulated by ROK is being assumed to represent the radial burnup distribution. However, both DA and NDA results indicate that this simulated estimate is not 100% correct. In particular, the burnup obtained from the axial gamma scan of 7 pins does not represent exactly the same 'average' pin burnup as the ROK simulation. Correction for this discrepancy is a goal of the well-characterized assembly task but will take time. For now, I have come up with a correlation for 26 axial points of the burnup as obtained by gamma scans of 7 different rods (C13, G01, G02, J11, K10, L02, and M04, neglecting K02 at this time) to the average burnup given by the simulation for each of the rods individually. The resulting fraction in each axial zone is then averaged for the 7 different rods so that it can represent every fuel pin in the assembly. The burnup in each of the 26 axial zones of rods in all ROK assemblies will then be directly adjusted using this fraction, which is given in Table 1. Note that the gamma scan data given by ROK for assembly G23 included a length of {approx}3686 mm, so the first 12 mm and the last 14 mm were ignored to give an actual rod length of {approx}366 cm. To represent assembly F02 in which no pin-by-pin burnup distribution is given by ROK, we must model it using infinitely-reflected geometry but can look at the effects of measuring in different axial zones by using intermediate burnup files (i.e. smaller burnups than 28 GWd/MTU) and determining which axial zone(s) each burnup represents. Details for assembly F02 are then given in Tables 2 and 3, which is given in Table 1 and has 44 total axial zones to represent the top meter in explicit detail in addition to the other 26 zones. Note that the MCNP files for F02 were created using the Monte Carlo burnup linkage code Monteburns, which saves MCNP input files with detailed compositions as a function of burnup. The 'intermediate burnup files' produced for F02 include a cooling time of 27 years. The axial location of 5 spacers was also included in the ROK F02 assembly in which each spacer contained a length of 3.81 cm. Note that due to the nature of Monteburns, which was run in a special fashion for this problem, the step number increments after the 27 year decay, so the second column of Table 2 refers to the step number that should be used in the Monteburns files.

Trellue, Holly R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Galloway, Jack D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

343

Cooling load estimation methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ongoing research on quantifying the cooling loads in residential buildings, particularly buildings with passive solar heating systems, is described. Correlations are described that permit auxiliary cooling estimates from monthly average insolation and weather data. The objective of the research is to develop a simple analysis method, useful early in design, to estimate the annual cooling energy required of a given building.

McFarland, R.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Review of Transmutation Fuel Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technology demonstration element of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program is aimed at demonstrating the closure of the fuel cycle by destroying the transuranic (TRU) elements separated from spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Multiple recycle through fast reactors is used for burning the TRU initially separated from light-water reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel. For the initial technology demonstration, the preferred option to demonstrate the closed fuel cycle destruction of TRU materials is a sodium-cooled fast reactor (FR) used as burner reactor. The sodium-cooled fast reactor represents the most mature sodium reactor technology available today. This report provides a review of the current state of development of fuel systems relevant to the sodium-cooled fast reactor. This report also provides a review of research and development of TRU-metal alloy and TRU-oxide composition fuels. Experiments providing data supporting the understanding of minor actinide (MA)-bearing fuel systems are summarized and referenced.

Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Heat-activated cooling devices: A guidebook for general audiences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat-activated cooling is refrigeration or air conditioning driven by heat instead of electricity. A mill or processing facility can us its waste fuel to air condition its offices or plant; using waste fuel in this way can save money. The four basic types of heat-activated cooling systems available today are absorption cycle, desiccant system, steam jet ejector, and steam turbine drive. Each is discussed, along with cool storage and biomass boilers. Steps in determining the feasibility of heat-activated cooling are discussed, as are biomass conversion, system cost and integration, permits, and contractor selection. Case studies are given.

Wiltsee, G.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Thermomechanical modeling of the Spent Fuel Test-Climax  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was conducted to evaluate the feasibility of retrievable deep geologic storage of commercially generated spent nuclear-reactor fuel assemblies. One of the primary aspects of the test was to measure the thermomechanical response of the rock mass to the extensive heating of a large volume of rock. Instrumentation was emplaced to measure stress changes, relative motion of the rock mass, and tunnel closures during three years of heating from thermally decaying heat sources, followed by a six-month cooldown period. The calculations reported here were performed using the best available input parameters, thermal and mechanical properties, and power levels which were directly measured or inferred from measurements made during the test. This report documents the results of these calculations and compares the results with selected measurements made during heating and cooling of the SFT-C.

Butkovich, T.R.; Patrick, W.C.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Vented Cavity Radiant Barrier Assembly And Method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vented cavity radiant barrier assembly (2) includes a barrier (12), typically a PV module, having inner and outer surfaces (18, 22). A support assembly (14) is secured to the barrier and extends inwardly from the inner surface of the barrier to a building surface (14) creating a vented cavity (24) between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. A low emissivity element (20) is mounted at or between the building surface and the barrier inner surface. At least part of the cavity exit (30) is higher than the cavity entrance (28) to promote cooling air flow through the cavity.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA); Jackaway, Adam D. (Berkeley, CA)

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

348

Hot compression process for making edge seals for fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hot compression process for forming integral edge seals in anode and cade assemblies wherein the assemblies are made to a nominal size larger than a finished size, beads of AFLAS are applied to a band adjacent the peripheral margins on both sides of the assemblies, the assemblies are placed in a hot press and compressed for about five minutes with a force sufficient to permeate the peripheral margins with the AFLAS, cooled and cut to finished size.

Dunyak, Thomas J. (Blacksburg, VA); Granata, Jr., Samuel J. (South Greensburg, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Actinide destruction and power peaking analysis in a 1000 MWt advanced burner reactor using moderated heterogeneous target assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of moderated heterogeneous subassemblies located in the core of a sodium-cooled fast reactor on minor actinide (MA) destruction rates over the lifecycle of the core. Additionally, particular emphasis was placed on the power peaking of the pins and the assemblies with the moderated targets as compared to standard unmoderated heterogeneous targets and a core without MA targets present. Power peaking analysis was performed on the target assemblies and on the fuel assemblies adjacent to the targets. The moderated subassemblies had a marked improvement in the overall destruction of heavy metals in the targets. The design with acceptable power peaking results had a 12.25% greater destruction of heavy metals than a similar ex-core unmoderated assembly. The increase in minor actinide destruction was most evident with americium where the moderated assemblies reduced the initial amount to less than 3% of the initial loading over a period of five years core residency. In order to take advantage of the high minor actinide destruction and minimize the power peaking effects, a hybrid scenario was devised where the targets resided ex-core in a moderated assembly for the first 506.9 effective full power days (EFPDs) and were moved to an in-core arrangement with the moderated targets removed for the remainder of the lifecycle. The hybrid model had an assembly and pin power peaking of less than 2.0 and a higher heavy metal and minor actinide destruction rate than the standard unmoderated heterogeneous targets either in-core or ex-core. The hybrid model has a 54.5% greater Am reduction over the standard ex-core model. It also had a 27.8% greater production of Cm and a 41.5% greater production of Pu than the standard ex-core model. The radiotoxicity of the targets in the hybrid design was 20% less than the discharged standard ex-core targets.

Kenneth Allen; Travis Knight; Samuel Bays

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Cooling water distribution system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

2001-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

352

Mox fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion. characteristics of the assembly.

Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly. 38 figs.

Kantrowitz, M.L.; Rosenstein, R.G.

1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

354

MOX fuel arrangement for nuclear core  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In order to use up a stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium, the plutonium is converted into a mixed oxide (MOX) fuel form wherein it can be disposed in a plurality of different fuel assembly types. Depending on the equilibrium cycle that is required, a predetermined number of one or more of the fuel assembly types are selected and arranged in the core of the reactor in accordance with a selected loading schedule. Each of the fuel assemblies is designed to produce different combustion characteristics whereby the appropriate selection and disposition in the core enables the resulting equilibrium cycle to closely resemble that which is produced using urania fuel. The arrangement of the MOX rods and burnable absorber rods within each of the fuel assemblies, in combination with a selective control of the amount of plutonium which is contained in each of the MOX rods, is used to tailor the combustion characteristics of the assembly.

Kantrowitz, Mark L. (Portland, CT); Rosenstein, Richard G. (Windsor, CT)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

PEM/SPE fuel cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PEM/SPE fuel cell is described including a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) having a plurality of oriented filament embedded the face thereof for supporting the MEA and conducting current therefrom to contiguous electrode plates. 4 figs.

Grot, S.A.

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

356

PEM/SPE fuel cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PEM/SPE fuel cell including a membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) having a plurality of oriented filament embedded the face thereof for supporting the MEA and conducting current therefrom to contiguous electrode plates.

Grot, Stephen Andreas (Henrietta, NY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Performance analysis of a Pb-Bi cooled fast reactor - PEACER-300 in proliferation resistance and transmutation aspects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A design study of 850 MWt lead-bismuth cooled reactor cores is performed to maximize the transmutation of both TRU nuclides in homogeneous fuel pin and long-lived fission products in separate target pins. Transmutation of minor actinide under a closed recycling was analyzed with assumption that decontamination factors in pyro-reprocessing plant data be reasonably high. The optimized design parameter were chosen as of a flat core shape with 50 cm in active core height and 5 m in core diameter, loaded with 17 x 17 arrayed fuel assemblies. A pitch to diameter ratio is 2.2, operating coolant temperature range is 300 deg. C-400 deg. C, and core consists of 3 different enrichment zones with one year cycle length. In safety aspects, this core design satisfied large negative temperature feedback coefficients, and sufficient shutdown margin by primary shutdown system with 20 B{sub 4}C control assemblies and by secondary shutdown system with 40 w/o enriched 12 B{sub 4}C control assemblies. Performance of designed core showed a high transmutation capability with support ratio of 2.085 and less TEX values than other reactor types. Better proliferation resistance could be achieved than other reactor types. (authors)

Lim, J. Y.; Kim, M. H. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin-shi, Gyeonggi-do, 449-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

I. IONIZATION COOLING A. Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ionization cooling techniques to reduce the 6­dimensional phase space emittance. B. Cooling TheoryI. IONIZATION COOLING A. Introduction The muon beam at the end of the decay channel is very intense for beam cooling. Cooling by synchrotron radiation, conventional stochastic cooling and conventional

McDonald, Kirk

359

Spent fuel integrity during transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conditions of recent shipments of light water reactor spent fuel were surveyed. The radioactivity level of cask coolant was examined in an attempt to find the effects of transportation on LWR fuel assemblies. Discussion included potential cladding integrity loss mechanisms, canning requirements, changes of radioactivity levels, and comparison of transportation in wet or dry media. Although integrity loss or degradation has not been identified, radioactivity levels usually increase during transportation, especially for leaking assemblies.

Funk, C.W.; Jacobson, L.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Tilt assembly for tracking solar collector assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A tilt assembly is used with a solar collector assembly of the type comprising a frame, supporting a solar collector, for movement about a tilt axis by pivoting a drive element between first and second orientations. The tilt assembly comprises a drive element coupler connected to the drive element and a driver, the driver comprising a drive frame, a drive arm and a drive arm driver. The drive arm is mounted to the drive frame for pivotal movement about a drive arm axis. Movement on the drive arm mimics movement of the drive element. Drive element couplers can extend in opposite directions from the outer portion of the drive arm, whereby the assembly can be used between adjacent solar collector assemblies in a row of solar collector assemblies.

Almy, Charles; Peurach, John; Sandler, Reuben

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

System and method for injecting fuel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

According to various embodiments, a system includes a staggered multi-nozzle assembly. The staggered multi-nozzle assembly includes a first fuel nozzle having a first axis and a first flow path extending to a first downstream end portion, wherein the first fuel nozzle has a first non-circular perimeter at the first downstream end portion. The staggered multi-nozzle assembly also includes a second fuel nozzle having a second axis and a second flow path extending to a second downstream end portion, wherein the first and second downstream end portions are axially offset from one another relative to the first and second axes. The staggered multi-nozzle assembly further includes a cap member disposed circumferentially about at least the first and second fuel nozzles to assemble the staggered multi-nozzle assembly.

Uhm, Jong Ho; Johnson, Thomas Edward

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

362

Cool and Quiet DCJ | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCool

363

Cooling Effects of Fans | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCoolWhy Do Fans Make

364

Hybrid Radiator Cooling System | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinement plasmasSandy-Nor'easter Situation ReportsHuubRadiator Cooling

365

Energy 101: Cool Roofs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia Nanoparticles asSecond stage ofDefects on . GradeCool Roofs Energy 101:

366

Assembling an On-Site Team | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombinedDepartment2015Services »of(BENEFIT)Wind Program FundingAssembling

367

California State Assembly | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis a city inCCSE Jump to:Control | OpenNaturalAssembly Jump

368

Energy Saver 101: Home Cooling Infographic | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTanklessDOJ TitleDr.Double |Department ofPumpkinSaverCooling

369

Clean Air-Cool Planet Community Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreisVolcanicPower Address: 13615 Stowe Drive Place:Air-Cool

370

Direct-Cooled Power Electronic Substrate | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit Services AuditTransatlanticDirect-Cooled Power Electronic Substrate

371

Better World Club Travel Cool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre Biomass FacilityOregon: EnergyBiofuels LLCTravel Cool Jump

372

Gas turbine cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

Bancalari, Eduardo E. (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Radio Triggered Star Formation in Cooling Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The giant galaxies located at the centers of cluster cooling flows are frequently sites of vigorous star formation. In some instances, star formation appears to have been triggered by the galaxy's radio source. The colors and spectral indices of the young populations are generally consistent with short duration bursts or continuous star formation for durations much less than 1 Gyr, which is less than the presumed ages of cooling flows. The star formation properties are inconsistent with fueling by a continuously accreting cooling flow, although the prevalence of star formation is consistent with repeated bursts and periodic refueling. Star formation may be fueled, in some cases, by cold material stripped from neighboring cluster galaxies.

B. R. McNamara

1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

374

New Cool Roof Coatings and Affordable Cool Color Asphalt | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthCommentsAugustNationalMarkets with Wind Power |Energy New Cool

375

POOL WATER TREATMENT AND COOLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is located in the Waste Handling Building (WHB), and is comprised of various process subsystems designed to support waste handling operations. This system maintains the pool water temperature within an acceptable range, maintains water quality standards that support remote underwater operations and prevent corrosion, detects leakage from the pool liner, provides the capability to remove debris from the pool, controls the pool water level, and helps limit radiological exposure to personnel. The pool structure and liner, pool lighting, and the fuel staging racks in the pool are not within the scope of the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System. Pool water temperature control is accomplished by circulating the pool water through heat exchangers. Adequate circulation and mixing of the pool water is provided to prevent localized thermal hotspots in the pool. Treatment of the pool water is accomplished by a water treatment system that circulates the pool water through filters, and ion exchange units. These water treatment units remove radioactive and non-radioactive particulate and dissolved solids from the water, thereby providing the water clarity needed to conduct waste handling operations. The system also controls pool water chemistry to prevent advanced corrosion of the pool liner, pool components, and fuel assemblies. Removal of radioactivity from the pool water contributes to the project ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) goals. A leak detection system is provided to detect and alarm leaks through the pool liner. The pool level control system monitors the water level to ensure that the minimum water level required for adequate radiological shielding is maintained. Through interface with a demineralized water system, adequate makeup is provided to compensate for loss of water inventory through evaporation and waste handling operations. Interface with the Site Radiological Monitoring System provides continuous radiological monitoring of the pool water. The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System, Site-Generated Radiological Waste Handling System, Site Radiological Monitoring System, Waste Handling Building Electrical System, Site Water System, and the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System.

V. King

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

376

Low thermal resistance power module assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A power module assembly with low thermal resistance and enhanced heat dissipation to a cooling medium. The assembly includes a heat sink or spreader plate with passageways or openings for coolant that extend through the plate from a lower surface to an upper surface. A circuit substrate is provided and positioned on the spreader plate to cover the coolant passageways. The circuit substrate includes a bonding layer configured to extend about the periphery of each of the coolant passageways and is made up of a substantially nonporous material. The bonding layer may be solder material which bonds to the upper surface of the plate to provide a continuous seal around the upper edge of each opening in the plate. The assembly includes power modules mounted on the circuit substrate on a surface opposite the bonding layer. The power modules are positioned over or proximal to the coolant passageways.

Hassani, Vahab (Denver, CO); Vlahinos, Andreas (Castle Rock, CO); Bharathan, Desikan (Arvada, CO)

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

377

Passive containment cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

Conway, Lawrence E. (Robinson Township, Allegheny County, PA); Stewart, William A. (Penn Hills Township, Allegheny County, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Energy 101: Cool Roofs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This edition of Energy 101 takes a look at how switching to a cool roof can save you money and benefit the environment.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

379

Self assembly of complex structures.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The state of the art in artificial micro self assembly concepts are reviewed. The history of assembly is presented with a comparison to macro assembly,… (more)

Nellis, Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Evaluation of fuel rod characterization for transient fuel modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basis events (DBEs), reactivity initiated accidents (RIAs), power-cooling-mismatch (PCM) accidents, and loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Steady state fuel behavior encompasses the thermal and mechanical responses of the fuel rods under normal plant...EVALUATION OF FUEL ROD CHARACTERIZATION FOR TRANSIENT FUEL MODELING A Thesis by ERIC WAYNE BECHLER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

Bechler, Eric Wayne

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Materials and Fuels Complex Tour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Materials and Fuels Complex at Idaho National Laboratory is home to several facilities used for the research and development of nuclear fuels. Stops include the Fuel Conditioning Facility, the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (post-irradiation examination), and the Space and Security Power System Facility, where radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) are assembled for deep space missions. You can learn more about INL research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

382

Assessment of helical-cruciform fuel rods for high power density LWRs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to significantly increase the power density of Light Water Reactors (LWRs), the helical-cruciform (HC) fuel rod assembly has been proposed as an alternative to traditional fuel geometry. The HC assembly is a ...

Conboy, Thomas M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Nuclear fuel cycles for mid-century development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparative analysis of nuclear fuel cycles was carried out. Fuel cycles reviewed include: once-through fuel cycles in LWRs, PHWRs, HTGRs, and fast gas cooled breed and burn reactors; single-pass recycle schemes: plutonium ...

Parent, Etienne, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

The design of high power density annular fuel for LWRs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel performance models have been developed to assess the performance of internally and externally cooled LWR annular fuel. Such fuel may be operated at 30-50% higher core power density than the current operating LWRs, and ...

Yuan, Yi, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

USED FUEL RAIL SHOCK AND VIBRATION TESTING OPTIONS ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the rail shock and vibration tests is to complete the framework needed to quantify loads of fuel assembly components that are necessary to guide materials research and establish a technical basis for review organizations such as the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A significant body of experimental and numerical modeling data exists to quantify loads and failure limits applicable to normal conditions of transport (NCT) rail transport, but the data are based on assumptions that can only be verified through experimental testing. The test options presented in this report represent possible paths for acquiring the data that are needed to confirm the assumptions of previous work, validate modeling methods that will be needed for evaluating transported fuel on a case-by-case basis, and inform material test campaigns on the anticipated range of fuel loading. The ultimate goal of this testing is to close all of the existing knowledge gaps related to the loading of used fuel under NCT conditions and inform the experiments and analysis program on specific endpoints for their research. The options include tests that would use an actual railcar, surrogate assemblies, and real or simulated rail transportation casks. The railcar carrying the cradle, cask, and surrogate fuel assembly payload would be moved in a train operating over rail track modified or selected to impart shock and vibration forces that occur during normal rail transportation. Computer modeling would be used to help design surrogates that may be needed for a rail cask, a cask’s internal basket, and a transport cradle. The objective of the design of surrogate components would be to provide a test platform that effectively simulates responses to rail shock and vibration loads that would be exhibited by state-of-the-art rail cask, basket, and/or cradle structures. The computer models would also be used to help determine the placement of instrumentation (accelerometers and strain gauges) on the surrogate fuel assemblies, cask and cradle structures, and the railcar so that forces and deflections that would result in the greatest potential for damage to high burnup and long-cooled UNF can be determined. For purposes of this report we consider testing on controlled track when we have control of the track and speed to facilitate modeling.

Ross, Steven B.; Best, Ralph E.; Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Jensen, Philip J.; Maheras, Steven J.

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

386

Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Cool Earth Solar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

388

Secondary condenser Cooling water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Receiver Secondary condenser LC LC Reboiler TC PC Cooling water PC FCPC Condenser LC XC Throttling valve ¨ mx my l© ª y s § y m «¬ ly my wx l n® ® x np © ¯ Condenser Column Compressor Receiver Super-heater Decanter Secondary condenser Reboiler Throttling valve Expansion valve Cooling water

Skogestad, Sigurd

389

Cool Earth Solar  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

390

Why Cool Roofs?  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

Chu, Steven

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

391

Very Cool Close Binaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new observations of cool <6000K and low mass <1Msun binary systems that have been discovered by searching several modern stellar photometric databases. The search has led to a factor of 10 increase in the number of known cool close eclipsing binary systems.

J. Scott Shaw; Mercedes Lopez-Morales

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

392

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about CoolCab...

393

Proceedings of FUELCELL2006 The 4th International Conference on FUEL CELL SCIENCE, ENGINEERING and TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-models: anode, cathode, fuel cell body, and cooling. Additionally, the oxidant supply blower, cooling pump, and cooling fan are explicitly incorporated. Mass and energy conservation are applied to each using a lumped an Anode ca Cathode clt Coolant co Crossover dyn Dynamic f Liquid fluid fan Cooling fan fc Fuel cell fs

Yao, Bin

394

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

Staub, Fred Wolf (Schenectady, NY); Willett, Fred Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

396

Turbine blade cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

397

Water cooled steam jet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

Wagner, Jr., Edward P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Laser diode package with enhanced cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

Deri, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA); Kotovsky, Jack (Oakland, CA); Spadaccini, Christopher M. (Oakland, CA)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

399

Laser diode package with enhanced cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

Deri, Robert J.; Kotovsky, Jack; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

400

Laser diode package with enhanced cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser diode package assembly includes a reservoir filled with a fusible metal in close proximity to a laser diode. The fusible metal absorbs heat from the laser diode and undergoes a phase change from solid to liquid during the operation of the laser. The metal absorbs heat during the phase transition. Once the laser diode is turned off, the liquid metal cools off and resolidifies. The reservoir is designed such that that the liquid metal does not leave the reservoir even when in liquid state. The laser diode assembly further includes a lid with one or more fin structures that extend into the reservoir and are in contact with the metal in the reservoir.

Deri, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA); Kotovsky, Jack (Oakland, CA); Spadaccini, Christopher M. (Oakland, CA)

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Cooling with a Whole House Fan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCoolWhy Do FansCooling

402

Cool Muscles: Storing Elastic Energy for Flight | Advanced Photon Source  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControlsCool MagneticCool

403

PHYSICS ASSEMBLY LABORATORY HAER NO. SC-43  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizingTools Software and Tools Chos ChosPETScASSEMBLY

404

Spent Fuel Test-Climax: An evaluation of the technical feasibility of geologic storage of spent nuclear fuel in granite: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site, eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized. When test data indicated that the test objectives were met during the 3-year storage phase, the spent-fuel canisters were retrieved and the thermal sources were de-energized. The project demonstrated the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner. In addition to emplacement and retrieval operations, three exchanges of spent-fuel assemblies between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility, conducted during the storage phase, furthered this demonstration. The test led to development of a technical measurements program. To meet these objectives, nearly 1000 instruments and a computer-based data acquisition system were deployed. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data were recorded on a continuing basis for the three-year storage phase and six-month monitored cool-down of the test. This report summarizes the engineering and scientific endeavors which led to successful design and execution of the test. The design, fabrication, and construction of all facilities and handling systems are discussed, in the context of test objectives and a safety assessment. The discussion progresses from site characterization and experiment design through data acquisition and analysis of test data in the context of design calculations. 117 refs., 52 figs., 81 tabs.

Patrick, W.C. (comp.)

1986-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Radiant cooling research scoping study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61–65° F (16–18°C) cooling supply air temperatures requiredprovide appropriate cooling with supply water no cooler thancirculation of the cooling/heating supply water through the

Moore, Timothy; Bauman, Fred; Huizenga, Charlie

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Homes & Buildings Space Heating & Cooling Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings...

407

Multiphase cooling flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I discuss the multiphase nature of the intracluster medium whose neglect can lead to overestimates of the baryon fraction of clusters by up to a factor of two. The multiphase form of the cooling flow equations are derived and reduced to a simple form for a wide class of self-similar density distributions. It is shown that steady-state cooling flows are \\emph{not} consistent with all possible emissivity profiles which can therefore be used as a test of the theory. In combination, they provide strong constraints on the mass distribution within the cooling radius.

Peter A. Thomas

1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

Natural Cooling Retrofit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the most important design considerations for any method of Natural Cool ing is the chil led water temperature range selected for use during Natural Cool ing. Figure VI shows that for a hypo thetical Chicago plant, the hours of operation for a Natural..." system on the Natural Cool ing cycle. As the pressures and flow rates of the condenser and chil led water systems are seldom the same, the designer must pay careful attention to the cross over system design to ensure harmonious operations on both...

Fenster, L. C.; Grantier, A. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Temperature and Burnup Correlated FCCI in U-10Zr Metallic Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic fuels are proposed for use in advanced sodium cooled fast reactors. The experience basis for metallic fuels is extensive and includes development and qualification of fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor I, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II, FERMI-I, and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactors. Metallic fuels provide a number of advantages over other fuel types in terms of fabricability, performance, recyclability, and safety. Key to the performance of all nuclear fuel systems is the resistance to “breach” and subsequent release of fission products and fuel constituents to the primary coolant system of the nuclear power plant. In metallic fuel, the experience is that significant fuel-cladding chemical (FCCI) interaction occurs and becomes prevalent at high power-high temperature operation and ultimately leads to fuel pin breach and failure. Empirical relationships for metallic fuel pin failure have been developed from a large body of in-pile and out of pile research, development, and experimentation. It has been found that significant in-pile acceleration of the FCCI rate is experienced over similar condition out-of-pile experiments. The study of FCCI in metallic fuels has led to the quantification of in-pile failure rates to establish an empirical time and temperature dependent failure limit for fuel elements. Up until now the understanding of FCCI layer formation has been limited to data generated in EBR-II experiments. This dissertation provides new FCCI data extracted from the MFF-series of metallic fuel irradiations performed in the FFTF. These fuel assemblies contain valuable information on the formation of FCCI in metallic fuels at a variety of temperature and burnup conditions and in fuel with axial fuel height three times longer than EBR-II experiments. The longer fuel column in the FFTF and the fuel pins examined have significantly different flux, power, temperature, and FCCI profiles than that found in similar tests conducted in the EBR-II and study of the differences between the two fuel systems is critical for design of large advanced sodium cooled fast reactor systems. Comparing FCCI layer formation data between FFTF and EBR-II indicates that the same diffusion model can be used to represent the two systems when considering time, temperature, burnup history, and axial temperature and power profiles. This dissertation shows that FCCI formation peaks further below the top of the fuel column in FFTF experiments than has been observed in EBR-II experiments. The work provided in this dissertation will help forward the design of advanced metallic fuel systems for advanced sodium cooled fast reactors by allowing the prediction of FCCI layer formation in full length reactor designs. This will allow the accurate lifetime prediction of fuel performance capability for new advanced sodium cooled fast reactors with extended core designs.

William J. Carmack

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Experimental validation of the DARWIN2.3 package for fuel cycle applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DARWIN package, developed by the CEA and its French partners (AREVA and EDF) provides the required parameters for fuel cycle applications: fuel inventory, decay heat, activity, neutron, {gamma}, {alpha}, {beta} sources and spectrum, radiotoxicity. This paper presents the DARWIN2.3 experimental validation for fuel inventory and decay heat calculations on Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). In order to validate this code system for spent fuel inventory a large program has been undertaken, based on spent fuel chemical assays. This paper deals with the experimental validation of DARWIN2.3 for the Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Uranium Oxide (UOX) and Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel inventory calculation, focused on the isotopes involved in Burn-Up Credit (BUC) applications and decay heat computations. The calculation - experiment (C/E-1) discrepancies are calculated with the latest European evaluation file JEFF-3.1.1 associated with the SHEM energy mesh. An overview of the tendencies is obtained on a complete range of burn-up from 10 to 85 GWd/t (10 to 60 GWcVt for MOX fuel). The experimental validation of the DARWIN2.3 package for decay heat calculation is performed using calorimetric measurements carried out at the Swedish Interim Spent Fuel Storage Facility for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies, covering a large burn-up (20 to 50 GWd/t) and cooling time range (10 to 30 years). (authors)

San-Felice, L.; Eschbach, R.; Bourdot, P. [DEN, DER, CEA-Cadarache, F-13108 ST Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Tsilanizara, A.; Huynh, T. D. [DEN, DM2S, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Ourly, H. [EDF, R and D, 1 av. General de Gaulle, F-92131 Clamart Cedex (France); Thro, J. F. [AREVA, Tour AREVA, F-92084 Paris la Defense (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Fuel processor and method for generating hydrogen for fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing a H.sub.2 rich gas stream includes supplying an O.sub.2 rich gas, steam, and fuel to an inner reforming zone of a fuel processor that includes a partial oxidation catalyst and a steam reforming catalyst or a combined partial oxidation and stream reforming catalyst. The method also includes contacting the O.sub.2 rich gas, steam, and fuel with the partial oxidation catalyst and the steam reforming catalyst or the combined partial oxidation and stream reforming catalyst in the inner reforming zone to generate a hot reformate stream. The method still further includes cooling the hot reformate stream in a cooling zone to produce a cooled reformate stream. Additionally, the method includes removing sulfur-containing compounds from the cooled reformate stream by contacting the cooled reformate stream with a sulfur removal agent. The method still further includes contacting the cooled reformate stream with a catalyst that converts water and carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and H.sub.2 in a water-gas-shift zone to produce a final reformate stream in the fuel processor.

Ahmed, Shabbir (Naperville, IL); Lee, Sheldon H. D. (Willowbrook, IL); Carter, John David (Bolingbrook, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Myers, Deborah J. (Lisle, IL)

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

412

Numerical and experimental validation of transient modelling for Scramjet active cooling with supercritical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical and experimental validation of transient modelling for Scramjet active cooling of the engine. In order to simulate the behaviour of a complete actively cooled scramjet, a one for supercritical fuel under pyrolysis. This model is called RESPIRE (French acronym for Scramjet Cooling

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

413

1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity Natural Gas Power Heat + Cooling Electricity Cooling Natural GasNatural Gas or Biogas Fuel Cell H Excess for Our Energy Future 5 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.govSource: US DOE 10/2010 #12;Biogas Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov #12;Biogas Resource Example: Methane from Waste Water

414

Sisyphus Cooling of Lithium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser cooling to sub-Doppler temperatures by optical molasses is thought to be inhibited in atoms with unresolved, near-degenerate hyperfine structure in the excited state. We demonstrate that such cooling is possible in one to three dimensions, not only near the standard D2 line for laser cooling, but over a range extending to the D1 line. Via a combination of Sisyphus cooling followed by adiabatic expansion, we reach temperatures as low as 40 \\mu K, which corresponds to atomic velocities a factor of 2.6 above the limit imposed by a single photon recoil. Our method requires modest laser power at a frequency within reach of standard frequency locking methods. It is largely insensitive to laser power, polarization and detuning, magnetic fields, and initial hyperfine populations. Our results suggest that optical molasses should be possible with all alkali species.

Paul Hamilton; Geena Kim; Trinity Joshi; Biswaroop Mukherjee; Daniel Tiarks; Holger Müller

2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

415

Optimization of Cooling Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A cooling water system can be optimized by operation at the highest possible cycles of concentration without risking sealing and fouling on heat exchanger surfaces. The way to optimize will be shown, with a number of examples of new systems....

Matson, J.

416

Global Cool Cities Alliance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently supporting the Global Cool Cities Alliance (GCCA), a non-profit organization that works with cities, regions, and national governments to speed the...

417

Laser cooling of solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

Epstein, Richard I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor [UNM

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Assembly of a Molecular Needle, from the Bottom Up  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication2ArgonneAssembly of a MolecularAssembly of a

419

Self-Assembling Circuits Plasticity in Self-Assembly: Templating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-Assembling Circuits Plasticity in Self-Assembly: Templating Generates Functionally Different on a combination of self-assembly and external guidance. We demonstrate the self-assembly of mm-sized components of a template--that is, by the geometry of the volume in which the self-assembly proceeds. The components carry

Prentiss, Mara

420

Fossil fuels -- future fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fuel assemblies cooling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Flexible Assembly Solar Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2007-2010 BrightSource Energy, Inc. All rights reserved. 1 Flexible Assembly Solar Technology Binyamin Koretz Director, Strategic Planning & IP 2 Proprietary &...

422

Composite turbine bucket assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite turbine blade assembly includes a ceramic blade including an airfoil portion, a shank portion and an attachment portion; and a transition assembly adapted to attach the ceramic blade to a turbine disk or rotor, the transition assembly including first and second transition components clamped together, trapping said ceramic airfoil therebetween. Interior surfaces of the first and second transition portions are formed to mate with the shank portion and the attachment portion of the ceramic blade, and exterior surfaces of said first and second transition components are formed to include an attachment feature enabling the transition assembly to be attached to the turbine rotor or disk.

Liotta, Gary Charles; Garcia-Crespo, Andres

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

423

Numerical Simulation of Transpiration Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University, Templergraben 55, 52056 Aachen SUMMARY Transpiration cooling using ceramic matrix composite (CMC

424

Laser Cooling of Matter INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- velopment of techniques that have allowed the ion motion to be cooled into the ground state of the confiningLaser Cooling of Matter INTRODUCTION Laser cooling of neutral atoms in the past decades has been a breakthrough in the understanding of their dy- namics and led to the seminal proposals of laser cooling

Kaiser, Robin

425

Rotating diffuser for pressure recovery in a steam cooling circuit of a gas turbine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The buckets of a gas turbine are steam-cooled via a bore tube assembly having concentric supply and spent cooling steam return passages rotating with the rotor. A diffuser is provided in the return passage to reduce the pressure drop. In a combined cycle system, the spent return cooling steam with reduced pressure drop is combined with reheat steam from a heat recovery steam generator for flow to the intermediate pressure turbine. The exhaust steam from the high pressure turbine of the combined cycle unit supplies cooling steam to the supply conduit of the gas turbine.

Eldrid, Sacheverel Q. (Saratoga Springs, NY); Salamah, Samir A. (Niskayuna, NY); DeStefano, Thomas Daniel (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Demonstration of Emitted-Neutron Computed Tomography to Count Fuel Pins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report demonstration of emitted-neutron computed tomography using fast fission neutrons to infer the geometry of sources of special nuclear material (SNM) such as fuel pins. In a proof-of-concept measurement at the Idaho National Laboratory s (INL s) Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) facility, an array of unirradiated Pu MOX fuel rodlets in a soup can were imaged, and a bias defect consisting of a single rodlet containing Pu replaced by one containing depleted uranium (DU) was detected. The imaging system employed in the demonstration is based on a newly constructed array of pixelated neutron detectors that are suitable for arrangement in a close-packed imaging array and whose active volume consists of liquid scintillator EJ-309 which allows neutron-gamma discrimination via pulse shape to enable pure fast-neutron imaging. The imaging array was used along with a radial collimator aperture in order to perform high quality fast-neutron imaging where tomographic reconstruction of slices through an object resolve neutron sources similar in dimension to a fuel pellet, or about 1 cm. Measurements were performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with neutron sources in addition to those performed at the INL s ZPPR facility with Pu MOX fuel rodlets. An analogous capability to detect single-pin defects in spent fuel assemblies would be desirable, such as for safeguards verification measurements of spent fuel assemblies just prior to transferring them from the spent fuel cooling pool to long term dry cask storage. This paper describes the design and construction of the present imager, characterization measurements with neutron sources at ORNL, measurements with SNM at INL s ZPPR facility, and feasibility of building an analogous imager for spent fuel measurements.

Hausladen, Paul [ORNL] [ORNL; Blackston, Matthew A [ORNL] [ORNL; Brubaker, E. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Chichester, David [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)] [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marleau, P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)] [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Newby, Robert Jason [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Demonstration of Emitted-Neutron Computed Tomography to Count Fuel Pins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we report demonstration of emitted-neutron computed tomography using fast fission neutrons to infer the geometry of sources of special nuclear material (SNM) such as fuel pins. In a proof-of-concept measurement at the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) facility, an array of unirradiated Pu MOX fuel rodlets in a soup can were imaged, and a bias defect consisting of a single rodlet containing Pu replaced by one containing depleted uranium (DU) was detected. The imaging system employed in the demonstration is based on a newly constructed array of pixelated neutron detectors that are suitable for arrangement in a close-packed imaging array and whose active volume consists of liquid scintillator EJ-309 which allows neutron-gamma discrimination via pulse shape to enable pure fast-neutron imaging. The imaging array was used along with a radial collimator aperture in order to perform high quality fast-neutron imaging where tomographic reconstruction of slices through an object resolve neutron sources similar in dimension to a fuel pellet, or about 1 cm. Measurements were performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with neutron sources in addition to those performed at the INL’s ZPPR facility with Pu MOX fuel rodlets. An analogous capability to detect single-pin defects in spent fuel assemblies would be desirable, such as for safeguards verification measurements of spent fuel assemblies just prior to transferring them from the spent fuel cooling pool to long term dry cask storage. This paper describes the design and construction of the present imager, characterization measurements with neutron sources at ORNL, measurements with SNM at INL’s ZPPR facility, and feasibility of building an analogous imager for spent fuel measurements.

P. A. Hausladen; M. A. Blackston; E. Brubaker; D. L. Chichester; P. Marleau; R. J. Newby

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combustor assembly in a gas turbine engine. The combustor assembly includes a combustor device coupled to a main engine casing, a first fuel injection system, a transition duct, and an intermediate duct. The combustor device includes a flow sleeve for receiving pressurized air and a liner disposed radially inwardly from the flow sleeve. The first fuel injection system provides fuel that is ignited with the pressurized air creating first working gases. The intermediate duct is disposed between the liner and the transition duct and defines a path for the first working gases to flow from the liner to the transition duct. An intermediate duct inlet portion is associated with a liner outlet and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the liner. An intermediate duct outlet portion is associated with a transition duct inlet section and allows movement between the intermediate duct and the transition duct.

Wiebe, David J; Fox, Timothy A

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

429

Determining Plutonium Mass in Spent Fuel with Nondestructive Assay Techniques -- Preliminary Modeling Results Emphasizing Integration among Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are a variety of motivations for quantifying Pu in spent (used) fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthen the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies to safeguards nuclear facilities, quantifying shipper/receiver difference, determining the input accountability value at reprocessing facilities and providing quantitative input to burnup credit determination for repositories. For the purpose of determining the Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies, twelve NDA techniques were identified that provide information about the composition of an assembly. A key point motivating the present research path is the realization that none of these techniques, in isolation, is capable of both (1) quantifying the elemental Pu mass of an assembly and (2) detecting the diversion of a significant number of pins. As such, the focus of this work is determining how to best integrate 2 or 3 techniques into a system that can quantify elemental Pu and to assess how well this system can detect material diversion. Furthermore, it is important economically to down-select among the various techniques before advancing to the experimental phase. In order to achieve this dual goal of integration and down-selection, a Monte Carlo library of PWR assemblies was created and is described in another paper at Global 2009 (Fensin et al.). The research presented here emphasizes integration among techniques. An overview of a five year research plan starting in 2009 is given. Preliminary modeling results for the Monte Carlo assembly library are presented for 3 NDA techniques: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, and Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence. As part of the focus on integration, the concept of"Pu isotopic correlation" is discussed and the role of cooling time determination.

Tobin, S. J.; Fensin, M. L.; Ludewigt, B. A.; Menlove, H. O.; Quiter, B. J.; Sandoval, N. P.; Swinhoe, M. T.; Thompson, S. J.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

430

Spacer grid assembly and locking mechanism  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A spacer grid assembly is disclosed for retaining a plurality of fuel rods in substantially parallel spaced relation, the spacer grids being formed with rhombic openings defining contact means for engaging from one to four fuel rods arranged in each opening, the spacer grids being of symmetric configuration with their rhombic openings being asymmetrically offset to permit inversion and relative rotation of the similar spacer grids for improved support of the fuel rods. An improved locking mechanism includes tie bars having chordal surfaces to facilitate their installation in slotted circular openings of the spacer grids, the tie rods being rotatable into locking engagement with the slotted openings.

Snyder, Jr., Harold J. (Rancho Santa Fe, CA); Veca, Anthony R. (San Diego, CA); Donck, Harry A. (San Diego, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

High speed door assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high speed door assembly is described, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

Shapiro, C.

1993-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

432

High speed door assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

Shapiro, Carolyn (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Turbine disc sealing assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A disc seal assembly for use in a turbine engine. The disc seal assembly includes a plurality of outwardly extending sealing flange members that define a plurality of fluid pockets. The sealing flange members define a labyrinth flow path therebetween to limit leakage between a hot gas path and a disc cavity in the turbine engine.

Diakunchak, Ihor S.

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

434

Transmutation Dynamics: Impacts of Multi-Recycling on Fuel Cycle Performances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a physics standpoint, it is feasible to sustain continuous multi-recycle in either thermal or fast reactors. In Fiscal Year 2009, transmutaton work at INL provided important new insight, caveats, and tools on multi-recycle. Multi-recycle of MOX, even with all the transuranics, is possible provided continuous enrichment of the uranium phase to ~6.5% and also limitting the transuranic enrichment to slightly less than 8%. Multi-recycle of heterogeneous-IMF assemblies is possible with continuous enrichment of the UOX pins to ~4.95% and having =60 of the 264 fuel pins being inter-matrix. A new tool enables quick assessment of the impact of different cooling times on isotopic evolution. The effect of cooling time was found to be almost as controlling on higher mass actinide concentrations in fuel as the selection of thermal versus fast neutron spectra. A new dataset was built which provides on-the-fly estimates of gamma and neutron dose in MOX fuels as a function of the isotopic evolution. All studies this year focused on the impact of dynamic feedback due to choices made in option space. Both the equilibrium fuel cycle concentrations and the transient time to reach equilibrium for each isotope were evaluated over a range of reactor, reprocessing and cooling time combinations. New bounding cases and analysis methods for evaluating both reactor safety and radiation worker safety were established. This holistic collection of physics analyses and methods gives improved resolution of fuel cycle options, and impacts thereof, over that of previous ad-hoc and single-point analyses.

S. Bays; S. Piet; M. Pope; G. Youinou; A. Dumontier; D. Hawn

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Passive containment cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

Billig, Paul F. (San Jose, CA); Cooke, Franklin E. (San Jose, CA); Fitch, James R. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Passive containment cooling system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

437

Constrained space camera assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A constrained space camera assembly which is intended to be lowered through a hole into a tank, a borehole or another cavity. The assembly includes a generally cylindrical chamber comprising a head and a body and a wiring-carrying conduit extending from the chamber. Means are included in the chamber for rotating the body about the head without breaking an airtight seal formed therebetween. The assembly may be pressurized and accompanied with a pressure sensing means for sensing if a breach has occurred in the assembly. In one embodiment, two cameras, separated from their respective lenses, are installed on a mounting apparatus disposed in the chamber. The mounting apparatus includes means allowing both longitudinal and lateral movement of the cameras. Moving the cameras longitudinally focuses the cameras, and moving the cameras laterally away from one another effectively converges the cameras so that close objects can be viewed. The assembly further includes means for moving lenses of different magnification forward of the cameras.

Heckendorn, Frank M. (Aiken, SC); Anderson, Erin K. (Augusta, GA); Robinson, Casandra W. (Trenton, SC); Haynes, Harriet B. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is p