National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fte full-time equivalent

  1. PJnazFte

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ., .: . . . 1 I . . ' ; .2. . : .' : .. .,~ .' _. ,' ~ ,.:... :- . : Jr ~ttuntion: PJnazFte :fm of wxural the LC' ?SU~S cubic , feet dEa= ax3 (11, ., 1 ' . ,:,.. C& & and ' .. : ,. ; ws .ite " -:.., , ' . 1.. . . :

  2. Neutron dose equivalent meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olsher, Richard H. (Los Alamos, NM); Hsu, Hsiao-Hua (Los Alamos, NM); Casson, William H. (Los Alamos, NM); Vasilik, Dennis G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kleck, Jeffrey H. (Menlo Park, CA); Beverding, Anthony (Foster City, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A neutron dose equivalent detector for measuring neutron dose capable of accurately responding to neutron energies according to published fluence to dose curves. The neutron dose equivalent meter has an inner sphere of polyethylene, with a middle shell overlying the inner sphere, the middle shell comprising RTV.RTM. silicone (organosiloxane) loaded with boron. An outer shell overlies the middle shell and comprises polyethylene loaded with tungsten. The neutron dose equivalent meter defines a channel through the outer shell, the middle shell, and the inner sphere for accepting a neutron counter tube. The outer shell is loaded with tungsten to provide neutron generation, increasing the neutron dose equivalent meter's response sensitivity above 8 MeV.

  3. NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History U.S. 144,086 152,538 148,859 150,870 148,450 139,621 1973-2016

  4. Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, J

    2011-05-31

    This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

  5. NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Sep-15 Oct-15 Nov-15 Dec-15 Jan-16 Feb-16 View History U.S. 144,086 152,538 148,859 150,870 148,450 139,621 1973-2016

    Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012

  6. Waste Determination Equivalency - 12172

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Rebecca D.

    2012-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility encompassing approximately 800 square kilometers near Aiken, South Carolina which began operations in the 1950's with the mission to produce nuclear materials. The SRS contains fifty-one tanks (2 stabilized, 49 yet to be closed) distributed between two liquid radioactive waste storage facilities at SRS containing carbon steel underground tanks with storage capacities ranging from 2,800,000 to 4,900,000 liters. Treatment of the liquid waste from these tanks is essential both to closing older tanks and to maintaining space needed to treat the waste that is eventually vitrified or disposed of onsite. Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2005 (NDAA) provides the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), a methodology to determine that certain waste resulting from prior reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel are not high-level radioactive waste if it can be demonstrated that the waste meets the criteria set forth in Section 3116(a) of the NDAA. The Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the NRC, signed a determination in January 2006, pursuant to Section 3116(a) of the NDAA, for salt waste disposal at the SRS Saltstone Disposal Facility. This determination is based, in part, on the Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site and supporting references, a document that describes the planned methods of liquid waste treatment and the resulting waste streams. The document provides descriptions of the proposed methods for processing salt waste, dividing them into 'Interim Salt Processing' and later processing through the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Interim Salt Processing is separated into Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) and Actinide Removal Process/Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (ARP/MCU). The Waste Determination was signed by the Secretary of Energy in January of 2006 based on proposed processing techniques with the expectation that it could be revised as new processing capabilities became viable. Once signed, however, it became evident that any changes would require lengthy review and another determination signed by the Secretary of Energy. With the maturation of additional salt removal technologies and the extension of the SWPF start-up date, it becomes necessary to define 'equivalency' to the processes laid out in the original determination. For the purposes of SRS, any waste not processed through Interim Salt Processing must be processed through SWPF or an equivalent process, and therefore a clear statement of the requirements for a process to be equivalent to SWPF becomes necessary. (authors)

  7. Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience The referenced ...

  8. Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Experience | Department of Energy Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience The referenced document has been used by the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to grant equivalencies to candidates undergoing qualification as a Facility Representative (FR) using the FR Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS). Since the generation of the referenced

  9. Equivalence in Ventilation and Indoor Air Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max; Walker, Iain; Logue, Jennifer

    2011-08-01

    We ventilate buildings to provide acceptable indoor air quality (IAQ). Ventilation standards (such as American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Enginners [ASHRAE] Standard 62) specify minimum ventilation rates without taking into account the impact of those rates on IAQ. Innovative ventilation management is often a desirable element of reducing energy consumption or improving IAQ or comfort. Variable ventilation is one innovative strategy. To use variable ventilation in a way that meets standards, it is necessary to have a method for determining equivalence in terms of either ventilation or indoor air quality. This study develops methods to calculate either equivalent ventilation or equivalent IAQ. We demonstrate that equivalent ventilation can be used as the basis for dynamic ventilation control, reducing peak load and infiltration of outdoor contaminants. We also show that equivalent IAQ could allow some contaminants to exceed current standards if other contaminants are more stringently controlled.

  10. Nearly Equivalent Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hydrogen Bonding in 1,3,5-Triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene at High Pressure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nearly Equivalent Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen ...

  11. The endotopism semigroups of an equivalence relation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuchok, Yu V; Toichkina, E A

    2014-05-31

    In this work we investigate six types of endotopism semigroups for a given equivalence relation. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of all such endotopisms are presented. Conditions for the regularity and coregularity of each of the endotopism semigroups of agiven type are established. The notion of the endotype of abinary relation with respect to its endotopisms is introduced and the endotype of an arbitrary equivalence relation is calculated. Bibliography: 26 titles.

  12. Equivalence between XY and dimerized models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Roncaglia, Marco

    2010-06-15

    The spin-1/2 chain with XY anisotropic coupling in the plane and the XX isotropic dimerized chain are shown to be equivalent in the bulk. For finite systems, we prove that the equivalence is exact in given parity sectors, after taking care of the precise boundary conditions. The proof is given constructively by finding unitary transformations that map the models onto each other. Moreover, we considerably generalized our mapping and showed that even in the case of fully site-dependent couplings the XY chain can be mapped onto an XX model. This result has potential application in the study of disordered systems.

  13. CP Violation, Neutral Currents, and Weak Equivalence

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Fitch, V. L.

    1972-03-23

    Within the past few months two excellent summaries of the state of our knowledge of the weak interactions have been presented. Correspondingly, we will not attempt a comprehensive review but instead concentrate this discussion on the status of CP violation, the question of the neutral currents, and the weak equivalence principle.

  14. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 16, Equivalenci...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 16, Equivalencies and Exemptions Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 16, Equivalencies and Exemptions June...

  15. Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in ...

  16. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan- Chapter 16, Equivalencies and Exemptions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2016 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 16, Equivalencies and Exemptions Describes DOE Headquarters procedures for requesting Equivalencies and Exemptions to DOE security directives.

  17. Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 16, Equivalenci...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6, Equivalencies and Exemptions Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 16, Equivalencies and Exemptions June 2015 2015 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan...

  18. Chapter_16_Equivalencies_and_Exemptions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6 Equivalencies and Exemptions DOE security orders and manuals often require certain measures to be taken to protect DOE security interests. In some cases, a DOE organization may be unable to comply with the requirements as specified in the directive, but can achieve the security goal in another equally effective manner. In other cases, the security requirement cannot be met as prescribed. DOE Order 251.1C, Departmental Directives Program, Paragraph 6a(3)(c), establishes a process for requesting

  19. Equivalent Circuit Modeling of Hysteresis Motors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitao, J J; Scharlemann, E T; Kirkendall, B A

    2009-08-31

    We performed a literature review and found that many equivalent circuit models of hysteresis motors in use today are incorrect. The model by Miyairi and Kataoka (1965) is the correct one. We extended the model by transforming it to quadrature coordinates, amenable to circuit or digital simulation. 'Hunting' is an oscillatory phenomenon often observed in hysteresis motors. While several works have attempted to model the phenomenon with some partial success, we present a new complete model that predicts hunting from first principles.

  20. Equivalencies/Exemptions - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equivalencies/Exemptions by Website Administrator Microsoft Word Document icon Action_Memo_for_Exemptions or Equivalencies.doc - Microsoft Word Document, 31 KB (32256 bytes) Document Actions Print this

  1. Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Q. Richardson

    2012-06-28

    Final Technical Report for the Recovery Act Project for the Installation of a Low Flow Unit at the Abiquiu Hydroelectric Facility. The Abiquiu hydroelectric facility existed with two each 6.9 MW vertical flow Francis turbine-generators. This project installed a new 3.1 MW horizontal flow low flow turbine-generator. The total plant flow range to capture energy and generate power increased from between 250 and 1,300 cfs to between 75 and 1,550 cfs. Fifty full time equivalent (FTE) construction jobs were created for this project - 50% (or 25 FTE) were credited to ARRA funding due to the ARRA 50% project cost match. The Abiquiu facility has increased capacity, increased efficiency and provides for an improved aquatic environment owing to installed dissolved oxygen capabilities during traditional low flow periods in the Rio Chama. A new powerhouse addition was constructed to house the new turbine-generator equipment.

  2. PMCDP Certification and Equivalency Guidelines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Equivalency Guidelines PMCDP Certification and Equivalency Guidelines This Certification and Equivalency Guidelines (CEG) establishes the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) competency requirements for all DOE federal project management personnel to be certified as DOE Federal Projects Directors (FPDs) in accordance with DOE Order 361.1C, Acquisition Career Management Program, Chapter V (Project Management Career Development Program [PMCDP]). The purpose of the CEG is to provide requirements for

  3. Development of an Equivalent Wind Plant Power-Curve: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wan, Y. H.; Ela, E.; Orwig, K.

    2010-06-01

    Development of an equivalent wind plant power-curve becomes highly desirable and useful in predicting plant output for a given wind forecast. Such a development is described and summarized in this paper.

  4. Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent continuum elastic compliance of fractured rock masses Authors: Gutierrez, Marte ; Youn, Dong-Joon Publication Date: 2015-12-01 OSTI Identifier: 1224355 Grant/Contract

  5. Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed Media This study presents discrete and continuum simulations of shock wave propagating through jointed media. The simulations were performed using the Lagrangian hydrocode GEODYN-L with joints treated explicitly using an advanced contact algorithm. They studied both

  6. Choice of an equivalent black body solar temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parrott, J.E. )

    1993-09-01

    In the course of modeling the performance of photovoltaic solar cells for space use, it became desirable to set up a black body spectrum equivalent to the standard Air Mass Zero (AMO) solar spectrum. A method of calculating the equivalent black body solar surface temperature, based on irradiance and photon number flux derived from the AMO spectrum, is presented. It does not require knowledge of the angle subtended by the sun at the earth's surface. The value obtained is 5730 +/- 90 K.

  7. Nearly Equivalent Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1,3,5-Triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene at High Pressure (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Nearly Equivalent Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in 1,3,5-Triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene at High Pressure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nearly Equivalent Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in 1,3,5-Triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene at High Pressure Authors: Manaa, M R ; Fried, L E Publication Date: 2011-10-24 OSTI Identifier: 1226974 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-508473

  8. Wave propagation in equivalent continuums representing truss lattice materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Messner, Mark C.; Barham, Matthew I.; Kumar, Mukul; Barton, Nathan R.

    2015-07-29

    Stiffness scales linearly with density in stretch-dominated lattice meta-materials offering the possibility of very light yet very stiff structures. Current additive manufacturing techniques can assemble structures consisting of these lattice materials, but the design of such structures will require accurate, efficient simulation techniques. Equivalent continuum models have several advantages over discrete truss models of stretch dominated lattices, including computational efficiency and ease of model construction. However, the development an equivalent model suitable for representing the dynamic response of a periodic truss is complicated by microinertial effects. This paper derives a dynamic equivalent continuum model for periodic truss structures and verifiesmore » it against detailed finite element simulations. The model must incorporate microinertial effects to accurately reproduce long-wavelength characteristics of the response such as anisotropic elastic soundspeeds. The formulation presented here also improves upon previous work by preserving equilibrium at truss joints for affine lattice deformation and by improving numerical stability by eliminating vertices in the effective yield surface.« less

  9. Equivalence of optical and electrical noise equivalent power of hybrid NbTiN-Al microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssen, R. M. J.; Endo, A.; Visser, P. J. de; Klapwijk, T. M.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2014-11-10

    We have measured and compared the response of hybrid NbTiN-Al Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) to changes in bath temperature and illumination by sub-mm radiation. We show that these two stimulants have an equivalent effect on the resonance feature of hybrid MKIDs. We determine an electrical noise equivalent power (NEP) from the measured temperature responsivity, quasiparticle recombination time, superconducting transition temperature, and noise spectrum, all of which can be measured in a dark environment. For the two hybrid NbTiN-Al MKIDs studied in detail, the electrical NEP is within a factor of two of the optical NEP, which is measured directly using a blackbody source.

  10. II V It.. "/.::::JIJtCl.4 National Nuclear Security Admfnistratlon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The analysis identified a gap of 1.0 Full Time Employee (FTE) to perform the federal ... U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce or counter global threats to national and global security ...

  11. Distributed resonance self-shielding using the equivalence principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altiparmakov, D.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents an extension of the equivalence principle to allow distributed resonance self-shielding in a multi-region fuel configuration. Rational expansion of fuel-to-fuel collision probability is applied in order to establish equivalence between the actual fuel configuration and a homogeneous mixture of hydrogen and resonant absorber, which is a commonly used model to calculate library tables of resonance integrals. The main steps in derivation are given along with the basic physics assumptions on which the presented approach relies. The method has been implemented in the lattice code WIMS-AECL and routinely used for calculation of CANDU-type reactor lattices. Its capabilities are illustrated by comparison of WIMS-AECL and MCNP results of {sup 238}U resonance capture in a CANDU lattice cell. In order to determine optimal rational expansion of fuel-to-fuel collision probability, the calculations were carried out by varying the number of rational terms from 1 to 6. The results show that 4 terms are sufficient. The further increase of the number of terms affects the computing time, while the impact on accuracy is negligible. To illustrate the convergence of the results, the fuel subdivision is gradually refined varying the number of fuel pin subdivisions from 1 to 32 equal-area annuli. The results show very good agreement with the reference MCNP calculation. (authors)

  12. On The Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: On The Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On The Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions You are ...

  13. Demonstration of the Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Demonstration of the Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration of the Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin ...

  14. The impact of equivalence ratio oscillations on combustion dynamics in a backward-facing step combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murat Altay, H.; Speth, Raymond L.; Hudgins, Duane E.; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2009-11-15

    The combustion dynamics of propane-air flames are investigated in an atmospheric pressure, atmospheric inlet temperature, lean, premixed backward-facing step combustor. We modify the location of the fuel injector to examine the impact of equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame on the combustion dynamics. Simultaneous pressure, velocity, heat-release rate and equivalence ratio measurements and high-speed video from the experiments are used to identify and characterize several distinct operating modes. When the fuel is injected far upstream from the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame is steady and the combustion dynamics are controlled only by flame-vortex interactions. In this case, different dynamic regimes are observed depending on the operating parameters. When the fuel is injected close to the step, the equivalence ratio arriving at the flame exhibits oscillations. In the presence of equivalence ratio oscillations, the measured sound pressure level is significant across the entire range of lean mean equivalence ratios even if the equivalence ratio oscillations arriving at the flame are out-of-phase with the pressure oscillations. The combustion dynamics are governed primarily by the flame-vortex interactions, while the equivalence ratio oscillations have secondary effects. The equivalence ratio oscillations could generate variations in the combustion dynamics in each cycle under some operating conditions, destabilize the flame at the entire range of the lean equivalence ratios, and increase the value of the mean equivalence ratio at the lean blowout limit. (author)

  15. Periodic equivalence ratio modulation method and apparatus for controlling combustion instability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, George A.; Janus, Michael C.; Griffith, Richard A.

    2000-01-01

    The periodic equivalence ratio modulation (PERM) method and apparatus significantly reduces and/or eliminates unstable conditions within a combustion chamber. The method involves modulating the equivalence ratio for the combustion device, such that the combustion device periodically operates outside of an identified unstable oscillation region. The equivalence ratio is modulated between preselected reference points, according to the shape of the oscillation region and operating parameters of the system. Preferably, the equivalence ratio is modulated from a first stable condition to a second stable condition, and, alternatively, the equivalence ratio is modulated from a stable condition to an unstable condition. The method is further applicable to multi-nozzle combustor designs, whereby individual nozzles are alternately modulated from stable to unstable conditions. Periodic equivalence ratio modulation (PERM) is accomplished by active control involving periodic, low frequency fuel modulation, whereby low frequency fuel pulses are injected into the main fuel delivery. Importantly, the fuel pulses are injected at a rate so as not to affect the desired time-average equivalence ratio for the combustion device.

  16. An analytical method to calculate equivalent fields to irregular symmetric and asymmetric photon fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tahmasebi Birgani, Mohamad J.; Chegeni, Nahid; Zabihzadeh, Mansoor; Hamzian, Nima

    2014-04-01

    Equivalent field is frequently used for central axis depth-dose calculations of rectangular- and irregular-shaped photon beams. As most of the proposed models to calculate the equivalent square field are dosimetry based, a simple physical-based method to calculate the equivalent square field size was used as the basis of this study. The table of the sides of the equivalent square or rectangular fields was constructed and then compared with the well-known tables by BJR and Venselaar, et al. with the average relative error percentage of 2.5 ± 2.5% and 1.5 ± 1.5%, respectively. To evaluate the accuracy of this method, the percentage depth doses (PDDs) were measured for some special irregular symmetric and asymmetric treatment fields and their equivalent squares for Siemens Primus Plus linear accelerator for both energies, 6 and 18 MV. The mean relative differences of PDDs measurement for these fields and their equivalent square was approximately 1% or less. As a result, this method can be employed to calculate equivalent field not only for rectangular fields but also for any irregular symmetric or asymmetric field.

  17. Preliminary Evaluation of the Section 1603 Treasury Grant Program for Renewable Power Projects in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Darghouth, Naim

    2010-05-05

    This article evaluates the first year of the Section 1603 Treasury cash grant program, which enables renewable power projects in the U.S. to elect cash grants in lieu of the federal tax credits that are otherwise available. To date, the program has been heavily subscribed, particularly by wind power projects, which had received 86% of the nearly $2.6 billion in grants that had been disbursed as of March 1, 2010. As of that date, 6.2 GW of the 10 GW of new wind capacity installed in the U.S. in 2009 had applied for grants in lieu of production tax credits. Roughly 2.4 GW of this wind capacity may not have otherwise been built in 2009 absent the grant program; this 2.4 GW may have supported approximately 51,600 short-term full-time-equivalent (FTE) gross job-years in the U.S. during the construction phase of these wind projects, and 3,860 longterm FTE gross jobs during the operational phase. The program’s popularity stems from the significant economic value that it provides to renewable power projects, relative to the otherwise available tax credits. Although grants reward investment rather than efficient performance, this evaluation finds no evidence at this time of either widespread “gold-plating” or performance problems.

  18. Method for detecting water equivalent of snow using secondary cosmic gamma radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, K.J.

    1997-01-14

    Water equivalent of accumulated snow determination by measurement of secondary background cosmic radiation attenuation by the snowpack. By measuring the attenuation of 3-10 MeV secondary gamma radiation it is possible to determine the water equivalent of snowpack. The apparatus is designed to operate remotely to determine the water equivalent of snow in areas which are difficult or hazardous to access during winter, accumulate the data as a function of time and transmit, by means of an associated telemetry system, the accumulated data back to a central data collection point for analysis. The electronic circuitry is designed so that a battery pack can be used to supply power. 4 figs.

  19. Method for detecting water equivalent of snow using secondary cosmic gamma radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Condreva, Kenneth J.

    1997-01-01

    Water equivalent of accumulated snow determination by measurement of secondary background cosmic radiation attenuation by the snowpack. By measuring the attentuation of 3-10 MeV secondary gamma radiation it is possible to determine the water equivalent of snowpack. The apparatus is designed to operate remotely to determine the water equivalent of snow in areas which are difficult or hazardous to access during winter, accumulate the data as a function of time and transmit, by means of an associated telemetry system, the accumulated data back to a central data collection point for analysis. The electronic circuitry is designed so that a battery pack can be used to supply power.

  20. Demonstration of a Full-core Reactivity Equivalence for FeCrAl...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Demonstration of a Full-core Reactivity Equivalence for FeCrAl Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel in BWRs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration of a Full-core ...

  1. Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High-Explosive Charges (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent High-Explosive Charges Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simulation Study of Near-Surface Coupling of Nuclear Devices vs. Equivalent High-Explosive Charges Authors: Fournier, K B ; Walton, O R ; Benjamin, R ; Dunlop, W H Publication Date: 2014-09-29 OSTI Identifier: 1171337 Report Number(s): LLNL-TR-662280 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344

  2. Demonstration of a Full-core Reactivity Equivalence for FeCrAl Enhanced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accident Tolerant Fuel in BWRs (Conference) | SciTech Connect Demonstration of a Full-core Reactivity Equivalence for FeCrAl Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel in BWRs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Demonstration of a Full-core Reactivity Equivalence for FeCrAl Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel in BWRs Authors: George, Nathan M [1] ; Powers, Jeffrey J [1] ; Maldonado, G Ivan [1] ; Worrall, Andrew [1] ; Terrani, Kurt A [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2015-01-01

  3. Development of a Full-core Reactivity Equivalence for FeCrAl Enhanced

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accident Tolerant Fuel in BWRs (Conference) | SciTech Connect Development of a Full-core Reactivity Equivalence for FeCrAl Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel in BWRs Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of a Full-core Reactivity Equivalence for FeCrAl Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuel in BWRs Authors: George, Nathan M [1] ; Powers, Jeffrey J [1] ; Maldonado, G Ivan [1] ; Worrall, Andrew [1] ; Terrani, Kurt A [1] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Publication Date: 2015-01-01 OSTI

  4. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Bcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Bcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Bcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  5. Canister storage building compliance assessment SNF project NRC equivalency criteria - HNF-SD-SNF-DB-003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLACK, D.M.

    1999-08-11

    This document presents the Project's position on compliance with the SNF Project NRC Equivalency Criteria--HNF-SD-SNF-DE-003, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Path Forward Additional NRC Requirements. No non-compliances are shown The compliance statements have been reviewed and approved by DOE. Open items are scheduled to be closed prior to project completion.

  6. Sex-specific tissue weighting factors for effective dose equivalent calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X.G. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Reece, W.D. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The effective dose equivalent was defined in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 26 in 1977 and later adopted by the U.S. Nuclear REgulatory Commission. To calculate organ doses and effective dose equivalent for external exposures using Monte Carlo simulations, sex-specific anthropomorphic phantoms and sex-specific weighting factors are always employed. This paper presents detailed mathematical derivation of a set of sex-specific tissue weighting factors and the conditions which the weighting factors must satisfy. Results of effective dose equivalent calculations using female and male phantoms exposed to monoenergetic photon beams of 0.08, 0.3, and 1.0 MeV are provided and compared with results published by other authors using different sex-specific weighting factors and phantoms. The results indicate that females always receive higher effective dose equivalent than males for the photon energies and geometries considered and that some published data may be wrong due to mistakes in deriving the sex-specific weighting factors. 17 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Creating dynamic equivalent PV circuit models with impedance spectroscopy for arc-fault modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Jay Dean; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Strauch, Jason E.; Schoenwald, David Alan

    2011-06-01

    Article 690.11 in the 2011 National Electrical Code{reg_sign} (NEC{reg_sign}) requires new photovoltaic (PV) systems on or penetrating a building to include a listed arc fault protection device. Currently there is little experimental or empirical research into the behavior of the arcing frequencies through PV components despite the potential for modules and other PV components to filter or attenuate arcing signatures that could render the arc detector ineffective. To model AC arcing signal propagation along PV strings, the well-studied DC diode models were found to inadequately capture the behavior of high frequency arcing signals. Instead dynamic equivalent circuit models of PV modules were required to describe the impedance for alternating currents in modules. The nonlinearities present in PV cells resulting from irradiance, temperature, frequency, and bias voltage variations make modeling these systems challenging. Linearized dynamic equivalent circuits were created for multiple PV module manufacturers and module technologies. The equivalent resistances and capacitances for the modules were determined using impedance spectroscopy with no bias voltage and no irradiance. The equivalent circuit model was employed to evaluate modules having irradiance conditions that could not be measured directly with the instrumentation. Although there was a wide range of circuit component values, the complex impedance model does not predict filtering of arc fault frequencies in PV strings for any irradiance level. Experimental results with no irradiance agree with the model and show nearly no attenuation for 1 Hz to 100 kHz input frequencies.

  8. Effects of fuel type and equivalence ratios on the flickering of triple flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, K.B.; Kundu, A.; Ganguly, R.; Datta, A.

    2009-02-15

    An experimental study has been conducted in axisymmetric, co-flowing triple flames with different equivalence ratios of the inner and outer reactant streams (2<{phi}{sub in}<3 and 0{<=}{phi}{sub out}<0.7). Different fuel combinations, like propane/propane, propane/methane or methane/methane in the inner and outer streams respectively, have been used in the experiments. The structures of the triple flames have been compared for the different fuel combinations and equivalence ratios. The conditions under which triple flames exhibit oscillation have been identified. During the oscillation, the non-premixed flame and the outer lean premixed flame flicker strongly, while the inner rich premixed flame remains more or less stable. The flickering frequency has been evaluated through image processing and fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the average pixel intensity of the image frames. It is observed that, for all the fuel combinations, the frequency decreases with the increase in the outer equivalence ratio, while it is relatively invariant with the change in the inner equivalence ratio. However, an increase in the inner equivalence ratio affects the structure of the flame by increasing the heights of the inner premixed flame and non-premixed flame and also enlarges the yellow soot-laden zone at the tip of the inner flame. A scaling analysis of the oscillating flames has been performed based on the measured parameters, which show a variation of Strouhal number (St) with Richardson number (Ri) as St {proportional_to} Ri{sup 0.5}. The fuel type is found to have no influence on this correlation. (author)

  9. The Equivalent Thermal Resistance of Tile Roofs with and without Batten Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A

    2013-01-01

    Clay and concrete tile roofs were installed on a fully instrumented attic test facility operating in East Tennessee s climate. Roof, attic and deck temperatures and heat flows were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventionally pigmented and direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The data were used to benchmark a computer tool for simulation of roofs and attics and the tool used to develop an approach for computing an equivalent seasonal R-value for sub-tile venting. The approach computed equal heat fluxes through the ceilings of roofs having different combinations of surface radiation properties and or building constructions. A direct nailed shingle roof served as a control for estimating the equivalent thermal resistance of the air space. Simulations were benchmarked to data in the ASHRAE Fundamentals for the thermal resistance of inclined and closed air spaces.

  10. Equivalence of integral and differential methods of generating accurately solvable potentials of the steady Schroedinger equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samsonov, B.F.

    1995-09-01

    It is proven that the well-known nonlocal (i.e., based on integral transformations) methods of generating accurately solvable potentials of the one-dimensional steady Schroedinger equation are equivalent to multiple use of the local (i.e., based on a differential transformation) method known as the Darboux transformation. New accurately solvable potentials with a hydrogen-like spectrum are obtained, and several functions of the lowest states of the discrete spectrum are presented.

  11. Flame Inhibition by Phosphorus-Containing Compounds over a Range of Equivalence Ratios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayaweera, T M; Melius, C F; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Korobeinichev, O P; Shvartsberg, V M; Shmakov, A G; Rybitskaya, I V; Curran, H

    2004-03-17

    There is much interest in the combustion mechanism of organophosphorus compounds (OPCs) due to their role as potential halon replacements in fire suppression. A continuing investigation of the inhibition activity of organophosphorus compounds under a range of equivalence ratios was performed experimentally and computationally, as measured by the burning velocity. Updates to a previous mechanism were made by the addition and modification of reactions in the mechanism for a more complete description of the recombination reactions. In this work, the laminar flame speed is measured experimentally and calculated numerically for a premixed propane/air flame, under a range of equivalence ratios, undoped and doped with dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP). A detailed investigation of the catalytic cycles involved in the recombination of key flame radicals is made for two equivalence ratios, lean and rich. From this, the importance of different catalytic cycles involved in the lean versus rich case is discussed. Although the importance of certain cycles is different under different stoichiometries, the OPCs are similarly effective across the range, demonstrating the robustness of OPCs as flame suppressants. In addition, it is shown that the phosphorus compounds are most active in the high temperature region of the flame. This may, in part, explain their high level of inhibition effectiveness.

  12. Combinatorial theory of the semiclassical evaluation of transport moments. I. Equivalence with the random matrix approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkolaiko, G.; Kuipers, J.

    2013-11-15

    To study electronic transport through chaotic quantum dots, there are two main theoretical approaches. One involves substituting the quantum system with a random scattering matrix and performing appropriate ensemble averaging. The other treats the transport in the semiclassical approximation and studies correlations among sets of classical trajectories. There are established evaluation procedures within the semiclassical evaluation that, for several linear and nonlinear transport moments to which they were applied, have always resulted in the agreement with random matrix predictions. We prove that this agreement is universal: any semiclassical evaluation within the accepted procedures is equivalent to the evaluation within random matrix theory. The equivalence is shown by developing a combinatorial interpretation of the trajectory sets as ribbon graphs (maps) with certain properties and exhibiting systematic cancellations among their contributions. Remaining trajectory sets can be identified with primitive (palindromic) factorisations whose number gives the coefficients in the corresponding expansion of the moments of random matrices. The equivalence is proved for systems with and without time reversal symmetry.

  13. Formulating a simplified equivalent representation of distribution circuits for PV impact studies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Matthew J.; Broderick, Robert Joseph; Grijalva, Santiago

    2013-04-01

    With an increasing number of Distributed Generation (DG) being connected on the distribution system, a method for simplifying the complexity of the distribution system to an equivalent representation of the feeder is advantageous for streamlining the interconnection study process. The general characteristics of the system can be retained while reducing the modeling effort required. This report presents a method of simplifying feeders to only specified buses-of-interest. These buses-of-interest can be potential PV interconnection locations or buses where engineers want to verify a certain power quality. The equations and methodology are presented with mathematical proofs of the equivalence of the circuit reduction method. An example 15-bus feeder is shown with the parameters and intermediate example reduction steps to simplify the circuit to 4 buses. The reduced feeder is simulated using PowerWorld Simulator to validate that those buses operate with the same characteristics as the original circuit. Validation of the method is also performed for snapshot and time-series simulations with variable load and solar energy output data to validate the equivalent performance of the reduced circuit with the interconnection of PV.

  14. Measurements of neutron dose equivalent for a proton therapy center using uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Liu Yaxi; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Andries Niek; Keole, Sameer

    2012-06-15

    Purpose: Neutron exposure is of concern in proton therapy, and varies with beam delivery technique, nozzle design, and treatment conditions. Uniform scanning is an emerging treatment technique in proton therapy, but neutron exposure for this technique has not been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, under various treatment conditions for uniform scanning beams employed at our proton therapy center. Methods: Using a wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, ThermoScientific, MA), the authors measured H/D at 50 cm lateral to the isocenter as a function of proton range, modulation width, beam scanning area, collimated field size, and snout position. They also studied the influence of other factors on neutron dose equivalent, such as aperture material, the presence of a compensator, and measurement locations. They measured H/D for various treatment sites using patient-specific treatment parameters. Finally, they compared H/D values for various beam delivery techniques at various facilities under similar conditions. Results: H/D increased rapidly with proton range and modulation width, varying from about 0.2 mSv/Gy for a 5 cm range and 2 cm modulation width beam to 2.7 mSv/Gy for a 30 cm range and 30 cm modulation width beam when 18 Multiplication-Sign 18 cm{sup 2} uniform scanning beams were used. H/D increased linearly with the beam scanning area, and decreased slowly with aperture size and snout retraction. The presence of a compensator reduced the H/D slightly compared with that without a compensator present. Aperture material and compensator material also have an influence on neutron dose equivalent, but the influence is relatively small. H/D varied from about 0.5 mSv/Gy for a brain tumor treatment to about 3.5 mSv/Gy for a pelvic case. Conclusions: This study presents H/D as a function of various treatment parameters for uniform scanning proton beams. For similar treatment conditions, the H/D value per uncollimated beam size for uniform scanning beams was slightly lower than that from a passive scattering beam and higher than that from a pencil beam scanning beam, within a factor of 2. Minimizing beam scanning area could effectively reduce neutron dose equivalent for uniform scanning beams, down to the level close to pencil beam scanning.

  15. Measurement of neutron dose equivalent outside and inside of the treatment vault of GRID therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xudong; Charlton, Michael A.; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony Y.; Li, Ying; Papanikolaou, Nikos

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rates at the treatment vault entrance (H{sub n,D} and H{sub G}), and to study the secondary radiation to the patient in GRID therapy. The radiation activation on the grid was studied.Methods: A Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator was working at 18 MV mode with a grid manufactured by .decimal, Inc. The H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} were measured using an Andersson–Braun neutron REM meter, and a Geiger Müller counter. The radiation activation on the grid was measured after the irradiation with an ion chamber γ-ray survey meter. The secondary radiation dose equivalent to patient was evaluated by etched track detectors and OSL detectors on a RANDO{sup ®} phantom.Results: Within the measurement uncertainty, there is no significant difference between the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} with and without a grid. However, the neutron dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 35.3% lower than that without the grid when using the same field size and the same amount of monitor unit. The photon dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 44.9% lower. The measured average half-life of the radiation activation in the grid is 12.0 (±0.9) min. The activation can be categorized into a fast decay component and a slow decay component with half-lives of 3.4 (±1.6) min and 15.3 (±4.0) min, respectively. There was no detectable radioactive contamination found on the surface of the grid through a wipe test.Conclusions: This work indicates that there is no significant change of the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} in GRID therapy, compared with a conventional external beam therapy. However, the neutron and scattered photon dose equivalent to the patient decrease dramatically with the grid and can be clinical irrelevant. Meanwhile, the users of a grid should be aware of the possible high dose to the radiation worker from the radiation activation on the surface of the grid. A delay in handling the grid after the beam delivery is suggested.

  16. SU-E-T-329: Tissue-Equivalent Phantom Materials for Neutron Dosimetry in Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halg, R; Lomax, A; Clarke, S; Wieger, B; Pryser, E; Arghal, R; Pozzi, S; Bashkirov, V; Schulte, R; Schneider, U

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To characterize tissue equivalence of phantom materials in terms of secondary neutron production and dose deposition from neutrons produced in radiation therapy phantom materials in the context of proton therapy using Monte Carlo simulations and measurements. Methods: In order to study the influence of material choice on neutron production in therapeutic proton beams, Monte Carlo simulations using the Geant4 and MCNPX-PoliMi transport codes were performed to generate the neutron fields produced by protons of 155 and 200 MeV. A simple irradiation geometry was used to investigate the effect of different materials. The proton beams were stopped in slab phantoms to study the production of secondary neutrons. The investigated materials were water, Lucite, and tissue-equivalent phantom materials (CIRS Inc., Norfolk, VA). Neutron energy spectra and absorbed dose by neutrons and their secondary particles were scored. In addition, simulations were performed for reference tissues (ICRP/ICRU) to assess tissue equivalence with respect to neutron generation and transport. In order to benchmark the simulation results, measurements were performed with a system developed at the University of Michigan; organic liquid scintillators were used to detect the neutron emissions from the irradiation of tissue-equivalent materials. Additionally, the MPPost code was used to calculate the scintillator response from the MCNPX-PoliMi output. Results: The simulated energy spectra and depth dose curves of the neutrons produced in different phantom materials showed similar shape. The differences of spectra and fluences between all studied materials and reference tissues were well within the achievable precision of neutron dosimetry. The shape of the simulated detector response of the liquid scintillators agreed well with measurements on the proton beamline. Conclusion: Based on Geant4 and MCNPX-PoliMi simulations, the investigated materials appear to be suitable to study the production of neutrons in proton therapy. MC simulations were verified with neutron measurements in therapeutic proton beams. This work was funded in part by the ANDANTE grant of the European Commission in the 7th Framework Program.

  17. Equivalent circuit analysis of radiative coupling in monolithic tandem solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lan, Dongchen E-mail: d.lan@unswalumni.com; Green, Martin A.

    2015-06-29

    As solar cell efficiency improves towards the Shockley-Queisser limit, so does the radiative efficiency of the cell. For tandem stacks of cells where energy conversion efficiency now exceeds 46%, radiative coupling between the cells is becoming increasingly important to consider in cell design, measurement, and performance prediction. We show how an equivalent circuit model can capture the complex radiative interactions between cells in such tandem stacks, allowing more insight into the impact on cell performance. The circuit's use is demonstrated by deriving results relevant to the critical step of eliminating coupling effects from measured cell spectral responses.

  18. On the Equivalence of Trapped Colloids, Pinned Vortices, and Spin Ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nisoli, Cristiano

    2014-04-23

    We investigate the recently reported analogies between pinned vortices in nano-structured superconductors or colloids in optical traps, and spin ice materials. The frustration of the two models, one describing colloids and vortices, the other describing spin ice, differs essentially. However, their effective energetics is made identical by the contribution of an emergent field associated to a topological charge. This equivalence extends to the local low-energy dynamics of the ice manifold, yet breaks down in lattices of mixed coordination, because of topological charge transfer between sub-latices.

  19. Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2010-03-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

  20. Lineal energy calibration of mini tissue-equivalent gas-proportional counters (TEPC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conte, V.; Moro, D.; Colautti, P.; Grosswendt, B.

    2013-07-18

    Mini TEPCs are cylindrical gas proportional counters of 1 mm or less of sensitive volume diameter. The lineal energy calibration of these tiny counters can be performed with an external gamma-ray source. However, to do that, first a method to get a simple and precise spectral mark has to be found and then the keV/{mu}m value of this mark. A precise method (less than 1% of uncertainty) to identify this markis described here, and the lineal energy value of this mark has been measured for different simulated site sizes by using a {sup 137}Cs gamma source and a cylindrical TEPC equipped with a precision internal {sup 244}Cm alpha-particle source, and filled with propane-based tissue-equivalent gas mixture. Mini TEPCs can be calibrated in terms of lineal energy, by exposing them to {sup 137}Cesium sources, with an overall uncertainty of about 5%.

  1. An equivalent circuit model and power calculations for the APS SPX crab cavities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berenc, T. )

    2012-03-21

    An equivalent parallel resistor-inductor-capacitor (RLC) circuit with beam loading for a polarized TM110 dipole-mode cavity is developed and minimum radio-frequency (rf) generator requirements are calculated for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) short-pulse x-ray (SPX) superconducting rf (SRF) crab cavities. A beam-loaded circuit model for polarized TM110 mode crab cavities was derived. The single-cavity minimum steady-state required generator power has been determined for the APS SPX crab cavities for a storage ring current of 200mA DC current as a function of external Q for various vertical offsets including beam tilt and uncontrollable detuning. Calculations to aid machine protection considerations were given.

  2. Solvent Blending Strategy to Upgrade MCU CSSX Solvent to Equivalent Next-Generation CSSX Solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Moyer, Bruce A

    2012-12-01

    The results of the present study have validated an equal-volume blending strategy for upgrading freshly prepared CSSX solvent to a blended solvent functionally equivalent to NG-CSSX solvent. It is shown that blending fresh CSSX solvent as currently used in MCU with an equal volume of an NG-CSSX solvent concentrate of appropriate composition yields a blended solvent composition (46.5 mM of MaxCalix, 3.5 mM of BOBCalixC6, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, 3 mM of guanidine suppressor, and 1.5 mM of TOA in Isopar L) that exhibits equivalent batch ESS performance to that of the NG-CSSX solvent containing 50 mM of MaxCalix, 0.5 M of Cs-7SB, and 3 mM of guanidine suppressor in Isopar L. The solvent blend composition is robust to third-phase formation. Results also show that a blend containing up to 60% v/v of CSSX solvent could be accommodated with minimal risk. Extraction and density data for the effect of solvent concentration mimicking diluent evaporation or over-dilution of the equal-volume blended solvent are also given, providing input for setting operational limits. Given that the experiments employed all pristine chemicals, the results do not qualify a blended solvent starting with actual used MCU solvent, which can be expected to have undergone some degree of degradation. Consequently, further work should be considered to evaluate this risk and implement appropriate remediation if needed.

  3. Lean-burn hydrogen spark-ignited engines: the mechanical equivalent to the fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S.M.; Smith, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    Fuel cells are considered as the ideal power source for future vehicles, due to their high efficiency and low emissions. However, extensive use of fuel cells in light-duty vehicles is likely to be years away, due to their high manufacturing cost. Hydrogen-fueled, spark-ignited, homogeneous-charge engines offer a near-term alternative to fuel cells. Hydrogen in a spark-ignited engine can be burned at very low equivalence ratios, so that NO[sub x] emissions can be reduced to less than 10 ppm without catalyst. HC and CO emissions may result from oxidation of engine oil, but by proper design are negligible (a few ppm). Lean operation also results in increased indicated efficiency due to the thermodynamic properties of the gaseous mixture contained in the cylinder. The high effective octane number of hydrogen allows the use of a high compression ratio, further increasing engine efficiency. In this paper, a simplified engine model is used for predicting hydrogen engine efficiency and emissions. The model uses basic thermodynamic equations for the compression and expansion processes, along with an empirical correlation for heat transfer, to predict engine indicated efficiency. A friction correlation and a supercharger/turbocharger model are then used to calculate brake thermal efficiency. The model is validated with many 1345 experimental points obtained in a recent evaluation of a hydrogen research engine. The experimental data are used to adjust the empirical constants in the heat release rate and heat transfer correlation. The adjusted engine model predicts pressure traces, indicated efficiency and NO,, emissions with good accuracy over the range of speed, equivalence ratio and manifold pressure experimentally covered.

  4. Results of the remote sensing feasibility study for the uranium hexafluoride storage cylinder yard program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balick, L.K.; Bowman, D.R.; Bounds, J.H.

    1997-02-01

    The US DOE manages the safe storage of approximately 650,000 tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride remaining from the Cold War. This slightly radioactive, but chemically active, material is contained in more than 46,000 steel storage cylinders that are located at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Paducah, Kentucky; and Portsmouth, Ohio. Some of the cylinders are more than 40 years old, and approximately 17,500 are considered problem cylinders because their physical integrity is questionable. These cylinders require an annual visual inspection. The remainder of the 46,000-plus cylinders must be visually inspected every four years. Currently, the cylinder inspection program is extremely labor intensive. Because these inspections are accomplished visually, they may not be effective in the early detection of leaking cylinders. The inspection program requires approximately 12--14 full-time-equivalent (FTE) employees. At the cost of approximately $125K per FTE, this translates to $1,500K per annum just for cylinder inspection. As part of the technology-development portion of the DOE Cylinder Management Program, the DOE Office of Facility Management requested the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) to evaluate remote sensing techniques that have potential to increase the effectiveness of the inspection program and, at the same time, reduce inspection costs and personnel radiation exposure. During two site visits (March and May 1996) to the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, TN, RSL personnel tested and characterized seven different operating systems believed to detect leakage, surface contamination, thickness and corrosion of cylinder walls, and general area contamination resulting from breached cylinders. The following techniques were used and their performances are discussed: Laser-induced fluorescent imaging; Long-range alpha detection; Neutron activation analysis; Differential gamma-ray attenuation; Compton scatterometry; Active infrared inspection; and Passive thermal infrared imaging.

  5. Investigation of critical equivalence ratio and chemical speciation in flames of ethylbenzene-ethanol blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Therrien, Richard J.; Ergut, Ali; Levendis, Yiannis A.; Richter, Henning; Howard, Jack B.; Carlson, Joel B.

    2010-02-15

    This work investigates five different one-dimensional, laminar, atmospheric pressure, premixed ethanol/ethylbenzene flames (0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 90% ethanol by weight) at their soot onset threshold ({phi}{sub critical}). Liquid ethanol/ethylbenzene mixtures were pre-vaporized in nitrogen, blended with an oxygen-nitrogen mixture and, upon ignition, burned in premixed one-dimensional flames at atmospheric pressure. The flames were controlled so that each was at its visual soot onset threshold, and all had similar temperature profiles (determined by thermocouples). Fixed gases, light volatile hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbons were directly sampled at three locations in each flame. The experimental results were compared with a detailed kinetic model, and the modeling results were used to perform a reaction flux analysis of key species. The critical equivalence ratio was observed to increase in a parabolic fashion as ethanol concentration increased in the fuel mixture. The experimental results showed increasing trends of methane, ethane, and ethylene with increasing concentrations of ethanol in the flames. Carbon monoxide was also seen to increase significantly with the increase of ethanol in the flame, which removes carbon from the PAH and soot formation pathways. The PAH and oxygenated aromatic hydrocarbon values were very similar in the 0%, 25% and 50% ethanol flames, but significantly lower in the 75% and 90% ethanol flames. These results were in general agreement with the model and were reflected by the model soot predictions. The model predicted similar soot profiles for the 0%, 25% and 50% ethanol flames, however it predicted significantly lower values in the 75% and 90% ethanol flames. The reaction flux analysis revealed benzyl to be a major contributor to single and double ring aromatics (i.e., benzene and naphthalene), which was identified in a similar role in nearly sooting or highly sooting ethylbenzene flames. The presence of this radical was significantly reduced as ethanol concentration was increased in the flames, and this effect in combination with the lower carbon to oxygen ratios and the enhanced formation of carbon monoxide, are likely what allowed higher equivalence ratios to be reached without forming soot. (author)

  6. Electrically detected magnetic resonance modeling and fitting: An equivalent circuit approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leite, D. M. G.; Batagin-Neto, A.; Nunes-Neto, O.; Gmez, J. A.; Graeff, C. F. O.

    2014-01-21

    The physics of electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) quadrature spectra is investigated. An equivalent circuit model is proposed in order to retrieve crucial information in a variety of different situations. This model allows the discrimination and determination of spectroscopic parameters associated to distinct resonant spin lines responsible for the total signal. The model considers not just the electrical response of the sample but also features of the measuring circuit and their influence on the resulting spectral lines. As a consequence, from our model, it is possible to separate different regimes, which depend basically on the modulation frequency and the RC constant of the circuit. In what is called the high frequency regime, it is shown that the sign of the signal can be determined. Recent EDMR spectra from Alq{sub 3} based organic light emitting diodes, as well as from a-Si:H reported in the literature, were successfully fitted by the model. Accurate values of g-factor and linewidth of the resonant lines were obtained.

  7. A New Equivalence Theory Method for Treating Doubly Heterogeneous Fuel - II. Verifications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Kong, Chidong; Lee, Deokjung; Williams, Mark L.

    2015-03-09

    A new methodology has been developed recently to treat resonance self-shielding in systems for which the fuel compact region of a reactor lattice consists of small fuel grains dispersed in a graphite matrix. The theoretical development adopts equivalence theory in both micro- and macro-level heterogeneities to provide approximate analytical expressions for the shielded cross sections, which may be interpolated from a table of resonance integrals or Bondarenko factors using a modified background cross section as the interpolation parameter. This paper describes the first implementation of the theoretical equations in a reactor analysis code. In order to reduce discrepancies caused bymore » use of the rational approximation for collision probabilities in the original derivation, a new formulation for a doubly heterogeneous Bell factor is developed in this paper to improve the accuracy of doubly heterogeneous expressions. This methodology is applied to a wide range of pin cell and assembly test problems with varying geometry parameters, material compositions, and temperatures, and the results are compared with continuous-energy Monte Carlo simulations to establish the accuracy and range of applicability of the new approach. It is shown that the new doubly heterogeneous self-shielding method including the Bell factor correction gives good agreement with reference Monte Carlo results.« less

  8. A New Equivalence Theory Method for Treating Doubly Heterogeneous Fuel - I. Theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Williams, Mark L.; Lee, Deokjung; Choi, Sooyoung

    2015-03-04

    A new methodology has been developed to treat resonance self-shielding in doubly heterogeneous very high temperature gas-cooled reactor systems in which the fuel compact region of a reactor lattice consists of small fuel grains dispersed in a graphite matrix. This new method first homogenizes the fuel grain and matrix materials using an analytically derived disadvantage factor from a two-region problem with equivalence theory and intermediate resonance method. This disadvantage factor accounts for spatial self-shielding effects inside each grain within the framework of an infinite array of grains. Then the homogenized fuel compact is self-shielded using a Bondarenko method to accountmore » for interactions between the fuel compact regions in the fuel lattice. In the final form of the equations for actual implementations, the double-heterogeneity effects are accounted for by simply using a modified definition of a background cross section, which includes geometry parameters and cross sections for both the grain and fuel compact regions. With the new method, the doubly heterogeneous resonance self-shielding effect can be treated easily even with legacy codes programmed only for a singly heterogeneous system by simple modifications in the background cross section for resonance integral interpolations. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the new method and a sensitivity study of double-heterogeneity parameters introduced during the derivation. The implementation of the method and verification results for various test cases are presented in the companion paper.« less

  9. On the equivalence of the RTI and SVM approaches to time correlated analysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Croft, S.; Favalli, A.; Henzlova, D.; Santi, P. A.

    2014-11-21

    Recently two papers on how to perform passive neutron auto-correlation analysis on time gated histograms formed from pulse train data, generically called time correlation analysis (TCA), have appeared in this journal [1,2]. For those of us working in international nuclear safeguards these treatments are of particular interest because passive neutron multiplicity counting is a widely deployed technique for the quantification of plutonium. The purpose of this letter is to show that the skewness-variance-mean (SVM) approach developed in [1] is equivalent in terms of assay capability to the random trigger interval (RTI) analysis laid out in [2]. Mathematically we could alsomore » use other numerical ways to extract the time correlated information from the histogram data including for example what we might call the mean, mean square, and mean cube approach. The important feature however, from the perspective of real world applications, is that the correlated information extracted is the same, and subsequently gets interpreted in the same way based on the same underlying physics model.« less

  10. A New Equivalence Theory Method for Treating Doubly Heterogeneous Fuel - II. Verifications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Sooyoung; Kong, Chidong; Lee, Deokjung; Williams, Mark L.

    2015-03-09

    A new methodology has been developed recently to treat resonance self-shielding in systems for which the fuel compact region of a reactor lattice consists of small fuel grains dispersed in a graphite matrix. The theoretical development adopts equivalence theory in both micro- and macro-level heterogeneities to provide approximate analytical expressions for the shielded cross sections, which may be interpolated from a table of resonance integrals or Bondarenko factors using a modified background cross section as the interpolation parameter. This paper describes the first implementation of the theoretical equations in a reactor analysis code. In order to reduce discrepancies caused by use of the rational approximation for collision probabilities in the original derivation, a new formulation for a doubly heterogeneous Bell factor is developed in this paper to improve the accuracy of doubly heterogeneous expressions. This methodology is applied to a wide range of pin cell and assembly test problems with varying geometry parameters, material compositions, and temperatures, and the results are compared with continuous-energy Monte Carlo simulations to establish the accuracy and range of applicability of the new approach. It is shown that the new doubly heterogeneous self-shielding method including the Bell factor correction gives good agreement with reference Monte Carlo results.

  11. A New Equivalence Theory Method for Treating Doubly Heterogeneous Fuel - I. Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark L.; Lee, Deokjung; Choi, Sooyoung

    2015-03-04

    A new methodology has been developed to treat resonance self-shielding in doubly heterogeneous very high temperature gas-cooled reactor systems in which the fuel compact region of a reactor lattice consists of small fuel grains dispersed in a graphite matrix. This new method first homogenizes the fuel grain and matrix materials using an analytically derived disadvantage factor from a two-region problem with equivalence theory and intermediate resonance method. This disadvantage factor accounts for spatial self-shielding effects inside each grain within the framework of an infinite array of grains. Then the homogenized fuel compact is self-shielded using a Bondarenko method to account for interactions between the fuel compact regions in the fuel lattice. In the final form of the equations for actual implementations, the double-heterogeneity effects are accounted for by simply using a modified definition of a background cross section, which includes geometry parameters and cross sections for both the grain and fuel compact regions. With the new method, the doubly heterogeneous resonance self-shielding effect can be treated easily even with legacy codes programmed only for a singly heterogeneous system by simple modifications in the background cross section for resonance integral interpolations. This paper presents a detailed derivation of the new method and a sensitivity study of double-heterogeneity parameters introduced during the derivation. The implementation of the method and verification results for various test cases are presented in the companion paper.

  12. Development of an equivalent diameter expression for vertical U-tubes used in ground-coupled heat pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Y.; O`Neal, D.L.

    1998-12-31

    An expression for the equivalent diameter was developed for the heat transfer of a vertical U-tube heat exchanger used in applications of ground-coupled heat pumps. The expression was derived using the assumptions of steady-state heat transfer and concentricity of one leg and the borehole. Potential errors in applying the results to a transient start-up problem are also quantified and discussed in this paper, using transient cylindrical heat source solutions available in the literature. A conformal mapping technique was used to develop a solution to examine the errors in evaluating the external thermal resistance with a concentricity assumption. The principle of superposition of multiple heat sources was applied in the present work. The results show that the equivalent diameter depends on the tube diameter and the leg spacing. The ratio of the calculated equivalent diameter to the tube diameter can be two or greater.

  13. Theory of hydro-equivalent ignition for inertial fusion and its applications to OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nora, R.; Betti, R.; Bose, A.; Woo, K. M.; Christopherson, A. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R. L.

    2014-05-15

    The theory of ignition for inertial confinement fusion capsules [R. Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 058102 (2010)] is used to assess the performance requirements for cryogenic implosion experiments on the Omega Laser Facility. The theory of hydrodynamic similarity is developed in both one and two dimensions and tested using multimode hydrodynamic simulations with the hydrocode DRACO [P. B. Radha et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 032702 (2005)] of hydro-equivalent implosions (implosions with the same implosion velocity, adiabat, and laser intensity). The theory is used to scale the performance of direct-drive OMEGA implosions to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) energy scales and determine the requirements for demonstrating hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA. Hydro-equivalent ignition on OMEGA is represented by a cryogenic implosion that would scale to ignition on the NIF at 1.8?MJ of laser energy symmetrically illuminating the target. It is found that a reasonable combination of neutron yield and areal density for OMEGA hydro-equivalent ignition is 3 to 6??10{sup 13} and ?0.3?g/cm{sup 2}, respectively, depending on the level of laser imprinting. This performance has not yet been achieved on OMEGA.

  14. Package Equivalent Reactor Networks as Reduced Order Models for Use with CAPE-OPEN Compliant Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeks, E.; Chou, C. -P.; Garratt, T.

    2013-03-31

    Engineering simulations of coal gasifiers are typically performed using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, where a 3-D representation of the gasifier equipment is used to model the fluid flow in the gasifier and source terms from the coal gasification process are captured using discrete-phase model source terms. Simulations using this approach can be very time consuming, making it difficult to imbed such models into overall system simulations for plant design and optimization. For such system-level designs, process flowsheet software is typically used, such as Aspen Plus® [1], where each component where each component is modeled using a reduced-order model. For advanced power-generation systems, such as integrated gasifier/gas-turbine combined-cycle systems (IGCC), the critical components determining overall process efficiency and emissions are usually the gasifier and combustor. Providing more accurate and more computationally efficient reduced-order models for these components, then, enables much more effective plant-level design optimization and design for control. Based on the CHEMKIN-PRO and ENERGICO software, we have developed an automated methodology for generating an advanced form of reduced-order model for gasifiers and combustors. The reducedorder model offers representation of key unit operations in flowsheet simulations, while allowing simulation that is fast enough to be used in iterative flowsheet calculations. Using high-fidelity fluiddynamics models as input, Reaction Design’s ENERGICO® [2] software can automatically extract equivalent reactor networks (ERNs) from a CFD solution. For the advanced reduced-order concept, we introduce into the ERN a much more detailed kinetics model than can be included practically in the CFD simulation. The state-of-the-art chemistry solver technology within CHEMKIN-PRO allows that to be accomplished while still maintaining a very fast model turn-around time. In this way, the ERN becomes the basis for high-fidelity kinetics simulation, while maintaining the spatial information derived from the geometrically faithful CFD model. The reduced-order models are generated in such a way that they can be easily imported into a process flowsheet simulator, using the CAPE-OPEN architecture for unit operations. The ENERGICO/CHEMKIN-PRO software produces an ERN-definition file that is read by a dynamically linked library (DLL) that can be easily linked to any CAPE-OPEN compliant software. The plug-in unitoperation module has been successfully demonstrated for complex ERNs of coal gasifiers, using both Aspen Plus and COFE process flowsheet simulators through this published CAPE-OPEN interface.

  15. Lithium-ion battery cell-level control using constrained model predictive control and equivalent circuit models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xavier, MA; Trimboli, MS

    2015-07-01

    This paper introduces a novel application of model predictive control (MPC) to cell-level charging of a lithium-ion battery utilizing an equivalent circuit model of battery dynamics. The approach employs a modified form of the MPC algorithm that caters for direct feed-though signals in order to model near-instantaneous battery ohmic resistance. The implementation utilizes a 2nd-order equivalent circuit discrete-time state-space model based on actual cell parameters; the control methodology is used to compute a fast charging profile that respects input, output, and state constraints. Results show that MPC is well-suited to the dynamics of the battery control problem and further suggest significant performance improvements might be achieved by extending the result to electrochemical models. (C) 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. MODIFYING A 60 YEAR OLD STACK SAMPLING SYSTEM TO MEET ANSI N13.1-1999 EQUIVALENCY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMMONS, F.M.

    2006-06-14

    The 291-T-1 stack was constructed in 1944 to support ongoing missions associated with the Hanford Project. Recent changes in the plant mission required a revision to the existing license of the stack that was operating as a minor emission unit. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Washington Department of Health (WDOH) deemed this revision to be a significant modification, thereby requiring the stack to operate to the ANSI N13.1-1999 sampling and monitoring requirements. Because the stack is similar to other stacks on the Hanford site, allowance was made by EPA to demonstrate equivalency to the ANSI standard via calculations in lieu of actual testing. Calculations were allowed for determining the deposition, nozzle transmission and aspiration ratios, but measurements were required for the stack flow coefficient of variation (COV). The equivalency determination was to be based on the requirements of Table 6 of the ANSI N13.1-1999 Standard.

  17. Measurement of the neutron spectrum and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radev, R.

    2015-07-07

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement of the neutron spectral distribution and fluence from the 252Cf source (model NS-120, LLNL serial # 7001677, referred as the SMALL Cf source) and determination of the ambient neutron dose rate equivalent and kerma at 100 cm for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad- X). The dosimetric quantities should be based on the neutron spectrum and the current neutron-to-dose conversion coefficients.

  18. Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing: Supplemental Report on Penetration Software Algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.; Costyk, D.; Narang, A.

    2005-03-01

    This report supplements the July 2003 report ''Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing'' (NREL/SR-560-33909). The original report presented methods for calculating penetration limits for distributed energy resources interconnected with distribution circuits of utility-owned electric power systems. This report describes the algorithms required to develop application software to calculate penetration limits. The original report can be found at http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy03osti/33909.pdf.

  19. On equivalence of high temperature series expansion and coupling parameter series expansion in thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sai Venkata Ramana, A.

    2014-04-21

    The coupling parameter series expansion and the high temperature series expansion in the thermodynamic perturbation theory of fluids are shown to be equivalent if the interaction potential is pairwise additive. As a consequence, for the class of fluids with the potential having a hardcore repulsion, if the hard-sphere fluid is chosen as reference system, the terms of coupling parameter series expansion for radial distribution function, direct correlation function, and Helmholtz free energy follow a scaling law with temperature. The scaling law is confirmed by application to square-well fluids.

  20. A discussion on the interpretation and characterization of metafilms/metasurfaces: the two-dimensional equivalent of metamaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'hara, John F; Azad, Abul K

    2008-01-01

    A metafilm (also referred to as a metasurface) is the surface equivalent of a metamaterial. More precisely, a metafilm is a surface distribution of suitable chosen electrically small scatterers. Metafilms are becoming popular as an alternative to full three-dimensional metamaterials. Unfortunately, many papers in the literature present incorrect interpretations and mischaracterizations of these metafilms. In fact, some of the characterizations presented in the literature result in non-unique parameters for a uniquely defined metafilm. In this paper we discuss an appropriate interpretation and characterization of metafilms and present a correct manner to characterize a metafilm. Additionally, we illustrate the error that results from an incorrect characterization of metafilms. We present various examples to emphasize these points. Finally we present a retrieval approach for determining the uniquely defined quantities (the electric and magnetic susceptibilities of its constituent scatterers) that characterize a metafilm.

  1. Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horn, Kevin M.

    2013-07-09

    A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

  2. Uranium-Loaded Water Treatment Resins: 'Equivalent Feed' at NRC and Agreement State-Licensed Uranium Recovery Facilities - 12094

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camper, Larry W.; Michalak, Paul; Cohen, Stephen; Carter, Ted

    2012-07-01

    Community Water Systems (CWSs) are required to remove uranium from drinking water to meet EPA standards. Similarly, mining operations are required to remove uranium from their dewatering discharges to meet permitted surface water discharge limits. Ion exchange (IX) is the primary treatment strategy used by these operations, which loads uranium onto resin beads. Presently, uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be disposed as a waste product or processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities if that licensed facility has applied for and received permission to process 'alternate feed'. The disposal of uranium-loaded resin is costly and the cost to amend a uranium recovery license to accept alternate feed can be a strong disincentive to commercial uranium recovery facilities. In response to this issue, the NRC issued a Regulatory Issue Summary (RIS) to clarify the agency's policy that uranium-loaded resin from CWSs and mining operations can be processed by NRC- or Agreement State-licensed uranium recovery facilities without the need for an alternate feed license amendment when these resins are essentially the same, chemically and physically, to resins that licensed uranium recovery facilities currently use (i.e., equivalent feed). NRC staff is clarifying its current alternate feed policy to declare IX resins as equivalent feed. This clarification is necessary to alleviate a regulatory and financial burden on facilities that filter uranium using IX resin, such as CWSs and mine dewatering operations. Disposing of those resins in a licensed facility could be 40 to 50 percent of the total operations and maintenance (O and M) cost for a CWS. Allowing uranium recovery facilities to treat these resins without requiring a license amendment lowers O and M costs and captures a valuable natural resource. (authors)

  3. Dose equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, Richard V.; Hankins, Dale E.; Tomasino, Luigi; Gomaa, Mohamed A. M.

    1983-01-01

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurements indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer containing conversion material such as .sup.6 Li and .sup.10 B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet. The density of conversion material in the radiator layer is of an amount which is chosen so that the density of tracks produced in the detecting sheet is proportional to the biological damage done by neutrons, regardless of whether the tracks are produced as the result of moderate energy neutrons striking the radiator layer or as the result of higher energy neutrons striking the sheet of track etch material.

  4. EnergyEquivalents.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy.Gov Presents: Understanding The Grid Energy.Gov Presents: Understanding The Grid Addthis Topic Smart Grid The U.S. Department of Energy is making a series of announcements to support its Grid Modernization Initiative. As we do so, we realize many of you may be wondering: what does "grid modernization" mean? Watch this video to find out Program | Department of Energy

    Graduates » Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Career Pathways Program Energy/National

  5. Establishing LED Equivalency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-10-01

    Solid-state lighting program technology fact sheet that provides guidance for comparing products based on LED or other light source technologies.

  6. GS Equivalency Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for General Schedule (i.e., annual) positions. The Chart provides guidance for Human Resource Specialists and Assistants in making qualification determinations when BPA...

  7. NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado-Kansas 13 2014-2014 Colorado-Utah 34 2014-2014 Florida 0 0 0 0 233 1968-2014 Florida-Florida 233 2014-2014 Gulf of Mexico 0 0 87,478 70,292 75,648 2007-2014 Gulf of ...

  8. Microsoft Word - Badging

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    April06.doc Microsoft Word - April06.doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - April06.doc More Documents & Publications Secretary Directs FPO to Prepare Strategic Plan Microsoft Word - August

    ATTACHMENT B PROGRAM ASSESSMENT CRITERIA Identify the following for all sites: Program Management * Number FTE's devoted to Records Management o Full-time Federal and Contractor o Part-time Federal and Contractor Percent of time spent on Records Management duties * Percentage of time each Records Management

  9. Microsoft Word - CCP-PO-012-Revision 15

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    April06.doc Microsoft Word - April06.doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - April06.doc More Documents & Publications Secretary Directs FPO to Prepare Strategic Plan Microsoft Word - August

    ATTACHMENT B PROGRAM ASSESSMENT CRITERIA Identify the following for all sites: Program Management * Number FTE's devoted to Records Management o Full-time Federal and Contractor o Part-time Federal and Contractor Percent of time spent on Records Management duties * Percentage of time each Records Management

  10. WIPP WAC Equivalence Support Measurements for Low-Level Sludge Waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory - 12242

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruetzmacher, Kathleen M.; Bustos, Roland M.; Ferran, Scott G.; Gallegos, Lucas E.; Lucero, Randy P.

    2012-07-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) uses the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) as an off-site disposal facility for low-level waste (LLW), including sludge waste. NNSS has issued a position paper that indicates that systems that are not certified by the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) disposal of Transuranic (TRU) waste must demonstrate equivalent practices to the CBFO certified systems in order to assign activity concentration values to assayed items without adding in the Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) when certifying waste for NNSS disposal. Efforts have been made to meet NNSS requirements to accept sludge waste for disposal at their facility. The LANL LLW Characterization Team uses portable high purity germanium (HPGe) detector systems for the nondestructive assay (NDA) of both debris and sludge LLW. A number of performance studies have been conducted historically by LANL to support the efficacy and quality of assay results generated by the LANL HPGe systems, and, while these detector systems are supported by these performance studies and used with LANL approved procedures and processes, they are not certified by CBFO for TRU waste disposal. Beginning in 2009, the LANL LLW Characterization Team undertook additional NDA measurements of both debris and sludge simulated waste containers to supplement existing studies and procedures to demonstrate full compliance with the NNSS position paper. Where possible, Performance Demonstration Project (PDP) drums were used for the waste matrix and PDP sources were used for the radioactive sources. Sludge drums are an example of a matrix with a uniform distribution of contaminants. When attempting to perform a gamma assay of a sludge drum, it is very important to adequately simulate this uniform distribution of radionuclides in order to accurately model the assay results. This was accomplished by using a spiral radial source tube placement in a sludge drum rather than the standard three source tubes seen in debris PDP drums. Available line sources (Eu-152) were placed in the spiral tubes to further accomplish the desired uniform distribution of radionuclides. The standard PDP drum (PDP matrix drum 005) and PDP sources were used to determine the lower limits of detection (LLD) and TMU. Analysis results for the sludge drum matrix case for two HPGe detectors were tabulated and evaluated. NNSS has accepted the methodology and results of the measurements towards demonstrating equivalence to CBFO certified systems. In conclusion, the WES-WGS and CMR-OPS gamma spectroscopy teams at LANL have defined and performed measurements that serve to establish and demonstrate equivalency with the processes used by CBFO certified NDA systems. The supplemental measurements address four key areas in Appendix A of DOE/WIPP-02-3122: Annual Calibration Confirmation and Performance Check measurements; LLD determination; and TMU definition. For these measurements the containers, matrices and activity loadings are selected to represent items being assayed in real LLW cases. The LLD and the TMU bounding measurements are to be performed one time and will not be required to be repeated in future campaigns. The annual calibration and performance check measurements were performed initially and planned to repeat in annual campaigns in order to maintain NNSS certification. PDP sources and a PDP sludge drum as well as Eu-152 line sources and a spiral sludge drum were used for the measurements. In all cases, the results for accuracy and precision (%R and %RSD, respectively) were within allowable ranges as defined by the WIPP PDP program. LLD (or MDC) results were established for all the ten WIPP reportable radionuclides and U-235, and the MDC for Pu-239 was established in all cases to be well under 100 nCi/g. Useful results for reducing estimated uncertainties were established and an interesting unexpected case of high bias was observed and will be applied toward this end. (authors)

  11. A reconsideration of the noise equivalent power and the data analysis procedure for the infrared imaging video bolometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandya, Shwetang N. Sano, Ryuichi; Peterson, Byron J.; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Mukai, Kiyofumi; Pandya, Santosh P.

    2014-12-15

    The infrared imaging video bolometer (IRVB) used for measurement of the two-dimensional (2D) radiation profiles from the Large Helical Device has been significantly upgraded recently to improve its signal to noise ratio, sensitivity, and calibration, which ultimately provides quantitative measurements of the radiation from the plasma. The reliability of the quantified data needs to be established by various checks. The noise estimates also need to be revised and more realistic values need to be established. It is shown that the 2D heat diffusion equation can be used for estimating the power falling on the IRVB foil, even with a significant amount of spatial variation in the thermal diffusivity across the area of the platinum foil found experimentally during foil calibration. The equation for the noise equivalent power density (NEPD) is re-derived to include the errors in the measurement of the thermophysical and the optical properties of the IRVB foil. The theoretical value estimated using this newly derived equation matches closely, within 5.5%, with the mean experimental value. The change in the contribution of each error term of the NEPD equation with rising foil temperature is also studied and the blackbody term is found to dominate the other terms at elevated operating temperatures. The IRVB foil is also sensitive to the charge exchange (CX) neutrals escaping from the plasma. The CX neutral contribution is estimated to be marginally higher than the noise equivalent power (NEP) of the IRVB. It is also established that the radiation measured by the IRVB originates from the impurity line radiation from the plasma and not from the heated divertor tiles. The change in the power density due to noise reduction measures such as data smoothing and averaging is found to be comparable to the IRVB NEPD. The precautions that need to be considered during background subtraction are also discussed with experimental illustrations. Finally, the analysis algorithm with all the improvements is validated and found to reproduce the input power well within 10% accuracy. This article answers many fundamental questions relevant to the IRVB and illustrates the care to be exercised while processing the IRVB data.

  12. SU-E-T-130: Dosimetric Evaluation of Tissue Equivalent Gel Dosimeter Using Saccharide in Radiotherapy System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, Y; Lee, D; Jung, H; Ji, Y; Kim, K; Chang, U; Kwon, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In this study, the dose responses of the MAGIC gel with various concentrations and type of saccharide are examined to clarify the roles of mono and disaccharide in the polymerization process. Then we focused on the tissue equivalence and dose sensitivity of MAGIC gel dosimeters. Methods: The gel is composed of HPLC, 8% gelatin, 2 10-3 M L-ascorbic acid, 1.8 10-2 M hydroquinone, 8 10-5 M copper(II)sulfate and 9% methacrylic acid, new polymer gels are synthesized by adding glucose(monosaccharide), sucrose(disaccharide) and urea in the concentration range of 5?35%. For irradiation of the gel, cesium-137 gamma-ray irradiator was used, radiation dose was delivered from 5?50 Gy. MRI images of the gel were acquired by using a 3.0 T MRI system. Results: When saccharide and urea were added, the O/C, O/N and C/N ratios agreed with those of soft tissue with 1.7%. The dose-response of glucose and sucrose gel have slope-to-intercept ratio of 0.044 and 0.283 respectively. The slope-to-ratio is one important determinant of gel sensitivity. R-square values of glucose and sucrose gel dosimeters were 0.984 and 0.994 respectively. Moreover when urea were added, the slope-to-intercept ratio is 0.044 and 0.073 respectively. R-square values of mono and disaccharide gel were 0.973 and 0.989 respectively. When a saccharide is added into the MAGIC gel dosimeter, dose sensitivity is increased. However when urea were added, dose sensitivity is slightly decreased. Conclusion: In this study, it was possible to obtain the following conclusions by looking at the dose response characteristics after adding mono-, di-saccharide and urea to a MAGIC gel dosimeter. Saccharide was a tendency of increasing dose sensitivity with disaccharide. Sa.ccharide is cost effective, safe, soft tissue equivalent, and can be used under various experimental conditions, making it a suitable dosimeter for some radiotherapy applications.

  13. Best available control technology (BACT) equivalent for the control of volatile organic emissions from paint dipping operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blankenship, W.R.; Pugh, C.W. Jr.

    1999-07-01

    This paper provides details of a study conducted to demonstrate an equivalent method of Best Available Control Technology (BACT) compliance for volatile organic emissions from dip coating of certain miscellaneous metal parts. The study was proposed to show that the total volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from 3.8 lb of VOC/gallon coating formulations were no greater than the total VOC emissions from 3.5 lb/gallon formulations used under the same conditions for coating steel joists. The presumptive BACT standard enforced by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) for dip coating of steel joists is 3.5 lb/gallon. The requirement of 3.5 lb/gallon was derived from the US Environmental Protection Agency Guideline Series Control of Volatile Organic Emissions from Existing Stationary Sources--Volume 6: Surface Coating of Miscellaneous Metal Parts and Products. On June 5, 1998 the source completed a 12 month, full scale comparison study under a consent order with the Virginia DEQ. During the study period, the source made daily measurements of product produced, paint used, and emissions from the control and test paint tanks, and reported data to EPA and the DEQ every two months. The study concluded that a 26 percent reduction in paint usage and a 20 percent reduction in emissions was achieved in the test tanks using a 3.8 lb/gal coating compared to the control tanks using a 3.5 lb/gal coating. This study enables the source to achieve greater emission reductions than the presumptive BACT level and at the same time reduce painting costs by 34%. This study provides positive results for the environment, the steel joist industry, and the construction industry. This study could impact EPA's current Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) rule development for Miscellaneous Metal Parts and Products and national VOC rules for this source category under Section 183(e) of the Clean Air Act.

  14. Measurement of the ambient gamma dose equivalent and kerma from the small 252Cf source at 1 meter and the small 60Co source at 2 meters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl, W. F.

    2015-07-30

    NASA Langley Research Center requested a measurement and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 100 cm from the 252Cf source and determination of the ambient gamma dose equivalent rate and kerma at 200 cm from the 60Co source for the Radiation Budget Instrument Experiment (Rad-X). An Exradin A6 ion chamber with Shonka air-equivalent plastic walls in combination with a Supermax electrometer were used to measure the exposure rate and free-in-air kerma rate of the two sources at the requested distances. The measured gamma exposure, kerma, and dose equivalent rates are tabulated.

  15. Equivalence of ADM Hamiltonian and Effective Field Theory approaches at next-to-next-to-leading order spin1-spin2 coupling of binary inspirals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levi, Michele [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, Universit Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS-UMR 7095, 98 bis Boulevard Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Steinhoff, Jan, E-mail: michele.levi@upmc.fr, E-mail: jan.steinhoff@ist.utl.pt [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2014-12-01

    The next-to-next-to-leading order spin1-spin2 potential for an inspiralling binary, that is essential for accuracy to fourth post-Newtonian order, if both components in the binary are spinning rapidly, has been recently derived independently via the ADM Hamiltonian and the Effective Field Theory approaches, using different gauges and variables. Here we show the complete physical equivalence of the two results, thereby we first prove the equivalence of the ADM Hamiltonian and the Effective Field Theory approaches at next-to-next-to-leading order with the inclusion of spins. The main difficulty in the spinning sectors, which also prescribes the manner in which the comparison of the two results is tackled here, is the existence of redundant unphysical spin degrees of freedom, associated with the spin gauge choice of a point within the extended spinning object for its representative worldline. After gauge fixing and eliminating the unphysical degrees of freedom of the spin and its conjugate at the level of the action, we arrive at curved spacetime generalizations of the Newton-Wigner variables in closed form, which can also be used to obtain further Hamiltonians, based on an Effective Field Theory formulation and computation. Finally, we make use of our validated result to provide gauge invariant relations among the binding energy, angular momentum, and orbital frequency of an inspiralling binary with generic compact spinning components to fourth post-Newtonian order, including all known sectors up to date.

  16. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR DOE STANDARD 3013 EQUIVALENCY SUPPORTING REDUCED TEMPERATURE STABILIZATION OF OXALATE-DERIVED PLUTONIUM OXIDE PRODUCED BY THE HB-LINE FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Berg, J.; Veirs, D.

    2012-07-02

    The HB-Line (HBL) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is designed to produce high-purity plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) which is suitable for future use in production of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. The MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) requires PuO{sub 2} feed to be packaged per the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Standard 3013 (DOE-STD-3013) to comply with the facility's safety basis. The stabilization conditions imposed by DOE-STD-3013 for PuO{sub 2} (i.e., 950 C for 2 hours) preclude use of the HBL PuO{sub 2} in direct fuel fabrication and reduce the value of the HBL product as MFFF feedstock. Consequently, HBL initiated a technical evaluation to define acceptable operating conditions for production of high-purity PuO{sub 2} that fulfills the DOE-STD-3013 criteria for safe storage. The purpose of this document is to demonstrate that within the defined operating conditions, the HBL process will be equivalent for meeting the requirements of the DOE-STD-3013 stabilization process for plutonium-bearing materials from the DOE complex. The proposed 3013 equivalency reduces the prescribed stabilization temperature for high-purity PuO{sub 2} from oxalate precipitation processes from 950 C to 640 C and places a limit of 60% on the relative humidity (RH) at the lowest material temperature. The equivalency is limited to material produced using the HBL established flow sheet, for example, nitric acid anion exchange and Pu(IV) direct strike oxalate precipitation with stabilization at a minimum temperature of 640 C for four hours (h). The product purity must meet the MFFF acceptance criteria of 23,600 {micro}g/g Pu (i.e., 2.1 wt %) total impurities and chloride content less than 250 {micro}g/g of Pu. All other stabilization and packaging criteria identified by DOE-STD-3013-2012 or earlier revisions of the standard apply. Based on the evaluation of test data discussed in this document, the expert judgment of the authors supports packaging the HBL product under a 3013 equivalency. Under the defined process conditions and associated material specifications, the high-purity PuO{sub 2} produced in HBL presents no unique safety concerns for packaging or storage in the 3013 required configuration. The PuO{sub 2} produced using the HBL flow sheet conditions will have a higher specific surface area (SSA) than PuO{sub 2} stabilized at 950 C and, consequently, under identical conditions will adsorb more water from the atmosphere. The greatest challenge to HBL operators will be controlling moisture content below 0.5 wt %. However, even at the 0.5 wt % moisture limit, the maximum acceptable pressure of a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen and oxygen in the 3013 container is greater than the maximum possible pressure for the HBL PuO{sub 2} product.

  17. SU-E-T-411: Characterization of Novel Water-Equivalent PRESAGE for Megavoltage and Kilovoltage X-Ray Beam Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alqathami, M; Ibbott, G; Blencowe, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To introduce and characterize novel water-equivalent PRESAGE dosimeters for megavoltage and kilovoltage X-ray beam dosimetry. Methods: Three novel metal-optimized PRESAGE dosimeters referred to as MO-PRESAGE 1, 2 and 3 were formulated. The radiological properties were key factors that were considered when formulating the new dosimeters. All formulations were prepared in spectrophotometric cuvettes, irradiated with a 6 MV X-ray beam, and the change in optical density was measured using a spectrophotometer. Their sensitivity, post-response stability, and water equivalency were investigated. Results: The results showed that all three formulations exhibited radiological properties closer to water than any of the commercially available PRESAGE formulations. For example, the novel MO-PRESAGE 1, 2 and 3 have mass densities only 3.9-4.4% higher than that of water, whereas the mass density for the commercial formulation is 5.3% higher. The novel formulations have almost identical Zeff values to that of water (7.42), while the Zeff for the commercial formulation was 3.7% higher than that of water. In addition, the MO-PRESAGE 3 formulation showed mass and energy attenuation coefficients that deviated from those of water by less than 50% relative to the commercial formulation. Furthermore, the reduced Zeff of the three different MOPRESAGE formulations resulted in a maximum variation in the probability of photoelectric absorption of 1.3 times than of water, compared to 1.8 times that of water for the commercial formulation. MO-PRESAGE 3 was also more sensitive to radiation than the other two new formulations introduced in this work due to the presence of alkylbromide radical initiators in the MO-PRESAGE 3 formulation. Conclusion: All three novel MOPRESAGE dosimeter formulations displayed excellent radiological properties, superior to any of the commercially available PRESAGE formulations and thus can be used for the dosimetry of clinical megavoltage and kilovoltage X-ray beams.

  18. Dose-equivalent neutron dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffith, R.V.; Hankins, D.E.; Tomasino, L.; Gomaa, M.A.M.

    1981-01-07

    A neutron dosimeter is disclosed which provides a single measurement indicating the amount of potential biological damage resulting from the neutron exposure of the wearer, for a wide range of neutron energies. The dosimeter includes a detecting sheet of track etch detecting material such as a carbonate plastic, for detecting higher energy neutrons, and a radiator layer contaning conversion material such as /sup 6/Li and /sup 10/B lying adjacent to the detecting sheet for converting moderate energy neutrons to alpha particles that produce tracks in the adjacent detecting sheet.

  19. High quality HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb(001) metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with 0.8?nm equivalent oxide thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, Michael; Datta, Suman; Bruce Rayner, G.; McDonnell, Stephen; Wallace, Robert M.; Bennett, Brian R.; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2014-12-01

    We investigate in-situ cleaning of GaSb surfaces and its effect on the electrical performance of p-type GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) using a remote hydrogen plasma. Ultrathin HfO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition were used as a high permittivity gate dielectric. Compared to conventional ex-situ chemical cleaning methods, the in-situ GaSb surface treatment resulted in a drastic improvement in the impedance characteristics of the MOSCAPs, directly evidencing a much lower interface trap density and enhanced Fermi level movement efficiency. We demonstrate that by using a combination of ex-situ and in-situ surface cleaning steps, aggressively scaled HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb MOSCAP structures with a low equivalent oxide thickness of 0.8?nm and efficient gate modulation of the surface potential are achieved, allowing to push the Fermi level far away from the valence band edge high up into the band gap of GaSb.

  20. SU-E-T-403: Measurement of the Neutron Ambient Dose Equivalent From the TrueBeam Linac Head and Varian 2100 Clinac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, M; Pollard, J; Wen, Z; Gao, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: High-energy x-ray therapy produces an undesirable source of stray neutron dose to healthy tissues, and thus, poses a risk for second cancer induction years after the primary treatment. Hence, the purpose of this study was to measure the neutron ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), produced from the TrueBeam and Varian 2100 linac heads, respectively. Of particular note is that there is no measured data available in the literature on H*(10) production from the TrueBeam treatment head. Methods: Both linacs were operated in flattening filter mode using a 15 MV x-ray beam on TrueBeam and an 18 MV x-ray beam for the Varian 2100 Clinac with the jaws and multileaf collimators in the fully closed position. A dose delivery rate of 600 MU/min was delivered on the TrueBeam and the Varian 2100 Clinac, respectively and the H*(10) rate was measured in triplicate using the WENDI-2 detector located at multiple positions including isocenter and longitudinal (gun-target) to the isocenter. Results: For each measurement, the H*(10) rate was relatively constant with increasing distance away from the isocenter with standard deviations on the order of a tenth of a mSv/h or less for the given beam energy. In general, fluctuations in the longitudinal H*(10) rate between the anterior-posterior couch directions were approximately a percent for both beam energies. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest an H*(10) rate of about 30 mSv/h (40 mSv/h) or less for TrueBeam (Varian Clinac 2100) for all measurements considered in this study indicating a relatively low contribution of produced secondary neutrons to the primary therapeutic beam.

  1. Plutonium Equivalent Inventory for Belowground Radioactive Waste at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Sean B.; Shuman, Rob

    2012-04-18

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) generates radioactive waste as a result of various activities. Many aspects of the management of this waste are conducted at Technical Area 54 (TA-54); Area G plays a key role in these management activities as the Laboratory's only disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste (LLW). Furthermore, Area G serves as a staging area for transuranic (TRU) waste that will be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal. A portion of this TRU waste is retrievably stored in pits, trenches, and shafts. The radioactive waste disposed of or stored at Area G poses potential short- and long-term risks to workers at the disposal facility and to members of the public. These risks are directly proportional to the radionuclide inventories in the waste. The Area G performance assessment and composite analysis (LANL, 2008a) project long-term risks to members of the public; short-term risks to workers and members of the public, such as those posed by accidents, are addressed by the Area G Documented Safety Analysis (LANL, 2011a). The Documented Safety Analysis uses an inventory expressed in terms of plutonium-equivalent curies, referred to as the PE-Ci inventory, to estimate these risks. The Technical Safety Requirements for Technical Area 54, Area G (LANL, 2011b) establishes a belowground radioactive material limit that ensures the cumulative projected inventory authorized for the Area G site is not exceeded. The total belowground radioactive waste inventory limit established for Area G is 110,000 PE-Ci. The PE-Ci inventory is updated annually; this report presents the inventory prepared for 2011. The approach used to estimate the inventory is described in Section 2. The results of the analysis are presented in Section 3.

  2. Two-dimensional [sup 1]H-NMR EXSY study of the fluxional behavior of the novel carbenium ion complex [FvMo[sub 2](CO)[sub 4]([mu],[eta][sup 2],[eta][sup 3]-MeC[equivalent to]CCH[sub 2])][BF[sub 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amouri, H.E.; Besace, Y.; Vollhardt, K.P.C.; Ball, G.E. Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA ); Vaissermann, J. )

    1993-03-01

    The title compound [FuMo[sub 2](CO)[sub 4]([mu],[eta][sup 2],[eta][sup 3]-MeC[equivalent to]CCH[sub 2])][BF[sub 4

  3. High efficiency turbine blade coatings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Gallis, Michail A.

    2014-06-01

    The development of advanced thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) that exhibit lower thermal conductivity through better control of electron beam - physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) processing is of prime interest to both the aerospace and power industries. This report summarizes the work performed under a two-year Lab-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project (38664) to produce lower thermal conductivity, graded-layer thermal barrier coatings for turbine blades in an effort to increase the efficiency of high temperature gas turbines. This project was sponsored by the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Investment Area. Therefore, particular importance was given to the processing of the large blades required for industrial gas turbines proposed for use in the Brayton cycle of nuclear plants powered by high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). During this modest (~1 full-time equivalent (FTE)) project, the processing technology was developed to create graded TBCs by coupling ion beam-assisted deposition (IBAD) with substrate pivoting in the alumina-YSZ system. The Electron Beam - 1200 kW (EB-1200) PVD system was used to deposit a variety of TBC coatings with micron layered microstructures and reduced thermal conductivity below 1.5 W/m.K. The use of IBAD produced fully stoichiometric coatings at a reduced substrate temperature of 600 oC and a reduced oxygen background pressure of 0.1 Pa. IBAD was also used to successfully demonstrate the transitioning of amorphous PVD-deposited alumina to the -phase alumina required as an oxygen diffusion barrier and for good adhesion to the substrate Ni2Al3 bondcoat. This process replaces the time consuming thermally grown oxide formation required before the YSZ deposition. In addition to the process technology, Direct Simulation Monte Carlo plume modeling and spectroscopic characterization of the PVD plumes were performed. The project consisted of five tasks. These included the production of layered periodic microstructures in the coating, the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) modeling of particle transport in the PVD plume, functional graded layer development, the deposition of all layers to form a complete coating, and materials characterization including thermal testing. Ion beam-assisted deposition, beam sharing through advanced digital rastering, substrate pivoting, hearth calorimetry, infrared imaging, fiber optic-enabled optical emission spectroscopy and careful thermal management were used to achieve all the milestones outlined in the FY02 LDRD proposal.

  4. Note Field Name Worksheet Cell Status Definition Report Table...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on top of company key tab sheet. Color code number to match chart. 12 FTE Allocation H5 Required Enter FTE charged to the specific NETL division. Use 2 decimal places. 13 FYXX...

  5. Designating Responsibility for Equivalencies or Exemptions from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (PPPO); Jack R. Craig, Director, Consolidated Business Center Ohio (CBC); James R. Cooper, Deputy Manager for Idaho Cleanup Project (ID); Susan M. Cange, Assistant Manager for...

  6. Nearly Equivalent Inter- and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Physical Chemistry. C; Journal Volume: 116; Journal Issue: 3 ...

  7. Time-temperature equivalence in Martensite tempering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackenberg, Robert E.; Thomas, Grant A.; Speer, John G.; Matlock, David K.; Krauss, George

    2008-06-16

    The relationship between time and temperature is of great consequence in many materials-related processes including the tempering of martensite. In 1945, Hollomon and Jaffe quantified the 'degree of tempering' as a function of both tempering time, t, and tempering temperature, T, using the expression, T(log t + c). Here, c is thought to be a material constant and appears to decrease linearly with increasing carbon content. The Hollomon-Jaffe tempering parameter is frequently cited in the literature. This work reviews the original derivation of the tempering parameter concept, and presents the use of the characteristics diffusion distance as an alternative time-temperature relationship during martensite tempering. During the tempering of martensite, interstitial carbon atoms diffuse to form carbides. In addition, austenite decomposes, dislocations and grain boundaries rearrange, associated with iron self diffusion. Since these are all diffusional processes, it is reasonable to expect the degree of tempering to relate to the extent of diffusion.

  8. Chapter_16_Equivalencies_and_Exemptions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the level of additional risk and the measures implemented to reduce risk to a ... Chapter 16-1 At HQ, the Head of Element must submit requests for exemptions from security ...

  9. Property:Equivalent URI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    anenergysolutions.orgcontent2010-vehicle-technologies-market-report + A A Compendium of Utility-Sponsored Energy-Efficient Rebate Programs + http:cleanenergysolutions.org...

  10. NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent at Processing Plants

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    NA 2012-2012 Colorado 53,590 67,607 82,637 90,801 81,943 1967-2012 Florida 22 0 0 0 0 1968-2012 Illinois 42 31 345 1,043 0 1967-2012 Indiana 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2012 Kansas 28,302...

  11. Job Counting Guidelines

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Definitions and Guidelines for Counting Monthly and Quarterly EM Recovery Act Full Time Equivalents (FTEs) and Cumulative Head-Count The following updated definitions and...

  12. "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-63B...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Photovoltaic Industry Status, 2013" "Reporting companies, total number of:",81 "Employment, full-time equivalent employees:",9288 "Involved in photovoltaic-related activities" ...

  13. FMT Workforce FTEs by Scope Current Contract Scope of Work (Section J. Appendix A)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FMT Workforce FTEs by Scope Current Contract Scope of Work (Section J. Appendix A) FTE's* Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) 1,329 Campaigns 260 Readiness in Technical Base & Facilities (RTBF) and Site Stewardship 110 Secure Transportation Asset (STA) 125 Security (Physical and Cyber) 160 Other NNSA/Other DOE 310 includes ICO and Emergency Response Non-DOE (Work for Others) 360 Total FTE's 2,654 *FTEs shown include allocation of indirect FTE's

  14. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    investment (systems and FTE) * This infrastructure investment will be minimized due to: * Economies of scale * Within our core competence * Synergy between lessee and lessor * No...

  15. Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2012-12-31

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  16. Assessing Equivalent Viscous Damping Using Piping System test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, J.; Morante, R.

    2010-07-18

    The specification of damping for nuclear piping systems subject to seismic-induced motions has been the subject of many studies and much controversy. Damping estimation based on test data can be influenced by numerous factors, consequently leading to considerable scatter in damping estimates in the literature. At present, nuclear industry recommendations and nuclear regulatory guidance are not consistent on the treatment of damping for analysis of nuclear piping systems. Therefore, there is still a need to develop a more complete and consistent technical basis for specification of appropriate damping values for use in design and analysis. This paper summarizes the results of recent damping studies conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  17. Estimating Radiation Risk from Total Effective Dose Equivalent...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0 Tc 0.37 No. 1Tj 5.25 0 TD 0.098 Tc 0 Tw (No.) Tj 15.755 -13.5 TD 0.3to Tw ( ) Tj 5.25 0 TD F1 10.5 Tf -0.1925 Tc 0 5 Report 0 1Tj 5.25 0 TD 0.098 Tc 0 Tw 8No. 7 0 TD -0.IRRPC,

  18. Equivalent Continuum Modeling for Shock Wave Propagation in Jointed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In one approach, jointed are modeled explicitly in a Lagrangian framework with appropriate contact algorithms used to track motion along the interfaces. In the other approach, the ...

  19. NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent at Processing Plants (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    44,086 152,538 148,859 150,870 148,450 139,621 1973

  20. Estimating Radiation Risk from Total Effective Dose Equivalent...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    of Dose to the Public, DOE Report DOEEH-0070, July 1988. DOE, 1988b. Internal Dose Conversion Factors for Calculation of Dose to the Public, DOE Report DOEEH-0071, July 1988. ...

  1. METHOD OF USING AND MANUFACTURING PLASTIC EQUIVALENT TO ORGANIC MATERIALS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shonka, F.R.; Rose, J.E.; Failla, G.

    1961-10-24

    Compositions of matter that have the radiation response of animal muscle tissue, bone, or air were prepared. These compositions are composed of specific proportions of three or more of the following constituents: polyethylene plastic, polyamide plastic, oil furnace black, silica, and calcium fluoride. (AEC)

  2. Effects of fracture distribution and length scale on the equivalent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 6; Journal ID: ISSN 1674-7755 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: Country unknown...

  3. Macroencapsulation Equivalency Guidance for Classified Weapon Components and NNSSWAC Compliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poling, J.

    2012-05-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex has a surplus of classified legacy weapon components generated over the years with no direct path for disposal. The majority of the components have been held for uncertainty of future use or no identified method of sanitization or disposal. As more weapons are retired, there is an increasing need to reduce the amount of components currently in storage or on hold. A process is currently underway to disposition and dispose of the legacy/retired weapons components across the DOE complex.

  4. U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    61 67 1982 71 65 69 65 64 62 63 61 59 60 61 62 1983 72 64 66 62 62 60 63 66 64 68 68 75 1984 79 69 71 69 69 67 69 68 65 69 68 74 1985 77 70 71 66 66 63 65 65 64 66 66 75 1986 76 67 ...

  5. NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent at Processing Plants (Summary...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    066,366 1,134,473 1,250,012 1,356,709 1,608,148 1,717,894 1930-2015 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 0 0 87,478 70,292 75,648 2007-2014 Alabama 19,059 17,271 7,133 7,675 7,044 ...

  6. Dark-Matter-Induced Violation of the Weak Equivalence Principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Sean M.; Mantry, Sonny [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Ramsey-Musolf, Michael J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Stubbs, Christoper W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2009-07-03

    A long-range fifth force coupled to dark matter can induce a coupling to ordinary matter if the dark matter interacts with standard model fields. We consider constraints on such a scenario from both astrophysical observations and laboratory experiments. We also examine the case where the dark matter is a weakly interacting massive particle, and derive relations between the coupling to dark matter and the coupling to ordinary matter for different models. Currently, this scenario is most tightly constrained by galactic dynamics, but improvements in Eoetvoes experiments can probe unconstrained regions of parameter space.

  7. Physical Sciences Facility Air Emission Control Equivalency Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, David M.; Belew, Shan T.

    2008-10-17

    This document presents the adequacy evaluation for the application of technology standards during design, fabrication, installation and testing of radioactive air exhaust systems at the Physical Sciences Facility (PSF), located on the Horn Rapids Triangle north of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) complex. The analysis specifically covers the exhaust portion of the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems associated with emission units EP-3410-01-S, EP-3420-01-S and EP 3430-01-S.

  8. Operation and biasing for single device equivalent to CMOS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, James D.

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed are semiconductor devices including at least one junction which is rectifying whether the semiconductor is caused to be N or P-type, by the presence of field induced carriers. In particular, inverting and non-inverting gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to conventional multiple device CMOS systems, which can be operated as modulators, are disclosed as are a non-latching SCR and an approach to blocking parasitic currents. Operation of the gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to multiple device CMOS systems under typical bias schemes is described, and simple demonstrative five mask fabrication procedures for the inverting and non-inverting gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to multiple device CMOS systems are also presented.

  9. Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical Equivalence

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Ratio | Department of Energy Our research shows that fuel can be blended to have a low ignition quality, which is desirable for high-efficiency advanced combustion, and with a high n-paraffin content to reduce CO and THC. PDF icon deer12_lilik.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fuel Properties to Enable Lifted Flame Combustion Advancement in Fuel Spray and Combustion Modeling for Compression Ignition Engine Applications A University

  10. High-Efficiency Parking Lighting in Federal Facilities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Of course, the lamps did not all fail at the same time, so the parking garage had to devote nearly the equivalent of a full-time staff person's time to traveling around the very ...

  11. Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The total number of hours was divided by the number of years for each activity. The hours ... Onsite Full-Time Equivalents Start Finish Years Canister Storage Building (CONCSB) ...

  12. New York Marcellus Shale: Industry boom put on hold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercurio, Angelique

    2012-01-16

    Key catalysts for Marcellus Shale drilling in New York were identified. New York remains the only state in the nation with a legislative moratorium on high-volume hydraulic fracturing, as regulators and state lawmakers work to balance the advantages of potential economic benefits while protecting public drinking water resources and the environment. New York is being particularly careful to work on implementing sufficiently strict regulations to mitigate the environmental impacts Pennsylvania has already seen, such as methane gas releases, fracturing fluid releases, flowback water and brine controls, and total dissolved solids discharges. In addition to economic and environmental lessons learned, the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) also acknowledges impacts to housing markets, security, and other local issues, and may impose stringent measures to mitigate potential risks to local communities. Despite the moratorium, New York has the opportunity to take advantage of increased capital investment, tax revenue generation, and job creation opportunities by increasing shale gas activity. The combination of economic benefits, industry pressure, and recent technological advances will drive the pursuit of natural gas drilling in New York. We identify four principal catalysts as follows: Catalyst 1: Pressure from Within the State. Although high-volume hydraulic fracturing has become a nationally controversial technology, shale fracturing activity is common in every U.S. state except New York. The regulatory process has delayed potential economic opportunities for state and local economies, as well as many industry stakeholders. In 2010, shale gas production accounted for $18.6 billion in federal royalty and local, state, and federal tax revenues. (1) This is expected to continue to grow substantially. The DEC is under increased pressure to open the state to the same opportunities that Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Montana, New Mexico, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, West Virginia, and Wyoming are pursuing. Positive labor market impacts are another major economic draw. According to the Revised Draft SGEIS on the Oil, Gas and Solution Mining Regulatory Program (September 2011), hydraulic fracturing would create between 4,408 and 17,634 full-time equivalent (FTE) direct construction jobs in New York State. Indirect employment in other sectors would add an additional 29,174 FTE jobs. Furthermore, the SGEIS analysis suggests that drilling activities could add an estimated $621.9 million to $2.5 billion in employee earnings (direct and indirect) per year, depending upon how much of the shale is developed. The state would also receive direct tax receipts from leasing land, and has the potential to see an increase in generated indirect revenue. Estimates range from $31 million to $125 million per year in personal income tax receipts, and local governments would benefit from revenue sharing. Some landowner groups say the continued delay in drilling is costing tens of thousands of jobs and millions of dollars in growth for New York, especially in the economically stunted upstate. A number of New York counties near Pennsylvania, such as Chemung, NY, have experienced economic uptick from Pennsylvania drilling activity just across the border. Chemung officials reported that approximately 1,300 county residents are currently employed by the drilling industry in Pennsylvania. The Marcellus shale boom is expected to continue over the next decade and beyond. By 2015, gas drilling activity could bring 20,000 jobs to New York State alone. Other states, such as Pennsylvania and West Virginia, are also expected to see a significant increase in the number of jobs. Catalyst 2: Political Reality of the Moratorium. Oil and gas drilling has taken place in New York since the 19th century, and it remains an important industry with more than 13,000 currently active wells. The use of hydraulic fracturing in particular has been employed for decades. Yet, as technological advancements have enabled access to gas in areas where drilling is not common practice, public concern has ballooned. Opponents argue that more oversight is necessary to protect the environment and public health, while supporters believe the industry is already adequately regulated. Although it is important for New York to complete a thorough environmental and regulatory review, an extended ban could lead to litigation by property owners who have been stripped of the ability to lease their mineral rights. Other states are moving forward by implementing legislative guidelines or rules created by commissions to ensure that resources are developed safely. One of the most controversial issues in other states to date has revolved around the public disclosure of chemical additives in drilling fluid. While the industry is hesitant to reveal trade secrets, the public and many officials want the security of knowing what chemicals are pumped into the ground. Industry transparency could help mitigate the public concern and controversy that is delaying a lift of the moratorium. Currently, at least five other states have set chemical disclosure rules. Arkansas, Michigan, Montana, Texas, and Wyoming require disclosure of the chemical components of drilling fluid. Colorado has the most stringent rules, requiring not just the disclosure of the additives but of their concentrations as well. As more states continue to allow hydraulic fracturing, New York will likely lift the moratorium and instead implement more stringent regulations that help to alleviate public concern surrounding hydraulic fracturing. This will allow the state to safely pursue the expansive opportunities offered by the Marcellus shale without falling behind economically. Catalyst 3: Energy and Infrastructure Benefits. Natural gas provides a key source of energy in the Northeast. The DEC estimates the Marcellus shale gas resource potential to be between 168-516 Tcf. Even at the low end of this range, Marcellus alone could supply seven years of total U.S. energy consumption, and it would provide a local resource for New York. One report suggests that savings from lower natural gas costs would result in an average annual savings of $926 per household. (4) Industry growth is leading to lower natural gas and electric power prices, while decreasing reliance on Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) imports and enhancing domestic energy security. This makes development of the resources an even more attractive commitment to New York. In addition, the natural gas business is predominantly regional in scope. Drilling companies would be required to build new pipelines for gas development in New York, therefore State regulators face valuable ancillary benefits of natural gas development such as infrastructure improvements. Catalyst 4: Technology Improvements. Lastly, the moratorium itself does not prevent the use of alternative drilling technologies, such as non-hydraulic fracturing, for shale gas production. Developers are already using new systems in Texas and Canada, as well as in France where hydraulic fracturing is banned country-wide. Commercial viability of these new technologies could ultimately provide an alternative to jumpstart shale drilling in New York if necessary. The potential benefits from development of the Marcellus shale in New York are undeniable, though regulators are still working to balance the need to stimulate the economy with environmental protection and public health. Since closing the public comment period in January, the DEC has signaled that much more work is needed, making no promises to near-term completion. While, neighboring states are feeling the economic benefits of drilling, the political environment and the recession continues adding pressure to the process in New York state.

  13. N:\\My Documents\\porfin.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... C D 2002 3116 019-20 EE GA Atlanta US 1 D000 C E 1999 7. Inventory Page 41 of 133 Department of Energy 2006 Commercial and Inherently Governmental FTE Inventory Worksheet Seq No. ...

  14. Energy Lab to Evaluate Performance of UPS Hybrid-Electric Vans...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing Activity (AVTA), NREL's Fleet Test & Evaluation (FT&E) team is performing a 12-month evaluation of some of these 50 hybrid vans at UPS locations in Dallas and Phoenix. ...

  15. FMT Workforce FTEs by Scope Current Contract Scope of Work (Section...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    FMT Workforce FTEs by Scope Current Contract Scope of Work (Section J. Appendix A) FTE's* Directed Stockpile Work (DSW) 1,329 Campaigns 260 Readiness in Technical Base & Facilities...

  16. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh�s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  17. Theory_NuclearGluonsCharmEIC_FY16_Midyear

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Report 1. Nuclear gluons with charm at EIC Principal Investigator: C. Weiss (Theoretical and Computational Physics Center, 1.757.269.7013) ! Project Status Project execution started October 1, 2015 as planned. Regular group meetings were scheduled (including the external collaborators through videoconferencing) and a public project Wiki was set up for communication and documentation at https://wiki.jlab.org/nuclear_gluons/ . Weiss (20% FTE) and Higinbotham (10% FTE) have been working on the

  18. Non-destructive observation of intact bacteria and viruses in water by the highly sensitive frequency transmission electric-field method based on SEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogura, Toshihiko

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: We developed a high-sensitive frequency transmission electric-field (FTE) system. The output signal was highly enhanced by applying voltage to a metal layer on SiN. The spatial resolution of new FTE method is 41 nm. New FTE system enables observation of the intact bacteria and virus in water. - Abstract: The high-resolution structural analysis of biological specimens by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) presents several advantages. Until now, wet bacterial specimens have been examined using atmospheric sample holders. However, images of unstained specimens in water using these holders exhibit very poor contrast and heavy radiation damage. Recently, we developed the frequency transmission electric-field (FTE) method, which facilitates the SEM observation of biological specimens in water without radiation damage. However, the signal detection system presents low sensitivity. Therefore, a high EB current is required to generate clear images, and thus reducing spatial resolution and inducing thermal damage to the samples. Here a high-sensitivity detection system is developed for the FTE method, which enhances the output signal amplitude by hundredfold. The detection signal was highly enhanced when voltage was applied to the metal layer on silicon nitride thin film. This enhancement reduced the EB current and improved the spatial resolution as well as the signal-to-noise ratio. The spatial resolution of a high-sensitive FTE system is 41 nm, which is considerably higher than previous FTE system. New FTE system can easily be utilised to examine various unstained biological specimens in water, such as living bacteria and viruses.

  19. U.S. Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Billion

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1930's 75 62 52 48 52 55 61 70 73 74 1940's 80 115 119 122 143 160 165 189 210 224 1950's 260 292 319 340 354 377 418 434 458 498 1960's 543 592 624 670 723 753 739 785 828 867 1970's 906 883 908 917 887 872 854 863 852 808 1980's 777 775 762 790 838 816 800 812 816 785 1990's 784 835 872 886 889 908 958 964 938 973 2000's 1,016 954 957 876 927 876 906 930 953 1,024 2010's 1,066 1,134 1,250 1,357 1,608

  20. The International Framework for Maintaining Equivalence and Traceability in Radionuclide Metrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, Mike; Sahagia, Maria

    2008-08-14

    Confidence that a testing or calibration laboratory consistently obtains reliable results is of major importance to users of laboratory services and participation in proficiency testing schemes provides laboratories with an objective means of assessing and demonstrating the level of confidence that can be ascribed to the reliability of the data they are producing. That level of confidence, in turn, depends on the quality of the proficiency tests and, in particular, on the accuracy of the property values associated with the test samples. In the ideal situation, the relevant property value, such as the activity of a particular radionuclide in a test matrix, will be directly traceable to the SI via comparisons with a national or international metrology institute (NMI). This, in turn, begs the question of, how reliable are the results from that NMI.Demonstration of that reliability at the highest metrological levels is achieved through inter-laboratory comparisons that are conducted between national and international metrological institutes. These are coordinated primarily by the Bureau International des Poids et Mesures (BIPM) via Key Comparisons or by comparisons within Regional Metrological Organisations (RMOs), with the results from those RMO exercises being linked to the BIPM Key Comparison results. Such programmes have been in place for many years but they have grown in importance and frequency over the past decade. Tabulation of these comparison data has been regularized recently and made available to the user communities via the BIPM Key Comparison Database (KCDB).In the field of ionizing radiation, the radionuclide metrology discipline exhibits a number of special features. For example, these include the number of potential radionuclides in a user sample; the variety of physical and chemical formats that may be presented; the statistical and temporal effects of radioactive decay; the variations in primary standardization techniques; and the restricted applicability of those primary standardization techniques to the full range of potential radionuclides and activities. Each of these, singly or in combination, ensure that there can never be a fully comprehensive set of Key Comparisons which will cover the requirements of the user community and, in turn, compromise the ability to provide a full range of proficiency tests for testing and calibration laboratories.These problems are discussed, in the context of radioactivity measurements, together with the structure and range of Key Comparisons and associated databases at the highest international level that are currently in place to underpin the proficiency tests that are necessary for the user communities in this field of application.

  1. rbstmultiprince.f; Equivalent Dipole Polarizability Inversion of Time Domain Electromagnetic Induction Data

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-10-01

    This software, rbstmultiprince.f, computes polarizations and positions from electromagnetic data and is used in conjunction with technology to detect UXO. This software was funded by the ESTCP program of the DoD. This code makes use of third party code from the 1970s and 1980s that appears to have entered the public domain and is available for free download via the website netlib.org. The code was first developed by the author while he was employed atmore » UCB and funded by the SERDP of the U.S. Army.« less

  2. Thermal lag test engines evaluated and compared to equivalent Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tailer, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal lag engines run both free piston and with pistons kinematically linked. Free piston, a thermal lag engine may be the simplest of all piston engines as it is valveless and has only one moving part, the piston. Horizontal and vertical thermal lag engines with substantially identical cooled pistons and cylinders are tested and evaluated, particularly as to power density. The horizontal engine has an elongated, small diameter heated chamber and the vertical engine has a large diameter flat heated chamber. Both heated chambers may be altered in volume to maximize engine power at optimum compression ratios. The power density of unpressurized thermal lag engines is compared to that of early commercial Stirling cycle unpressurized air engines. The comparison indicates the potential for applying well-known modern Stirling technology to thermal lag engines.

  3. Biasing, operation and parasitic current limitation in single device equivalent to CMOS, and other semiconductor systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, James D.

    2003-09-23

    Disclosed are semiconductor devices including at least one junction which is rectifying whether the semiconductor is caused to be N or P-type, by the presence of applied gate voltage field induced carriers in essentially intrinsic, essentially homogeneously simultaneously containing both N and P-type metallurgical dopants at substantially equal doping levels, essentially homogeneously simultaneously containing both N and P-type metallurgical dopants at different doping levels, and containing a single metallurgical doping type, and functional combinations thereof. In particular, inverting and non-inverting gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to conventional multiple device CMOS systems, which can be operated as modulators, are disclosed as are a non-latching SCR and an approach to blocking parasitic currents utilizing material(s) which form rectifying junctions with both N and P-type semiconductor whether metallurigically or field induced.

  4. Estimation of Equivalent Sea Level Cosmic Ray Exposure for Low Background Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, Austen T.; Orrell, John L.

    2012-08-25

    While scientists at CERN and other particle accelerators around the world explore the boundaries of high energy physics, the Majorana project investigates the other end of the spectrum with its extremely sensitive, low background, low energy detector. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR aims to detect neutrinoless double beta decay (0???), a rare theoretical process in which two neutrons decay into two protons and two electrons, without the emission of the two antineutrinos that are a product of a normal double beta decay. This process is only possible if and therefore a detection would prove the neutrino is a Majorana particle, meaning that it is its own antiparticle [Aaselth et al. 2004] . The existence of such a decay would also disprove lepton conservation and give information about the neutrino's mass.

  5. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project path forward: nuclear safety equivalency to comparable NRC-licensed facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvin, L.J.

    1995-11-01

    This document includes the Technical requirements which meet the nuclear safety objectives of the NRC regulations for fuel treatment and storage facilities. These include requirements regarding radiation exposure limits, safety analysis, design and construction. This document also includes administrative requirements which meet the objectives of the major elements of the NRC licensing process. These include formally documented design and safety analysis, independent technical review, and oppportunity for public involvement.

  6. Disturbed subsurface microbial communities follow equivalent trajectories despite different structural starting points

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Miller, Christopher S.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Kantor, Rose S.; Thomas, Brian C.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2015-03-01

    We explored the impact of the starting community composition and structure on ecosystem response to perturbations using organic carbon amendment experiments. Subsurface sediment was partitioned into flow-through columns, and the microbial communities were initially stimulated in situ by addition of acetate as a carbon and electron donor source. This drove community richness and evenness down, and pushed the system into a new biogeochemical state characterized by iron reduction. Reconstructed near-full-length 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated a concomitant enrichment of Desulfuromonadales, Comamonadaceae and Bacteroidetes lineages. After 10 to 12 days, acetate was exchange for lactate in a subset of columns. Following the clear onset of sulfate reduction (35 days after acetate-amendment), acetate was substituted for lactate in additional columns. Acetatestimulated communities differed markedly during each biogeochemical regime and at each lactate-switch. Regardless, however, of when communities were switched to lactate, they followed comparable trajectories with respect to composition and structure, with convergence evident one week after each switch, and marked after one month of lactate amendment. During sulfate reduction all treatments were enriched in Firmicutes and a number of species likely involved in sulfate reduction (notably Desulfobulbus, Desulfosporosinus, Desulfitobacterium and Desulfotomaculum). Lactate treatments were distinguished by substantially lower relative abundances of Desulfotomaculum and Bacteroidetes, and enrichments of Psychrosinus and Clostridiales species. Results imply that the structure of the starting community was not significant in controlling organism selection in community succession.

  7. Defense Program Equivalencies for Technical Qualification Standard Competencies12/12/1995

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Defense Programs has undertaken an effort to compare the competencies in the GeneralTechnical Base Qualification Standard and the Functional Area Qualification Standards withvarious positions in...

  8. General Technical Base Qualification Equivalencies Based On Previous Experience, 12/12/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "The header lists the general field of experience, Commercial Nuclear Power or Navy Nuclear PowerProgram, with all other categories under these two areas. The subheader lists the position title of...

  9. Demonstration of the Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; CORRELATION ...

  10. On The Equivalence of Soft and Zero-Bin Subtractions (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Language: English Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; 71 CLASSICAL AND QUANTUM MECHANICS, GENERAL PHYSICS; DEEP INELASTIC SCATTERING; FACTORIZATION; FORM ...

  11. System and method to determine electric motor efficiency using an equivalent circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G.

    2015-10-27

    A system and method for determining electric motor efficiency includes a monitoring system having a processor programmed to determine efficiency of an electric motor under load while the electric motor is online. The determination of motor efficiency is independent of a rotor speed measurement. Further, the efficiency is based on a determination of stator winding resistance, an input voltage, and an input current. The determination of the stator winding resistance occurs while the electric motor under load is online.

  12. System and method to determine electric motor efficiency using an equivalent circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G.

    2011-06-07

    A system and method for determining electric motor efficiency includes a monitoring system having a processor programmed to determine efficiency of an electric motor under load while the electric motor is online. The determination of motor efficiency is independent of a rotor speed measurement. Further, the efficiency is based on a determination of stator winding resistance, an input voltage, and an input current. The determination of the stator winding resistance occurs while the electric motor under load is online.

  13. Three cardiovirus Leader proteins equivalently inhibit four different nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciomperlik, Jessica J.; Basta, Holly A.; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2015-10-15

    Cardiovirus infections inhibit nucleocytoplasmic trafficking by Leader protein-induced phosphorylation of Phe/Gly-containing nucleoporins (Nups). Recombinant Leader from encephalomyocarditis virus, Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus and Saffold virus target the same subset of Nups, including Nup62 and Nup98, but not Nup50. Reporter cell lines with fluorescence mCherry markers for M9, RS and classical SV40 import pathways, as well as the Crm1-mediated export pathway, all responded to transfection with the full panel of Leader proteins, showing consequent cessation of path-specific active import/export. For this to happen, the Nups had to be presented in the context of intact nuclear pores and exposed to cytoplasmic extracts. The Leader phosphorylation cascade was not effective against recombinant Nup proteins. The findings support a model of Leader-dependent Nup phosphorylation with the purpose of disrupting Nup-transportin interactions. - Highlights: • Nup98, but not Nup50 becomes phosphorylated by cardiovirus Leader protein-dependent mechanisms. • At least four independent nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathways are inhibited by this process. • Nups must be presented in a nuclear pore context for Leader-directed phosphorylation. • Leader, by itself, does not cause activation of cellular kinases.

  14. System and method to determine electric motor efficiency using an equivalent circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Bin; Habetler, Thomas G

    2015-11-06

    A system and method for determining electric motor efficiency includes a monitoring system having a processor programmed to determine efficiency of an electric motor under load while the electric motor is online. The determination of motor efficiency is independent of a rotor speed measurement. Further, the efficiency is based on a determination of stator winding resistance, an input voltage, and an input current. The determination of the stator winding resistance occurs while the electric motor under load is online.

  15. DEMONSTRATION OF EQUIVALENCY OF CANE AND SOFTWOOD BASED CELOTEX FOR MODEL 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, R; Jason Varble, J

    2008-05-27

    Cane-based Celotex{trademark} has been used extensively in various Department of Energy (DOE) packages as a thermal insulator and impact absorber. Cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard was only manufactured by Knight-Celotex Fiberboard at their Marrero Plant in Louisiana. However, Knight-Celotex Fiberboard shut down their Marrero Plant in early 2007 due to impacts from hurricane Katrina and other economic factors. Therefore, cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard is no longer available for use in the manufacture of new shipping packages requiring the material as a component. Current consolidation plans for the DOE Complex require the procurement of several thousand new Model 9975 shipping packages requiring cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard. Therefore, an alternative to cane-based Celotex{trademark} fiberboard is needed. Knight-Celotex currently manufactures Celotex{trademark} fiberboard from other cellulosic materials, such as hardwood and softwood. A review of the relevant literature has shown that softwood-based Celotex{trademark} meets all parameters important to the Model 9975 shipping package.

  16. Distributed and Electric Power System Aggregation Model and Field Configuration Equivalency Validation Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.; Costyk, D.; Narang, A.

    2003-07-01

    This study determines the magnitude of distributed resources that can be added to a distribution circuit without causing undesirable conditions or equipment damage.

  17. Final Report, Volume 4, The Development of Qualification Standards for Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, W.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 ???¢????????Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels???¢??????? for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope???????® and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation was carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope???????® and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890 ???¢???????? 5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890 ???¢???????? 5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly

  18. Final Report, Volume 4, The Develpoment of Qualification Standards forCast Super Duplex Stainless Steel (2507 Wrought Equivalent)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hariharan, Vasudevan; Lundin, Carl, D.

    2005-09-30

    The objective of the program is to determine the suitability of ASTM A923 Standard Test methods for Detecting Detrimental Intermetallic Phase in Wrought Duplex Austenitic-Ferritic Stainless Steels for 25 Cr Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steels (ASTM A890-5A). Different tests were carried out on the materials procured from various steel foundries as stated in the ASTM A923. The foundries were designated as Foundry A, B, C and D. All the materials were foundry solution annealed. Materials from Foundry D were solution heat treated at The University of Tennessee also and then they were subjected to heat treatment schedule which was derived from the testing of wrought DSS to establish the A923 specification. This was possible because the material from the same heat was sufficient for conducting the full scope of heat treatment. This was done prior to carrying out various other tests. Charpy samples were machined. The Ferrite content was measured in all the Charpy samples using Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count Method. After the ferrite content was measured the samples were sent to AMC-Vulcan, Inc. in Alabama to conduct the Charpy impact test based on ASTM A923 Test Method B. This was followed by etch testing and corrosion analysis based on ASTM A923 Test Methods A and C respectively at University of Tennessee. Hardness testing using Rockwell B and C was also carried out on these samples. A correlation was derived between all the three test methods and the best method for evaluating the presence of intermetallic in the material was determined. The ferrite content was correlated with the toughness values. Microstructural analysis was carried out on the etch test samples using Scanning Electron Microscopy in order to determine if intermetallic phases were present. The fracture surfaces from Charpy test specimens were also observed under SEM in order to determine the presence of any cracks and whether it was a brittle or a ductile fracture. A correlation was carried out between the ferrite content, hardness values and the type of fracture. SEM was also carried out on the corrosion samples in order to see the difference on the surface after corrosion analysis has been carried out. Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy was carried out on the material acquired from Foundry D in order to determine the variation in the amount of the chemical composition of various elements when the material is subjected to different heat treatment schedules. X-Ray analysis was also carried out in order to verify whether it is possible to identify the different phases present in the material. Volume percentage of ferrite was also calculated from X-Ray diffraction and compared with the Feritscope{reg_sign} and ASTM E562 Manual Point Count data in order to determine whether X-Ray Diffraction is a suitable method for carrying out qualitative analysis of different phases present. From the various tests that were conducted, it was concluded that since ASTM A923 Methods adequately identifies the presence of intermetallic phases in A890-5A grade Cast Super Duplex Stainless Steel A890-5A can be directly included in ASTM A923. Correlation was determined between all the ASTM A923 Test Methods A, B and C and Test Method B were identified as the best method for detecting the presence of detrimental intermetallic phases. The micrographs from the A890-4A grade (now in ASTM A923) were identified as applicable for the A890-5A grade to compare and detect the presence of intermetallic phases. Using these micrographs one can verify whether an A890-5A sample has an unaffected, affected or a possibly affected structure. It was also observed that when compared to the A890-4A grade A890-5A grade is more sensitive to heat treatment. From the ferrite and hardness measurement a correlation was developed between toughness, volume percentage ferrite and hardness of the material. From SEM and EDS the type of intermetallic phase present and its chemical composition was determined. The best method for calculating volume percentage ferrite was determined between the Ferits

  19. SU-E-T-464: On the Equivalence of the Quality Correction Factor for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorriaux, J; Paganetti, H; Testa, M; Giantsoudi, D; Schuemann, J; Bertrand, D; Orban de Xivry, J.; Lee, J; Palmans, H; Vynckier, S; Sterpin, E

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In current practice, most proton therapy centers apply IAEA TRS-398 reference dosimetry protocol. Quality correction factors (kQ) take into account in the dose determination process the differences in beam qualities used for calibration unit and for treatment unit. These quality correction factors are valid for specific reference conditions. TRS-398 reference conditions should be achievable in both scattered proton beams (i.e. DS) and scanned proton beams (i.e. PBS). However, it is not a priori clear if TRS-398 kQ data, which are based on Monte Carlo (MC) calculations in scattered beams, can be used for scanned beams. Using TOPAS-Geant4 MC simulations, the study aims to determine whether broad beam quality correction factors calculated in TRS-398 can be directly applied to PBS delivery modality. Methods: As reference conditions, we consider a 101010 cm{sup 3} homogeneous dose distribution delivered by PBS system in a water phantom (32/10 cm range/modulation) and an air cavity placed at the center of the spread-out-Bragg-peak. In order to isolate beam differences, a hypothetical broad beam is simulated. This hypothetical beam reproduces exactly the same range modulation, and uses the same energy layers than the PBS field. Ion chamber responses are computed for the PBS and hypothetical beams and then compared. Results: For an air cavity of 220.2 cm{sup 3}, the ratio of ion chamber responses for the PBS and hypothetical beam qualities is 0.9991 0.0016. Conclusion: Quality correction factors are insensitive to the delivery pattern of the beam (broad beam or PBS), as long as similar dose distributions are achieved. This investigation, for an air cavity, suggests that broad beam quality correction factors published in TRS-398 can be applied for scanned beams. J. Sorriaux is financially supported by a public-private partnership involving the company Ion Beam Applications (IBA)

  20. Estimation of m.w.e (meter water equivalent) depth of the salt mine of Slanic Prahova, Romania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitrica, B.; Margineanu, R.; Stoica, S.; Petcu, M.; Brancus, I. M.; Petre, M.; Toma, G.; Saftoiu, A.; Apostu, A.; Jipa, A.; Lazanu, I.; Sima, O.; Haungs, A.; Rebel, H.

    2010-11-24

    A new mobile detector was developed in IFIN-HH, Romania, for measuring muon flux at surface and in underground. The measurements have been performed in the salt mines of Slanic Prahova, Romania. The muon flux was determined for 2 different galleries of the Slanic mine at different depths. In order to test the stability of the method, also measurements of the muon flux at surface at different altitudes were performed. Based on the results, the depth of the 2 galleries was established at 610 and 790 m.w.e. respectively.

  1. Audit Report: WR-B-00-07 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Audit Report: WR-B-00-07 September 20, 2000 Vehicle Use at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory The main site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore) occupies one square mile. For on-site transportation of its 7,300 full-time equivalent employees, Livermore leased vehicles from General Services Administration (GSA), operated a taxi service, and provided bicycles. A network of sidewalks and paved trails was available for persons bicycling or walking between site facilities. In

  2. Job Counting Guidelines | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mission » Recovery Act » Job Counting Guidelines Job Counting Guidelines The following updated definitions and guidelines are intended to provide EM Recovery Act sites with information to collect and report timely and accurate full-time equivalent and cumulative head-count data for both monthly and quarterly jobs data calls. These revised guidelines supersede the previous monthly jobs data reporting definitions and guidelines dated February 9, 2010. These revised guidelines remain consistent

  3. F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Physics potential of polarized light ions with EIC@JLab" Principal Investigator: C. Weiss (JLab Theory) Project Status Project execution started 01 Dec 2013. A postdoctoral fellow in experimental physics, Dr. Kijun Park, is working for the project at 50% FTE per agreement with Old Dominion University, as planned. Project schedule and first-year deliverables were revisited in view of the compressed timeline, and short-term visits of the senior theory collaborators were arranged on

  4. LDRD Project Mid-Year Report

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics potential of polarized light ions with EIC@JLab Principal Investigator: C. Weiss (JLab Theory) Project Status Project work continued into FY15 with the same personnel as in FY14 (JLab investigators, 50% FTE postdoc shared with Old Dominion U., visitors). Following demonstration of feasibility of spectator tagging in the 1st project year, 2nd year efforts so far focused mainly on physics extraction, strengthening the theoretical framework, and outreach. Theory agenda and schedule had to

  5. Dual-spacecraft reconstruction of a three-dimensional magnetic flux rope at the Earth's magnetopause

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hasegawa, H.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ö.; Eriksson, S.; Nakamura, T. K. M.; Kawano, H.

    2015-02-03

    We present the first results of a data analysis method, developed by Sonnerup and Hasegawa (2011), for reconstructing three-dimensional (3-D), magnetohydrostatic structures from data taken as two closely spaced satellites traverse the structures. The method is applied to a magnetic flux transfer event (FTE), which was encountered on 27 June 2007 by at least three (TH-C, TH-D, and TH-E) of the five THEMIS probes near the subsolar magnetopause. The FTE was sandwiched between two oppositely directed reconnection jets under a southward interplanetary magnetic field condition, consistent with its generation by multiple X-line reconnection. The recovered 3-D field indicates that amore » magnetic flux rope with a diameter of ~ 3000 km was embedded in the magnetopause. The FTE flux rope had a significant 3-D structure, because the 3-D field reconstructed from the data from TH-C and TH-D (separated by ~ 390 km) better predicts magnetic field variations actually measured along the TH-E path than does the 2-D Grad–Shafranov reconstruction using the data from TH-C (which was closer to TH-E than TH-D and was at ~ 1250 km from TH-E). Such a 3-D nature suggests that the field lines reconnected at the two X-lines on both sides of the flux rope are entangled in a complicated way through their interaction with each other. The generation process of the observed 3-D flux rope is discussed on the basis of the reconstruction results and the pitch-angle distribution of electrons observed in and around the FTE.« less

  6. Microsoft Word - Attachment D - Position Qualifications.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D - POSITION QUALIFICATIONS POSITION QUALIFICATIONS NOTE: If accepted, the labor category and minimum position qualifications proposed will be incorporated into (and/or replace) the below listing. Historical Allocation (FTE) DESCRIPTION Program Manager 1 Requirements for the Program Manager include a Bachelors or higher degree in a social science, business, or related field; at least 10 years of supervisory and management experience of which 5 years must be in the operation, administration,

  7. Technical Justification: Technical Justification of Equivalency for Surface Impoundment Requirements for the Temporary Storage Area Basin and Site Water Treatment Plant Equalization Basin.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

  8. Equivalence of donor and acceptor fits of temperature dependent Hall carrier density and Hall mobility data: Case of ZnO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brochen, Stphane; Feuillet, Guy; Pernot, Julien

    2014-04-28

    In this work, statistical formulations of the temperature dependence of ionized and neutral impurity concentrations in a semiconductor, needed in the charge balance equation and for carrier scattering calculations, have been developed. These formulations have been used in order to elucidate a confusing situation, appearing when compensating acceptor (donor) levels are located sufficiently close to the conduction (valence) band to be thermally ionized and thereby to emit (capture) an electron to (from) the conduction (valence) band. In this work, the temperature dependent Hall carrier density and Hall mobility data adjustments are performed in an attempt to distinguish the presence of a deep acceptor or a deep donor level, coexisting with a shallower donor level and located near the conduction band. Unfortunately, the present statistical developments, applied to an n-type hydrothermal ZnO sample, lead in both cases to consistent descriptions of experimental Hall carrier density and mobility data and thus do not allow to determine the nature, donor or acceptor, of the deep level. This demonstration shows that the emission of an electron in the conduction band, generally assigned to a (0/+1) donor transition from a donor level cannot be applied systematically and could also be attributed to a (?1/0) donor transition from an acceptor level. More generally, this result can be extended for any semiconductor and also for deep donor levels located close to the valence band (acceptor transition)

  9. Installations

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reporting companies, total number of: 81 Employment, full-time equivalent employees: 9,288 Module and/or cell manufacturing 33 Module or system design 23 Prototype module development 23 Prototype systems development 12 Wholesale distribution 42 Retail distribution 15 Installations 12 Other 8 90-100% 53 50-89% 6 10-49% 3 Less than 10% 19 Crystalline silicon: single-crystal modules 15 Crystalline silicon: cast modules 9 Thin-film: amorphous silicon modules 1 Thin-film: other modules 4

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - KTH_pres - Leif Kari.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    KTH Royal Institute of Technology Research at KTH Leif Kari Dean School of Engineering Sciences 10 March 2015 * Sweden's oldest and largest university of technology. * More than 12,000 full-time (equivalents) students. * More than 1,800 PhD students. * Over 4,800 employees. * Ranked as the 126th best university in the world by THE * Ranked as the 30th best univ. of technology in the world by THE Sweden's leading university of technology 2 President Obama visits KTH September 4th 2013 KTH's

  11. Evaluation of the freeze-thaw/evaporation process for the treatment of produced waters. Final report, August 1992--August 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boysen, J.E.; Walker, K.L.; Mefford, J.L.; Kirsch, J.R.; Harju, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    The use of freeze-crystallization is becoming increasingly acknowledged as a low-cost, energy-efficient method for purifying contaminated water. The natural freezing process can be coupled with natural evaporative processes to treat oil and gas produced waters year round in regions where subfreezing temperatures seasonally occur. The climates typical of Colorado`s San Juan Basin and eastern slope, as well as the oil and gas producing regions of Wyoming, are well suited for application of these processes in combination. Specifically, the objectives of this research are related to the development of a commercially-economic FTE (freeze-thaw/evaporation) process for the treatment and purification of water produced in conjunction with oil and natural gas. The research required for development of this process consists of three tasks: (1) a literature survey and process modeling and economic analysis; (2) laboratory-scale process evaluation; and (3) field demonstration of the process. Results of research conducted for the completion of these three tasks indicate that produced water treatment and disposal costs for commercial application of the process, would be in the range of $0.20 to $0.30/bbl in the Rocky Mountain region. FTE field demonstration results from northwestern New Mexico during the winter of 1995--96 indicate significant and simultaneous removal of salts, metals, and organics from produced water. Despite the unusually warm winter, process yields demonstrate disposal volume reductions on the order of 80% and confirm the potential for economic production of water suitable for various beneficial uses. The total dissolved solids concentrations of the FTE demonstration streams were 11,600 mg/L (feed), 56,900 mg/L (brine), and 940 mg/L (ice melt).

  12. Amended Record of Decision for the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives (DOE/EIS-0082-S2) (1/24/06)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    4 Federal Register / Vol. 71, No. 15 / Tuesday, January 24, 2006 / Notices (f) Quality of Evaluation Plan (Total 15 Points). (g) Budget (Total 8 Points). 2. Review and Selection Process: Tiebreaker for Development Grants. In tie-breaking situations for development grants described in 34 CFR 606.23(b), the HSI Program regulations require that we award one additional point to an application from an IHE that has an endowment fund for which the market value per FTE student is less than the

  13. MEMORANDUM FOR H FROM: ACTING SENIOR PROCUREMENT EXECUTIVE OFFICE OF ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ^ g December 1, 200S MEMORANDUM FOR ELIZABETH MONTOYA TRANSITION TEAM FROM THOMAS N. PYKE, J CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER SUBJECT: Follow-up to our meeting this morning Carl Staton and I appreciated the opportunity to brief you this morning on our office's activities, including the cyber security issue. We noted four follow-up actions: 1. The breakdown ofOCIO Federal and contracting FTE at all of our sites is: Federal Contractor a. Forrestal 51 144 b. Germantown 85 213 c. Albuquerque 1 39 d.

  14. MEMORANDUM FOR ELIZABETH MONTOYA TRANSITION TEAM FROM THOMAS N. PYKE, J

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ^ g December 1, 200S MEMORANDUM FOR ELIZABETH MONTOYA TRANSITION TEAM FROM THOMAS N. PYKE, J CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER SUBJECT: Follow-up to our meeting this morning Carl Staton and I appreciated the opportunity to brief you this morning on our office's activities, including the cyber security issue. We noted four follow-up actions: 1. The breakdown ofOCIO Federal and contracting FTE at all of our sites is: Federal Contractor a. Forrestal 51 144 b. Germantown 85 213 c. Albuquerque 1 39 d.

  15. Research in Theoretical Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, Hume A; Marfatia, Danny

    2014-09-24

    This document is the final report on activity supported under DOE Grant Number DE-FG02-13ER42024. The report covers the period July 15, 2013 – March 31, 2014. Faculty supported by the grant during the period were Danny Marfatia (1.0 FTE) and Hume Feldman (1% FTE). The grant partly supported University of Hawaii students, David Yaylali and Keita Fukushima, who are supervised by Jason Kumar. Both students are expected to graduate with Ph.D. degrees in 2014. Yaylali will be joining the University of Arizona theory group in Fall 2014 with a 3-year postdoctoral appointment under Keith Dienes. The group’s research covered topics subsumed under the Energy Frontier, the Intensity Frontier, and the Cosmic Frontier. Many theoretical results related to the Standard Model and models of new physics were published during the reporting period. The report contains brief project descriptions in Section 1. Sections 2 and 3 lists published and submitted work, respectively. Sections 4 and 5 summarize group activity including conferences, workshops and professional presentations.

  16. Economic Development Benefits from Wind Energy in Nebraska: A Report for the Nebraska Energy Office (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.

    2009-06-01

    This report focuses on the economic development impacts estimated from building and operating 7,800 MW of new wind power in Nebraska. This level of development is on the scale envisioned in the Department of Energy (DOE) report 20% Wind Energy by 2030. A practical first step to building 7,800 of wind is completing 1,000 MW. We also include the estimated economic impacts to Nebraska from building 1,000 MW of wind power. Our primary analysis indicates that the development and construction of approximately 7,800 MW of wind energy in Nebraska by 2030 will support 20,600 to 36,500 annual full-time equivalents (AFTE). In addition, operating the full 7,800 MW of wind energy could support roughly 2,000 to 4,000 full-time workers throughout the operating life of the wind facilities (LFTE). Nebraska's economy is estimated to see an average annual boost in economic activity ranging from $140 million to $260 million solely from construction and development related activities between 2011 and 2030. An additional boost of $250 - $442 million annually is estimated from operating 7,800 MW of wind capacity.

  17. Economic Impacts from Indiana's First 1,000 Megawatts of Wind Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.; Keyser, D.; Flores-Espino, F.; Hauser, R.

    2014-08-01

    The magnitude of Indiana's available wind resource indicates that the development of wind power infrastructure has the potential to support millions of dollars of economic activity in the state. The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, are tools used to estimate some of the economic impacts of energy projects at the state level. JEDI calculates results in the form of jobs, earnings, and economic output in three categories: project development and onsite labor, local revenue and supply chain, and induced impacts. According to this analysis, the first 1,000 MW of wind power development in Indiana (projects built between 2008 and 2011): supported employment totaling more than 4,400 full-time-equivalent jobs in Indiana during the construction periods; supports approximately 260 ongoing Indiana jobs; supported nearly $570 million in economic activity for Indiana during the construction periods; supported and continues to support nearly $40 million in annual Indiana economic activity during the operating periods; generates more than $8 million in annual property taxes; generates nearly $4 million annually in income for Indiana landowners who lease their land for wind energy projects.

  18. Westinghouse, DOE see apples, oranges in IG staffing report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-03-01

    The operator of the Energy Department's Savannah River weapons plant has at least 1,800 more employees than it needs, and could save $400 million over a five-year period by cutting its staff accordingly, a DOE inspector general study says. Most of the boat - 1,206 employees - was attributed to excessive numbers of managers, with the inspector general concluding that Westinghouse Savannah River Co. had roughly twice as many layers of management than two other DOE weapons contractors. The study also concluded that Westinghouse in fiscal year 1992 significantly understated its actual staffing levels in reports to DOE, failing to disclose 1,765 full-time employees or the equivalent hours worked. Through such underreporting Westinghouse was able to [open quotes]circumvent staffing ceilings established by the department,[close quotes] the study added. Overall, DOE Inspector General John Layton said Westinghouse's staff levels substantially exceeded those needed for efficient operation of the South Carolina nuclear weapons facility. Layton based his analysis on efficiency standards attained by other DOE weapons plant contractors, such as Martin Marietta Energy Systems at DOE's Oak Ridge, Tenn., plant and EG G Rocky Flats, as well as widely utilized worker performance requirements used by the Navy and private sector companies that perform work similar to that done at Savannah River.

  19. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by work schedule: Full-Time (1) Apply Full-Time filter Filter by work type: Permanent (1) Apply Permanent filter Filter by occupational series: Accounting (1) Apply Accounting...

  20. Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical Equivalence Ratio Effects of Ignition Quality and Fuel Composition on Critical Equivalence Ratio Our research shows ...

  1. The Geometry Of Disorder: Theoretical Investigations Of Quasicrystals...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Of Quasicrystals And Frustrated Magnets: Quasi-Crystals And Quasi-Equivalence: ... Of Quasicrystals And Frustrated Magnets: Quasi-Crystals And Quasi-Equivalence: ...

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    tax on a gallon equivalent basis. Alternative fuels include natural gas, propane, hydrogen, and hythane. A gallon equivalent is defined as 5.660 pounds (lbs.) of compressed...

  3. Executive summary for assessing the near-term risk of climate uncertainty : interdependencies among the U.S. states.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loose, Verne W.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Reinert, Rhonda K.; Backus, George A.; Warren, Drake E.; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Klise, Geoffrey T.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-04-01

    Policy makers will most likely need to make decisions about climate policy before climate scientists have resolved all relevant uncertainties about the impacts of climate change. This study demonstrates a risk-assessment methodology for evaluating uncertain future climatic conditions. We estimate the impacts of climate change on U.S. state- and national-level economic activity from 2010 to 2050. To understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and to provide a near-term rationale for policy interventions to mitigate the course of climate change, we focus on precipitation, one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change. We use results of the climate-model ensemble from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report 4 (AR4) as a proxy for representing climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, map the simulated weather from the climate models hydrologically to the county level to determine the physical consequences on economic activity at the state level, and perform a detailed 70-industry analysis of economic impacts among the interacting lower-48 states. We determine the industry-level contribution to the gross domestic product and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effects on personal income, and consequences for the U.S. trade balance. We show that the mean or average risk of damage to the U.S. economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of $1 trillion over the next 40 years, with losses in employment equivalent to nearly 7 million full-time jobs.

  4. Assessing the near-term risk of climate uncertainty : interdependencies among the U.S. states.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loose, Verne W.; Lowry, Thomas Stephen; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Stamber, Kevin Louis; Reinert, Rhonda K.; Backus, George A.; Warren, Drake E.; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Klise, Geoffrey T.; Vargas, Vanessa N.

    2010-04-01

    Policy makers will most likely need to make decisions about climate policy before climate scientists have resolved all relevant uncertainties about the impacts of climate change. This study demonstrates a risk-assessment methodology for evaluating uncertain future climatic conditions. We estimate the impacts of climate change on U.S. state- and national-level economic activity from 2010 to 2050. To understand the implications of uncertainty on risk and to provide a near-term rationale for policy interventions to mitigate the course of climate change, we focus on precipitation, one of the most uncertain aspects of future climate change. We use results of the climate-model ensemble from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report 4 (AR4) as a proxy for representing climate uncertainty over the next 40 years, map the simulated weather from the climate models hydrologically to the county level to determine the physical consequences on economic activity at the state level, and perform a detailed 70-industry analysis of economic impacts among the interacting lower-48 states. We determine the industry-level contribution to the gross domestic product and employment impacts at the state level, as well as interstate population migration, effects on personal income, and consequences for the U.S. trade balance. We show that the mean or average risk of damage to the U.S. economy from climate change, at the national level, is on the order of $1 trillion over the next 40 years, with losses in employment equivalent to nearly 7 million full-time jobs.

  5. Implementation of two-equation soot flamelet models for laminar diffusion flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbonell, D.; Oliva, A.; Perez-Segarra, C.D.

    2009-03-15

    The two-equation soot model proposed by Leung et al. [K.M. Leung, R.P. Lindstedt, W.P. Jones, Combust. Flame 87 (1991) 289-305] has been derived in the mixture fraction space. The model has been implemented using both Interactive and Non-Interactive flamelet strategies. An Extended Enthalpy Defect Flamelet Model (E-EDFM) which uses a flamelet library obtained neglecting the soot formation is proposed as a Non-Interactive method. The Lagrangian Flamelet Model (LFM) is used to represent the Interactive models. This model uses direct values of soot mass fraction from flamelet calculations. An Extended version (E-LFM) of this model is also suggested in which soot mass fraction reaction rates are used from flamelet calculations. Results presented in this work show that the E-EDFM predict acceptable results. However, it overpredicts the soot volume fraction due to the inability of this model to couple the soot and gas-phase mechanisms. It has been demonstrated that the LFM is not able to predict accurately the soot volume fraction. On the other hand, the extended version proposed here has been shown to be very accurate. The different flamelet mathematical formulations have been tested and compared using well verified reference calculations obtained solving the set of the Full Transport Equations (FTE) in the physical space. (author)

  6. RBSTMULTIPRINCE.F

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003073MLTPL00 rbstmultiprince.f; Equivalent Dipole Polarizability Inversion of Time Domain Electromagnetic Induction Data

  7. ANNUAL FEDERAL EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY STATISTICAL REPORT...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    STATISTICAL REPORT OF DISCRIMINATION COMPLAINTS (REPORTING PERIOD BEGINS OCTOBER 1ST AND ... COUNSELORINVESTIGATOR F. COMPLAINTS IN LINE E CLOSED DURING REPORT PERIOD a. FULL-TIME b. ...

  8. Y-12s Biomonitoring and Water Quality

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation. Although many industries were slow to come into compliance, most permitted sites today devote full-time resources to...

  9. STEM Women All-Stars Hit the Road | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... she pursued her interest in mechanical engineering to become the first full-time staffer ... Elisabeth Hagen's (Undersecretary for Food Safety at the US Department of Agriculture) ...

  10. Labs at-a-Glance: Ames Laboratory | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Location: Ames, Iowa 8 acres and 12 buildings 310 Full Time Employees 149 Students Core Capabilities Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science Chemical and Molecular Science ...

  11. design basis threat

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    training courses, and additional full-time instructors.

    • The shift to an "Elite Forces," or Tactical Response Force (TRF) model, to transform NNSA's protective forces...

    • Severance Pay

      Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

      Severance pay is authorized for full-time and part-time employees who are involuntarily separated from Federal service and who meet other conditions of eligibility.

    • DOE Awards Up To $405,000 to Nine Graduate Fellows Studying the...

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      environment. Selected AFCI fellows are full-time students pursuing master's degrees in nuclear engineering, applied physics, or other fields of science and engineering relevant...

    • Veteran Cooperative Program Sees Successful First Year at Savannah...

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      SRR currently employs seven veterans part time, and their positions could become full time in the future. They work in science, math, engineering, and technology (STEM) and ...

    • Chaninik Wind Group: Wind Heat Smart Grids

      Office of Environmental Management (EM)

      Wind Heat System Components * ETS heat output at high is equivalent to a Toyostove Laser 56 * .10 per kwh is equivalent to buying diesel at 2.90 per gallon * Current diesel ...

    • Instructions for Preparing Occupational Exposure Data for Submittal...

      Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

      for this monitoring period, in millirem. 45 Committed Equivalent Dose to the lungs (CEqD - LU) 189 7 302-308 The 50-year Committed Equivalent Dose to the lungs from the...

    • 2006 Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report

      Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

      ... Sieverts TEDE. Total.Effective.Dose.Equivalent TODE. Total.Organ.Dose.Equivalent TVA. Tennessee.Valley.Authority UNSCEAR. United.Nations.Scientific.Committee.on.the.Effects.of.Atom...

    • Immediate Deployment of Waste Energy Recovery Technologies at Multi Sites

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      Dennis Castonguay

      2012-06-29

      Verso Paper Corp. implemented a portfolio of 13 commercially available proven industrial technologies each exceeding 30% minimum threshold efficiency and at least 25% efficiency increase. These sub-projects are a direct result of a grant received from the Department of Energy (DOE) through its FOA 0000044 (Deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) Systems, District Energy Systems, Waste Energy Recovery Systems, and Efficient Industrial Equipment), which was funded by the American Recovery Act. These were installed at 3 sites in 2 states and are helping to reduce Verso costs, making the facilities more competitive. This created approximately 100 construction jobs (FTE's) and reduced impacted Verso facilities' expense budgets. These sub-projects were deployed at Verso paper mills located in Jay, Maine, Bucksport, Maine, and Sartell, Minnesota. The paper mills are the economic engines of the rural communities in which these mills are located. Reinvestment in waste energy recovery capital improvements is providing a stimulus to help maintain domestic jobs and to competitively position the US pulp and paper industry with rising energy costs. Energy efficiency improvements are also providing a positive environmental impact by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the quantity of wastewater treated and discharged, and fossil fuel demand. As a result of these projects, when fully operating, Verso realized a total of approximately 1.5 TBtu/Year reduction in overall energy consumption, which is 119% of the project objectives. Note that three paper machines have since been permanently curtailed. However even with these shutdowns, the company still met its energy objectives. Note also that the Sartell mill's paper machine is down due to a recent fire which damaged the mill's electrical infrastructure (the company has not decided on the mill's future).

    • MANAGING ENGINEERING ACTIVITIES FOR THE PLATEAU REMEDIATION CONTRACT - HANFORD

      SciTech Connect (OSTI)

      KRONVALL CM

      2011-01-14

      In 2008, the primary Hanford clean-up contract transitioned to the CH2MHill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). Prior to transition, Engineering resources assigned to remediation/Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities were a part of a centralized engineering organization and matrixed to the performing projects. Following transition, these resources were reassigned directly to the performing project, with a loose matrix through a smaller Central Engineering (CE) organization. The smaller (10 FTE) central organization has retained responsibility for the overall technical quality of engineering for the CHPRC, but no longer performs staffing and personnel functions. As the organization has matured, there are lessons learned that can be shared with other organizations going through or contemplating performing a similar change. Benefits that have been seen from the CHPRC CE organization structure include the following: (1) Staff are closely aligned with the 'Project/facility' that they are assigned to support; (2) Engineering priorities are managed to be consistent with the 'Project/facility' priorities; (3) Individual Engineering managers are accountable for identifying staffing needs and the filling of staffing positions; (4) Budget priorities are managed within the local organization structure; (5) Rather than being considered a 'functional' organization, engineering is considered a part of a line, direct funded organization; (6) The central engineering organization is able to provide 'overview' activities and maintain independence from the engineering organizations in the field; and (7) The central engineering organization is able to maintain a stable of specialized experts that are able to provide independent reviews of field projects and day-to-day activities.

    • JM to Develop DOE P 364.1, Health and Safety Training Reciprocity

      Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

      2013-12-19

      The policy will provide expectations for the acceptance of equivalent worker safety and health training across the DOE Complex.

  1. Method for finding the beam waist through ABCD matrix element adjustment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J.D.

    1988-12-15

    Laser beam parameters includingbeam waist are calculated for laser cavities using an equivalent lens waveguide approach.(AIP)

  2. Comparison of Energy Efficiency Incentive Programs: Rebates and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Efficiency, - Utility Topics: Environmental Website: www.sciencedirect.comsciencearticlepiiS0957178709000460 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontent...

  3. Deployment of Demand Response as a Real-Time Resource in Organized...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.sciencedirect.comsciencearticlepiiS1040619008000973 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontent...

  4. A European Supergrid for Renewable Energy: Local Impacts and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.sciencedirect.comsciencearticlepiiS0959652611002447 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontent...

  5. Project Get Ready | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Equivalent URI http:cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentproject-get-ready-pgr-total-cost-vehicle-ownership-calculator-0, http:cleanenergysolutions.orgcontent...

  6. Appliance Energy Consumption in Australia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ?viewPublicatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentappliance-energy-consumption-australi DeploymentPrograms: Industry Codes & Standards Regulations:...

  7. Piloting the Smart Grid | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentpiloting-smart-grid Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in...

  8. UNEP-Bioenergy Decision Support Tool | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Free Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentbioenergy-decision-support-tool Language: English DeploymentPrograms: Public-Private Partnerships Regulations: Mandates...

  9. Dissecting the Cost of the Smart Grid | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontentdissecting-cost-smart-grid Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: "Resource Integration Planning,Cost...

  10. Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tegen, S.

    2006-05-01

    Report comparing the impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal.

  11. Small Town Energy Program (STEP) Final Report revised

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Charles T.

    2014-01-02

    University Park, Maryland (“UP”) is a small town of 2,540 residents, 919 homes, 2 churches, 1 school, 1 town hall, and 1 breakthrough community energy efficiency initiative: the Small Town Energy Program (“STEP”). STEP was developed with a mission to “create a model community energy transformation program that serves as a roadmap for other small towns across the U.S.” STEP first launched in January 2011 in UP and expanded in July 2012 to the neighboring communities of Hyattsville, Riverdale Park, and College Heights Estates, MD. STEP, which concluded in July 2013, was generously supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The STEP model was designed for replication in other resource-constrained small towns similar to University Park - a sector largely neglected to date in federal and state energy efficiency programs. STEP provided a full suite of activities for replication, including: energy audits and retrofits for residential buildings, financial incentives, a community-based social marketing backbone and local community delivery partners. STEP also included the highly innovative use of an “Energy Coach” who worked one-on-one with clients throughout the program. Please see www.smalltownenergy.org for more information. In less than three years, STEP achieved the following results in University Park: • 30% of community households participated voluntarily in STEP; • 25% of homes received a Home Performance with ENERGY STAR assessment; • 16% of households made energy efficiency improvements to their home; • 64% of households proceeded with an upgrade after their assessment; • 9 Full Time Equivalent jobs were created or retained, and 39 contractors worked on STEP over the course of the project. Estimated Energy Savings - Program Totals kWh Electricity 204,407 Therms Natural Gas 24,800 Gallons of Oil 2,581 Total Estimated MMBTU Saved (Source Energy) 5,474 Total Estimated Annual Energy Cost Savings $61,343 STEP clients who had a home energy upgrade invested on average $4,500, resulting in a 13% reduction in annual energy use and utility bill savings of $325. Rebates and incentives covered 40%-50% of retrofit cost, resulting in an average simple payback of about 7 years. STEP has created a handbook in which are assembled all the key elements that went into the design and delivery of STEP. The target audiences for the handbook include interested citizens, elected officials and municipal staff who want to establish and run their own efficiency program within a small community or neighborhood, using elements, materials and lessons from STEP.

  12. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doctor, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded.

  13. Process for magnetic beneficiating petroleum cracking catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doctor, R.D.

    1993-10-05

    A process is described for beneficiating a particulate zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst having metal values in excess of 1000 ppm nickel equivalents. The particulate catalyst is passed through a magnetic field in the range of from about 2 Tesla to about 5 Tesla generated by a superconducting quadrupole open-gradient magnetic system for a time sufficient to effect separation of said catalyst into a plurality of zones having different nickel equivalent concentrations. A first zone has nickel equivalents of about 6,000 ppm and greater, a second zone has nickel equivalents in the range of from about 2000 ppm to about 6000 ppm, and a third zone has nickel equivalents of about 2000 ppm and less. The zones of catalyst are separated and the second zone material is recycled to a fluidized bed of zeolite petroleum cracking catalyst. The low nickel equivalent zone is treated while the high nickel equivalent zone is discarded. 1 figures.

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methodology with Department Of Energy (DOE). BPA captures the number of hours worked for prime contractors as well as first tier sub-contractors which is converted to full time...

  15. Eight Y-12 employees awarded master's in engineering management...

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    full-time and still has the discipline and drive to take on college studies deserves special recognition. Putting in a 410 workweek and then taking another full day of classes -...

  16. Eligibility | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Have been teaching full-time in a public or private elementary or secondary school for at least five of the last seven years in a science, technology, engineering, or mathematics ...

  17. Interview: LaborWorks@NeighborWorks Provides Vermont Contractors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    temporary labor pool formed to assist professional contractors involved with the HEAT Squad during busy periods when they couldn't keep up with demand or hire full-time help. ...

  18. Rhode Island to Build First Offshore Wind Farm

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Block Island, a small town with only 1,000 full-time, residents, is the site for a big project, when it will become home to Rhode Island’s first offshore wind farm.

  19. Chapter 6

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Nonprofessional couriers must be U.S. citizens and full-time direct hire U.S. government employees; have a Top Secret (or DOE "Q") security clearance, a diplomatic passport, a ...

  20. Leave | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    As a full time employee, you will earn 13 days of vacation time per year the first three years of employment, 19.5 days per year from three to 15 years of employment, and 26 days ...

  1. The original of this document contains information which is subject...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... major repairs on their home after their son flooded it; in addition, the Individual was taking difficult college courses, including Matrix Algebra; and he was working full-time. ...

  2. Women @ Energy: Mary "Molly" Finster | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    arrived at Argonne in 2005 as a post-doc, but is now full time staff. With degrees in Chemical Engineering (B.S. and M.S.) and Civil and Environmental Engineering (Ph.D.), her...

  3. Optical Metrology Lab Receives New Funding for Upgrades

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    at the ALS is renowned for its precision and technical expertise in metrology of x-ray optics. It has achieved this notoriety with only two full-time staff members and extremely...

  4. Student Internship Programs Program Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for a summer high school student to 75,000 for a Ph.D. student working full-time for a year. Program Coordinator: Scott Robbins Email: srobbins@lanl.gov Phone number: 663-5621...

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    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Established in July 2004, the PA Small Business Advantage Grant Program provides matching funds to for-profit businesses with a maximum of 100 full-time employees for...

  6. Women @ Energy: Lara Leininger | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lara Leininger Women @ Energy: Lara Leininger July 9, 2014 - 2:21pm Addthis Lara D. Leininger, Ph.D. has been a full-time Engineer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)...

  7. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    candidate for an exciting full-time permanent position within the Division of Gas--Environment and Engineering of the Office of Energy Projects. The position is located in the...

  8. "NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No Participation...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8.4;" " Unit: Percents." "NAICS Code(a)","Energy-Management Activity","No ... MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES" ,"Full-Time Energy Manager (c)",0.7,4.8,3.9,"--" ,"Set Goals ...

  9. Jonathan Squire wins Princeton University Honorific Fellowship...

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    study at Princeton. "It will definitely help in allowing me to focus more on my thesis research," since fellowship winners are required to spend full time on their research...

  10. Energy Department Internship Program Leads to Opportunity | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    projects. After his internship, Daniel graduated from college and secured a full-time position as a Junior Energy Analyst supporting DOE's SunShot Initiative, which works to...

  11. IT Specialist (Systems Administration/Systems Analysis) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Promotion procedures. The announcement number is: DOE-BPA-15-11382-MP . Work Schedule Full time Work Type Permanent Series 2210 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1112 Salary Min 61,737...

  12. Policy Specialist | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    apply under the Merit Promotion announcement. Work Schedule Full time Work Type Permanent Series 1101 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1313 Salary Min 87,994.00 Salary Max 114,390...

  13. Deputy Director, EMCBC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Who May Apply All U.S Citizens Work Schedule Full Time Work Type Permanent Series 0340 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 0000 Salary Min 121,956.00 Salary Max 183,300.00 Start Date...

  14. Senior Advisor, Chief Information Security Officer | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    May Apply ALL U.S. CITIZENS Work Schedule FULL-TIME Work Type PERMANENT Series 2210 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 0000 Salary Min 121,956.00 Salary Max 183,300.00 Start Date...

  15. Policy Specialist | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    apply under the Merit Promotion announcement. Work Schedule Full time Work Type Permanent Series 1101 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1212 Salary Min 73,998.00 Salary Max 96,203...

  16. Diversity and Inclusion Specialist | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Merit Promotion announcement. Work Schedule Full time Work Type Permanent Series 0301 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1313 Salary Min 87,994.00 Salary Max 114,390.00 Start Date...

  17. Program Support Specialist | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    vacancy WAPA-16-MP-19. Work Schedule Full-Time Work Type Permanent Series 0301 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1111 Salary Min 62,850.00 Salary Max 81,706.00 Start Date...

  18. Director, Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from all U.S. Citizens. Work Schedule Full-Time Work Type Permanent Series 0340 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 0000 Salary Min 121,956.00 Salary Max 183,300.00 Start Date...

  19. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full-Time Competitive Status USAJobs Search USAJobs Search The jobs listed below are open to all U.S. Citizens. If you are a current DOE employee, or a current Federal employee...

  20. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full-Time - Excepted Service USAJobs Search USAJobs Search The jobs listed below are open to all U.S. Citizens. If you are a current DOE employee, or a current Federal employee...

  1. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Excepted Service - Full Time USAJobs Search USAJobs Search The jobs listed below are open to all U.S. Citizens. If you are a current DOE employee, or a current Federal employee...

  2. USAJobs Search | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This is a full-time position USAJobs Search USAJobs Search The jobs listed below are open to all U.S. Citizens. If you are a current DOE employee, or a current Federal employee...

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    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Apply on USAJOBS Who May Apply All U.S. Citizens Work Schedule Full-Time Work Type Permanent Series 2181 Salary Basis Per Year Grade 1313 Salary Min 90,779.00 Salary Max ...

  4. Regional Vermont Agency Provides Work in Tight-Knit Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Morgan McKane is a full-time weatherization auditor at the Southeastern Vermont Community Action (SEVCA) agency. He shares his experience working to help low-income residents increase their energy efficiency and quality of living.

  5. Small Business Advantage Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Established in July 2004, the PA Small Business Advantage Grant Program provides matching funds to for-profit businesses with a maximum of 100 full-time employees for improvements in energy effic...

  6. LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse March 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an award, a researcher must be an untenured, tenure-track assistant professor at a U.S. academic institution or a full-time employee at a DOE national laboratory, who received a...

  7. Five companies received funding through new venture acceleration fund

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engineer Edith Clarke Five Fast Facts About Engineer Edith Clarke March 19, 2015 - 3:42pm Addthis Edith Clarke was the first professionally employed female electrical engineer and the first full time female professor of electrical engineering in the country. | Photo courtesy of the National Inventors Hall of Fame. Edith Clarke was the first professionally employed female electrical engineer and the first full time female professor of electrical engineering in the country. | Photo courtesy of the

  8. Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EQUIVALENT WIDTH DISTRIBUTION (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EQUIVALENT WIDTH DISTRIBUTION Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EQUIVALENT WIDTH DISTRIBUTION We present theoretical predictions of the UV continuum luminosity function (UV LF) and

  9. THE WHITE HOUSE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DIRECTIVES EXEMPTION/ EQUIVALENCY APPROVAL MEMORANDUM Actions Approved by the Secretarial Officer (Effective: April 8, 2015) NOTE: This action memorandum is used to request approval of an exemption or equivalency to an existing directive. Please use Calibri 12 point font, the standard for Action Memoranda. MEMORANDUM FOR THE PRINCIPAL THROUGH: NAME TITLE FROM: NAME TITLE SUBJECT: Exempting (Name the Program seeking Exemption/ Equivalency) from Department of Energy (Directive number and title).

  10. Ira, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ira, Vermont: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.5345134, -73.0620512 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":...

  11. Greater Sun Center, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greater Sun Center, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 27.718086, -82.351759 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  12. Sun Prairie, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sun Prairie, Wisconsin: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.1836046, -89.2137254 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  13. Sun City, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Sun City, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.7091878, -117.1972566 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  14. Sun City, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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    Sun City, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.5975393, -112.2718239 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alabama Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of petroleum (GGEs) ...

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idaho Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of petroleum (GGEs) ...

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nebraska Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of petroleum (GGEs) ...

  18. Word Pro - Untitled1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Includes Adjustment for Fossil Fuel Equivalence. See "Primary Energy Consumption" in Glossary. 2 Includes electricity sales to each sector in addition to Primary Energy consumed in ...

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Jersey Transportation Data...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Electricity Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of ...

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Iowa Transportation Data for Alternativ...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Electricity Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of ...

  1. ANL-08/04 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Where applicable, results are compared to the U. S. Department of Energy Radiation ... 28 the committed effective dose equivalent from consumption of water can be calculated. ...

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Utah Transportation Data for Alternativ...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Electricity Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of ...

  3. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Mississippi Transportation Data...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of petroleum (GGEs) ...

  4. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Missouri Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Electricity Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of ...

  5. Alternative Fuels Data Center: New Mexico Transportation Data...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of petroleum (GGEs) ...

  6. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maine Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of petroleum (GGEs) ...

  7. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Montana Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of petroleum (GGEs) ...

  8. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tennessee Transportation Data...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Electricity Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of ...

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center: South Dakota Transportation Data...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of petroleum (GGEs) ...

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maryland Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Electricity Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of ...

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: District of Columbia Transportation...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Electricity Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of ...

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vermont Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of petroleum (GGEs) ...

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Kentucky Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of petroleum (GGEs) ...

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Delaware Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of petroleum (GGEs) ...

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Arkansas Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Electricity Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of ...

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Oklahoma Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of petroleum (GGEs) ...

  17. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Rhode Island Transportation Data...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Electricity Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of ...

  18. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Nevada Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Electricity Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of ...

  19. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Massachusetts Transportation Data...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    ... Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Electricity Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of ...

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Transportation Data for...

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Gasoline Diesel Propane Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Consumption Source: State Energy Data System based on beta data converted to gasoline gallon equivalents of petroleum (GGEs) ...

  1. Riverdale Park, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Riverdale Park, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.6018128, -121.0421102 Show Map Loading map......

  2. Maplewood Park, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maplewood Park, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.1356133, -80.5845173 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  3. Tangelo Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tangelo Park, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.4558386, -81.4459047 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  4. Walnut Park, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9680703, -118.2250723 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  5. Evergreen Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7205889, -87.7017175 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  6. Clearbrook Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clearbrook Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.309831, -74.4645962 Show Map Loading map......

  7. Florham Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Florham Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources (Redirected from Florham Park, NJ) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.787878, -74.3882072 Show Map...

  8. Stone Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9055862, -87.8836732 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  9. Mountain Park, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Georgia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.8442715, -84.1293605 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  10. Laurel Park, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.1245734, -81.6809391 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  11. Gloria Glens Park, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glens Park, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.0583883, -81.8979171 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  12. Azalea Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Azalea Park, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.5411128, -81.3006237 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  13. Broadview Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Broadview Park, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.0995317, -80.2086585 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  14. Richton Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Richton Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.484479, -87.7033787 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  15. Indian Head Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Head Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7703092, -87.9022808 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  16. Cedar Park, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cedar Park, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.505198, -97.8202888 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  17. Merrionette Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Merrionette Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6842004, -87.7003277 Show Map Loading map......

  18. Summit Park, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.7457808, -111.6115928 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  19. Perry Park, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.2566575, -104.9924844 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  20. Orland Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6303103, -87.8539425 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  1. Roosevelt Park, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.1964038, -86.2722804 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  2. Loveland Park, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Loveland Park, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.299781, -84.2632706 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  3. Florham Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Florham Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.787878, -74.3882072 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  4. Aspen Park, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.539155, -105.2947148 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  5. Palos Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6672547, -87.8303315 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  6. St. Louis Park, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.9482979, -93.3480051 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  7. Tinley Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tinley Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.5733669, -87.7844944 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  8. View Park-Windsor Hills, California: Energy Resources | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park-Windsor Hills, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9929545, -118.3491169 Show Map Loading map......

  9. Baldwin Park, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.0852868, -117.9608978 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  10. Midland Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.9892643, -74.1406988 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  11. Oakland Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oakland Park, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.1723065, -80.1319893 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  12. Kings Park, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.886209, -73.2573369 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  13. Madison Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.4514954, -74.3079248 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  14. South Park Township, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park Township, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.29695, -79.993864 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  15. Big Park, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.780297, -111.7626535 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  16. Citrus Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.0783497, -82.5698192 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  17. Fern Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fern Park, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.6491649, -81.3511796 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  18. Cambrian Park, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.2568879, -121.930789 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  19. Valley Park, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.2928744, -95.737483 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  20. Buena Park, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Buena Park, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.8675143, -117.9981181 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  1. Galena Park, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.7335616, -95.2302123 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  2. Orchard Park, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.7675593, -78.7439189 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  3. Manassas Park County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park County, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.7733495, -77.4386429 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  4. Seaside Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.9267852, -74.0770806 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  5. Colonial Park, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3006446, -76.8096938 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  6. Cliffside Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cliffside Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.8214894, -73.9876388 Show Map Loading map......

  7. Overland Park, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Overland Park, Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.9822282, -94.6707917 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  8. Minerva Park, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minerva Park, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.0764526, -82.9437921 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  9. Cascade-Chipita Park, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chipita Park, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.9498727, -105.0031457 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  10. Village Park, Hawaii: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Hawaii: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 21.3930017, -158.0253941 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  11. Palisades Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Palisades Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.8481556, -73.997639 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  12. Loves Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Loves Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.3200189, -89.0581621 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  13. Highlands-Baywood Park, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Highlands-Baywood Park, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.5243879, -122.3475948 Show Map Loading map......

  14. West Menlo Park, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Menlo Park, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.4335499, -122.2030209 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  15. Union Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.56385, -81.236017 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"g...

  16. Sunland Park, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sunland Park, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.796496, -106.5799891 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  17. Woodlawn Park, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Woodlawn Park, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.5114455, -97.6500419 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  18. Gulivoire Park, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gulivoire Park, Indiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6133812, -86.2452839 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  19. Brook Park, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Brook Park, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.3983838, -81.8045788 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  20. Iowa Park, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9514847, -98.6686709 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  1. Warren Park, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Warren Park, Indiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.7819866, -86.0502615 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  2. Severna Park, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Severna Park, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.070388, -76.5452409 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  3. Ingalls Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ingalls Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.5213, -88.033882 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  4. Maple Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9075282, -88.5992494 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  5. South Park, Wyoming: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Wyoming: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.4221501, -110.793261 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  6. Roeland Park, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Roeland Park, Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.0375053, -94.6321795 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  7. Maywood Park, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.5528965, -122.5603714 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  8. Bethel Park, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3275697, -80.0394977 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  9. Schiller Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9558637, -87.8708965 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  10. Hanover Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9994722, -88.1450735 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  11. Lake Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.8003398, -80.0664305 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  12. Gresham Park, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gresham Park, Georgia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.7034405, -84.3143682 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  13. Willow Park, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.7626286, -97.6505822 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  14. Hazel Park, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.4625362, -83.1040912 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  15. Munds Park, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Munds Park, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.945574, -111.6401551 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  16. Ridgefield Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ridgefield Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.8570442, -74.0215285 Show Map Loading map......

  17. Nicoma Park, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nicoma Park, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.4911731, -97.3230893 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  18. Monterey Park, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Monterey Park, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.0625106, -118.1228476 Show Map Loading map......

  19. Estes Park, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Estes Park, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3772059, -105.5216651 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  20. Bedford Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.769767, -87.798046 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":...

  1. Roxborough Park, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Roxborough Park, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.4738776, -105.0852642 Show Map Loading map......

  2. Edgemont Park, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Edgemont Park, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.7467016, -84.5935918 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  3. Pembroke Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pembroke Park, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.9878691, -80.1747687 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  4. Spring Park, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 44.9352407, -93.6321817 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  5. Harrington Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Harrington Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.9837089, -73.9798601 Show Map Loading map......

  6. Sherwood Park, Alberta: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Alberta: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 6146279 Coordinates 53.51684, -113.3187 Show Map Loading map......

  7. Calumet Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Calumet Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6628119, -87.6606037 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  8. Kendall Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.4209391, -74.560711 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  9. Huntington Park, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9816812, -118.2250725 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  10. Fairview Park, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4414366, -81.8643039 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"g...

  11. West Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.0116857, -82.5162068 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  12. Washington Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.1325859, -80.1811576 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice"...

  13. Comstock Park, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Comstock Park, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.0386368, -85.6700332 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  14. Biscayne Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biscayne Park, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.8825951, -80.1806025 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  15. Mangonia Park, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mangonia Park, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.760341, -80.0736529 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  16. La Grange Park, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Grange Park, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8347535, -87.861726 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  17. Belvedere Park, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Belvedere Park, Georgia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.4606984, -84.9040969 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  18. Litchfield Park, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, Arizona: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.4933743, -112.3579364 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  19. Rochelle Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Park, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.9073211, -74.0751412 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  20. Terrace Park, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Terrace Park, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.1592269, -84.3071602 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  1. Alondra Park, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alondra Park, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.8894595, -118.3309073 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  2. Santa Cruz, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.9922457, -106.0472452 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  3. White Sands, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sands, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.38319, -106.481499 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  4. Tesuque, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tesuque, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.7616955, -105.9325214 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  5. Guadalupe County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.8235801, -104.8454619 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  6. Dona Ana County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ana County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.485767, -106.7234639 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  7. Radium Springs, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springs, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.501453, -106.926575 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  8. Cuartelez, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cuartelez, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.9948034, -106.0199355 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  9. Mesquite, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.1645415, -106.6966649 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  10. Los Alamos County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.8496249, -106.3228338 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  11. Cundiyo, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cundiyo, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.9591921, -105.8964091 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  12. McKinley County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.7152472, -108.2377519 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  13. Angel Fire, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Angel Fire, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.3930879, -105.2850091 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  14. Eddy County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Eddy County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.4170622, -104.4723301 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  15. Cedar Grove, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.1708774, -106.1900242 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goog...

  16. Socorro County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Socorro County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.8837087, -106.7234639 Show Map Loading map......

  17. Rincon, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rincon, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.6728583, -107.064739 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  18. Rio Chiquito, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chiquito, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.0025, -105.90417 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  19. Chimayo, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chimayo, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.0039131, -105.9469656 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  20. Espanola, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Espanola, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.0028011, -106.0578009 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  1. Hermosillo, Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hermosillo, Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 4004898 Coordinates 29.06667, -110.96667 Show Map Loading map......

  2. Chaves County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chaves County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.4757392, -104.4723301 Show Map Loading map......

  3. Tijeras, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tijeras, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.084862, -106.386398 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  4. Mesilla, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mesilla, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.2700945, -106.8008376 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  5. Pojoaque, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pojoaque, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.8928034, -106.0230784 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  6. Galisteo, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Galisteo, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.3955945, -105.9464093 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  7. Bernalillo County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bernalillo County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.0177854, -106.6291304 Show Map Loading map......

  8. Lea County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.8968816, -103.3587288 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  9. Torrance County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Torrance County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.6784317, -105.9699878 Show Map Loading map......

  10. Lincoln County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.8853309, -105.4068079 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  11. Edgewood, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.0614358, -106.1914141 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  12. Columbus, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.8276002, -107.6400232 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  13. Glorieta, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glorieta, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.5830906, -105.7700174 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  14. Springer, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springer, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.3611445, -104.5952668 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  15. El Rancho, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rancho, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.889192, -106.0797459 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  16. Curry County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.5751567, -103.2663479 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  17. Los Alamos, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alamos, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.8880796, -106.3069722 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  18. Cedar Crest, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crest, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.1075459, -106.3728019 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  19. Harding County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.8925537, -103.8216261 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  20. Hatch, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hatch, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.6653572, -107.1530744 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  1. North Valley, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valley, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.1733771, -106.6233591 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  2. Hidalgo County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hidalgo County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.93552, -108.7125791 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  3. Sierra County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.134596, -107.1011931 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"g...

  4. Union County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.3724334, -103.3587288 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goog...

  5. Rio Rancho, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rancho, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.2600406, -106.7061395 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  6. Otero County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.6341716, -105.5943388 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  7. Raton, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Raton, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.9033581, -104.4391532 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  8. Salem, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.707577, -107.2130762 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googl...

  9. San Juan County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.761667, -107.905 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemap...

  10. Anthony, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.0039897, -106.6058257 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  11. Lordsburg, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lordsburg, New Mexico: Energy Resources (Redirected from Lordsburg, NM) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.3503605, -108.7086649 Show Map Loading...

  12. South Valley, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valley, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.0100487, -106.6780809 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  13. Cuyamungue, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cuyamungue, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.869799, -106.008537 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  14. Alamo, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.4208918, -107.5108753 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  15. Maxwell, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maxwell, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.5400319, -104.5433229 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  16. La Cienega, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    La Cienega, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.5628113, -106.1308561 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  17. Cibola County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cibola County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.0947557, -107.8583868 Show Map Loading map......

  18. Jaconita, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jaconita, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.88908, -106.024696 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  19. Carnuel, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carnuel, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.0639364, -106.4572452 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  20. Lamy, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lamy, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.4814259, -105.8797413 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  1. Santa Teresa, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teresa, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.1533504, -106.6794817 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  2. Dona Ana, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ana, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.391265, -106.815301 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  3. Sombrillo, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sombrillo, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.9800238, -106.0400228 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  4. Catron County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Catron County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.1515173, -108.4276047 Show Map Loading map......

  5. Los Cerrillos, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cerrillos, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.4384889, -106.1198699 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  6. Madrid, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.4067047, -106.1525226 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"goog...

  7. Chupadero, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chupadero, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.8225278, -105.9166877 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  8. Quay County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Quay County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.9569924, -103.7289167 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapp...

  9. Chaparral, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chaparral, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.025929, -106.399456 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  10. Acomita Lake, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Acomita Lake, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.0703192, -107.6136628 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  11. Alamogordo, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alamogordo, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.8995325, -105.960265 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  12. Rio Arriba County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.6162892, -106.7234639 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  13. Colfax County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colfax County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 36.5799757, -104.4723301 Show Map Loading map......

  14. Sandoval County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sandoval County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.6020667, -106.7234639 Show Map Loading map......

  15. Eagle Nest, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nest, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.4383653, -107.3244921 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  16. De Baca County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    De Baca County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.2734196, -104.3791912 Show Map Loading map......

  17. Grant County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Grant County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.9690805, -108.2377519 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  18. Roosevelt County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9538388, -103.3587288 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  19. Mora County, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County, New Mexico: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.927203, -104.9388853 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  20. August, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    August, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.9788123, -121.2621683 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  1. Consumer Choice of E85: Lessons from Minnesota's Experience

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ND Fleet MN State IA State ND State The Minnesota data was previously analyzed by Greene ... gallon equivalent Using data from Minnesota through 2007, Greene (2009) found price ...

  2. Appendix C References | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    DOE (U.S. Department of Energy) 2003. Estimating Radiation Risk from Total Effective Dose Equivalent (TEDE). ISCORS Technical Report No. 1. DOEEH-41200150802, Rev. 1. January. ...

  3. Conejos County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conejos County, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.2689711, -106.2522143 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  4. New South Wales, Australia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    South Wales, Australia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name New South Wales, Australia Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 2155400 Coordinates -33, 146 Show Map...

  5. Sydney, Australia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sydney, Australia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 2147714 Coordinates -33.86785, 151.20732 Show Map Loading map......

  6. Victoria, Australia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Victoria, Australia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name Victoria, Australia Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 2145234 Coordinates -37, 145 Show Map Loading...

  7. Amsterdam-Churchill, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Amsterdam-Churchill, Montana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.744628, -111.319624 Show Map Loading map......

  8. Churchill County, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Churchill County, Nevada: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.6626678, -118.4863963 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  9. Garner, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Garner, North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.7112642, -78.6141709 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappin...

  10. Carmel Hamlet, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carmel Hamlet, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.414547, -73.683758 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  11. North St. Paul, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    St. Paul, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.0124657, -92.9918828 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  12. Gresham, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gresham, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.4981757, -122.4314796 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  13. Evans, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Evans, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3763701, -104.6921874 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  14. Continuous Learning Points Credit Assignment Table | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon Microsoft Word - CLPCreditAssignmentTable More Documents & Publications PMCDP Curriculum Learning Map Microsoft Word - AL2006-07.doc PMCDP Certification and Equivalency ...

  15. Jakarta, Indonesia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jakarta, Indonesia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Name Jakarta, Indonesia Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 1642911 Coordinates -6.2182, 106.8584 Show Map...

  16. Levy County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Levy County, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.3178545, -82.820974 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...

  17. Boardman, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Boardman, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.0242256, -80.6628528 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  18. Crowley County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crowley County, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.2498631, -103.8216261 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  19. Crowley, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crowley, Louisiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 30.2140928, -92.3745761 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingser...

  20. Copper Canyon, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Copper Canyon, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.0959546, -97.0966777 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  1. Switzerland County, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Switzerland County, Indiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.8419394, -85.0649071 Show Map Loading map......

  2. Zug, Switzerland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zug, Switzerland: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 2657908 Coordinates 47.166192, 8.515414 Show Map Loading map......

  3. White Bird, Idaho: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bird, Idaho: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.7615508, -116.3006974 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":...

  4. Hitchcock, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hitchcock, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.3482905, -95.0160368 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservi...

  5. Hitchcock County, Nebraska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hitchcock County, Nebraska: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.1844599, -101.0711758 Show Map Loading map......

  6. Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wade Hampton Census Area, Alaska: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 62.1458336, -162.8919191 Show Map Loading map......

  7. Baltimore, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Baltimore, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.8453418, -82.6007185 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  8. Baltimore City County, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Baltimore City County, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.2903848, -76.6121893 Show Map Loading map......

  9. North Baltimore, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    North Baltimore, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.1828302, -83.6782668 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  10. Baltimore, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Baltimore, Vermont: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.360351, -72.5731478 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingserv...

  11. Baca County, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Baca County, Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.394731, -102.5298028 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  12. Mount Hope, Kansas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hope, Kansas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.8686224, -97.665047 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"...

  13. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and shape which could be related to the equivalent permeability of a fracture. - Conduct hydraulic fracture injection experiments in the lab under stress to study the nature of...

  14. Yokkaichi, Japan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yokkaichi, Japan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia GeoNames ID 1848373 Coordinates 34.9651567, 136.6244847 Show Map Loading map......

  15. Sonora, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sonora, Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.524226, -85.8930192 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservic...

  16. Brooke County, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Brooke County, West Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.2697757, -80.5660657 Show Map Loading map......

  17. Johnson City, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Johnson City, Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.4045648, -122.5789805 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mapping...

  18. Central Adams, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Adams, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.1382966, -102.6799359 Show Map Loading map......

  19. West Adams, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.1901728, -102.9074546 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappings...

  20. East Adams, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Adams, North Dakota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.1228923, -102.293303 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingse...