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  1. Practical Analysis of materials with depth varying compositions using FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.F. McClelland; R.W. Jones; Siquan Luo

    2004-09-30

    FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is discussed as a nondestructive method to probe the molecular composition of materials versus depth on the basis of the analysis of layers of experimentally controllable thickness, which are measured from the sample surface to depths of some tens of micrometers, depending on optical and thermal properties. Computational methods are described to process photoacoustic amplitude and phase spectra for both semi-quantitative and quantitative depth analyses. These methods are demonstrated on layered and gradient samples.

  2. NPB UPC-FT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NPB UPC-FT NPB UPC-FT Description This is the Berkeley Unified Parallel C (UPC) implementation of the NAS Parallel Benchmark FT. The transpose communication is implemented using...

  3. NPB UPC-FT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NPB UPC-FT NPB UPC-FT Description This is the Berkeley Unified Parallel C (UPC) implementation of the NAS Parallel Benchmark FT. The transpose communication is implemented using both blocking functions (upc_memget) and nonblocking functions (upc_memput_nb). The default is nonblocking functions, which is defined in UPC description 3.1. If nonblocking functions are not supported on your system, it will switch to blocking functions automatically. Users are allowed to change the selection by

  4. Sandia Energy - SWiFT Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Operations Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy SWiFT Facility & Testing SWiFT Operations SWiFT Operationscwdd2015-05-28T15:24:41+00:00 wind-turbines The...

  5. Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ft Bidwell...

  6. SWiFT Software Quality Assurance Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, Jonathan Charles

    2016-01-01

    This document describes the software development practice areas and processes which contribute to the ability of SWiFT software developers to provide quality software. These processes are designed to satisfy the requirements set forth by the Sandia Software Quality Assurance Program (SSQAP). APPROVALS SWiFT Software Quality Assurance Plan (SAND2016-0765) approved by: Department Manager SWiFT Site Lead Dave Minster (6121) Date Jonathan White (6121) Date SWiFT Controls Engineer Jonathan Berg (6121) Date CHANGE HISTORY Issue Date Originator(s) Description A 2016/01/27 Jon Berg (06121) Initial release of the SWiFT Software Quality Assurance Plan

  7. FT Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Place: South Jordan, Utah Zip: 84095 Product: JV between Headwaters Technology Innovation Group and Rentech to focus on Fischer-Tropsch (FT) gas-to-liquids processes and...

  8. Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing...

  9. 3-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 3-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC)...

  10. 5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC)...

  11. 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    .5-ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers...

  12. Sandia Energy - Wind Plant Optimization: SWiFT Restart Technical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant Optimization: SWiFT Restart Technical Review Committee Home SWIFT Wind Energy Wind News Wind Plant Optimization: SWiFT Restart Technical Review Committee Previous Next Wind...

  13. Ft. Mojave Renewable Energy Feasibility Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Ft. Mojave Renewable Energy Feasibility Study Presented by Bill Cyr and Russell Gum Presented by Bill Cyr and Russell Gum Overview Document possible renewable energy sources Evaluate their feasibility Develop a business plan for implementation of selected alternatives Location along Colorado river where Arizona, California and Nevada meet Participants Aha Machav Power Service Avi Kwa Ame Farm ERCC Analytics Objectives Business plan that will result in

  14. SWiFT site atmospheric characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, Christopher Lee; Ennis, Brandon Lee

    2016-01-01

    Historical meteorological tall tower data are analyzed from the Texas Tech University 200 m tower to characterize the atmospheric trends of the Scaled Wind Farm Technologies (SWiFT) site. In this report the data are analyzed to reveal bulk atmospheric trends, temporal trends and correlations of atmospheric variables. Through this analysis for the SWiFT turbines the site International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) classification is determined to be class III-C. Averages and distributions of atmospheric variables are shown, revealing large fluctuations and the importance of understanding the actual site trends as opposed to simply using averages. The site is significantly directional with the average wind speed from the south, and particularly so in summer and fall. Site temporal trends are analyzed from both seasonal (time of the year) to daily (hour of the day) perspectives. Atmospheric stability is seen to vary most with time of day and less with time of year. Turbulence intensity is highly correlated with stability, and typical daytime unstable conditions see double the level of turbulence intensity versus that experienced during the average stable night. Shear, veer and atmospheric stability correlations are shown, where shear and veer are both highest for stable atmospheric conditions. An analysis of the Texas Tech University tower anemometer measurements is performed which reveals the extent of the tower shadow effects and sonic tilt misalignment.

  15. Spherically symmetric static spacetimes in vacuum f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferraro, Rafael; Fiorini, Franco

    2011-10-15

    We show that Schwarzschild geometry remains as a vacuum solution for those four-dimensional f(T) gravitational theories behaving as ultraviolet deformations of general relativity. In the gentler context of three-dimensional gravity, we also find that the infrared-deformed f(T) gravities, like the ones used to describe the late cosmic speed up of the Universe, have as the circularly symmetric vacuum solution a Deser-de Sitter or a Banados, Teitelboim and Zanelli-like spacetime with an effective cosmological constant depending on the infrared scale present in the function f(T).

  16. Ft. Carson Army Base, Colorado Springs, Colorado | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ft. Carson Army Base, Colorado Springs, Colorado Ft. Carson Army Base, Colorado Springs, Colorado Photo of High-Bay Aviation Maintenance Facility at Butts Army Airfield Fort Carson U.S. Army Base is located south of Colorado Springs, Colorado. It was the first Federal facility to install a "solar wall"-a solar ventilation air preheating system. The solar wall heats Ft. Carson's new high-bay aviation maintenance facility at Butts Army Airfield by pre-warming air as much as 54°F and

  17. Cosmological viability conditions for f(T) dark energy models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setare, M.R.; Mohammadipour, N. E-mail: N.Mohammadipour@uok.ac.ir

    2012-11-01

    Recently f(T) modified teleparallel gravity where T is the torsion scalar has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy. We perform a detailed dynamical analysis of these models and find conditions for the cosmological viability of f(T) dark energy models as geometrical constraints on the derivatives of these models. We show that in the phase space exists two cosmologically viable trajectory which (i) The universe would start from an unstable radiation point, then pass a saddle standard matter point which is followed by accelerated expansion de sitter point. (ii) The universe starts from a saddle radiation epoch, then falls onto the stable matter era and the system can not evolve to the dark energy dominated epoch. Finally, for a number of f(T) dark energy models were proposed in the more literature, the viability conditions are investigated.

  18. Generalized second law of thermodynamics in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karami, K.; Abdolmaleki, A. E-mail: AAbdolmaleki@uok.ac.ir

    2012-04-01

    We investigate the validity of the generalized second law (GSL) of gravitational thermodynamics in the framework of f(T) modified teleparallel gravity. We consider a spatially flat FRW universe containing only the pressureless matter. The boundary of the universe is assumed to be enclosed by the Hubble horizon. For two viable f(T) models containing f(T) = T+?{sub 1}((?T)){sup n} and f(T) = T??{sub 2}T(1?e{sup ?T{sub 0}/T}), we first calculate the effective equation of state and deceleration parameters. Then, (we investigate the null and strong energy conditions and conclude that a sudden future singularity appears in both models. Furthermore, using a cosmographic analysis we check the viability of two models. Finally, we examine the validity of the GSL and find that for both models it) is satisfied from the early times to the present epoch. But in the future, the GSL is violated for the special ranges of the torsion scalar T.

  19. Sandia Energy - New Facility Tool at SWiFT Makes Rotor Work More...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Tool at SWiFT Makes Rotor Work More Efficient Home Renewable Energy Energy SWIFT Facilities Partnership News Wind Energy News & Events New Facility Tool at SWiFT Makes...

  20. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of...

  1. 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: ...

  2. Technology development for iron F-T catalysts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

    1994-08-01

    The objectives of this work were twofold. The first objective was to design and construct a pilot plant for preparing precipitated iron oxide F-T precursors and demonstrate that the rate of production from this plant is equivalent to 100 lbs/day of dried metal oxide. Secondly, these precipitates were to be used to prepare catalysts capable of achieving 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion with {le} 5 mole percent selectivity to methane + ethane.

  3. A new day: SWiFT reaches rotor mounting milestone

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    day: SWiFT reaches rotor mounting milestone - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  4. Cosmological perturbation in f(T) gravity revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumi, Keisuke; Ong, Yen Chin E-mail: ongyenchin@member.ams.org

    2013-06-01

    We perform detailed investigation of cosmological perturbations in f(T) theory of gravity coupled with scalar field. Our work emphasizes on the way to gauge fix the theory and we examine all possible modes of perturbations up to second order. The analysis includes pseudoscalar and pseudovector modes in addition to the usual scalar, vector, and tensor modes. We find no gravitational propagating degree of freedom in the scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, as well as pseudovector modes. In addition, we find that the scalar and tensor perturbations have exactly the same form as their counterparts in usual general relativity with scalar field, except that the factor of reduced Planck mass squared M{sub pl}{sup 2}?1/(8?G) that occurs in the latter has now been replaced by an effective time-dependent gravitational coupling ?2(df/dT)|{sub T=T{sub 0}}, with T{sub 0} being the background torsion scalar. The absence of extra degrees of freedom of f(T) gravity at second order linear perturbation indicates that f(T) gravity is highly nonlinear. Consequently one cannot conclusively analyze stability of the theory without performing nonlinear analysis that can reveal the propagation of the extra degrees of freedom.

  5. Can f(T) gravity theories mimic ?CDM cosmic history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setare, M.R.; Mohammadipour, N. E-mail: N.Mohammadipour@uok.ac.ir

    2013-01-01

    Recently the teleparallel Lagrangian density described by the torsion scalar T has been extended to a function of T. The f(T) modified teleparallel gravity has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy to explain the late time acceleration of the universe. In order to reconstruct the function f(T) by demanding a background ?CDM cosmology we assume that, (i) the background cosmic history provided by the flat ?CDM (the radiation ere with ?{sub eff} = (1/3), matter and de Sitter eras with ?{sub eff} = 0 and ?{sub eff} = ?1, respectively) (ii) the radiation dominate in the radiation era with ?{sub 0r} = 1 and the matter dominate during the matter phases when ?{sub 0m} = 1. We find the cosmological dynamical system which can obey the ?CDM cosmic history. In each era, we find a critical lines that, the radiation dominated and the matter dominated are one points of them in the radiation and matter phases, respectively. Also, we drive the cosmologically viability condition for these models. We investigate the stability condition with respect to the homogeneous scalar perturbations in each era and we obtain the stability conditions for the fixed points in each eras. Finally, we reconstruct the function f(T) which mimics cosmic expansion history.

  6. SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for Research in

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Dynamics of Coupled Systems | Department of Energy SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for Research in the Dynamics of Coupled Systems SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for Research in the Dynamics of Coupled Systems March 31, 2014 - 11:19am Addthis Research conducted at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility (SWiFT) in Lubbock, Texas, drew a lot of interest from attendees at the International Modal Analysis Conference held in Orlando,

  7. Sandia Energy - Power Production Started on All Three SWiFT Turbines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Production Started on All Three SWiFT Turbines Home Renewable Energy Energy SWIFT Facilities Partnership News Wind Energy News & Events Power Production Started on All Three...

  8. Violation of the first law of black hole thermodynamics in f(T) gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao, Rong-Xin; Li, Miao; Miao, Yan-Gang E-mail: mli@itp.ac.cn

    2011-11-01

    We prove that, in general, the first law of black hole thermodynamics, ?Q = T?S, is violated in f(T) gravity. As a result, it is possible that there exists entropy production, which implies that the black hole thermodynamics can be in non-equilibrium even in the static spacetime. This feature is very different from that of f(R) or that of other higher derivative gravity theories. We find that the violation of first law results from the lack of local Lorentz invariance in f(T) gravity. By investigating two examples, we note that f''(0) should be negative in order to avoid the naked singularities and superluminal motion of light. When f''(T) is small, the entropy of black holes in f(T) gravity is approximatively equal to f'(T)/4 A.

  9. Well cored to 9,800 ft in Paraguay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunn, K.B. )

    1991-05-13

    The mining industry's slim hole drilling rigs have proven applicable to primary oil exploration. These machines are smaller than conventional drilling rigs and can be transported with relative ease to remote locations. A typical rig drills an entire well by coring, with the cores retrieved by wire line without tripping the pipe. The core drilling system is specially suited to drilling hard rock formations. This paper reports on the project which evaluated the geological aspects of the Parana basin and determined the applicability of slim hole, core drilling techniques as an exploration tool. The Parana basin is found in the eastern third of Paraguay, part of northeastern Argentina, and part of southern Brazil. Much of the basin is overlaid by basalt flows up to 5,000-ft thick, and there are numerous igneous intrusions and dikes within the sedimentary section. This combination makes seismic quality poor and interpretation extremely difficult. The formations are relatively old, with Triassic red beds occurring only a few feet below the surface or immediately below the basalt. Beneath the Triassic are Permian marine deposits, Permo-Carboniferous tillites, and then Devonian, Silurian, and Ordovician deposits to the basement. The section outcrops 100 miles west of the Mallorquin Well No. 1 site. The Parana basin has been only randomly explored. To date, success has been limited to a minor gas find near Sao Paulo, Brazil.

  10. Alvord (3000-ft Strawn) LPG flood: design and performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, G.D.; Todd, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Mitchell Energy Corporation has implemented a LPG-dry gas miscible process in the Alvord (3000 ft Strawn) Unit in Wise County, Texas utilizing the DOE tertiary incentive program. The field had been waterflooded for 14 years and was producing near its economic limit at the time this project was started. This paper presents the results of the reservoir simulation study that was conducted to evaluate pattern configuration and operating alternatives so as to maximize LPG containment and oil recovery performance. Several recommendations resulting from this study were implemented for the project. Based on the model prediction, tertiary oil recovery is expected to be between 100,000 and 130,000 bbls, or about 7 percent of th oil originally in place in the Unit. An evaluation of the project performance to date is presented. In July of 1981 the injection of a 16% HPV slug of propane was completed. Natural gas is being used to drive the propane slug. A peak oil response of 222 BOPD was achieved in August of 1981 and production has since been declining. The observed performance of the flood indicates that the actual tertiary oil recovered will reach the predicted value, although the project life will be longer than expected. The results presented in this paper indicate that, without the DOE incentive program, the economics for this project would still be uncertain at this time.

  11. Coiled tubing velocity string set at record 20,500 ft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, L.S. )

    1992-04-13

    This paper reports that coiled tubing, set at record depth, significantly reduced costs and posed lower mechanical failure risk for recompleting a gas well in the Delaware basin of West Texas. Alternative completions such as replacing the existing tubing string with smaller diameter conventional API production tubing was deemed less economical and effective. The gas well, George M. Shelton No. 2, was recompleted on July 18, 1991, by Chevron U.S.A. Production Co. The gas is produced from the deep, low-pressure Ellenburger formation in the Gomez field. The hang-off depth of 20,500 ft set a world record for the deepest permanently installed coiled tubing. The 1-1/2 in. coiled tubing velocity string, run within the existing 4-1/2 and 4-in. tapered production tubing string, consists of seven segments that vary in wall thickness from 0.087 to 0.156 in.

  12. 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comparison to Reference Methods | Department of Energy Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters PDF icon 2005_deer_lake.pdf More Documents & Publications Reductant Utilization in a LNT + SCR System Spatiotemporal Distribution of NOx

  13. M4FT-15LL0806062-LLNL Thermodynamic and Sorption Data FY15 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavarin, M.; Wolery, T. J.

    2015-08-31

    This progress report (Milestone Number M4FT-15LL0806062) summarizes research conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) within Work Package Number FT-15LL080606. The focus of this research is the thermodynamic modeling of Engineered Barrier System (EBS) materials and properties and development of thermodynamic databases and models to evaluate the stability of EBS materials and their interactions with fluids at various physicochemical conditions relevant to subsurface repository environments. The development and implementation of equilibrium thermodynamic models are intended to describe chemical and physical processes such as solubility, sorption, and diffusion.

  14. Opportunities for the Early Production of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the U.S. -- An Overview | Department of Energy for the Early Production of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels in the U.S. -- An Overview Opportunities for the Early Production of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels in the U.S. -- An Overview 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: U.S. Department of Energy PDF icon 2002_deer_shen.pdf More Documents & Publications Coal-Derived Liquids to Enable HCCI Technology WA_99_018_TEXACO_ENERGY_SYSTEMS_Waiver_of_Domestic_and_Forei.pdf Advanced Fuels in HDV Applications

  15. FT-IR Study of CO2 Interaction with Na-rich Montmorillonite (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect FT-IR Study of CO2 Interaction with Na-rich Montmorillonite Citation Details In-Document Search Title: FT-IR Study of CO2 Interaction with Na-rich Montmorillonite Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) in saline reservoirs in sedimentary formations has the potential to reduce the impact of fossil fuel combustion on climate change by reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and storing the CO2 in geologic formations in perpetuity. At pressure and temperature

  16. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR DOWNEAST LNG, INC. - FT DKT. NO. 14-172-LNG - ORDER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NO. 3600 (FTA) | Department of Energy DOWNEAST LNG, INC. - FT DKT. NO. 14-172-LNG - ORDER NO. 3600 (FTA) SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR DOWNEAST LNG, INC. - FT DKT. NO. 14-172-LNG - ORDER NO. 3600 (FTA) No Reports Received More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR - STROM, INC. - FE DKT. NO. 14-56-LNG - ORDER NO 3537 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR TEXAS LNG - TEXAS LNG - FTA - FE DKT. NO. 13-160-LNG - 3443 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS - TEXAS LNG BROWNSVILLE LLC - FE DKT. 15-62-LNG - Order 3716 FTA

  17. SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers. PDF icon p-07_frazee.pdf More Documents & Publications 5 Hz Catalytic Emissions FT-IR Monitoring during Lean-Rich Engine Cycles: Comparison to Reference Methods Urea SCR and DPF

  18. Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen P. Bergin

    2006-06-30

    The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer lab evaluation; cold-start test-cell evaluations; overall feasibility, economics, and efficiency of SFP fuel production; and an economic analysis. Two unexpected issues that arose during the project were further studied and resolved: variations in NOx emissions were accounted for and fuel-injection nozzle fouling issues were traced to the non-combustible (ash) content of the engine oil, not the F-T fuel. The F-T fuel domestically produced and evaluated in this effort appears to be a good replacement candidate for petroleum-based transportation fuels. However, in order for domestic F-T fuels to become a viable cost-comparable alternative to petroleum fuels, the F-T fuels will need to be produced from abundant U.S. domestic resources such as coal and biomass, rather than stranded natural gas.

  19. Utility Assessment Report for SPIDERS Phase 2: Ft. Carson (Rev 1.0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hadley, Mark D.; Schneider, Kevin P.

    2014-01-01

    This document contains the Utility Assessment Report (UAR) for the Phase 2 operational Demonstration (OD) of the Smart Power Infrastructure Demonstration for Energy Reliability and Security (SPIDERS) Joint Capability Technology Demonstration (JCTD). The UAR for Phase 2 shows that the SPIDERS system was able to meet the requirements of the Implementation Directive at Ft. Carson.

  20. Shape selective catalysts for F-T chemistry. Interim report : January 2001 - December 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronauer, D. C.

    2003-01-29

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) chemistry, specifically the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to F-T catalysts needing high activity, it is desirable that they have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. In this project, selectivity is directed toward the production of diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. Shape-selective catalysts have the potential to both limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected ''cage.'' This cage also restricts their loss by attrition during use in slurry-bed reactors. Experimentation has included evaluation of samples of (1) iron-based F-T catalysts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory, (2) iron-based F-T catalysts prepared by B.H. Davis of the Center of Applied Energy Research (CAER), (3) the Davis catalyst that were sized by differential gravity separation, and (4) the Davis catalyst onto which inorganic or catalytic ''shells'' were deposited. The ANL-prepared samples had a wide range of particle size and were irregular in shape. A sizeable portion of the samples provided by Davis were spherical, because they had been prepared by spray-drying. To compare the catalytic activities of the samples, we used a micro-scale fixed-bed reactor system for F-T runs of low conversion to avoid thermal and mass transfer effects. In summary, the highest activity was that of the original Davis catalyst; additional research must be carried out to generate more permeable surface cages. A number of approaches that have been published for other applications will be tested.

  1. Variability of biomass chemical composition and rapid analysis using FT-NIR techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Lu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ye, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

    2010-04-01

    A quick method for analyzing the chemical composition of renewable energy biomass feedstock was developed by using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis. The study presents the broad-based model hypothesis that a single FT-NIR predictive model can be developed to analyze multiple types of biomass feedstock. The two most important biomass feedstocks corn stover and switchgrass were evaluated for the variability in their concentrations of the following components: glucan, xylan, galactan, arabinan, mannan, lignin, and ash. A hypothesis test was developed based upon these two species. Both cross-validation and independent validation results showed that the broad-based model developed is promising for future chemical prediction of both biomass species; in addition, the results also showed the method's prediction potential for wheat straw.

  2. Application of Printed Circuit Board Technology to FT-ICR MS Analyzer Cell Construction and Prototyping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, Franklin E.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2014-12-01

    Although Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICRMS) remains themass spectrometry platform that provides the highest levels of performance for mass accuracy and resolving power, there is room for improvement in analyzer cell design as the ideal quadrupolar trapping potential has yet to be generated for a broadband MS experiment. To this end, analyzer cell designs have improved since the field’s inception, yet few research groups participate in this area because of the high cost of instrumentation efforts. As a step towards reducing this barrier to participation and allowing for more designs to be physically tested, we introduce a method of FT-ICR analyzer cell prototyping utilizing printed circuit boards at modest vacuum conditions. This method allows for inexpensive devices to be readily fabricated and tested over short intervals and should open the field to laboratories lacking or unable to access high performance machine shop facilities because of the required financial investment.

  3. DE-AT26-97FT34342 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterizing Arctic Hydrates (Canadian Test Well and Alaskan "Wells of Opportunity") photo of drilling rig at Mallik 2L-38 location Rig at Mallik 2L-38 location courtesy Geological Survey of Canada DE-AT26-97FT34342 Project Goal The purpose of this project is to assess the recoverability and potential production characteristics of the onshore natural gas hydrate and associated free-gas accumulations in the Arctic of North America Performer United States Geological Survey, Denver,

  4. DE-AT26-97FT34344 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Resolution Sidescan Sonar and Multibeam Bathymetric Data Collection and Processing, Atwater Canyon, Gulf of Mexico DE-AT26-97FT34344 photo of DTAGS seismic source being deployed DTAG seismic source being deployed. Courtesy Naval Research Laboratory Project Goal During February 14-18, 2005, a scientific cruise was conducted using the R/V Pelican to obtain high-resolution sidescan sonar and multibeam bathymetric data of Mounds D and F in the Atwater Valley area of the Gulf of Mexico, to

  5. ft. n. Both, Ohtef, RarourQb DWrion,Oak Ridgo

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    _ ,' .' ft. n. Both, Ohtef, RarourQb DWrion,Oak Ridgo hwt 2% w9 s. P. Morgan, Aar' t, Pimotor; Produotlon Dirirloa, i BY00 sniwm! OP Zr T~BIDm 1 . It ir axpeat tbt 4alivery of @air wteri8.l will be maa on orbaforo leptcmwrl, lg4g. Idantifioatioii my&ml "2416" haa been wr@md to thlr ahip nent and all related dauuuentr, aat ma&or Watlr Br n&R 1 ::_,, : ; .,. . . . ,~,-,.", :;> .

  6. I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Y ~L.ho-I . I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286 : This dooumetlt consists 0.f 3 pages E end p. t' &ures. No. a of &copies. a Seriee A. 7 Novembar 6, 1944 Subject: Visit to Fansteel Netallurgical Corporaticn, North Chicago, Novembar 4, 1944 - AwAlabilityof~lnmbium!kkl Chapin, Simmons end I discussed witb~. C. N. B&e (ResearchDirector) . end LIr. F.L.Hunter (Chief&ineer, TanteInmDivision) availability, purity, and @co of columbiwn,metel. columbium metal is of particular interest

  7. Rolling Thunder -- Integration of the Solo 161 Stirling engine with the CPG-460 solar concentrator at Ft. Huachuca

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diver, R.B.; Moss, T.A.; Goldberg, V.; Thomas, G.; Beaudet, A.

    1998-09-01

    Project Rolling Thunder is a dish/Stirling demonstration project at Ft. Huachuca, a US Army fort in southeastern Arizona (Huachuca means rolling thunder in Apache). It has been supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a cooperative program between the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy (DOE). As part of a 1992 SERDP project, Cummins Power Generation, Inc. (CPG) installed a CPG 7 kW(c) dish/Stirling system at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC) in Ft. Huachuca, Arizona. The primary objective of the SERDP Dish/Stirling for DoD Applications project was to demonstrate a CPG 7-kW(c) dish/Stirling system at a military facility. Unfortunately, Cummins Engine Company decided to divest its solar operations. As a direct result of Ft. Huachuca`s interest in the Cummins dish/Stirling technology, Sandia explored the possibility of installing a SOLO 161 Stirling power conversion unit (PCU) on the Ft. Huachuca CPG-460. In January 1997, a decision was made to retrofit a SOLO 161 Stirling engine on the CPG-460 at Ft. Huachuca. Project Rolling Thunder. The SOLO 161 Demonstration at Ft. Huachuca has been a challenge. Although, the SOLO 161 PCU has operated nearly flawlessly and the CPG-460 has been, for the most part, a solid and reliable component, integration of the SOLO PCU with the CPG-460 has required significant attention. In this paper, the integration issues and technical approaches of project Rolling Thunder are presented. Lessons of the project are also discussed.

  8. FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A.; Williams, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

  9. ?CDM model in f(T) gravity: reconstruction, thermodynamics and stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salako, I.G.; Kpadonou, A.V.; Houndjo, M.J.S.; Tossa, J.; Rodrigues, M.E. E-mail: esialg@gmail.com E-mail: sthoundjo@yahoo.fr

    2013-11-01

    We investigate some cosmological features of the ?CDM model in the framework of the generalized teleparallel theory of gravity f(T) where T denotes the torsion scalar. Its reconstruction is performed giving rise to an integration constant Q and other input parameters according to which we point out more analysis. Thereby, we show that for some values of this constant, the first and second laws of thermodynamics can be realized in the equilibrium description, for the universe with the temperature inside the horizon equal to that at the apparent horizon. Moreover, still within these suitable values of the constant, we show that the model may be stable using the de Sitter and Power-Law cosmological solutions.

  10. In-situ FT-IR diagnostics for monitoring and control of fossil fuel combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonanno, A.S.; Wojtowicz, M.A.; Serio, M.A.; Nelson, C.M.; Solomon, P.R.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the development and testing of a prototype fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) based measurement system for continuous emission monitoring (CEM) and process control in fossil fuel-fired power plants. On several occasions, prototype systems have been transported and assembled at full-scale and pilot-scale fossil fuel-fired combustors. The in-situ version of the prototype is able to measure NH{sub 3} and HCl concentrations, which are difficult to measure extractively, as well as CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, H{sub 2}O, and SO{sub x} concentrations. The results of recent tests will be presented which involve in-situ monitoring of selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) of NO{sub x} based on simultaneous measurement of NO, NH{sub 3} and CO.

  11. Sandia Wake Imaging System Field Test Report: 2015 Deployment at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naughton, Brian Thomas; Herges, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    This report presents the objectives, configuration, procedures, reporting , roles , and responsibilities and subsequent results for the field demonstration of the Sandia Wake Imaging System (SWIS) at the Sandia Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility near Lubbock, Texas in June and July 2015.

  12. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995. No. 13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, A.H.

    1996-09-05

    The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

  13. Analysis of Debris Trajectories at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Jonathan R.; Burnett, Damon J.

    2016-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories operates the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility (SWiFT) on behalf of the Department of Energy Wind and Water Power Technologies Office. An analysis was performed to evaluate the hazards associated with debris thrown from one of SWiFT’s operating wind turbines, assuming a catastrophic failure. A Monte Carlo analysis was conducted to assess the complex variable space associated with debris throw hazards that included wind speed, wind direction, azimuth and pitch angles of the blade, and percentage of the blade that was separated. In addition, a set of high fidelity explicit dynamic finite element simulations were performed to determine the threshold impact energy envelope for the turbine control building located on-site. Assuming that all of the layered, independent, passive and active engineered safety systems and administrative procedures failed (a 100% failure rate of the safety systems), the likelihood of the control building being struck was calculated to be less than 5/10,000 and ballistic simulations showed that the control building would not provide passive protection for the majority of impact scenarios. Although options exist to improve the ballistic resistance of the control building, the recommendation is not to pursue them because there is a low probability of strike and there is an equal likelihood personnel could be located at similar distances in other areas of the SWiFT facility which are not passively protected, while the turbines are operating. A fenced exclusion area has been created around the turbines which restricts access to the boundary of the 1/100 strike probability. The overall recommendation is to neither relocate nor improve passive protection of the control building as the turbine safety systems have been improved to have no less than two independent, redundant, high quality engineered safety systems. Considering this, in combination with a control building strike probability of less than 5/10,000, the overall probability of turbine debris striking the control building is less than 1/1,000,000.

  14. Attrition Resistant Iron-Based Catalysts For F-T SBCRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeyinka A. Adeyiga

    2006-01-31

    The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction provides a way of converting coal-derived synthesis gas (CO+ H{sub 2}) to liquid fuels. Since the reaction is highly exothermic, one of the major problems in control of the reaction is heat removal. Recent work has shown that the use of slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) can largely solve this problem. The use of iron-(FE) based catalysts is attractive not only due to their low cost and ready availability, but also due to their high water-gas shift activity which makes it possible to use these catalysts with low H{sub 2}/CO ratios. However, a serious problem with the use of Fe catalysts in a SBCR is their tendency to undergo attrition. This can cause fouling/plugging of downstream filters and equipment; makes the separation of catalyst from the oil/wax product very difficult, if not impossible; and results in a steady loss of catalyst from the reactor. Under a previous Department of Energy (DOE)/University Research Grant (UCR) grant, Hampton University reported, for the first time, the development of demonstrably attrition-resistant Fe F-T synthesis catalysts having good activity, selectivity, and attrition resistance. These catalysts were prepared by spray drying Fe catalysts with potassium (K), copper (Cu), and silica (SiO{sub 2}) as promoters. SiO{sub 2} was also used as a binder for spray drying. These catalysts were tested for activity and selectivity in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed reactor. Fundamental understanding of attrition is being addressed by incorporating suitable binders into the catalyst recipe. This has resulted in the preparation of a spray dried HPR-43 catalyst having average particle size (aps) of 70 {micro}m with high attrition resistance. This HPR-43 attrition resistant, active and selective catalyst gave 95% CO conversion through 125 hours of testing in a fixed-bed at 270 C, 1.48 MPa, H{sub 2}/CO=0.67 and 2.0 NL/g-cat/h with C{sub 5+} selectivity of >78% and methane selectivity of less than 5% at an {alpha} of 0.9. Research is proposed to enable further development and optimization of these catalysts by (1) better understanding the role and interrelationship of various catalyst composition and preparation parameters on attrition resistance, activity, and selectivity of these catalysts, (2) the presence of sulfide ions on a precipitated iron catalyst, and (3) the effect of water on sulfided iron F-T catalysts for its activity, selectivity, and attrition. Catalyst preparations will be based on spray drying. The research employed, among other measurements, attrition testing and F-T synthesis at high pressure. Catalyst activity and selectivity is evaluated using a small fixed-bed reactor and a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). The catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation, followed by binder addition and spray drying at 250 C in a 1-m-diameter, 2-m-tall spray dryer. The binder silica content was varied from 0 to 20 wt%. The results show that the use of small amounts of precipitated SiO{sub 2} alone in spray-dried Fe catalysts can result in good attrition resistance. All catalysts investigated with SiO2 wt% {le} 12 produced fines less than 10 wt% during the jet cup attrition test, making them suitable for long-term use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Thus, concentration rather than the type of SiO{sub 2} incorporated into catalyst has a more critical impact on catalyst attrition resistance of spray-dried Fe catalysts. Lower amounts of SiO{sub 2} added to a catalyst give higher particle densities and therefore higher attrition resistances. In order to produce a suitable SBCR catalyst, however, the amount of SiO{sub 2} added has to be optimized to provide adequate surface area, particle density, and attrition resistance. Two of the catalysts with precipitated and binder silica were tested in Texas A&M University's CSTR (Autoclave Engineers). The two catalysts were also tested at The Center for Applied Energy Research in Lexington, Kentucky of the University of Kentucky. Spray-dried catalysts with compositions 100 Fe/5 Cu/4.2 K/11 (P) SiO{sub 2} and

  15. Distributed computing strategies for processing of FT-ICR MS imaging datasets for continuous mode data visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Donald F.; Schulz, Carl; Konijnenburg, Marco; Kilic, Mehmet; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    High-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry imaging enables the spatial mapping and identification of biomolecules from complex surfaces. The need for long time-domain transients, and thus large raw file sizes, results in a large amount of raw data (big data) that must be processed efficiently and rapidly. This can be compounded by largearea imaging and/or high spatial resolution imaging. For FT-ICR, data processing and data reduction must not compromise the high mass resolution afforded by the mass spectrometer. The continuous mode Mosaic Datacube approach allows high mass resolution visualization (0.001 Da) of mass spectrometry imaging data, but requires additional processing as compared to featurebased processing. We describe the use of distributed computing for processing of FT-ICR MS imaging datasets with generation of continuous mode Mosaic Datacubes for high mass resolution visualization. An eight-fold improvement in processing time is demonstrated using a Dutch nationally available cloud service.

  16. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, A.H.

    1996-03-21

    The investigation of the effect of certain promoters (Fe, Pd, and Ru) on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis was continued during this reporting period. All catalysts were tested first at 220{degrees}C, then at higher temperatures from 240 to 280{degrees}C, while monitoring their deactivation. The choice of these promoters was based on their intrinsic ability to enhance the hydrogenation reactions while slowing down the Boudouard reaction under the conditions used in F-T synthesis. Olefin hydrogenation and CO dissociation reactions were used individually to investigate further the nature of the deactivation process of these catalyst during F-T synthesis. Hydrogenation of isobutene (IB) was carried out in the presence of CO between 120 and 180{degrees}C and atmospheric pressure. CO dissociation activities of the catalysts were measured using a pulse technique at 2.5 atm and at temperatures between 180 and 280{degrees}C with intermittent H{sub 2} bracketing at 350{degrees}C. Promotion with high loadings of Fe or Pd resulted in catalysts with relatively lower activity and higher methane selectivity. The deactivation process and rate for catalysts containing Pd or Fe were similar to those of the non-promoted or Ru-promoted alumina-supported Co catalysts tested previously. The only exception was Co.068 with 1% Pd which had adequate activity and selectivity as well as lower deactivation rate at the various temperatures tested.

  17. Viability of the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology for general potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haro, Jaume; Amors, Jaume E-mail: jaume.amoros@upc.edu

    2014-12-01

    We consider the matter bounce scenario in F(T) gravity and Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) for phenomenological potentials that at early times provide a nearly matter dominated Universe in the contracting phase, having a reheating mechanism in the expanding or contracting phase, i.e., being able to release the energy of the scalar field creating particles that thermalize in order to match with the hot Friedmann Universe, and finally at late times leading to the current cosmic acceleration. For these potentials, numerically solving the dynamical perturbation equations we have seen that, for the particular F(T) model that we will name teleparallel version of LQC, and whose modified Friedmann equation coincides with the corresponding one in holonomy corrected LQC when one deals with the flat Friedmann-Lematre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) geometry, the corresponding equations obtained from the well-know perturbed equations in F(T) gravity lead to theoretical results that fit well with current observational data. More precisely, in this teleparallel version of LQC there is a set of solutions which leads to theoretical results that match correctly with last BICEP2 data, and there is another set whose theoretical results fit well with Planck's experimental data. On the other hand, in the standard holonomy corrected LQC, using the perturbed equations obtained replacing the Ashtekar connection by a suitable sinus function and inserting some counter-terms in order to preserve the algebra of constrains, the theoretical value of the tensor/scalar ratio is smaller than in the teleparallel version, which means that there is always a set of solutions that matches with Planck's data, but for some potentials BICEP2 experimental results disfavours holonomy corrected LQC.

  18. Accelerated Aging of BKC 44306-10 Rigid Polyurethane Foam: FT-IR Spectroscopy, Dimensional Analysis, and Micro Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbertson, Robert D.; Patterson, Brian M.; Smith, Zachary

    2014-01-02

    An accelerated aging study of BKC 44306-10 rigid polyurethane foam was carried out. Foam samples were aged in a nitrogen atmosphere at three different temperatures: 50 C, 65 C, and 80 C. Foam samples were periodically removed from the aging canisters at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 month intervals when FT-IR spectroscopy, dimensional analysis, and mechanical testing experiments were performed. Micro Computed Tomography imaging was also employed to study the morphology of the foams. Over the course of the aging study the foams the decreased in size by a magnitude of 0.001 inches per inch of foam. Micro CT showed the heterogeneous nature of the foam structure likely resulting from flow effects during the molding process. The effect of aging on the compression and tensile strength of the foam was minor and no cause for concern. FT-IR spectroscopy was used to follow the foam chemistry. However, it was difficult to draw definitive conclusions about the changes in chemical nature of the materials due to large variability throughout the samples.

  19. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Topical report No.1, Effects of supports and promoters on cobalt F-T catalyst behavior in fixed bed vs. slurry bubble column reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oukaci, R.; Marcelin, G.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.

    1995-01-17

    A series of cobalt-based F-T catalysts supported on alumina, silica, or titania were prepared with Ru and/or ZrO{sub 2} as promoters. All catalysts were extensively characterized by different methods. The catalysts were evaluated in terms of their activity and selectivity both in fixed bed and slurry bubble column reactors. Similar trends were observed in both reactors for support effects. However, this was not the case for the effects of promoters. Noble metal promotion effects were much more accentuated in the fixed bed reactor than under slurry bubble column reaction conditions, while the opposite seemed to hold true in the case of ZrO{sub 2} promotion effects, at least for SiO{sub 2}-supported Co catalysts.

  20. Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

    2008-12-15

    Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  1. Property:Depth(m) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Depth(m) Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "Depth(m)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft...

  2. Progress Report on FY15 Crystalline Experiments M4FT-15LL0807052

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavarin, M.; Zhao, P.; Joseph, C.; Begg, J.; Dai, Z.; Kersting, A. B.

    2015-08-13

    Colloid-facilitated plutonium transport is expected to be the dominant mechanism in its migration through the environment. The forms of Pu colloids (intrinsic versus pseudo-colloid) and their stabilities control temporal and spatial scales of Pu transport in the environment. In the present study, we examine the stability of Pu intrinsic colloids freshly prepared in alkaline solution relative to Pu-montmorillonite pseudo-colloids using a dialysis device and modeling approaches. Intrinsic colloids prepared under alkaline conditions were found to be unstable over a timescale of months. The kinetics of multiple processes, including hydrolysis/precipitation of Pu(IV), dissolution of intrinsic colloids in the absence and presence of the clay colloids, transport of dissolved Pu species across the dialysis membrane, and formation of pseudo-colloids were examined. The dissolution of intrinsic colloids was the rate-limiting process in most cases. The apparent intrinsic colloid dissolution rate constants range from 6×10-7 to 1×10- 6 mol·m-2·day-1 and 4×10-6 to 8×10-6 mol·m-2·day-1 at 25 and 80°C, respectively, while the apparent diffusion rate constants for Pu ions crossing the dialysis membrane are >200 times higher. Elevated temperatures enhance dissolution of Pu colloids and the activation energy for the process is estimated to be 28 kJ mol-1. The sorption of Pu to montmorillonite appears to be endothermic as the affinity of Pu for the clay increases with increasing temperature. Our results provide an in-depth understanding of how intrinsic and pseudo-colloids interact with each other kinetically. Although the fact that intrinsic colloids tend to dissolve in the presence of montmorillonite and transform into pseudo-colloids may limit the migration of intrinsic colloids, the thermodynamically more stable pseudo-colloids may play an important role in Pu transport in the environment over significant temporal and spatial scales.

  3. High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-03-01

    We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

  4. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Oil and Hydrotreated Product from Pine Feedstock Characterized by Heteronuclear Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy and FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Cort, John R.; Hallen, Richard T.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) crude oil and hydrotreated product from pine tree farm waste (forest product residual, FPR) have been analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes and high-resolution twodimensional heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. FT-ICR MS resolves thousands of compounds in complex oils and provides unparalleled compositional details for individual molecules for identification of compound class (heteroatom content), type (number of rings plus double bonds to carbon or double bond equivalents (DBE) and carbon number (degree of alkylation). Heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy provides one-bond and multiple-bond correlations between pairs of 1H and 13C chemical shifts that are characteristic of different organic functional groups. Taken together this information provides a picture of the chemical composition of these oils. Pyrolysis crude oil product from pine wood was characterized for comparison. Generally, pyrolysis oil is comprised of a more diverse distribution of heteroatom classes with higher oxygen number relative to HTL oil as shown by both positive- and negative-ion ESI FT-ICR MS. A total of 300 N1, 594 O1 and 267 O2 compounds were observed as products of hydrotreatment. The relative abundance of N1O1, N1O2, N1O3, N2, N2O1, N2O2 and O3 compounds are reduced to different degrees after hydrotreatment and other higher heteroatom containing species (O4-O10, N1O4, N1O5 and N2O3) are completely removed by hydrotreatment.

  5. Milestone M3FT-15OR0203112. Build redesigned HFIR rabbit capsules and make ready for insertion for irradiation in HFIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, Richard H; McDuffee, Joel Lee; Okuniewski, Maria A.

    2015-09-01

    This report details the fabrication and delivery of two Fuel Cycle Research and Development irradiation capsules (FCRP20 and FCRP03), with associated quality assurance documentation, to the High Flux Isotope Reactor. The capsules and documentation were delivered by September 30, 2015, thus meeting the deadline for milestone M3FT-15OR0203112. These irradiation experiments irradiate metal parallelepiped specimens that may consist of various compositions including uranium metal, steel, etc. This document contains a copy of the completed capsule fabrication request sheets, which detail all constituent components, pertinent drawings, etc., along with a detailed summary of the capsule assembly process performed by the Thermal Hydraulics and Irradiation Engineering Group (THIEG) in the Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division. A complete fabrication package record is maintained by THIEG and is available upon request.

  6. Initial activity of reduced chromia/alumina catalyst in n-butane dehydrogenation monitored by on-line FT-IR gas analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakuli, A.; Kytoekivi, A.; Suntola, T.

    1996-06-01

    The initial activity of chromia/alumina catalyst (13 wt% Cr) in n-butane dehydrogenation was studied in a flow reactor at 853 K. The initial activity was determined by on-line FT-IR gas analysis, which enabled sampling of the gaseous product mixture at a time resolution of seconds. The catalysts were processed in repeated cycles of oxidation, reduction, and dehydrogenation using n-butane, methane, hydrogen, or carbon monoxide as reducing agents. With n-butane, methane, and hydrogen and dehydrogenation activity was associated with Cr{sup 3+} species apparently formed in the reduction of high-valence Cr species. The catalyst reduced with carbon monoxide at 853 K showed poor initial selectivity for butenes and, relative to the other catalysts. Simultaneous data relating the initial activity, coke content, and some of the physicochemical properties of the catalyst indicated that the surfaces of all catalysts were modified to some extent by the successive reaction cycles. 33 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Dynamics of Propane in Silica Mesopores Formed upon PropyleneHydrogenation over Pt Nanoparticles by Time-Resolved FT-IRSpectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waslylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

    2007-01-31

    Propylene hydrogenation over Pt nanoparticles supported onmesoporous silica type SBA-15 was monitored by time-resolved FT-IRspectroscopy at 23 ms resolution using short propylene gas pulses thatjoined a continuous flow of hydrogen in N2 (1 atm total pressure).Experiments were conducted in the temperature range 323-413 K. Propanewas formed within 100 milliseconds or faster. The CH stretching regionrevealed distinct bands for propane molecules emerging inside thenanoscale channels of the silica support. Spectral analysis gave thedistribution of the propane product between support and surrounding gasphase as function of time. Kinetic analysis showed that the escape ofpropane molecules from the channels occurred within hundreds ofmilliseconds (3.1 + 0.4 s-1 at 383 K). A steady state distribution ofpropane between gas phase and mesoporous support is established as theproduct is swept from the catalyst zone by the continuous flow ofhydrogen co-reactant. This is the first direct spectroscopic observationof emerging products of heterogeneous catalysis on nanoporous supportsunder reaction conditions.

  8. Microsoft PowerPoint - ft

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    &3;&27;09072&4;3&4;3&4;&3;,&3;'&4;,-&4;0&3;,9&4;&3;94 08&4;&4;&4;03.0&3;,9&3;&28;&5;,8.,&4;0 &29;7,3&4;&3;&30;:0&4;&4;07 &27;059 &3;41&3;&26;425:907&3;.&4;03.0 &31;479&4;&3;&26;,74&4;&4;3,&3;9,90&3;&3&4;;078&4;9&5; &15; 08&4;&4;&4;03.0&3;&4;3&3;&2;&26; &7; &2;&26;&1;&3;&14; &4; &14; &4;&3;3408...

  9. SWiFT Research Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Program - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  10. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Topical report No.3, Zirconia promotion of Fischer-Tropsch cobalt catalysts: Behavior in fixed-bed and slurry bubble column reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oukaci, R.; Marcelin, G.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.

    1995-01-17

    A series of cobalt-based F-T catalysts supported on alumina and silica were prepared with different loadings of Zr and different sequences of impregnation of Co and Zr. All catalysts were extensively characterized by different methods. The catalysts were evaluated in terms of their activity and selectivity both in fixed bed and slurry bubble column reactors. Addition of ZrO{sub 2} to both Co/SiO{sub 2} and Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts resulted in at least a twofold increase in the catalyst activity for F-T synthesis in the fixed bed reactor. In the slurry bubble column reactor, a similar promotion effect was observed for the SiO{sub 2}-supported catalysts, while the addition of Zr to a cobalt/alumina catalyst had a less significant effect.

  11. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-09-29

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

  12. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2006-06-30

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

  13. USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-02-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

  14. Milestone Report - Demonstrate Braided Material with 3.5 g U/kg Sorption Capacity under Seawater Testing Condition (Milestone M2FT-15OR0310041 - 1/30/2015)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Christopher James; Das, Sadananda; Oyola, Yatsandra; Mayes, Richard T; Gill, Gary; Kuo, Li-Jung; Wood, Jordana

    2015-01-01

    This report describes work on the successful completion of Milestone M2FT-15OR0310041 (1/30/2015) entitled, Demonstrate braided material with 3.5 g U/kg sorption capacity under seawater testing condition . This effort is part of the Seawater Uranium Recovery Program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy, and involved the development of new adsorbent braided materials at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and marine testing at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). ORNL has recently developed four braided fiber adsorbents that have demonstrated uranium adsorption capacities greater than 3.5 g U/kg adsorbent after marine testing at PNNL. The braided adsorbents were synthesized by braiding or leno weaving high surface area polyethylene fibers and conducting radiation-induced graft polymerization of itaconic acid and acrylonitrile monomers onto the braided materials followed by amidoximation and base conditioning. The four braided adsorbents demonstrated capacity values ranging from 3.7 to 4.2 g U/kg adsorbent after 56 days of exposure in natural coastal seawater at 20 oC. All data are normalized to a salinity of 35 psu.

  15. UK FT PDU Facility Draft EA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for University of Kentucky Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch ...

  16. UK FT PDU Facility Draft EA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    42S Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment for University of Kentucky Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Lexington, KY February 2014 Prepared for: Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory This page intentionally left blank. Final Supplemental Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1642S Fischer-Tropsch Process Development Unit February 2014 Cover Sheet Proposed

  17. 2-ft Flume Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Experience Studies done for Yaquina, WA, RIB floating breakwater, generalized Core-Loc stability tests, Cresent City, CA, generalized dolos structural tests, jetty...

  18. SWiFT Site Atmospheric Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & ...

  19. The 200 ft. Solar Tower at Sandia ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories provides 218 computer-controlled heliostats to reflect concentrated solar energy onto the tower, producing a total thermal capacity of 6 MW and peak flux to 300...

  20. SWiFT performs accredited research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the third turbine five diameters downwind (the turbines form a three, five-, six-diameter-length triangle). Two turbines are funded by the DOE's Office of Energy...

  1. Sandia Energy - SWiFT Facility & Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    near the turbine rotor at temporal and spatial scales not accessible by current measurement techniques such as scanning LIDAR or particle image velocimetry (PIV). The...

  2. PP-56_NYPA_Ft._Covington.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  3. Direct observation of surface ethyl to ethane interconversion uponC2H4 hydrogenation over Pt/Al2O3 catalyst by time-resolved FT-IRspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

    2004-12-10

    Time-resolved FT-IR spectra of ethylene hydrogenation over alumina-supported Pt catalyst were recorded at 25 ms resolution in the temperature range 323 to 473 K using various H2 flow rates (1 atm total gas pressure). Surface ethyl species (2870 and 1200 cm-1) were detected at all temperatures along with the gas phase ethane product (2954 and 2893 cm-1). The CH3CH2Pt growth was instantaneous on the time scale of 25ms under all experimental conditions. At 323 K, the decay time of surface ethyl (122 + 10 ms) coincides with the rise time of C2H6 (144 + 14 ms).This establishes direct kinetic evidence for surface ethyl as the kinetically relevant intermediate. Such a direct link between the temporal behavior of an observed intermediate and the final product growth in a heterogeneous catalytic system has not been demonstrated before to our knowledge. A fraction (10 percent) of the asymptotic ethane growth at 323 K is prompt, indicating that there are surface ethyl species that react much faster than the majority of the CH3CH2Pt intermediates. The dispersive kinetics is attributed to the varying strength of interaction of the ethyl species with the Pt surface caused by heterogeneity of the surface environment. At 473 K, the majority of ethyl intermediates are hydrogenated prior to the recording of the first time slice (24 ms), and a correspondingly large prompt growth of ethane is observed. The yield and kinetics of the surface ethylidyne are in agreement with the known spectator nature of this species.

  4. Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Ft. Hood Military Base Outside Killeen, Texas. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geiger, J.; Lisell, L.; Mosey, G.

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative through the Region 6 contract, selected Ft. Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this study is to assess the site for possible photovoltaic (PV) system installations and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

  5. Intermediate depth burial of classified transuranic wastes in arid alluvium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Environmental Risk and Decision Analysis Dept.; Crowe, B.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Geologic Integration Group; Di Sanza, F. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Nevada Operations Office

    1999-04-01

    Intermediate depth disposal operations were conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the DOE`s Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1984 through 1989. These operations emplaced high-specific activity low-level wastes (LLW) and limited quantities of classified transuranic (TRU) wastes in 37 m (120-ft) deep, Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes. The GCD boreholes are 3 m (10 ft) in diameter and founded in a thick sequence of arid alluvium. The bottom 15 m (50 ft) of each borehole was used for waste emplacement and the upper 21 m (70 ft) was backfilled with native alluvium. The bottom of each GCD borehole is almost 200 m (650 ft) above the water table. The GCD boreholes are located in one of the most arid portions of the US, with an average precipitation of 13 cm (5 inches) per year. The limited precipitation, coupled with generally warm temperatures and low humidities results in a hydrologic system dominated by evapotranspiration. The US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) 40 CFR 191 defines the requirements for protection of human health from disposed TRU wastes. This EPA standard sets a number of requirements, including probabilistic limits on the cumulative releases of radionuclides to the accessible environment for 10,000 years. The DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) has contracted with Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) to conduct a performance assessment (PA) to determine if the TRU wastes emplaced in the GCD boreholes complies with the EPA`s 40 CFR 191 requirements. This paper describes DOE`s actions undertaken to evaluate whether the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes will, or will not, endanger human health. Based on preliminary modeling, the TRU wastes in the GCD boreholes meet the EPA`s requirements, and are, therefore, protective of human health.

  6. Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    yd + Amedee Geothermal Area + 213 m0.213 km 0.132 mi 698.819 ft 232.939 yd + B Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area + 1,500 m1.5 km 0.932 mi 4,921.26 ft 1,640.415 yd + Bad Blumau...

  7. 4-16-13_Christopher_Turner FT HNR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SOUTHWESTERN PROFILE As one of four Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) in the United ... system that includes digital microwave, VHF radio, and fiber optic components. ...

  8. 6-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Services Yes Past Pertinent Test Experience Used for testing sandbag configurations, CORE-LOC units, shoreline stability designs, etc. Special Characteristics Special...

  9. 11-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Test Services Yes Past Pertinent Test Experience Used for testing sandbag configurations, CORE-LOC units, shoreline stability designs, etc. Special Characteristics Special...

  10. 10-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Test Services Test Services Yes Past Pertinent...

  11. 7-12-12_Kathleen_Hogan_FT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal government's efforts in advanced vehicles As part of its all-of-the-above energy strategy, and in its efforts to reduce oil imports by one- third, the Obama Administration...

  12. 4-9-13_Ernest_Moniz FT SENR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    research community with unique research opportunities at major facilities for nuclear and particle physics, energy science, materials research and discovery, large scale...

  13. 7-12-12_David_Frantz_FT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    improving its systems to ensure accurate application tracking, project management, and ready access to historical and current information. 3 The workflow management system will...

  14. 07-26-2012_Kathleen_Hogan_FT

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    sector accounts for approximately two-thirds of the United States' oil consumption and contributes to one-third of the Nation's greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. 1 Net...

  15. 6-27-13_Kathleen_Hogan FT HSST

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), and Executive Order 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance. The preliminary data from...

  16. Microsoft Word - Draft Ft Yukon Biomass System EA_0220

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA Environmental Assessment EFH Essential Fish Habitat EO Executive Order F Degrees ... Environmental Protection Agency USFWS U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service gm 3 microgram per ...

  17. Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is a vertical plane, closed recirculating, variable-speed, variable-pressure, open jet test section, closed jet test section, and semi-rectangular test section. Towing...

  18. SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    available for researchers to perform validation studies of various modal analysis and vibration techniques as well as investigate turbine-to-turbine interactions and advanced rotor...

  19. 9-11-2012_Lauren_Azar_FT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Today, the electricity generated by these federal facilities is incredibly valuable: with water as its fuel source, it is generally inexpensive 3 and produced without air-pollution ...

  20. Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Topical report No.2, Comparison of patented F-T cobalt catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oukaci, R.; Marcelin, G.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr.

    1995-01-17

    Based on the information provided in patents assigned to Gulf, Shell, Exxon, and Statoil, a series of catalysts has been prepared consisting of 12--20 wt. % cobalt, a second metal promoter (Ru or Re), and an oxide promoter such as lanthana, zirconia, or alkali oxide, the support being alumina, silica, or titania. All catalysts have been extensively characterized by different methods. The catalysts have been evaluated in terms of their activity, selectivity both in a fixed bed reactor and in a slurry bubble column reactor, and the results correlated with their physico-chemical properties.

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - GradedApproach_P&RA_CoP_December2013 ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Geologic Setting g g * Example of a representative hydrostratigraphic profiles f hi "A" for geographic area "A" Depth (ft) Elevation (ft) Geologic Unit Description...

  2. U.S. Army Office of Energy Initiatives

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Huachuca Ft. Stewart Yakima Training Center Schofield Barracks Redstone Arsenal Ft. Bliss ... Gordon Ft. Benning Ft. Benning, Ft. Gordon, Ft. Stewart, GA 90 MW Solar GSA Areawide ...

  3. FT-IR Study of CO2 Interaction with Na-rich Montmorillonite

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Krukowski, Elizabeth G; Goodman, Angela; Rother, Gernot; Ilton, Eugene; Guthrie, George; Bodnar, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) in saline reservoirs in sedimentary formations has the potential to reduce the impact of fossil fuel combustion on climate change by reducing CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and storing the CO2 in geologic formations in perpetuity. At pressure and temperature (PT) conditions relevant to CCUS, CO2 is less dense than the pre-existing brine in the formation, and the more buoyant CO2 will migrate to the top of the formation where it will be in contact with cap rock. Interactions between clay-rich shale cap rocks and CO2 are poorly understood at PT conditions appropriate formore » CCUS in saline formations. In this study, the interaction of CO2 with clay minerals in the cap rock overlying a saline formation has been examined using Na+ exchanged montmorillonite (Mt) (Na+-STx-1) (Na+ Mt) as an analog for clay-rich shale. Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to discern mechanistic information for CO2 interaction with hydrated (both one- and two-water layers) and relatively dehydrated (both dehydrated layers and one-water layers) Na+-STx-1 at 35 C and 50 C and CO2 pressure from 0 5.9 MPa. CO2-induced perturbations associated with the water layer and Na+-STx-1 vibrational modes such as AlAlOH and AlMgOH were examined. Data indicate that CO2 is preferentially incorporated into the interlayer space, with relatively dehydrated Na+-STx-1 capable of incorporating more CO2 compared to hydrated Na+-STx-1. Spectroscopic data provide no evidence of formation of carbonate minerals or the interaction of CO2 with sodium cations in the Na+-STx-1 structure.« less

  4. Comments on: SWiFT Facility Prepared for More-Efficient Operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    swift-facility-prepared-for-more-efficient-operations-advanced-turbine-turbine-wake-interaction-control-research...

  5. 4-23-13_Ingrid_Kolb FT SENR_0.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  6. SWiFT Facility Prepared for More-Efficient Operations & Advanced

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turbine-Turbine Wake-Interaction-Control Research Prepared for More-Efficient Operations & Advanced Turbine-Turbine Wake-Interaction-Control Research - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy

  7. Microsoft Word - M2FT-14LB0811011_International Collab Activities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of DOE Order 414.1 NQA-1-2000 Other This Deliverable was subjected to: Technical Review Peer Review Technical Review (TR) Peer Review (PR) Review Documentation Provided...

  8. Properties of 30 lb/ft{sup 3} rigid polyurethane foams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenski. E.G.; Stinebaugh, R.E.; York, A.R. II

    1997-03-01

    This report summarizes tests on five different foams. Two are manufactured at Allied Signal, two at North Carolina Foam Industries, and one at General Plastics. The tests conducted are: thermal conductivity at various temperatures, specific heat at 60{degrees}C, compressive strength at ambient and 60{degrees}C, thermogravimetric analysis to 800{degrees}C, intumescence, and char formation properties. A CHN analysis was also performed. Funding for the testing of rigid polyurethane foams originated from the AT-400A container program at Sandia National Laboratories. This testing supported the development of the AT-400A container. The AT-400A is a storage and transportation container that will be used initially at the Pantex Plant for storage of plutonium from dismantled nuclear weapons.

  9. Sandia Energy - SWiFT Facility Prepared for More-Efficient Operations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Prepared for More-Efficient Operations & Advanced Turbine-Turbine Wake-Interaction-Control Research Home Renewable Energy Energy SWIFT Facilities Partnership Capabilities...

  10. M3FT-15OR0202212: SUBMIT SUMMARY REPORT ON THERMODYNAMIC EXPERIMENT AND MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMurray, Jake W.; Brese, Robert G.; Silva, Chinthaka M.; Besmann, Theodore M.

    2015-09-01

    Modeling the behavior of nuclear fuel with a physics-based approach uses thermodynamics for key inputs such as chemical potentials and thermal properties for phase transformation, microstructure evolution, and continuum transport simulations. Many of the lanthanide (Ln) elements and Y are high-yield fission products. The U-Y-O and U-Ln-O ternaries are therefore key subsystems of multi-component high-burnup fuel. These elements dissolve in the dominant urania fluorite phase affecting many of its properties. This work reports on an effort to assess the thermodynamics of the U-Pr-O and U-Y-O systems using the CALPHAD (CALculation of PHase Diagrams) method. The models developed within this framework are capable of being combined and extended to include additional actinides and fission products allowing calculation of the phase equilibria, thermochemical and material properties of multicomponent fuel with burnup.

  11. 2-28-14-signed-NEPA-UK-FT-Final-SEA-FONSI_2.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  12. Sandia Energy - SWiFT Commissioned to Study Wind Farm Optimization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the continued growth of our nation's clean energy economy while helping to speed the deployment of next generation energy technologies and bring more clean, affordable renewable...

  13. Commercial Scale Coal to F-T Liquid Plant Using a Dry Feed Gasifier

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tower or steam systems. However, most of the water loss is evaporative loss from the cooling towers. More air- cooled heat exchangers could be added to reduce the load on the...

  14. Modeling Volatile Species Retention Experiments: Interim Progress Report (M3FT-12LA0202053)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Neil N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-06

    Metal nuclear fuel is a candidate transmutation fuel form for advanced fuel cycles. One constituent of the fuel, americium, has a high vapor pressure, and there is a concern that excessive volatility losses of americium will occur during casting of the metal. A number of experiments have been performed using americium and surrogate metals, including experiments slated for FY12, to address the concern. The present task is to model and numerically simulate these experiments. This report describes a system-level model of the relevant experiments that has been developed together with some results. It also describes some initial 3D, full-physics simulations of portions of the experiments that have been performed.

  15. DE-AT26-99FT40267 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development Center, Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) - project management and research products Location Huntington, WV 25701 Project Impact The results...

  16. Alvord (3,000-ft strawn) LPG flood - design and performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, G.D.; Todd, M.R.

    1982-01-01

    Mitchell Energy Corporation has implemented a LPG-dry gas miscible process in the Alvord (3000' Strawn) Unit in Wise County, Texas utilizing the DOE tertiary incentive program. The field had been waterflooded for 14 years and was producing near its economic limit at the time this project was started. This paper presents the results of the reservoir simulation study that was conducted to evaluate pattern configuration and operating alternatives so as to maximize LPG containment and oil recovery performance. Several recommendations resulting from this study were implemented for the project. Based on the model predictions, tertiary oil recovery is expected to be between 100,000 and 130,000 bbls, or about 7 percent of the oil originally in place in the Unit. 12 refs.

  17. Microsoft Word - 12.18.13 NEPA UK FT DSEA draft DearReaderLtr...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with the Council on Environmental Quality's National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) implementing regulations (40 CFR Parts 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing...

  18. FY 2014 Status Report: of Vibration Testing of Clad Fuel (M4FT-14OR0805033)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevard, Bruce Balkcom

    2014-03-28

    The DOE Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) tasked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to investigate the behavior of light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel cladding material performance related to extended storage and transportation of UNF. ORNL has been tasked to perform a systematic study on UNF integrity under simulated normal conditions of transportation (NCT) by using the recently developed hot-cell testing equipment, Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT). To support the testing on actual high-burnup UNF, fast-neutron irradiation of pre-hydrided zirconium-alloy cladding in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at elevated temperatures will be used to simulate the effects of high-burnup on fuel cladding for help in understanding the cladding materials properties relevant to extended storage and subsequent transportation. The irradiated pre-hydrided metallic materials testing will generate baseline data to benchmark hot-cell testing of the actual high-burnup UNF cladding. More importantly, the HFIR-irradiated samples will be free of alpha contamination and can be provided to researchers who do not have hot cell facilities to handle highly contaminated high-burnup UNF cladding to support their research projects for the UFDC.

  19. Low severity upgrading of F-T waxes with solid superacids. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

    1995-09-30

    The use of solid acids, especially Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4}, to convert long chain alkanes and Fischer-Tropsch waxes to liquid fuels under mild reaction conditions was explored in this work. Anion and/or hydrogenation metal modified zirconium oxides were synthesized, characterized, and tested for hydrocracking and hydroisomerization. of model compounds, chiefly with n-hexadecane. The relationship between catalytic activity and acidic character of the bifunctional Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst was investigated.

  20. Microsoft Word - 12.18.13 NEPA UK FT DSEA draft DearReaderLtr.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    William.Gwilliam@netl.doe.gov  Voice (304) 285-4401  Fax (304) 285-4403  www.netl.doe.gov A l b a ny, O R * M o rg a n tow n , W V * Pi t t s b u rg h , PA December 18 , 2013 Dear Reader: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) invites comments on the enclosed draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment (draft SEA) for the University of Kentucky Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch

  1. DE-AT26-97FT34343 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of hydrate-containing sediments via piston cores, and the measurement of hydrate sediment properties through laboratory experiments. Project Impact This project has already...

  2. Report on Fission Time Projection Chamber M3FT-12IN0210052

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James K. Jewell

    2012-08-01

    The Time Projection Chamber is a collaborative effort to implement an innovative approach and deliver unprecedented fission measurements to DOE programs. This 4?-detector system will provide unrivaled 3-D data about the fission process. Shown here is a half populated TPC (2?) at the LLNL TPC laboratory as it undergoes testing before being shipped to LANSCE for beam experiments.

  3. ft. n. Both, Ohtef, RarourQb DWrion,Oak Ridgo

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    w9 s. P. Morgan, Aar' t, Pimotor; Produotlon Dirirloa, i BY00 sniwm OP Zr TBIDm 1 . It ir axpeat tbt 4alivery of @air wteri8.l will be maa on orbaforo leptcmwrl, lg4g....

  4. Microsoft Word - M2FT-14LB0811011_International Collab Activities_Sep 2014

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Jens Birkholzer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory September, 2014 FCRD-UFD-2014-000065 LBNL-6782E DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor the Regents of the

  5. F-T process using an iron on mixed zirconia-titania supported catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dyer, Paul N.; Nordquist, Andrew F.; Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1987-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising iron co-deposited with or deposited on particles comprising a mixture of zirconia and titania, preferably formed by co-precipitation of compounds convertible to zirconia and titania, such as zirconium and titanium alkoxide. The invention also comprises the method of making this catalyst and an improved Fischer-Tropsch reaction process in which the catalyst is utilized.

  6. ARM - Measurement - Snow depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Send Measurement : Snow depth Snow depth measured at the surface Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the...

  7. Protections = Defenses in Depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protections = Defenses in Depth Protections = Defense in Depth We use a defense-in-depth strategy to protect the environment. August 1, 2013 Protections = Defense in Depth: Protection #1: Remove the source of contamination; Protection #2: Stabilize, retain or remove contaminated sediments; Protection #3: Sample for known and unexpected contaminants Clean the Past: Protections Protections: Cleanup Cleanup 101 Corrective Measures Process Protection #1: Remove the Source Example Cleanup: Removal of

  8. Analytical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5000 ft., depth 5000 ft., and steam-filled porosity of 5%. References Hardee, H.C. ; Larson, D.W. (1 January 1980) Thermal techniques for characterizing magma body geometries...

  9. Technology demonstration of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles at Ft. Bliss, Texas. Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, R.A.; Yost, D.M.

    1995-11-01

    A technology demonstration program of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles was conducted at FL Bliss, Texas to demonstrate the use of CNG as an alternative fuel. The demonstration program at FL Bliss was the first Army initiative with CNG-fueled vehicles under the legislated Alternative Motor Fuels Act. This Department of Energy (DOE)-supported fleet demonstration consisted of 48 General Services Administration (GSA)-owned, Army-leased 1992 dedicated CNG General Motors (GM) 3/4-ton pickup trucks and four 1993 gasoline-powered Chevrolet 3/4-ton pickup trucks.

  10. Electrical energy and demand savings from a geothermal heat pump energy savings performance contract at Ft. Polk, LA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J.

    1997-06-01

    At Fort Polk, LA the space conditioning systems of an entire city (4,003 military family housing units) have been converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHP) under an energy savings performance contract. At the same time, other efficiency measures such as compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), low-flow hot water outlets, and attic insulation were installed. Pre- and post-retrofit data were taken at 15-minute intervals on energy flows through the electrical distribution feeders that serve the family housing areas of the post. 15-minute interval data was also taken on energy use from a sample of the residences. This paper summarizes the electrical energy and demand savings observed in this data. Analysis of feeder-level data shows that for a typical year, the project will result in a 25.6 million kWh savings in electrical energy use, or 32.4% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption in family housing. Results from analysis of building-level data compare well with this figure. Analysis of feeder-level data also shows that the project has resulted in a reduction of peak electrical demand of 6,541 kW, which is 39.6% of the pre-retrofit peak electrical demand. In addition to these electrical savings, the facility is also saving an estimated 260,000 therms per year of natural gas. It should be noted that the energy savings presented in this document are the apparent energy savings observed in the monitored data, and are not to be confused with the contracted energy savings used as the basis for payments. To determine the contracted energy savings, the apparent energy savings may require adjustments for such things as changes in indoor temperature performance criteria, additions of ceiling fans, and other factors.

  11. M3FT-15OR0202237: Submit Report on Results From Initial Coating Layer Development For UN TRISO Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolly, Brian C.; Lindemer, Terrence; Terrani, Kurt A.

    2015-02-01

    In support of fully ceramic matrix (FCM) fuel development, coating development work has begun at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to produce tri-isotropic (TRISO) coated fuel particles with UN kernels. The nitride kernels are used to increase heavy metal density in these SiC-matrix fuel pellets with details described elsewhere. The advanced gas reactor (AGR) program at ORNL used fluidized bed chemical vapor deposition (FBCVD) techniques for TRISO coating of UCO (two phase mixture of UO2 and UCx) kernels. Similar techniques were employed for coating of the UN kernels, however significant changes in processing conditions were required to maintain acceptable coating properties due to physical property and dimensional differences between the UCO and UN kernels.

  12. Milestone Report - M4FT-14OR0312022 - Co-absorption studies - Design system complete/test plan complete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Spencer, Barry B.; Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this test plan is to describe research that will determine the effectiveness of silver mordenite and molecular sieve beds to remove iodine and water (tritium) from off-gas streams arising from used nuclear fuel recycling processes, and to demonstrate that the iodine and water can be recovered separately from one another.

  13. Milestone report - M4FT-14OR0302102b - Evaluation of Tritium Content and Release from Surry-2 Fuel Cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Sharon M.; Chattin, Marc Rhea; Giaquinto, Joseph M.; Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2014-09-01

    To design and operate future reprocessing plants in a safe and environmentally compliant manner, the amount and form of tritium in the used nuclear fuel (UNF) must be understood and quantified.To gain a better understanding of how tritium in cladding will behave during processing, scoping tests are being performed to determine the tritium content in the cladding pre- and post-tritium pretreatment. A sample of Surry-2 pressurized water reactor (PWR) cladding was heated to 11001200C to oxidize the zirconium and release all of the tritium in the cladding sample. The tritium content was measured to be ~240 Ci/g. Cladding samples were heated to 500C, which is within the temperature range (480 - 600C) expected for standard air tritium pretreatment systems, and to a slightly higher temperature (700C) to determine the impact of tritium pretreatment on tritium release from the cladding. Heating at 500C for 24 hr removes ~0.2% of the tritium from the cladding, and heating at 700C for 24 hr removes ~9%. Thus, a significant fraction of the tritium remains bound in the cladding and must be considered in operations involving cladding recycle.

  14. DOE Building America Technology and Energy Savings Analysis of Two 2721 ft2 Homes in a Mixed Humid Climate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Roderick K; Christian, Jeffrey E; Khowailed, Gannate A

    2013-09-01

    The ZEBRAlliance is an opportunity to accelerate progress toward DOE s goal of maximizing cost-effective energy efficiency by investing in a highly leveraged, focused effort to test new ultra-high-efficiency components emerging from ORNL s Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partners and others. The Alliance integrated efficient components into the construction of four research houses that will be used as test markets to gauge the integral success of the components and houses. These four research houses are expected to be the first houses used to field-test several newly emerging products such as the ClimateMaster ground-source integrated heat pump, factory assembled ZEHcor walls, and one or more new appliances from Whirlpool Corporation.

  15. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein,A.; Blucher, E.; Cline, D. B.; Diwan, M. V.; Fleming, b.; Kadel, R.; Kearns, E.; Klein, J.; Lande, K.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; McKeown, R.; Morse, W.; Radeika, R.; Scholberg, K.; Smy, M.; Sobel, H.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Vagins, M.; Walter, C.; Zwaska, R.

    2008-12-22

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of tens of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper (or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which provides enhanced capability for background rejection. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures. Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  16. Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kadel, Richard W.; Bernstein, Adam; Blucher, Edward; Cline, David B.; Diwan, Milind V.; Fleming, Bonnie; Kearns, Edward; Klein, Joshua; Lande, Kenneth; Lanni, Francesco; Lissauer, David; McKeown, Robert; Morse, William; Rameika, Regina; Scholberg, Kate; Smy, Michael; Sobel, Henry; Sullivan, Gregory; Svoboda, Robert; Vagins, Mark; Walter, Christopher; Zwaska, Robert

    2008-12-23

    This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of hundreds of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent in a mountain. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper(or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which should provide enhanced capability for background rejection. We have based background rejection on reasonable estimates of track and energy resolution, and in some cases scaled background rates from measurements in water. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures.Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

  17. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, Peter M. (Hamburg, NY); Reger, Robert J. (Grand Island, NY)

    1996-01-01

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member.

  18. Variable depth core sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourgeois, P.M.; Reger, R.J.

    1996-02-20

    A variable depth core sampler apparatus is described comprising a first circular hole saw member, having longitudinal sections that collapses to form a point and capture a sample, and a second circular hole saw member residing inside said first hole saw member to support the longitudinal sections of said first hole saw member and prevent them from collapsing to form a point. The second hole saw member may be raised and lowered inside said first hole saw member. 7 figs.

  19. Thermal Gradient Holes At Chena Geothermal Area (Holdmann, Et...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    eight wells ranging in depth from 200 to 300 ft. References Gwen Holdmann, Dick Benoit, David Blackwell (2006) Integrated Geoscience Investigation and Geothermal Exploration at...

  20. Fig 9-revised Flowchart.xls

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Figure 9 Soil Nature and Extent AOI Identification Process d The PRG value for lead is not a calculated PRG, but rather is taken from the EPA guidance document Revised Interim Soil Lead Guidance for CERCLA Sites and RCRA Correction Action Facilities (1994). e For surface soil (0 to 0.5 ft), WRW surface soil (0 to 0.5 ft) PRGs are used. For subsurface soil (0.5 ft to a maximum depth of 209 ft), WRW subsurface soil (0.5 to 8 ft) PRGs are used. a Soil "superset" for soil samples collected

  1. ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical depth A measure of how much light aerosols prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including

  2. ARM - Measurement - Cloud optical depth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    optical depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud optical depth Amount of light cloud droplets or ice particles prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all

  3. Rotating drum variable depth sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Steeper, Timothy J. (Trenton, SC)

    2008-07-01

    A sampling device for collecting depth-specific samples in silt, sludge and granular media has three chambers separated by a pair of iris valves. Rotation of the middle chamber closes the valves and isolates a sample in a middle chamber.

  4. Characterization Of The Hydrogenation Products Of Bix (phenylethynyl) Benzene (DEB) Getter Using Combined GC/FTIR/MS, FT-Raman, and ATR Spectroscopies (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smyrl, N. R.; Powell, G. L.

    2011-06-09

    Organic hydrogen getters are utilized to minimize hydrogen accumulation in sealed systems where such build up could produce either a safety problem from pressure build up or corrosion problem due the hydriding of metals contained in the sealed vessel. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) is a hydrogen getter that is based on the palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to single bonds in aromatic aryl compound. DEB is a getter mixed with 25% carbon and 1% Pd and pressed into pellets with some porosity. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reactions with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates.

  5. Remedial measures plan for a spill of solvent refined coal liquid at the SRC Pilot Plant, Ft. Lewis, Washington. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimshaw, T.W.; Little, W.M.

    1980-08-22

    On 19 December 1979, a spill of SRC liquid occurred during transfer of the liquid from a storage tank to sample drums. Approximately 2300 gallons of fluid flowed into the floor of the tank farm and infiltrated into the porous and permeable gravels at the site. Because of concern for the possible impact of the SRC fluid on the quality of ground water, surface water, and water supply sources at and near the site, GMRC commissioned Radian to evaluate the problem and recommend specific measures to mitigate any known or anticipated impacts. This report presents the results of Radian's investigations. Although ground-water contamination apparently has occurred as a result of the 19 December spill, the contamination plume is localized to the vicinity of the SRC plant and Lake Sequalitchew. A contamination plume apparently is presently moving toward Lake Sequalitchew, but the two pump wells included in the Remedial Mesures Plan will arrest this movement. These wells will be pumped until phenol concentrations in the groundwater fall to acceptable levels. The source of contamination at the spill is being cut off by excavation of the contaminated soil and sealing of the floor of the tank farm. No public water supplies are appreciably endangered by the 19 December spill. Most public wells are upgradient from the spill and are thus in no danger. The downgradient wells are protected by the fact that they tap deeper aquifers than the upper aquifer at the SRC plant site and by the buffering effect of Lake Sequalitchew. The upper aquifer in the vicinity of the spill site probably should not be considered for use as a public or private water supply for the foreseeable future.

  6. Remedial measures plan for a spill of solvent refined coal liquid at the SRC pilot plant, Ft. Lewis, Washington. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimshaw, T.W.; Little, W.M.

    1980-08-22

    On December 19, 1979, a spill of SRC liquid occurred during transfer of the liquid from a storage tank to sample drums. Approximately 2,300 gallons of fluid flowed into the floor of the tank farm and infiltrated into the porous and permeable gravels at the site. Because of concern for the possible impact of the SRC fluid on the quality of ground water, surface water, and water supply sources at and near the site, GMRC commissioned Radian to evaluate the problem and recommend specific measures to mitigate any known or anticipated impacts. This report presents the results of Radian's investigations. Although ground-water contamination apparently has occurred as a result of the December 19 spill, the contamination plume is localized to the vicinity of the SRC plant and Lake Sequalitchew. A contamination plume apparently is presently moving toward Lake Sequalitchew, but the two pump wells included in the Remedial Measures Plan will arrest this movement. These wells will be pumped until phenol concentrations in the groundwater fall to acceptable levels. The source of contamination at the spill is being cut off by excavation of the contaminated soil and sealing of the floor of the tank farm. No public water supplies are appreciably endangered by the December 19 spill. A long-term ground-water monitoring plan is being implemented to ensure early discovery of any unanticipated impacts of the spill. If further water quality problems are disclosed, additional remedial measures will be undertaken as necessary.

  7. High-throughput prediction of Acacia and eucalypt lignin syringyl/guaiacyl content using FT-Raman spectroscopy and partial least squares modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lupoi, Jason S.; Healey, Adam; Singh, Seema; Sykes, Robert; Davis, Mark; Lee, David J.; Shepherd, Merv; Simmons, Blake A.; Henry, Robert J.

    2015-01-16

    High-throughput techniques are necessary to efficiently screen potential lignocellulosic feedstocks for the production of renewable fuels, chemicals, and bio-based materials, thereby reducing experimental time and expense while supplanting tedious, destructive methods. The ratio of lignin syringyl (S) to guaiacyl (G) monomers has been routinely quantified as a way to probe biomass recalcitrance. Mid-infrared and Raman spectroscopy have been demonstrated to produce robust partial least squares models for the prediction of lignin S/G ratios in a diverse group of Acacia and eucalypt trees. The most accurate Raman model has now been used to predict the S/G ratio from 269 unknown Acaciamore » and eucalypt feedstocks. This study demonstrates the application of a partial least squares model composed of Raman spectral data and lignin S/G ratios measured using pyrolysis/molecular beam mass spectrometry (pyMBMS) for the prediction of S/G ratios in an unknown data set. The predicted S/G ratios calculated by the model were averaged according to plant species, and the means were not found to differ from the pyMBMS ratios when evaluating the mean values of each method within the 95 % confidence interval. Pairwise comparisons within each data set were employed to assess statistical differences between each biomass species. While some pairwise appraisals failed to differentiate between species, Acacias, in both data sets, clearly display significant differences in their S/G composition which distinguish them from eucalypts. In conclusion, this research shows the power of using Raman spectroscopy to supplant tedious, destructive methods for the evaluation of the lignin S/G ratio of diverse plant biomass materials.« less

  8. Proceedings of 1999 U.S./Japan Workshop (99FT-05) On High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions for Next Fusion Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NYGREN,RICHARD E.; STAVROS,DIANA T.

    2000-06-01

    The 1999 US-Japan Workshop on High Heat Flux Components and Plasma Surface Interactions in Next Step Fusion Devices was held at the St. Francis Hotel in Santa Fe, New Mexico, on November 1-4, 1999. There were 42 presentations as well as discussion on technical issues and planning for future collaborations. The participants included 22 researchers from Japan and the United States as well as seven researchers from Europe and Russia. There have been important changes in the programs in both the US and Japan in the areas of plasma surface interactions and plasma facing components. The US has moved away from a strong focus on the ITER Project and has introduced new programs on use of liquid surfaces for plasma facing components, and operation of NSTX has begun. In Japan, the Large Helical Device began operation. This is the first large world-class confinement device operating in a magnetic configuration different than a tokamak. In selecting the presentations for this workshop, the organizers sought a balance between research in laboratory facilities or confinement devices related to plasma surface interactions and experimental research in the development of plasma facing components. In discussions about the workshop itself, the participants affirmed their preference for a setting where ''work-in-progress'' could be informally presented and discussed.

  9. Milestone Report - M4FT-15OR0312026 - Complete NO and NO2 aging of AgZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Patton, Kaara K.; Walker, Jr, Joseph Franklin; Jubin, Robert Thomas

    2015-03-31

    In an off-gas system within a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, any capture material will be exposed to a gas stream for months at a time. This gas stream may be at elevated temperature and could contain water, NOx gas, or a variety of other constituents that comprise the off-gas stream. For this reason, it is important to understand the effects of long-term exposure, or aging, on proposed capture materials. One material under consideration is silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ). The aim of this study was to determine the effect of extended exposure at 150C to an air stream containing NO on the iodine capture capacity of the hydrogen reduced form of AgZ designated as Ag0Z. The study was originally also intended to expand on the static NO2 aging studies by exposing Ag0Z to a flowing stream of NO2 for an extended period of time, but those tests were delayed due to NO2 production schedules by the gas vendor. Unreduced silver mordenite has a loading capacity of approximately 25 mg I/g AgZ and that capacity is increased to 100 mg I/g Ag0Z upon reduction. It appears that extended exposure of AgZ to 1% NO at 150C may not only neutralize the increased capacity gained by reduction, but perhaps degrade the sorbent even further. Loss of 80% of sorbent capacity and surface area was observed after 8 weeks of exposure to a 1% NO stream at 150C. Investigations continue into the effects of aging by off-gas components on iodine sorbents. Future work will age silver mordenite with streams containing NO2. As the simulated off-gas streams become more complex and more corrosive, the ability of AgZ to withstand conditions present in off-gas streams will be more fully known.

  10. Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

    2009-03-09

    n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for both primary reference fuels, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Additionally, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the aforementioned fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  11. FY-13 FCRD Milestone M3FT-13OR0202311 Weldability of ORNL Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Model Alloys For Thin Walled Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL; Yamamoto, Yukinori [ORNL

    2013-07-01

    Ferritic FeCrAl-based alloys show increased oxidation resistance for accident tolerant applications as fuel cladding. This study focuses on investigating the weldability of three model FeCrAl alloys with varying alloy compositions using laser-welding techniques. A detailed study of the mechanical properties of bead-on-plate welds was used to determine the quality of welds as a function of alloy composition. Laser welding resulted in defect free welds devoid of cracking or inclusions. Initial results indicate a reduction in the yield strength of weldments compared to the base material due to distinct changes in the microstructure within the fusion zone. Although a loss of yield strength was observed, there was no significant difference in the magnitude of the tensile property changes with varying Cr or Al content. Also, there was no evidence of embrittlement; the material in the fusion zones demonstrated ductile behavior with high local ductility.

  12. MT3FT-15OR0204122: Report on the acquisition and installation of FEI Talos F200X S/TEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Chad M.

    2015-09-01

    This document describes the installation, performance, and early results from the FCRD-funded acquisition of a new advanced analytical scanning / transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Low Activation Materials Development and Analysis (LAMDA) facility.

  13. Corrosion mechanisms for metal alloy waste forms: experiment and theory Level 4 Milestone M4FT-14LA0804024 Fuel Cycle Research & Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiang-Yang; Taylor, Christopher D.; Kim, Eunja; Goff, George Scott; Kolman, David Gary

    2014-07-31

    This document meets Level 4 Milestone: Corrosion mechanisms for metal alloy waste forms - experiment and theory. A multiphysics model is introduces that will provide the framework for the quantitative prediction of corrosion rates of metallic waste forms incorporating the fission product Tc. The model requires a knowledge of the properties of not only the metallic waste form, but also the passive oxide films that will be generated on the waste form, and the chemistry of the metal/oxide and oxide/environment interfaces. in collaboration with experimental work, the focus of this work is on obtaining these properties from fundamental atomistic models. herein we describe the overall multiphysics model, which is based on MacDonald's point-defect model for passivity. We then present the results of detailed electronic-structure calculations for the determination of the compatibility and properties of Tc when incorporated into intermetallic oxide phases. This work is relevant to the formation of multi-component oxides on metal surfaces that will incorporate Tc, and provide a kinetic barrier to corrosion (i.e. the release of Tc to the environment). Atomistic models that build upon the electronic structure calculations are then described using the modified embedded atom method to simulate metallic dissolution, and Buckingham potentials to perform classical molecular dynamics and statics simulations of the technetium (and, later, iron-technetium) oxide phases. Electrochemical methods were then applied to provide some benchmark information of the corrosion and electrochemical properties of Technetium metal. The results indicate that published information on Tc passivity is not complete and that further investigation is warranted.

  14. Recommended Practice: Defense-in-Depth

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    External Report # INL/EXT-06-11478 Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies May 2006 Prepared by Idaho National Laboratory Recommended Best Practice: Defense in Depth 2 Table of Contents Keywords............................................................................................................................. 3 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 3 Background

  15. Uterine caliper and depth gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Loyd L.; Wheeler, Robert G.; Fish, Thomas M.

    1977-01-01

    A uterine caliper and sound consisting of an elongated body having outwardly biased resilient caliper wings and a spring-loaded slidable cervical stop. A slide on the body is operatively connected to the wings by a monofilament and operates with respect to a first scale on the body as a width indicator. A rod extending longitudinally on the body is connected to the cervical stop and cooperates with a second scale on the body as a depth indicator. The instrument can be positioned to measure the distance from the outer cervical ostium to the fundus, as read on said second scale. The wings may be allowed to open by moving the slide, and when the wings engage the utero-tubal junctions, the width may be read on said first scale. By adjustment of the caliper wings the instrument may be retracted until the resistance of the inner ostium of the cervix is felt, enabling the length of the cervical canal to be read directly by the position of the longitudinal indicator rod with respect to said second scale. The instrument may be employed to measure the width of the uterine cavity at any position between the inner ostium of the cervix and the fundus.

  16. Soda Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Reservoir: 1219 m1.219 km 0.757 mi 3,999.344 ft 1,333.111 yd 1 Average Depth to Reservoir: 762 m0.762 km 0.473 mi 2,500 ft 833.331 yd Use the "Edit with Form" button at...

  17. Control of electrode depth in electroslag remelting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melgaard, David K.; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Damkroger, Brian K.

    2002-01-01

    A method of and apparatus for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace by driving the electrode at a nominal speed based upon melting rate and geometry while making minor proportional adjustments based on a measured metric of the electrode immersion depth. Electrode drive speed is increased if a measured metric of electrode immersion depth differs from a set point by a predetermined amount, indicating that the tip is too close to the surface of a slag pool. Impedance spikes are monitored to adjust the set point for the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon one or more properties of the impedance spikes.

  18. 100-F/IU Area ROD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area ROD Christopher Guzzetti US EPA Topics 15 waste sites with ICs for contamination at depth 1 waste site with IC for Irrigation MNA for Groundwater 15 ft HH GWSW 15...

  19. ARM - PI Product - Niamey Aerosol Optical Depths

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Optical Depths ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Niamey Aerosol Optical Depths MFRSR irradiance data collected during the ACRF AMF deployment in Niamey, Niger have been used to derive AOD for five wavelength channels of the MFRSR. These data have been corrected to adjust for filter drift over the course of the campaign and contamination due to forward scattering as a result of

  20. Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in ...

  1. Botas line repaired ahead of schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-01

    This paper reports on damaged sections of Botas' dual 30-in. gas line carrying USSR gas across the Marmara Sea to Turkey that were replaced 30 days ahead of contract schedule. Tefken Construction and Installation Co., Inc., Istanbul, working under a $4-million contract, replaced two sections on one of the dual lines near Ambarli, Turkey, within a two-month period. The offshore system stretches 33-mi under the Marmara Sea with some pipe laid at 262-ft maximum water depths. The scope of the project was to replace a 426-ft offshore approach to the northern shoreline and a 984-ft onshore section, which were damaged by a submarine landslide.

  2. Recent Gulf of Mexico pipeline activity reflects industry's recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1990-08-27

    Pipeline construction in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico has improved considerably in recent years, especially activity in shallow water (less than 300 ft). Construction for middle depths (300-600 ft) has been flat, while deepwater (600+ ft) projects have held firm or increased slightly. Overall pipeline mileage constructed in federal waters 1985-89 period showed a strengthening industry, especially during the 1988-89 period. These trends are evident from analyses of 5-year data. The author tracks comparisons between applications that were approved by the MMS during this period and projects that have been reported to the MMS as completed.

  3. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM ...

  4. Milestone Report - M4FT-15OR03120218 - A Literature Search on the Effects of the Decay of 85Kr to 85Rb on Long-term Storage Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, Stephanie H.; Strachan, Denis M.; Jubin, Robert Thomas; Spencer, Barry B.

    2015-10-01

    Reprocessing of UNF that has been out of the reactor for less than about 50 y requires the removal of 85Kr from the process off-gas streams. This is needed despite the relatively small amount of that isotope in the combined Xe and Kr inventory (Table 1). The decay of 85Kr to 85Rb presents challenges to the materials that will potentially be used to remove and store the Kr recovered from the off-gas. To address some of these problems, a thorough literature survey was completed, and the results of that analysis are summarized in this document.

  5. Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

    2013-11-13

    4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the worlds first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STARs spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

  6. Ground penetrating radar surveys over an alluvial DNAPL site, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, P.J. |; Doll, W.E.; Phillips, B.E.

    1994-09-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were used to map shallow sands and gravels which are DNAPL migration pathways at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant in western Kentucky. The sands and gravels occur as paleochannel deposits, at depths of 17-25 ft, embedded in Pleistocene lacustrine clays. More than 30 GPR profiles were completed over the Drop Test Area (DTA) to map the top and base of the paleochannel deposits, and to assess their lateral continuity. A bistatic radar system was used with antenna frequencies of 25 and 50 MHz. An average velocity of 0.25 ft/ns for silty and clayey materials above the paleochannel deposits was established from radar walkaway tests, profiles over culverts of known depth, and comparison of radar sections with borings. In the south portion of the DTA, strong reflections corresponded to the water table at approximately 9-10 ft, the top of the paleochannel deposits at approximately 18 ft, and to gravel horizons within these deposits. The base of these deposits was not visible on the radar sections. Depth estimates for the top of the paleochannel deposits (from 50 records) were accurate to within 2 ft across the southern portion of the DTA. Continuity of these sands and gravels could not be assessed due to interference from air-wave reflections and lateral changes in signal penetration depth. However, the sands and gravels appear to extend across the entire southern portion of the DTA, at depths as shallow as 17 ft. Ringing, air-wave reflections and diffractions from powerlines, vehicles, well casings, and metal equipment severly degraded GPR profiles in the northern portion of the DTA; depths computed from reflection times (where visible) were accurate to within 4 ft in this area. The paleochannel deposits are deeper to the north and northeast where DNAPL has apparently pooled (DNAPL was not directly imaged by the GPR, however). Existing hydrogeological models of the DTA will be revised.

  7. Ms. Maria Galanti Site Coordinator

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... in the Engineering EvaluationCost Analysis for the X-633 Recirculating Cooling Water Complex at the ... wet well, which remains in place, is 98 ft by 57 ft by 26 ft deep. ...

  8. Property:Cost(per day) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Contact POC + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Contact POC + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Contact...

  9. Method and apparatus of prefetching streams of varying prefetch depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan; Ohmacht, Martin; Salapura, Valentina; Sugavanam, Krishnan; Hoenicke, Dirk

    2012-01-24

    Method and apparatus of prefetching streams of varying prefetch depth dynamically changes the depth of prefetching so that the number of multiple streams as well as the hit rate of a single stream are optimized. The method and apparatus in one aspect monitor a plurality of load requests from a processing unit for data in a prefetch buffer, determine an access pattern associated with the plurality of load requests and adjust a prefetch depth according to the access pattern.

  10. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling Advanced Technology ...

  11. Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bouguer gravity anomalies, depth to bedrock, and shallow temperature in the Humboldt House geothermal area, Pershing County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  12. A Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar Lo, Chaomei Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Comstock, Jennifer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory...

  13. Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  14. Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in ... strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a ...

  15. Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Feet per Well) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes...

  16. Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

    2011-05-10

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

  17. Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report | Department of Energy Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report DOE 2010 Geothermal

  18. Electrode immersion depth determination and control in electroslag remelting furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Melgaard, David K.; Beaman, Joseph J.; Shelmidine, Gregory J.

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus and method for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace comprising adjusting electrode drive speed by an amount proportional to a difference between a metric of electrode immersion and a set point, monitoring impedance or voltage, and calculating the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon a predetermined characterization of electrode immersion depth as a function of impedance or voltage.

  19. Energy Incentive Programs, Illinois | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    steam trap repairs and pipe insulation repairreplacement. 200-600 incentives are available for steam trap repairs and between 8ft and 20ft for pipe insulation repair...

  20. Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Home Page Home > Commercial Buildings Home > Sq Ft Tables > Table 2a. Electricity Consumption per Sq Ft Table 2a. Electricity Consumption and Electricity...

  1. Tampa Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State Florida Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audits and CFLs: Free Insulation (Ceiling): 0.255sq. ft. Insulation (Wall): 0.40sq. ft. Insulation...

  2. Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

  3. Heat Flow At Standard Depth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Heat Flow At Standard Depth Abstract Secular and long-term periodic changes in surface...

  4. Confocal volume in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maruyama, Yutaka; Kanematsu, Wataru

    2011-11-15

    To clarify the degradation of confocality in laser Raman microscopy depth profiling (optical sectioning) and the influence of pinhole filtering on it, we investigate the confocal volume in detail based on Gaussian beam optics and scalar wave optics. Theoretical depth profiles of a homogeneous transparent sample for four different pinhole sizes, which are computed using the measured incident beam waist radius w{sub 0} and only a few optical system specific parameters such as a numerical aperture (NA) and a focal length, show a good agreement with the corresponding measured depth profiles. The computed confocal volume demonstrates that the pinhole size affects the actual probe depth as well as the axial resolution and the total intensity loss.

  5. Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koontz, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, J; Flynn, C; Michalsky, J

    2013-03-17

    This document describes the process applied to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from multifilter rotating shadowband radiometers (MFRSR) and normal incidence multifilter radiometers (NIMFR) operated at the ARM Climate Research Facility’s ground-based facilities.

  6. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  7. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM Fed) has long been one of the Nation's principal sources of proved reserves. At the end of 2009, the GOM Fed accounted for close to one-fifth of oil proved reserves (second only to Texas) and just over four percent of natural gas proved reserves (the country's seventh largest reporting region). 1 Natural gas proved reserves

  8. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; Vladimir Romanovsky; William Cable

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  9. Continuous Snow Depth, Intensive Site 1, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman; Vladimir Romanovsky; William Cable

    2014-11-06

    Continuous Snow depth data are being collected at several points within four intensive study areas in Barrow, Alaska. These data are being collected to better understand the energy dynamics above the active layer and permafrost. They complement in-situ snow and soil measurements at this location. The data could also be used as supporting measurements for other research and modeling activities.

  10. Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon vss031_rask_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking - Level 2 (in-depth) Data Collection for Improved Cold Temperature Thermal Modeling Advanced Technology Vehicle Benchmark and Assessment

  11. Acoustic Camera Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Approach and Fate at Surface Flow Outlets of Two Hydropower Dams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Serkowski, John A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Hedgepeth, J.; Skalski, John R.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Klatte, Bernard A.

    2006-08-04

    The objective of this study was to estimate and compare fate probabilities for juvenile salmon approaching two surface flow outlets (SFOs) to identify effective design characteristics. The SFOs differed principally in forebay location, depth, discharge, and water velocity over a sharp-crested weir. Both outlets were about 20 ft wide. The 22-ft deep Bonneville Powerhouse 2 Corner Collector (B2CC) was located in the southwest corner of the forebay and passed 5,000 ft3/s of water at normal-pool elevation. In contrast, The Dalles Dam ice and trash sluiceway outlet above Main Unit 1-3 (TDITC) was not located in a forebay corner, was only 7-ft deep, and discharged about 933 ft3/s at normal-pool elevation. The linear velocity of water over the weir was about 15 ft/s at the B2CC and 5 ft/s at the TDITC. We used a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) to record movements of fish within about 65 ft of the B2CC and within 35 ft of the TDITC. We actively tracked fish by manually adjusting pan and tilt rotator angles to keep targets in view. Contrary to expectations, active tracking did not provide a predominance of long tracks that clearly indicated fish fate because most tracks were incomplete. Active tracking did increase error in fish-position estimation, which complicated data processing, so we plan to sample multiple fixed zones in the future. The probability of fish entering each SFO was estimated by a Markov chain analysis, which did not require complete fish tracks. At the B2CC, we tracked 7,943 juvenile salmonids and most of them entered the B2CC. Fish moving south 40 to 60 ft upstream of the dam face were more likely to enter the eddy at the south end of the powerhouse than to enter the B2CC. At the TDITC, we tracked 2,821 smolts. Fish movement was complex with active swimming toward and away from the entrance. The high entrance probability zone (EPZ), where over 90% of tracked fish entered the SFO, extended 32 ft out at the B2CC and only 8 ft out at the TDITC. Greater discharge at the B2CC pushed the entrainment zone (EZ - where flow exceeded 7 ft/s) upstream from the entrance so that fish were entrained before they began to struggle against the flow. The high EPZ also was extended by flow along the powerhouse face at both sites, but more at the B2CC (about 450 ft) than at the TDITC (about 50 ft). Fish entering the large south eddy that circulated past the B2CC entrance were provided multiple opportunities to discover and enter. In contrast, fish moving past the sampled TDITC entrance either entered adjacent sluiceway openings or moved west to the spillway because there was no eddy to provide additional opportunities. Information from our study should be useful to fisheries managers and engineers seeking to transfer SFO technologies from one site to another. There are two important components to designing SFOs, the location within the forebay to take advantage of forebay circulation and specific entrance characteristics such as discharge and depth which affect the size and shape of the EZ and the high EPZ. Providing SFOs with an EZ extending upstream of structure could reduce entrance rejection, decrease forebay residence time and risk of predation, and increase passage of schools of smolts.

  12. Pipelines following exploration in deeper Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1988-07-04

    Gulf of Mexico pipeline construction has been falling of sharply to shallow-water (less than 300 ft) areas, while construction for middle depth (300 - 600 ft) and deepwater (600 + ft) areas as been holding steady. These trends are evident from analyses of 5-year data compiled by the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) Minerals Management Service (MMS). This article continues a series of updates based on MMS gulf pipeline data (OGJ, June 8, 1987, p. 50). These installments track construction patterns in water depths, diameter classifications, and mileage. The figures are also evaluated in terms of pipeline-construction cost data published in Oil and Gas Journal's annual Pipeline Economics Reports.

  13. Gulf of Mexico pipelines heading into deeper waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1987-06-08

    Pipeline construction for Gulf of Mexico federal waters is following drilling and production operations into deeper waters, according to U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) Minerals Management Service (MMS) records. Review of MMS 5-year data for three water depth categories (0-300 ft, 300-600 ft, and deeper than 600 ft) reveals this trend in Gulf of Mexico pipeline construction. Comparisons are shown between pipeline construction applications that were approved by the MMS during this period and projects that have been reported to the MMS as completed. This article is the first of annual updates of MMS gulf pipeline data. Future installments will track construction patterns in water depths, diameter classifications, and mileage. These figures will also be evaluated in terms of pipeline-construction cost data.

  14. RFID tag modification for full depth backscatter modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jeffrey Wayne [Pasco, WA; Pratt, Richard M [Richland, WA

    2010-07-20

    A modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device includes a diode detector configured to selectively modulate a reply signal onto an incoming continuous wave; communications circuitry configured to provide a modulation control signal to the diode detector, the diode detector being configured to modulate the reply signal in response to be modulation control signal; and circuitry configured to increase impedance change at the diode detector which would otherwise not occur because the diode detector rectifies the incoming continuous wave while modulating the reply signal, whereby reducing the rectified signal increases modulation depth by removing the reverse bias effects on impedance changes. Methods of improving depth of modulation in a modulated backscatter radio frequency identification device are also provided.

  15. Measurement of 3H in soil cores from the Hyrax Event (U3bh) subsidence crater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreek, S.; Hudson, G.B.; Ruth, M.

    1996-07-01

    Core samples were collected from two boreholes drilled in the subsidence crater of the Hyrax event (U3bh). The moisture in the core samples was extracted via freeze drying and tritiw-n was measured in the extracted moisture via `He accumulation mass spectrometry or liquid scintillation counting. Elevated tritium concentrations (IE4 - IE6 pCi/L extracted moisture as of the time of measurement) were observed in the extracted moisture from virtually all of the core samples with significant increases beginning at about 30 ft depth. No longer-lived fission products (144 Ce) or activation products (`OCo, `Eu, 114 En) were observed by gamma-ray spectroscopy in a subset of the core samples. This likely indicates that a catastrophic failure of containment (if it occurred) did not release significant radioactivities to this shallow depth (30 ft). The presence of `Cs at much greater depths (@210 ft, 64 m) may indicate that gaseous and/or vapor products were released shortly after the Hyrax event to a depth of about 210 ft. The relatively shallow depth where the elevated tritium is observed makes highly improbable any significant linkage between the elevated tritium concentrations and a Hyrax event containment failure. This may indicate that an additional source of enriched `H was introduced at this site.

  16. Identification Of Rippability And Bedrock Depth Using Seismic Refraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ismail, Nur Azwin; Saad, Rosli; Nawawi, M. N. M; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; El Hidayah Ismail, Noer; Mohamad, Edy Tonizam

    2010-12-23

    Spatial variability of the bedrock with reference to the ground surface is vital for many applications in geotechnical engineering to decide the type of foundation of a structure. A study was done within the development area of Mutiara Damansara utilising the seismic refraction method using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph. The geological features of the subsurface were investigated and velocities, depth to the underlying layers were determined. The seismic velocities were correlated with rippability characteristics and borehole records. Seismic sections generally show a three layer case. The first layer with velocity 400-600 m/s predominantly consists of soil mix with gravel. The second layer with velocity 1600-2000 m/s is suggested to be saturated and weathered area. Both layers forms an overburden and generally rippable. The third layer represents granite bedrock with average depth and velocity 10-30 m and >3000 m/s respectively and it is non-rippable. Steep slope on the bedrock are probably the results of shear zones.

  17. Campbell penetration depth in Fe-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prommapan, Plegchart

    2011-08-15

    A 'true' critical current density, j{sub c}, as opposite to commonly measured relaxed persistent (Bean) current, j{sub B}, was extracted from the Campbell penetration depth, {lambda}{sub c}(T,H) measured in single crystals of LiFeAs, and optimally electron-doped Ba(Fe{sub 0.954}Ni{sub 0.046}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (FeNi122). In LiFeAs, the effective pinning potential is nonparabolic, which follows from the magnetic field - dependent Labusch parameter {alpha}. At the equilibrium (upon field - cooling), {alpha}(H) is non-monotonic, but it is monotonic at a finite gradient of the vortex density. This behavior leads to a faster magnetic relaxation at the lower fields and provides a natural dynamic explanation for the fishtail (second peak) effect. We also find the evidence for strong pinning at the lower fields.The inferred field dependence of the pinning potential is consistent with the evolution from strong pinning, through collective pinning, and eventually to a disordered vortex lattice. The value of j{sub c}(2 K) {approx_equal} 1.22 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} provide an upper estimate of the current carrying capability of LiFeAs. Overall, vortex behavior of almost isotropic, fully-gapped LiFeAs is very similar to highly anisotropic d-wave cuprate superconductors, the similarity that requires further studies in order to understand unconventional superconductivity in cuprates and pnictides. In addition to LiFeAs, we also report the magnetic penetration depth in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} based superconductors including irradiation of FeNi122. In unirradiated FeNi122, the maximum critical current value is, j{sub c}(2K) {approx_equal} 3.3 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. The magnetic-dependent feature was observed near the transition temperature in FeTe{sub 0.53}Se{sub 0.47} and irradiated FeNi122. Because of this feature, further studies are required in order to properly calibrate the Campbell penetration depth. Finally, we detected the crossing between the magnetic penetration depth and London penetration depth in optimally hold-doped Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (BaK122) and isovalent doped BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 0.7}P{sub 0.3}){sub 2} (BaP122). These phenomena probably coincide with anomalous Meissner effect reported in pnicitde superconductors [Prozorov et al. (2010b)] however more studies are needed in order to clarify this.

  18. Installation of the Monitoring Site at the Los Alamos Canyon Low-Head Weir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.J.Stone; D.L.Newell

    2002-08-01

    The Cerro Grande fire of 2000 had an enormously adverse impact on and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Immediately there were concerns about the potential for enhanced runoff/offsite transport of contaminant-laden sediments because of watershed damage. In response to this concern, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers installed a low-head weir in Los Alamos Canyon near the White Rock ''Y.'' However, the occurrence of fractured basalt at the surface and ponding of runoff behind the weir enhance the possibility of downward migration of contaminants. Therefore, three boreholes were drilled on the south bank of the channel by LANL to provide a means of monitoring the impact of the Cerro Grande fire and of the weir on water quality beneath the canyon. The boreholes and associated instrumentation are referred to as the Los Alamos Weir Site (LAWS). The three boreholes include a vertical hole and two angled holes (one at approximately 45{sup o} and one at approximately 30{sup o}). Since the basalt is highly fractured, the holes would not stay open. Plans called for inserting flexible liners into all holes. However, using liners in such unstable ground was problematic and, in the angled holes, required deployment through scalloped or perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shield. The vertical hole (LAWS-01), drilled to a total depth of 281.5 ft below ground surface (bgs), was completed as a 278-ft deep monitoring well with four screens: one targeting shallow perched water encountered at 80 ft, two in what may correspond to the upper perched zone at regional groundwater characterization well R-9i (1/4 mi. to the west), and one in what may correspond to the lower perched zone at R-9i. A Water FLUTe{trademark} system deployed in the well isolates the screened intervals; associated transducers and sampling ports permit monitoring head and water quality in the screened intervals. The second hole (LAWS-02), drilled at an angle of 43{sup o} from horizontal, is 156 ft long and bottoms at a depth of 106 ft bgs. The shallow perched water seen at LAWS-01 (at 80 ft) was not encountered. A scalloped PVC shield was installed to keep the hole open while permitting flexible liners to contact the borehole wall. It was initially instrumented with a color-reactive liner to locate water-producing fractures. That was later replaced by an absorbent liner to collect water from the vadose zone. The third hole (LAWS-03), drilled at an angle of 34{sup o} from horizontal, initially had a length of 136 ft and bottomed at a depth of 76 ft bgs. However, the PVC shield rotated during installation such that scallops were at the top and rock debris repeatedly fell in, preventing liner insertion. While pulling the scalloped PVC to replace it with a perforated PVC shield that did not require orientation, the scalloped PVC broke and only 85 ft was recovered. The hole was blocked at that position and could not be drilled out with the equipment available. Thus, LAWS-03 was completed at a length of 85 ft and a depth of 40 ft bgs. An absorbent liner was installed at the outset in preparation for the 2002 summer monsoon season. The entire monitoring site is enclosed inside a locked, 8-ft-high chainlink fence for security. The liners used in the angled boreholes carry electrical wire pairs to detect soil-moisture changes. Surface-water data are provided by stream gages above and below the weir site. Depth of ponding behind the weir is provided by a gage installed just behind the structure.

  19. Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    UC-1-P-1SRC Data This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Well Completion Report for CAU 443 CNTA December 2009 Doc. No. S05827 Page D-1 Table D-1. UC-1-P-1SRC Chronology Date Time Depth (ft bgs) Activity 05/23/09 13:30 - 18:30 NA Position workover rig over the hole and pulled out about 50 ft of 4.5-in. casing. A steel die fell into hole and indications were that casing had separated during initial pulling. 05/24/09 06:00 - 09:00 NA Workover rig moves off the hole after

  20. LMS-AMC-S01980-0-0.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Historic Borehole Data Amchitka, Alaska, LTS&M Plan U.S. Department of Energy Doc. No. S0198000 Rev. 0 Page J-2 Rev. Date: September 17, 2008 This page intentionally left blank Table J-1. Historic Borehole Data Type Borehole Name Depth (ft) Status Northing (1) (meters) Easting (1) (meters) Ground Elevation (ft) Comments References Drill Site "A" - No drilling occurred at this site Millow - Drill Site "B" - Total 3 Boreholes Emplacement Hole UA-2 4,030 Abandoned September

  1. Microsoft Word - S09799_EnhancedMR.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Water Level Data This page intentionally left blank REPORT DATE: 3/7/2013 2:09 pm LOCATION CODE TOP OF CASING ELEVATION (FT) MEASUREMENT DATE TIME WATER ELEVATION (FT) FLOW CODE DEPTH FROM TOP OF CASING (FT) STATIC WATER LEVELS (USEE700) FOR SITE RVT01, Riverton Processing Site WATER LEVEL FLAG 0101 9.92 O 10:11 06/12/2012 4946.58 4936.66 10.70 10:27 12/04/2012 4946.58 4935.88 0110 12.35 O 09:48 06/12/2012 4950.19 4932.00 14.20 10:25 12/04/2012 4950.19 4935.99 0111 9.05 O 09:59 06/12/2012

  2. RADIOLOGICAL DATA FOR ALARA PLANNING PURPOSES Rev. 1 Contact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RADIOLOGICAL DATA FOR ALARA PLANNING PURPOSES Rev. 1 Contact 1 ft 3 ft 10 ft 25 ft 50 ft 125 ft 100 mR/hr line 5 mR/hr line (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (R/hr) (feet) (feet) Outside of Cask (max) *Unshielded Liner (max) Top of *Unshielded Liner after the cask lid is removed *Unshielded Liner Inside of Cask/Lid Outside of Cask Lifting rig or any other support equipment Does the cask have fixed contamination that may "leach out" during transport (Yes/No)? If yes, please list

  3. Los Alamos Drills to Record-breaking Depths | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Drills to Record-breaking Depths Los Alamos Drills to Record-breaking Depths November 26, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers reached a record-breaking depth of 1,100 feet with a sonic drill rig. Workers reached a record-breaking depth of 1,100 feet with a sonic drill rig. LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - The EM-supported Environmental Programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory is pushing the limits of drilling technology with the use of a sonic drill rig to drill coreholes more than 1,100 feet deep in support of

  4. Borehole completion data package for SWL facility wells 699-22-35 and 699-23-34B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodges, F.N.

    1997-09-01

    Two groundwater monitoring wells were drilled at the Hanford Solid Waste Landfill in 1993 and 1994 in support of the WAC 173-304 groundwater monitoring program at that size. The wells, 699-22-35 and 699-23-34B, were constructed in accordance with the requirements of WAC 173-160. However, a waver was received from the Washington State Department of Ecology to complete the wells with 10.7-m (35-ft) screens to allow for the expected drop in the water table in the vicinity of the landfill. The wells, drilled with an ODEX air rotary drilling rig, were completed at depths of 54.8 m (180 ft) and 49.8 m (163.5 ft), respectively, and were completed with 4-in. stainless steel casing and continuous-wrap wire screen with a sand pack of 20-40 mesh silica sand. The wells were developed and equipped with Hydrostar sampling pumps. Sampling with the SEAMIST membrane system during drilling indicated significant quantities of carbon tetrachloride vapor to depths of at least 35.6 m (120 ft) within the vadose zone.

  5. DEPTH-CHARGE static and time-dependent perturbation/sensitivity system for nuclear reactor core analysis. Revision I. [DEPTH-CHARGE code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J.R.

    1985-04-01

    This report provides the background theory, user input, and sample problems required for the efficient application of the DEPTH-CHARGE system - a code black for both static and time-dependent perturbation theory and data sensitivity analyses. The DEPTH-CHARGE system is of modular construction and has been implemented within the VENTURE-BURNER computational system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The DEPTH module (coupled with VENTURE) solves for the three adjoint functions of Depletion Perturbation Theory and calculates the desired time-dependent derivatives of the response with respect to the nuclide concentrations and nuclear data utilized in the reference model. The CHARGE code is a collection of utility routines for general data manipulation and input preparation and considerably extends the usefulness of the system through the automatic generation of adjoint sources, estimated perturbed responses, and relative data sensitivity coefficients. Combined, the DEPTH-CHARGE system provides, for the first time, a complete generalized first-order perturbation/sensitivity theory capability for both static and time-dependent analyses of realistic multidimensional reactor models. This current documentation incorporates minor revisions to the original DEPTH-CHARGE documentation (ORNL/CSD-78) to reflect some new capabilities within the individual codes.

  6. Two weight system for measuring depth and sediment in slurry-supported excavations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deming, P.; Good, D.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a two weight system using bar and flat shaped weights for measuring depth and detecting sediment at the bottom of slurry-supported excavations. Currently there are no standard depth measurement weights or methods for reliably identifying bottom sediment. Two weights and a procedural system for using the weights is described. Details suitable for manufacture are provided.

  7. Using the depth-velocity-size diagram to interpret equilibrium bed configurations in river flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southard, J.B. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Data from flume studies that report equilibrium bed configuration as well as water temperature, flow depth, flow velocity, and sediment size were used to develop the best approximation to the relationships among the various bed phases (ripples, dunes, lower regime plane bed, upper regime plane bed, and antidunes) in a three-axis graph (depth-velocity-size diagram) with dimensionless measures of mean flow depth, mean flow velocity, and sediment size along the axis. Relationships are shown in a series of depth-velocity and velocity-size sections through the diagram. Boundaries between bed-phase stability fields are drawn as surfaces that minimize, misplacement of data points. A large subset of the data, for which reliable values of bed shear stress are reported, was also used to represent the stability relationships in a graph of dimensionless boundary shear stress against dimensionless sediment size, but with results less useful for fluvial flow interpretation. The diagram covers about one order of magnitude in flow depth. To be useful for river flows, the diagram must be extrapolated in flow depth by about one more order of magnitude, but this is not a serious problem for approximate work. The depth-velocity-size diagram permits prediction of equilibrium bed configuration in river flows when the approximate flow depth and mean flow velocity are known. Because the diagram is essentially dimensionless, the effect of water temperature (via the fluid viscosity) on the bed configuration is easily accounted for by use of the diagram.

  8. Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

    1984-06-27

    The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

  9. NREL: Wind Research - Small and Distributed Wind Turbine Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility (SWiFT): SWiFT carries out studies to improve the efficiency of wind farms in areas including wake energy loss, wake-induced loads, advanced rotor development,...

  10. National Grid (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    25 Pipe Insulation Space heating: 0.75 per ft fiberglass, 40.50 per ft per foam Summary National Grid's High Efficiency Heating Rebates are offered to residential gas heating...

  11. National Grid (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    50 Others Pipe Insulation: 0.75 per ft (fiberglass), 0.50 per ft (foam) Summary National Grid's High Efficiency Heating Rebates are offered to gas heating customers in...

  12. Sandia Corporate Overview - Core group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subsystem EtherCAT up to 1000 Hz All DAQ signals available for control Running on NI ... rotor preparation 1,000 sq. ft. machine shop Outline What is the SWiFT Facility? ...

  13. Opportunities for the Early Production of Fischer-Tropsch (F...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for the Early Production of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels in the U.S. -- An Overview Opportunities for the Early Production of Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels in the U.S. -- An Overview...

  14. A WSRC-MS-g8-00318 Heat Transfer Model of Above and Underground...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    location at the start of interval (ft) Xe fluid location at the end of interval (ft) wind wind velocity (mph) BASIC EQUATIONS (1) inner surface area of heat transfer for pipes...

  15. Microsoft Word - Gas Order Form.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IND., R20 NITROGEN, IND., 90 CU FT NITROGEN, IND., 220 CU FT NITROGEN, UHP, 5.0, SIZE 200 NITROGEN, PREPURIFIED 4.8 SIZE 200 NITROUS OXIDE, 64, SIZE 200 ...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - Conf 10 PPT Template

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Grid Computing Small Businesses Leading the Way to Recovery and Reinvestment Page 7 Marie V. McDemmond Applied Research Center (RISE) 135 000 ft f *135,000 sq. ft. of research...

  17. Wharf site.sdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SACR ANT Cement Pad ECOR 75 Ft from water edge 10 ft from low wall Front of container ANT van not on cement pad 245 mtr PWR DROP in red, 245 meters from west lot line

  18. Thermal Characteristics of the Chena Hot Springs Alaska Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    zone isabout 2000 ft long and 300 ft wide. The system islocated at the edge of a granitic body where deepcirculating geothermal waters reach the surface byway of fractures along...

  19. Kansas Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 4 12 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 132 236 283 277 486 764 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 128 235 244 218 314 489...

  20. Pacific Power - Home Energy Savings Program For Builders | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0.75 - 1sq. ft. Attic Insulation: 0.05sq.ft. Central Air Conditioning: 275 Heat Pump Water Heater: 250 Summary Pacific Power provides an incentive for home builders in...

  1. Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas) - Business Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Food Service Equipment: Varies widely Drain water heat transfer system: 400 Outdoor Swimming Pool Cover: 0.50sq.ft. Outdoor SpaHot Tub Cover: 7sq.ft. Steam Trap: 100 Duct...

  2. Property:Available Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure...

  3. Suitland Federal Center, Suitland, Maryland | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    east of Washington, D.C., installed a photovoltaic (PV) system that was as part of ... A total of almost 2,300 linear ft. of photovoltaic array structure, divided into 80-ft. ...

  4. IID Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0.30sq ft Electric Attic Fan: 75 Solar Attic Fan: 125 Refrigerator: 75unit Room Air Conditioner: 100unit Dual Pane Windows: 2.00sq ft Variable Speed Pool Pumps:...

  5. New moves cut costs at Kayenta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.

    1984-07-01

    Peabody Coal Co's plans for its Kayenta Mine in Arizona are outlined. These include a 20,000 ton capacity, dome-covered reinforced earth storage area. The storage area is 80 ft deep with a diameter at the top of 160 ft, and the dome is 70 ft high and 185 ft in diameter. Coal is crushed to -2 in. and fed to the storage area at a rate of 2600 ton/h.

  6. Depth Profiling of SiC Lattice Damage Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Depth Profiling of SiC Lattice Damage Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Depth Profiling of SiC Lattice Damage Using Micro-Raman Spectroscopy Depth profiling for the amount of lattice damage using a Confocal Micro-Raman (CMR) spectrometer is demonstrated in this paper. Samples of n-type silicon carbide were implanted with 2 MeV He and O ions at both room temperature and 500 C, and fluences between 10{sup 15} and 10{sup 17}

  7. ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Documentation Use the Data File Inventory tool to view data availability at the file level. Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) The MPLCOD VAP retrieves the column cloud visible optical depth using LIDAR derived backscatter from the MPLNOR (Micro Pulse Lidar Normalized Backscatter) and

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Technology Vehicle Lab Benchmarking- Level 2 (in-depth)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about level 2 (in-depth...

  9. Depth-dependent ordering, two-length-scale phenomena, and crossover...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    behavior in a crystal featuring a skin layer with defects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Depth-dependent ordering, two-length-scale phenomena, and crossover behavior ...

  10. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Mishra, X. Zhang, K. Chesnel, J.B. Kortright, S.K. Sinha, and I.K. Schuller,, "Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange Bias System," Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 047201...

  11. Method of varying a physical property of a material through its depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniel, Claus

    2015-04-21

    A method is disclosed for varying a mechanical property of a material at two depths. The method involves the application of at least two laser pulses of different durations. The method involves a determination of the density of the material from the surface to each depth, a determination of the heat capacity of the material from the surface to each depth, and a determination of the thermal conductivity of the material from the surface to each depth. Each laser pulse may affect the density, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity of the material, so it may be necessary to re-evaluate those parameters after each laser pulse and prior to the next pulse. The method may be applied to implantation materials to improve osteoblast and osteoclast activity.

  12. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  13. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory and Developmental...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  14. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  15. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled ...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  16. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  17. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  18. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled ...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  19. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  20. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  1. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0...

  2. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled ...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  3. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  4. Virginia Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 0 0 0 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 839 67 800 697 471 806 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 839 67 800 697 471 806 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 0 0 0 0

  5. Alabama Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 1 2 2 15 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 1 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 126 162 102 40 73 36 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 126 162 101 38 71 26 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 1 2 2 1

  6. Michigan Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6 0 0 0 4 3 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 8 4 4 5 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 556 314 147 95 63 49 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 535 311 146 95 48 34 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 21 3 1 0 15 1

  7. Miscellaneous Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7 5 7 12 9 6 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 102 62 120 92 48 42 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 102 62 120 89 48 42 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 0 3 0 0

  8. Mississippi Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    117 94 90 82 73 85 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 1 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 257 207 220 127 143 204 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 255 207 219 127 143 200 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 2 0 1 0 0 4

  9. Montana Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 74 59 95 104 155 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 1 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 127 146 81 124 80 125 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 104 91 50 48 30 29 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 23 55 31 76 50 9

  10. TX, RRC District 3 Onshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    26 37 19 118 163 189 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 14 15 14 25 13 19 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 798 879 714 671 735 709 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 685 739 627 556 502 527 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 113 140 87 115 233 182

  11. TX, RRC District 7B Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 8 13 19 12 16 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 1 0 0 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 737 897 890 857 629 464 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 714 890 878 840 617 407 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 23 7 12 17 12 5

  12. TX, RRC District 8A Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    413 418 419 433 367 361 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 6 11 5 6 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 376 369 360 336 309 258 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 2 1 1 1 1 1 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 374 368 359 335 308 25

  13. TX, State Offshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 0 1 0 0 0 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 2 0 1 0 1 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 61 29 29 24 15 10 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 59 29 25 22 13 10 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 2 0 4 2 2 0

  14. CA, Coastal Region Onshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    51 199 248 293 280 281 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 22 35 20 242 123 225 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 1 0 0 0 0 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 22 34 20 242 123 225

  15. CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    29 66 69 55 60 45 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 12 21 23 16 16 11 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 12 21 23 16 16 11

  16. CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    146 210 163 226 214 216 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 401 359 319 81 96 55 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 311 253 265 36 61 37 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 90 106 54 45 35 18

  17. CA, State Offshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    46 47 62 53 52 46 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 2 1 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 25 26 33 21 13 12 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 3 0 2 1 0 0 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 22 26 31 20 13 12

  18. California Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    272 522 542 627 606 588 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 2 1 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 460 441 395 360 248 303 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 314 254 267 37 61 37 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 146 187 128 323 187 266

  19. Federal Offshore, Pacific (California) Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    12 13 13 25 17 18 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 2 2 2 2 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 36 35 42 46 16 14 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 2 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 34 35 42 46 16 14

  20. Florida Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 2 4 3 9 6 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 4 0 14 0 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 4 0 14 0 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 0 0 0 0

  1. Illinois Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 15 0 0 0 0 1996-2005 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2004 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 1 1 0 0 0 1996-2004 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2004 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 1 1

  2. Indiana Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2005 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2004 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 2 6 0 0 0 1996-2004 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 2 6 0 0 0 1996-2004 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0

  3. Kentucky Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 0 0 1 0 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 149 106 75 6 3 6 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 149 106 75 6 3 6 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 0 0 0 0

  4. LA, State Offshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    12 9 19 13 16 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 6 4 2 3 1 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 284 209 70 98 91 44 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 143 177 57 62 74 28 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 141 32 13 36 17 16

  5. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent

  6. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent

  7. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent

  8. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent

  9. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent

  10. Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print Wednesday, 25 January 2006 00:00 The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used

  11. Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MISR, and MODIS Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, MISR, and MODIS Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Joint histograms of Cloud Top Height (CTH) and Optical Depth (OD) derived by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are being widely used by the climate modeling community in evaluating global climate models. Similar joint histograms

  12. Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in Low Level Waste Disposal | Department of Energy Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Defense-in-Depth, How Department of Energy Implements Radiation Protection in Low Level Waste Disposal Linda Suttora*, U.S. Department of Energy ; Andrew Wallo, U.S. Department of Energy Abstract: The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has adopted an integrated protection system for the safety of radioactive waste disposal similar to

  13. Measurement of sound speed vs. depth in South Pole ice: pressure waves and shear waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Klein, Spencer

    2009-06-04

    We have measured the speed of both pressure waves and shear waves as a function of depth between 80 and 500 m depth in South Pole ice with better than 1% precision. The measurements were made using the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS), an array of transmitters and sensors deployed in the ice at the South Pole in order to measure the acoustic properties relevant to acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos. The transmitters and sensors use piezoceramics operating at {approx}5-25 kHz. Between 200 m and 500 m depth, the measured profile is consistent with zero variation of the sound speed with depth, resulting in zero refraction, for both pressure and shear waves. We also performed a complementary study featuring an explosive signal propagating vertically from 50 to 2250 m depth, from which we determined a value for the pressure wave speed consistent with that determined for shallower depths, higher frequencies, and horizontal propagation with the SPATS sensors. The sound speed profile presented here can be used to achieve good acoustic source position and emission time reconstruction in general, and neutrino direction and energy reconstruction in particular. The reconstructed quantities could also help separate neutrino signals from background.

  14. Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

    2003-01-01

    A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

  15. Phase 2 drilling operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51--20)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

    1992-06-01

    This report describes the second drilling phase, completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991, of the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. The well in Long Valley Caldera is planned to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C (whichever comes first). There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart with scientific experiments in the wellbore between active drilling periods. Phase 1 drilling in 1989 was completed with 20 in. casing from surface to a depth of 2558 ft., and a 3.8 in. core hole was drilled below the shoe to a depth of 2754 in. Phase 2 included a 17-{1/2} in. hole out of the 20 in. shoe, with 13-3/8 in. casing to 6825 ft., and continuous wireline coring below that to 7588 ft. This document comprises a narrative log of the daily activities, the daily drilling reports, mud logger's reports, summary of drilling fluids used, and other miscellaneous records.

  16. Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling System and Horizontal Directional Drilling Technology Demonstration, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Myers, D.A.; Gardner, M.G.; Williamson, T.; Huffman, J.

    1999-06-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD) system and Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) were successfully demonstrated at the Mock Tank Leak Simulation Site and the Drilling Technology Test Site, Hanford, Washington. The use of directional drilling offers an alternative to vertical drilling site characterization. Directional drilling can develop a borehole under a structure, such as a waste tank, from an angled entry and leveling off to horizontal at the desired depth. The EMWD system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The technology demonstration consisted of the development of one borehole under a mock waste tank at a depth of {approximately} {minus}8 m ({minus}27 ft.), following a predetermined drill path, tracking the drill path to within a radius of {approximately}1.5 m (5 ft.), and monitoring for zones of radiological activity using the EMWD system. The purpose of the second borehole was to demonstrate the capability of drilling to a depth of {approximately} {minus}21 m ({minus}70 ft.), the depth needed to obtain access under the Hanford waste tanks, and continue drilling horizontally. This report presents information on the HDD and EMWD technologies, demonstration design, results of the demonstrations, and lessons learned.

  17. The first tunnel section of the Superconducting Super Collider project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundin, T.K.; Laughton, C.; Nelson, P.P.

    1990-11-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project will be constructed for the United States Department of Energy at a competitively-selected site in Ellis County, Texas, about 30 mile (50 km) south of the central business district of Dallas. The injector system and main collider ring will be housed in 70 mile (110 km) of tunnel, and the project will include additional shafts and underground enclosures with clear spans up to 30 ft (10 m) at depths of more than 250 ft (75 m). The first tunnel segment to be designed and constructed will include approximately 5.9 mile (9.4 km) of 12 ft (3.7 m) finished internal diameter tunnel, four shafts up to 55 ft (16.8 m) diameter, and various connecting tunnels and adits. Construction will be in weak rock lithologies, including mudstones, marls, and chalks with compressive strengths typically between 300 and 2500 psi (2.0 and 17.2 MPa). Design is underway, with an expected bid date before the end of 1990, and with start of construction following in the spring of 1991. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  18. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    1998-03-01

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  19. ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Chitra Sivaraman; Connor Flynn

    10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

  20. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Surveys of Velocity Downstream of Albeni Falls Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, William A.; Titzler, P. Scott; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Kallio, Sara E.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

    2010-09-30

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Seattle District, is studying the potential to locate fish bypass systems at Albeni Falls Dam. The USACE requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to survey velocity magnitude and direction in the dam tailrace. The empirical data collected will be used to support future numerical modeling, physical modeling, and evaluation of fish bypass system alternatives. In May 2010, PNNL conducted velocity surveys of the Albeni Falls Dam using a boat-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler. The surveys were conducted over three days (May 25 through 27). During the survey period, total river discharge at the dam varied between 30.2 and 31.0 kcfs. A small amount of spill discharge, 2 kcfs, was present on two days (May 26 and 27). This report presents data plots showing measured velocity direction and magnitude averaged over the entire depth and over 5-ft depth increments from 5 to 30 ft.

  1. Extraction of depth-dependent perturbation factors for silicon diodes using a plastic scintillation detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacroix, Frederic; Guillot, Mathieu; McEwen, Malcolm; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: This work presents the experimental extraction of the perturbation factor in megavoltage electron beams for three models of silicon diodes (IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded) using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The authors used a single scanning PSD mounted on a high-precision scanning tank to measure depth-dose curves in 6-, 12-, and 18-MeV clinical electron beams. They also measured depth-dose curves using the IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded diodes. The authors used the depth-dose curves measured with the PSD as a perturbation-free reference to extract the perturbation factors of the diodes. Results: The authors found that the perturbation factors for the diodes increased substantially with depth, especially for low-energy electron beams. The experimental results show the same trend as published Monte Carlo simulation results for the EFD diode; however, the perturbations measured experimentally were greater. They found that using an effective point of measurement (EPOM) placed slightly away from the source reduced the variation of perturbation factors with depth and that the optimal EPOM appears to be energy dependent. Conclusions: The manufacturer recommended EPOM appears to be incorrect at low electron energy (6 MeV). In addition, the perturbation factors for diodes may be greater than predicted by Monte Carlo simulations.

  2. Daily snow depth measurements from 195 stations in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, L.J.; Easterling, D.R.; Jamason, P.; Bowman, D.P.; Hughes, P.Y.; Mason, E.H.

    1997-02-01

    This document describes a database containing daily measurements of snow depth at 195 National Weather Service (NWS) first-order climatological stations in the United States. The data have been assembled and made available by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina. The 195 stations encompass 388 unique sampling locations in 48 of the 50 states; no observations from Delaware or Hawaii are included in the database. Station selection criteria emphasized the quality and length of station records while seeking to provide a network with good geographic coverage. Snow depth at the 388 locations was measured once per day on ground open to the sky. The daily snow depth is the total depth of the snow on the ground at measurement time. The time period covered by the database is 1893--1992; however, not all station records encompass the complete period. While a station record ideally should contain daily data for at least the seven winter months (January through April and October through December), not all stations have complete records. Each logical record in the snow depth database contains one station`s daily data values for a period of one month, including data source, measurement, and quality flags.

  3. Depth profiling analysis of solar wind helium collected in diamond-like carbon film from Genesis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bajo, Ken-ichi; Olinger, Chad T.; Jurewicz, Amy J.G.; Burnett, Donald S.; Sakaguchi, Isao; Suzuki, Taku; Itose, Satoru; Ishihara, Morio; Uchino, Kiichiro; Wieler, Rainer; et al

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of solar-wind ions in Genesis mission collectors, as determined by depth profiling analysis, constrains the physics of ion solid interactions involving the solar wind. Thus, they provide an experimental basis for revealing ancient solar activities represented by solar-wind implants in natural samples. We measured the first depth profile of ⁴He in a collector; the shallow implantation (peaking at <20 nm) required us to use sputtered neutral mass spectrometry with post-photoionization by a strong field. The solar wind He fluence calculated using depth profiling is ~8.5 x 10¹⁴ cm⁻². The shape of the solar wind ⁴He depth profile ismore » consistent with TRIM simulations using the observed ⁴He velocity distribution during the Genesis mission. It is therefore likely that all solar-wind elements heavier than H are completely intact in this Genesis collector and, consequently, the solar particle energy distributions for each element can be calculated from their depth profiles. Ancient solar activities and space weathering of solar system objects could be quantitatively reproduced by solar particle implantation profiles.« less

  4. LINKING Ly? AND LOW-IONIZATION TRANSITIONS AT LOW OPTICAL DEPTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaskot, A. E.; Oey, M. S.

    2014-08-20

    We suggest that low optical depth in the Lyman continuum (LyC) may relate the Ly? emission, C II and Si II absorption, and C II* and Si II* emission seen in high-redshift galaxies. We base this analysis on Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph spectra of four Green Pea (GP) galaxies, which may be analogs of z > 2 Ly? emitters (LAEs). In the two GPs with the strongest Ly? emission, the Ly? line profiles show reduced signs of resonant scattering. Instead, the Ly? profiles resemble the H? line profiles of evolved star ejecta, suggesting that the Ly? emission originates from a low column density and similar outflow geometry. The weak C II absorption and presence of non-resonant C II* emission in these GPs support this interpretation and imply a low LyC optical depth along the line of sight. In two additional GPs, weak Ly? emission and strong C II absorption suggest a higher optical depth. These two GPs differ in their Ly? profile shapes and C II* emission strengths, however, indicating different inclinations of the outflows to our line of sight. With these four GPs as examples, we explain the observed trends linking Ly?, C II, and C II* in stacked LAE spectra, in the context of optical depth and geometric effects. Specifically, in some galaxies with strong Ly? emission, a low LyC optical depth may allow Ly? to escape with reduced scattering. Furthermore, C II absorption, C II* emission, and Ly? profile shape can reveal the optical depth, constrain the orientation of neutral outflows in LAEs, and identify candidate LyC emitters.

  5. ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling Of Insulating Samples, Interlaced Mode Or Non-interlaced Mode?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhaoying; Jin, Ke; Zhang, Yanwen; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2014-11-01

    Dual beam depth profiling strategy has been widely adopted in ToF-SIMS depth profiling, in which two basic operation modes, interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode, are commonly used. Generally, interlaced mode is recommended for conductive or semi-conductive samples, whereas non-interlaced mode is recommended for insulating samples, where charge compensation can be an issue. Recent publications, however, show that the interlaced mode can be used effectively for glass depth profiling, despite the fact that glass is an insulator. In this study, we provide a simple guide for choosing between interlaced mode and non-interlaced mode for insulator depth profiling. Two representative cases are presented: (1) depth profiling of a leached glass sample, and (2) depth profiling of a single crystal MgO sample. In brief, the interlaced mode should be attempted first, because (1) it may provide reasonable-quality data, and (2) it is time-saving for most cases, and (3) it introduces low H/C/O background. If data quality is the top priority and measurement time is flexible, non-interlaced mode is recommended because interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity and poor mass resolution. A big challenge is tracking trace H/C/O in a highly insulating sample (e.g., MgO), because non-interlaced mode may introduce strong H/C/O background but interlaced mode may suffer from low signal intensity. Meanwhile, a C or Au coating is found to be very effective to improve the signal intensity. Surprisingly, the best analyzing location is not on the C or Au coating, but at the edge (outside) of the coating.

  6. Exploration and Resource Assessment at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho Using an Integrated Team Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph C. Armstrong; Robert P. Breckenridge; Dennis L. Nielson; John W. Shervais; Thomas R. Wood

    2012-10-01

    The U.S. Air Force is facing a number of challenges as it moves into the future, one of the biggest being how to provide safe and secure energy to support base operations. A team of scientists and engineers met at Mountain Home Air Force Base near Boise, Idaho, to discuss the possibility of exploring for geothermal resources under the base. The team identified that there was a reasonable potential for geothermal resources based on data from an existing well. In addition, a regional gravity map helped identify several possible locations for drilling a new well. The team identified several possible sources of funding for this well—the most logical being to use U.S. Department of Energy funds to drill the upper half of the well and U.S. Air Force funds to drill the bottom half of the well. The well was designed as a slimhole well in accordance with State of Idaho Department of Water Resources rules and regulations. Drilling operations commenced at the Mountain Home site in July of 2011 and were completed in January of 2012. Temperatures increased gradually, especially below a depth of 2000 ft. Temperatures increased more rapidly below a depth of 5500 ft. The bottom of the well is at 5976 ft, where a temperature of about 140°C was recorded. The well flowed artesian from a depth below 5600 ft, until it was plugged off with drilling mud. Core samples were collected from the well and are being analyzed to help understand permeability at depth. Additional tests using a televiewer system will be run to evaluate orientation and directions at fractures, especially in the production zone. A final report on the well exploitation will be forthcoming later this year. The Air Force will use it to evaluate the geothermal resource potential for future private development options at Mountain Home AFB.

  7. Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho Geothermal Resource Assessment and Future Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph C. Armstrong; Robert P. Breckenridge; Dennis L. Nielson; John W. Shervais; Thomas R. Wood

    2013-03-01

    The U.S. Air Force is facing a number of challenges as it moves into the future, one of the biggest being how to provide safe and secure energy to support base operations. A team of scientists and engineers met at Mountain Home Air Force Base in early 2011 near Boise, Idaho, to discuss the possibility of exploring for geothermal resources under the base. The team identified that there was a reasonable potential for geothermal resources based on data from an existing well. In addition, a regional gravity map helped identify several possible locations for drilling a new well. The team identified several possible sources of funding for this well—the most logical being to use U.S. Department of Energy funds to drill the upper half of the well and U.S. Air Force funds to drill the bottom half of the well. The well was designed as a slimhole well in accordance with State of Idaho Department of Water Resources rules and regulations. Drilling operations commenced at the Mountain Home site in July of 2011 and were completed in January of 2012. Temperatures increased gradually, especially below a depth of 2000 ft. Temperatures increased more rapidly below a depth of 5500 ft. The bottom of the well is at 5976 ft, where a temperature of about 140°C was recorded. The well flowed artesian from a depth below 5600 ft, until it was plugged off with drilling mud. Core samples were collected from the well and are being analyzed to help understand permeability at depth. Additional tests using a televiewer system will be run to evaluate orientation and directions at fractures, especially in the production zone. A final report on the well exploitation will be forthcoming later this year. The Air Force will use it to evaluate the geothermal resource potential for future private development options at Mountain Home Air Force Base. In conclusion, Recommendation for follow-up efforts include the following:

  8. Cloudy Skies G. L. Stephens, P. M. Gabriel, K. F. Evans, and D. Duda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G. L. Stephens, P. M. Gabriel, K. F. Evans, and D. Duda Colorado State University Department of Atmospheric Science Ft. Collins, CO 80523 Introduction disposition of the heating at different depths in the cloud compared with the plane parallel heating. The heating is highly distributed and significantly exceeds the plane parallel values in the densest regions of the cloud. The two panels differ in the microphysics assumed in the simulation. Clearly, both microphysics and geometry affect the

  9. DATE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 SECTION A. Project Title: TAN - Monitoring Well Drilling Actions SECTION B. Project Description Two new monitoring wells will be drilled in the spring of 2015 within the Test Area North facility. Both wells will be drilled to a total depth of approximately 280 ft. and will be completed with two vapor ports, two pumps, and an inflatable isolation packer. Depending on location, the annular space will be filled with bentonite, silica sand, and bentonite associated with the vapor port filter pack

  10. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    2014-01-10

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  11. In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs January 7, 2014 - 5:30pm Addthis These solar power collection dishes at Sandia National Labs' National Solar Thermal Test Facility are capable of some of the highest solar to electricity conversion. In January 2008, this technology set a new solar-to-grid system conversion efficiency record of 31.25 percent net efficiency rate; the technology is still available to benefit the U.S. by delivering power at all hours

  12. Depth-dependent ordering, two-length-scale phenomena, and crossover

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    behavior in a crystal featuring a skin layer with defects (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Depth-dependent ordering, two-length-scale phenomena, and crossover behavior in a crystal featuring a skin layer with defects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Depth-dependent ordering, two-length-scale phenomena, and crossover behavior in a crystal featuring a skin layer with defects Structural defects in a crystal are responsible for the ''two-length-scale'' behavior in which a sharp

  13. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  14. Possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers for percent depth-dose measurements in clinical electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: This study investigated the possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers for percent depth-dose (PDD) measurements in high-energy clinical electron beams. Methods: The cavity correction factor, P{sub cav}, for cylindrical chambers with various diameters was calculated as a function of depth from the surface to R{sub 50}, in the energy range of 6-18 MeV electrons with the EGSnrc C ++ -based user-code CAVITY. The results were compared with those for IBA NACP-02 and PTW Roos parallel-plate ionization chambers. The effective point of measurement (EPOM) for the cylindrical chamber and the parallel-plate chamber was positioned according to the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice. The overall correction factor, P{sub Q}, and the percent depth-ionization (PDI) curve for a PTW30013 Farmer-type chamber were also compared with those of NACP-02 and Roos chambers. Results: The P{sub cav} values at depths between the surface and R{sub 50} for cylindrical chambers were all lower than those with parallel-plate chambers. However, the variation in depth for cylindrical chambers equal to or less than 4 mm in diameter was equivalent to or smaller than that for parallel-plate chambers. The P{sub Q} values for the PTW30013 chamber mainly depended on P{sub cav}, and for parallel-plate chambers depended on the wall correction factor, P{sub wall}, rather than P{sub cav}. P{sub Q} at depths from the surface to R{sub 50} for the PTW30013 chamber was consequently a lower value than that with parallel-plate chambers. However, the variation in depth was equivalent to that of parallel-plate chambers at electron energies equal to or greater than 9 MeV. The shift to match calculated PDI curves for the PTW30013 chamber and water (perturbation free) varied from 0.65 to 0 mm between 6 and 18 MeV beams. Similarly, the shifts for NACP-02 and Roos chambers were 0.5-0.6 mm and 0.2-0.3 mm, respectively, and were nearly independent of electron energy. Conclusions: Calculated PDI curves for PTW30013, NACP-02, and Roos chambers agreed well with that of water by using the optimal EPOM. Therefore, the possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers can be expected for PDD measurements in clinical electron beams.

  15. Systems and methods that generate height map models for efficient three dimensional reconstruction from depth information

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frahm, Jan-Michael; Pollefeys, Marc Andre Leon; Gallup, David Robert

    2015-12-08

    Methods of generating a three dimensional representation of an object in a reference plane from a depth map including distances from a reference point to pixels in an image of the object taken from a reference point. Weights are assigned to respective voxels in a three dimensional grid along rays extending from the reference point through the pixels in the image based on the distances in the depth map from the reference point to the respective pixels, and a height map including an array of height values in the reference plane is formed based on the assigned weights. An n-layer height map may be constructed by generating a probabilistic occupancy grid for the voxels and forming an n-dimensional height map comprising an array of layer height values in the reference plane based on the probabilistic occupancy grid.

  16. Effect of Ion Skin Depth on Relaxation of Merging Spheromaks to a Field-Reversed Configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Ono, Yasushi

    2005-08-19

    The effect of ion skin depth on the relaxation of merging spheromaks to a field-reversed configuration (FRC) is studied experimentally for a wide range of size parameter S* (ratio of minor radius to ion skin depth) from 1 to 7. The two merging spheromaks are observed to relax to an FRC or a new spheromak depending on whether the initial poloidal eigenvalue is smaller or larger than a threshold value. The bifurcation value is found to increase with decreasing size parameter S{sup *}, indicating that the low-S* condition provides a wide bifurcated range of relaxation to an FRC. The FRC-style relaxation under the low-S* conditions was accompanied by the suppression of the low-n modes (n is the toroidal mode number) activity. The fast rotations of the modes were followed by suppression of the low-n modes.

  17. Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR)

    1995-01-01

    A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

  18. Tsunami and acoustic-gravity waves in water of constant depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendin, Gali; Stiassnie, Michael

    2013-08-15

    A study of wave radiation by a rather general bottom displacement, in a compressible ocean of otherwise constant depth, is carried out within the framework of a three-dimensional linear theory. Simple analytic expressions for the flow field, at large distance from the disturbance, are derived. Realistic numerical examples indicate that the Acoustic-Gravity waves, which significantly precede the Tsunami, are expected to leave a measurable signature on bottom-pressure records that should be considered for early detection of Tsunami.

  19. Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

  20. DOE/SC-ARM/TR-129 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product A Koontz C Flynn G Hodges J Michalsky J Barnard March 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use

  1. Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings J. Woods, J. Winkler, and D. Christensen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-57441 January 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401

  2. NREL Takes First In-Depth Look at Solar Project Completion Timelines - News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Releases | NREL Takes First In-Depth Look at Solar Project Completion Timelines Report examines new data to show how long the PV interconnection process takes in the U.S. February 11, 2015 The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has gathered and analyzed data for more than 30,000 solar photovoltaic (PV) installations across the United States to better understand how interconnection regulations align with actual project completion timelines. The findings indicate

  3. STARSPOTS-TRANSIT DEPTH RELATION OF THE EVAPORATING PLANET CANDIDATE KIC 12557548b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawahara, Hajime; Kurosaki, Kenji; Ito, Yuichi; Ikoma, Masahiro; Hirano, Teruyuki

    2013-10-10

    Violent variation of transit depths and an ingress-egress asymmetry of the transit light curve discovered in KIC 12557548 have been interpreted as evidence of a catastrophic evaporation of atmosphere with dust ( M-dot {sub p}?>1 M{sub ?} Gyr{sup 1}) from a close-in small planet. To explore what drives the anomalous atmospheric escape, we perform time-series analysis of the transit depth variation of Kepler archival data for ?3.5 yr. We find a ?30% periodic variation of the transit depth with P {sub 1} = 22.83 0.21 days, which is within the error of the rotation period of the host star estimated using the light curve modulation, P {sub rot} = 22.91 0.24 days. We interpret the results as evidence that the atmospheric escape of KIC 12557548b correlates with stellar activity. We consider possible scenarios that account for both the mass loss rate and the correlation with stellar activity. X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV)-driven evaporation is possible if one accepts a relatively high XUV flux and a high efficiency for converting the input energy to the kinetic energy of the atmosphere. Star-planet magnetic interaction is another possible scenario, though huge uncertainty remains for the mass loss rate.

  4. Method for the depth corrected detection of ionizing events from a co-planar grids sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY); Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Carini, Gabriella (Port Jefferson, NY)

    2009-05-12

    A method for the detection of ionizing events utilizing a co-planar grids sensor comprising a semiconductor substrate, cathode electrode, collecting grid and non-collecting grid. The semiconductor substrate is sensitive to ionizing radiation. A voltage less than 0 Volts is applied to the cathode electrode. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the cathode is applied to the non-collecting grid. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the non-collecting grid is applied to the collecting grid. The collecting grid and the non-collecting grid are summed and subtracted creating a sum and difference respectively. The difference and sum are divided creating a ratio. A gain coefficient factor for each depth (distance between the ionizing event and the collecting grid) is determined, whereby the difference between the collecting electrode and the non-collecting electrode multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient is the depth corrected energy of an ionizing event. Therefore, the energy of each ionizing event is the difference between the collecting grid and the non-collecting grid multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient. The depth of the ionizing event can also be determined from the ratio.

  5. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S.; Mett, Richard R.; Swarts, Steven G.; Swartz, Harold M.

    2014-10-15

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 ?M of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 ? coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  6. Observed damage during Argon gas cluster depth profiles of compound semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, Anders J. Portoles, Jose F.; Cumpson, Peter J.

    2014-08-07

    Argon Gas Cluster Ion Beam (GCIB) sources have become very popular in XPS and SIMS in recent years, due to the minimal chemical damage they introduce in the depth-profiling of polymer and other organic materials. These GCIB sources are therefore particularly useful for depth-profiling polymer and organic materials, but also (though more slowly) the surfaces of inorganic materials such as semiconductors, due to the lower roughness expected in cluster ion sputtering compared to that introduced by monatomic ions. We have examined experimentally a set of five compound semiconductors, cadmium telluride (CdTe), gallium arsenide (GaAs), gallium phosphide (GaP), indium arsenide (InAs), and zinc selenide (ZnSe) and a high-? dielectric material, hafnium oxide (HfO), in their response to argon cluster profiling. An experimentally determined HfO etch rate of 0.025?nm/min (3.95??10{sup ?2}?amu/atom in ion) for 6?keV Ar gas clusters is used in the depth scale conversion for the profiles of the semiconductor materials. The assumption has been that, since the damage introduced into polymer materials is low, even though sputter yields are high, then there is little likelihood of damaging inorganic materials at all with cluster ions. This seems true in most cases; however, in this work, we report for the first time that this damage can in fact be very significant in the case of InAs, causing the formation of metallic indium that is readily visible even to the naked eye.

  7. Results of Hg speciation testing on tanks 30, 32, and 37 depth samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.

    2015-11-30

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with preparing and shipping samples for Hg speciation by Eurofins Frontier Global Sciences, Inc. in Seattle, WA on behalf of the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Mercury Task Team. The twelfth shipment of samples was designated to include 3H evaporator system Tank 30, 32, and 37 depth samples. The Tank 30 depth sample (HTF-30-15-70) was taken at 190 inches from the tank bottom and the Tank 32 depth sample (HTF-32-15-68) was taken at 89 inches from the tank bottom and both were shipped to SRNL on June 29, 2015 in an 80 mL stainless steel dip bottles. The Tank 37 surface sample (HTF-37-15-94) was taken around 253.4 inches from the tank bottom and shipped to SRNL on July 21, 2015 in an 80 mL stainless steel dip bottle. All samples were placed in the SRNL Shielded Cells and left unopened until intermediate dilutions were made on July 24, 2015 using 1.00 mL of sample diluted to 100.00 mL with deionized H2O. A 30 mL Teflon bottle was rinsed twice with the diluted tank sample and then filled leaving as little headspace as possible. It was immediately removed from the Shielded Cells and transferred to refrigerated storage where it remained at 4 C until final dilutions were made on October 20. A second portion of the cells diluted tank sample was poured into a shielded polyethylene bottle and transferred to Analytical Development for radiochemical analysis data needed for Hazardous Material Transportation calculations.

  8. Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woods, J.; Winkler, J.; Christensen, D.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the effective moisture penetration depth (EMPD) model, and its suitability for building simulations. The EMPD model is a compromise between the simple, inaccurate effective capacitance approach and the complex, yet accurate, finite-difference approach. Two formulations of the EMPD model were examined, including the model used in the EnergyPlus building simulation software. An error in the EMPD model we uncovered was fixed with the release of EnergyPlus version 7.2, and the EMPD model in earlier versions of EnergyPlus should not be used.

  9. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, M.D.

    1994-01-11

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position. 8 figures.

  10. Apparatus for in-situ calibration of instruments that measure fluid depth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Campbell, Melvin D. (Richland, WA)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention provides a method and apparatus for in-situ calibration of distance measuring equipment. The method comprises obtaining a first distance measurement in a first location, then obtaining at least one other distance measurement in at least one other location of a precisely known distance from the first location, and calculating a calibration constant. The method is applied specifically to calculating a calibration constant for obtaining fluid level and embodied in an apparatus using a pressure transducer and a spacer of precisely known length. The calibration constant is used to calculate the depth of a fluid from subsequent single pressure measurements at any submerged position.

  11. THE OHIO RIVER VALLEY CO2 STORAGE PROJECT - PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF DEEP SALINE RESERVOIRS AND COAL SEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. Mudd; Howard Johnson; Charles Christopher; T.S. Ramakrishnan, Ph.D.

    2003-08-01

    This report describes the geologic setting for the Deep Saline Reservoirs and Coal Seams in the Ohio River Valley CO{sub 2} Storage Project area. The object of the current project is to site and design a CO{sub 2} injection facility. A location near New Haven, WV, has been selected for the project. To assess geologic storage reservoirs at the site, regional and site-specific geology were reviewed. Geologic reports, deep well logs, hydraulic tests, and geologic maps were reviewed for the area. Only one well within 25 miles of the site penetrates the deeper sedimentary rocks, so there is a large amount of uncertainty regarding the deep geology at the site. New Haven is located along the Ohio River on the border of West Virginia and Ohio. Topography in the area is flat in the river valley but rugged away from the Ohio River floodplain. The Ohio River Valley incises 50-100 ft into bedrock in the area. The area of interest lies within the Appalachian Plateau, on the western edge of the Appalachian Mountain chain. Within the Appalachian Basin, sedimentary rocks are 3,000 to 20,000 ft deep and slope toward the southeast. The rock formations consist of alternating layers of shale, limestone, dolomite, and sandstone overlying dense metamorphic continental shield rocks. The Rome Trough is the major structural feature in the area, and there may be some faults associated with the trough in the Ohio-West Virginia Hinge Zone. The area has a low earthquake hazard with few historical earthquakes. Target injection reservoirs include the basal sandstone/Lower Maryville and the Rose Run Sandstone. The basal sandstone is an informal name for sandstones that overlie metamorphic shield rock. Regional geology indicates that the unit is at a depth of approximately 9,100 ft below the surface at the project site and associated with the Maryville Formation. Overall thickness appears to be 50-100 ft. The Rose Run Sandstone is another potential reservoir. The unit is located approximately 1,100 ft above the basal sandstone and is 100-200 ft thick. The storage capacity estimates for a 20-mile radius from the injection well ranged from 39-78 million tons (Mt) for each formation. Several other oil and gas plays have hydraulic properties conducive for injection, but the formations are generally only 5-50 ft thick in the study area. Overlying the injection reservoirs are thick sequences of dense, impermeable dolomite, limestone, and shale. These layers provide containment above the potential injection reservoirs. In general, it appears that the containment layers are much thicker and extensive than the injection intervals. Other physical parameters for the study area appear to be typical for the region. Anticipated pressures at maximum depths are approximately 4,100 psi based on a 0.45 psi/ft pressure gradient. Temperatures are likely to be 150 F. Groundwater flow is slow and complex in deep formations. Regional flow directions appear to be toward the west-northwest at less than 1 ft per year within the basal sandstone. Vertical gradients are downward in the study area. A review of brine geochemistry indicates that formation fluids have high salinity and dissolved solids. Total dissolved solids ranges from 200,000-325,000 mg/L in the deep reservoirs. Brine chemistry is similar throughout the different formations, suggesting extensive mixing in a mature basin. Unconsolidated sediments in the Ohio River Valley are the primary source of drinking water in the study area.

  12. Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    HTH-1RC Data This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Well Completion Report for CAU 443 CNTA December 2009 Doc. No. S05827 Page E-1 Table E-1. HTH-1RC_Chronology Date Time Depth (ft bgs) Activity 05/26/09 15:45 - 21:00 NA DH rig (LK17) arrives on site, rig is inspected, tire replaced, and rig was moved to HTH-1 pad. 05/26/09 23:30 NA Fishing tool was run 180 ft down HTH-1 and the bladder pump was retrieved. 05/27/09 01:00 NA Rig is moved off HTH-1 and goes to UC-1-P-1S

  13. An in-depth longitudinal analysis of mixing patterns in a small scientific collaboration network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

    2009-01-01

    Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on large-scale statistical analyses of networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a small-scale network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research center involved in the development and application of sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortativity mixing of these node characteristics: academic department, affiliation, position, and country of origin of the individuals in the network. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

  14. Device and method for the measurement of depth of interaction using co-planar electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeGeronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY)

    2007-09-18

    A device and method for measuring a depth of interaction of an ionizing event and improving resolution of a co-planar grid sensor (CPG) are provided. A time-of-occurrence is measured using a comparator to time the leading edge of the event pulse from the non-collecting or collecting grid. A difference signal between the grid signals obtained with a differential amplifier includes a pulse with a leading edge occurring at the time-of-detection, measured with another comparator. A timing difference between comparator outputs corresponds to the depth of interaction, calculated using a processor, which in turn weights the difference grid signal to improve spectral resolution of a CPG sensor. The device, which includes channels for grid inputs, may be integrated into an Application Specific Integrated Circuit. The combination of the device and sensor is included. An improved high-resolution CPG is provided, e.g., a gamma-ray Cadmium Zinc Telluride CPG sensor operating at room temperature.

  15. Migration depths of adult steelhead Oncorhynchus mykiss in relation to dissolved gas supersaturation in a regulated river system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Eric L.; Clabough, Tami S.; Caudill, Christopher C.; keefer, matthew L.; Peery, Christopher A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-04-01

    Adult steelhead tagged with archival transmitters primarily migrated through a large river corridor at depths > 2 m, interspersed with frequent but short (< 5 min) periods closer to the surface. The recorded swimming depths and behaviours probably provided adequate hydrostatic compensation for the encountered supersaturated dissolved gas conditions and probably limited development of gas bubble disease (GBD). Results parallel those from a concurrent adult Chinook salmon study, except steelhead experienced greater seasonal variability and were more likely to have depth-uncompensated supersaturation exposure in some dam tailraces, perhaps explaining the higher incidence of GBD in this species.

  16. GEOPHYSICS AND SITE CHARACTERIZATION AT THE HANFORD SITE THE SUCCESSFUL USE OF ELECTRICAL RESISTIVITY TO POSITION BOREHOLES TO DEFINE DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION - 11509

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GANDER MJ; LEARY KD; LEVITT MT; MILLER CW

    2011-01-14

    Historic boreholes confirmed the presence of nitrate and radionuclide contaminants at various intervals throughout a more than 60 m (200 ft) thick vadose zone, and a 2010 electrical resistivity survey mapped the known contamination and indicated areas of similar contaminants, both laterally and at depth; therefore, electrical resistivity mapping can be used to more accurately locate characterization boreholes. At the Hanford Nuclear Reservation in eastern Washington, production of uranium and plutonium resulted in the planned release of large quantities of contaminated wastewater to unlined excavations (cribs). From 1952 until 1960, the 216-U-8 Crib received approximately 379,000,000 L (100,000,000 gal) of wastewater containing 25,500 kg (56,218 lb) uranium; 1,029,000 kg (1,013 tons) of nitrate; 2.7 Ci of technetium-99; and other fission products including strontium-90 and cesium-137. The 216-U-8 Crib reportedly holds the largest inventory of waste uranium of any crib on the Hanford Site. Electrical resistivity is a geophysical technique capable of identifying contrasting physical properties; specifically, electrically conductive material, relative to resistive native soil, can be mapped in the subsurface. At the 216-U-8 Crib, high nitrate concentrations (from the release of nitric acid [HNO{sub 3}] and associated uranium and other fission products) were detected in 1994 and 2004 boreholes at various depths, such as at the base of the Crib at 9 m (30 ft) below ground surface (bgs) and sporadically to depths in excess of 60 m (200 ft) bgs. These contaminant concentrations were directly correlative with the presence of observed low electrical resistivity responses delineated during the summer 2010 geophysical survey. Based on this correlation and the recently completed mapping of the electrically conductive material, additional boreholes are planned for early 2011 to identify nitrate and radionuclide contamination: (a) throughout the entire vertical length of the vadose zone (i.e., 79 m [260 ft] bgs) within the footprint of the Crib, and (b) 15 to 30 m (50 to 100 ft) east of the Crib footprint, where contaminants are inferred to have migrated through relatively permeable soils. Confirmation of the presence of contamination in historic boreholes correlates well with mapping from the 2010 survey, and serves as a basis to site future characterization boreholes that will likely intersect contamination both laterally and at depth.

  17. Source Parameters for Moderate Earthquakes in the Zagros Mountains with Implications for the Depth Extent of Seismicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, A; Brazier, R; Nyblade, A; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2009-02-23

    Six earthquakes within the Zagros Mountains with magnitudes between 4.9 and 5.7 have been studied to determine their source parameters. These events were selected for study because they were reported in open catalogs to have lower crustal or upper mantle source depths and because they occurred within an area of the Zagros Mountains where crustal velocity structure has been constrained by previous studies. Moment tensor inversion of regional broadband waveforms have been combined with forward modeling of depth phases on short period teleseismic waveforms to constrain source depths and moment tensors. Our results show that all six events nucleated within the upper crust (<11 km depth) and have thrust mechanisms. This finding supports other studies that call into question the existence of lower crustal or mantle events beneath the Zagros Mountains.

  18. Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onstott, T. C.; Aubrey, A.D.; Kieft, T L; Silver, B J; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Van Heerden, E.; Opperman, D. J.; Bada, J L.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 C and 1 2 years for 3 km depth and 54 C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

  19. Snow Depth and Density at End-of-Winter for NGEE Areas A, B, C and D, Barrow, Alaska, 2012-2014

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Anna Liljedahl; Cathy Wilson

    2016-02-02

    End-of-winter snow depth and average snow density from area A, B, C and D, which include 1000's of point depth measurement located between approximately 20 and 50 cm apart.

  20. Final Report - Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth for Underground Test Area (UGTA) Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Oberlander; D. McGraw; C. Russell

    2007-10-31

    Hydraulic conductivity with depth has been calculated for Underground Test Area (UGTA) wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock. The following wells in volcanic tuff are evaluated: ER-EC-1, ER-EC-2a, ER-EC-4, ER-EC-5, ER-5-4#2, ER-EC-6, ER-EC-7, and ER-EC-8. The following wells in carbonate rock are evaluated: ER-7-1, ER-6-1, ER-6-1#2, and ER-12-3. There are a sufficient number of wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock to associate the conductivity values with the specific hydrogeologic characteristics such as the stratigraphic unit, hydrostratigraphic unit, hydrogeologic unit, lithologic modifier, and alteration modifier used to describe the hydrogeologic setting. Associating hydraulic conductivity with hydrogeologic characteristics allows an evaluation of the data range and the statistical distribution of values. These results are relevant to how these units are considered in conceptual models and represented in groundwater models. The wells in volcanic tuff illustrate a wide range of data values and data distributions when associated with specific hydrogeologic characteristics. Hydraulic conductivity data within a hydrogeologic characteristic can display normal distributions, lognormal distributions, semi-uniform distribution, or no identifiable distribution. There can be multiple types of distributions within a hydrogeologic characteristic such as a single stratigraphic unit. This finding has implications for assigning summary hydrogeologic characteristics to hydrostratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. The results presented herein are specific to the hydrogeologic characteristic and to the wells used to describe hydraulic conductivity. The wells in carbonate rock are associated with a fewer number of hydrogeologic characteristics. That is, UGTA wells constructed in carbonate rock have tended to be in similar hydrogeologic materials, and show a wide range in hydraulic conductivity values and data distributions. Associations of hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics are graphically presented even when there are only a few data. This approach benchmarks what is currently known about the association of depth-specific hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics.

  1. Depth profiling analysis of solar wind helium collected in diamond-like carbon film from Genesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajo, Ken-ichi; Olinger, Chad T.; Jurewicz, Amy J.G.; Burnett, Donald S.; Sakaguchi, Isao; Suzuki, Taku; Itose, Satoru; Ishihara, Morio; Uchino, Kiichiro; Wieler, Rainer; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2015-10-01

    The distribution of solar-wind ions in Genesis mission collectors, as determined by depth profiling analysis, constrains the physics of ion solid interactions involving the solar wind. Thus, they provide an experimental basis for revealing ancient solar activities represented by solar-wind implants in natural samples. We measured the first depth profile of ⁴He in a collector; the shallow implantation (peaking at <20 nm) required us to use sputtered neutral mass spectrometry with post-photoionization by a strong field. The solar wind He fluence calculated using depth profiling is ~8.5 x 10¹⁴ cm⁻². The shape of the solar wind ⁴He depth profile is consistent with TRIM simulations using the observed ⁴He velocity distribution during the Genesis mission. It is therefore likely that all solar-wind elements heavier than H are completely intact in this Genesis collector and, consequently, the solar particle energy distributions for each element can be calculated from their depth profiles. Ancient solar activities and space weathering of solar system objects could be quantitatively reproduced by solar particle implantation profiles.

  2. Active probing of cloud thickness and optical depth using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Tellier, L. L.; Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60{sup o} full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Section 2 covers the up-to-date evolution of the nighttime WAIL instrument at LANL. Section 3 reports our progress towards daytime capability for WAIL, an important extension to full diurnal cycle monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter. Section 4 describes briefly how the important cloud properties can be inferred from WAIL signals.

  3. Wave like signatures in aerosol optical depth and associated radiative impacts over the central Himalayan region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, K. K.; Phanikumar, D. V.; Kumar, Niranjan; Reddy, Kishore; Kotamarthi, Veerabhadra R.; Newsom, Rob K.; Ouarda, Taha B.

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we present a case study on 16 October 2011 to show the first observational evidence of the influence of short period gravity waves in aerosol transport during daytime over the central Himalayan region. The Doppler lidar data has been utilized to address the daytime boundary layer evolution and related aerosol dynamics over the site. Mixing layer height is estimated by wavelet covariance transform method and found to be ~ 0.7 km, AGL. Aerosol optical depth observations during daytime revealed an asymmetry showing clear enhancement during afternoon hours as compared to forenoon. Interestingly, Fourier and wavelet analysis of vertical velocity and attenuated backscatter showed similar 50-90 min short period gravity wave signatures during afternoon hours. Moreover, our observations showed that gravity waves are dominant within the boundary layer implying that the daytime boundary layer dynamics is playing a vital role in transporting the aerosols from surface to the top of the boundary layer. Similar modulations are also evident in surface parameters like temperature, relative humidity and wind speed indicating these waves are associated with the dynamical aspects over Himalayan region. Finally, time evolution of range-23 height indicator snapshots during daytime showed strong upward velocities especially during afternoon hours implying that convective processes through short period gravity waves plays a significant role in transporting aerosols from the nearby valley region to boundary layer top over the site. These observations also establish the importance of wave induced daytime convective boundary layer dynamics in the lower Himalayan region.

  4. Low temperature London penetration depth and superfluid density in Fe-based superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyunsoo

    2013-05-15

    The superconducting gap symmetry of the Fe-based superconductors was studied by measurements and analysis of London penetration depth and super uid density. Tunnel diode resonator technique for these measurements was implemented in a dilution refrigerator allowing for the temperatures down to 50 mK. For the analysis of the super uid density, we used both experimental studies of Al-coated samples and original thermodynamic approach based on Rutgers relation. In three systems studied, we found that the superconducting gap at the optimal doping is best described in multi-gap full gap scenario. By performing experiments on samples with arti#12;cially introduced disorder with heavy ion irradiation, we show that evolution of the superconducting transition temperature and of the super uid density are consistent with full-gap sign changing s#6; superconducting state. The superconducting gap develops strong modulation both in the under-doped and the over-doped regimes. In the terminal hole-doped KFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}, both temperature dependence of the super uid density and its evolution with increase of the scattering rate are consistent with symmetry imposed vertical line nodes in the superconducting gap. By comparative studies of hole-doped (Ba,K)Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} and electron-doped Ca10-3-8, we show that the superconducting gap modulation in the under-doped regime is intrinsic and is not induced by the coexisting static magnetic order.

  5. Metal affinity enrichment increases the range and depth of proteome identification for extracellular microbial proteins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, Korin; Erickson, Brian K; Mueller, Ryan; Singer, Steven; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hwang, Mona; Thelen, Michael P.; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2012-01-01

    Many key proteins, such as those involved in cellular signaling or transcription, are difficult to measure in microbial proteomic experiments due to the interfering presence of more abundant, dominant proteins. In an effort to enhance the identification of previously undetected proteins, as well as provide a methodology for selective enrichment, we evaluated and optimized immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) coupled with mass spectrometric characterization of extracellular proteins from an extremophilic microbial community. Seven different metals were tested for IMAC enrichment. The combined results added 20% greater proteomic depth to the extracellular proteome. Although this IMAC enrichment could not be conducted at the physiological pH of the environmental system, this approach did yield a reproducible and specific enrichment of groups of proteins with functions potentially vital to the community, thereby providing a more extensive biochemical characterization. Notably, 40 unknown proteins previously annotated as hypothetical were enriched and identified for the first time. Examples of identified proteins includes a predicted TonB signal sensing protein homologous to other known TonB proteins and a protein with a COXG domain previously identified in many chemolithoautotrophic microbes as having a function in the oxidation of CO.

  6. Seismic Velocities Contain Information About Depth, Lithology, Fluid Content, and Microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berge, P A; Bonner, B P

    2002-01-03

    Recent advances in field and laboratory methods for measuring elastic wave velocities provide incentive and opportunity for improving interpretation of geophysical data for engineering and environmental applications. Advancing the state-of-the-art of seismic imaging requires developing petrophysical relationships between measured velocities and the hydrogeology parameters and lithology. Our approach uses laboratory data and rock physics methods. Compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave velocities, Vp/Vs ratios, and relative wave amplitudes show systematic changes related to composition, saturation, applied stress (analogous to depth), and distribution of clay for laboratory ultrasonic measurements on soils. The artificial soils were mixtures of Ottawa sand and a second phase, either Wyoming bentonite or peat moss used to represent clay or organic components found in natural soils. Compressional and shear wave velocities were measured for dry, saturated, and partially-saturated conditions, for applied stresses between about 7 and 100 kPa, representing approximately the top 5 m of the subsurface. Analysis of the results using rock physics methods shows the link between microstructure and wave propagation, and implications for future advances in seismic data interpretation. For example, we found that Vp in dry sand-clay mixtures initially increases as clay cements the sand grains and fills porosity, but then Vp decreases when the clay content is high enough that the clay matrix controls the elastic response of the material. Vs decreases monotonically with increasing clay content. This provides a method for using Vp/Vs ratios to estimate clay content in a dry soil.

  7. Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondaryaccumulation at shallow depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.

    2007-05-31

    Geologic storage of CO2 can be a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases only if it can bedemonstrated that leakage from proposed storage reservoirs and associatedhazards are small or can be mitigated. Risk assessment must evaluatepotential leakage scenarios and develop a rational, mechanisticunderstanding of CO2 behavior during leakage. Flow of CO2 may be subjectto positive feedbacks that could amplify leakage risks and hazards,placing a premium on identifying and avoiding adverse conditions andmechanisms. A scenario that is unfavorable in terms of leakage behavioris formation of a secondary CO2 accumulation at shallow depth. This paperdevelops a detailed numerical simulation model to investigate CO2discharge from a secondary accumulation, and evaluates the role ofdifferent thermodynamic and hydrogeologic conditions. Our simulationsdemonstrate self-enhancing as well as self-limiting feedbacks.Condensation of gaseous CO2, 3-phase flow of aqueous phase -- liquid CO2-- gaseous CO2, and cooling from Joule-Thomson expansion and boiling ofliquid CO2 are found to play important roles in the behavior of a CO2leakage system. We find no evidence that a subsurface accumulation of CO2at ambient temperatures could give rise to a high-energy discharge, aso-called "pneumatic eruption."

  8. Alaska Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    633 622 566 802 639 548 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 63 2 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 193 246 351 1,243 1,093 1,190 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 173 231 288 289 353 356 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 20 15 63 954 740 834

  9. NM, East Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    149 180 185 232 304 460 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 12 16 18 29 25 15 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 1,052 1,216 1,358 1,306 1,447 2,085 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 649 664 701 660 434 478 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 403 552 657 646 1,013 1,607

  10. Nebraska Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 View History Crude Oil (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2004 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2004 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2004 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2004 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-200

  11. Ohio Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 1 1 2 7 3 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 1 6 11 35 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 68 19 54 252 1,072 3,504 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 67 14 50 246 1,015 3,498 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 1 5 4 6 57 6

  12. TX, RRC District 2 Onshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    14 53 242 711 615 825 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 1 22 100 369 268 438 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 648 886 1,504 3,707 2,477 4,014 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 617 810 1,104 2,307 1,567 2,454 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 31 76 400 1,400 910 1,560

  13. TX, RRC District 7C Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    221 286 301 438 400 642 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 10 13 4 14 3 5 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 1,619 1,659 1,551 1,844 1,540 2,305 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 875 789 447 387 157 318 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 744 870 1,104 1,457 1,383 1,98

  14. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    125 102 52 34 33 84 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 35 29 20 8 11 21 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 1,557 874 561 296 320 487 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 1,096 502 368 235 231 273 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 461 372 193 61 89 214

  15. LA, South Onshore Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 126 113 125 155 188 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 13 19 17 22 24 21 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 1,225 1,470 1,260 1,601 1,417 1,708 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 976 1,225 1,028 1,409 1,120 1,387 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 249 245 232 192 297 321

  16. Microsoft Word - DVZ Technologies Public Information Exchange Summary.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DVZ Technologies Public Information Exchange June 7, 2011 Location: Shilo Inn, Richland, WA Opening Session - Flip Chart Notes Comments  Excavation technologies are good to approximately 40 ft. and make a big footprint. Develop some cost curves to get general understanding of cost/benefit.  Excavation can be cheap and quick.  Lots of deep vadose zone problems are black and white at 60 to 120 ft, but not at 250 ft.  Good technology screening process important. Need to categorize and

  17. West Virginia Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 0 1 1 2 1 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 1 17 23 27 104 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 818 926 1,579 2,532 6,549 17,221 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 815 924 1,575 2,529 6,546 17,219 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 3 2 4 3 3

  18. Reciprocal space XRD mapping with varied incident angle as a probe of structure variation within surface depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qiguang; Williams, Frances; Zhao, Xin; Reece, Charles E.; Krishnan, Mahadevan

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we used a differential-depth X-Ray diffraction Reciprocal Spacing Mapping (XRD RSM) technique to investigate the crystal quality of a variety of SRF-relevant Nb film and bulk materials. By choosing different X-ray probing depths, the RSM study successfully revealed evolution the of materials? microstructure after different materials processes, such as energetic condensation or surface polishing. The RSM data clearly measured the materials? crystal quality at different thickness. Through a novel differential-depth RSM technique, this study found: I. for a heteroepitaxy Nb film Nb(100)/MgO(100), the film thickening process, via a cathodic arc-discharge Nb ion deposition, created a near-perfect single crystal Nb on the surface?s top-layer; II. for a mechanically polished single-crystal bulk Nb material, the microstructure on the top surface layer is more disordered than that in-grain.

  19. Engineering Task Plan for Development and Fabrication and Deployment of Nested Fixed Depth Fluidic Sampling and At Tank Analysis Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOGER, R.M.

    2000-10-30

    This engineering task plan identifies the resources, responsibilities, and schedules for the development and deployment of a mobile, variable depth sampling system and an at-tank analysis system. The mobile, variable depth sampling system concept was developed after a cost assessment indicated a high cost for multiple deployments of the nested, fixed-depth sampling system. The sampling will provide double-shell tank (DST) staging tank waste samples for assuring the readiness of the waste for shipment to the LAW/HLW plant for treatment and immobilization. The at-tank analysis system will provide ''real-time'' assessments of the samples' chemical and physical properties. These systems support the Hanford Phase 1B vitrification project.

  20. Seismic signatures of the Lodgepole fractured reservoir in Utah-Wyoming overthrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, J.; Collier, H.; Angstman, B.

    1997-08-01

    In low porosity, low permeability zones, natural fractures are the primary source of permeability which affect both production and injection of fluids. The open fractures do not contribute much to porosity, but they provide an increased drainage network to any porosity. An important approach to characterizing the fracture orientation and fracture permeability of reservoir formations is one based upon the effects of such conditions on the propagation of acoustic and seismic waves in the rock. We present the feasibility of using seismic measurement techniques to map the fracture zones between wells spaced 2400 ft at depths of about 1000 ft. For this purpose we constructed computer models (which include azimuthal anisotropy) using Lodgepole reservoir parameters to predict seismic signatures recorded at the borehole scale, crosswell scale, and 3 D seismic scale. We have integrated well logs with existing 2D surfaces seismic to produce petrophysical and geological cross sections to determine the reservoir parameters and geometry for the computer models. In particular, the model responses are used to evaluate if surface seismic and crosswell seismic measurements can capture the anisotropy due to vertical fractures. Preliminary results suggested that seismic waves transmitted between two wells will propagate in carbonate fracture reservoirs, and the signal can be received above the noise level at the distance of 2400 ft. In addition, the large velocities contrast between the main fracture zone and the underlying unfractured Boundary Ridge Member, suggested that borehole reflection imaging may be appropriate to map and fracture zone thickness variation and fracture distributions in the reservoir.

  1. Sampling and analyses report for June 1992 semiannual postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG site, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindblom, S.R.

    1992-08-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RMl) underground coal gasification (UCG) test was conducted from November 16, 1987 through February 26, 1988 (United Engineers and Constructors 1989) at a site approximately one mile south of Hanna, Wyoming. The test consisted of dual module operation to evaluate the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) technology, the elongated linked well (ELW) technology, and the interaction of closely spaced modules operating simultaneously. The test caused two cavities to be formed in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam and associated overburden. The Hanna No. 1 coal seam is approximately 30 ft thick and lays at depths between 350 ft and 365 ft below the surface in the test area. The coal seam is overlain by sandstones, siltstones and claystones deposited by various fluvial environments. The groundwater monitoring was designed to satisfy the requirements of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) in addition to providing research data toward the development of UCG technology that minimizes environmental impacts. The June 1992 semiannual groundwater.sampling took place from June 10 through June 13, 1992. This event occurred nearly 34 months after the second groundwater restoration at the RM1 site and was the fifteenth sampling event since UCG operations ceased. Samples were collected for analyses of a limited suite set of parameters as listed in Table 1. With a few exceptions, the groundwater is near baseline conditions. Data from the field measurements and analysis of samples are presented. Benzene concentrations in the groundwater were below analytical detection limits.

  2. Observation manipulator bell proves worth in Transmediterranean pipeline construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, R.E.

    1981-10-26

    In constructing the trans-Mediterranean undersea pipeline between Tunisia and Sicily, Perry Oceanographics used a manned, tethered vehicle called an observation manipulator bell (OMB), which has proven itself in deepwater pipelaying operations. The OMB carries a crew of two inside a pressure hull with an internal diameter of 76 in. Its overall diameter is 102 in. and it weighs 17,500 lb. The vehicle has two 5-hp port- and starboard-mounted electric thrusters. Its vertical position can be controlled by either the bell operator using a clump-weight haul-down winch or the surface operator with the umbilical winch. The OMB is fitted with video cameras and voice communication. The vehicle has reached depths of 3000 ft within 30 min with only a 10-ft overshoot. The OMB's single and/or dual manipulator-arm systems can operate its onboard impact wrenches, cut-off saws, water jets, and cable cutters. In addition, the manipulator claws can operate valve wheels and levers, attach anodes, and connect of disconnect cables and hydraulic systems. The versatility of the OMB was demonstrated recently when the vehicle rescued a PC-1602 submarine that had become entangled at 1740 ft.

  3. Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project: A summary of drilling and engineering activities and scientific results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, H.P.; Forsgren, C.K.

    1992-04-01

    The Salton Sea Scientific g Project (SSSDP) completed the first major well in the United States Continental Scientific Drilling Program. The well (State 2-14) was drilled to 10,W ft (3,220 m) in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in California's Imperial Valley, to permit scientific study of a deep, high-temperature portion of an active geothermal system. The program was designed to investigate, through drilling and testing, the subsurface thermal, chemical, and mineralogical environments of this geothermal area. Extensive samples and data, including cores, cuttings, geothermal fluids and gases, and geophysical logs, were collected for future scientific analysis, interpretation, and publication. Short duration flow tests were conducted on reservoirs at a depth of approximately 6,120 ft (1,865 m) and at 10,136 ft (3,089 m). This report summarizes all major activities of the SSSDP, from project inception in the fall of 1984 through brine-pond cleanup and site restoration, ending in February 1989. This report presents a balanced summary of drilling, coring, logging, and flow-test operations, and a brief summary of technical and scientific results. Frequent reference is made to original records, data, and publication of results. The report also reviews the proposed versus the final well design, and operational summaries, such as the bit record, the casing and cementing program, and the coring program. Summaries are and the results of three flow tests. Several teamed during the project.

  4. Quantifying Aerosol Direct Effects from Broadband Irradiance and Spectral Aerosol Optical Depth Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creekmore, Torreon N.; Joseph, Everette; Long, Charles N.; Li, Siwei

    2014-05-16

    We outline a methodology using broadband and spectral irradiances to quantify aerosol direct effects on the surface diffuse shortwave (SW) irradiance. Best Estimate Flux data span a 13 year timeframe at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Screened clear-sky irradiances and aerosol optical depth (AOD), for solar zenith angles ≤ 65°, are used to estimate clear-sky diffuse irradiances. We validate against detected clear-sky observations from SGP’s Basic Radiation System (BRS). BRS diffuse irradiances were in accordance with estimates, producing a root-mean-square error and mean bias errors of 4.0 W/m2 and -1.4 W/m2, respectively. Absolute differences show 99% of estimates within ±10 W/m2 (10%) of the mean BRS observations. Clear-sky diffuse estimates are used to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol radiative effects, represented as the aerosol diffuse irradiance (ADI). ADI is the contribution of diffuse SW to global SW, attributable to scattering of atmospheric transmission by natural plus anthropogenic aerosols. Estimated slope for the ADI as a function of AOD indicates an increase of ~22 W/m2 in diffuse SW for every 0.1 increase in AOD. Such significant increases in the diffuse fraction could possibly increase photosynthesis. Annual mean ADI is 28.2 W/m2, and heavy aerosol loading at SGP provides up to a maximum increase of 120 W/m2 in diffuse SW over background conditions. With regard to seasonal variation, the mean diffuse forcings are 17.2, 33.3, 39.0, and 23.6 W/m2 for winter, spring, summer, and fall, respectively.

  5. Black Hills Energy (Gas) - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    sq ft. Infiltration Control: 70% of installed cost Doors: 25 or 50 Pool Cover: 250 Spa Cover: 50 Summary Black Hills Energy offers commercial and industrial customers...

  6. Table 3a. Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3a. Natural Gas Consumption per Sq Ft Table 3a. Total Natural Gas Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Natural Gas...

  7. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Management Portfolio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    gas handling equipment and 250 ft stack Miles of underground piping and underground tanks Radioactive liquid processing equipment and facilities Contaminated soils ...

  8. Before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Friedmann, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Clean Coal Before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations PDF icon 2-11-14JulioFriedmann FT...

  9. Before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Nuclear Security Administration Before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations PDF icon 6-12-15Madelyn Creedon FT...

  10. Welcome to EMSL | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Onward... Researchers are literally taking their science onward and upward using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS).... Read More >>...

  11. Preliminary performance of HT datalink

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cieslewski, Grzegorz

    2014-02-11

    Preliminary performance of HT HS datalink at room temperature over 5000ft of wireline. The data shows ablility of the datalink to adapt by decreasing speed.

  12. Ligncellulosic feedstock supply systems with intermodal and overseas...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GHG emissions is required to design cost effective, sustainable logistic process operations; in order to ... or pellets) and size ofmore the FT-diesel production plant. ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... sustainable logistic process operations; in order to improve ... of the FT-diesel production plant. With the flexibility to change the design of supply chains as well as ...

  14. Before the House Committee on Armed Services - Subcommittee on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FT HAS.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs Before the Senate Committee on Armed Services Before the Senate Foreign Affairs ...

  15. Columbia Gas of Virginia - Home Savings Rebate Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State Virginia Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount High Efficiency Gas Furnace: 300 High Efficiency Windows (Replacement): 1sq. ft. Attic Insulation...

  16. 14O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O β+-Decay Evaluated Data Measurements for Superallowed Beta Decay 1965KAZX: 14O. 1975HA45: 14O; calculated ft for superallowed β decays. 1978WI04: 14O; measured T1/2; deduced ft values. 1981WH03: 14O(β+); deduced Q. 14O deduced Qβ, radiative corrected ft. 2003TO03: 14N(p, n); deduced threshold energies. 14O deduced Q(EC) for superallowed decay. 2003TO29: 14O(EC); compiled, analyzed superallowed decays Q-values, T1/2, log ft, related data; deduced Vμd matrix element. 2004BA78: 14O(β+);

  17. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … High...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    home, built for 36 per ft 2 in 2008, incorporated both energy efficiency and strategies to reduce building costs. ... program was started in 1995 to provide research and ...

  18. Before the House Subcommittee on Energy Policy, Health Care ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testimony of Christopher Smith, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Office of Fossil ... Reform PDF icon 4-30-14ChristopherSmith FT HOGR.pdf More Documents & Publications ...

  19. Compiler Comparisons

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    solving systems of linear equation E EP Embarassingly Parallel Generate independent Gaussian random variates using the Marsaglia polar method E FT Fast Fourier Transform Solve a...

  20. EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale. DOEEIS-0357, Department of Energy...

  1. Before the House Subcommittee on Investigations & Oversight ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Investigations & Oversight - Committee on Science, Space, and Technology PDF icon 5-8-12KathleenHoganFT.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the Subcommittee on...

  2. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2006-019

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by NALCO CHEMICAL CORPORATION for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-06FT42721

  3. Secure Wireless Tritium Air Monitoring Cart Development

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Pre-amplifier - Floating with respect to ground - True differential input - Eliminates ground loops - Excellent AC common mode rejection * Impedance matched for up to 200ft RG58...

  4. Section 42

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cloud-Resolving Simulations of Arctic Stratus J. Y. Harrington, W. R. Cotton, S. Kreidenweis and P. Q. Olsson Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Ft....

  5. Ener1 Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Name: Ener1 Group Place: Ft. Lauderdale, Florida Product: Investment firm with stakes in several battery companies and a fuel cell company, through its...

  6. Photovoltaics Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Photovoltaics Inc Place: Ft. Pierce, Florida Zip: 34981 Product: Makes nano crystalline silicon particles and collides, and has over 22...

  7. Vera Irrigation District #15 - Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    State Washington Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount RefrigeratorFreezer Recycling: 30 Water Heaters: 100 Windows: 6sq. ft. Heat Pumps: 450 Duct Sealing: 400 -...

  8. Fault Tolerant Programming Abstractions and Failure Recovery...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Problem Description * Why adding FT to MPI is difficult? * Challenges & areas of concern Lessons Learned * Where do we go from here? * Summary Approaches * Current solutions to...

  9. Preliminary performance of HT datalink

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cieslewski, Grzegorz

    Preliminary performance of HT HS datalink at room temperature over 5000ft of wireline. The data shows ablility of the datalink to adapt by decreasing speed.

  10. Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment - House Committee...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Director National Energy Technology Laboratory Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Environment - House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology 11-30-12AnthonyCugini FT HSST...

  11. EECBG Sub-Committee Briefing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... well served when considering creating or filling these types of positions. (Ft. Worth, 212012) * Better Energy Efficiency Branding - Create an iconic brand for energy efficiency. ...

  12. Soil Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ringrose...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    approximately 1000 ft to the NE of the sample area to account for background soil mercury concentrations. Sample lines were designed to cross known nearby structural features...

  13. Lighting and Electrical Team Leadership and Project Delivery

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting and Electrical Team Leadership and Project Delivery 2014 Building Technologies ... million sq ft of high efficiency parking lighting by February 2014 2. LEEP: 300 million sq ...

  14. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    occupancy * Equipment installation complete * Start-up testing and commissioning * 35 million DOE investment under ARRA * 42,000 sf facility with 390-ft. long processing line. ...

  15. Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ft007_sluder_2011

  16. Utah's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    district in Utah. Registered Energy Companies in Utah's 3rd congressional district Better Biodiesel Composite Tower Solutions Domestic Energy Partners Evergreen Clean Energy FT...

  17. Advance Patent Waiver W(A)2008-026

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a request by Siemens Power Generation for a DOE waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-FC26-98FT40343

  18. Property:FirstWellFlowComments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Showing 3 pages using this property. C Chena Geothermal Area + Flow test enabled estimation of drawdown of 148 ft in the production well at the required...

  19. Analysis of Transportation and Logistics Challenges Affecting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Technologies that enable larger wind turbines on taller towers create opportunities for ... of "no hazard" from the FAA for installations of turbines slightly taller than 500 ft. ...

  20. NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE WASTE DISPOSAL OPERATIONS FY 2016 - QUARTER ONE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 - QUARTER ONE DISPOSAL VOLUME REPORT DOE/NV/25946--2729 FY16 - Quarter 1 FY16 Cumulative FY16 - Quarter 1 FY16 Cumulative DOE APPROVED Waste Volume Volume DOE APPROVED Waste Volume Volume GENERATORS Type (Ft 3 ) (Ft 3 ) GENERATORS Type (Ft 3 ) (Ft 3 ) ABERDEEN PROVING GROUNDS (MD) LLW 1,122 1,122 NATIONAL SECURITY TECHNOLOGIES (NV) LLW 173 173 LLW 810 810 MIXED 6,447 6,447 CONSOLIDATED NUCLEAR SECURITY, LLC / Y-12 (TN) LLW 23,066 23,066 OAK RIDGE RESERVATION / UCOR (TN) LLW 12,681 12,681

  1. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantitatively Modeling Application Resilience with the Data Vulnerability Factor Jeffrey S. Vetter Li Yu, Sparsh Mittal, Dong Li, Jeremy Meredith http:ft.ornl.gov ...

  2. Non-Petroleum-Based Fuels: Effects on Emissions Control Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ft007sluder2011...

  3. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects - Advanced Metering Infrastructure...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Municipal Light Department Smart Grid Project Marblehead Massachusetts 1,346,175 2,692,350 Navajo Tribal Utility Association Smart Grid Project Ft. Defiance Arizona...

  4. Novel catalysts for hydrogen fuel cell applications:Final report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An external laser desorption ion source was successfully installed on the existing Fourier transform ion-cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. However, operation of...

  5. Quality, Performance, and Emission Impacts of Biofuels and Biofuel...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon ft003mccormick2011

  6. Preparation of most promising braided and/or textile-based adsorbents for seawater testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janke, Chris; Sadananda, Das; Mayes, Richard

    2014-02-26

    Progress Report...Prepare the most promising braided and/or textile-based adsorbents for seawater testing. M3FT-14OR0310012

  7. SUBTASK 3.12 - GASIFICATION, WARM-GAS CLEANUP, AND LIQUID FUELS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that the liquid fuels production from the FT catalyst was ... and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources ... funding was provided by the Illinois Clean Coal Institute. ...

  8. Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    E. Mainzer, Administrator, Bonneville Power Administration Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources PDF icon 3-25-14ElliotMainzer FT...

  9. Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    K. Drummond, Administrator, Bonneville Power Administration Before the Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Natural Resources Committee 4-16-13WilliamDrummond FT HNR More...

  10. Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M. Turner, Administrator, Southwestern Power Administration Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Committee on Natural Resources PDF icon 3-25-14ChristopherTurner FT ...

  11. Planning for Years to Come

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enlarge http:farm8.staticflickr.com71117650961650ed1571174ft.jpg Enlarge Create a Sustainable Future: Planning LANL's Governing Policy on the Environment Environmental...

  12. NREL: Sustainable NREL - Research Support Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Research Support Facility (RSF) is the laboratory's newest sustainable green building. This 360,000 ft2 Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum office ...

  13. Property:Recirculating | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flume Facility + No + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + No + B Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Yes +...

  14. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    US1204842","Journal Article","FT",,"Journal Name: Innovation, America's Journal of Technology Commercialization","SRS","DOE","12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE WASTES, AND...

  15. Property:Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flume + Flume + Alden Tow Tank + Tow Tank + Alden Wave Basin + Wave Basin + B Breakwater Research Facility + Wave Basin + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Flume + C Carderock 2-ft...

  16. Property:Wavemaking Capabilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + None + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + Yes + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + None + C Carderock 2-ft Variable...

  17. Property:Special Characteristics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + None + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable...

  18. Property:Wind Capabilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + None + C Carderock 2-ft Variable...

  19. Property:Towing Capabilities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alden Small Flume + None + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + None + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable...

  20. Property:Cameras | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Yes Alden Small Flume + Yes Alden Tow Tank + Yes Alden Wave Basin + Yes B Breakwater Research Facility + None C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None...

  1. Property:Real-Time | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + No + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + No + C Carderock 2-ft Variable...

  2. Property:Channel/Tunnel/Flume | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + None + Alden Wave Basin + None + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable...

  3. 6He

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deduced log ft, Gamow-Teller transition strength, level width, di-neutron, neutron halo roles. 1993BO24: 6He(-); measured -delayed deuteron spectrum; deduced branching...

  4. 11Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deduced log ft, Gamow-Teller transition strength, level width, di-neutron, neutron halo roles. 1992LI24: 11Li(-); measured NMR asymmetry; deduced quadrupole moment ratio....

  5. 14Be

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14Be(-); measured beta-delayed neutron-, -spectra, -coin; deduced log ft, halo neutron related features. 14B deduced levels. Tof. 1997BE66: 14Be(-); measured...

  6. Buildings Energy Data Book: 7.5 Efficiency Standards for Residential Appliances

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Efficiency Standards for Wet Cleaning Equipment Effective from products manufactured from January 1, 2007 through December 31, 2011 Top-Loading, Compact (Capacity < 1.6 ft^3) Front-Loading, Compact (Capacity < 1.6 ft^3) Top-Loading, Semi-Automatic (1) Suds-Saving (1) Effective for products manufactured on or after January 1, 2011 Top-Loading, Compact (Capacity ≥ 1.6 ft^3) Front-Loading, Compact (Capacity ≥ 1.6 ft^3) Dishwashers: Effective for products manufactured on or after January

  7. Geological site characterization for the proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Facility, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reneau, S.L.; Raymond, R. Jr.

    1995-12-01

    This report presents the results of geological site characterization studies conducted from 1992 to 1994 on Pajarito Mesa for a proposed Los Alamos National Laboratory Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (MWDF). The MWDF is being designed to receive mixed waste (waste containing both hazardous and radioactive components) generated during Environmental Restoration Project cleanup activities at Los Alamos. As of 1995, there is no Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted disposal site for mixed waste at the Laboratory, and construction of the MWDF would provide an alternative to transport of this material to an off-site location. A 2.5 km long part of Pajarito Mesa was originally considered for the MWDF, extending from an elevation of about 2150 to 2225 m (7060 to 7300 ft) in Technical Areas (TAs) 15, 36, and 67 in the central part of the Laboratory, and planning was later concentrated on the western area in TA-67. The mesa top lies about 60 to 75 m (200 to 250 ft) above the floor of Pajarito Canyon on the north, and about 30 m (100 ft) above the floor of Threemile Canyon on the south. The main aquifer used as a water supply for the Laboratory and for Los Alamos County lies at an estimated depth of about 335 m (1100 ft) below the mesa. The chapters of this report focus on surface and near-surface geological studies that provide a basic framework for siting of the MWDF and for conducting future performance assessments, including fulfillment of specific regulatory requirements. This work includes detailed studies of the stratigraphy, mineralogy, and chemistry of the bedrock at Pajarito Mesa by Broxton and others, studies of the geological structure and of mesa-top soils and surficial deposits by Reneau and others, geologic mapping and studies of fracture characteristics by Vaniman and Chipera, and studies of potential landsliding and rockfall along the mesa-edge by Reneau.

  8. Depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy for characterizing GaN-based light emitting diode structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Wei-Liang; Lee, Yu-Yang; Chang, Yu-Ming, E-mail: ymchang@ntu.edu.tw [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China)] [Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chiao-Yun; Huang, Huei-Min; Lu, Tien-Chang [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Photonics, National Chiao Tung University, 30010 Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrate that depth-resolved confocal micro-Raman spectroscopy can be used to characterize the active layer of GaN-based LEDs. By taking the depth compression effect due to refraction index mismatch into account, the axial profiles of Raman peak intensities from the GaN capping layer toward the sapphire substrate can correctly match the LED structural dimension and allow the identification of unique Raman feature originated from the 0.3 ?m thick active layer of the studied LED. The strain variation in different sample depths can also be quantified by measuring the Raman shift of GaN A{sub 1}(LO) and E{sub 2}(high) phonon peaks. The capability of identifying the phonon structure of buried LED active layer and depth-resolving the strain distribution of LED structure makes this technique a potential optical and remote tool for in operando investigation of the electronic and structural properties of nitride-based LEDs.

  9. Monte Carlo study of the depth-dependent fluence perturbation in parallel-plate ionization chambers in electron beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zink, K.; Czarnecki, D.; Voigts-Rhetz, P. von; Looe, H. K.; Harder, D.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: The electron fluence inside a parallel-plate ionization chamber positioned in a water phantom and exposed to a clinical electron beam deviates from the unperturbed fluence in water in absence of the chamber. One reason for the fluence perturbation is the well-known inscattering effect, whose physical cause is the lack of electron scattering in the gas-filled cavity. Correction factors determined to correct for this effect have long been recommended. However, more recent Monte Carlo calculations have led to some doubt about the range of validity of these corrections. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to reanalyze the development of the fluence perturbation with depth and to review the function of the guard rings. Methods: Spatially resolved Monte Carlo simulations of the dose profiles within gas-filled cavities with various radii in clinical electron beams have been performed in order to determine the radial variation of the fluence perturbation in a coin-shaped cavity, to study the influences of the radius of the collecting electrode and of the width of the guard ring upon the indicated value of the ionization chamber formed by the cavity, and to investigate the development of the perturbation as a function of the depth in an electron-irradiated phantom. The simulations were performed for a primary electron energy of 6 MeV. Results: The Monte Carlo simulations clearly demonstrated a surprisingly large in- and outward electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary. This results in a strong influence of the depth-dependent development of the electron field in the surrounding medium upon the chamber reading. In the buildup region of the depth-dose curve, the inout balance of the electron fluence is positive and shows the well-known dose oscillation near the cavity/water boundary. At the depth of the dose maximum the inout balance is equilibrated, and in the falling part of the depth-dose curve it is negative, as shown here the first time. The influences of both the collecting electrode radius and the width of the guard ring are reflecting the deep radial penetration of the electron transport processes into the gas-filled cavities and the need for appropriate corrections of the chamber reading. New values for these corrections have been established in two forms, one converting the indicated value into the absorbed dose to water in the front plane of the chamber, the other converting it into the absorbed dose to water at the depth of the effective point of measurement of the chamber. In the Appendix, the inout imbalance of electron transport across the lateral cavity boundary is demonstrated in the approximation of classical small-angle multiple scattering theory. Conclusions: The inout electron transport imbalance at the lateral boundaries of parallel-plate chambers in electron beams has been studied with Monte Carlo simulation over a range of depth in water, and new correction factors, covering all depths and implementing the effective point of measurement concept, have been developed.

  10. Final Report: Depth-specific Hydraulic Testing of Yucca Flat and Frenchman Flat Environmental Restoration Wells, FY 2003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberlander, Phil; Russell, Charles

    2004-03-09

    Borehole flow logging contributes a greater understanding of subsurface conditions than measuring well discharge only at land surface. Combining the results of up to nine borehole flow logs to estimate hydraulic conductivity with depth includes data averaging over vertical intervals and averaging of calculated hydraulic conductivities among the various flow logs. Data filtering is also necessary to aid in differentiating between changes in borehole flow rate due to flow turbulence (and other causes) and those associated with groundwater inflow. Borehole flow logging during well pumping has provided the quantity of groundwater iniflow and hydraulic conductivity at depth for three wells. The results provided are believed to be an appropriate balance between predictive accuracy and preserving spatial resolution.

  11. Single-vortex pinning and penetration depth in superconducting NdFeAsO1-xFx

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Jessie T.; Kim, Jeehoon; Huefner, Magdalena; Ye, Cun; Kim, Stella; Canfield, Paul C.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Auslaender, Ophir M.; Hoffman, Jennifer E.

    2015-10-12

    We use a magnetic force microscope (MFM) to investigate single vortex pinning and penetration depth in NdFeAsO1-xFx, one of the highest-Tc iron-based superconductors. In fields up to 20 Gauss, we observe a disordered vortex arrangement, implying that the pinning forces are stronger than the vortex-vortex interactions. We measure the typical force to depin a single vortex, Fdepin ≃ 4.5 pN, corresponding to a critical current up to Jc ≃ 7×105 A/cm2. As a result, our MFM measurements allow the first local and absolute determination of the superconducting in-plane penetration depth in NdFeAsO1-xFx, λab = 320 ± 60 nm, which ismore » larger than previous bulk measurements.« less

  12. Characterization of Pliocene and Miocene Formations in the Wilmington Graben, Offshore Los Angeles, for Large-Scale Geologic Storage of CO₂

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, Michael

    2014-12-08

    Geomechanics Technologies has completed a detailed characterization study of the Wilmington Graben offshore Southern California area for large-scale CO₂ storage. This effort has included: an evaluation of existing wells in both State and Federal waters, field acquisition of about 175 km (109 mi) of new seismic data, new well drilling, development of integrated 3D geologic, geomechanics, and fluid flow models for the area. The geologic analysis indicates that more than 796 MMt of storage capacity is available within the Pliocene and Miocene formations in the Graben for midrange geologic estimates (P50). Geomechanical analyses indicate that injection can be conducted without significant risk for surface deformation, induced stresses or fault activation. Numerical analysis of fluid migration indicates that injection into the Pliocene Formation at depths of 1525 m (5000 ft) would lead to undesirable vertical migration of the CO₂ plume. Recent well drilling however, indicates that deeper sand is present at depths exceeding 2135 m (7000 ft), which could be viable for large volume storage. For vertical containment, injection would need to be limited to about 250,000 metric tons per year per well, would need to be placed at depths greater than 7000ft, and would need to be placed in new wells located at least 1 mile from any existing offset wells. As a practical matter, this would likely limit storage operations in the Wilmington Graben to about 1 million tons per year or less. A quantitative risk analysis for the Wilmington Graben indicate that such large scale CO₂ storage in the area would represent higher risk than other similar size projects in the US and overseas.

  13. Preliminary stratigraphic and petrologic characterization of core samples from USW-G1, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, A.C.; Carroll, P.R. (eds.)

    1981-11-01

    Tuffs of the Nevada Test Site are currently under investigation to determine their potential for long-term storage of radioactive waste. As part of this program, hole USW-G1 was drilled to a depth of 6000 ft below the surface, in the central part of the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Petrographic study of the USW-G1 core is presented in this report and shows the tuffs (which generally were variably welded ash flows) are partly recrystallized to a variety of secondary minerals. The important alteration products are zeolites (heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite and analcime), smectite clays with minor interstratified illite, albite, micas, potassium feldspar, and various forms of silica. Iijima`s zeolite zones I through IV of burial metamorphism can be recognized in the core. Zeolites are first observed at about the 1300-ft depth, and the high-temperature boundary of zeolite stability in this core occurs at about 4350 ft. Analcime persists, either metastably or as a retrograde mineral, deeper in the core. The oxidation state of Fe-Ti oxide minerals, through most of the core, increases as the degree of welding decreases, but towards the bottom of the hole, reducing conditions generally prevail. Four stratigraphic units transected by the core may be potentially favorable sites for a waste repository. These four units, in order of increasing depth in the core, are (1) the lower cooling unit of the Topopah Spring Member, (2) cooling unit II of the Bullfrog Member, (3) the upper part of the Tram tuff, and (4) the Lithic-rich tuff.

  14. Soil bacterial and fungal community responses to nitrogen addition across soil depth and microhabitat in an arid shrubland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Rebecca C.; Belnap, Jayne; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-09-04

    Arid shrublands are stressful environments, typified by alkaline soils low in organic matter, with biologically-limiting extremes in water availability, temperature, and UV radiation. The widely-spaced plants and interspace biological soil crusts in these regions provide soil nutrients in a localized fashion, creating a mosaic pattern of plant- or crust-associated microhabitats with distinct nutrient composition. With sporadic and limited rainfall, nutrients are primarily retained in the shallow surface soil, patterning biological activity. We examined soil bacterial and fungal community responses to simulated nitrogen (N) deposition in an arid Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa field experiment in southern Nevada, USA, using high-throughput sequencing of ribosomal RNA genes. To examine potential interactions among the N application, microhabitat and soil depth, we sampled soils associated with shrub canopies and interspace biological crusts at two soil depths (00.5 or 010 cm) across the N-amendment gradient (0, 7, and 15 kg ha1 yr1). We hypothesized that localized compositional differences in soil microbiota would constrain the impacts of N addition to a microhabitat distribution that would reflect highly localized geochemical conditions and microbial community composition. The richness and community composition of both bacterial and fungal communities differed significantly by microhabitat and with soil depth in each microhabitat. Only bacterial communities exhibited significant responses to the N addition. Community composition correlated with microhabitat and depth differences in soil geochemical features. Provided the distinct roles of soil bacteria and fungi in major nutrient cycles, the resilience of fungi and sensitivity of bacteria to N amendments suggests that increased N input predicted for many arid ecosystems could shift nutrient cycling toward pathways driven primarily by fungal communities.

  15. Soil bacterial and fungal community responses to nitrogen addition across soil depth and microhabitat in an arid shrubland

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mueller, Rebecca C.; Belnap, Jayne; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2015-09-04

    Arid shrublands are stressful environments, typified by alkaline soils low in organic matter, with biologically-limiting extremes in water availability, temperature, and UV radiation. The widely-spaced plants and interspace biological soil crusts in these regions provide soil nutrients in a localized fashion, creating a mosaic pattern of plant- or crust-associated microhabitats with distinct nutrient composition. With sporadic and limited rainfall, nutrients are primarily retained in the shallow surface soil, patterning biological activity. We examined soil bacterial and fungal community responses to simulated nitrogen (N) deposition in an arid Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa field experiment in southern Nevada, USA, using high-throughput sequencing ofmore » ribosomal RNA genes. To examine potential interactions among the N application, microhabitat and soil depth, we sampled soils associated with shrub canopies and interspace biological crusts at two soil depths (0–0.5 or 0–10 cm) across the N-amendment gradient (0, 7, and 15 kg ha–1 yr–1). We hypothesized that localized compositional differences in soil microbiota would constrain the impacts of N addition to a microhabitat distribution that would reflect highly localized geochemical conditions and microbial community composition. The richness and community composition of both bacterial and fungal communities differed significantly by microhabitat and with soil depth in each microhabitat. Only bacterial communities exhibited significant responses to the N addition. Community composition correlated with microhabitat and depth differences in soil geochemical features. Provided the distinct roles of soil bacteria and fungi in major nutrient cycles, the resilience of fungi and sensitivity of bacteria to N amendments suggests that increased N input predicted for many arid ecosystems could shift nutrient cycling toward pathways driven primarily by fungal communities.« less

  16. EVALUATION OF FROST HEAVE ON WASTE TRANSFER LINES WITH SHALLOW DEPTHS IN DST (DOUBLE SHELL TANK) FARMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAQ MA

    2009-05-12

    The purpose of this document is to evaluate the effect of frost heave on waste transfer lines with shallow depths in DST farms. Because of the insulation, well compacted sandy material around waste transfer lines, the type of sandy and gravel soil, and relatively low precipitation at Hanford site, it is concluded that waste transfer lines with one foot of soil covers (sandy cushion material and insulation) are not expected to undergo frost heave damaging effects.

  17. Waste Tank Size Determination for the Hanford River Protection Project Cold Test, Training, and Mockup Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onishi, Yasuo; Wells, Beric E.; Kuhn, William L.

    2001-03-30

    The objective of the study was to determine the minimum tank size for the Cold Test Facility process testing of Hanford tank waste. This facility would support retrieval of waste in 75-ft-diameter DSTs with mixer pumps and SSTs with fluidic mixers. The cold test model will use full-scale mixer pumps, transfer pumps, and equipment with simulated waste. The study evaluated the acceptability of data for a range of tank diameters and depths and included identifying how the test data would be extrapolated to predict results for a full-size tank.

  18. Numerical simulation of undersea cable dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablow, C.M.; Schechter, S.

    1983-01-01

    A fully three-dimensional code has been written to compute the motion of a towed cable. The code is based on a robust and stable finite difference approximation to the differential equations derived from basic dynamics. A 3500-ft cable pulled at 18.5 knots (hr/sup -1/) through a circular turn of 700 yd radius has been computed in about half of the real time of the maneuver. The computed displacements are close to the measured ones; the changes in depth are within 2%.

  19. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-14-015.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-14-015 SECTION A. Project Title: United States Geological Survey (USGS) Geotechnical Drilling for USGS-142 and USGS-143 SECTION B. Project Description: The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) proposes to continuously core geotechnical boreholes USGS-142 and USGS-143 to a depth of 1,000 and 2,000 ft below land surface, respectively. Boreholes USGS-142 and USGS-143 would be constructed as monitoring wells and used to measure and collect aquifer data. Borehole USGS-142 (see

  20. Trenton strata in western Illinois Basin, Brown and Schuyler Counties, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pochel, R.M.

    1984-12-01

    Trenton strata in the western Illinois basin are very good prospects for oil exploration. Much drilling has been done in the area but, as yet, no producing wells have been completed. Oil stains and some tars have been found in some samples from most wells. The Trenton in the area of Brown and Schuyler Counties is a fine-grained limestone that underlies the Maquoketa Shale at an average depth of 800 ft (244 m). Because of its position near the edge of the Illinois basin, the stratigraphy varies considerably and inconsistencies are present in most samples viewed.

  1. Interfacial development of electrophoretically deposited graphene oxide films on Al alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Sumin; Dickerson, James H.; Pham, Viet Hung; Brochu, Mathieu

    2015-07-28

    Adhesion between film and substrate is critical for electronic device and coating applications. Interfacial development between electrophoretically deposited graphene oxide films on Al 1100 and Al 5052 alloys were investigated using FT-IR and XPS depth profiling techniques. Obtained results suggest metal ion permeation from the substrates into deposited graphene oxide films. The interface between the films and the substrates were primarily composed of Al-O-C bonds from oxygenated defects on graphene oxide plane rather than expected Al-C formation. Films heat treated at 150 C had change in microstructure and peak shifts in XPS spectra suggesting change in chemical structure of bonds between the films and the substrates.

  2. Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    HTH-2 Data and 2009 Well Survey Data This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Well Completion Report for CAU 443 CNTA December 2009 Doc. No. S05827 Page A-1 Table A-1 Groundwater Quality Data by Location Groundwater Quality Data by Location (USEE100) FOR SITE CNT01, Central Nevada Test Area Site REPORT DATE: 9/11/2009 Location: HTH-2 WELL Parameter Units Sample Date ID Depth Range (Ft BLS) Result Qualifiers Lab Data QA Detection Limit Uncertainty Alkalinity, Total (As CaCO3)

  3. Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MV-4 Data This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Well Completion Report for CAU 443 CNTA December 2009 Doc. No. S05827 Page B-1 Table B-1. MV-4 Chronology Date Time Depth (ft bgs) Activity 04/16/09 through 04/22/09 NA NA Mobilization to CNTA and rig-up to drill 04/22/09 15:45 0 Rig inspection and drill pad walk through inspection, continue with preparations for drilling. 04/22/09 21:50 0 Begin drilling 31-inch diameter conductor casing borehole 04/23/09 10:10 100 Advanced

  4. Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    MV-5 Data This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Well Completion Report for CAU 443 CNTA December 2009 Doc. No. S05827 Page C-1 Table C-1. MV-5 Chronology Date Time Depth (ft bgs) Activity 05/09/09 through 05/10/09 NA NA Move rig and equipment from MV-4 pad to MV-5 pad and prepare to drill MV-5. 05/10/09 12:10 0 Rig inspection and drill pad walk through inspection, continue with preparations for drilling. 05/10/09 14:00 0 Begin drilling 31-inch diameter conductor casing

  5. Microsoft Word - S09799_EnhancedMR.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AWSS Data This page intentionally left blank DETECTION LIMIT PARAMETER LOCATION CODE UN- CERTAINTY REPORT DATE: 4/17/2013 2:30 pm GENERAL WATER QUALITY DATA BY PARAMETER (USEE205) FOR SITE RVT01, Riverton Processing Site UNITS QUALIFIERS: LAB DATA QA RESULT SAMPLE: DATE ID LOC TYPE, SUBTYPE DEPTH RANGE (FT BLS) mg/L 0813 N001 10/24/2012 - - # .48 0 DS, TAP - 0.00 0.00 Chlorine, Total Residual mg/L 0815 N001 10/24/2012 - - # .43 0 DS, TAP - 0.00 0.00 mg/L 0816 N001 10/24/2012 - - # .42 0 DS, TAP

  6. DOE/EA-1381

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and 3.1.4.2 Groundwater The depth to groundwater in Yucca Flat is about 160 m (525 ft) below land surface. Groundwater flows generally south and southwest. Groundwater quality within aquifers is generally acceptable for drinking water and industrial and agricultural uses. There are four water supply wells in Area 6: United States Geological Survey Water Well C, Water Well C1, Water Well 4, and Water Well 4A, all located in the southeast portion of Area 6. The wells closest to the proposed Atlas

  7. Assessment of Barotrauma Resulting from Rapid Decompression of Depth Acclimated Juvenile Chinook Salmon Bearing Radio Telemetry Transmitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Welch, Abigail E.; Stephenson, John R.; Abernethy, Cary S.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Theriault, Marie-Helene

    2007-09-06

    A multifactor study was conducted by Battelle for the US Army Corps of Engineers to assess the significance of the presence of a radio telemetry transmitter on the effects of rapid decompression from simulated hydro turbine passage on depth acclimated juvenile run-of-the-river Chinook salmon. Study factors were: (1) juvenile chinook salmon age;, subyearling or yearling, (2) radio transmitter present or absent, (3) three transmitter implantation factors: gastric, surgical, and no transmitter, and (4) four acclimation depth factors: 1, 10, 20, and 40 foot submergence equivalent absolute pressure, for a total of 48 unique treatments. Exposed fish were examined for changes in behavior, presence or absence of barotrauma injuries, and immediate or delayed mortality. Logistic models were used to test hypotheses that addressed study objectives. The presence of a radio transmitter was found to significantly increase the risk of barotrauma injury and mortality at exposure to rapid decompression. Gastric implantation was found to present a higher risk than surgical implantation. Fish were exposed within 48 hours of transmitter implantation so surgical incisions were not completely healed. The difference in results obtained for gastric and surgical implantation methods may be the result of study design and the results may have been different if tested fish had completely healed surgical wounds. However, the test did simulate the typical surgical-release time frame for in-river telemetry studies of fish survival so the results are probably representative for fish passing through a turbine shortly following release into the river. The finding of a significant difference in response to rapid decompression between fish bearing radio transmitters and those not implies a bias may exist in estimates of turbine passage survival obtained using radio telemetry. However, the rapid decompression (simulated turbine passage) conditions used for the study represented near worst case exposure for fish passing through turbines. At this time, insufficient data exist about the distribution of river-run fish entering turbines, and particularly, the distribution of fish passing through turbine runners, to extrapolate study findings to the population of fish passing through FCRPS turbines. This study is the first study examining rapid decompression study to include acclimation depth as an experimental factor for physostomous fish. We found that fish acclimated to deeper depth were significantly more vulnerable to barotrauma injury and death. Insufficient information about the distribution of fish entering turbines and their depth acclimation currently exists to extrapolate these findings to the population of fish passing through turbines. However, the risk of barotrauma for turbine-passed fish could be particularly high for subyearling Chinook salmon that migrate downstream at deeper depths late in the early summer portion of the outmigration. Barotrauma injuries led to immediate mortality delayed mortality and potential mortality due to increased susceptibility to predation resulting from loss of equilibrium or swim bladder rupture.

  8. The change of microstructure and thermal properties in ion irradiated carbon nanotube mats as a function of ion penetration depth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aitkaliyeva, A. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)] [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Shao, L. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States) [Materials Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2013-02-11

    A stack of three carbon nanotube (CNT) mats was irradiated with 3 MeV He ions. The change in structural and thermal properties of individual mats as a function of ion penetration depth was characterized using electron microscopy and laser flash techniques. Ion irradiation can enhance thermal conductivity of the mats by introducing inter-tube displacements, which improve phonon transport across adjacent nanotubes. The enhancement, however, is reduced at higher damage levels due to the increasing phonon-defect scattering within the tubes. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using ion irradiation to manipulate thermal transport in carbon nanotubes.

  9. A summary report on the search for current technologies and developers to develop depth profiling/physical parameter end effectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Q.H.

    1994-09-12

    This report documents the search strategies and results for available technologies and developers to develop tank waste depth profiling/physical parameter sensors. Sources searched include worldwide research reports, technical papers, journals, private industries, and work at Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) at Richland site. Tank waste physical parameters of interest are: abrasiveness, compressive strength, corrosiveness, density, pH, particle size/shape, porosity, radiation, settling velocity, shear strength, shear wave velocity, tensile strength, temperature, viscosity, and viscoelasticity. A list of related articles or sources for each physical parameters is provided.

  10. Property:EstReservoirVol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    km 1.799 mi 264,860,000,407.5 ft 9,809,629,642.5 yd 7,500,000,000,000 L + B Bac-Man Laguna Geothermal Area + 27,500,000,000 m27.5 km 6.598 mi 971,153,334,827.5 ft...

  11. NM, West Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0 0 0 0 10 29 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 1 1 4 4 3 5 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 2,732 2,384 2,098 1,349 951 945 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft)...

  12. Breakthroughs in Practical-Sized, High Quality OLED Light Panel Source

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    General Electric Global Research has achieved a major breakthrough, developing a fully functional 2 ft. x 2 ft. light panel that produces more than 1200 lumens of quality white light with an efficacy of 15 lumens per watt. This device offers 50% better energy performance than their previous device, breaking two world records.

  13. New York Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 19 15 2 6 1 1 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 19 15 2 6 1 1...

  14. Handling and Emplacement Options for Deep Borehole Disposal Conceptual Design.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, John R.; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-07-01

    This report presents conceptual design information for a system to handle and emplace packages containing radioactive waste, in boreholes 16,400 ft deep or possibly deeper. Its intended use is for a design selection study that compares the costs and risks associated with two emplacement methods: drill-string and wireline emplacement. The deep borehole disposal (DBD) concept calls for siting a borehole (or array of boreholes) that penetrate crystalline basement rock to a depth below surface of about 16,400 ft (5 km). Waste packages would be emplaced in the lower 6,560 ft (2 km) of the borehole, with sealing of appropriate portions of the upper 9,840 ft (3 km). A deep borehole field test (DBFT) is planned to test and refine the DBD concept. The DBFT is a scientific and engineering experiment, conducted at full-scale, in-situ, without radioactive waste. Waste handling operations are conceptualized to begin with the onsite receipt of a purpose-built Type B shipping cask, that contains a waste package. Emplacement operations begin when the cask is upended over the borehole, locked to a receiving flange or collar. The scope of emplacement includes activities to lower waste packages to total depth, and to retrieve them back to the surface when necessary for any reason. This report describes three concepts for the handling and emplacement of the waste packages: 1) a concept proposed by Woodward-Clyde Consultants in 1983; 2) an updated version of the 1983 concept developed for the DBFT; and 3) a new concept in which individual waste packages would be lowered to depth using a wireline. The systems described here could be adapted to different waste forms, but for design of waste packaging, handling, and emplacement systems the reference waste forms are DOE-owned high- level waste including Cs/Sr capsules and bulk granular HLW from fuel processing. Handling and Emplacement Options for Deep Borehole Disposal Conceptual Design July 23, 2015 iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report has benefited greatly from review principally by Steve Pye, and also by Paul Eslinger, Dave Sevougian and Jiann Su.

  15. Identifying the Effects on Fish of Changes in Water Pressure during Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, James M.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2003-09-01

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage and dissolved gas supersaturation. We investigated the responses of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to these two stresses, singly and in combination, in the laboratory. Fish were exposed to total dissolved gas levels of 100%, 120%, or 135% of saturation while being held at either surface or 30 ft of pressure. Some of these fish were then subjected to decreases in pressure simulating passage through a Kaplan turbine under worst case (to 0.1 atmospheres) or more fish friendly (to 0.5 atmospheres) scenarios. Surface- and depth-acclimated Chinook salmon and bluegill, with no exposure to dissolved gas above ambient levels, were subjected to decreases in pressure simulating passage through a bulb turbine under worst case (to 0.68 atmospheres) or more fish friendly (to 1.0 atmospheres) scenarios. Bluegill, the most pressure-sensitive among the three species, incurred injuries that ranged from mild (internal hemorrhaging) (bulb turbine) to death (Kaplan turbine). For each type of turbine passage, bluegill acclimated to 30 ft depth and subjected to the more severe pressure nadir were more susceptible to injury/death. However, even control bluegill (i.e., not subjected to simulated turbine passage) experienced mild to moderate injury from rapidly ascending from 30 ft of pressure to surface pressure. The dissolved gas level had only a small additive effect on the injury/death rate of bluegill subjected to simulated Kaplan turbine passage. Thus, while physoclistous fish, such as bluegill, appear to be susceptible to injury from any rapid pressure decrease, those that are most severe (e.g., Kaplan turbine passage) are likely to be most injurious. Chinook salmon and rainbow trout were much less susceptible than bluegill to death/injury from simulated Kaplan turbine passage, and Chinook salmon incurred no visible injuries from simulated bulb turbine passage under any scenario. Acclimation to 30 ft depth had little additional effect on the injury/death rate of Chinook salmon and rainbow trout subjected to Kaplan turbine passage. However, these species were much more susceptible to acute gas bubble trauma than bluegill, particularly those acclimated at surface pressure at 120% or 135% of saturation. Consequently, it would be advantageous to develop advanced turbines that operate efficiently under more fish friendly pressure regimes and to reduce the amount of gas supersaturation.

  16. Skylighting saves over $20,000/year at paint manufacturing site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arakawa, W.

    1983-05-01

    A discussion of the economics and installation of skylights in a warehouse and manufacturing area was presented. Included in the discussion were details on the installation, costs, energy conserved, savings, and payback period. In the particular case outlined, the installation costs were dependent on the type of existing roof. These costs ranged from $80 per 4 ft. by 8 ft. unit to $375 per 8 ft. by 8 ft. unit. In skylighting a 250,000 sq. ft. warehouse (1.5% of the roof area), the installation cost was $44,458. The power saving was $14,706 per year, with a payback period of slightly over three years. Later increase in power rates by 20% decreased the payback period by almost a year.

  17. Utilization of the St. Peter Sandstone in the Illinois Basin for CO2 Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Will, Robert; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    This project is part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) under cooperative agreement DE-FE0002068 from 12/08/2009 through 9/31/2014. The study is to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon Sandstone as potential targets for carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins. This report evaluates the potential injectivity of the Ordovician St. Peter Sandstone. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data acquired through funding in this project as well as existing data from two additional, separately funded projects: the US DOE funded Illinois Basin Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) in Macon County, Illinois, and the Illinois Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) Project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), which received a phase two award from DOE. This study addresses the question of whether or not the St. Peter Sandstone may serve as a suitable target for CO2 sequestration at locations within the Illinois Basin where it lies at greater depths (below the underground source of drinking water (USDW)) than at the IBDP site. The work performed included numerous improvements to the existing St. Peter reservoir model created in 2010. Model size and spatial resolution were increased resulting in a 3 fold increase in the number of model cells. Seismic data was utilized to inform spatial porosity distribution and an extensive core database was used to develop porosity-permeability relationships. The analysis involved a Base Model representative of the St. Peter at in-situ conditions, followed by the creation of two hypothetical models at in-situ + 1,000 feet (ft.) (300 m) and in-situ + 2,000 ft. (600 m) depths through systematic depthdependent adjustment of the Base Model parameters. Properties for the depth shifted models were based on porosity versus depth relationship extracted from the core database followed by application of the porosity-permeability relationship. Each of the three resulting models were used as input to dynamic simulations with the single well injection target of 3.2 million tons per annum (MTPA) for 30 years using an appropriate fracture gradient based bottom hole pressure limit for each injection level. Modeling results are presented in terms of well bottomhole pressure (BHP), injection rate profiles, and three-dimensional (3D) saturation and differential pressure volumes at selected simulation times. Results suggest that the target CO2 injection rate of 3.2 MTPA may be achieved in the St. Peter Sandstone at in-situ conditions and at the in-situ +1,000 ft. (300 m) depth using a single injector well. In the latter case the target injection rate is achieved after a ramp up period which is caused by multi-phase flow effects and thus subject to increased modeling uncertainty. Results confirm that the target rate may not be achieved at the in-situ +2,000 ft. (600 m) level even with multiple wells. These new modeling results for the in-situ case are more optimistic than previous modeling results. This difference is attributed to the difference in methods and data used to develop model permeability distributions. Recommendations for further work include restriction of modeling activity to the in-situ +1,000 ft. (300 m) and shallower depth interval, sensitivity and uncertainty analysis, and refinement of porosity and permeability estimates through depth and area selective querying of the available core database. It is also suggested that further modeling efforts include scope for evaluating project performance in terms of metrics directly related to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Class VI permit requirements for the area of review (AoR) definition and post injection site closure monitoring.

  18. A Bayesian inversion framework for yield and height-of-burst/depth-of-burial for near-surface explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johannesson, Gardar; Bulaevskaya, Vera; Ramirez, Abe; Ford, Sean; Rodgers, Artie

    2015-09-07

    A Bayesian inversion framework is presented to estimate the yield of an explosion and height-of-burst/depth-of-burial (HOB/DOB) using seismic and air pressure data. This is accomplished by first calibrating the parameters in the forward models that relate the observations to the yield and HOB/DOB and then using the calibrated model to estimate yield and HOB/DOB associated with a new set of seismic and air pressure observations. The MCMC algorithms required to perform these steps are outlined, and the results with real data are shown. Finally, an extension is proposed for a case when clustering in the seismic displacement occurs as a function of different types of rock and other factors.

  19. Depth-dependent magnetism in epitaxial MnSb thin films: effects of surface passivation and cleaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aldous J. D.; Sanchez-Hanke C.; Burrows, C.W.; Maskery, I.; Brewer, M.S.; Hase, T.P.A.; Duffy, J.A.; Lees, M. Rs; Decoster, T.; Theis, W.; Quesada, A.; Schmid, A.K.; Bell, G.R.

    2012-03-15

    Depth-dependent magnetism in MnSb(0001) epitaxial films has been studied by combining experimental methods with different surface specificities: polarized neutron reflectivity, x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), x-ray resonant magnetic scattering and spin-polarized low energy electron microscopy (SPLEEM). A native oxide {approx}4.5 nm thick covers air-exposed samples which increases the film's coercivity. HCl etching efficiently removes this oxide and in situ surface treatment of etched samples enables surface magnetic contrast to be observed in SPLEEM. A thin Sb capping layer prevents oxidation and preserves ferromagnetism throughout the MnSb film. The interpretation of Mn L{sub 3,2} edge XMCD data is discussed.

  20. Spatially resolved penetration depth measurements and vortex manipulation in the ferromagnetic superconductor ErNi2B2C

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wulferding, Dirk; Yang, Ilkyu; Yang, Jinho; Lee, Minkyung; Choi, Hee Cheul; Bud'ko, Sergey L.; Canfield, Paul C.; Yeom, Han Woong; Kim, Jeehoon

    2015-07-31

    We present a local probe study of the magnetic superconductor ErNi2B2C, using magnetic force microscopy at sub-Kelvin temperatures. ErNi2B2C is an ideal system to explore the effects of concomitant superconductivity and ferromagnetism. At 500 mK, far below the transition to a weakly ferromagnetic state, we directly observe a structured magnetic background on the micrometer scale. We determine spatially resolved absolute values of the magnetic penetration depth λ and study its temperature dependence as the system undergoes magnetic phase transitions from paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic, and to weak ferromagnetic, all within the superconducting regime. We estimate the absolute pinning force of Abrikosovmore » vortices, which shows a position dependence and temperature dependence as well, and discuss the possibility of the purported spontaneous vortex formation.« less

  1. Measurement of the Depth of Maximum of Extensive Air Showers above 10^18 eV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; /Lisbon, IST /Boskovic Inst., Zagreb

    2010-02-01

    We describe the measurement of the depth of maximum, X{sub max}, of the longitudinal development of air showers induced by cosmic rays. Almost 4000 events above 10{sup 18} eV observed by the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in coincidence with at least one surface detector station are selected for the analysis. The average shower maximum was found to evolve with energy at a rate of (106{sub -21}{sup +35}) g/cm{sup 2}/decade below 10{sup 18.24 {+-} 0.05}eV, and (24 {+-} 3) g/cm{sup 2}/decade above this energy. The measured shower-to-shower fluctuations decrease from about 55 to 26 g/cm{sup 2}. The interpretation of these results in terms of the cosmic ray mass composition is briefly discussed.

  2. Depth-dependent Vertical-to-Horizontal (V/H) Ratios of Free-Field Ground Motion Response Spectra for Deeply Embedded Nuclear Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei X.; Braverman J.; Miranda, M.; Rosario, M.E.; Costantino, C.J.

    2015-02-25

    This report documents the results of a study to determine the depth-dependent V/H ratios of ground motion response spectra in the free field. The V/H ratios reported herein were developed from a worldwide database of surface and downhole acceleration recordings obtained from 45 vertical array stations. This database was specifically compiled for this project, and includes information from a diversity of active tectonic regions (California, Alaska, Taiwan, Japan), site conditions (rock to soft soil), ground motion intensity levels (PGAs between 0.01 g and 0.50 g), magnitudes (between ML 2.78 and JMA 8.1), epicentral distances (between 3.2 km and 812 km), and source depths (between 1.2 km and 112 km), as well as sensors at surface and at a wide range of depths relevant to the project. To study the significance of the depth effect, V/H ratios from all the records were sorted into a number of depth bins relevant to the project, and statistics (average, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, 16th, 50th, and 84th percentiles) of the V/H ratios within each bin were computed. Similar analyses were repeated, controlling for different site conditions, ground motion intensity levels, array locations, and source depths, to study their relative effect on the V/H ratios. Our findings confirm the importance of the depth effect on the V/H ratios. The research findings in this report can be used to provide guidance on the significance of the depth effect, and the extent to which this effect should be considered in the seismic design of deeply embedded SMR structures and NPP structures in general.

  3. Niamey Aerosol Optical Depths

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Flynn, Connor

    2008-10-01

    MFRSR irradiance data collected during the ACRF AMF deployment in Niamey, Niger have been used to derive AOD for five wavelength channels of the MFRSR. These data have been corrected to adjust for filter drift over the course of the campaign and contamination due to forward scattering as a result of large dust particles in the atmosphere around Niamey.

  4. A Built for Purpose Micro-Hole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bart Patton

    2007-09-30

    This report will serve as the final report on the work performed from the contract period October 2005 thru April 2007. The project 'A Built for Purpose Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR)' purpose was to upgrade an existing state-of-the-art Coiled Tubing Drilling Rig to a Microhole Coiled Tubing Rig (MCTR) capable of meeting the specifications and tasks of the Department of Energy. The individual tasks outlined to meet the Department of Energy's specifications are: (1) Concept and development of lubricator and tool deployment system; (2) Concept and development of process control and data acquisition; (3) Concept and development of safety and efficiency improvements; and (4) Final unit integration and testing. The end result of the MCTR upgrade has produced a unit capable of meeting the following requirements: (1) Capable of handling 1-inch through 2-3/8-inch coiled tubing (Currently dressed for 2-3/8-inch coiled tubing and capable of running up to 3-1/2-inch coiled tubing); (2) Capable of drilling and casing surface, intermediate, production and liner hole intervals; (3) Capable of drilling with coiled tubing and has all controls and installation piping for a top drive; (4) Rig is capable of running 7-5/8-inch range 2 casing; and (5) Capable of drilling 5,000 ft true vertical depth (TVD) and 6,000 ft true measured depth (TMD).

  5. Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-5 (C-3002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis W. Powers; Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-01-18

    SNL-5 (permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-3002) was drilled to provide geological data and hydrological testing of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation in an area north of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site where data are sparse and where a pumping or monitoring well for the northern pumping test is needed. SNL-5 is located in the southeast quarter of section 6, T22S, R31E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico. SNL-5 was drilled to a total depth of 687 ft below ground level (bgl), based on driller's measurements. Below the caliche pad, SNL-5 encountered the Mescalero caliche, Gatu?a, Dewey Lake, and Rustler Formations. Two intervals of the Rustler were cored: (1) from the lower Forty-niner Member through the Magenta Dolomite and into the upper Tamarisk Member; and (2) from the lower Tamarisk Member through the Culebra Dolomite and into the upper Los Meda?os Members. Geophysical logs were acquired from the open hole to a depth of ~672 ft. No water was observed to flow into the open drillhole until the Culebra was penetrated. includes horizontal beds and laminae near the base, and the uppermost part shows some inclined bedding. The mudstone unit shows mostly reddish brown claystone and siltstone with some gray mottling. Clasts or intraclasts are also included in the unit. The upper Tamarisk sulfate is somewhat brecciated near the base.

  6. Active probing of cloud multiple scattering, optical depth, vertical thickness, and liquid water content using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B.; Rohde, C. A.; Tellier, L. L.; Ho, Cheng,

    2002-01-01

    At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60-degree full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer, and, from there, estimate the volume-averaged liquid water content. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Here we present recent WAIL data oti various clouds and discuss the extension of WAIL to full diurnal monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter for daytime measurements.

  7. In-Depth Analysis of Simulation Engine Codes for Comparison with DOE s Roof Savings Calculator and Measured Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    New, Joshua Ryan; Levinson, Ronnen; Huang, Yu; Sanyal, Jibonananda; Miller, William A.; Mellot, Joe; Childs, Kenneth W.; Kriner, Scott

    2014-06-01

    The Roof Savings Calculator (RSC) was developed through collaborations among Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), White Box Technologies, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and the Environmental Protection Agency in the context of a California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research project to make cool-color roofing materials a market reality. The RSC website and a simulation engine validated against demonstration homes were developed to replace the liberal DOE Cool Roof Calculator and the conservative EPA Energy Star Roofing Calculator, which reported different roof savings estimates. A preliminary analysis arrived at a tentative explanation for why RSC results differed from previous LBNL studies and provided guidance for future analysis in the comparison of four simulation programs (doe2attic, DOE-2.1E, EnergyPlus, and MicroPas), including heat exchange between the attic surfaces (principally the roof and ceiling) and the resulting heat flows through the ceiling to the building below. The results were consolidated in an ORNL technical report, ORNL/TM-2013/501. This report is an in-depth inter-comparison of four programs with detailed measured data from an experimental facility operated by ORNL in South Carolina in which different segments of the attic had different roof and attic systems.

  8. Determination of hydrogen diffusion coefficients in F82H by hydrogen depth profiling with a tritium imaging plate technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higaki, M.; Otsuka, T.; Hashizume, K.; Tokunaga, K.; Ezato, K.; Suzuki, S.; Enoeda, M.; Akiba, M.

    2015-03-15

    Hydrogen diffusion coefficients in a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel (F82H) and an oxide dispersion strengthened F82H (ODS-F82H) have been determined from depth profiles of plasma-loaded hydrogen with a tritium imaging plate technique (TIPT) in the temperature range from 298 K to 523 K. Data on hydrogen diffusion coefficients, D, in F82H, are summarized as D [m{sup 2}*s{sup -1}] =1.1*10{sup -7}exp(-16[kJ mol{sup -1}]/RT). The present data indicate almost no trapping effect on hydrogen diffusion due to an excess entry of energetic hydrogen by the plasma loading, which results in saturation of the trapping sites at the surface and even in the bulk. In the case of ODS-F82H, data of hydrogen diffusion coefficients are summarized as D [m{sup 2}*s{sup -1}] =2.2*10{sup -7}exp(-30[kJ mol{sup -1}]/RT) indicating a remarkable trapping effect on hydrogen diffusion caused by tiny oxide particles (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) in the bulk of F82H. Such oxide particles introduced in the bulk may play an effective role not only on enhancement of mechanical strength but also on suppression of hydrogen penetration by plasma loading.

  9. Clinal morphological variation along a depth gradient in the living scleractinian reef coral Favia pallida: Effects on perceived evolutionary tempos in the fossil record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuffey, R.J. ); Pachut, J.F. )

    1990-12-01

    The Holocene reef-building coral Favia pallida was sampled at 4.5 m depth increments (to 40 m) from two reefs on Enewetak Atoll to examine intraspecific environmental effects. An exposed outer reef was massive and wall-like, whereas a sheltered lagoonal reef grew as a slender pinnacle. Corallite diameter and growth rate, two attributes retrievable in fossil corals, were measured with data partitioned into shallow (<20 m), intermediate (20 to 29 m), and deep-water (>29 m) subsets. Highly significant differences between depth zone populations were found for both corallite diameters and growth rates in analyses of individual and combined reef data sets. Canonical variates analyses (CVA) separated populations from depth zones along single, highly significant, functions. Centroids and 95% confidence intervals, calculated from CVA scores of colonies in each population, are widely separated for the lagoon reef and combined data sets. Conversely, populations from shallow and intermediate depths on the outer reef display overlapping confidence bars indicative of more gradational morphologic changes. When CV's were used to classify specimens to groups, misassignments of intermediate depth specimens to shallow or deep-water populations underscored the gradational nature of the environment. Completely intergrading populations of Favia pallida collected from different depths can be morphologically separated into statistically distinct groupings. A stratigraphic succession of such morphotypes might be interpreted as abruptly appearing separate species if sampling were not as uniform, systematic, and detailed as was possible on modern reefs. Analyses of evolutionary patterns must carefully assess potential effects of clinal variation if past evolutionary patterns are to be interpreted correctly.

  10. Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 4.4.1 Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI) Presentation Number: 015 Investigator: Patterson, Doug (Baker Hughes Oilfield Operations Incorporated) Objectives: To develop an ultrasonic borehole televiewer that can operate at temperatures as high as 300 °C and in depths as great as 10,000 m. Average Overall Score: 3.3/4.0 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 Relevance/ Impact Scientific/ Technical Approach

  11. METHANE HYDRATE PRODUCTION FROM ALASKAN PERMAFROST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Sigal; Kent Newsham; Thomas Williams; Barry Freifeld; Timothy Kneafsey; Carl Sondergeld; Shandra Rai; Jonathan Kwan; Stephen Kirby; Robert Kleinberg; Doug Griffin

    2005-02-01

    Natural-gas hydrates have been encountered beneath the permafrost and considered a nuisance by the oil and gas industry for years. Engineers working in Russia, Canada and the USA have documented numerous drilling problems, including kicks and uncontrolled gas releases, in arctic regions. Information has been generated in laboratory studies pertaining to the extent, volume, chemistry and phase behavior of gas hydrates. Scientists studying hydrate potential agree that the potential is great--on the North Slope of Alaska alone, it has been estimated at 590 TCF. However, little information has been obtained on physical samples taken from actual rock containing hydrates. The work scope drilled and cored a well The Hot Ice No. 1 on Anadarko leases beginning in FY 2003 and completed in 2004. An on-site core analysis laboratory was built and utilized for determining the physical characteristics of the hydrates and surrounding rock. The well was drilled from a new Anadarko Arctic Platform that has a minimal footprint and environmental impact. The final efforts of the project are to correlate geology, geophysics, logs, and drilling and production data and provide this information to scientists developing reservoir models. No gas hydrates were encountered in this well; however, a wealth of information was generated and is contained in this report. The Hot Ice No. 1 well was drilled from the surface to a measured depth of 2300 ft. There was almost 100% core recovery from the bottom of surface casing at 107 ft to total depth. Based on the best estimate of the bottom of the methane hydrate stability zone (which used new data obtained from Hot Ice No. 1 and new analysis of data from adjacent wells), core was recovered over its complete range. Approximately 580 ft of porous, mostly frozen, sandstone and 155 of conglomerate were recovered in the Ugnu Formation and approximately 215 ft of porous sandstone were recovered in the West Sak Formation. There were gas shows in the bottom part of the Ugnu and throughout the West Sak. No hydrate-bearing zones were identified either in recovered core or on well logs. The base of the permafrost was found at about 1260 ft. With the exception of the deepest sands in the West Sak and some anomalous thin, tight zones, all sands recovered (after thawing) are unconsolidated with high porosity and high permeability. At 800 psi, Ugnu sands have an average porosity of 39.3% and geometrical mean permeability of 3.7 Darcys. Average grain density is 2.64 g/cc. West Sak sands have an average porosity of 35.5%, geometrical mean permeability of 0.3 Darcys, and average grain density of 2.70 g/cc. There were several 1-2 ft intervals of carbonate-cemented sandstone recovered from the West Sak. These intervals have porosities of only a few percent and very low permeability. On a well log they appear as resistive with a high sonic velocity. In shallow sections of other wells these usually are the only logs available. Given the presence of gas in Hot Ice No. 1, if only resistivity and sonic logs and a mud log had been available, tight sand zones may have been interpreted as containing hydrates. Although this finding does not imply that all previously mapped hydrate zones are merely tight sands, it does add a note of caution to the practice of interpreting the presence of hydrates from old well information. The methane hydrate stability zone below the Hot Ice No. 1 location includes thick sections of sandstone and conglomerate which would make excellent reservoir rocks for hydrates and below the permafrost zone shallow gas. The Ugnu formation comprises a more sand-rich section than does the West Sak formation, and the Ugnu sands when cleaned and dried are slightly more porous and significantly more permeable than the West Sak.

  12. Seismic Velocity Structure and Depth-Dependence of Anisotropy in the Red Sea and Arabian Shield from Surface Wave Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, S; Gaherty, J; Schwartz, S; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-07-25

    We investigate the lithospheric and upper mantle structure as well as the depth-dependence of anisotropy along the Red Sea and beneath the Arabian Peninsula using receiver function constraints and phase velocities of surface waves traversing two transects of stations from the Saudi Arabian National Digital Seismic Network. Frequency-dependent phase delays of fundamental-mode Love and Rayleigh waves, measured using a cross-correlation procedure, require very slow shear velocities and the presence of anisotropy throughout the upper mantle. Linearized inversion of these data produce path-averaged 1D radially anisotropic models with about 4% anisotropy in the lithosphere, increasing to about 4.8% anisotropy across the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). Models with reasonable crustal velocities in which the mantle lithosphere is isotropic cannot satisfy the data. The lithospheric lid, which ranges in thickness from about 70 km near the Red Sea coast to about 90 km beneath the Arabian Shield, is underlain by a pronounced low-velocity zone with shear velocities as low as 4.1 km/s. Forward models, which are constructed from previously determined shear-wave splitting estimates, can reconcile surface and body wave observations of anisotropy. The low shear velocity values are similar to many other continental rift and oceanic ridge environments. These low velocities combined with the sharp velocity contrast across the LAB may indicate the presence of partial melt beneath Arabia. The anisotropic signature primarily reflects a combination of plate- and density-driven flow associated with active rifting processes in the Red Sea.

  13. Preliminary results of wildcat drilling in Absaroka volcanic rocks, Hot Springs County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, M.H.; Sundell, K.A.

    1986-08-01

    Recent drilling of three remote, high-elevation wildcat wells has proven that excellent Paleozoic reservoirs are present at shallow depths beneath Eocene volcaniclastic rocks. The Tensleep and Madison Formations are fluid filled above an elevation of 8000 ft, and all Paleozoic formations exhibit shows of oil and gas. These prolific reservoir rocks have produced billions of barrels of oil from the adjacent Bighorn and Wind river basins, and they pinch out with angular unconformity against the base of the volcanics, providing enormous potential for stratigraphic oil accumulations. Vibroseis and portable seismic data have confirmed and further delineate large anticlines of Paleozoic rocks, which were originally discovered by detailed surface geologic mapping. These structures can be projected along anticlinal trends from the western Owl Creek Mountains to beneath the volcanics as well. The overlying volcanics are generally soft, reworked sediments. However, large, hard boulders and blocks of andesite-dacite, which were previously mapped as intrusives, are present and are the result of catastrophic landslide/debris flow. The volcanics locally contain highly porous and permeable sandstones and abundant bentonite stringers. Oil and gas shows were observed throughout a 2400-ft thick interval of the Eocene Tepee Trail and Aycross Formations. Shows were recorded 9100 ft above sea level in the volcanic rocks. A minimum of 10 million bbl of oil (asphaltum) and an undetermined amount of gases and lighter oils have accumulated within the basal volcanic sequence, based on the evaluation of data from two drill sites. Significant amounts of hydrocarbons have migrated since the volcanics were deposited 50 Ma. Large Laramide anticlines were partially eroded and breached into the Paleozoic formations and resealed by overlying volcanics with subsequent development of a massive tar seal.

  14. Log analysis of six boreholes in conjunction with geologic characterization above and on top of the Weeks Island salt dome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sattler, A.R.

    1996-04-01

    Six boreholes were drilled during the geologic characterization and diagnostics of the Weeks Island sinkhole that is over the two-tiered salt mine which was converted for oil storage by the US Strategic Petroleum Reserve. These holes were drilled to provide for geologic characterization of the Weeks Island Salt Dome and its overburden in the immediate vicinity of the sinkhole (mainly through logs and core); to establish a crosswell configuration for seismic tomography; to establish locations for hydrocarbon detection and tracer injection; and to Provide direct observations of sinkhole geometry and material properties. Specific objectives of the logging program were to: (1) identify the top of and the physical state of the salt dome; (2) identify the water table; (3) obtain a relative salinity profile in the aquifer within the alluvium, which ranges from the water table directly to the top of the Weeks Island salt dome; and (4) identify a reflecting horizon seen on seismic profiles over this salt dome. Natural gamma, neutron, density, sonic, resistivity and caliper logs were run. Neutron and density logs were run from inside the well casing because of the extremely unstable condition of the deltaic alluvium overburden above the salt dome. The logging program provided important information about the salt dome and the overburden in that (1) the top of the salt dome was identified at {approximately}189 ft bgl (103 ft msl), and the top of the dome contains relatively few fractures; (2) the water table is approximately 1 ft msl, (3) this aquifer appears to become steadily more saline with depth; and (4) the water saturation of much of the alluvium over the salt dome is shown to be influenced by the prevalent heavy rainfall. This logging program, a part of the sinkhole diagnostics, provides unique information about this salt dome and the overburden.

  15. Energy Efficiency Projects: Overcoming Internal Barriers to Implementation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RICHMOND SITE Site Background  90 acre campus  275,000 ft 2 DSC  220,000 ft 2 Paint Plant  30,000 ft 2 Resin Plant  353 Total Employees Site Background  Main Plant Built in 1976; Resin in 1985; DSC in 1994  Topography and flow consideration  Novel Management Style  No time clock, rotating shifts, team meeting rooms  Team input on overtime, hiring, capital and CI  Innovator Award Program Richmond Sustainability Timeline  2006 Capital Allocated to Reduce Natural

  16. 20O

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O β--Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1960SC01: 20O; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1970MA42: 20O; measured T1/2, Eγ, Iγ; deduced log ft. 1974AL09: 20O; measured Eγ, Iγ, T1/2, deduced log ft. 20F levels deduced γ-branching. 1985AN17: 20O(β-); deduced Q. Mass excess data input. 1987AL06: 20O(β-); measured Eγ, Iγ; deduced β- branching, log ft. 20F levels deduced γ-branching, allowed, first-forbidden unique, nonunique transition strength. 2009LI51: 20O(β-);

  17. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-15-071.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 SECTION A. Project Title: Idaho Falls (IF)-675 Majestic Park Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy (PINS) Laboratory (MPPL) Environmental Chamber Installation SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: The proposed action would install and test a Cincinnati Sub-Zero (CSZ) Model ZPH-8-2-H/AC Temperature/Humidity Test Chamber at the IF-675 Majestic Park PINS Laboratory (MPPL) located at 2752 E. 14th N. Idaho Falls, Idaho. The chamber unit is approximately 3 ft X 5 ft X 6 ft high. The CSZ Model

  18. Arkansas Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 0 11 10 8 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 5,872 7,274 5,919 3,520 4,844 4,011 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 5,872 7,273 5,919 3,450 4,774 3,951 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 1 0 70 70 6

  19. New Mexico Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    149 180 185 232 314 489 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 13 17 22 33 28 20 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 3,784 3,600 3,456 2,655 2,398 3,030 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 3,376 3,043 2,794 2,005 1,369 1,377 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 408 557 662 650 1,029 1,653

  20. North Dakota Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    63 969 1,421 2,207 3,278 3,456 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 8 42 6 6 0 1 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 510 920 1,324 2,360 3,619 3,559 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 23 20 18 9 2 3 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 487 900 1,306 2,351 3,617 3,55

  1. North Louisiana Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8 45 30 13 12 17 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 6 6 10 15 16 30 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 11,616 17,647 13,832 8,296 7,405 11,448 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 11,599 17,635 13,820 8,284 7,366 11,430 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 17 12 12 12 39 18

  2. Oklahoma Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    138 143 244 279 292 444 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 56 66 94 148 188 224 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 8,161 10,288 10,965 11,828 9,688 13,996 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 7,990 9,856 9,935 10,145 7,878 10,953 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 171 432 1,030 1,683 1,810 3,043

  3. Pennsylvania Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 0 0 0 0 0 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 3 3 13 17 22 38 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 2,282 5,472 13,069 17,236 21,500 24,089 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 2,282 5,472 13,067 17,236 21,500 24,087 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 2 0 0 2

  4. TX, RRC District 1 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    26 144 436 1,266 1,324 1,427 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 6 28 128 257 158 233 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 743 1,725 3,627 6,524 4,317 7,542 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 719 1,545 2,960 4,532 2,079 4,721 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 24 180 667 1,992 2,238 2,821

  5. TX, RRC District 10 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 35 51 70 70 46 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 27 55 54 59 41 68 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 2,325 3,353 2,954 2,906 2,062 2,744 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 2,162 3,138 2,633 2,579 1,728 2,486 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 163 215 321 327 334 258

  6. TX, RRC District 5 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 1 29 12 28 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 9,039 9,340 8,784 3,255 2,729 3,216 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 9,039 9,340 8,779 3,237 2,724 3,201 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 0 0 5 18 5 15

  7. TX, RRC District 6 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2 11 16 32 18 40 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 21 34 25 39 27 42 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 5,690 7,090 6,712 4,849 4,273 4,458 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 5,671 6,977 6,596 4,643 4,087 4,373 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 19 113 116 206 186 8

  8. TX, RRC District 8 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    679 790 934 1,144 1,057 1,441 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 6 44 19 29 30 20 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 2,469 2,518 2,891 2,626 2,752 3,333 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 1,427 1,157 991 335 402 368 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 1,042 1,361 1,900 2,291 2,350 2,965

  9. TX, RRC District 9 Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5 21 20 32 20 39 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 8 8 12 8 10 4 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 4,168 4,274 2,974 2,824 2,455 2,133 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 3,935 4,043 2,724 2,452 2,236 1,763 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 233 231 250 372 219 370

  10. Texas Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1,455 1,883 2,456 4,293 4,065 5,060 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 124 274 445 896 683 944 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 31,336 36,190 37,479 35,178 30,143 37,750 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 28,549 32,605 32,240 26,632 21,944 27,130 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 2,787 3,585 5,239 8,546 8,199 10,620

  11. Utah Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    235 257 258 368 312 261 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 11 40 44 57 33 28 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 2,110 3,476 3,646 3,573 3,100 2,837 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 1,739 3,125 3,230 2,955 2,621 2,460 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 371 351 416 618 479 377

  12. Quantification of progress in indirect coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, D.; ElSawy, A.; Tomlinson, G.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this study is to quantify the economic and technical impact of incorporating various advanced technologies into the indirect coal liquefaction system. These advanced technologies include entrained flow Shell gasification and slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis. This objective was accomplished by substituting the Shell entrained goal gasifier system for the Lurgi and the advanced slurry F-T reactor for the Synthol and ARGE F-T systems in a SASOL-type indirect liquefaction facility. 4 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Colorado Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    42 180 208 283 607 765 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 34 41 30 79 148 133 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 8,188 7,527 6,794 6,386 8,732 8,523 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 7,732 6,768 5,316 4,694 5,804 5,064 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 456 759 1,478 1,692 2,928 3,459

  14. Federal Offshore U.S. Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,150 1,710 2,662 2,189 2,456 2,306 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 103 91 79 49 58 63 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 6,039 4,791 4,893 3,808 3,696 3,776 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 3,758 2,869 2,343 1,750 1,469 1,581 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 2,281 1,922 2,550 2,058 2,227 2,195

  15. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Proved Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves 2,013 1,595 2,597 2,130 2,406 2,204 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 66 60 57 39 47 42 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 4,446 3,882 4,290 3,466 3,360 3,275 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 2,660 2,367 1,975 1,515 1,238 1,308 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 1,786 1,515 2,315 1,951 2,122 1,967

  16. Louisiana Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    149 183 152 157 180 221 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 25 29 29 40 41 51 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 13,125 19,326 15,162 9,995 8,913 13,200 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 12,718 19,037 14,905 9,755 8,560 12,845 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 407 289 257 240 353 35

  17. Single-Shell Tank Leak Integrity Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harlow, D. G.; Girardot, C. L.; Venetz, T. J.

    2015-03-26

    This document summarizes and evaluates the information in the Hanford Tri-Party Agreement Interim Milestone M-045-91F Targets completed between 2010 and 2015. 1) Common factors of SST liner failures (M-045-91F-T02), 2) the feasibility of testing for ionic conductivity between the inside and outside of SSTs (M-045-91F-T03, and 3) the causes, locations, and rates of leaks from leaking SSTs (M-045-91F-T04).

  18. Collegiate Wind Competition Wind Tunnel Specifications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tunnel Specifications The basic wind tunnel configuration is shown below. The dimensions of the test chamber are 4 ft x 4 ft x 8 ft (48 in x 48 in x 96 in). There are inlet and outlet components of the wind tunnel that extend beyond the test chamber as shown. The tunnel has a "draw down" configuration. That is, the air is "sucked through" the test section-entering at the left, exiting at the right-with the draw down being induced by the fan on the right side of the tunnel. A

  19. Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit, Annapolis, Maryland (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bay Ridge Gardens-Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit Annapolis, Maryland PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: Existing Type: Apartment building: Bay Ridge Gardens Annapolis, MD www.bayridgegardens.com Size: 12 apartment units, 713 ft 2 and 909 ft 2 each Year of construction: 1970s Date completed: 2013 Climate Zone: Mixed-humid PERFORMANCE DATA Pre-retrofit annual energy use (normalized): 28.4 kilowatt-hour per square foot (kWh/ft 2 ) Post-retrofit annual energy use

  20. Wyoming Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    144 152 188 233 219 362 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 125 86 94 68 73 61 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 12,839 11,628 11,304 7,961 8,938 8,710 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 12,812 11,593 11,256 7,745 8,658 8,298 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 27 35 48 216 280 41

  1. HVAC Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder, Houston, Texas (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for New Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    HVAC Design Strategy for a Hot-Humid Production Builder Houston, Texas PROJECT INFORMATION Construction: New Home Type: Single-family, production builder Builder: David Weekley Homes - Houston www.davidweekleyhomes.com/ new-homes/tx/houston Size: 1,757 ft 2 to 4,169 ft 2 Price Range: about $260,000 to $450,000 Date Completed: 2013 Climate Zone: Hot-humid PERFORMANCE DATA HERS index: Builder standard practice = 66; case study 1,757-ft 2 house = 54 Projected annual energy cost savings: $375

  2. Fort Bidwell Indian Reservation - Geothermal Direct-Use Feasibility Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ft. Bidwell Indian Reservation GEOTHERMAL Direct-Use Feasibility Study Tribal Energy Program Review, Oct 19, 2005 I'SOT Inc. I'SOT Geothermal 35 GPM @ 197°F 35 Buildings 53,000 sq. ft. Tribal Energy Program Review, Oct 19, 2005 Tribal Energy Program Review, Oct 19, 2005 Tribal Energy Program Review, Oct 19, 2005 Tribal Energy Program Review, Oct 19, 2005 Tribal Energy Program Review, Oct 19, 2005 Town of Ft. Bidwell FBIC Housing 350 GPM @ 198°F Tribal Energy Program Review, Oct 19, 2005 FBIC

  3. Appendix A Lithologic and Monitor Well Completion Logs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    A Lithologic and Monitor Well Completion Logs This page intentionally left blank WELL INSTALLATION BLANK CASING: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 0.0 to 0.35 METHOD WELL SCREEN: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 0.35 to 3.27 DATE DEVELOPED SUMPIEND CAP: 1.25 in. Stainless Steel 3.27 to 3.58 WATER LEVEL (FT BGS) SURFACE SEAL: LOGGED BY P. McKenzie REMARKS Drillers hit water at 5 fl: well point removed. LITHOLOGIC DESCRIPTION LOCATION SHIPROCK, NM SURFACE ELEV. ( FT NGVD) 4890.00 SITE SHIPROCK TOP OF CASING (FT)

  4. Catalyst for selective conversion of synthesis gas and method of making the catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dyer, Paul N.; Pierantozzi, Ronald

    1986-01-01

    A Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst, a method of making the catalyst and an F-T process utilizing the catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consists of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of an F-T metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

  5. SU-E-I-11: Cascaded Linear System Model for Columnar CsI Flat Panel Imagers with Depth Dependent Gain and Blur

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peng, B; Lubinsky, A; Zheng, H; Zhao, W; Teymurazyan, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To implement a depth dependent gain and blur cascaded linear system model (CLSM) for optimizing columnar structured CsI indirect conversion flat panel imager (FPI) for advanced imaging applications. Methods: For experimental validation, depth dependent escape efficiency, e(z), was extracted from PHS measurement of different CsI scintillators (thickness, substrate and light output). The inherent MTF and DQE of CsI was measured using high resolution CMOS sensor. For CLSM, e(z) and the depth dependent MTF(f,z), were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation (Geant4) of optical photon transport through columnar CsI. Previous work showed that Monte Carlo simulation for CsI was hindered by the non-ideality of its columnar structure. In the present work we allowed variation in columnar width with depth, and assumed diffusive reflective backing and columns. Monte Carlo simulation was performed using an optical point source placed at different depth of the CsI layer, from which MTF(z,f) and e(z) were computed. The resulting e(z) with excellent matching with experimental measurements were then applied to the CLSM, Monte Carlo simulation was repeated until the modeled MTF, DQE(f) also match experimental measurement. Results: For a 150 micron FOS HL type CsI, e(z) varies between 0.56 to 0.45, and the MTF at 14 cycles/mm varies between 62.1% to 3.9%, from the front to the back of the scintillator. The overall MTF and DQE(f) at all frequencies are in excellent agreement with experimental measurements at all frequencies. Conclusion: We have developed a CLSM for columnar CsI scintillators with depth dependent gain and MTF, which were estimated from Monte Carlo simulation with novel optical simulation settings. Preliminary results showed excellent agreement between simulation results and experimental measurements. Future work is aimed at extending this approach to optimize CsI screen optic design and sensor structure for achieving higher DQE(f) in cone-beam CT, which uses high kVp.

  6. Single-vortex pinning and penetration depth in superconducting NdFeAsO1-xFx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jessie T.; Kim, Jeehoon; Huefner, Magdalena; Ye, Cun; Kim, Stella; Canfield, Paul C.; Prozorov, Ruslan; Auslaender, Ophir M.; Hoffman, Jennifer E.

    2015-10-12

    We use a magnetic force microscope (MFM) to investigate single vortex pinning and penetration depth in NdFeAsO1-xFx, one of the highest-Tc iron-based superconductors. In fields up to 20 Gauss, we observe a disordered vortex arrangement, implying that the pinning forces are stronger than the vortex-vortex interactions. We measure the typical force to depin a single vortex, Fdepin ? 4.5 pN, corresponding to a critical current up to Jc ? 7105 A/cm2. As a result, our MFM measurements allow the first local and absolute determination of the superconducting in-plane penetration depth in NdFeAsO1-xFx, ?ab = 320 60 nm, which is larger than previous bulk measurements.

  7. Efficacy of low level electric current (A-C) for controlling quagga mussles in the Welland Canal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fears, C.; Mackie, G.L.

    1995-06-01

    The efficacy of systems (for which patents are pending) which use low-voltage A-C currents for preventing settlement and attachment by zebra mussels were tested with steel rods and plates placed near the intake of a pulp and paper plant in the Welland Canal at Thorold, Ontario. Six racks made of 16 ft. (4.9 m), 2x4s (5.1 x 10.2 cm) were placed into the Welland Canal on August 5, 1994. One rack had 1/8th in (3.2 mm) diam x 12 in (30.5 cm) long steel rods, each separated by 2 in (5.1 cm) attached to pressure treated wood and concrete blocks and an A-C current of 16 v (or 8 v/in); rack 2 had steel rods of the same configuration but 12 v (or 6 v/in) was applied; rack 3 was identical to these but no current was applied and was used as a rod control. The remaining three racks had steel plates, each plate being 3 in (7.6 cm) wide X 24 in (61 cm) long X 1/4 in (6.4 mm) thick and separated by 2 in (5.1 cm); one had 12 v applied (or 6 v/in), another had 16 v applied (or 8 v/in), and the third had no current and was used as a plate control. The racks were placed on the upstream and downstream side of the intake at a depth of about 7 ft (2.1 m) where the mussels populations were heaviest (as determined by SCUBA diving). All mussels were quagga mussels (Dreissena bugensis). The racks were pulled in mid November after settlement was complete and the results showed: (1) complete prevention of settlement of both new recruits and translocators at 8 volts/in with steel rods on both wood and concrete surfaces and with steel plate trash bars; (2) partial prevention of settlement at 6 volts/in with steel rods on both wood and concrete surfaces and steel plates; and (3) that, at current kilowatt hr rates, total efficacy at 8 volts/in would cost approximately $10.80/day/1000 sq ft using rods to protect concrete walls and about $16.32/day/1000 sq ft to protect 3 in wide x 1/4 in thick trash bars. These costs can be reduced even further with pulse dosed AC currents.

  8. Management of Pit 9 - highlights of accomplishments and lessons learned to date

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, F.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Pit 9 project is a U.S. Department of Energy prototype full scale demonstration to retrieve and treat buried mixed transuranic waste. The project is being managed by the DOE-Idaho Environmental Restoration Program, in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency Region 10 and the state of Idaho, under the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Pit 9 is located in the northeast corner of the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The Pit 9 project was conceived out of the need to determine capabilities to cost effectively retrieve and treat buried radioactive and radioactive mixed waste, and obtain characterization and contaminant migration data for buried waste at the INEL. Waste was disposed in Pit 9 from November 1967 to June 1969. Pit 9, at about 380 feet by 125 feet, represents approximately one acre of surface area of the 88 acre SDA. The pit contains approximately 350,000 ft{sup 3} of soil beneath and between the buried waste and about 250,000 ft{sup 3} of overburden soil. The average depth of the pit from soil surface to bedrock is approximately 17.5 feet. Approximately 110,000 ft{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) contaminated mixed wastes from Rocky Flats and approximately 40,000 ft{sup 3} of low level and mixed wastes from the INEL were buried in Pit 9 during this period. Pit 9 is estimated to contain over 30,000 gallons of organics (over 30% of the total organic inventory in the SDA) and approximately 66 pounds of TRU radionuclides (between 3% and 4% of the total TRU inventory in the SDA). Pit 9 was selected as a demonstration site because it was one of the last disposal pits at the INEL to receive Rocky Flats waste, disposal records are better for Pit 9 than for disposal pits and trenches from earlier points in time, and the wastes in Pit 9 are representative of the wastes disposed in the SDA.

  9. Combined UHV/high-pressure catalysis setup for depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization and catalytic testing of model catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayr, Lukas; Kltzer, Bernhard; Penner, Simon; Rameshan, Raffael; Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin ; Rameshan, Christoph; Institute of Materials Chemistry, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/BC/01, 1060 Vienna

    2014-05-15

    An ultra-high vacuum (UHV) setup for real and inverse model catalyst preparation, depth-resolved near-surface spectroscopic characterization, and quantification of catalytic activity and selectivity under technologically relevant conditions is described. Due to the all-quartz reactor attached directly to the UHV-chamber, transfer of the catalyst for in situ testing without intermediate contact to the ambient is possible. The design of the UHV-compatible re-circulating batch reactor setup allows the study of reaction kinetics under close to technically relevant catalytic conditions up to 1273 K without contact to metallic surfaces except those of the catalyst itself. With the attached differentially pumped exchangeable evaporators and the quartz-microbalance thickness monitoring equipment, a reproducible, versatile, and standardised sample preparation is possible. For three-dimensional near-surface sample characterization, the system is equipped with a hemispherical analyser for X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron-beam or X-ray-excited Auger-electron spectroscopy, and low-energy ion scattering measurements. Due the dedicated geometry of the X-ray gun (54.7, magic angle) and the rotatable sample holder, depth analysis by angle-resolved XPS measurements can be performed. Thus, by the combination of characterisation methods with different information depths, a detailed three-dimensional picture of the electronic and geometric structure of the model catalyst can be obtained. To demonstrate the capability of the described system, comparative results for depth-resolved sample characterization and catalytic testing in methanol steam reforming on PdGa and PdZn near-surface intermetallic phases are shown.

  10. Method and apparatus for the evaluation of a depth profile of thermo-mechanical properties of layered and graded materials and coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Finot, Marc (Somerville, MA); Kesler, Olivera (Cambridge, MA); Suresh, Subra (Wellesley, MA)

    1998-01-01

    A technique for determining properties such as Young's modulus, coefficient of thermal expansion, and residual stress of individual layers within a multi-layered sample is presented. The technique involves preparation of a series of samples, each including one additional layer relative to the preceding sample. By comparison of each sample to a preceding sample, properties of the topmost layer can be determined, and residual stress at any depth in each sample, resulting from deposition of the top layer, can be determined.

  11. US Geological Survey publications on western tight gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupa, M.P.; Spencer, C.W.

    1989-02-01

    This bibliography includes reports published from 1977 through August 1988. In 1977 the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the US Department of Energy's, (DOE), Western Gas Sands Research program, initiated a geological program to identify and characterize natural gas resources in low-permeability (tight) reservoirs in the Rocky Mountain region. These reservoirs are present at depths of less than 2,000 ft (610 m) to greater than 20,000 ft (6,100 m). Only published reports readily available to the public are included in this report. Where appropriate, USGS researchers have incorporated administrative report information into later published studies. These studies cover a broad range of research from basic research on gas origin and migration to applied studies of production potential of reservoirs in individual wells. The early research included construction of regional well-log cross sections. These sections provide a basic stratigraphic framework for individual areas and basins. Most of these sections include drill-stem test and other well-test data so that the gas-bearing reservoirs can be seen in vertical and areal dimensions. For the convenience of the reader, the publications listed in this report have been indexed by general categories of (1) authors, (2) states, (3) geologic basins, (4) cross sections, (5) maps (6) studies of gas origin and migration, (7) reservoir or mineralogic studies, and (8) other reports of a regional or specific topical nature.

  12. Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evenson, Grant

    2005-07-01

    This Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 554, Area 23 Release Site, located in Mercury at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554 is comprised of one corrective action site (CAS): (1) CAS 23-02-08, USTs 23-115-1, 2, 3/Spill 530-90-002. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document/Closure Report is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 554 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities were performed from January 18 through May 5, 2005, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site'' (NNSA/NSO, 2004) and Records of Technical Change No. 1 and No. 2. The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: (1) Determine whether contaminants of concern are present. (2) If contaminants of concern are present, determine their nature and extent. (3) Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 554 dataset from the investigation results was evaluated based on the data quality indicator parameters. This evaluation demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the dataset for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against preliminary action levels (PALs) established in the CAU 554 CAIP for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) benzo(a)pyrene, dibenz(a,h)anthracene, and trichloroethene (TCE). Specifically: (1) The soil beneath and laterally outward from former underground storage tanks at CAS 23-02-08 contains TPH-diesel-range organics (DRO) above the PAL of 100 milligrams per kilogram, confined vertically from a depth of approximately 400 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs). The contamination is confined to 12.5 ft bgs to the subsurface media and laterally within approximately 100 ft of the release. (2) A single soil sample collected from the depth of 99 to 100 ft bgs demonstrated the presence of TCE at a concentration above the PAL. (3) Two soil samples collected from depths of 198 to 199 ft bgs and 380 to 382 ft bgs demonstrated the presence of benzo(a)pyrene at a concentration above the PAL. (4) Two soil samples collected from depths of 240 to 241 ft bgs and 290 to 291 ft bgs demonstrated the presence of dibenz(a,h)anthracene at a concentration above the PAL. Tier 2 final action levels (FALs) were then calculated for these contaminants. The Tier 2 FALs for TCE, benzo(a)pyrene, and dibenz(a,h)anthracene were calculated based on a limited exposure to subsurface contamination scenario, and the Tier 2 FAL for TPH-DRO was established as the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 9 Preliminary Remediation Goal values for the individual hazardous constituents of diesel. The evaluation of TPH-DRO, benzo(a)pyrene, dibenz(a,h)anthracene, and TCE based on the Tier 2 FALs determined that no FALs were exceeded. Therefore, the DQO data needs were met, and it was determined that no corrective action (based on risk to human receptors) is necessary for the site. As a best management practice for the remaining subsurface diesel contamination present at the site, a use restriction was imposed on future site activities that would not allow for future contact of the subsurface contamination. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: (1) No further corrective action for CAU 554. (2) No Corrective Action Plan. (3) A Notice of Completion to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 554. (4) Corrective Action Unit 554 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  13. Sampling and analyses report for December 1991 semiannual postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG site, Hanna, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindblom, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) underground coal gasification (UCG) test was conducted from November 16, 1987, through February 26, 1988 at a site approximately one mile south of Hanna, Wyoming. The test consisted of a dual-module operation to evaluate the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) technology, the elongated linked well (ELW) technology, and the interaction of closely spaced modules operating simultaneously. The test caused two cavities to form in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam and associated overburden. The Hanna No. 1 coal seam was approximately 30 ft thick and lay at depths between 350 and 365 ft below the surface in the test area. The coal seam was overlain by sandstones, siltstones, and claystones deposited by various fluvial environments. The groundwater monitoring was designed to satisfy the requirements of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) in addition to providing research data toward the development of UCG technology that minimizes environmental impacts. Further background material and the sampling and analytical procedures associated with the sampling task are described in the Rocky Mountain 1 Postburn Groundwater Monitoring Quality Assurance Plan (Mason and Johnson 1988).

  14. Sampling and analyses report for December 1991 semiannual postburn sampling at the RM1 UCG site, Hanna, Wyoming. [Quarterly report, January--March 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindblom, S.R.

    1992-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain 1 (RM1) underground coal gasification (UCG) test was conducted from November 16, 1987, through February 26, 1988 at a site approximately one mile south of Hanna, Wyoming. The test consisted of a dual-module operation to evaluate the controlled retracting injection point (CRIP) technology, the elongated linked well (ELW) technology, and the interaction of closely spaced modules operating simultaneously. The test caused two cavities to form in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam and associated overburden. The Hanna No. 1 coal seam was approximately 30 ft thick and lay at depths between 350 and 365 ft below the surface in the test area. The coal seam was overlain by sandstones, siltstones, and claystones deposited by various fluvial environments. The groundwater monitoring was designed to satisfy the requirements of the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality (WDEQ) in addition to providing research data toward the development of UCG technology that minimizes environmental impacts. Further background material and the sampling and analytical procedures associated with the sampling task are described in the Rocky Mountain 1 Postburn Groundwater Monitoring Quality Assurance Plan (Mason and Johnson 1988).

  15. LANL Robotic Vessel Scanning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webber, Nels W.

    2015-11-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in J-1 DARHT Operations Group uses 6ft spherical vessels to contain hazardous materials produced in a hydrodynamic experiment. These contaminated vessels must be analyzed by means of a worker entering the vessel to locate, measure, and document every penetration mark on the vessel. If the worker can be replaced by a highly automated robotic system with a high precision scanner, it will eliminate the risks to the worker and provide management with an accurate 3D model of the vessel presenting the existing damage with the flexibility to manipulate the model for better and more in-depth assessment.The project was successful in meeting the primary goal of installing an automated system which scanned a 6ft vessel with an elapsed time of 45 minutes. This robotic system reduces the total time for the original scope of work by 75 minutes and results in excellent data accumulation and transmission to the 3D model imaging program.

  16. Pumpdown assistance extends coiled tubing reach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tailby, R.J. )

    1992-07-01

    One of the most challenging coiled tubing applications to emerge in the last few years is horizontal well maintenance. When wireline cannot be used, techniques that offer some of the same flexibility, availability and relatively low cost must be used. During this same period, however, drilling technology has also made huge strides in horizontal and extended-reach areas. Wells are now being drilled with horizontal lengths in excess of 6,000 ft and measured depths of more than 22,000 ft. This paper reports that although horizontal wells are definitely here to stay, many operators have had to reevaluate their positions after being confronted with the problem of recompleting these wells to eliminate excessive water or gas production. A full workover with workstring using either a drilling rig or snubbing unit can be expensive and may lead to lost production because of limited rig availability. Coiled tubing has successfully been used in most cases thus far, but it has length and horizontal reach limitations that drilling technology will soon overtake. Within the constraints of current technology and tube capabilities, coiled tubing does not have the buckling resistance or reel capacity to service today's longest horizontal and extended reach wells or those planned and foreseen in the future. Even if coiled tubing can reach TD, operations requiring downward force are severely restricted.

  17. Underbalanced coiled-tubing-drilled horizontal well in the North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wodka, P.; Tirsgaard, H.; Damgaard, A.P.; Adamsen, C.J.

    1996-05-01

    Maersk Olie and Gas A/S (Maersk Oil) has drilled a 3,309-ft-long near-horizontal drainhole with coiled tubing to a total measured depth (MD) of 11,000 ft in the Danish sector of the North Sea. The well was completed in may 1994 as a 3{1/2}-in. openhole producer in the Gorm field chalk reservoir. Part of the well was drilled at underbalanced conditions, and oil production rates of up to 1,100 STB/D were reached during drilling. Conventional well-test equipment was used for handling returns. A nearby process facilities platform supplied lift gas and received the produced hydrocarbons during the drilling phase. Worth noting are the penetration of several chert layers, the fairly long reach, and the application of geosteering. Indications were that the well productivity was significantly improved compared with that of a conventionally drilled well, but problems were experienced with borehole stability in a fractured region.

  18. Sinkhole progression at the Weeks Island, Louisiana, Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.

    1995-11-01

    A sinkhole measuring 11 m (36 ft) across and 9 m (30 ft) deep was first observed in alluvium overlying the Weeks Island, Louisiana, salt dome in May 1992, but it was about a year old, based on initial surface appearance and subsequent reverse extrapolation of growth rates. A second and much smaller sinkhole was identified in early 1995, nearly three years later. Their position directly over the edges of the SPR oil storage chamber, a former room-and-pillar salt mine, caused apprehension. The association of sinkholes over mines is well established and this occurrence suggested that groundwater influx undoubtedly was causing salt dissolution at shallow depth, and associated collapse of soil at the surface. Leaks of groundwater into other salt mines in Louisiana and elsewhere led to flooding and eventual abandonment (Coates et al., 1981). Consequently, much attention has been and continues to be given to characterizing these sinkholes, and to mitigation. This paper summarizes current engineering geologic concepts, and briefly describes diagnostic and risk mitigation efforts being conducted by the US Department of Energy, operator of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (Bauer et al., 1994).

  19. Installation of a Hydrologic Characterization Network for Vadose Zone Monitoring of a Single-Shell Tank Farm at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, Glendon W. ); Ward, Anderson L. ); Ritter, Jason C. ); Sisson, James B.; Hubbell, Joel M.; Sydnor, Harold A.

    2001-10-30

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory and Duratek Federal Services, deployed a suite of vadose-zone instruments at the B Tank Farm in the 200 E Area of the Hanford Site, near Richland, Washington, during the last quarter of FY 2001. The purpose of the deployment was to obtain in situ hydrologic characterization data within the vadose zone of a high-level-waste tank farm. Eight sensor nests, ranging in depth from 67 m (220 ft) below ground surface (bgs) to 0.9 m (3 ft) bgs were placed in contact with vadose-zone sediments inside a recently drilled, uncased, borehole (C3360) located adjacent to Tank B-110. The sensor sets are part of the Vadose Zone Monitoring System and include advanced tensiometers, heat dissipation units, frequency domain reflectometers, thermal probes, and vadose zone solution samplers. Within the top meter of the surface, a water flux meter was deployed to estimate net infiltration from meteoric water (rain and snowmelt) sources. In addition, a rain gage was located within the tank farm to document on-site precipitation events. All sensor units, with the exception of the solution samplers, were connected to a solar-powered data logger located within the tank farm. Data collected from these sensors are currently being accessed by modem and cell phone and will be analyzed as part of the DOE RL31SS31 project during the coming year (FY 2001).

  20. Healthcare Energy: State University of New York Upstate Medical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photo of an aerial view of the SUNY children's hospital City: Syracuse, NY Year Built: 1995 Total Floor Space: 143,000 ft2 The East Wing includes: the emergency medicine ...