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1

FT Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FT Solutions LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name FT Solutions LLC Place South Jordan, Utah Zip 84095 Product JV between Headwaters Technology Innovation Group and Rentech to focus...

2

2-ft Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-ft Flume Facility 2-ft Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 2-ft Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 61.0 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

3

FT Duplication Coordinates Reproductive and Vegetative Growth  

SciTech Connect

Annual plants grow vegetatively at early developmental stages and then transition to the reproductive stage, followed by senescence in the same year. In contrast, after successive years of vegetative growth at early ages, woody perennial shoot meristems begin repeated transitions between vegetative and reproductive growth at sexual maturity. However, it is unknown how these repeated transitions occur without a developmental conflict between vegetative and reproductive growth. We report that functionally diverged paralogs FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (FT1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T2 (FT2), products of whole-genome duplication and homologs of Arabidopsis thaliana gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), coordinate the repeated cycles of vegetative and reproductive growth in woody perennial poplar (Populus spp.). Our manipulative physiological and genetic experiments coupled with field studies, expression profiling, and network analysis reveal that reproductive onset is determined by FT1 in response to winter temperatures, whereas vegetative growth and inhibition of bud set are promoted by FT2 in response to warm temperatures and long days in the growing season. The basis for functional differentiation between FT1 and FT2 appears to be expression pattern shifts, changes in proteins, and divergence in gene regulatory networks. Thus, temporal separation of reproductive onset and vegetative growth into different seasons via FT1 and FT2 provides seasonality and demonstrates the evolution of a complex perennial adaptive trait after genome duplication.

Hsu, Chuan-Yu [Mississippi State University (MSU); Adams, Joshua P. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Kim, Hyejin [Mississippi State University (MSU); No, Kyoungok [Mississippi State University (MSU); Ma, Caiping [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Strauss, Steven [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Drnevich, Jenny [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Wickett, Norman [Pennsylvania State University; Vandervelde, Lindsay [Mississippi State University (MSU); Ellis, Jeffrey D. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Rice, Brandon [Mississippi State University (MSU); Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Brunner, Amy M. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Page, Grier P. [RTI International; Carlson, John E. [Pennsylvania State University; DePamphilis, Claude [Pennsylvania State University; Luthe, Dawn S. [Pennsylvania State University; Yuceer, Cetin [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The 2-Foot Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel is a vertical plane, closed recirculating, variable-speed, variable-pressure, open jet test section, closed jet test section, and semi-rectangular test section. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 17 Recirculating Yes

5

1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-ft Wave Flume Facility -ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.5 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

6

10-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 10-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 3.0 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

7

5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-ft Wave Flume Facility 5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 1.5 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

8

Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 0.7 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel is a vertical plane, closed recirculating with resorber, variable-speed, variable-pressure, two interchangeable circular test sections. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 25.8 Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None

9

11-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 77.4 Beam(m) 3.4 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

10

3-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-ft Wave Flume Facility 3-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.9 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

11

FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy investigation of oxidized wool  

SciTech Connect

The Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectra (FT-IR/PAS) of wool, shrink-resist treated wool and corona discharge oxidized wool are reported. Products of the oxidation of wool by dichloroisocyanuric acid are discussed. The FT-IR/PAS results indicate the formation of a sulphinic acid residue during the wool treatment.

McKenna, W.P.; Gale, D.J.; Rivett, D.E.; Eyring, E.M.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ft Bidwell Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ft. Bidwell, California Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

13

U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado October 7, 2013 - 10:01am Addthis Photo of High-Bay Aviation Maintenance Facility at Butts Army Airfield Fort Carson U.S. Army Base is located south of Colorado Springs, Colorado. It was the first Federal facility to install a "solar wall"-a solar ventilation air preheating system. The solar wall heats Ft. Carson's new high-bay aviation maintenance facility at Butts Army Airfield by pre-warming air as much as 54°F and supplying the heated air to the building's central heating system. This collector system is especially advantageous for buildings that require large volumes of heated air. The system cost $140,000 to design, build, and install. The unglazed collector consists of 7,800 ft.² of sheet metal dotted with tiny holes. It

14

Spherically symmetric static spacetimes in vacuum f(T) gravity  

SciTech Connect

We show that Schwarzschild geometry remains as a vacuum solution for those four-dimensional f(T) gravitational theories behaving as ultraviolet deformations of general relativity. In the gentler context of three-dimensional gravity, we also find that the infrared-deformed f(T) gravities, like the ones used to describe the late cosmic speed up of the Universe, have as the circularly symmetric vacuum solution a Deser-de Sitter or a Banados, Teitelboim and Zanelli-like spacetime with an effective cosmological constant depending on the infrared scale present in the function f(T).

Ferraro, Rafael [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fiorini, Franco [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

6-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Flume Facility Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 6-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 105.2 Beam(m) 1.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

16

Langley 16-Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the NASA Langley 16-Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) System and presents results of a test conducted June 22-23, 2000 in the tunnel to validate the PSP system. The PSP system provides global surface pressure measurements ...

Sprinkle Danny R.; Obara Clifford J.; Amer Tahani R.; Leighty Bradley D.; Carmine Michael T.; Burkett Cecil G.; Sealey Bradley S.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Technology development for iron F-T catalysts. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this work were twofold. The first objective was to design and construct a pilot plant for preparing precipitated iron oxide F-T precursors and demonstrate that the rate of production from this plant is equivalent to 100 lbs/day of dried metal oxide. Secondly, these precipitates were to be used to prepare catalysts capable of achieving 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion with {le} 5 mole percent selectivity to methane + ethane.

Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Can $f(T)$ gravity theories mimic $?$CDM cosmic history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently the teleparallel Lagrangian density described by the torsion scalar T has been extended to a function of T. The $f(T)$ modified teleparallel gravity has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy to explain the late time acceleration of the universe. In order to reconstruct the function $f(T)$ by demanding a background $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology we assume that, (i) the background cosmic history provided by the flat $\\Lambda$CDM (the radiation ere with $\\omega_{eff}=1/3$, matter and de Sitter eras with $\\omega_{eff}=0$ and $\\omega_{eff}=-1$, respectively) (ii) the radiation dominate in the radiation era with $\\Omega_{0r}=1$ and the matter dominate during the matter phases when $\\Omega_{0m}=1$. We find the cosmological dynamical system which can obey the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmic history. In each era, we find a critical lines that, the radiation dominated and the matter dominated are one points of them in the radiation and matter phases, respectively. Also, we drive the cosmologically viability condition for these models. We investigate the stability condition with respect to the homogeneous scalar perturbations in each era and we obtain the stability conditions for the fixed points in each eras. Finally, we reconstruct the function $f(T)$ which mimics cosmic expansion history.

M. R. Setare; N. Mohammadipour

2013-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Army - Ft. U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies Project Planning & Implementation Project Assistance

20

ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECCENTRIC ECLIPSING BINARY STAR FT ORIONIS  

SciTech Connect

Accurate absolute properties are determined for the first time for the 3.15 day period eccentric eclipsing binary star FT Ori based on new absolute photometry, five differential light curves, and a radial velocity curve. The stars appear to be normal for their spectral types, A0 + A2. The orbit is highly eccentric (e = 0.409) and shows apsidal motion with a period of 536 years. The absolute properties and the degree of central mass concentration of the stars are consistent with current theoretical models at an age of 190 Myr.

Sabby, Jeffrey A. [Physics Department, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL 62025 (United States); Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg [Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Ibanoglu, Cafer [Astronomy and Space Sciences Department, Science Faculty, Ege University, 35100 Boronova, Izmir (Turkey); Claret, Antonio, E-mail: jsabby@siue.edu, E-mail: clacy@uark.edu, E-mail: cafer.ibanoglu@ege.edu.tr, E-mail: claret@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apdo. Postal 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

HydraNet-FT: network support for dependable servors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes an infrastructure to dynamically replicate services across an internetwork and have them provide a single fault tolerant service access point to clients. For service replication, it relies on previous work for network support for large-scale service scaling within the HydraNet effort. The current work develops a means to combine service replication with TCP communication service to provide fault-tolerant services in a fully client-transparent fashion. The HydraNet-FT infrastructure consists of two components: host servers and redirecting. Host servers are hosts that are specially equipped to act as servers for replicated and fault-tolerant services. The location of the host servers is known to the redirecting, specially equipped routers that detect requests for replicated services and direct the requests to them. Host servers allow one-to-many message delivery from the client to servers and many-to-one message delivery from the servers to the clients. They also provide a low-latency failure estimator to determine server unavailability due to failure or congestion. A management protocol allows to dynamically install or remove service replica and reconfigure the system in case of failure or prolonged congestion of a server in the system. The thesis studies the results obtained by implementing the infrastructure on an experimental testbed. Throughput results indicate that the amount of overhead imposed by using the HydraNet-FT scheme is not unreasonably high.

Shenoy, Gurudatt

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Feasibility study for aquaculture and space heating, Ft. Bidwell, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Expansion of the aquaculture facilities and geothermal space heating at Ft. Bidwell, California were investigated. The lack of cold water is the limiting factor for aquaculture expansion and is also a problem for the town domestic water supply. A new cold water well approximately 1200 feet deep would provide for the aquaculture expansion and additional domestic water. A 2900 foot test well can be completed to provide additional hot water at approximately 200/sup 0/F and an estimated artesian flow of 500 gpm. If these wells are completed, the aquaculture facility could be expanded to produce 6000 two pound catfish per month on a continuous basis and provide space heating of at least 20 homes. The design provided allows for heating 11 homes initially with possible future expansion. 9 figs.

Culver, G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Retrofit the 74,000 sq. ft Illinois National Guard State Headquarter...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the 74,000 sq. ft Illinois National Guard State Headquarter's building's aging boilerchiller equipment with a geothermal system Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation,...

24

D0 Silicon Upgrade: Calculating Mass Flow Rates at Sub-Sonic Conditions Trhough Venturis (FT-4052-H & FT-4053-H) and an Orifice Plate (F)-2019-H)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this engineering note is to explain the method involved in calculating the mass flow rates through venturis and orifice plates at sub-sonic conditions. In particular, the mass flow rate calculations are required for two FLOW-DYNE venturi flow meters, serial no. 35821 and no. 35822, and an orifice plate flow meter, serial no. 35823. The two venturis, FT-4052-H and FT-4053-H, are located in the D-Zero VLPC valve box at the refrigerator and the orifice plate, FO-2019-H, is on the high pressure helium supply line in the assembly building.

Zaczek, Mauiusz; /Fermilab

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Nonnative Lizards Nile Monitor 4 to 6 ft. Brown/yellow body bands; forked black/blue tongue; long sharp claws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constrictor 6 to 9 ft. Tan oval spots; reddish-brown tail Green Anaconda 13 to 15 ft. Green body; large, round, dark spots; eye stripes Yellow Anaconda 6 to 9 ft. Yellow body; large, dark spots; five dark stripes

Mazzotti, Frank

27

Microsoft Word - FT2a 092408 97-03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

include the injection of 1,000 tons of CO 2 into the stacked coal seams. 1600 1700 1800 1900 2000 2100 2200 2300 LEE FORMATION POCAHONTAS FORMATION DEPTH GR DENSITY * * * * LEE...

28

Dilaton Dark Energy Model in f(R), f(T) and Horava-Lifshitz Gravities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, we have considered dilaton dark energy model in Weyl-scaled induced gravitational theory in presence of barotropic fluid. It is to be noted that the dilaton field behaves as a quintessence. Here we have discussed the role of dilaton dark energy in modified gravity theories namely, f(R); f(T) and Horava-Lifshitz gravities and analyzed the behaviour of the dilaton field and the corresponding potential in respect to these modified gravity theories instead of Einstein's gravity. In f(R) and f(T) gravities, we have considered some particular forms of f(R) and f(T) and we have shown that the potentials always increase with the dilaton fields. But in Horava-Lifshitz gravity, it has been seen that the potential always decreases as dilation field increases.

Khatua, Piyali Bagchi; Debnath, Ujjal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Reconstruction of f(T) gravity from the Holographic dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among different candidates to play the role of Dark Energy (DE), modified gravity has emerged as offering a possible unification of Dark Matter (DM) and DE. The purpose of this work is to develop a reconstruction scheme for the modified gravity with $f(T)$ action using holographic energy density. In the framework of the said modified gravity we have considered the equation of state of the Holographic DE (HDE) density. Subsequently we have developed a reconstruction scheme for modified gravity with $f(T)$ action. Finally we have obtained a modified gravity action consistent with the HDE scenario.

Chattopadhyay, Surajit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Reconstruction of f(T) gravity from the Holographic dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among different candidates to play the role of Dark Energy (DE), modified gravity has emerged as offering a possible unification of Dark Matter (DM) and DE. The purpose of this work is to develop a reconstruction scheme for the modified gravity with $f(T)$ action using holographic energy density. In the framework of the said modified gravity we have considered the equation of state of the Holographic DE (HDE) density. Subsequently we have developed a reconstruction scheme for modified gravity with $f(T)$ action. Finally we have obtained a modified gravity action consistent with the HDE scenario.

Surajit Chattopadhyay; Antonio Pasqua

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

31

Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer lab evaluation; cold-start test-cell evaluations; overall feasibility, economics, and efficiency of SFP fuel production; and an economic analysis. Two unexpected issues that arose during the project were further studied and resolved: variations in NOx emissions were accounted for and fuel-injection nozzle fouling issues were traced to the non-combustible (ash) content of the engine oil, not the F-T fuel. The F-T fuel domestically produced and evaluated in this effort appears to be a good replacement candidate for petroleum-based transportation fuels. However, in order for domestic F-T fuels to become a viable cost-comparable alternative to petroleum fuels, the F-T fuels will need to be produced from abundant U.S. domestic resources such as coal and biomass, rather than stranded natural gas.

Stephen P. Bergin

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

The distinctions between $?$CDM and $f(T)$ gravity according Noether symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Noether's theory offers us a useful tool to research the conserved quantities and symmetries of the modified gravity theories, among which the $f(T)$ theory, a generally modified teleparallel gravity, has been proposed to account for the dark energy phenomena. By the Noether symmetry approach, we investigate the power-law, exponential and polynomial forms of $f(T)$ theories. All forms of $f(T)$ concerned in this work possess the time translational symmetry, which is related with energy condition or Hamilton constraint. In addition, we find out that the performances of the power-law and exponential forms are not pleasing. It is rational adding a linear term $T$ to $T^n$ as the most efficient amendment to resemble the teleparallel gravity or General Relativity on small scales, ie., the scale of the solar system. The corresponding Noether symmetry indicates that only time translational symmetry remains. Through numerically calculations and observational data-sets constraining, the optimal form $\\alpha T + \\beta T^{-1}$ is obtained, whose cosmological solution resembles the standard $\\Lambda$CDM best with lightly reduced cosmic age which can be alleviated by introducing another $T^m$ term. More important is that we find the significant differences between $\\Lambda$CDM and $f(T)$ gravity. The $\\Lambda$CDM model has also two additional symmetries and corresponding positive conserved quantities, except the two negative conserved quantities.

Han Dong; Jiaxin Wang; Xinhe Meng

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

33

Shape selective catalysts for F-T chemistry. Interim report : January 2001 - December 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) chemistry, specifically the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to F-T catalysts needing high activity, it is desirable that they have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. In this project, selectivity is directed toward the production of diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. Shape-selective catalysts have the potential to both limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected ''cage.'' This cage also restricts their loss by attrition during use in slurry-bed reactors. Experimentation has included evaluation of samples of (1) iron-based F-T catalysts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory, (2) iron-based F-T catalysts prepared by B.H. Davis of the Center of Applied Energy Research (CAER), (3) the Davis catalyst that were sized by differential gravity separation, and (4) the Davis catalyst onto which inorganic or catalytic ''shells'' were deposited. The ANL-prepared samples had a wide range of particle size and were irregular in shape. A sizeable portion of the samples provided by Davis were spherical, because they had been prepared by spray-drying. To compare the catalytic activities of the samples, we used a micro-scale fixed-bed reactor system for F-T runs of low conversion to avoid thermal and mass transfer effects. In summary, the highest activity was that of the original Davis catalyst; additional research must be carried out to generate more permeable surface cages. A number of approaches that have been published for other applications will be tested.

Cronauer, D. C.

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

34

Variability of biomass chemical composition and rapid analysis using FT-NIR techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quick method for analyzing the chemical composition of renewable energy biomass feedstock was developed by using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis. The study presents the broad-based model hypothesis that a single FT-NIR predictive model can be developed to analyze multiple types of biomass feedstock. The two most important biomass feedstocks corn stover and switchgrass were evaluated for the variability in their concentrations of the following components: glucan, xylan, galactan, arabinan, mannan, lignin, and ash. A hypothesis test was developed based upon these two species. Both cross-validation and independent validation results showed that the broad-based model developed is promising for future chemical prediction of both biomass species; in addition, the results also showed the method's prediction potential for wheat straw.

Liu, Lu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ye, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Requirements for boom lift operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft while operating a boom lift  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fall Protection Requirements for Boom Lift Fall Protection Requirements for Boom Lift 2010 Requirements for boom lift operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft while operating a boom lift. While operating a JLG Aerial lift. LBNL best practices requirements for boom lift Operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft while operating a boom lift. January 14, 2009 OSHA Letter # 20070823-7896 - Whether a manufacturer stipulated minimum anchor point elevation of 18½ feet precludes the use of a shock absorbing lanyard in an aerial lift. (See attached Letter) An adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft will keep the operator from protected from being ejected out of the lift. If a non-adjustable 6ft lanyard is used for fall restraint it is required that fall distance from the anchor point must be at a height not under

36

RiPed_By_ILookImager*p* #e?**??i /ft*rp-A,dST?L ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RiPed_By_ILookImager*p*?#e?**??i /ft*rp-A,dST?L*6?ɢ??O? 42^*a ? ????l*ex?fA7???*?4TE?u\\??X ...

2005-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

37

Improved prediction of biomass composition for switchgrass using reproducing kernel methods with wavelet compressed FT-NIR spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) technique is an effective approach to predict chemical properties and can be applied to online monitoring in bio-energy industry. High dimensionality and collinearity of the FT-NIR spectral data makes it difficult ... Keywords: Fourier transform near-infrared spectra, Kernel partial least squares regression, Kernel ridge regression, Reproducing kernel Hilbert space, Vertical energy thresholding technique, Wavelet transform

Jong I. Park; Lu Liu; X. Philip Ye; Myong K. Jeong; Young-Seon Jeong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

On the Gravitational Energy-Momentum Vector in f(T) Theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is devoted to analyze the energy of the Universe in the context of f(T) theories. Such theories are the analogous counterpart of the well known f(R) theories that, however, uses torsion instead of curvature. We obtain a general expression for the gravitational energy-momentum vector in this framework. Using the hypothesis of the isotropy of spacetime, we find the energy of the Universe and compare it with the energy obtained in the realm of teleparallelism equivalent to general relativity (TEGR).

Ulhoa, S C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Can $f(T)$ gravity theories mimic $\\Lambda$CDM cosmic history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently the teleparallel Lagrangian density described by the torsion scalar T has been extended to a function of T. The $f(T)$ modified teleparallel gravity has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy to explain the late time acceleration of the universe. In order to reconstruct the function $f(T)$ by demanding a background $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology we assume that, (i) the background cosmic history provided by the flat $\\Lambda$CDM (the radiation ere with $\\omega_{eff}=1/3$, matter and de Sitter eras with $\\omega_{eff}=0$ and $\\omega_{eff}=-1$, respectively) (ii) the radiation dominate in the radiation era with $\\Omega_{0r}=1$ and the matter dominate during the matter phases when $\\Omega_{0m}=1$. We find the cosmological dynamical system which can obey the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmic history. In each era, we find a critical lines that, the radiation dominated and the matter dominated are one points of them in the radiation and matter phases, respectively. Also, we drive the cosmologically...

Setare, M R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Y ~L.ho-I . Y ~L.ho-I . I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286 : This dooumetlt consists 0.f 3 pages E end p. t' &ures. No. a of &copies. a Seriee A. 7 Novembar 6, 1944 Subject: Visit to Fansteel Netallurgical Corporaticn, North Chicago, Novembar 4, 1944 - AwAlabilityof~lnmbium!kkl Chapin, Simmons end I discussed witb~. C. N. B&e (ResearchDirector) . end LIr. F.L.Hunter (Chief&ineer, TanteInmDivision) availability, purity, and @co of columbiwn,metel. columbium metal is of particular interest to the Project because tuballoy-columbium alloys containing about 4$ or more of columbium are remarkably corrosion resistant. An 'order has &ready been &.ced for 30 lbs. of columbium metal, end it is cerW that large qutnititicsof them&al willbeneededin order that

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Behaviour of interacting Ricci dark energy in logarithmic f(T) gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present work we have considered a modified gravity dubbed as "logarithmic $f(T)$ gravity" and investigated the behavior of Ricci dark energy interacting with pressureless dark matter. We have chosen the interaction term in the form $Q\\propto H\\delta\\rho_{m}$ and investigated the behavior of the Hubble parameter $H$ as a function of the redshift $z$. For this reconstructed $H$ we have investigated the behavior of the density of the Ricci dark energy $\\rho_{RDE}$ and density contribution due to torsion $\\rho_{T}$. All of the said cosmological parameters are seen to have increasing behavior from higher to lower redshifts for all values of $c^{2}$ pertaining to the Ricci dark energy. Subsequently, we observed the equation of state parameter $w_{RDE}$ in this situation. The equation of state parameter is found to behave like phantom for all choices of $c^{2}$ in the Ricci dark energy.

Rahul Ghosh; Surajit Chattopadhyay

2012-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

Rolling Thunder -- Integration of the Solo 161 Stirling engine with the CPG-460 solar concentrator at Ft. Huachuca  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Rolling Thunder is a dish/Stirling demonstration project at Ft. Huachuca, a US Army fort in southeastern Arizona (Huachuca means rolling thunder in Apache). It has been supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a cooperative program between the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy (DOE). As part of a 1992 SERDP project, Cummins Power Generation, Inc. (CPG) installed a CPG 7 kW(c) dish/Stirling system at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC) in Ft. Huachuca, Arizona. The primary objective of the SERDP Dish/Stirling for DoD Applications project was to demonstrate a CPG 7-kW(c) dish/Stirling system at a military facility. Unfortunately, Cummins Engine Company decided to divest its solar operations. As a direct result of Ft. Huachuca`s interest in the Cummins dish/Stirling technology, Sandia explored the possibility of installing a SOLO 161 Stirling power conversion unit (PCU) on the Ft. Huachuca CPG-460. In January 1997, a decision was made to retrofit a SOLO 161 Stirling engine on the CPG-460 at Ft. Huachuca. Project Rolling Thunder. The SOLO 161 Demonstration at Ft. Huachuca has been a challenge. Although, the SOLO 161 PCU has operated nearly flawlessly and the CPG-460 has been, for the most part, a solid and reliable component, integration of the SOLO PCU with the CPG-460 has required significant attention. In this paper, the integration issues and technical approaches of project Rolling Thunder are presented. Lessons of the project are also discussed.

Diver, R.B.; Moss, T.A.; Goldberg, V.; Thomas, G.; Beaudet, A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A Novel 9.4 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Novel 9.4 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass advances in instrument speed and sensitivity. We have redesigned our custom built 9 4 tesla FT ICR New 9 = 800 000 [C32H55S1+H]+ [C35H51+H]+ We have redesigned our custom-built 9.4 tesla FT-ICR mass

Weston, Ken

44

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

Singleton, A.H.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate the influence of various promoters, additives, and supports on minimizing the methane selectivity and increasing the water-gas shift (WGS) activity of cobalt (Co) Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to identify and demonstrate a catalyst preparation procedure that will be scaled up for the reproducible synthesis of commercial quantities of supported Co catalysts with desired activity, selectivity, and lifetime for use in F-T synthesis in three-phase slurry bubble column reactors. Accomplishments for this quarter are: Four new catalysts were formulated and prepared during this period under both subtasks 1.2 and 1.3 and five more catalysts were prepared by Calsicat; The characterization of all the catalysts in order to determine their physical properties (BET surface area, pore volume, pore size diameter, particle size distribution), as well as the cobalt reducibility, extent of reduction, and dispersion) was continued; Seven new catalysts have been tested for their F-T synthesis performance; An investigation of the effect of pre-treatment (i.e. calcination in static air versus flowing air, direct reduction without prior calcination) of a selected number of catalysts upon their performance for F-T synthesis was continued during this period.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

46

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H2/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low ( < 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

Singleton, A.H.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

47

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this Project is to investigate the influence of various promoters, additives, and supports on minimizing the methane selectivity and increasing the water-gas shift (WGS) activity of cobalt (Co) Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to identify and demonstrate a catalyst preparation Procedure that will be scaled up for the reproducible synthesis of commercial quantities of supported CO catalysts with desired activity, sleectivity, and lifetime for use in F-T synthesis in three-phase slurry bubble column reactors. Seven new catalysts were formulated and prepared during this period under both subtasks 1.2 and 1.3. Two more catalysts were prepared by Calsicat. The characterization of all the catalysts in order to determine their physical properties (BET surface area, pore volume, pore size diameter, particle size distribution), as well as the cobalt reducibility, extent of reduction, and dispersion) was continued. Fixed-bed reactor testing of the catalysts was continued. Six new catalysts were tested for their F-T synthesis performance. An investigation of the effect of pretreatment in various atmospheres (calcination in air or nitrogen prior to reduction in hydrogen, direct reduction without prior calcination, and reductiono)ddation-reduction (ROR)) of a selected number of catalysts upon their performance for F-T synthesis was continued during this period. Under subtask 2.2 during this reporting period a total of 11 runs were made in the two slurry bubble column reactors with eleven catalysts, including five on alumina, two from Calsicat, one WGS blend, and three on silica support. Four high CO conversion runs were made. Data were compiled to compare the CO conversions and product selectivities of the-methane reduction catalysts.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

48

Effective Dark Energy Models and Dark Energy Models with Bounce in frames of $F(T)$ Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various cosmological models in frames of $F(T)$ gravity are considered. The general scheme of constructing effective dark energy models with various evolution is presented. It is showed that these models in principle are compatible with $\\Lambda$CDM model. The dynamics of universe governed by $F(T)$ gravity can mimics $\\Lambda$CDM evolution in past but declines from it in a future. We also construct some dark energy models with the "real" (non-effective) equation-of-state parameter $w$ such that $w\\leq-1$. It is showed that in $F(T)$ gravity the Universe filled phantom field not necessarily ends its existence in singularity. There are two possible mechanisms permitting the final singularity. Firstly due to the nonlinear dependence between energy density and $H^{2}$ ($H$ is the Hubble parameter) the universe can expands not so fast as in the general relativity and in fact Little Rip regime take place instead Big Rip. We also considered the models with possible bounce in future. In these models the universe expansion can mimics the dynamics with future singularity but due to bounce in future universe begin contracts.

Artyom V. Astashenok

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

49

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The investigation of the effect of certain promoters (Fe, Pd, and Ru) on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis was continued during this reporting period. All catalysts were tested first at 220{degrees}C, then at higher temperatures from 240 to 280{degrees}C, while monitoring their deactivation. The choice of these promoters was based on their intrinsic ability to enhance the hydrogenation reactions while slowing down the Boudouard reaction under the conditions used in F-T synthesis. Olefin hydrogenation and CO dissociation reactions were used individually to investigate further the nature of the deactivation process of these catalyst during F-T synthesis. Hydrogenation of isobutene (IB) was carried out in the presence of CO between 120 and 180{degrees}C and atmospheric pressure. CO dissociation activities of the catalysts were measured using a pulse technique at 2.5 atm and at temperatures between 180 and 280{degrees}C with intermittent H{sub 2} bracketing at 350{degrees}C. Promotion with high loadings of Fe or Pd resulted in catalysts with relatively lower activity and higher methane selectivity. The deactivation process and rate for catalysts containing Pd or Fe were similar to those of the non-promoted or Ru-promoted alumina-supported Co catalysts tested previously. The only exception was Co.068 with 1% Pd which had adequate activity and selectivity as well as lower deactivation rate at the various temperatures tested.

Singleton, A.H.

1996-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

50

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & ApplicationChapter 14 Application of FT-NIR for Rapid Determination of the Trans Fatty Acid Composition in Fats and Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application Chapter 14 Application of FT-NIR for Rapid Determination of the Trans Fatty Acid Composition in Fats and Oils Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books

51

Observation of the scattering of a CO/sub 2/ laser beam by small-scale plasma waves in the FT-2 tokamak  

SciTech Connect

Scattering of a laser beam by fluctuations with a scale of 0.7-5mm in the frequency range 3-15 MHz in the FT-2 tokamak is observed. (AIP)

Askinazi, L.G.; Budnikov, V.N.; Bulanin, V.V.; Esipov, L.A.; Korneev, D.O.; Sakharov, I.E.; Stepanov, A.Y.; Ushakov, S.N.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Reconstruction of f(T) and f(R) gravity according to (m,n)-type holographic dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by earlier works on reconstruction of modified gravity models with dark energy components, we extend them by considering a newly proposed model of (m, n)- type of holographic dark energy for two models of modified gravity, f(R) and f(T) theories, where R and T represent Ricci scalar and torsion scalar respectively. Specifically we reconstruct the two later gravity models and discuss their viability and cosmography. The obtained gravity models are ghost free, compatible with local solar system tests and describe effective positive gravitational constant.

Farooq, M Umar; Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project`s goal is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor. During the seventh quarter, significant progress in several areas has enabled us to make a number of important conclusions. Preliminary catalyst preparation of 3 batches of a Ru-promoted 20% Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has confirmed the similarity in catalysts prepared by Energy International and by Calsicat using the same procedure. This similarity was evident in both fixed and SBC reactor studies. All TiO{sub 2}-supported Co catalysts have been found to have poor F-T properties in both the fixed-bed and SBC reactors. These catalysts had been prepared following exactly the procedures given in the Exxon patents. One of the main problems in using TiO{sub 2} as a support is the fact that it has low surface area for supporting a 20 wt % Co catalyst. Another problem is that it does not seem to be robust enough for use in a SBC reactor. Ru promotion of Co/SiO{sub 2} does not have as dramatic an effect on catalyst activity as seen for Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, it does play a major role in maintaining higher activity (factor of 2 in the SBCR) when K is added to Co/Sr/SiO{sub 2}. Zr has been clearly shown by us to significantly enhance the F-T activity of Co/SiO{sub 2}. Such promotion is a basis for many of the Shell cobalt F-T patents. Latest results indicate that Zr also improves the activity of Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, although the methane selectivity is also slightly elevated. Finally, for our design of a ``benchmark`` Co F- T catalyst, research has now shown using both fixed-bed and SBC reactors that 0.3 wt % K is the optimum amount to use with Ru- promoted 20 wt % Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This amount of K greatly improves higher hydrocarbon selectivity without causing an unacceptable loss of activity.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

54

Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Moessbauer spectroscopy investigations were carried out on 14 iron-based catalysts during the period under review. The catalyst 100Fe/4.4Si/0.71K (all atomic ratios) was subjected to activation first in syngas and subsequently in CO gas atmosphere. Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis was carried out on the above catalyst. Another catalyst 100Fe/4.4Si/2.6Cu/0.71K (all atomic ratios) activated in syngas and subjected to FT synthesis was also studied to understand the effect of added Cu on the phase distribution and its effect on the FT activity. The following trends were observed: (1) activation of the catalyst in syngas, H{sub 2}/CO, lead to the formation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and no carbides were formed, the FT activity was found to be low at 9--12% (H{sub 2}+CO) conversion; (2) activation of the catalyst in CO for 22hrs lead to the formation of 33% of {chi}-carbide and the FT activity was found to be high at 88% maximum; (3) addition of copper to the catalyst has improved the FT activity for those catalysts pretreated in syngas at elevated pressures.

Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Drilling of a 2000-metre (6562-FT) Borehole for Geothermal Steam in Iceland  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drilling for geothermal heat has been carried out in Iceland since 1928, when hot water was obtained for district heating in Reykjavik. From that time, in particular in the sixties, extensive drilling has resulted in the annual utilization of 54 million tons of water and 2 million tons of steam. Five drilling rigs are used for geothermal drilling, with depth capacity ranging from 400 to 3,600 meters (1,312 to 11,812 feet). Drilling procedures vary extensively and depend on whether a high- or low-temperature field is being drilled, the main difference being the well-casing program and the blowout equipment used.

Ragnars, K.; Benediktsson, S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

ALOFT-FT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to aid in the planning process for the intentional burning of crude oils spills on ... Smoke Plume Trajectory From In Situ Burning of Crude Oil in Alaska ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

58

BP License - FT Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1600 1800 2000 Illinois Basin Coal Qatar LNG Alaska Natural Gas Wyoming Natural Gas Kentucky SNG with geologic storage lb s C O 2e / M W h ...

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

59

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

Property:Depth(m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Depth(m) Depth(m) Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "Depth(m)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.9 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 1.5 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 1.8 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 1.8 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.9 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 1.5 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 1.8 + A Alden Large Flume + 3.0 + Alden Small Flume + 1.8 + Alden Tow Tank + 1.2 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.2 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.8 + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + 0.6 + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + 0.6 + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + 0.7 + Carderock Circulating Water Channel + 2.7 +

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Direct observation of surface ethyl to ethane interconversion upon C2H4 hydrogenation over Pt/Al2O3 catalyst by time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-Situ Spectroscopy of Catalysts; Weckhuysen, B.M. , Ed. ;Hydrogenation over Pt/Al 2 O 3 Catalyst by Time-Resolved FT-over alumina-supported Pt catalyst were recorded at 25 ms

Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Final quarterly technical progress report No. 11, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results on the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis obtained during the last quarter confirmed that Co catalysts were very sensitive to temperature and deactivated significantly at temperatures above 240{degree}C both in the fixed bed and the slurry bubble column reactors. Following this preliminary investigation, a series of tests were carried out during this period in order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process as well as determine possible means of preventing it. In order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process, the catalysts which had undergone significant deactivation after high temperature (280{degree}C) reaction in either the fixed bed reactor or the slurry bubble column reactor were regenerated and retested in the fixed bed reactor. In both cases the catalysts recovered completely their initial activity. In addition, reactions at very high H{sub 2}CO ratios and high temperatures showed very little deactivation, suggesting that the deactivation of the Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperatures was mainly due carbon formation via the Boudouard reaction. Due to the unreactive nature of this carbon, it could only be removed by calcination. A second series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effect of certain promoters (Zr, La, Cr, and Re) as well as the effect of another support such as silica on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperature. The results suggest that the deactivation process and rate for most of these catalysts are similar to those of the alumina-supported catalysts tested previously (Co.005 and Co-053), and that none of the promoters helps to slow down the rate of carbon formation at high temperatures above 240{degree}C.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

63

Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

University of Kentucky has been developing Fischer-Tropsch catalysts which are active at a low H{sub 2}/CO ratio. It is of interest to find out any relationships that may exist between the iron phases that are produced during activation and FT synthesis and the activity of the catalysts. Moessbauer spectroscopy investigations were carried out on 16 iron-based catalysts during the period under review. Moessbauer measurements on two of the samples were also carried out at 13.5 K. The composition of one set of the catalysts studied consists of 100Fe/3.6Si/0.71K (all atomic % relative to Fe). Activation was carried out in syngas at a low pressure of 1 atm to investigate the effect of low pressure activation as compared to high pressure activation. The composition of a second set of catalysts consisted of 100Fe/3.6Si/2.6Cu/0.71K (all atomic % relative to Fe) and activation was carried out in syngas at a relatively high pressure of 12 atm. The composition of a third set of catalysts consisted of 100Fe/4.4Si/2.6Cu/1.0K (all atomic % relative to Fe) and activation was carried out in H{sub 2} at 1 atm. In all the cases the temperature was kept at 270 C and space velocity at 3.3nL/hr-g(Fe) for 24hrs. Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis was carried out at 13 atm at 270 C, 3.4nL/hr-g(Fe) syngas/g-Fe/hrs.

Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Dynamics of Propane in Silica Mesopores Formed upon PropyleneHydrogenation over Pt Nanoparticles by Time-Resolved FT-IRSpectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Propylene hydrogenation over Pt nanoparticles supported onmesoporous silica type SBA-15 was monitored by time-resolved FT-IRspectroscopy at 23 ms resolution using short propylene gas pulses thatjoined a continuous flow of hydrogen in N2 (1 atm total pressure).Experiments were conducted in the temperature range 323-413 K. Propanewas formed within 100 milliseconds or faster. The CH stretching regionrevealed distinct bands for propane molecules emerging inside thenanoscale channels of the silica support. Spectral analysis gave thedistribution of the propane product between support and surrounding gasphase as function of time. Kinetic analysis showed that the escape ofpropane molecules from the channels occurred within hundreds ofmilliseconds (3.1 + 0.4 s-1 at 383 K). A steady state distribution ofpropane between gas phase and mesoporous support is established as theproduct is swept from the catalyst zone by the continuous flow ofhydrogen co-reactant. This is the first direct spectroscopic observationof emerging products of heterogeneous catalysis on nanoporous supportsunder reaction conditions.

Waslylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Texas A and M University has been developing Fischer-Tropsch catalysts which are active at a low H{sub 2}/CO ratio of 0.67. It is of interest to find out any relationships that may exist between the iron phases that are produced during activation and FT synthesis and the activity of the catalysts. Moessbauer spectroscopy investigations were carried out on 13 iron-based catalysts during the period under review. The catalysts were taken from fixed bed reactors at the end of the tests. All the catalysts were mixed with glass beads. The glass beads were removed to a large extent by a hand held magnet. For each run, samples were taken from both top and bottom of the reactor to find out whether there are any differences between the two samples taken from different regions of the reactor. The catalysts with 24 parts of SiO{sub 2} were reduced with H{sub 2} at 250C for 24h, and the catalysts with 16 parts of SiO{sub 2} were reduced with H{sub 2} at 240C for 2h. All the test were carried out at 250C, 200 psig, 2.0nL(syngas)/g-cat/h with H{sub 2}/CO feed ratio of 0.67. The compositions of the catalysts studied are given in a table. Three catalysts consisted of Ca in addition to Cu and K.

Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Implementation plan for the demonstration of a 50,000 ft/sup 2/ solar hot water system for the textile industry. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis of textile processes was conducted to determine their applicability to integration into a 50,000 ft/sup 2/ collector field and into a waste heat recovery system. Various processes in a typical carpet finishing plant, a typical cotton/cotton blend finishing plant, and a typical 100% synthetic fabric pressurized beck finishing plant are analyzed. The flat-plate, evacuated tube, and parabolic concentrator are discussed and evaluated. Evaluations of direct heat exchange, closed cycle enhanced recovery, and open cycle enhanced heat recovery techniques as applied to textile processes are presented. Conceptual designs are discussed that use a solar array to produce hot water and use standard boilers to produce process steam and to augment the hot water output when insolation values are insufficient to meet process demands. Conceptual designs and cost estimates are presented for: process water systems with evacuated tube solar collectors; process water system with concentrating-tracking solar collectors; feedwater system with concentrating-tracking solar collectors; templifier and direct exchange waste heat recovery system; direct heat recovery systems; integrated system using enhanced heat recovery and concentrating-tracking solar collectors; integrated system using direct heat recovery and concentrating-tracking solar collectors; integrated system using direct heat recovery, evacuated tube solar collectors and concentrating-tracking solar collectors; and integrated system using enhanced heat recovery, evacuated tube collectors, and concentrating-tracking source collectors. An economic evaluation of the systems is presented using the rate of return method. Results and recommendations are summarized. (MCW)

Hester, J.C.; Beasley, D.E.; Rogers, W.A. Jr.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Topical report No.3, Zirconia promotion of Fischer-Tropsch cobalt catalysts: Behavior in fixed-bed and slurry bubble column reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of cobalt-based F-T catalysts supported on alumina and silica were prepared with different loadings of Zr and different sequences of impregnation of Co and Zr. All catalysts were extensively characterized by different methods. The catalysts were evaluated in terms of their activity and selectivity both in fixed bed and slurry bubble column reactors. Addition of ZrO{sub 2} to both Co/SiO{sub 2} and Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts resulted in at least a twofold increase in the catalyst activity for F-T synthesis in the fixed bed reactor. In the slurry bubble column reactor, a similar promotion effect was observed for the SiO{sub 2}-supported catalysts, while the addition of Zr to a cobalt/alumina catalyst had a less significant effect.

Oukaci, R.; Marcelin, G.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

68

Hydraulic frac sets Rockies depth record  

SciTech Connect

A depth record for massive hydraulic fracture in the Rocky Mt. region was set April 22 with the treatment of a central Wyoming gas well. The No. 1-29 Moneta Hills Well was treated through perforations at 19,838 to 19,874 ft and 20,064 to 20,100 ft. Soon after, another well in the Madden Deep Field was subject to hydraulic fracture through perforations a

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

72

Solar Total Energy System, Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume III. Appendix. [1. 72 MW thermal and 383. 6 kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the appendix to the Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design report on ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2). The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia, and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. Under this contract Stearns-Roger developed a conceptual design, which was site specific, containing the following major elements: System Requirements Analysis, Site Description, System Conceptual Design, Conceptual Test and Operating Plans, Development Plans, Procurement and Management Plans for Subsequent Phases, and Cost Estimates. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. Drawings, tables, and data sheets are included on hourly temperatures, displacement, utility rates, power conversion system, seasonal design load summary, average collector temperature optimization study, system operating temperature optimization study, power conversion system seasonal performance, thermal storage/fluid loop, system integration, and cost estimates. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

73

14MIB*ft* * * Kyoto Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline 1 Kinetic chemotaxis model 2 Goals and first results 3 Work in progress and future applications direction randomly, biased by chemical signal #12;Analysis on kinetic chemotaxis models using a functionalAnalysis on kinetic chemotaxis models using a functional analytic approach Analysis on kinetic

Sparks, Donald L.

74

UK FT PDU Facility Draft EA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2S 2S Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment for University of Kentucky Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Lexington, KY December 2013 Prepared for: Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory This page intentionally left blank. Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1642S Fischer-Tropsch Process Development Unit December 2013 Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes, through a cooperative agreement with the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), to partially fund the completion of the design, construction, and operation of a small-scale pilot plant for research related to the gasification of coal

75

ALOFT-FT: Frequently Asked Questions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NISTIR 5958 Smoke Plume Trajectory From In Situ Burning of Crude Oil in Alaska: Field Experiments and Modeling of Complex Terrain. ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Nuclear threaths from terrorist : -ft or fiction?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Summary After the terrorist attack on 9/11 on New York City and the Pentagon, it could seen to be an increase of speculation in the (more)

Kristine, Rakkenes

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

~'ftEMISTRY PftOIDNOIDO~  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rights reserved SSDI I0 I0-6030( 95 )04223-7 environment such as "electric energy per order" [8 photo efficiencies [ 10]. Vogler and coworkers [ 11] recommended the usage of formal rate constants

Sauvé, Geneviève

78

Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AvgReservoirDepth AvgReservoirDepth Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AvgReservoirDepth Property Type Quantity Description Average depth to reservoir Use this type to express a quantity of length. The default unit is the meter (m). Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Meters - 1 m, meter, meters Meter, Meters, METER, METERS Kilometers - 0.001 km, kilometer, kilometers, Kilometer, Kilometers, KILOMETERS, KILOMETERS Miles - 0.000621371 mi, mile, miles, Mile, Miles, MILE, MILES Feet - 3.28084 ft, foot, feet, Foot, Feet, FOOT, FEET Yards - 1.09361 yd, yard, yards, Yard, Yards, YARD, YARDS Pages using the property "AvgReservoirDepth" Showing 24 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + 213 m0.213 km 0.132 mi 698.819 ft 232.939 yd + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 850 m0.85 km

79

Property:FirstWellDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FirstWellDepth FirstWellDepth Jump to: navigation, search Property Name FirstWellDepth Property Type Quantity Use this type to express a quantity of length. The default unit is the meter (m). Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Meters - 1 m, meter, meters Meter, Meters, METER, METERS Kilometers - 0.001 km, kilometer, kilometers, Kilometer, Kilometers, KILOMETERS, KILOMETERS Miles - 0.000621371 mi, mile, miles, Mile, Miles, MILE, MILES Feet - 3.28084 ft, foot, feet, Foot, Feet, FOOT, FEET Yards - 1.09361 yd, yard, yards, Yard, Yards, YARD, YARDS Pages using the property "FirstWellDepth" Showing 5 pages using this property. B Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + 672 m0.672 km 0.418 mi 2,204.724 ft 734.906 yd + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + 1,968 m1.968 km

80

FT-ICR Z-- FT-ICR Mass Spectroscopy of Precursor Clusters of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"ü,Á,½,±,? ,?·CNX^S"O,ª·G"}OEø?,?,æ,è"ñ·í,?`·,-·i,ñ,?,¢,é ,?·l,¦,ç,ê,é·DFig.2(c),Í Ni/Co/C ,ð

Maruyama, Shigeo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

FT-ICR ,,,NX^[,Z-- FT-ICR Mass Spectroscopy of Atomic Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S?,-·ÝOEv,?,?,Á,?,¢,é·D--¼`¤,?^·[{·ªZq|" v(300l/s),?,æ,Á,?·C"w^³3·~10-10 Torr ,?·,·^DFig

Maruyama, Shigeo

82

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Ft. Hood Military Base Outside Killeen, Texas. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative through the Region 6 contract, selected Ft. Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this study is to assess the site for possible photovoltaic (PV) system installations and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Geiger, J.; Lisell, L.; Mosey, G.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Solar Total Energy System, Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume II, Section 3. Facility concept design. [1. 72 MW thermal and 383. 6 kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design of ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2) is presented. The various LSEs are part of ERDA's Solar Total Energy Program (STES) and a separate activity of the National Solar Thermal Power Systems Program. The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia, and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. The details of studies conducted for Phase II of the Solar Total Energy System (STES) for the conceptual design requirements of the facility are presented. Included in this section are the detailed descriptions and analyses of the following subtasks: facility concept design, system concept design, performance analysis, operation plan, component and subsystem development, procurement plan, cost estimating and scheduling, and technical and management plans. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

84

Solar Total Energy System: Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume I. Section 1. Conclusions and recommendations. Section 2. Systems requirements. [1. 72-MW thermal and 383. 6-kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design of ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2) is described. The various LSE's are part of ERDA's Solar Total Energy Program (STES) and a separate activity of the National Solar Thermal Power Systems Program. The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power (both space heating and process heat) and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. The section on conclusions and recommendations described the baseline design recommendation, facility requirements, the solar system, power conversion system, schedules and cost, and additional candidate systems. The systems requirements analysis includes detailed descriptions and analyses of the following subtasks: load analysis, energy displacement, local laws and ordinances, life cycle cost, health and safety, environmental assessment, reliability assessment, and utility interface. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

85

4-16-13_Christopher_Turner FT HNR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHRISTOPHER M. TURNER CHRISTOPHER M. TURNER ADMINISTRATOR SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON WATER AND POWER COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES APRIL 16, 2013 EXAMINING THE PROPOSED FISCAL YEAR 2014 SPENDING, PRIORITIES AND THE MISSIONS OF THE BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, THE FOUR POWER MARKETING ADMINISTRATIONS AND THE U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY'S WATER PROGRAM Mr. Chairman and members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to share with you today the highlights of the President's Fiscal Year (FY) 2014 budget request for the Southwestern Power Administration (Southwestern). Southwestern, as you know, is committed to marketing and delivering clean, renewable, cost-based hydropower to America's heartland. Our customers in Arkansas, Kansas, Louisiana,

86

9-11-2012_Lauren_Azar_FT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 11, 2012 September 11, 2012 Chairman Hastings, Ranking Member Markey, thank you for the opportunity to testify on the Federal Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs), and specifically, Secretary Chu's March 16, 2012 Memorandum (Memo) setting forth "foundational goals" that the Department of Energy (DOE) is considering for the PMAs. In order to address these goals, DOE intends to work with each PMA sequentially to develop tailored approaches to ensure each region has the infrastructure necessary to power the U.S. economy. DOE has begun this work with the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) and our approach to the other PMAs will be revised in light of our experience with WAPA. PMA PRIMARY MISSIONS: POWER MARKETING AND TRANSMISSION The PMAs have two primary obligations: (1) marketing electricity to preference

87

4-9-13_Ernest_Moniz FT SENR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ernest J. Moniz Nominee for the Position of Secretary of the United States Department of Energy Before the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources United States Senate April 9, 2013 Chairman Wyden, Ranking Member Murkowski, and distinguished members of the Committee, it is a privilege to appear before you as President Obama's nominee for Secretary of Energy. I am deeply honored by the President's confidence in me, as expressed by this nomination. If confirmed by the Senate, I will work to the best of my abilities to advance the public interest across all the missions entrusted to the Department of Energy (DOE) - energy, nuclear security, science, and environmental remediation. With the Chairman's permission, I would like to start with some thanks. First, I thank

88

Microsoft Word - M2FT-12LB0811021_Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UFD Campaign UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Jens Birkholzer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory September, 2012 FCRD-UFD-2012-000295 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trade mark, manufacturer, or

89

7-12-12_David_Frantz_FT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

G. Frantz G. Frantz Acting Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office U.S. Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Power And Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Committee on Energy and Commerce U. S. House of Representatives July 12, 2012 Introduction Chairmen Whitfield and Stearns, Ranking Members Rush and DeGette, and Members of the Subcommittees, thank you for the opportunity to testify before you today. My name is David Frantz, and I am the Acting Executive Director of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Loan Programs Office (LPO). I was the first Federal employee hired for the Loan Guarantee Program, and served as its first Director when I joined, moving from the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) on August 5,

90

7-12-12_Kathleen_Hogan_FT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DR. KATHLEEN HOGAN DR. KATHLEEN HOGAN DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY & RENEWABLE ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND POWER AND SUBCOMMITTEE ON OVERSIGHT AND INVESTIGATIONS COMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND COMMERCE U. S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES JULY 12, 2012 2 Chairman Whitfield, Ranking Member Rush, and Members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to discuss the Department's efforts to improve the energy efficiency of the Federal government and the industrial sector, and to comment on the legislation being considered by the Committee today. As Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency in the Office of Energy Efficiency and

91

6-27-13_Kathleen_Hogan FT HSST  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Statement of Dr. Kathleen Hogan Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Before the Committee on Science, Space and Technology Subcommittee on Oversight Subcommittee on Energy U.S. House of Representatives June 27, 2013 1 Chairmen Broun and Lummis, Ranking Members Maffei and Swalwell, and Members of the Subcommittees, thank you for inviting me to testify today on behalf of the Department of Energy (DOE) regarding energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs). Energy efficiency is a large, untapped resource in the United States that can provide savings for consumers, improve competitiveness, and reduce reliance on oil. As Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), I am

92

Microsoft Word - M2FT-13LA0807043.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluid Flow Model Fluid Flow Model Development for Representative Geologic Media Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Scott Painter Carl Gable Nataliia Makedonska Jeffrey Hyman Tsung-Lin Hsieh Quan Bui Los Alamos National Laboratory H.H. Liu Jens Birkholzer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory December 2012 LA-UR-12-26878 FCRD-UFD-2013-000058 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

93

Microsoft Word - Draft Ft Yukon Biomass System EA_0220  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOR A COMBINED POWER AND BIOMASS HEATING SYSTEM FORT YUKON, ALASKA U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE In Cooperation with USDA RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE DENALI COMMISSION FEBRUARY 2013 ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ADEC Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation AFRPA Alaska Forest Resources Practices Act BFE Base Flood Elevation BMP best management practice BTU British Thermal Unit CATG Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments CEQ Council on Environmental Quality CFR Code of Federal Regulations CHP Combined Heat and Power CO carbon monoxide CO 2 carbon dioxide CWA Clean Water Act dBA A-weighted decibel DBH diameter at breast height DOE U.S. Department of Energy EA Environmental Assessment

94

Microsoft Word - FT2b 092408 97-03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Warrior Basin Coal Seam Project Black Warrior Basin Coal Seam Project Field Test Location Tuscaloosa County, Alabama Summary of Field Test Site and Operations The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Black Warrior Basin Coal Seam Project injection testing will be performed to provide an initial assessment of the capability of mature coalbed methane reservoirs to receive and adsorb significant volumes of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) for geologic carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. A coalbed methane well in Deerlick Creek Coal Degasification Field (Figure 1) will be used for injection testing, and three deep monitoring wells will be drilled and cored. Coal seams in the Black Creek, Mary Lee, and Pratt coal zones of the Pennsylvanian-age Pottsville

95

07-26-2012_Kathleen_Hogan_FT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WRITTEN STATEMENT OF DR. KATHLEEN HOGAN DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY & RENEWABLE ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY & THE ENVIRONMENT COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY UNITED STATES HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES JULY 26, 2012 2 Chairman Harris, Ranking Member Miller, and Members of the Subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to discuss the Department of Energy's (DOE's) transportation portfolio-specifically the Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP). As part of the President's sustained, all-of-the-above approach to American energy, the Department is working to develop advanced vehicle technologies that can secure our energy future.

96

BFRL: Fire on the Web - ALOFT-FT Download  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NISTIR 5958 Smoke Plume Trajectory From In Situ Burning of Crude Oil in Alaska: Field Experiments and Modeling of Complex Terrain. ...

97

Microsoft Word - FINAL! Healy FT 1251 07062007.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by in-state refineries as feedstocks or blending products to replace high-sulfur crude oil. Potential customers include the Flint Hills and PetroStar refineries in North Pole,...

98

HEFA and F-T jet fuel cost analyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aviation and the Environment 2. HEFA jet fuel from vegetable oil bottom-up cost study 3. HEFA jet fuel from microalgae bottom-up cost

Nick Carter; Michael Bredehoeft; Christoph Wollersheim; Hakan Olcay; James Hileman; Steven Barrett; Website Lae. Mit. Edu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

FT-IR Microspectroscopy and Multivariate Statistics on Plant ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The model system chosen for this study was the uni-cellular algae, chlorella.pyrenoidosa, which was found to be sensitive to many of the same ...

100

Award Recipient of the ENERGY STAR Challenge for Industry Ft...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

manufacturing resources K-12 school resources Multifamily housing resources Restaurant resources Retail resources Senior care resources Small business resources State and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Process Optimization of FT-Diesel Production from Lignocellulosic Switchgrass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................................................. 20 Fischer-Tropsch Kerosene Global Biomass Fischer-Tropsch Fuel Chains...................................................... 39 Fisher Tropsch Quantitative Analysis ­ Parameters & Assumptions .................... 43 Fischer-Tropsch

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

102

Microsoft Word - FT3 092408 97-03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Partners Advanced Resources, International Denbury Resources, Incorporated Duke Energy Tennessee Valley Authority secarb.org 2 Southeast Regional Carbon...

103

Wet Chemical Bench (Heated): Reynolds Tech (8-ft)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Contains 4 dip tanks, 4 reflux quartz heated baths, glove rinse, DI and N2 spray guns, GFCI 120 VAC receptacle, and two safety eyewash stations. ...

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

104

Wet Chemiscal Bench (Heated): Reynolds Tech (6-ft)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Contains 2 dip tanks, two reflux quartz heated baths, glove rinse, DI and N2 spray guns, GFCI 120 VAC receptacle, and two safety eyewash stations ...

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

105

Microsoft Word - FT1 092408 97-03 _3_ _2_  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and marine sandstones, separated by regionally extensive thick impermeable marine shales that isolate fluids. Further compartmentalization and isolation of storage volumes...

106

Microsoft Word - M2FT-12LB0811021_Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at the Tournemire URL, France (Focus: EBS) ... 7 3.1.4 Task B1: HE-E Heater Test at Mont Terri URL, Switzerland (Focus: EBS and its interaction with NBS)...

107

Microsoft Word - FT2b 092408 97-03  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Warrior Basin Coal Seam Project Field Test Location Tuscaloosa County, Alabama Summary of Field Test Site and Operations The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration...

108

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Topical report No.2, Comparison of patented F-T cobalt catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on the information provided in patents assigned to Gulf, Shell, Exxon, and Statoil, a series of catalysts has been prepared consisting of 12--20 wt. % cobalt, a second metal promoter (Ru or Re), and an oxide promoter such as lanthana, zirconia, or alkali oxide, the support being alumina, silica, or titania. All catalysts have been extensively characterized by different methods. The catalysts have been evaluated in terms of their activity, selectivity both in a fixed bed reactor and in a slurry bubble column reactor, and the results correlated with their physico-chemical properties.

Oukaci, R.; Marcelin, G.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

109

Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Understanding Fault Characteristics And Sediment Depth For Geothermal Exploration Using 3D Gravity Inversion In Walker Valley, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Southern Walker Lake Basin, situated in the Walker Lake structural domain, consists of primarily E-W directed extension along N-NNW striking normal faults. Water well drilling on the eastern slopes of the Wassuk Range, west of the city of Hawthorne, Nevada showed elevated temperatures. Two recent drill holes reaching downhole depths of more than 4000 ft give some insight to the geologic picture, but more information

110

Method and apparatus for recovering geopressured methane gas from ocean depths  

SciTech Connect

A suggested method for recovering the estimated 50,000 trillion CF of methane that is dissolved in areas of the Gulf of Mexico at depths of 15,000 ft involves liberating the methane molecules by means of an electrolytic process. Electrodes lowered to the desired depth and insulated from the overlying saltwater establish an electrical circuit with the methane-laden water acting as the electrolyte. The a-c current density causes dissociation of the water molecules, freeing the methane gas, which rises to the ocean surface. A tent-like structure lying on the surface traps the gas for transfer to a storage facility.

Carpenter, N.

1982-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

111

Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass in the mega-ton scale will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. In addition to the physics justification there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake, and the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. The depth requirements associated with the various physics processes are reported for water Cherenkov and liquid argon detector technologies. While some of these physics processes can be adequately studied at shallower depths, none of them require a depth greater than 4300 mwe which corresponds to the 4850 ft level at Homestake. It is very important to note that the scale of the planned detector is such that even for accelerator neutrino detection (which allows one to use the accelerator duty factor to eliminate cosmics) a minimum depth is needed to reduce risk of contamination from cosmic rays. After consideration of the science and the practical issues regarding the Homestake site, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850ft level in a timely manner.

Adam Bernstein; Mary Bishai; Edward Blucher; David B. Cline; Milind V. Diwan; Bonnie Fleming; Maury Goodman; Zbigniew J. Hladysz; Richard Kadel; Edward Kearns; Joshua Klein; Kenneth Lande; Francesco Lanni; David Lissauer; Steve Marks; Robert McKeown; William Morse; Regina Rameika; William M. Roggenthen; Kate Scholberg; Michael Smy; Henry Sobel; James Stewart; Gregory Sullivan; Robert Svoboda; Mark Vagins; Brett Viren; Christopher Walter; Robert Zwaska

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

EMISSION CHARACTERISTICS OF JP-8, JP-900, FISCHER-TROPSCH (FT) AND JP-8/FT BLENDS IN A MODEL GAS TURBINE COMBUSTOR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The increasing usage of coal-based fuels in aviation turbines and fluctuating prices of the crude oil imports emphasizes the need to study and analyze alternate (more)

Kalaskar, Vickey

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Microsoft Word - LBNL M2FT-12LB0807061 final with signatures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Modeling on Modeling Coupled Processes in the Near Field of a Clay Repository Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition H.H. Liu, Jim Houseworth, Jonny Rutqvist, Lianchong Li, Daisuke Asahina, Fei Chen, Jens Birkholzer Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory August, 2012 FCRD-UFD-2012-000223 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial

114

Report on Fission Time Projection Chamber M3FT-12IN0210052  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Time Projection Chamber is a collaborative effort to implement an innovative approach and deliver unprecedented fission measurements to DOE programs. This 4?-detector system will provide unrivaled 3-D data about the fission process. Shown here is a half populated TPC (2?) at the LLNL TPC laboratory as it undergoes testing before being shipped to LANSCE for beam experiments.

James K. Jewell

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Cyclohexene Photo-oxidation over Vanadia Catalyst Analyzed by Time Resolved ATR-FT-IR Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oxidation over Vanadia Catalyst Analyzed by Time Resolvedperformance of vanadia catalysts [5] even though hydrationabsorption spectrum of these catalysts into the visible [

Mul, Guido

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

J. Phys. III1 (1991) 141-149 FtVRIER 1991, PAGE 141 Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the economics of liquefaction, the cost of liquefying helium and nitrogen is compared with the cost installations in France. The mains types of helium liquefiers encountered are described and then the French (liquefier, recovery system, purifying,.. ) during the last few years are discussed. In a final section about

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

117

Financial Times (FT) Interview with US e-Chromic CEO and ...  

"What I'm concerned about is that we actually establish an energy policy, and whatever party or president will establish that, ...

118

Feasibility report on the potential hydroelectric development at Combie Dam. [3. 5 MW, 70-ft head  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of an investigation of the technical, environmental, economic and financial feasibility of installing a hydroelectric powerplant at the existing Combie Dam on the Bear River in Nevada and Placer Counties, California, are discussed. This dam is owned and operated by the Nevada Irrigation District (the District) to act as a diversion and provide some storage for District water supply. The power plant would utilize flows which presently pass over the dam's spillway. The project would involve expanding the existing four foot diameter outlet on the southern gravity portion of the dam, installing a penstock (approximately 175 feet long, 102 inches in diameter) and constructing a 3500 kilowatts (kW) power plant on the south bank of the river below the dam. The capital cost of the project, including interest during construction, would total approximately $4,500,000 in July 1980 dollars. The unit capacity cost of the project at the 1980 price level would be $1,285 per kilowatt. The energy production unit cost would be 41.4 mills per kilowatt hour in 1980, and 56.3 mills per kilowatt hour in 1984. Environmental impacts of the Combie Power Project would be minimal. The primary conclusion from this study is that the Combie Power Project is economically, environmentally and institutionally viable, at the present time if an adequate power purchase agreement can be reached. Continued escalation of energy values will make this project even more attractive. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

An investigation of design alternatives for 328-ft (100-m) tall wind turbine towers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As wind turbines are continued to be placed at higher elevations, the need for taller wind turbine towers becomes necessary. However, there are multiple challenges (more)

Lewin, Thomas James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Modeling Volatile Species Retention Experiments: Interim Progress Report (M3FT-12LA0202053)  

SciTech Connect

Metal nuclear fuel is a candidate transmutation fuel form for advanced fuel cycles. One constituent of the fuel, americium, has a high vapor pressure, and there is a concern that excessive volatility losses of americium will occur during casting of the metal. A number of experiments have been performed using americium and surrogate metals, including experiments slated for FY12, to address the concern. The present task is to model and numerically simulate these experiments. This report describes a system-level model of the relevant experiments that has been developed together with some results. It also describes some initial 3D, full-physics simulations of portions of the experiments that have been performed.

Carlson, Neil N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Chemical Reaction of Cobalt Clusters with Ethanol by Using FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectrometer Shuhei Inoue*3 and Shigeo Maruyama*4 *3 Dept. of Mech. Sys. Eng., Hiroshima Univ., 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima-shi, Hiroshima, 739-8527, Japan *4 Dept. of Mech. Eng., The Univ. of Tokyo, 7

Maruyama, Shigeo

122

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 3,183-hour long catalyst aging slurry bubble column reactor test run utilizing one of the selected catalysts prepared by Calsicat started on January 8, 1996 was ended on May 20, 1996. The effects of temperature, pressure, and catalyst age on catalyst productivity, product distribution, methane yields, Anderson-Shulz-Flory chain growth probability were determined utilizing one of the bench-scale slurry bubble column reactors. Experimental details about this run as well as the results and conclusions derived from it will be provided in the final report.

Singleton, A.H.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

F-T process using an iron on mixed zirconia-titania supported catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Fischer-Tropsch catalyst comprising iron co-deposited with or deposited on particles comprising a mixture of zirconia and titania, preferably formed by co-precipitation of compounds convertible to zirconia and titania, such as zirconium and titanium alkoxide. The invention also comprises the method of making this catalyst and an improved Fischer-Tropsch reaction process in which the catalyst is utilized.

Dyer, Paul N. (Allentown, PA); Nordquist, Andrew F. (Whitehall, PA); Pierantozzi, Ronald (Macungie, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Low severity upgrading of F-T waxes with solid superacids  

SciTech Connect

We have previously reported the isomerization and hydrocracking of n-hexadecane and a n-C{sub 32} straight chain paraffin with a Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst at 170{degrees}C and 350 psig of hydrogen. This study has now been extended to the treatment of a Fisher-Tropsch wax with a carbon number range from C{sub 55}-C{sub 62}. The results reported in Table 1 show that the Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst is active for the isomerization and hydrocracking of this substrate. At an 88.6 wt% conversion level, an 86.1% selectivity to isoparaffins was achieved. The products consisted mainly of C{sub 4}-C{sub 9} and C{sub 10}-C{sub 14} fractions, suitable as gasoline and diesel fuels. A feed/catalyst ratio of 6:1 was used; there was no evidence of catalytic deactivation. The melted wax is viscous and there was a decrease in conversion with time, indicating that diffusion might be a limitation for chains of very high molecular weight.

Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

125

New 480 ft. Flue Gas Stack and Existing Fly Ash Silo Right: Inlet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Passamaquoddy Recovery Scrubber Clean Coal Project at Dragon Products Company's cement plant in Thomaston, Maine, started pre-opera- tions equipment checkout in January and...

126

New Mercury Control Technology for the Ft. Dix Waste-to-Energy Plant Sid Nelson Jr.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature. Mercury chloride (HgCI2) tends to be found in incinerator flue gases and this species may be well mercury measurement with no interference from acidic gases, such as S02. Low-Temperature Sorbents After of the oxidized mercury species, such as mercury chloride. Then, the large surface area in the baghouse would

Columbia University

127

Alvord (3,000-ft strawn) LPG flood - design and performance evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Mitchell Energy Corporation has implemented a LPG-dry gas miscible process in the Alvord (3000' Strawn) Unit in Wise County, Texas utilizing the DOE tertiary incentive program. The field had been waterflooded for 14 years and was producing near its economic limit at the time this project was started. This paper presents the results of the reservoir simulation study that was conducted to evaluate pattern configuration and operating alternatives so as to maximize LPG containment and oil recovery performance. Several recommendations resulting from this study were implemented for the project. Based on the model predictions, tertiary oil recovery is expected to be between 100,000 and 130,000 bbls, or about 7 percent of the oil originally in place in the Unit. 12 refs.

Frazier, G.D.; Todd, M.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Summary for FT, IT and SE 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aspects of Fusion Energy; ITER Activities Fusion Technology and Power Plant Design Summary and Conclusion of electricity generation; Through ITER the economically acceptable first generation fusion power plants could growing rapidly Predictions suggest strong growth will continue FPM/1 by C.M.Ferreira #12;Carbon dioxide

129

The applicability of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy in waste management  

SciTech Connect

State and stability or reactivity of waste materials are important properties that must be determined to obtain information about the future behavior and the emission potential of the materials. Different chemical and biological parameters are used to describe the stage of organic matter in waste materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy provides information about the chemistry of waste materials in a general way. Several indicator bands that are referred to functional groups represent components or metabolic products. Their presence and intensity or their absence shed light on the phase of degradation or stabilization. The rapid assessment of the stage of organic matter decomposition is a very important field of application. Therefore, infrared spectroscopy is an appropriate tool for process and quality control, for the assessment of abandoned landfills and for checking of the successful landfill remediation. A wide range of applications are presented in this study for different waste materials. Progressing stages of a typical yard/kitchen waste composting process are shown. The fate of anaerobically 'stabilized' leftovers in a subsequent liquid aerobic process is revealed by spectroscopic characteristics. A compost that underwent the biological stabilization process is distinguished from a 'substrate' that comprises immature biogenic waste mixed with mineral compounds. Infrared spectra of freeze-dried leachate from untreated and aerated landfill material prove the effect of the aerobic treatment during 10 weeks in laboratory-scale experiments.

Smidt, Ena [BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: ena.smidt@boku.ac.at; Meissl, Katharina [BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Institute of Waste Management, Department of Water, Atmosphere and Environment, Muthgasse 107, 1190 Vienna (Austria)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Hydrologic Evaluation of Rainfall Estimates from Radar, Satellite, Gauge, and Combinations on Ft. Cobb Basin, Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates rainfall estimates from the Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD), operational rain gauges, Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), and Precipitation Estimation from Remotely ...

Jonathan J. Gourley; Yang Hong; Zachary L. Flamig; Jiahu Wang; Humberto Vergara; Emmanouil N. Anagnostou

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

TT^T7Gs!rf5ft Riso-R-425 Metallurgy Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbines built by a group of electricity generating companies. Six wings with a length of 12 meters each- ters: General Materials Research, Technology and Materials Development, Fuel Elements, Non by the staff during 1979 is included. INIS-descriptors: FUEL ELEMENTS, METALLURGY, NON-DESTRUCTIVE TESTING

132

Microsoft Word - LBNL M2FT-12LB0807061 final with signatures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lee C.A. (1996) Modelling rock using bonded assemblies of circular particles. In: Proceedings of the 1996 2nd North American Rock Mechanics Symposium, NARMS'96, pp. 19-37....

133

Waste Logic: FT 2.0: Waste Logic: FastTrack Version 2.0 with Data Link  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tracking and trending liquid processing performance data is critical for utility low-level waste (LLW) managers to sufficiently recognize good performance of their liquid processing systems and identify areas for improvement. In response to this challenge, EPRI's LLW group developed FastTrack. EPRI's Waste Logic: FastTrack Version 2.0 with Data Link software for Microsoft Windows-based PC computers is a custom database software application that provides storage, retrieval, analysis, graphing, repo...

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

134

Time-Resolved FT-IR Spectroscopy of CO Hydrogenation over Supported Ru Catalyst at 700K  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. In-Situ Spectroscopy of Catalysts 2004, 32-46. Basu, P. ;over Supported Ru Catalyst at 700 K Walter Wasylenko andAl 2 O 3 -supported, Ru catalyst (Aldrich, 5% Ru, Degussa

Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

DOE Building America Technology and Energy Savings Analysis of Two 2721 ft2 Homes in a Mixed Humid Climate  

SciTech Connect

The ZEBRAlliance is an opportunity to accelerate progress toward DOE s goal of maximizing cost-effective energy efficiency by investing in a highly leveraged, focused effort to test new ultra-high-efficiency components emerging from ORNL s Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) partners and others. The Alliance integrated efficient components into the construction of four research houses that will be used as test markets to gauge the integral success of the components and houses. These four research houses are expected to be the first houses used to field-test several newly emerging products such as the ClimateMaster ground-source integrated heat pump, factory assembled ZEHcor walls, and one or more new appliances from Whirlpool Corporation.

Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL; Khowailed, Gannate A [ORNL

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

EXAFS and FT-IR Characterization of Mn and Li Promoted Titania-Supported Rh Catalysts for CO Hydrogenation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of Li and Mn promoters on the structure and selectivity of supported Rh catalysts for CO hydrogenation reaction was examined. Infrared spectroscopy and X-ray absorption were used to investigate the adsorption of reactants and local structure of Rh. These techniques were used in combination with reactivity, H{sub 2} chemisorption, and temperature programmed studies to correlate structural characteristics with activity and selectivity during CO hydrogenation of unpromoted Rh/TiO{sub 2} and three promoted Rh catalysts: Rh-Li/TiO{sub 2}, Rh-Mn/TiO{sub 2}, and Rh-Li-Mn/TiO{sub 2}. The presence of a promoter slightly decreases the Rh clusters size; however, no evidence for an electronic effect induced by the presence of Li and Mn was found. Higher turnover frequencies were found for the promoted catalysts, which also showed the lower dispersion. The Li promoter introduces a weakened CO adsorption site that appears to enhance the selectivity to C{sub 2+} oxygenates. The selectivity to C{sub 2+} oxygenates varies inversely with the reducibility of Rh metal, that is, the lower the Rh reducibility, the higher the selectivity.

V Schwartz; A Campos; A Egbebi; J Spivey; S Overbury

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

SWN Nets as a Framework for the Specification and the Analysis of FT Techniques Adopted in Electric Plant Automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of formal methods for specification and analysis of dependable systems is considered a promising opportunity to support the evaluation of critical issues since the early design phases. Stochastic Petri nets can play an important role not only ...

Lorenzo Capra; Rossano Gaeta; Oliver Botti

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Low severity upgrading of F-T waxes with solid superacids. Quarterly report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work in the proceeding quarter focussed on the kinetic modeling of isomerization and hydrocracking reactions of long-chain paraffins over a Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst. The model is based on a simplified reaction network. The effects of hydrogen pressure and platinum loading on catalytic activity of Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} were included in the kinetic model. This model, which describes the lumping products as a function of time, was fitted with experimental data obtained from a batch reactor. The predicted product distribution agrees with the experimental data within {plus_minus} 10%. In addition, following up previous work on the alkylation of aromatics in the presence of paraffinic compounds, the Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyzed reaction of neopentylbenzene was carried out. This compound cannot form an olefinic bond and was investigated to obtain evidence on the possibility of the alkylation of benzene proceeding via olefinic intermediates. It appears that the reaction proceeds by direct protonation of paraffinic structures.

Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

207_14 Application of FT-NIR for Rapid Determination of the Trans Fatty Acid Composition in Fats and  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Press, Urbana, IL 61802 2006 by AOCS Press. All rights reserved. No part of this PDF may be repro-

140

Coal liquefaction process streams characterization and evaluation: FT-IR methods for characterization of coal liquefaction products  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to demonstrate the use of two FTIR techniques for the analysis of direct coal liquefaction process-derived materials. The two methods were quantitative FTIR analysis and themogravimetric (TG) analysis with FTIR analysis of evolved products (TG-FTIR). The quantitative FTIR analyses of both whole resids and THF-soluble resids provided quantitation of total hydrogen, aliphatic and aromatic hydrogen, total carbon, total oxygen, hydroxyl and etheric oxygen, and ash contents. The FTIR results were usually in agreement with values derived by other, more conventional methods. However, the accuracies of specific measurements, in comparisons with results from conventional methods, ranged from good to poor. The TG-FTIR method provided approximate analyses of coals and resids. The data provided included the time dependent evolution profiles of the volatile species and the elemental composition of the char. Reproducible data of gaseous species and pyrolysis tar yields for whole resid samples larger than 10 mg were obtainable. The yields and evolution profiles of certain volatiles (tar, CO, and methane) provided structural information on the samples. There were some experimental and interpretational difficulties associated with both techniques. Optimization of the curve-resolving routine for coal-liquefaction samples would improve the quantitative FTIR accuracy. Aerosol formation limited the full application of the TG-FTIR technique with the THF-soluble resid samples. At this time, further development of these analytical methods as process development tools will be required before their use for that purpose can be recommended. The use of FTIR as an on-line analytical technique for coal liquefaction process streams requires demonstration before it can be recommended; however, such a demonstration may be warranted.

Serio, M.A.; Teng, H.; Bassilakis, R.; Solomon, P.R. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

FT-ICR `'u,SJ"-,t[OE",Z-- "OE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/s),?,æ,Á,?·C"w^³3·~10-10 Torr ,?·,·^DFig. 3 ,?·¶·"·ª,?,ÍOE·[U·[·ö"-NX^·[OE¹,ª, ,é,ª

Maruyama, Shigeo

142

Low severity upgrading of F-T waxes with solid superacids. Progress report, March 1, 1992--May 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

We have previously reported the isomerization and hydrocracking of n-hexadecane and a n-C{sub 32} straight chain paraffin with a Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst at 170{degrees}C and 350 psig of hydrogen. This study has now been extended to the treatment of a Fisher-Tropsch wax with a carbon number range from C{sub 55}-C{sub 62}. The results reported in Table 1 show that the Pt/ZrO{sub 2}/SO{sub 4} catalyst is active for the isomerization and hydrocracking of this substrate. At an 88.6 wt% conversion level, an 86.1% selectivity to isoparaffins was achieved. The products consisted mainly of C{sub 4}-C{sub 9} and C{sub 10}-C{sub 14} fractions, suitable as gasoline and diesel fuels. A feed/catalyst ratio of 6:1 was used; there was no evidence of catalytic deactivation. The melted wax is viscous and there was a decrease in conversion with time, indicating that diffusion might be a limitation for chains of very high molecular weight.

Wender, I.; Tierney, J.W.

1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

143

1 IAEA-CN-94/FT/1-3Ra Addressing Key Science and Technology Issues for IFE Chambers,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plant must supply about 500,000 targets per day, including manufacturing the spherical fuel capsule deposition material hohlraum, have been developed (see Fig. 3). Development of additional foam fabrication for 400 MJ targets. We have performed a cost analysis of manufacturing the direct drive target

Najmabadi, Farrokh

144

Technology demonstration of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles at Ft. Bliss, Texas. Interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technology demonstration program of dedicated compressed natural gas (CNG) original equipment manufacturer (OEM) vehicles was conducted at FL Bliss, Texas to demonstrate the use of CNG as an alternative fuel. The demonstration program at FL Bliss was the first Army initiative with CNG-fueled vehicles under the legislated Alternative Motor Fuels Act. This Department of Energy (DOE)-supported fleet demonstration consisted of 48 General Services Administration (GSA)-owned, Army-leased 1992 dedicated CNG General Motors (GM) 3/4-ton pickup trucks and four 1993 gasoline-powered Chevrolet 3/4-ton pickup trucks.

Alvarez, R.A.; Yost, D.M.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings at Schools in the Ft. Worth Independent School District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As part of the Texas LoanSTAR program, 44 schools in the Fort Worth Independent School District (FWISD) had lighting retrofits performed on there in late 1991. The Energy Systems Laboratory of Texas A&M University is monitoring hourly energy use at two of these 44 schools, Sims Elementary School and Dunbar Middle School. Data analyses at the Energy Systems Laboratory on the monitored data along with utility billing data from 102 other schools in the FWISD, have shown major O&M savings potential in these schools of over one-fourth of the total electricity consumption and gas consumption, which could amount to $ 1,658,000/yr. This report describes the analysis procedure and highlights the O&M energy savings potential in each of the 104 schools.

Liu, M.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Electrical energy and demand savings from a geothermal heat pump energy savings performance contract at Ft. Polk, LA  

SciTech Connect

At Fort Polk, LA the space conditioning systems of an entire city (4,003 military family housing units) have been converted to geothermal heat pumps (GHP) under an energy savings performance contract. At the same time, other efficiency measures such as compact fluorescent lights (CFLs), low-flow hot water outlets, and attic insulation were installed. Pre- and post-retrofit data were taken at 15-minute intervals on energy flows through the electrical distribution feeders that serve the family housing areas of the post. 15-minute interval data was also taken on energy use from a sample of the residences. This paper summarizes the electrical energy and demand savings observed in this data. Analysis of feeder-level data shows that for a typical year, the project will result in a 25.6 million kWh savings in electrical energy use, or 32.4% of the pre-retrofit electrical consumption in family housing. Results from analysis of building-level data compare well with this figure. Analysis of feeder-level data also shows that the project has resulted in a reduction of peak electrical demand of 6,541 kW, which is 39.6% of the pre-retrofit peak electrical demand. In addition to these electrical savings, the facility is also saving an estimated 260,000 therms per year of natural gas. It should be noted that the energy savings presented in this document are the apparent energy savings observed in the monitored data, and are not to be confused with the contracted energy savings used as the basis for payments. To determine the contracted energy savings, the apparent energy savings may require adjustments for such things as changes in indoor temperature performance criteria, additions of ceiling fans, and other factors.

Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Real Time Monitoring of Subsidence Along I-70 in Washington, Pennsylvania Kevin M. O==Connor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was to ensure the safety of the driving public as the highway was undermined. Coal Mining and Subsidence The 1.8 m (6 ft) thick Pittsburgh coal seam shown in Figure 3 was being mined 156 m (510 ft) below longwall coalmine panels were mined at a depth of approximately 156 m (510 ft) beneath I-70 east

148

Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of hundreds of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent in a mountain. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper(or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which should provide enhanced capability for background rejection. We have based background rejection on reasonable estimates of track and energy resolution, and in some cases scaled background rates from measurements in water. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures.Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

Kadel, Richard W.; Bernstein, Adam; Blucher, Edward; Cline, David B.; Diwan, Milind V.; Fleming, Bonnie; Kearns, Edward; Klein, Joshua; Lande, Kenneth; Lanni, Francesco; Lissauer, David; McKeown, Robert; Morse, William; Rameika, Regina; Scholberg, Kate; Smy, Michael; Sobel, Henry; Sullivan, Gregory; Svoboda, Robert; Vagins, Mark; Walter, Christopher; Zwaska, Robert

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

149

Report on the Depth Requirements for a Massive Detector at Homestake  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides the technical justification for locating a large detector underground in a US based Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory. A large detector with a fiducial mass greater than 100 kTon will most likely be a multipurpose facility. The main physics justification for such a device is detection of accelerator generated neutrinos, nucleon decay, and natural sources of neutrinos such as solar, atmospheric and supernova neutrinos. The requirement on the depth of this detector will be guided by the rate of signals from these sources and the rate of backgrounds from cosmic rays over a very wide range of energies (from solar neutrino energies of 5 MeV to high energies in the range of tens of GeV). For the present report, we have examined the depth requirement for a large water Cherenkov detector and a liquid argon time projection chamber. There has been extensive previous experience with underground water Cherenkov detectors such as IMB, Kamioka, and most recently, Super-Kamiokande which has a fiducial mass of 22 kTon and a total mass of 50 kTon at a depth of 2700 meters-water-equivalent. Projections for signal and background capability for a larger and deeper (or shallower) detectors of this type can be scaled from these previous detectors. The liquid argon time projection chamber has the advantage of being a very fine-grained tracking detector, which provides enhanced capability for background rejection. In the current work we have taken the approach that the depth should be sufficient to suppress the cosmogenic background below predicted signal rates for either of the above two technologies. Nevertheless, it is also clear that the underground facility that we are examining must have a long life and will most likely be used either for future novel uses of the currently planned detectors or new technologies. Therefore the depth requirement also needs to be made on the basis of sound judgment regarding possible future use. In particular, the depth should be sufficient for any possible future use of these cavities or the level which will be developed for these large structures. Along with these physics justifications there are practical issues regarding the existing infrastructure at Homestake and also the stress characteristics of the Homestake rock formations. In this report we will examine the various depth choices at Homestake from the point of view of the particle and nuclear physics signatures of interest. We also have sufficient information about the existing infrastructure and the rock characteristics to narrow the choice of levels for the development of large cavities with long lifetimes. We make general remarks on desirable ground conditions for such large cavities and then make recommendations on how to start examining these levels to make a final choice. In the appendix we have outlined the initial requirements for the detectors. These requirements will undergo refinement during the course of the design. Finally, we strongly recommend that the geotechnical studies be commenced at the 4850 ft level, which we find to be the most suitable, in a timely manner.

Bernstein,A.; Blucher, E.; Cline, D. B.; Diwan, M. V.; Fleming, b.; Kadel, R.; Kearns, E.; Klein, J.; Lande, K.; Lanni, F.; Lissauer, D.; McKeown, R.; Morse, W.; Radeika, R.; Scholberg, K.; Smy, M.; Sobel, H.; Sullivan, G.; Svoboda, R.; Vagins, M.; Walter, C.; Zwaska, R.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

150

Fixed-base platform concepts for deepwater Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, offshore platforms are installed in water as deep as 5,000 ft. Gulf of Mexico offshore platforms can be categorized by the water-depth ranges where they are cost-effective: Fixed-base rigid platforms (to approximately 1,400 ft); Compliant towers (1,200 to 2,000 ft); and Floating systems (deeper than 1,600 ft). The paper describes production and equipment, design, platform concepts, in-place considerations, fabrication considerations, and installation considerations.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Composites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

structures Resources * Abrasive blastersvapor hydrohone * Microprocessor controlled ovens * Autoclave: 4 ft. diameter x 8 ft. long * UV curing * Walk-in oven: 6 ft. x 6 ft. x...

152

MechMeasureCalbration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

range and up to 40 ft. depth range) * Wilson Instron Hardness testers * Non-contact laser measuring system * Avant 300 optical video inspection sys- tem * Precision pins in...

153

Direct Observation of the Kinetically Relevant Site of CO Hydrogenation on Supported Ru Catalyst at 700 K by Time-Resolved FT-IR Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In- Situ Spectroscopy of Catalysts; B.M. Weckhuysen, Ed. ;CO Hydrogenation on Supported Ru Catalyst at 700 K by Time-K. 1. Introduction Supported Ru catalysts are among the most

Wasylenko, Walter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels  

SciTech Connect

n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for both primary reference fuels, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Additionally, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the aforementioned fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

155

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the prices paid for energy in recent years. In the last 10 years electrical costs have ranged from $0.07 per,156,884 Solid Sidewall 27 7.5 5.28 lb. 104,178 2,812,806 Electrical Costs Analysis of the electrical costs data fuel and electrical costs contribute nearly 60% of these costs for Georgia contract broiler growers

Navara, Kristen

156

Characterization Of The Hydrogenation Products Of Bix (phenylethynyl) Benzene (DEB) Getter Using Combined GC/FTIR/MS, FT-Raman, and ATR Spectroscopies (U)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Organic hydrogen getters are utilized to minimize hydrogen accumulation in sealed systems where such build up could produce either a safety problem from pressure build up or corrosion problem due the hydriding of metals contained in the sealed vessel. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) is a hydrogen getter that is based on the palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to single bonds in aromatic aryl compound. DEB is a getter mixed with 25% carbon and 1% Pd and pressed into pellets with some porosity. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reactions with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates.

Smyrl, N. R.; Powell, G. L.

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

157

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the house. This is challenging with the high light output of energy saving light sources used in the typical, as levels of stray voltage come and go depending electricity usage down line from the farm. Check

Navara, Kristen

158

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is fairly typical of a house where power ventilation is used year round). From this information.05" and 0.20", as well as the energy efficiency of the fans at a static pressure of 0.05"). The spreadsheet as it enters the house as well as hourly water usage of the system under these weather conditions

Navara, Kristen

159

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

integrity, food safety, and energy usage are associated with large farming operations. Warranted or not-fed poultry are terms commonly used with small-scale poultry operations. These birds are typically reared

Navara, Kristen

160

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

choosing a light bulb, the lumen output should always be considered. A lumen is how much light is produced, while wattage is the amount of power used to produce that light. In general, higher wattage bulbs wattage light bulbs. In some

Navara, Kristen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to 100 watt bulbs will provide the needed light intensity. Light should be provided for a minimum of 12 have to be repeated several times to stop the broody condition. #12;Broody Pens Plus Light Light by poultry scientists that low levels of continuous artificial light (i.e. 0.5 foot candles for 12 hours

Navara, Kristen

162

Design and experimental validation of 328 ft (100 m) tall wind turbine towers utilizing high strength and ultra-high performance concrete.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With today's global capacity exceeding 280 GW, windpower has proven to be a formidable source of renewable energy worldwide. In order to keep pace with (more)

Schmitz, Grant M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

per gallon, 1400 to 2000 gallons of chicken fat that is either being turned into dissolved air Fermentation solids Centrifugation Fat for Fuel Proteins to Rendering #12;Recovery of this fat for broiler fuel and Environmental Sciences / Athens, Georgia 30602-4356 MARCH 2006 PROCESSING TIP . . . FAT RECOVERY FROM WASTEWATER

Navara, Kristen

164

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) it reduces wasted energy. The peck order provides the framework for regular and predictable relationships may take a few hours to a day depending on group size. This is how tension and wasted energy and the resulting wasted energy and injuries due to fighting can take their toll in production performance. Flocks

Navara, Kristen

165

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

warhead or a terrorist's "dirty bomb", nuclear "fallout" is produced. This fallout is the melted into the atmosphere and later falls back to earth. Fission products, the radioactive residue of fallout, are minerals mainly on the food eaten by the animal. Grazing animals that eat grass or forage contaminated by fallout

Navara, Kristen

166

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the business aspects of the biomanufacturing industry, including finance, supply chain issues and manufacturing production scales of the liquid biofuels industry at one end, to the high-quality and highly regulated and Bioprocessing #12;MBB MBBinBiomanufacturingandBioprocessing Biofuel/Biochemicals Industrial

Navara, Kristen

167

Dynamics of Propane in Silica Mesopores Formed upon Propylene Hydrogenation over Pt Nanoparticles by Time-Resolved FT-IR Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

state distribution of propane between gas and mesopore phaseWavenumber (cm ) B Gas Phase Propane 2968 cm k 1 = 3.1 0.4slices showing the gas phase propane component at 216, 648,

Waslylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and fanends of a house, reduce wind chill effect, and increased electricity usage. An inexpensive air velocity. The thinner a belt becomes, the lower it will ride in the motor and prop pulleys and the slower the fan blades pressure. Ideally, the pressure will be above 0.10 in. The lower the pressure, the more air you have

Navara, Kristen

169

Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Moessbauer spectroscopy investigations were carried out on 16 iron-based catalysts during the period under review. A set of 10 samples subjected to different pretreatments and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were investigated to understand the effect of reduction in different gas atmospheres on the iron phases formed. Another set of 5 catalysts pretreated in CO and subjected to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using two kinds of wax viz., (a) a low molecular wt. wax and (b) heavy wax were also studied. Although it is difficult to draw any definite conclusions from the data, some plausible trends are noticed: (1) pretreatment of a catalyst in H{sub 2} leads to the formation of {var_epsilon}-carbide; (2) pretreatment of a catalyst in H{sub 2}/CO leads to the formation of {chi}-carbide; (3) reduction of UCI-1185-149-2ND catalyst in CO leads to the formation of {chi}-carbide; and (4) reduction of DOE catalysts in CO leads to the formation of {var_epsilon}-carbide. Data are presented on the phases found in the various catalysts.

Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Moessbauer spectroscopy investigations were carried out on 7 iron-based catalysts during the period under review. A set of four samples subjected to activation in syn gas and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis were sent by R.J. Gormley, to understand the behavior of the low alpha catalyst used in these runs. Another three used catalyst samples extracted from the LaPorte Run II were sent By Dr. Bharat Bhatt to understand the phase distribution and any correlation with the run results. The high alpha UCI catalyst used in the LaPorte Run I was studied to compare with the UCI low alpha catalyst used in LaPorte Run II. All together 10 Moessbauer measurements both at room and low temperatures were carried out to identify the iron phases present in these catalyst samples. Results to date are presented and some plausible trends are outlined.

Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Exergy Analysis of a GTL Process Based on Low-Temperature Slurry F-T Reactor Technology with a Cobalt Catalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Hans Tropsch; their aim was to use a mixture of CO and H2 (referred to as synthesis gas, syngas) to produce hydrocarbons, chemicals, and liquid fuels. The production of syngas was achieved by coal into syngas and, then, Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of syngas into synthetic liquid fuels. A first plant

Kjelstrup, Signe

172

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into insulation and destroy it over time. Openings which allow air to leak into the building should be covered winter? First, the house should be appropriately insulated. Good insulation minimizes heat loss from with solid sidewalls are able to provide better insulation than curtain-sided houses because curtains have

Navara, Kristen

173

RMIT TREC7 Interactive Track  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... FT944-4576 12 drug. FT944-4576 13 genes. ... FT932-4965 1 FT 07 JUN 93/US fears flood of China's new slaves. ... FT931-9235 3 drugs. ...

174

On Rayleigh Optical Depth Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many different techniques are used for the calculation of Rayleigh optical depth in the atmosphere. In some cases differences among these techniques can be important, especially in the UV region of the spectrum and under clean atmospheric ...

Barry A. Bodhaine; Norman B. Wood; Ellsworth G. Dutton; James R. Slusser

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

ARM - Measurement - Cloud optical depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

optical depth optical depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud optical depth Amount of light cloud droplets or ice particles prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites Field Campaign Instruments EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites

176

ARM - Measurement - Aerosol optical depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

depth depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Aerosol optical depth A measure of how much light aerosols prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments HSRL : High Spectral Resolution Lidar MPL : Micropulse Lidar MFRSR : Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer NIMFR : Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer Field Campaign Instruments AOS-PMFOV : Acoustical Optical Spectrometer-Photometer with Multiple

177

Aircraft Maintenance Platform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 SWATH = 100 ft2 CURRENTLY: 460 ft2 @ 1 ft2/min = 460 minutes = 8 hours of continuous blasting ... Component specifications. Blast system ...

2011-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

178

This Too Shall Pass and Be Still Empty Moon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This too shall pass, 6ftx2ft, oil on wood. Adriana M.Garcia. Be still empty moon, 6ft x 2ft, oil on wood.

Garcia, Adriana M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Oscillatory Flame Response in Acoustically Coupled Fuel Droplet Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stavinoha. Properties of Fischer-Tropsch (FT) blends for useof fuels derived through Fischer Tropsch (FT) synthesis, afrom coal via the Fischer-Tropsch process, or FT fuel,

Sevilla Esparza, Cristhian Israel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Challenges of deep drilling  

SciTech Connect

Deep drilling poses major problems when high temperatures, high pressures, and acid gases are encountered. A combination of these items usually requires extensive planning, exotic materials, long drilling times, and heavy expenditures. Only 2 wells have been drilled below 30,000 ft in the US, the deeper a 31,441-ft hole in 1974. The deepest well in the world is reported to be in the Soviet Union, recently drilled below 34,895 ft, with a target depth of 15,000 m (49,212 ft). A review of current deep drilling technology and its capabilities is given.

Chadwick, C.E.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Water Well Data Elements Well Header Tab Page  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water producing from Lithologic formation from which water is produced. at depth Top of water producing formation (ft) to Base of water producing formation (ft) Static water level Static water level below casingWater Well Data Elements Well Header Tab Page: This list contains location and identification

Frank, Thomas D.

182

Human activities recognition using depth images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new method to classify human activities by leveraging on the cues available from depth images alone. Towards this end, we propose a descriptor which couples depth and spatial information of the segmented body to describe a human pose. Unique ... Keywords: depth image segmentation, human activity detection

Raj Gupta; Alex Yong-Sang Chia; Deepu Rajan

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Uterine caliper and depth gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A uterine caliper and sound consisting of an elongated body having outwardly biased resilient caliper wings and a spring-loaded slidable cervical stop. A slide on the body is operatively connected to the wings by a monofilament and operates with respect to a first scale on the body as a width indicator. A rod extending longitudinally on the body is connected to the cervical stop and cooperates with a second scale on the body as a depth indicator. The instrument can be positioned to measure the distance from the outer cervical ostium to the fundus, as read on said second scale. The wings may be allowed to open by moving the slide, and when the wings engage the utero-tubal junctions, the width may be read on said first scale. By adjustment of the caliper wings the instrument may be retracted until the resistance of the inner ostium of the cervix is felt, enabling the length of the cervical canal to be read directly by the position of the longitudinal indicator rod with respect to said second scale. The instrument may be employed to measure the width of the uterine cavity at any position between the inner ostium of the cervix and the fundus.

King, Loyd L. (Benton City, WA); Wheeler, Robert G. (Richland, WA); Fish, Thomas M. (Kennewick, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Columbia Rural Electric Association - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft. Floor Insulation (Multi-Family): 0.07 - 0.43sq. ft. Floor Insulation (Manufactured Home): 0.24sq. ft. Window Replacement: 6sq. ft. Eligible System Size Refrigerator...

185

PARTLY CLOUDY WITH NUMEROUS SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS. MAX TEMPERATURE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ABOVE 8000 FT....69-74. BELOW 8000 FT....80-85. 24 HR TREND......LITTLE CHANGE. MIN HUMIDITY... ABOVE 8000 FT....32-42 PCT. BELOW 8000 FT....28-38 PCT. 24 HR TREND......DOWN...

186

Demonstration of Energy Savings of Cool Roofs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

description building ft daily a/c savings insulation Davislocation building type daily a/c savings 1000ft insulationbuilding type location daily a/c savings 1000ft kWh/1000ft insulation

Konopacki, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Mapping the Interior of Nanocrystals in Depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Nanocrystals in Depth Complex, three-dimensional images of the interior of a nanocrystal have, for the first time, been obtained by researchers employing a new technique:...

188

Extending Depth of Field via Multifocus Fusion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In digital imaging systems, due to the nature of the optics involved, the depth of field is constricted in the field of view. Parts of (more)

Hariharan, Harishwaran

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Recommended Practice: Defense-in-Depth  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report # INL/EXT-06-11478 Report # INL/EXT-06-11478 Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies May 2006 Prepared by Idaho National Laboratory Recommended Best Practice: Defense in Depth 2 Table of Contents Keywords............................................................................................................................. 3 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 3 Background ......................................................................................................................... 3 Overview of Contemporary Control System Architectures................................................. 4 Security Challenges in Control Systems .............................................................................

190

Revisiting the Thermocline Depth in the Equatorial Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermocline depth is defined as the depth of the maximum vertical temperature gradient. In the equatorial Pacific, the depth of 20C isotherm is widely used to represent the thermocline depth. This work proposes that under the circumstance of ...

Haijun Yang; Fuyao Wang

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Microsoft PowerPoint - RMOTC_PNEC2007.ppt [Compatibility Mode...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Depths from 250-7000 ft. R l ld fi ld t ti * Real world field testing Teapot Dome Oil Field History * Production began in the early 1900's * By 1927 over 80 wells had been...

192

Practical Conversion of Pressure to Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conversion formula between pressure and depth is obtained employing the recently adopted equation of state for seawater (Millero et al., 1980). Assuming the ocean of uniform salinity 35 NSU and temperature 0C the following equation is proposed,...

Peter M. Saunders

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Underway ConductivityTemperatureDepth Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of the Underway ConductivityTemperatureDepth (UCTD) instrument is motivated by the desire for inexpensive profiles of temperature and salinity from underway vessels, including volunteer observing ships (VOSs) and research ...

Daniel L. Rudnick; Jochen Klinke

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 2 - hydrogenative and hydrothermal pretreatments and spectroscopic characterization using pyrolysis-GC-MS, CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR and FT-IR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been indicated by DOE COLIRN panel that low-temperature catalytic pretreatment is a promising approach to the development of an improved liquefaction process. This work is a fundamental study on effects of pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. The main objectives of this project are to study the coal structural changes induced by low-temperature catalytic and thermal pretreatments by using spectroscopic techniques; and to clarify the pretreatment-induced changes in reactivity or convertibility of coals. As the second volume of the final report, here we summarize our work on spectroscopic characterization of four raw coals including two subbituminous coals and two bituminous coals, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-extracted but unreacted coals, the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been thermally pretreated. in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent, and the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been catalytically pretreated in the presence of a dispersed Mo sulfide catalyst in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent.

Chunshan Song; Hatcher, P.G.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Electric vehicle propulsion batteries: design and cost study for nickel/zinc battery manufacture. Task A. [25 kWh, 700 pounds, 245 Ah at 100+ V, 4. 77 ft/sup 3/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For satisfying the 25-kWh energy requirement necessary for vehicle propulsion, a 700-pound nickel--zinc battery was configured. Containing 64 individual cells, the unit was selected for minimum weight from computed packaging possibilities. Unit volume was projected to be 4.77 cubic feet. Capacity of the cells delivering 100+ volts was set at 245 ampere-hours. Selection was made primarily because of the compatibility with expressed vehicle requirements of a lower-current system. Manufacturing costs were computed for a unit using sintered positive electrodes at $86/kWh, pilot plant rate, and $78/kWh, production plant rate. Based on a lower than anticipated cost differential between sintered and nonsintered positive electrodes and certain other performance differences, the sintered electrode was chosen for the battery design. Capital expenditures for a production rate of 10,000 batteries per year are estimated to be $2,316,500. Capital expenditure for demonstrating production rates in a pilot plant facility is approximately $280,000, with the use of some shared available equipment. 29 figures, 9 tables.

None

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Fig 9-revised Flowchart.xls  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

9 9 Soil Nature and Extent AOI Identification Process d The PRG value for lead is not a calculated PRG, but rather is taken from the EPA guidance document Revised Interim Soil Lead Guidance for CERCLA Sites and RCRA Correction Action Facilities (1994). e For surface soil (0 to 0.5 ft), WRW surface soil (0 to 0.5 ft) PRGs are used. For subsurface soil (0.5 ft to a maximum depth of 209 ft), WRW subsurface soil (0.5 to 8 ft) PRGs are used. a Soil "superset" for soil samples collected from June 28, 1991 through August 22, 2005. c Soil PRGs are defined as 1 x 10 -6 WRW PRGs based on using an HI of 0.1 or a risk of 1 x 10 -6 (the more conservative of the two values was used for the PRG). b Background level is defined as the background M2SD. RI-Ready Soil Data

198

Geothermal reservoir assessment case study, Northern Basin and Range Province. Final Report, 1 October 1978-30 September 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Campbell E No. 2 well in the Humboldt House geothermal field in central Pershing County, Nevada was drilled to a depth of 8061 ft in order to confirm the existence of a commercial reservoir. This well offsets the field discovery well which was drilled in 1977 and completed to a depth of only 1835 ft. Desert Peak B-23-1 well was likewise drilled in order to help evaluate a previously discovered geothermal field located in northwestern Churchill County, Nevada. The Desert Peak B-23-1 well was drilled to a depth of 9641 ft as compared to the deepest of three earlier wells drilled to 7662 ft. The drilling and completion of both these wells are described, including the daily drilling reports, drill bit records, descriptions of the casing and cementing programs, drilling fluid descriptions including methods of combating lost circulation, wellhead equipment descriptions, and logging programs.

Not Available

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Shale mineralogy and burial diagenesis of Frio and Vicksburg Formations in two geopressured wells, McAllen Ranch area, Hidalgo County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thirty-six shale samples ranging in depth from 1454 ft to 13,430 ft from Shell Oil Company No. 1 Dixie Mortgage Loan well and 33 shale samples ranging in depth from 2183 ft to 13,632 ft from Shell Oil/Delhi-Taylor Oil Corporation No. 3 A.A. McAllen well were examined by x-ray techniques to determine the mineralogical parameters of the geopressured zone in the Vicksburg Fairway. Both wells have the same weight-percent trends with depth for the mineralogy: quartz, calcite, total clay, and potassium feldspar are constant; plagioclase feldspar gradually increases; kaolinite increases; discrete illite decreases; total mixed-layer illite-smectite (I/S) decreases; illite in mixed-layer I/S increases; and smectite in mixed-layer I/S decreases. Chlorite is found only in the geopressured zone of each well.

Freed, R.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Construction features of the exploratory shaft at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

The Exploratory Shaft (ES) at Yucca Mountain is planned to be constructed during 1985 and 1986 as part of the detailed site characterization for one of three sites which may be selected as candidates for location of a high-level radioactive waste repository. Conventional mining methods will be used for the shaft sinking phase of the ES project. The ES will be comprised of surface support facilities, a 1480-ft-deep circular shaft lined with concrete to a finished inside diameter of 12 ft, lateral excavations and test installations extending up to 200 ft from the shaft, and long lateral borings extending up to 2300 ft from the shaft. The estimated time for sinking the shaft to a total depth of about 1480 ft and completing the lateral excavations and borings is about two years. The major underground development planned for the primary test level at a depth of 1200 ft consists of the equivalent of 1150 ft of 15- by 15-ft drift. The total volume of rock to be removed from the shaft proper and the lateral excavations totals about 1/2 million cubic feet. Construction equipment for the shaft and underground excavation phases consists of conventional mine hoisting equipment, shot hole and rock bolt drilling jumbos, mucking machines, and hauling machines. The desire to maintain relatively uniform and even walls in selected shaft and drift intervals will require that controlled blasting techniques be employed. Certain lateral boring operations associated with tests to be conducted in the underground development may pose some unusual problems or require specialized equipment. One of the operations is boring and lining a 30-in.-diam by 600-ft-long horizontal hole with a boring machine being developed under the direction of Sandia National Laboratories. Another special operation is coring long lateral holes (500 to 2000 ft) with minimum use of liquid circulating fluids. 8 figures.

Adair, G.W.; Fiore, J.N.

1984-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Wells R-9i, R-13, R-19, R-22, and R-31, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrologic information is essential for environmental efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Testing at new characterization wells being drilled to the regional aquifer (''R wells'') to improve the conceptual hydrogeologic model of the Pajarito Plateau is providing such information. Field tests were conducted on various zones of saturation penetrated by the R wells to collect data needed for determining hydraulic properties. This document provides details of the design and execution of testing as well as an analysis of data for five new wells: R-9i, R-13, R-19, R-22, and R-31. One well (R-13) was evaluated by a pumping test and the rest (R-9i, R-19, R-22, and R-31) were evaluated by injection tests. Characterization well R-9i is located in Los Alamos Canyon approximately 0.3 mi west of the Route 4/Route 502 intersection. It was completed at a depth of 322 ft below ground surface (bgs) in March 2000. This well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Both screens were tested. Screen 1 is completed at about 189-200 ft bgs in fractured basalt, and screen 2 is completed at about 270-280 ft bgs in massive basalt. Specific capacity analysis of the screen 1 data suggests that the fractured basalt has a transmissivity (T) of 589 ft{sup 2}/day and corresponds to a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 7.1 ft/day based on a saturated thickness of 83 ft. The injection test data from the massive basalt near screen 2 were analyzed by the Bouwer-Rice slug test methodology and suggest that K is 0.11 ft/day, corresponding to a T of about 2.8 ft{sup 2}/day based on a saturated thickness of 25 ft. Characterization well R-13 is located in Mortandad Canyon just west of the eastern Laboratory boundary. It was completed at a depth of 1029 ft bgs in February 2002. This well was constructed with one 60-ft long screen positioned about 125 ft below the regional water table. This screen is completed at about 958-1019 ft bgs and straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous units. The specific capacity analysis of a 12 minute pumping test indicates that the Puye fanglomerates near the R-13 screen have a T of 5269 ft{sup 2}/day and correspond to a hydraulic conductivity (K) of 17.6 ft/day based on a saturated thickness of 300 ft. Characterization well R-19 is located east of firing site IJ in Technical Area (TA) 36 on the mesa between Three-mile and Potrillo Canyons. It was completed at a depth of 1885 ft bgs in April 2000. This well was constructed with two screens positioned above the regional water table and five screens positioned below the regional water table. Only the bottom two screens were tested. Screen 6 is completed at about 1727-1734 ft bgs in Puye fanglomerate, and screen 7 is completed at about 1832-1849 ft bgs in Puye fanglomerate. Specific capacity analysis of the screen 6 data suggests that T is about 6923 ft{sup 2}/day and corresponds to a K of 18.6 ft/day based on a saturated thickness of 373 ft. Specific capacity analysis of the screen 7 data suggests that T is about 8179 ft{sup 2}/day and corresponds to a K of 22.0 ft/day based on a saturated thickness of 373 ft. Characterization well R-22 is located on Mesita del Buey between Canada del Buey and Pajarito Canyons immediately east of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G in TA-54. It was completed at a depth of 1489 ft bgs in October 2000. This well was constructed with five screens positioned at or below the regional water table; however, only screens 2-5 were tested. Screen 1 is completed at the regional water table at about 872-914 ft bgs in Cerros del Rio basalt. Screen 2 is completed at about 947-989 ft bgs in Cerros del Rio basalt. Screen 3 is completed at about 1272-1279 ft bgs in Puye fanglomerate. Screen 4 is completed at about 1378-1452 ft bgs in older basalt. Screen 5 is completed at about 1447-1452 ft bgs in older fanglomerate. Bouwer-Rice analyses of the injection-test recovery data suggest K values of 0.04, 0.32, 0.54, and 0.27 ft/day for screens 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively. These values correspond to

S.G.McLin; W.J. Stone

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Coring unconsolidated sands in the Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Diamant Board Stratabit has achieved coring recovery rates in soft, unconsolidated formations as high as 99 percent. These rates are achieved using conventional coring equipment in a special configuration to minimize frictional resistance to the core as it passes through the bit and core catcher assembly and enters the inner barrel. This paper describes DBS's coring experience with its Maximum Core Protection System, which has been used at depths from 3000 ft to below 20,000 ft and in deviated holes up to 57 degrees. In the Gulf of Mexico, the system cored over 5800 ft from Matagorda Island to Charlotte Harbor, with an overall recovery rate of 93 percent. In most applications, the hole size dictates the core barrel and core size. Through 9 5/8-in. casing with an 8 1/2-in. by 4-in. core bit, the 6 3/4-in. by 4-in. by 30-ft conventional core barrel will be used with a Fibertube inner barrel to replace the steel inner barrel, allowing a full 4-in. core to be cut. In smaller hole sizes, other equipment with the Maximum Core Protection System will be used. With a top drive unit or long Kelly, a 45-ft or 60-ft barrel may be used. Many times an unconsolidated formation will not support more than 30 ft of core, therefore 30-ft barrels are normally used.

Wilcox, J.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Snow Depth on Arctic Sea Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow depth and density were measured at Soviet drifting stations on multiyear Arctic sea ice. Measurements were made daily at fixed stakes at the weather station and once- or thrice-monthly at 10-m intervals on a line beginning about 500 m from ...

Stephen G. Warren; Ignatius G. Rigor; Norbert Untersteiner; Vladimir F. Radionov; Nikolay N. Bryazgin; Yevgeniy I. Aleksandrov; Roger Colony

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Depth estimation for ranking query optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relational ranking query uses a scoring function to limit the results of a conventional query to a small number of the most relevant answers. The increasing popularity of this query paradigm has led to the introduction of specialized rank join operators ... Keywords: DEEP, Data statistics, Depth estimation, Query optimization, Relational ranking query, Top-k

Karl Schnaitter; Joshua Spiegel; Neoklis Polyzotis

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2008 . The Gulf of Mexico Federal ...

206

Microsoft Word - defense_in_depth_fanning.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Engineering and Systems Analysis What is Defense in Depth? Defense in Depth is a safety philosophy that guides the design, construction, inspection, operation, and...

207

Mobile Variable Depth Sampling System Design Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A design study is presented for a mobile, variable depth sampling system (MVDSS) that will support the treatment and immobilization of Hanford LAW and HLW. The sampler can be deployed in a 4-inch tank riser and has a design that is based on requirements identified in the Level 2 Specification (latest revision). The waste feed sequence for the MVDSS is based on Phase 1, Case 3S6 waste feed sequence. Technical information is also presented that supports the design study.

BOGER, R.M.

2000-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

208

Deep frac activity breaks records in Rockies  

SciTech Connect

Record depths and extent of massive hydraulic fracture treatments have been reported in central Wyoming recently. Dowell Division of Dow Chemical Co. pumped 250,000 lb of bauxite through 24 perforations between 18,970 and 19,253 ft near Lysite, and Halliburton Services forced 110,140 lb of bauxite through a set of perforations between 20,064 and 20,100 ft in the Madden Gas Field. Dowell also treated another Madden Field well with 340,000 lb of bauxite between 20,031 and 20,099 ft. The Dowell treatments utilized the new YF400 frac fluid to deal with static bottom-hole temperatures.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

High-temperature borehole instrumentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research in materials, equipment, and instrument development was required in the Hot Dry Rock Energy Extraction Demonstration at Fenton Hill located in northern New Mexico. The new Phase II Energy Extraction System at the Fenton Hill Test Site will consist of two wellbores drilled to a depth of about 4570 m (15,000 ft) and then connected by a series of hydraulic-induced fractures. The first borehole (EE-2) was completed in May of 1980, at a depth of 4633 m (15,200 ft) of which approximately 3960 m (13,000 ft) is in Precambrian granitic rock. Starting at a depth of approximately 2930 m (9600 ft), the borehole was inclined up to 35/sup 0/ from vertical. Bottom-hole temperature in EE-2 is 317/sup 0/C. The EE-3 borehole was then drilled to a depth of 4236 m (13,900 ft). Its inclined part is positioned directly over the EE-2 wellbore with a vertical separation of about 450 m (1500 ft) between them. The materials development programs cover all aspects of geothermal energy extraction. Research on drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and wellbore logging were necessary to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the hot dry rock concepts.

Dennis, B.R.; Koczan, S.; Cruz, J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Proposed OTEC Punta Tuna Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect

Siting features and the design of a 40 MWe prototype OTEC for installation at Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico are presented. An annual average temperature gradient of 40 F from surface to 3,000 ft depth, a sharp coastal drop-off, projected benign environmental effects, and expensive indigenous power supplies are seen as favorable for fixed, floating, or grazing OTEC plants. The Punta Tuna design is for a platform fitted with generators in 300 ft of water, submarine cable power transmission, fiberglass seawater pipes, NH3 as a working fluid, and heat exchangers at the 300 ft depth, below hurricane wind and wave action. Methods of installing the 3,000 ft cold water pipes are discussed, and the use of OTEC derived electricity for aluminum smelting in the Caribbean is indicated.

Marina, J.; Perez, F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Shallow horizontal drilling in unconsolidated sands offshore California  

SciTech Connect

Four shallow horizontal wells were drilled from Platform C in Dos Cuadras field offshore California to recover reserves inaccessible with conventional drilling techniques. The wells had true vertical depths (TVD's) ranging from 746 to 989 ft with total horizontal displacements from 1,613 to 3,788 ft. The wells had horizontal displacement TVD ratios up to 3.95. The targets were unconsolidated, high-permeability sands. This paper details well planning, drilling, and completion.

Payne, J.D.; Bunyak, M.J. (Unocal Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States)); Huston, C.W. (Smith International Inc., Tyler, TX (United States))

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Accurate hydrogen depth profiling by reflection elastic recoil detection analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technique to convert reflection elastic recoil detection analysis spectra to depth profiles, the channel-depth conversion, was introduced by Verda, et al [1]. But the channel-depth conversion does not correct for energy spread, the unwanted broadening in the energy of the spectra, which can lead to errors in depth profiling. A work in progress introduces a technique that corrects for energy spread in elastic recoil detection analysis spectra, the energy spread correction [2]. Together, the energy spread correction and the channel-depth conversion comprise an accurate and convenient hydrogen depth profiling method.

Verda, R. D. (Raymond D.); Tesmer, Joseph R.; Nastasi, Michael Anthony,; Bower, R. W. (Robert W.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Longmont Power and Communications - Commercial and Industrial...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1.50sq. ft. Window Film: 0.73 - 1.00sq. ft. Roof Insulation: 0.16sq. ft. Wall Insulation: 0.03sq. ft. Air Sealing: 0.03 Cool Roof: 0.09sq. ft. Food Service...

214

Phase 2 and 3 Slim Hole Drilling and Testing at the Lake City, California Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During Phases 2 and 3 of the Lake City GRED II project two slim holes were cored to depths of 1728 and 4727 ft. Injection and production tests with temperature and pressure logging were performed on the OH-1 and LCSH-5 core holes. OH-1 was permanently modified by cementing an NQ tubing string in place below a depth of 947 ft. The LCSH-1a hole was drilled in Quaternary blue clay to a depth of 1727 ft and reached a temperature of 193 oF at a depth of 1649 ft. This hole failed to find evidence of a shallow geothermal system east of the Mud Volcano but the conductive temperature profile indicates temperatures near 325 oF could be present below depth of 4000 ft. The LCSH-5 hole was drilled to a depth of 4727 ft and encountered a significant shallow permeability between depths of 1443 and 1923 ft and below 3955 ft. LCSH-5 drilled impermeable Quaternary fanglomerate to a depth of 1270 ft. Below 1270 ft the rocks consist primarily of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The most significant formation deep in LCSH-5 appears to be a series of poikoilitic mafic lava flows below a depth of 4244 ft that host the major deep permeable fracture encountered. The maximum static temperature deep in LCSH-5 is 323 oF and the maximum flowing temperature is 329 oF. This hole extended the known length of the geothermal system by of a mile toward the north and is located over mile north of the northernmost hot spring. The OH-1 hole was briefly flow tested prior to cementing the NQ rods in place. This flow test confirmed the zone at 947 ft is the dominant permeability in the hole. The waters produced during testing of OH-1 and LCSH-5 are generally intermediate in character between the deep geothermal water produced by the Phipps #2 well and the thermal springs. Geothermometers applied to deeper fluids tend to predict higher subsurface temperatures with the maximum being 382 oF from the Phipps #2 well. The Lake City geothermal system can be viewed as having shallow (elevation > 4000 ft and temperatures of 270 to 310 oF), intermediate (elevation 2800 to 3700 ft and temperatures 270 to 320 oF ) and deep (elevations < 1000 ft and temperatures 323 to 337 oF) components. In the south part of the field, near Phipps #2 the shallow and deep components are present. In the central part of the field, near OH-1 the shallow and intermediate components are present and presumably the deep component is also present. In the north part of the field, the intermediate and deep components are present. Most or all of the fractures in the core have dips between 45 degrees and vertical and no strong stratigraphic control on the resource has yet been demonstrated. Conceptually, the Lake City geothermal resource seems to be located along the north-south trending range front in a relatively wide zone of fractured rock. The individual fractures do not seem to be associated with any readily identifiable fault. In fact, no major hydraulically conductive faults were identified by the core drilling.

Dick Benoit; David Blackwell; Joe Moore; Colin Goranson

2005-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

215

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM...

216

Defence-In-Depth: Application firewalls in a defence-in-depth design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well known and accepted by most security professionals that defence-in-depth is an important security principle: the age-old saying of ''don't put all your eggs in one basket'' applies just as much here as elsewhere. The wise assume that any part ...

Paul Byrne

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Distillate in Depth The Supply, Demand, and Price Picture  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Distillate in Depth The Supply, Demand, and Price Picture John Hackworth Joanne Shore Energy Information Administration ... In Response to Price, ...

218

[ iris1 8-3-99 ] ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 14155 0 FT932-7277 2 FT922-1970 0 FT922 ... import-sugar sugar-cane slovakia-survey oil tonne soviet world russia country supply said year ...

219

Southwest Gas Corporation - Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Insulation: 0.15sq ft Floor Insulation: 0.30sq ft Builders Energy Star Certified Home: 450 Natural Gas Tankless Water Heater: 450 Attic Insulation: 0.15sq ft Equipment...

220

In a mining accident, first responders are working against  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Nickel Metal Hydride (w 4hr minimum battery life) * 4ft x 2ft footprint * 2ft tall at tower * Integrated fiber optic interface Contact Information robotics@sandia.gov...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Application of Categorical Exclusions (1021.410) Disagree Agree...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 FT LENGTH 80 FT CREST WIDTH 3 FT SLOPE 2H : 1V FLOW CLEARING LIMITS (TYP) LOW WATER CROSSING RIPRAP STREAMBED & APPROACHES WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION DESERT...

222

Southwest Gas Corporation - Residential and Builder Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heater: 450 Natural Gas Clothes Dryer: 30 Windows: 0.95sq ft Attic Insulation: 0.15sq ft Floor Insulation: 0.30sq ft Builders Energy Star Certified Home: 450...

223

Table N8.3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

y(c)","Total","Utility(b)","Local Utility(c)","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(kWh)","(kWh)","(kWh)","(1000 cu ft)","(1000 cu ft)","(1000 cu ft)","(million...

224

Hydrologic characterization of the unconfined aquifer at the General Motors Harrison Division Plant, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Motors (GM) is studying the feasibility of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) for air conditioning at their Harrison Division plant located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has assisted in this effort by conducting field tests to measure the hydraulic properties of the proposed ATES well field, which will be within the unconfined aquifer and adjacent to the GM plant. Results showed that in the vicinity of the test well, transmissivity was 2000 ft{sup 2}/d, effective aquifer thickness was 50 ft, effective porosity was 6.2%, hydraulic gradient was 0.005, and seepage velocity was 3.2 ft/d. A second test series at a newly constructed well was expanded to include measuring specific capacity and investigating the vertical distribution of flow within the aquifer. Specific objectives were to determine the injection capacity of the aquifer and to examine efficiency of the well design. Transmissivity was 2300 to 2600 ft{sup 2}/d, effective aquifer thickness was 58 ft, effective porosity was 6.0 to 8.0%, hydraulic gradient was 0.0047, and seepage velocity was 3.1 to 2.7 ft/d. Injection capacity, based on a step-injection test, was approximately 17 gpm/ft and was independent of flow rate within the experimental range 90 to 338 gpm. Maximum hydraulic conductivity occurred within the uppermost 20 ft of saturated sediments, which consisted of well-sorted sand. Below the sand, sorting was progressively poorer with depth, and hydraulic conductivity decreased smoothly. At the base of the aquifer, hydraulic conductivity was less than 10% of that of the uppermost 20 ft. 7 refs., 10 figs.

Hall, S.H.; Newcomer, D.R.; Luttrell, S.P.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Compliance Monitoring of Underwater Blasting for Rock Removal at Warrior Point, Columbia River Channel Improvement Project, 2009/2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE) conducted the 20-year Columbia River Channel Improvement Project (CRCIP) to deepen the navigation channel between Portland, Oregon, and the Pacific Ocean to allow transit of fully loaded Panamax ships (100 ft wide, 600 to 700 ft long, and draft 45 to 50 ft). In the vicinity of Warrior Point, between river miles (RM) 87 and 88 near St. Helens, Oregon, the USACE conducted underwater blasting and dredging to remove 300,000 yd3 of a basalt rock formation to reach a depth of 44 ft in the Columbia River navigation channel. The purpose of this report is to document methods and results of the compliance monitoring study for the blasting project at Warrior Point in the Columbia River.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Skalski, J. R.; Seaburg, Adam

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

226

Downhole Seismic Monitoring at the Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 500-ft length, 6-level, 3-component, vertical geophone array was permanently deployed within the upper 800 ft of Unocal's well GDCF 63-29 during a plug and abandonment operation on April 7, 1998. The downhole array remains operational after a period of 1 year, at a temperature of about 150 C. Continuous monitoring and analysis of shallow seismicity (<4000 ft deep) has been conducted over that same 1-year period. The downhole array was supplemented with 4 surface stations in late-1998 and early-1999 to help constrain locations of shallow seismicity. Locations occurring within about 1 km ({approximately}3000 ft) of the array have been determined for a subset of high-frequency events detected on the downhole and surface stations for the 10-week period January 6 to March 16, 1999. These events are distinct from surface-monitored seismicity at The Geysers in that they occur predominantly above the producing reservoir, at depths ranging from about 1200 to 4000 ft depth (1450 to -1350 ft elevation). The shallow seismicity shows a northeast striking trend, similar to seismicity trends mapped deeper within the reservoir and the strike of the predominant surface lineament observed over the productive field.

Rutledge, J.T.; Anderson, T.D.; Fairbanks, T.D.; Albright, J.N.

1999-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

227

Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Average depth may ...

228

Flexible finite-element modeling of global geomagnetic depth sounding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling in 2D and 3D for Geomagnetic Depth Sounding (31, 16610. Banks, R. , 1969: Geomagnetic variations and the1997: Introduction to geomagnetic fields. Cambridge Univ Pr.

Ribaudo, Joseph Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Control Systems Cyber Security: Defense in Depth Strategies ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and direction for developing 'defense-in-depth' strategies for organizations that use control system networks while maintaining a multi-tier information architecture. Control...

230

Property:Water Type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Type Type Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Water Type Property Type String Pages using the property "Water Type" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Freshwater + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Freshwater + A Alden Large Flume + Freshwater + Alden Small Flume + Freshwater + Alden Tow Tank + Freshwater + Alden Wave Basin + Freshwater + B Breakwater Research Facility + Freshwater + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Freshwater + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Freshwater +

231

U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ... City Gate : $ 3.88 /thousand cu ft $ 4.88 /thousand cu ft Oct-13 find more: Residential : ...

232

Time set at Wed Aug 6 10:51:20 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 48607: FT923-13223: FT 15 JUL 92 / Business and the Environment: Getting into hot water - The Philippines' investment in geothermal energy is ...

233

Learning Task Experiments in the TREC 2010 Legal Track  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... schedule'|'period'|'documents'|'file'|'policy'|'e-mail' 205: FT_TEXT CONTAINS 'electricity'|'electric'|'loads'|'hydro'|'generator'|'power' 206: FT_TEXT ...

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Warroad, MN Natural Gas Imports by Pipeline from Canada  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit (Volumes in Million Cubic Ft., Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.)

235

Eagle Pass, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit (Volumes in Million Cubic Ft., Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.)

236

U.S. Total Exports - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit (Volumes in Million Cubic Ft., Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.)

237

McAllen, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit (Volumes in Million Cubic Ft., Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.)

238

U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Mexico - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit (Volumes in Million Cubic Ft., Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.)

239

Nogales, AZ Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Mexico  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit (Volumes in Million Cubic Ft., Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.)

240

National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NVLAP Code: 20/D12 SURFACE TEXTURE Field calibrations available Note 4 Granite Surface Plates Up to 12 ft 50 in per ft Rhan and ...

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to Japan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit (Volumes in Million Cubic Ft., Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.)

242

Sabine Pass, LA Liquefied Natural Gas Exports to South Korea  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit (Volumes in Million Cubic Ft., Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.)

243

El Paso, TX Natural Gas Exports to Mexico  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Exports by Point of Exit (Volumes in Million Cubic Ft., Prices in Dollars per Thousand Cubic Ft.)

244

Electrode immersion depth determination and control in electroslag remelting furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for controlling an electroslag remelting furnace comprising adjusting electrode drive speed by an amount proportional to a difference between a metric of electrode immersion and a set point, monitoring impedance or voltage, and calculating the metric of electrode immersion depth based upon a predetermined characterization of electrode immersion depth as a function of impedance or voltage.

Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM); Beaman, Joseph J. (Austin, TX); Shelmidine, Gregory J. (Tijeras, NM)

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

Microphysical and Dynamical Influences on Cirrus Cloud Optical Depth Distributions  

SciTech Connect

Cirrus cloud inhomogeneity occurs at scales greater than the cirrus radiative smoothing scale ({approx}100 m), but less than typical global climate model (GCM) resolutions ({approx}300 km). Therefore, calculating cirrus radiative impacts in GCMs requires an optical depth distribution parameterization. Radiative transfer calculations are sensitive to optical depth distribution assumptions (Fu et al. 2000; Carlin et al. 2002). Using raman lidar observations, we quantify cirrus timescales and optical depth distributions at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Lamont, OK (USA). We demonstrate the sensitivity of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) calculations to assumed optical depth distributions and to the temporal resolution of optical depth measurements. Recent work has highlighted the importance of dynamics and nucleation for cirrus evolution (Haag and Karcher 2004; Karcher and Strom 2003). We need to understand the main controls on cirrus optical depth distributions to incorporate cirrus variability into model radiative transfer calculations. With an explicit ice microphysics parcel model, we aim to understand the influence of ice nucleation mechanism and imposed dynamics on cirrus optical depth distributions.

Kay, J.; Baker, M.; Hegg, D.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

246

Reflection seismic profiling in Wabash Valley fault system in southwestern Indiana  

SciTech Connect

During the summer of 1988 common-depth-point (CDP) reflection seismic profiling was initiated by ARPEX in southwestern Indiana in the Wabash Valley fault system. A 2.2-im (1.4-mi) east-west profile was shot across the Mt. Vernon graben in Posey County. Minihole shooting in 21-m (68.9-ft) patterns using 3.4 kg (7.5 lb) of seismic explosives distributed in five 3-m (10-ft) holes provided the energy source. Most shotholes were made with a reversible air-driven penetrating tool that was effective in dense clays. The 12-geophone array length was 43 m (141 ft), and the nominal far-trace offset was 2.1 km (7,000 ft). A 48-channel recording yielded 24-CDP coverage at 11-m (36-ft) intervals. Data were enhanced by gapped deconvolution, bandpass filtering, and CDP stack. The strongest and most continuous reflections at 0.75 and 1.6 sec are associated with the New Albany Shale (Devonian-Mississippian) and Eau Claire Formation (Cambrian), respectively. Within the Mt. Vernon graben and east of the Spenser Consolidated oil field, the depth to Eau Claire Formation apparently increases by approximately 60 m (197 ft) over a horizontal distance of 1.4 km (0.9 mi). Minor faulting east of the Spencer Consolidated field appears to be synthetic to the Hovey lake fault, which bounds the eastern side of the Mt. Vernon graben. Tentative interpretations of faulting and weak reflections from depths greater than 4.5 km (15,000 ft) may be clarified by additional data processing and by additional seismic profiling planned by ARPEX.

Rene, R.M.; Hester, N.C.; Stanonis, F.L. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Ensemble-Based Data Assimilation for Estimation of River Depths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for estimating bathymetry in a river, based on observations of depth-averaged velocity during steady flow. The estimator minimizes a cost function that combines known information in the form of a prior estimate and measured ...

Greg Wilson; H. Tuba zkan-Haller

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Radar ReflectivityBased Estimates of Mixed Layer Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the potential for estimating mixed layer depth by taking advantage of the radial gradients in the radar reflectivity field produced by the large vertical gradients in water vapor mixing ratio that are characteristic of the ...

P. L. Heinselman; P. L. Spencer; K. L. Elmore; D. J. Stensrud; R. M. Hluchan; P. C. Burke

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Global Datasets of Rooting Zone Depth Inferred from Inverse Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two inverse methods are applied to a land surface model to infer global patterns of the hydrologically active depth of the vegetation's rooting zone. The first method is based on the assumption that vegetation is optimally adapted to its ...

Axel Kleidon

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Non-contact system for measuring tillage depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A microprocessor-based non-contact ultrasonic sensor for tillage depth was evaluated. The sensor was tested on concrete, grass, wheat stubble, lightly disked wheat stubble (semi-stubble) and disked surfaces. The grass surface gave a higher variation ...

M. Yasin; R. D. Grisso; G. M. Lackas

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Method and apparatus to measure the depth of skin burns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new device for measuring the depth of surface tissue burns based on the rate at which the skin temperature responds to a sudden differential temperature stimulus. This technique can be performed without physical contact with the burned tissue. In one implementation, time-dependent surface temperature data is taken from subsequent frames of a video signal from an infrared-sensitive video camera. When a thermal transient is created, e.g., by turning off a heat lamp directed at the skin surface, the following time-dependent surface temperature data can be used to determine the skin burn depth. Imaging and non-imaging versions of this device can be implemented, thereby enabling laboratory-quality skin burn depth imagers for hospitals as well as hand-held skin burn depth sensors the size of a small pocket flashlight for field use and triage.

Dickey, Fred M. (Albuquerque, NM); Holswade, Scott C. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Estimating Mixed Layer Depth from Oceanic Profile Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of mixed layer depth are important to a wide variety of oceanic investigations including upper-ocean productivity, airsea exchange processes, and long-term climate change. In the absence of direct turbulent dissipation measurements, ...

Richard E. Thomson; Isaac V. Fine

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Evaluation of Boundary Layer Depth Estimates at Summit Station, Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boundary layer conditions in polar regions have been shown to have a significant impact on the levels of trace gases in the lower atmosphere. The ability to properly describe boundary layer characteristics (e.g., stability, depth, and variations ...

B. Van Dam; D. Helmig; W. Neff; L. Kramer

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of silicon supersaturated with sulfur  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the luminescence of Si supersaturated with S (Si:S) using depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectroscopy as the S concentration is varied over 2 orders of magnitude ...

Fabbri, Filippo

255

Instrumentation and Technique for Deducing Cloud Optical Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using a photodiode radiometer to infer optical depth of thin clouds from solar intensity measurements is examined. Data were collected by a photodiode radiometer which measured incident radiation at angular fields of view of 2, ...

R. A. Raschke; S. K. Cox

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Autonomous Depth Adjustment for Underwater Sensor Networks: Design and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To fully understand the ocean environment requires sensing the full water column. Utilizing a depth adjustment system on an underwater sensor network provides this while also improving global sensing and communications. ...

Detweiler, Carrick

257

Colour videos with depth : acquisition, processing and evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Declaration This dissertation is the result of my own work and includes nothing which is the outcome of work done in collaboration except where specifically indicated in the text. This dissertation does not exceed the regulation length of 60 000 words... -step pipeline that aligns the video streams, efficiently removes and fills invalid and noisy geometry, and finally uses a spatiotemporal filter to increase the spatial resolution of the depth data and strongly reduce depth measurement noise. I show...

Richardt, Christian

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

258

Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

HTH-1RC Data HTH-1RC Data This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Well Completion Report for CAU 443 CNTA December 2009 Doc. No. S05827 Page E-1 Table E-1. HTH-1RC_Chronology Date Time Depth (ft bgs) Activity 05/26/09 15:45 - 21:00 NA DH rig (LK17) arrives on site, rig is inspected, tire replaced, and rig was moved to HTH-1 pad. 05/26/09 23:30 NA Fishing tool was run 180 ft down HTH-1 and the bladder pump was retrieved. 05/27/09 01:00 NA Rig is moved off HTH-1 and goes to UC-1-P-1S 06/04/09 21:40 NA Crane set up at HTH-1 to begin running in BQ tremie pipe. 06/05/09 03:10 NA Finish tripping in BQ tremie pipe to 2,700 ft. 06/05/09 06:55 NA Finish tripping in shallow piezometer string to a depth of 1,038.6 ft. 06/05/09 09:20 NA Finish tripping in deep piezometer string to a depth of 1,958.6 ft.

259

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MECHANICAL SLIMHOLE TESTING SYSTEM (MSTS) MECHANICAL SLIMHOLE TESTING SYSTEM (MSTS) SLIMHOLE DRILL STEM TESTER APRIL, 1995 FC9524/95DT4 MSTS Test in Casper Wyoming April 19,1995 Background MSTS EXP-2 was shipped back to SPT for modifications and re-testing. A 4-1/2" cased well at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) in Casper Wyoming was selected. The well conditions were: Casper Well Deviation 0 Casing 4-1/2" 10.5#/ft Test depth 5380 ft BHT NOT Tubing 2-3/8" 4.7#/ft Formation Fluid Water & Oil Kill Fluid 10#/gal brine The MSTS was tested with a single 3.06" Dowell packer which was set at 5380 ft, approximately 80 off bottom. The test string was configured: MSTS EXP-2 with Inflate recorder - HPR-D Formation Gage - HPR-D Single packer, Dowell 3.06 TFV - 12 inch stroke no cam 900 ft of 2-3/8" 4.7 #/ft tubing (3000 #)

260

Self propelled drilling rig starts offshore exploration  

SciTech Connect

Ocean Drilling and Exploration Co. recently commissioned its new $12 million self-propelled, semisubmersible drilling rig, Ocean Prospector, at Mitsubishi Shipyard, Japan, where the rig was built. Initial trail runs completed adjacent to the shipyard indicated that the ship has a speed of 7 kn ahead and 3 kn astern. Steering also is reported to be excellent. The rig has a minimum turning radius of approx. 2 barge lengths and shows instant response. This rig is powered by 4 Fairbanks Morse, 10-cylinder opposed piston, model 38D8-1/8 diesel engines. Each engine is rated at 1,600 hp at 720 rpm and they drive eight 1,600 kw, traction type D-C generators and two 1,000 kw A-C generators. The rated operating depth of the unit afloat is 600 ft of water. The overall length of Ocean Prospector is just over 344 ft, with the beam measuring 263-1/2 ft. During transit, when the rig will be completely deballasted, it will have a draft of approx. 20 ft. When it reaches the drilling site, ballast water will be pumped into the 18 ballast tanks until the draft is increased to 70 ft. At this point, the underside of the main deck will be 50 ft above the mean surface of the sea. Drilling operations will be conducted while the rig is at the 70 ft draft. The mooring system will consist of eight 2-3/4 in. chains, each measuring 3,300 ft in length and connected to a 15-ton anchor.

1971-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Depth profiling of tritium by neutron time-of-flight  

SciTech Connect

A method was developed to measure the depth profile of tritium implanted or absorbed in materials. The sample to be analyzed is bombarded with a pulsed proton beam and the energy of neutrons produced by the T(p,n) reaction is measured by the time-of-flight technique. From the neutron energy the depth in the target of the T atoms may be inferred. A sensitivity of 0.1 at. percent T or greater is possible. The technique is non-destructive and may be used with thick or radioactive host materials. Samples up to 20 $mu$m in thickness may be profiled with resolution limited by straggling of the proton beam for depths greater than 1 $mu$m. Deuterium depth profiling has been demonstrated using the D(d,n) reaction. The technique has been used to observe the behavior of an implantation spike of T produced by a 400 keV T$sup +$ beam stopping at a depth of 3 $mu$m in 11 $mu$m thick layers of Ti and TiH. The presence of H in the Ti lattice is observed to inhibit the diffusion of T through the lattice. Effects of the total hydrogen concentration (H + T) being forced above stoichiometry at the implantation site are suggested by the shapes of the implanation spikes. (auth)

Davis, J.C.; Anderson, J.D.; Lefevre, H.W.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM Fed) has long been one of the Nation's principal sources of proved reserves. At the end of 2009, the GOM Fed accounted for close to one-fifth of oil proved reserves (second only to Texas) and just over four percent of natural gas proved reserves (the country's seventh largest reporting region). 1 Natural gas proved reserves from the GOM Fed have gradually diminished, both volumetrically and as a percentage of overall U.S. proved reserves. The latter is especially true in recent years as onshore additions (particularly those associated with shale gas activity) have increased considerably. Proved oil reserves from

263

Heat Flow At Standard Depth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Heat Flow At Standard Depth Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Heat Flow At Standard Depth Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Secular and long-term periodic changes in surface temperature cause perturbations to the geothermal gradient which may be significant to depths of at least 1000 m, and major corrections are required to determine absolute values of heat flow from the Earth's interior. However, detailed climatic models remain contentious and estimates of error in geothermal gradients differ widely. Consequently, regions of anomalous heat flow which

264

ARM - Evaluation Product - Aerosol Optical Depths from SASHE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAerosol Optical Depths from SASHE ProductsAerosol Optical Depths from SASHE Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Aerosol Optical Depths from SASHE Site(s) PVC SGP General Description The Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer Hemispheric (SASHE) is a ground-based instrument that measures both direct and diffuse shortwave irradiance. In this regard, the instrument is similar to the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR)-an instrument that has been in the ARM Facility stable for more than 15 years. However, the two instruments differ significantly in wavelength resolution and range. In particular, the SASHE provides hyperspectral measurements from about 350 nm to 1700 nm at a wavelength resolution from 1 to several nanometers, while the MFRSR only

265

Depth recovery using an adaptive color-guided auto-regressive model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes an adaptive color-guided auto-regressive (AR) model for high quality depth recovery from low quality measurements captured by depth cameras. We formulate the depth recovery task into a minimization of AR prediction errors subject ... Keywords: AR model, depth camera, depth recovery, nonlocal filtering

Jingyu Yang; Xinchen Ye; Kun Li; Chunping Hou

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hot dry rock geothermal reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two wells, GT-2 and EE-1, were originally drilled to a depth of 9600 ft (2.93 km) and 10,000 ft (3.05 km), respectively, and, after some difficulties, including redrilling of the bottom portion of GT-2, a good fracture connection was made between EE-1 and GT-2B, as the modified GT-2 was called. The circulation system was studied extensively for the purpose of establishing a number of fracture properties. Techniques were developed to determine orientation, geometry, heat exchange area, volume, flow impedance and impedance distribution. A much larger fracture system was then created from a depth of 9620 ft (2.93 km) in EE-1. The techniques used and results obtained in the study of the new and old fracture systems are discussed. (MHR)

Aamodt, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2011) 2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Explore for development of an EGS demonstration project Notes The reservoir is developed in fractured Proterozoic schist and quartzite, and Archean quartz monzonite cut by younger diabase intrusions. The basement complex was deformed during the mid Tertiary and covered by approximately 5000 ft of late Tertiary sedimentary and volcanic deposits. Listric normal faults of Cenozoic age disrupt the Tertiary deposits but do not offset the basement rocks. RRG-9, the target well, was drilled southwest of the main well field to a measured depth (MD) of 6089 ft. The well is deviated to the west and cased to a depth of 2316 ft MD. It

268

MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel Overseeing Organization Maine Maritime Academy Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tow Vessel Depth(m) 15.2 Water Type Saltwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Tug: 73 ft (2)16V-92 Detroits Barge: 43 ft by 230ft Research Vessel Friendship: 40 foot vessel w/ 6 cylinder Cummins diesel engine and A-Frame crane Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 5.1 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Full onbard Navigation, GPS, marine radar and depth plotter; standard PC onboard can be configured as needed for data acquisition needs

269

Acoustic Camera Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Approach and Fate at Surface Flow Outlets of Two Hydropower Dams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to estimate and compare fate probabilities for juvenile salmon approaching two surface flow outlets (SFOs) to identify effective design characteristics. The SFOs differed principally in forebay location, depth, discharge, and water velocity over a sharp-crested weir. Both outlets were about 20 ft wide. The 22-ft deep Bonneville Powerhouse 2 Corner Collector (B2CC) was located in the southwest corner of the forebay and passed 5,000 ft3/s of water at normal-pool elevation. In contrast, The Dalles Dam ice and trash sluiceway outlet above Main Unit 1-3 (TDITC) was not located in a forebay corner, was only 7-ft deep, and discharged about 933 ft3/s at normal-pool elevation. The linear velocity of water over the weir was about 15 ft/s at the B2CC and 5 ft/s at the TDITC. We used a Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) to record movements of fish within about 65 ft of the B2CC and within 35 ft of the TDITC. We actively tracked fish by manually adjusting pan and tilt rotator angles to keep targets in view. Contrary to expectations, active tracking did not provide a predominance of long tracks that clearly indicated fish fate because most tracks were incomplete. Active tracking did increase error in fish-position estimation, which complicated data processing, so we plan to sample multiple fixed zones in the future. The probability of fish entering each SFO was estimated by a Markov chain analysis, which did not require complete fish tracks. At the B2CC, we tracked 7,943 juvenile salmonids and most of them entered the B2CC. Fish moving south 40 to 60 ft upstream of the dam face were more likely to enter the eddy at the south end of the powerhouse than to enter the B2CC. At the TDITC, we tracked 2,821 smolts. Fish movement was complex with active swimming toward and away from the entrance. The high entrance probability zone (EPZ), where over 90% of tracked fish entered the SFO, extended 32 ft out at the B2CC and only 8 ft out at the TDITC. Greater discharge at the B2CC pushed the entrainment zone (EZ - where flow exceeded 7 ft/s) upstream from the entrance so that fish were entrained before they began to struggle against the flow. The high EPZ also was extended by flow along the powerhouse face at both sites, but more at the B2CC (about 450 ft) than at the TDITC (about 50 ft). Fish entering the large south eddy that circulated past the B2CC entrance were provided multiple opportunities to discover and enter. In contrast, fish moving past the sampled TDITC entrance either entered adjacent sluiceway openings or moved west to the spillway because there was no eddy to provide additional opportunities. Information from our study should be useful to fisheries managers and engineers seeking to transfer SFO technologies from one site to another. There are two important components to designing SFOs, the location within the forebay to take advantage of forebay circulation and specific entrance characteristics such as discharge and depth which affect the size and shape of the EZ and the high EPZ. Providing SFOs with an EZ extending upstream of structure could reduce entrance rejection, decrease forebay residence time and risk of predation, and increase passage of schools of smolts.

Ploskey, Gene R.; Johnson, Gary E.; Weiland, Mark A.; Khan, Fenton; Mueller, Robert P.; Serkowski, John A.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Hedgepeth, J.; Skalski, John R.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Klatte, Bernard A.

2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

270

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bookshelves Lab Mgr. 12 Rack Bays, 1m Deep Bookshelves Workbench Cooper 5 MVA PEAK Transformer 23,700 lbs. 54 ft. 8.0 in. x 41 ft. Room 27 ft. 4.0 in. x 23 ft. 8.0 in. Room...

271

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

followed by Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Biomethane is methanerefining through Fischer- Tropsch (FT) synthesis,

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Folding and Insertion of the Ebola Virus Fusion Peptide into a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Infectious Diseases, Ft. Detrick, MD, USA 2 Biotechnology High Performance Computing Software Applications

273

Security Standards for the Global Information Grid Gary Buda, Booz Allen & Hamilton, Linthicum, MD 21090  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Telcordia Technologies, Morristown, NJ 07960 Chris Kubic, Department of Defense, Ft. Meade, MD, 20755

Lee, Ruby B.

274

The Ocean general circulation near 1000 m depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean Ocean circulation near 1000 m depth is estimated with a 100 km resolution from the Argo float displacements collected before January 1 2010. After a thorough validation, the 400 000 or so displacements found in the [950, 1150] dbar layer ...

Michel Ollitrault; Alain Colin de Verdire

275

Trap-depth determination from residual gas collisions  

SciTech Connect

We present a method for determining the depth of an atomic or molecular trap of any type. This method relies on a measurement of the trap loss rate induced by collisions with background gas particles. Given a fixed gas composition, the loss rate uniquely determines the trap depth. Because of the ''soft'' long-range nature of the van der Waals interaction, these collisions transfer kinetic energy to trapped particles across a broad range of energy scales, from room temperature to the microkelvin energy scale. The resulting loss rate therefore exhibits a significant variation over an enormous range of trap depths, making this technique a powerful diagnostic with a large dynamic range. We present trap depth measurements of a Rb magneto-optical trap using this method and a different technique that relies on measurements of loss rates during optical excitation of colliding atoms to a repulsive molecular state. The main advantage of the method presented here is its large dynamic range and applicability to traps of any type requiring only knowledge of the background gas density and the interaction potential between the trapped and background gas particles.

Van Dongen, J.; Zhu, C.; Clement, D.; Dufour, G.; Madison, K. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Booth, J. L. [Physics Department, British Columbia Institute of Technology, 3700 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby, British Columbia, V5G 3H2 (Canada)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

Computational depth complexity of measurement-based quantum computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that one-way quantum computations have the same computational power as quantum circuits with unbounded fan-out. It demonstrates that the one-way model is not only one of the most promising models of physical realisation, but also a very powerful model of quantum computation. It confirms and completes previous results which have pointed out, for some specific problems, a depth separation between the one-way model and the quantum circuit model. Since one-way model has the same computational power as unbounded quantum fan-out circuits, the quantum Fourier transform can be approximated in constant depth in the one-way model, and thus the factorisation can be done by a polytime probabilistic classical algorithm which has access to a constant-depth one-way quantum computer. The extra power of the one-way model, comparing with the quantum circuit model, comes from its classical-quantum hybrid nature. We show that this extra power is reduced to the capability to perform unbounded classical parity gates in constant depth.

Dan E. Browne; Elham Kashefi; Simon Perdrix

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

277

Inferring Optical Depth of Broken Clouds from Landsat Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical depths ?pp for broken, shallow clouds over ocean were inferred from Landsat cloud reflectances Rcld (0.83 ?m) with horizontal resolution of 28.5 m. The values ?pp were obtained by applying an inverse, homogeneous, plane-parallel radiance ...

Howard W. Barker; Damin Liu

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Interactions in the air: adding further depth to interactive tabletops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although interactive surfaces have many unique and compelling qualities, the interactions they support are by their very nature bound to the display surface. In this paper we present a technique for users to seamlessly switch between interacting on the ... Keywords: 3D, 3D graphics, computer vision, depth-sensing cameras, holoscreen, interactive surfaces, surfaces, switchable diffusers, tabletop

Otmar Hilliges; Shahram Izadi; Andrew D. Wilson; Steve Hodges; Armando Garcia-Mendoza; Andreas Butz

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Estimating Snow Water Equivalent Using Snow Depth Data and Climate Classes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many practical applications snow depth is known, but snow water equivalent (SWE) is needed as well. Measuring SWE takes 20 times as long as measuring depth, which in part is why depth measurements outnumber SWE measurements worldwide. Here a ...

Matthew Sturm; Brian Taras; Glen E. Liston; Chris Derksen; Tobias Jonas; Jon Lea

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Logging technology for high-temperature geothermal boreholes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research in materials, equipment, and instrument development was required in the Hot Dry Rock Energy Extraction Demonstration at Fenton Hill located in northern New Mexico. Results of this extensive development advanced the logging technology in geothermal boreholes to present state-of-the art. The new Phase II Energy Extraction System at the Fenton Hill Test Site will consist of two wellbores drilled to a depth of about 4570 m (15,000 ft) and then connected by a series of hydraulic-induced fractures. The first borehole (EE-2) was completed in May of 1980 at a depth of 4633 m (15,200 ft) of which approximately 3960 m (13,000 ft) is in Precambrian granitic rock. Starting at a depth of approximately 2930 m (9600 ft), the borehole was inclined up to 35/sup 0/ from vertical. Bottom-hole temperature in EE-2 is 320/sup 0/C. The EE-3 borehole was then drilled to a depth of 4236 m (13,900 ft). Its inclined part is positioned directly over the EE-2 wellbore with a vertical separation of about 450 m (1500 ft) between them. Many of the geophysical measurements needed to develop the hot dry rock concept are unique. Most of the routine instruments used in petroleum drilling fail in the hot and abrasive environment. New equipment developed includes not only the downhole sonde that houses the transducer and associated line driving electronics, but modifications also were needed on the entire data retrieval systems and associated data analysis technology. Successful performance of wellbore surveys in the EE-2 and EE-3 boreholes depended upon the capacity of the sensors, instrument sonde, cablehead, and armored logging cable to work in this severe environment. The major areas of materials development for surveying the boreholes in the high-temperature environment were on elastomeric seals, electrical insulation for logging cables, downhole sensors, and associated downhole electronic and electro-mechanical components.

Dennis, B.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Depth enhancement techniques for the in situ vitrification process  

SciTech Connect

In-situ vitrification (ISV) is a process by which electrical energy is supplied to a soil/waste matrix. The resulting Joule heat raises the temperature of the soil/waste matrix, producing a pool of molten soil. Since its inception, there have been many successful applications of the technology to both staged and actual waste sites. However, there has been some difficulty in extending the attainable treatment melt depth to levels greater than 5 m. Results obtained from application of two novel approaches for extending the ultimate treatment depth attainable with in-situ vitrification (ISV) are presented. In the first, the electrode design is modified to concentrate the Joule heat energy delivered to the soil/waste matrix in the lower region of the target melt zone. This electrode design has been dubbed the hot-tip electrode. Results obtained from both computational and experimental investigations of this design concept indicate that some benefit toward ISV depth enhancement was realized with these hot-tip electrodes. A second, alternative approach to extending process depth with ISV involves initiating the melt at depth and propagating it in either vertical direction (e.g., downward, upward, or both) to treat the target waste zone. A series of engineering-scale experiments have been conducted to assess the benefits of this approach. The results from these tests indicate that ISV may be effectively initiated and sustained using this subsurface start-up technique. A survey of these experiments and the associated results are presented herein, together with brief discussion of some considerations regarding setup and implementation of this subsurface start-up technique.

Lowery, P.S.; Luey, J.; Seiler, D.K.; Tixier, J.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Timmerman, C.L. [Geosafe Corp., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Fort Collins Utilities - Home Efficiency Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home Efficiency Program Home Efficiency Program Fort Collins Utilities - Home Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Cooling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Manufacturing Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Program Info State Colorado Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting: See Program Website Air Sealing: $200 - $500 Conditioned Crawl Space Insulation: $0.30/sq ft. - $0.75/sq ft. Cold Crawl Space: $0.30/sq ft. - $0.45/sq ft. Basement Wall Insulation:$0.50/sq ft. - $1.00/sq ft., Cantilever Floor Insulation: $0.50/sq ft. - $0.75/sq ft. Frame Floor Insulation Over Garage: $0.50/sq ft. - $0.75/sq ft.

283

Using depth-normalized coordinates to examine mass transport residual circulation in estuaries with large tidal amplitude relative to the mean depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual (subtidal) circulation profiles in estuaries with a large tidal amplitude to depth ratio often are quite complex and do not resemble the traditional estuarine gravitational circulation profile. In this paper we show how a depth-normalized,...

Sarah N. Giddings; Stephen G. Monismith; Derek A. Fong; Dr. Mark T. Stacey

284

Assessing the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Radiative Impact of Clouds of the Radiative Impact of Clouds of Low Optical Depth W. O'Hirok and P. Ricchiazzi Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California Santa Barbara, California C. Gautier Department of Geography and Institute for Computational Earth System Science University of California Santa Barbara, California Introduction Analysis from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) reveals that the global mean cloud optical depth is surprisingly low (i.e., τ = 3.8). While this value is probably dominated by extensive fields of cirrus, the average for liquid water clouds is also likely smaller than expected. It is in this regime (τ <10) where remote measurements of cloud optical thickness or liquid water path (LWP)

285

been conducted to analyze the exchanger experimentally (Bose and Parker 1983; Bose et al. 1980, 1982). An analytical study of such heat exchangers, which uses a detailed mathematical model to describe their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1982). An analytical study of such heat exchangers, which uses a detailed mathematical model-tube heat exchangers. Six 6-in (152-mm) wells were drilled at depths of 53, 60, 70, 80, 90, and 100 ft (16 exchanger and circulation pump, both cooling and heating SPFs would have been higher had a water-to-air unit

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

286

PII: S0016-2361 (97)00008-2 Fuel Vol. 76, No. 6, pp. 457-473, 1997  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conducted in Marshall County, West Virginia, USA, to evaluate enhanced coal bed methane recovery at depths of 1200 to 1800 feet, depending on surface topography. Horizontal coal bed methane wells were. 600 ft. shallower) Pittsburgh coal seam, and these wells have been producing coal bed methane (CBM

Thomas, Mark

287

Shale mineralogy and burial diagenesis of Frio and Vicksburg Formations in two geopressured wells, McAllen Ranch area, Hidalgo County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thirty-six shale samples ranging in depth from 1454 ft to 13,430 ft from Shell Oil Company No. 1 Dixie Mortage Loan well and 33 shale samples ranging in depth from 2183 ft to 13,632 ft from Shell Oil/Delhi-Taylor Oil Corporation No. 3 A.A. McAllen well were examined by x-ray techniques to determine the mineralogical parameters of the geopressured zone in the Vicksburg Fairway. Both wells have the same weight-percent trends with depth for the mineralogy: quartz, calcite, total clay, and potassium feldspar are constant; plagioclase feldspar gradually increases; kaolinite increases; discrete illite decreases; total mixed-layer illite-smectite (I/S) decreases; illite in mixed layer I/S increases; and smectite in mixed-layer I/S decreases. Chlorite is found only in the geopressured zone of each well. The Boles and Franks model is compatible with a steady supply of original mixed-layer I/S during the depositional history of the McAllen Ranch area. The constant content with depth of calcite, quartz, and potassium feldspar indicates that limited material, if any, is supplied by the shales to surrounding sands. The ions generated by changes within the clay minerals are involved in further clay mineral reactions as outlined above. In addition, magnesium and iron are involved in forming chlorite within the shales.

Freed, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Pressurized fluidized-bed combustion part-load behavior. Volume I. Summary report  

SciTech Connect

Tests performed during 1980 to determine the part-load characteristics of a pressurized fluidized-bed combustor for a combined-cycle power plant and to examine its behavior during load changing are discussed. Part-load operation was achieved by varying the bed temperature by amounts between 200 to 300/sup 0/F and the bed depth from between 9 and 10 ft at rates varying between 0.2 ft/min and 0.5 ft/min. The performance at part-load steady-state conditions and during transient conditions is reported with information on combustion efficiency (99% at full-load with 9 ft bed depth and 1650/sup 0/F bed temperature; 95% with 4 ft depth and 1390/sup 0/F); sulfur retention (95/sup 0/ at full load to 80% at low bed depth and low bed temperature); sulfur emissions (no definitive results); NO/sub x/ emissions (tendency for increase as bed temperature was reduced); alkali emissions (no bed temperature effect detected); and heat transfer. It was demonstrated that load can be altered in a rapid and controlled manner by changing combinations of bed depth temperature and pressure. The most important practical change was the reduction in O/sub 2/ concentration which occurred when the bed height was increased at a rapid rate. The extra energy required to reheat the incoming bed material resulted (in the most extreme case) in a temporary drop in excess air from 65% to 12%. In a full-scale plant the loss of heat from the stored bed material would be much lower and the excess air trough when increasing load would not be as pronounced. Nevertheless, it seems prudent to design full-scale plant for a full load excess air of not less than about 50% when using bed depth as a load control parameter.

Roberts, A. G.; Pillai, K. K.; Raven, P.; Wood, P.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Installation of the Monitoring Site at the Los Alamos Canyon Low-Head Weir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cerro Grande fire of 2000 had an enormously adverse impact on and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Immediately there were concerns about the potential for enhanced runoff/offsite transport of contaminant-laden sediments because of watershed damage. In response to this concern, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers installed a low-head weir in Los Alamos Canyon near the White Rock ''Y.'' However, the occurrence of fractured basalt at the surface and ponding of runoff behind the weir enhance the possibility of downward migration of contaminants. Therefore, three boreholes were drilled on the south bank of the channel by LANL to provide a means of monitoring the impact of the Cerro Grande fire and of the weir on water quality beneath the canyon. The boreholes and associated instrumentation are referred to as the Los Alamos Weir Site (LAWS). The three boreholes include a vertical hole and two angled holes (one at approximately 45{sup o} and one at approximately 30{sup o}). Since the basalt is highly fractured, the holes would not stay open. Plans called for inserting flexible liners into all holes. However, using liners in such unstable ground was problematic and, in the angled holes, required deployment through scalloped or perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shield. The vertical hole (LAWS-01), drilled to a total depth of 281.5 ft below ground surface (bgs), was completed as a 278-ft deep monitoring well with four screens: one targeting shallow perched water encountered at 80 ft, two in what may correspond to the upper perched zone at regional groundwater characterization well R-9i (1/4 mi. to the west), and one in what may correspond to the lower perched zone at R-9i. A Water FLUTe{trademark} system deployed in the well isolates the screened intervals; associated transducers and sampling ports permit monitoring head and water quality in the screened intervals. The second hole (LAWS-02), drilled at an angle of 43{sup o} from horizontal, is 156 ft long and bottoms at a depth of 106 ft bgs. The shallow perched water seen at LAWS-01 (at 80 ft) was not encountered. A scalloped PVC shield was installed to keep the hole open while permitting flexible liners to contact the borehole wall. It was initially instrumented with a color-reactive liner to locate water-producing fractures. That was later replaced by an absorbent liner to collect water from the vadose zone. The third hole (LAWS-03), drilled at an angle of 34{sup o} from horizontal, initially had a length of 136 ft and bottomed at a depth of 76 ft bgs. However, the PVC shield rotated during installation such that scallops were at the top and rock debris repeatedly fell in, preventing liner insertion. While pulling the scalloped PVC to replace it with a perforated PVC shield that did not require orientation, the scalloped PVC broke and only 85 ft was recovered. The hole was blocked at that position and could not be drilled out with the equipment available. Thus, LAWS-03 was completed at a length of 85 ft and a depth of 40 ft bgs. An absorbent liner was installed at the outset in preparation for the 2002 summer monsoon season. The entire monitoring site is enclosed inside a locked, 8-ft-high chainlink fence for security. The liners used in the angled boreholes carry electrical wire pairs to detect soil-moisture changes. Surface-water data are provided by stream gages above and below the weir site. Depth of ponding behind the weir is provided by a gage installed just behind the structure.

W.J.Stone; D.L.Newell

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Campbell penetration depth of a superconductor in the critical state.  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic penetration depth {lambda}(T,H{sub J}) was measured in the presence of a slowly relaxing supercurrent j. In single crystal Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} below approximately 25 K, {lambda}(T,H{sub J}) is strongly hysteretic. We propose that the irreversibility arises from a shift of the vortex position within its pinning well as j changes. The Campbell length depends upon the ratio j/j{sub c} where j{sub c} is the critical current defined through the Labusch parameter. Similar effects were observed in other cuprates and in an organic superconductor.

Prozorov, R.; Giannetta, R. W.; Tamegai, T.; Schlueter, J.; Kini, A. M.; Fournier, P.; Greene, R. L.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of South Carolina; Univ. of Tokyo; Univ. of Sherbrooke; Univ. of Maryland

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

5/20/09 9:14 AMPhysics in the oil sands of Alberta -Physics Today March 2009 Page 1 of 4http://ptonline.aip.org/journals/doc/PHTOAD-ft/vol_62/iss_3/31_1.shtml?type=PTFAVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model for continuous (unconventional) oil and gas accumulations-theSchmoker, J.W., 1999, U.S. Geological Survey assessment model for continuous (unconventional) oil and gas accumulations-the ""FORESPANFORESPANTechnically recoverable undiscovered hydrocarbon resourceshydrocarbon resources ­­ oil, natural gas, natural gas

Podgornik, Rudolf

292

Identifying and controlling casing corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A survey of 73 wells in California's vintage South Belridge field indicated numerous casing leaks concentrated at 200-ft and 400- to 500-ft depths. Cathodic protection methods could not be used, and it was necessary to establish the precise causes of corrosion in order to develop techniques to control it. Casing was retrieved from two wells and, after thorough lab analysis, it was concluded that shallow-zone corrosion was triggered by oxygen in surrounding soil and that deep-zone corrosion was the result of CO/sub 2/ in formation water. Prevention depends upon more reliable isolation of casing from the formation with better cementing methods and longer conductor pipe.

Gordon, B.A.; Grimes, W.D.; Treseder, R.S.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Geological, geochemical, and operational summary, aurora well, OCS Y-0943-1, Beaufort Sea, Alaska. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Aurora well is located just off the coast of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The well was spudded November 2, 1987, in 68 ft of water and plugged and abandoned 286 days later on August 30, 1988, after drilling to a total depth (TD) of 18,325 ft below the Kelly Bushing (RKB). The report presents our interpretations of the geologic and geochemical information collected from the Aurora well. Additionally, a significant section of the report is devoted to the operational aspects of drilling the Aurora well.

Paul, L.E.; Choromanski, D.R.; Turner, R.F.; Flett, T.O.; Paul, L.E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Average Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells Depth of Crude Oil and Natural Gas Wells (Feet per Well) Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 View History Exploratory and Development Wells 5,426 5,547 5,508 5,613 6,064 5,964 1949-2008 Crude Oil 4,783 4,829 4,836 4,846 5,111 5,094 1949-2008 Natural Gas 5,616 5,757 5,777 5,961 6,522 6,500 1949-2008 Dry Holes 5,744 5,848 5,405 5,382 5,578 5,540 1949-2008 Exploratory Wells 6,744 6,579 6,272 6,187 6,247 6,322 1949-2008 Crude Oil 6,950 8,136 8,011 7,448 7,537 7,778 1949-2008 Natural Gas 6,589 5,948 5,732 5,770 5,901 5,899 1949-2008 Dry Holes 6,809 6,924 6,437 6,340 6,307 6,232 1949-2008

295

Identification Of Rippability And Bedrock Depth Using Seismic Refraction  

SciTech Connect

Spatial variability of the bedrock with reference to the ground surface is vital for many applications in geotechnical engineering to decide the type of foundation of a structure. A study was done within the development area of Mutiara Damansara utilising the seismic refraction method using ABEM MK8 24 channel seismograph. The geological features of the subsurface were investigated and velocities, depth to the underlying layers were determined. The seismic velocities were correlated with rippability characteristics and borehole records. Seismic sections generally show a three layer case. The first layer with velocity 400-600 m/s predominantly consists of soil mix with gravel. The second layer with velocity 1600-2000 m/s is suggested to be saturated and weathered area. Both layers forms an overburden and generally rippable. The third layer represents granite bedrock with average depth and velocity 10-30 m and >3000 m/s respectively and it is non-rippable. Steep slope on the bedrock are probably the results of shear zones.

Ismail, Nur Azwin; Saad, Rosli; Nawawi, M. N. M; Muztaza, Nordiana Mohd; El Hidayah Ismail, Noer [Geophysics Section, School of Physics, 11800 Universiti Sains Malaysia, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Mohamad, Edy Tonizam [Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

296

Campbell penetration depth in Fe-based superconductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 'true' critical current density, j{sub c}, as opposite to commonly measured relaxed persistent (Bean) current, j{sub B}, was extracted from the Campbell penetration depth, {lambda}{sub c}(T,H) measured in single crystals of LiFeAs, and optimally electron-doped Ba(Fe{sub 0.954}Ni{sub 0.046}){sub 2}As{sub 2} (FeNi122). In LiFeAs, the effective pinning potential is nonparabolic, which follows from the magnetic field - dependent Labusch parameter {alpha}. At the equilibrium (upon field - cooling), {alpha}(H) is non-monotonic, but it is monotonic at a finite gradient of the vortex density. This behavior leads to a faster magnetic relaxation at the lower fields and provides a natural dynamic explanation for the fishtail (second peak) effect. We also find the evidence for strong pinning at the lower fields.The inferred field dependence of the pinning potential is consistent with the evolution from strong pinning, through collective pinning, and eventually to a disordered vortex lattice. The value of j{sub c}(2 K) {approx_equal} 1.22 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2} provide an upper estimate of the current carrying capability of LiFeAs. Overall, vortex behavior of almost isotropic, fully-gapped LiFeAs is very similar to highly anisotropic d-wave cuprate superconductors, the similarity that requires further studies in order to understand unconventional superconductivity in cuprates and pnictides. In addition to LiFeAs, we also report the magnetic penetration depth in BaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} based superconductors including irradiation of FeNi122. In unirradiated FeNi122, the maximum critical current value is, j{sub c}(2K) {approx_equal} 3.3 x 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}. The magnetic-dependent feature was observed near the transition temperature in FeTe{sub 0.53}Se{sub 0.47} and irradiated FeNi122. Because of this feature, further studies are required in order to properly calibrate the Campbell penetration depth. Finally, we detected the crossing between the magnetic penetration depth and London penetration depth in optimally hold-doped Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}As{sub 2} (BaK122) and isovalent doped BaFe{sub 2}(As{sub 0.7}P{sub 0.3}){sub 2} (BaP122). These phenomena probably coincide with anomalous Meissner effect reported in pnicitde superconductors [Prozorov et al. (2010b)] however more studies are needed in order to clarify this.

Prommapan, Plegchart

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Program or Field Office:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Install six groundwater monitoring wells and perform general site actions at the Bluewater Install six groundwater monitoring wells and perform general site actions at the Bluewater Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act site near Grants, NM. LM 5-12 Location: Near Grants, NM Proposed Action or Project Description: DOE proposes to install six groundwater monitoring wells, perform other actions related to use of existing monitoring wells, obtain a Light Detection and Ranging Survey (LiDAR), install a small weather station, and apply pesticide to control noxious weeds at the Bluewater Site. The wells would be drilled by a truck-mounted rotary drill rig. The B SIB-inch boreholes would extend to depths of 120 to 350 feet (ft) below ground surface. Mud pits to contain drilling fluids and drill cuttings would be required for some of the wells. The mud pits, where required, would be approximately 6 ft by 20 ft in

298

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Checklist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

D. # LM-lS-lO D. # LM-lS-lO U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management National Environmental Policy Act Environmental Checklist Project/Activity: Install geotechnical holes at the Lakeview, OR, Disposal Site A. Brief Project/Activity Description The U.S. DepaJiment of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) proposes to advance six direct-push geotechnical holes into the top of the Lakeview Disposal Cell and two geotechnical holes into the side slopes of the Lakeview Disposal Cell to determine moisture conditions within the cell. The holes would be hydraulically pushed 10 to 55 feet (ft) into the cell using a geoprobe rig. To ensure protection of the 2-ft-thick compacted clay barrier beneath the tailings, hole locations and depths would be limited so as to not extend within 10 ft of the base of the tailings. A plan that

299

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Northern Basin and Range Province, Stillwater prospect, Churchill County, Nevada. Final report, April 1979-July 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Union Oil Company of California drilled two exploratory geothermal wells in the Stillwater geothermal prospect area in northwestern Nevada to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations, which included the drilling of four earlier deep temperature gradient wells in the Stillwater area, was also provided. The two wells were drilled to total depths of 6946 ft and 10,014 ft with no significant drilling problems. A maximum reservoir temperature of 353 F was measured at 9950 ft. The most productive well flow tested at a rate of 152,000 lbs/hr with a wellhead temperature of 252 F and pressure of 20 psig. Based upon current economics, the Stillwater geothermal prospect is considered to be subcommercial for the generation of electrical power. This synopsis of the exploratory drilling activities and results contains summary drilling, geologic, and reservoir information from two exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Richmond Harbor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer of 1991, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) was contracted to conduct sampling and testing of sediments proposed for dredging of Richmond Harbor, California. The MSL collected sediment cores to a depth of [minus]40 ft MLLW ([minus]38 ft + 2 ft overdepth) from 28 (12-in. core) and 30 (4-in. core) stations. The sediment cores were allocated to six composite samples referred to as sediment treatments, which were then subjected to physical, chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation testing. Physical and chemical parameters included grain size, total organic carbon (TOC), total volatile solids (TVS), oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyis (PCBs), priority pollutant metals, and butyltins. The results from the test treatments were compared to results from five reference treatments representative of potential in-bay and offshore disposal sites.

Pinza, M R; Ward, J A; Mayhew, H L; Word, J Q; Niyogi, D K; Kohn, N P [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Use of hot-dry-rock geothermal resources for space heating: a case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study shows that a hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal space heat system proposed for the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations's Wallops Flight Center (WFC) will cost $10.9 million, saving $4.1 million over the existing oil heating system over a 30-yr lifetime. The minimal, economically feasible plan for HDR at WFC is shown to be the design of a single-fracture reservoir using a combined HDR preheat and a final oil burner after the first 4 years of operation. The WFC cost savings generalize and range from $3.1 million to $7.2 million for other HDR sites having geothermal temperature gradients ranging from 25/sup 0/C/km to 40/sup 0/C/km and depths to basement rock of 2400 ft or 5700 ft compared to the 30/sup 0/C/km and 9000 ft to basement rock at WFC.

Cummings, R.G.; Arundale, C.J.; Bivins, R.L.; Burness, H.S.; Drake, R.H.; Norton, R.D.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Electrical Resistivity Imaging for Unknown Bridge Foundation Depth Determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unknown bridge foundations pose a significant safety risk due to stream scour and erosion. Records from older structures may be non-existent, incomplete, or incorrect. Nondestructive and inexpensive geophysical methods have been identified as suitable to investigate unknown bridge foundations. The objective of the present study is to apply advanced 2D electrical resistivity imaging (ERI) in order to identify depth of unknown bridge foundations. A survey procedure is carried out in mixed terrain water and land environments with rough topography. A conventional resistivity survey procedure is used with the electrodes installed on the stream banks. However, some electrodes must be adapted for underwater use. Tests were conducted in one laboratory experimentation and at five field experimentations located at three roadway bridges, a geotechnical test site, and a railway bridge. The first experimentation was at the bridges with the smallest foundations, later working up in size to larger drilled shafts and spread footings. Both known to unknown foundations were investigated. The geotechnical test site is used as an experimental site for 2D and 3D ERI. The data acquisition is carried out along 2D profile with a linear array in the dipole-dipole configuration. The data collections have been carried out using electrodes deployed directly across smaller foundations. Electrodes are deployed in proximity to larger foundations to image them from the side. The 2D ERI can detect the presence of a bridge foundation but is unable to resolve its precise shape and depth. Increasing the spatial extent of the foundation permits better image of its shape and depth. Using electrode < 1 m to detect a slender foundation < 1 m in diameter is not feasible. The 2D ERI method that has been widely used for land surface surveys presently can be adapted effectively in water-covered environments. The method is the most appropriate geophysical method for determination of unknown bridge foundations. Fully 3D ERI method at bridge sites is labor intensive, time consuming, and does not add enough value over 2D ERI to make it worthwhile.

Arjwech, Rungroj

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Shared Communications: Volume 2. In-Depth Systems Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second of two documents that examine the literature for actual examples of organizations and agencies that share communications resources. While the primary emphasis is on rural, intelligent transportation system (ITS) communications involving transit, examples will not be limited to rural activities, nor to ITS implementation, nor even to transit. In addition, the term ''communication'' will be broadly applied to include all information resources. The first document of this series, ''Shared Communications: Volume I. A Summary and Literature Review'', defines the meaning of the term ''shared communication resources'' and provides many examples of agencies that share resources. This document, ''Shared Communications: Volume II. In-Depth Systems Research'', reviews attributes that contributed to successful applications of the sharing communication resources concept. A few examples of each type of communication sharing are provided. Based on the issues and best practice realworld examples, recommendations for potential usage and recommended approaches for field operational tests are provided.

Truett, LF

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

304

Interpolation Scheme for Standard Depth Data Applicable for Areas with a Complex Hydrographical Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oceanographic datasets, which are arranged for standard depths, have many applications for various users. However, oceanic observations are not always conducted exactly at standard depths, especially in the case of historical bottle observations. ...

Sachiko Oguma; Toru Suzuki; Yutaka Nagata; Hidetoshi Watanabe; Hatsuyo Yamaguchi; Kimio Hanawa

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Nonlinear Energy Transfer through the Spectrum of Gravity Waves for the Finite Depth Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm for calculation of the nonlinear kinetic integral is described for the case of finite depth. The use of an effective approximation of the exact dispersion relationship for gravity waves in finite depth permits modification of the ...

V. G. Polnikov

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A Finite-Depth Wind-Wave Model. Part I: Model Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parametric windsea model for arbitrary water depths is presented. The model is derived from a conservation of energy flux formulation and includes shoaling, refraction, dissipation by bottom friction, as well as finite-depth modifications of ...

Hans C. Graber; Ole S. Madsen

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Photon-limited time of flight depth acquisition : new parametric model and its analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As 3-D imaging systems become more popular, the depth estimation which is their core component should be made as accurate as possible at low power levels. In this thesis, we consider the time of flight depth acquisition ...

Montazerhodjat, Vahid

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Interannual Consistency in Fractal Snow Depth Patterns at Two Colorado Mountain Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fractal dimensions derived from loglog variograms are useful for characterizing spatial structure and scaling behavior in snow depth distributions. This study examines the temporal consistency of snow depth scaling features at two sites using ...

Jeffrey S. Deems; Steven R. Fassnacht; Kelly J. Elder

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Influence of Linear Depth Variation on Poincar, Kelvin, and Rossby Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exact solutions to the linearized shallow-water equations in a channel with linear depth variation and a mean flow are obtained in terms of confluent hypergeometric functions. These solutions are the generalization to finite s (depth variation ...

A. N. Staniforth; R. T. Williams; B. Neta

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Well R-14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well R-14 is located in Ten Site Canyon and was completed at a depth of 1316 ft below ground surface (bgs) in August 2002 within unassigned pumiceous deposits located below the Puye Formation (fanglomerate). The well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Individual static depths measured for each isolated screen after the Westbay{trademark} transducer monitoring system was installed in mid-December 2002 were nearly identical at 1177 ft bgs, suggesting only horizontal subsurface flow at this time, location, and depth. Screen 1 straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous deposits. Screen 2 is located about 50 ft deeper than screen 1 and is only within the unassigned pumiceous deposits. Constant-rate, straddle-packer, injection tests were conducted at screen 2, including two short tests and one long test. The short tests were 1 minute each but at different injection rates. These short tests were used to select an appropriate injection rate for the long test. We analyzed both injection and recovery data from the long test using the Theis, Theis recovery, Theis residual-recovery, and specific capacity techniques. The Theis injection, Theis recovery, and specific capacity methods correct for partial screen penetration; however, the Theis residual-recovery method does not. The long test at screen 2 involved injection at a rate of 10.1 gallons per minute (gpm) for 68 minutes and recovery for the next 85 minutes. The Theis analysis for screen 2 gave the best fit to residual recovery data. These results suggest that the 158-ft thick deposits opposite screen 2 have a transmissivity (T) equal to or greater than 143 ft{sup 2}/day, and correspond to a horizontal hydraulic conductivity (K) of at least 0.9 ft/day. The specific capacity method yielded a T value equal to or greater than 177 ft{sup 2}/day, and a horizontal K of at least 1.1 ft/day. Results from the injection and recovery phases of the test at screen 2 were similar to those from the residual-recovery portion of the test, but were lower by a factor of about two. The response to injection was typical for a partially penetrating well screen in a very thick aquifer.

S. McLin; W. Stone

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Property:Real-Time | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Real-Time Real-Time Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Real-Time Property Type String Pages using the property "Real-Time" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + No + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + No + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + No + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + No + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + No + Carderock Circulating Water Channel + No +

312

Category:Testing Facilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facilities Facilities Jump to: navigation, search This category is defined by the form Testing Facility. Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. H [×] Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type‎ 9 pages Pages in category "Testing Facilities" The following 82 pages are in this category, out of 82 total. 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility 10-ft Wave Flume Facility 11-ft Wave Flume Facility 2 2-ft Flume Facility 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility A Alden Large Flume Alden Small Flume Alden Tow Tank Alden Wave Basin B Breakwater Research Facility Bucknell Hydraulic Flume C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Carderock Circulating Water Channel

313

Property:Cameras | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Cameras Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Cameras Property Type Text Pages using the property "Cameras" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + None 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + None 2 2-ft Flume Facility + None 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + None 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + None A Alden Large Flume + Yes Alden Small Flume + Yes Alden Tow Tank + Yes Alden Wave Basin + Yes B Breakwater Research Facility + None C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None Carderock Circulating Water Channel + None

314

Property:Wavemaking Capabilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wavemaking Capabilities Property Type String Pages using the property "Wavemaking Capabilities" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Yes + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + None + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + Yes + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + None + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None +

315

Property:Wind Capabilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Capabilities Capabilities Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Wind Capabilities Property Type String Pages using the property "Wind Capabilities" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + None + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + None + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None +

316

Property:Towing Capabilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Towing Capabilities Property Type String Pages using the property "Towing Capabilities" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + None + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + None + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + None + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None +

317

Property:Test Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Services Services Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Test Services Property Type String Pages using the property "Test Services" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Yes + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None + Carderock Circulating Water Channel + None +

318

Property:Channel/Tunnel/Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Channel/Tunnel/Flume Property Type String Pages using the property "Channel/Tunnel/Flume" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Yes + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + None + Alden Wave Basin + None + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Yes + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Yes +

319

Property:Special Characteristics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Characteristics Characteristics Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Special Characteristics Property Type String Pages using the property "Special Characteristics" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + None + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + None + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Tow Tank + None + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + None + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Yes + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None + Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + None +

320

4D frequency analysis of computational cameras for depth of field extension  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depth of field (DOF), the range of scene depths that appear sharp in a photograph, poses a fundamental tradeoff in photography---wide apertures are important to reduce imaging noise, but they also increase defocus blur. Recent advances in computational ... Keywords: Fourier analysis, computational camera, depth of field, light field

Anat Levin; Samuel W. Hasinoff; Paul Green; Frdo Durand; William T. Freeman

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

A 2D nearest-neighbor quantum architecture for factoring in polylogarithmic depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We contribute a 2D nearest-neighbor quantum architecture for Shor's algorithm to factor an n-bit number in O(log3 n) depth. Our implementation uses parallel phase estimation, constant-depth fanout and teleportation, and constant-depth ... Keywords: Shor's algorithm, carry-save addition, nearest-neighbor, prime factorization, quantum architecture

Paul Pham, Krysta M. Svore

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Multirate depth control of an AUV by neurocontroller for enhanced situational awareness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on a critical component of the situational awareness (SA), the neural control of depth flight of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). Constant depth flight is a challenging but important task for AUVs to achieve high level of autonomy ... Keywords: autonomous underwater vehicle, depth flight, multirate system, neurocontroller, simulation, situational awareness

Igor Astrov; Andrus Pedai

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Calculation of the Effect of Random Superfluid Density on the Temperature Dependence of the Penetration Depth  

SciTech Connect

Microscopic variations in composition or structure can lead to nanoscale inhomogeneity in superconducting properties such as the magnetic penetration depth, but measurements of these properties are usually made on longer length scales. We solve a generalized London equation with a non-uniform penetration depth {lambda}(r), obtaining an approximate solution for the disorder-averaged Meissner screening. We find that the effective penetration depth is different from the average penetration depth and is sensitive to the details of the disorder. These results indicate the need for caution when interpreting measurements of the penetration depth and its temperature dependence in systems which may be inhomogeneous.

Lippman, Thomas; Moler, Kathryn A.

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

324

Aerosol optical depth increase in partly cloudy conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote sensing observations of aerosol from surface and satellite instruments are extensively used for atmospheric and climate research. From passive sensors, the apparent cloud-free atmosphere in the vicinity of clouds often appears to be brighter then further away from the clouds, leading to an enhancement in the retrieved aerosol optical depth. Mechanisms contributing to this enhancement, including contamination by undetected clouds, hygroscopic growth of aerosol particles, and meteorological conditions, have been debated in recent literature, but an extent to which each of these factors influence the observed enhancement is poorly known. Here we used 11 years of daily global observations at 10x10 km2 resolution from the MODIS on the NASA Terra satellite to quantify as a function of cloud fraction (CF). Our analysis reveals that, averaged over the globe, the clear sky is enhanced by ? = 0.05 which corresponds to relative enhancements of 25% in cloudy conditions (CF=0.8-0.9) compared with relatively clear conditions (CF=0.1-0.2). Unlike the absolute enhancement ?, the relative increase in ? is rather consistent in all seasons and is 25-35% in the subtropics and 15-25% at mid and higher latitudes. Using a simple Gaussian probability density function model to connect cloud cover and the distribution of relative humidity, we argue that much of the enhancement is consistent with aerosol hygroscopic growth in the humid environment surrounding clouds. Consideration of these cloud-dependent effects will facilitate understanding aerosol-cloud interactions and reduce the uncertainty in estimates of aerosol radiative forcing by global climate models.

Chand, Duli; Wood, R.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Rasch, Philip J.; Miller, Steven D.; Schichtel, Bret; Moore, Tom

2012-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

325

Anomalous fracture-extension pressure in granitic rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fracture-extension pressures appreciably higher than the least principal earth-stress were observed in hydraulic fractures formed in a pair of 3 km (9600 ft) deep boreholes drilled near the Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico. Pressurization of open wellbores in rock containing preexisting fractures may open these fractures, instead of creating new fractures at right angles to the least principal stress. The pressure necessary to flow into these fractures may be appreciably higher than the least principal stress. Upon sand-propping one such pre-existing fracture, a lower fracture extension pressure was observed. A second fracture in a parallel well-bore 92 m (300 ft) away, at the same depth of 2 km (6500 ft) exhibited the lower fracture extension pressure without propping, but with about 90/sup 0/ difference in fracture direction. Fractures created through perforations at a depth of 3 km (9600 ft) not only exhibited breakdown pressures upon initial pressurization, but sometimes even higher ''breakdown'' pressures upon repressurization. These phenomena may be of interest in the interpretation of earth stress measurements made by hydraulic fracturing.

Aamodt, R.L.; Potter, R.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Corrective action plan for corrective action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mercury Fire Training Pit is a former fire training area located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Mercury Fire Training Pit was used from approximately 1965 to the early 1990s to train fire-fighting personnel at the NTS, and encompasses an area approximately 107 meters (m) (350 feet [ft]) by 137 m (450 ft). The Mercury Fire Training Pit formerly included a bermed burn pit with four small burn tanks, four large above ground storage tanks an overturned bus, a telephone pole storage area, and areas for burning sheds, pallets, and cables. Closure activities will include excavation of the impacted soil in the aboveground storage tank and burn pit areas to a depth of 1.5 m (5 ft), and excavation of the impacted surface soil downgradient of the former ASTs and burnpit areas to a depth of 0.3 m (1 ft). Excavated soil will be disposed in the Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill at the NTS.

Nacht, S.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

ARM - Evaluation Product - MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth ProductsMicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : MicroPulse LIDAR Cloud Optical Depth (MPLCOD) 1999.05.01 - 2004.05.14 Site(s) SGP General Description The MPLCOD VAP retrieves the column cloud visible optical depth using LIDAR derived backscatter from the MPLNOR (Micro Pulse Lidar Normalized Backscatter) and radiosonde thermodynamic profiles. The optical depth retrieval is derived following Comstock et al. (2001), which retrieves visible optical depth and layer average backscatter-to-extinction ratio (k) at the lidar wavelength for each backscatter profile. Data Information Data Directory Contacts Principal Investigator Jennifer Comstock (509) 372-424

328

SNG completes deepest underwater pipelay in Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that gas began flowing this spring in the deepest underwater, large-diameter pipeline in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. Water depth along the route of the pipeline varies from approximately 460 ft at the Alabaster platform, increasing to the record depth of 1,220 ft in the Mississippi Canyon area, and decreasing to negligible water depth at the landfall site southwest of Venice. The SNG Mississippi Canyon Block 397 pipeline project exemplifies how a pipeline project can encounter an array of conditions which prompt special design considerations and installation techniques. Important considerations for this project were related to pipe properties, anti-corrosion and weight coatings, span and buckle considerations, and installation equipment. A team effort was used to study, research, test, design, and install this pipeline.

Vogt, G.B. (Project Consulting Services Inc., Metairie, LA (US))

1992-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

329

Total instantaneous energy transport in polychromatic fluid gravity waves at finite depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The total instantaneous energy transport can be found for polychromatic waves when using the deep water approximation. Expanding this theory to waves in waters of finite depth

J. Engstrm; J. Isberg; M. Eriksson; M. Leijon

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Weighted exponential regression for characterizing radionuclide concentrations in soil depth profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of radionuclide concentrations in soil profiles requires accurate evaluation of the depth distribution of the concentrations as measured by gamma emissions. An ongoing study based on 137Cs activity has shown that such concentration data generally follow an exponential trend when the fraction of radioactivity below depth is plotted against the depth. The slope of the exponential regression fit is defined as alpha/rho, the depth profile parameter. A weighted exponential regression procedure has been developed to compute a mean ??? for a group of related soil samples. Regression results from different areas or from different time periods can be used to compare representative radionuclide concentrations for the specified groupings.

C.P.Oertel; J.R.Giles

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

CSAMT method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object  

SciTech Connect

The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a CSAMT signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak.

Lee, David O. (Albuquerque, NM); Montoya, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Wayland, Jr., J. Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Non-photorealistic camera: depth edge detection and stylized rendering using multi-flash imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a non-photorealistic rendering approach to capture and convey shape features of real-world scenes. We use a camera with multiple flashes that are strategically positioned to cast shadows along depth discontinuities in the scene. The projective-geometric ... Keywords: depth edges, image enhancement, non-photorealistic rendering

Ramesh Raskar; Kar-Han Tan; Rogerio Feris; Jingyi Yu; Matthew Turk

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Hurricane-Generated Depth-Averaged Currents and Sea Surface Elevation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory of the depth-averaged currents and sea surface elevation generated by a moving hurricane in a stratified ocean with flat bottom is presented. Using a scale analysis of the depth-integrated momentum and continuity equations, it is found ...

Isaac Ginis; Georgi Sutyrin

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Non-photorealistic camera: depth edge detection and stylized rendering using multi-flash imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a non-photorealistic rendering approach to capture and convey shape features of real-world scenes. We use a camera with multiple flashes that are strategically positioned to cast shadows along depth discontinuities in the scene. The projective-geometric ... Keywords: depth edges, image enhancement, non-photorealistic rendering

Ramesh Raskar; Kar-Han Tan; Rogerio Feris; Jingyi Yu; Matthew Turk

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

From PD to Nonlinear Adaptive Depth-Control of a Tethered Autonomous Underwater Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From PD to Nonlinear Adaptive Depth-Control of a Tethered Autonomous Underwater Vehicle D and an adaptive nonlinear state feedback one, both applied on a tethered autonomous underwater vehicle. The aim performed using each of the above mentioned control laws. Keywords: Underwater robotics, Depth control

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

336

Combining multiple depth cameras and projectors for interactions on, above and between surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumented with multiple depth cameras and projectors, LightSpace is a small room installation designed to explore a variety of interactions and computational strategies related to interactive displays and the space that they inhabit. LightSpace cameras ... Keywords: augmented reality, depth cameras, interactive spaces, surface computing, ubiquitous computing

Andrew D. Wilson; Hrvoje Benko

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

338

Model for hydrogen isotope backscattering, trapping and depth profiles in C and a-Si  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model of low energy hydrogen trapping and backscattering in carbon and a-silicon is described. Depth profiles are calculated and numerical results presented for various incident angular and energy distributions. The calculations yield a relation between depth profiles and the incident ion energy distribution. The use of this model for tokamak plasma diagnosis is discussed.

Cohen, S.A.; McCracken, G.M.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Modeling risk and simulation-based optimization of channel depths at Cam Pha Coal Port  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a simulation-based method and a risk model of ship grounding for a long-term optimization of channel depths. The long-term optimization of channel depths should be considered a two-stage process: Firstly, establishing a ship entrance ... Keywords: entrance channel, risk modeling, ship grounding, simulation

N. M. Quy; J. K. Vrijling; P. H. A. J. M Gelder; R. Groenveld

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Kinect in the kitchen: testing depth camera interactions in practical home environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depth cameras have become a fixture of millions of living rooms thanks to the Microsoft Kinect. Yet to be seen is whether they can succeed as widely in other areas of the home. This research takes the Kinect into real-life kitchens, where touchless gestural ... Keywords: cooking, depth camera, gestures, home, joint selection, kinect, kitchen, push gesture, recipes

Galen Panger

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A comparison of carbide fracture during fixed depth and fixed load scratch tests  

SciTech Connect

In order to simulate abrasion of dual-phase materials containing large carbides under fixed depth conditions an apparatus has been designed and used to perform scratch tests at a fixed depth of cut on such materials. The scratch test consists of two support arms tipped with small steel balls held in contact with surface by /sup 700/ g, while the scratch tool is mounted on the tip of a central arm whose adjustable length allow control of the depth of cut. The scratch tool does not deflect significant when it encounters a large carbide. Scratch tests with the new apparatus have been performed on Co-base Stellite alloys containing large Cr-rich carbides, using individual particles of alumina as scratch tools to generate fixed depth scratches. A in situ SEM scratch test apparatus has also been used to genrate fixed load scratches. Comparison of the scratches shows that for comparable average scratch depths, under fixed load conditions the scratch tool deflects over the carbides without causing fracture, but that since it cannot deflect under fixed depth conditions it induces gross carbide fracture. Results suggest that the fixed depth scratch test can be successfully employed to simulate fixed depth abrasion, which has been previously shown to generate gross carbide fracture in these alloys. The in situ SEM scratch test simulates fixed load abrasion conditions such as those which occur in rubber wheel abrasion tests. 12 refs., 9 figs

Prasad, S.V.; Kosel, T.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Visible Optical Depth Derived from Lidar Lo, Chaomei Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Comstock, Jennifer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Optically thin clouds (e.g. optical depth < 3) can have a significant impact on radiative heating in the atmosphere, particularly in the cold upper troposphere. Currently, there is no value-added product (VAP) in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program archive that produces thin cloud optical depth, particularly at the Tropical Western Pacific and North Slope of Alaska sites. A VAP is under development to obtain the cirrus cloud visible optical depth from the MPLNOR (Micro Pulse Lidar Normalized

343

Property:Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Property Type Page Pages using the property "Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flume + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flume + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flume + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Flume + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flume + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flume + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flume + A Alden Large Flume + Flume + Alden Small Flume + Flume + Alden Tow Tank + Tow Tank + Alden Wave Basin + Wave Basin + B Breakwater Research Facility + Wave Basin + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Flume + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Tunnel +

344

English Units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

English Units. A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J. 1, Steam Point Calculator: English Units, ... 6, Height of steam point apparatus above ground (ft.), 0, ft. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

345

Columbia River PUD - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Windows: 6.00 per sq ft WallFloor Insulation: 0.65sq ft Attic Insulation: 0.02R-Value per square foot Heat Pump Water Heaters: 300-500unit Eligible System Size...

346

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Insulation: 0.50sq. ft. Attic and Ceiling Insulation: 0.25sq. ft. Energy Star New Home: 650 Installation Requirements Insulation: New insulation that increases the R-Value...

347

Property:Cost(per day) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost(per day) Cost(per day) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Cost(per day) Property Type String Pages using the property "Cost(per day)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Contact POC + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Contact POC + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Contact POC + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Contact POC + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Contact POC + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Contact POC + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Contact POC + A Alden Large Flume + $5000/week + Alden Small Flume + $2500/week + Alden Tow Tank + Depends on study + Alden Wave Basin + Depends on study + B Breakwater Research Facility + Contact POC + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + Depends on personnel requirements + C Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel + Contact POC +

348

Quantitative Analysis of the Principal-Agent Problem in Commercial Buildings in the U.S.: Focus on Central Space Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1b] over different ranges of building area. Table 5. Results6. Results from Model [1b] for Different Ranges of BuildingArea Building Area ?50k sq. ft. 50<<600k sq. ft. ?600k sq.

Blum, Helcio

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Evaluation for the City of Emeryville at Four Intersections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and street Parking locations Street light locations Possibledistance, ft) W E W 8 Street light exist/adequate (y/n) E Wdistance, ft) W E W 8 Street light exist/adequate (y/n) E 9

Johnson, Emily S.; Ragland, David R; Cooper, Jill F; O'Connor, Terri

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Whitehead Biomedical Research Building at Emory University, Atlanta...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will cover the additional first cost. Project Description The Whitehead Biomedical Research Facility is an eight-story, 325,000 gross ft 2 (212,264 net ft 2 ) laboratory...

351

Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washer: 50 Dishwasher: 50 Heat Pumps: 550-650unit (depending on efficiency) AtticWall Insulation: 0.20sq. ft. Window Solar ScreenFilm: 0.50sq. ft. Heat Pump Water...

352

ANALYSIS OF THE PERFORMANCE AND COST EFFECTIVENESS OF NINE SMALL WIND ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS FUNDED BY THE DOE SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been installed, and the turbine rotor, blades, associatedfrom Pa. 355-ft. dia. rotor, turbine, 64-ft. tower, towerThe turbine has 4 coupled to an blades with a rotor diameter

Kay, J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Thirty-Six Month Evaluation of UPS Diesel Hybrid Electric Delivery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO Gillig 40-ft transit bus Biodiesel blend (B20) Completed in October 2006 King County Metro Seattle, WA New Flyer 60-ft articulated transit bus Parallel hybrid, GM-Allison...

354

Section 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The normal prescribed test pattern shall be an area of 1 .2 m (4 ft) inl ength an d 3. 0 m (10 ft) in wi dth or t he wi dth oft he scal e pl atform ...

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATIO...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FC26-98FT40323 Western Research Institute FE DE-FC26-98FT40323 Gasification Division FY2010 Sara Zenner November 2009 - June 2010 Laramie, Wyoming Novel Sorbents for Emission...

356

SRS Composite Analysis A Risk Based Management Tool  

B r a n c h U pper T hree R u ns SRS Easting (ft) SRS Northing (ft) 45000 50000 55000 60000 65000 70000 72000 74000 76000 78000 80000 82000 Example: Old (a ...

357

Potential Benefits of Commissioning California Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity Electricity Consumption (kWh/ft 2 /year) TypicalCall Cases Electricity Consumption (kWh/ft 2 /year) Typicalyear, respectively). In all house types, the electricity consumption

Matson, Nance; Wray, Craig; Walker, Iain; Sherman, Max

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Executive Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(39F), the temperature at which the laboratory experimentation has been conducted. At a geothermal gradient of 2F100ft, 39F will be encountered approximately 350ft below...

359

The Southern Great Plains Site: A Climate Observatory in Oklahoma  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

other facilities throughout the SGP site. The 60-ft meteorological tower rises from a canola field at the SGP central facility in June 2011. The 60-ft meteorological tower rises...

360

Federal Energy Management Program: Boatwright Maintenance Park...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

111,566 sq ft, and has an energy baseline of 62.2 KBtusq ft. It's highlights include spray foam roof with R-13 rating, air-source heat pumps for office spaces, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Wharf site.sdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SACR ANT Cement Pad ECOR 75 Ft from water edge 10 ft from low wall Front of container ANT van not on cement pad 245 mtr PWR DROP in red, 245 meters from west lot line...

362

National Grid (Electric) - Residential EnergyWise Incentive Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermostat: 50% of cost 7-day Programmable Thermostat: 25 Deep Energy Retrofit Insulation Pilot Program: 2 - 3.50sq ft (base); 1.75sq ft (performance) Central AC or...

363

Lincoln Electric System (Commercial and Industrial) - Sustainable...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

reduction plus 0.045 per deemed first-year kWh reduction. Building SealingInsulation: 0.50sq ft Exterior Frame Wall Insulation: 0.80sq ft Air Conditioner: 250 -...

364

Rocky Mountain Power - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for contractor) Duct Sealing: 275 - 375 (75 for contractor) Windows: 1sq. ft. Insulation: 0.15 - 0.60sq. ft. Rocky Mountain Power offers the Home Energy Savings Program...

365

Columbia River PUD - Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Floor Insulation: 0.25 per sq ft Attic Insulation: 0.45 per sq ft Windows: 3.00 per square foot Water Heaters: 200 Clothes Washer: 20 - 50 depending on type and efficiency...

366

Microsoft Word - MRCSP Michigan Basin 2008 FactSheet _09-08_...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

drift less than 50 ft deep. Total thickness of glacial drift is over 500 ft thick. Many oil and gas wells penetrate the target storage reservoir in the area. Over 135 wells in the...

367

Vadose Zone Monitoring System Installation Report for McClellan AFB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100 ft but the cuttings indicated sandy sediment. The mostwas the predominance of sandy silt in the top 30 ft ofat 0942 in field: 0 ppm SANDY SILT (ML), with interlayered

Zawislanski, Peter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The National Fire Research Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 420 anchor points on 0.61 x 0.61 m (2 ft x 2 ft) grid; Horizontal Load ... Hydraulic Power Unit 340 lpm (90 gpm); Actuators (double acting) 762 mm (30 in ...

2013-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

369

Reservoir compaction of the Belridge Diatomite and surface subsidence, south Belridge field, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect

Surface subsidence due to reservoir compaction during production has been observed in many large oil fields. Subsidence is most obvious in coastal and offshore fields where inundation by the sea occurs. Well-known examples are Wilmington field in California and Ekofisk field in the North Sea. In South Belridge field, the Belridge Diatomite member of the late Miocene Reef Ridge Shale has proven prone to compaction during production. The reservoir, a high-porosity, low-permeability, highly compressive rock composed largely of diatomite and mudstone, is about 1,000 ft thick and lies at an average depth of 1,600 ft. Within the Belridge Diatomite, reservoir compaction due to withdrawal of oil and water in Sec. 12, T28S, R20E, MDB and M, was noticed after casing failures in producing wells began occurring and tension cracks, enlarged by hydrocompaction after a heavy rainstorm were observed. Surface subsidence in Sec. 12 has been monitored since April 1987, through the surveying of benchmark monuments. The average annualized subsidence rate during 1987 was {minus}1.86 ft/yr, {minus}0.92 ft/yr during 1988, and {minus}0.65 ft/yr during 1989; the estimated peak subsidence rate reached {minus}7.50 ft/yr in July 1985, after 1.5 yrs of production from the Belridge Diatomite reservoir. Since production from the Belridge Diatomite reservoir commenced in February 1984, the surface of the 160-ac producing area has subsided about 12.5 ft. This equates to an estimated reservoir compaction of 30 ft in the Belridge Diatomite and an average loss of reservoir porosity of 2.4% from 55.2 to 52.8%. Injection of water for reservoir pressure maintenance in the Belridge diatomite began in June 1987, and has been effective in mitigating subsidence to current rates and repressurizing the reservoir to near-initial pressure. An added benefit of water injection has been improved recovery of oil from the Belridge Diatomite by waterflood.

Bowersox, J.R.; Shore, R.A. (Mission Resources, Inc., Bakersfield, CA (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

PROCEEDINGS OF 1976 SUMMER WORKSHOP ON AN ENERGY EXTENSION SERVICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lO/Ft. (12) Insulate Steam Distribution System Repair Crackseliminating steam, water and air leaks. "Distribution" loads

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

PNNL: Available Technologies: Microsystems  

Combustion Gas Heat Exchanger; Compact Absorption Chiller; Compact High-Throughput Modular FT Reactor with Monolithic Catalyst Bed; Enhanced ...

372

Californias Energy Future: Transportation Energy Use in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

jet (HRJ) fuel and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels, which are running on hydrogen) Fischer-Tropsch Gallons of Gasoline

Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M; Hwang, Roland; Sperling, Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Assessment of Technologies for Compliance with the Low Carbon Fuel Standard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forest thinning, corn, and tallow resources. The study ACSsubstitutes California FAHC-Tallow FAHC-Grease FT-Municipal

Yeh, Sonia; Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Parker, Nathan C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Automated Demand Response and Commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

internal conditions. Maximum Demand Saving Intensity [W/ft2]automated electric demand sheds. The maximum electric shed

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Bourassa, Norman

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

THERMOSIPHON WATER HEATERS WITH HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 ector connecting pipes header heat exchanger insulationLt total connecting pipe length, m (ft) total number of heat

Mertol, Atila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Presented by Dealing with the Scale Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_BLALA. · Vampire PML loads a new class of MCA components. - Vprotocols provide the entire FT protocol (only

377

Influence of a local change of depth on the behavior of bouncing oil drops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work of Couder \\textit{et al} (see also Bush \\textit{et al}) inspired consideration of the impact of a submerged obstacle, providing a local change of depth, on the behavior of oil drops in the bouncing regime. In the linked videos, we recreate some of their results for a drop bouncing on a uniform depth bath of the same liquid undergoing vertical oscillations just below the conditions for Faraday instability, and show a range of new behaviors associated with change of depth. This article accompanies a fluid dynamics video entered into the Gallery of Fluid Motion of the 66th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics.

Carmigniani, Remi; Symon, Sean; McKeon, Beverley J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Phase 2 drilling operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51--20)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the second drilling phase, completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991, of the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. The well in Long Valley Caldera is planned to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C (whichever comes first). There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart with scientific experiments in the wellbore between active drilling periods. Phase 1 drilling in 1989 was completed with 20 in. casing from surface to a depth of 2558 ft., and a 3.8 in. core hole was drilled below the shoe to a depth of 2754 in. Phase 2 included a 17-{1/2} in. hole out of the 20 in. shoe, with 13-3/8 in. casing to 6825 ft., and continuous wireline coring below that to 7588 ft. This document comprises a narrative log of the daily activities, the daily drilling reports, mud logger's reports, summary of drilling fluids used, and other miscellaneous records.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Phase 2 drilling operations at the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVF 51--20)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the second drilling phase, completed to a depth of 7588 feet in November 1991, of the Long Valley Exploratory Well near Mammoth Lakes, California. The well in Long Valley Caldera is planned to reach an ultimate depth of 20,000 feet or a bottomhole temperature of 500{degrees}C (whichever comes first). There will be four drilling phases, at least a year apart with scientific experiments in the wellbore between active drilling periods. Phase 1 drilling in 1989 was completed with 20 in. casing from surface to a depth of 2558 ft., and a 3.8 in. core hole was drilled below the shoe to a depth of 2754 in. Phase 2 included a 17-{1/2} in. hole out of the 20 in. shoe, with 13-3/8 in. casing to 6825 ft., and continuous wireline coring below that to 7588 ft. This document comprises a narrative log of the daily activities, the daily drilling reports, mud logger's reports, summary of drilling fluids used, and other miscellaneous records.

Finger, J.T.; Jacobson, R.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

PROPOSAL TO LEASE SPACE IN RESPONSE TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SQUARE FOOT RATE PER ANNUM (10b divided by 10a) (10c divided by 10a) *The Common Area Factor(F)/Partial(P) RENTABLE SQUARE FEET (a) COMMON AREA FACTOR* SQ. FT. RATE PER YEAR (b) AMOUNT (a) x (b) SQ. FT. RATE PER. 12. a. Initial term rate includes: (1) $__________ / sq. ft. for operating cost base rate and (2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

OFFER TO LEASE SPACE IN RESPONSE TO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SQUARE FOOT RATE PER ANNUM (10b divided by 10a) (10c divided by 10a) *The Common Area Factor(F)/Partial(P) RENTABLE SQUARE FEET (a) COMMON AREA FACTOR* SQ. FT. RATE PER YEAR (b) AMOUNT (a) x (b) SQ. FT. RATE PER. 12. a. Initial term rate includes: (1) $__________ / sq. ft. for operating cost base rate and (2

382

Thermophysical Properties of Fluid Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Density, mol/l mol/m3 g/ml kg/m3 lb-mole/ft3 lbm/ft3. Energy, kJ/mol kJ/kg kcal/mol Btu/lb-mole kcal/g Btu/lbm. Velocity, m/s ft/s mph. ... All rights reserved ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Journal of Machine Learning Research 9 (2008) 2113-2139 Submitted 1/08; Published 10/08 Gradient Tree Boosting for Training Conditional Random Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In other words, we are setting the step size m = 1. We experimented with performing a line search to the appropriate child node. Suppose that nle ft examples are sent to the left child and nright examples are sent to the left child is multiplied by nle ft/(nle ft +nright). Similarly, the weight of each example sent

384

SUPPORTING INFORMATION to Large-Scale Gasification-Based Co-Production of Fuels and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

started production from coal syngas as vehicle fuel (Dry, 2002). Subsequently a coal-to-fuels program (derived by natural gas F-T conversion) are now beginning to be blended with conventional diesel fuels resurgence of interest in F-T fuels from gasified coal. Coal-based FT fuel production was commercialized

385

Keith Keesecker Office Building. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This two story office building has 4000 ft/sup 2/ of space and a 2000 ft/sup 2/ basement. The solar heating system has 936 ft/sup 2/ of flat plate collectors and a phase change storage system. A description of the system operation, the acceptance test plan, as built wiring and piping schematics, and predicted performance data are included. (MHR)

Bliege, C.L.

1981-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

386

Avista Utilities (Gas) - Prescriptive Commercial Incentive Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1,000 - 3,000 Ovens: 800 - 2,500 Griddle: 200 Dishwashers: 500 - 2,000 Attic Insulation: 0.17sq ft - 0.45sq ft Wall Insulation: 0.75sq ft Floor Insulation: 0.63 sq...

387

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Abstract Temperature gradient drilling has historically been a key tool in the exploration for geothermal resources in the Great Basin, USA, but regulatory, environmental, and accessibility issues, as well as the expense of drilling, are increasingly limiting its use. In cases where thermal groundwater is not overlain by near-surface cold aquifers, it is possible to augment temperature gradient drilling with temperatures measured from a 2-meter depth. We discuss the development of a rapid, efficient, and

388

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print Wednesday, 25 January 2006 00:00 The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent magnetization in an exchange-biased sample. These results provide atomic-level insights into the mechanism of exchange bias, specifically the involvement of mutual interactions between two kinds of uncompensated spins in the antiferromagnet and spins in the ferromagnet.

389

Analysis of Langley optical depth data, with aerosol and gas retrievals,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Langley optical depth data, with aerosol and gas retrievals, Analysis of Langley optical depth data, with aerosol and gas retrievals, for the RSS 103 instrument in Barrow, Alaska Gianelli, Scott Columbia University - NASA/GISS Lacis, Andrew NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies Carlson, Barbara NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies Category: Aerosols Bimodal aerosol retrievals, and high-resolution retrevals of nitrogen dioxide, are performed on the Langley optical depth data from the RSS 103 device that was situated in Barrow, Alaska between March and August in 1999. The results show a higher fine mode aerosol optical depth on average than was retrieved by the RSS 102 at the SGP site. The seasonal cycle is also reversed with high values at Barrow occurring in the spring and low values in the summer. The fine mode effective radius also appears to

390

U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

391

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

392

Depth-Integrated Vorticity Budget of the Southern Ocean from a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of the depth-integrated vorticity budget of the U.K. Fine Resolution Antarctic Model is used to investigate the mechanisms that maintain and dissipate vorticity in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and adjacent circulations of ...

N. C. Wells; B. A. De Cuevas

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

394

U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

395

U.S. Average Depth of Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

396

U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

397

Influence of Filter Band Function on Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Depth from Sunphotometer Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beers attenuation law is the basis for the retrieval of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from sunphotometer data. However, the filter band function causes uncertainty during the retrieval of AOD from sunphotometer data, particularly for channels ...

Hao Zhang; Bing Zhang; Dongmei Chen; Junsheng Li; Guangning Zhao

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A Comparison of Mixing Depths Observed by Ground-Based Wind Profilers and an Airborne Lidar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors compare the mixing depths in the daytime convective boundary layers that were observed remotely by wind profilers and an airborne lidar during the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study. The comparison is used to determine whether the mixing ...

A. B. White; C. J. Senff; R. M. Banta

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Inference of Cloud Optical Depth from Aircraft-Based Solar Radiometric Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is introduced for inferring cloud optical depth ? from solar radiometric measurements made on an aircraft at altitude z. It is assessed using simulated radiometric measurements produced by a 3D Monte Carlo algorithm acting on fields of ...

H. W. Barker; A. Marshak; W. Szyrmer; J-P. Blanchet; A. Trishchenko; Z. Li

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Methodology for Measuring Cirrus Cloud Visible-to-Infrared Spectral Optical Depth Ratios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of cirrus cloud optical depths is necessary to understand the earths current climate and to model the cloud radiation impact on future climate. Cirrus clouds, depending on the ratio of their shortwave visible to longwave infrared ...

Daniel H. DeSlover; William L. Smith; Paivi K. Piironen; Edwin W. Eloranta

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Inferring Optical Depth of Broken Clouds above Green Vegetation Using Surface Solar Radiometric Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for inferring cloud optical depth ? is introduced and assessed using simulated surface radiometric measurements produced by a Monte Carlo algorithm acting on fields of broken, single-layer, boundary layer clouds derived from Landsat ...

Howard W. Barker; Alexander Marshak

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Interannual Variations of Aerosol Optical Depth over Coastal India: Relation to Synoptic Meteorology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interannual variations in spectral aerosol optical depths (AOD) were examined using the data obtained from a chain of ground-based multiwavelength solar radiometers from various locations of the Indian peninsula during the dry winter season (...

Auromeet Saha; K. Krishna Moorthy; K. Niranjan

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Estimating Cloud Field Albedo Using One-Dimensional Series Of Optical Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the ability to estimate regional cloud albedo using 1D series of cloud optical depth ? similar to those inferred from ground-based microwave radiometers. The investigation has two facets: use of appropriate radiative transfer ...

Howard W. Barker

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Intermediate-Depth Circulation of the Indian and South Pacific Oceans Measured by Autonomous Floats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, 306 autonomous floats were deployed in the tropical and South Pacific Ocean and 228 were deployed in the Indian Ocean to observe the basinwide circulation near 900-m depth. Mean velocities, ...

Russ E. Davis

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Analysis of a Method to Estimate Chlorophyll-a Concentration from Irradiance Measurements at Varying Depths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model to estimate chlorophyll-a concentration and yellow substance absorption at 440 nm from irradiance measurements made at varying depths is examined. The derivation of the model, requiring irradiance measurements at three wavebands, is ...

Jasmine S. Nahorniak; Mark R. Abbott; Ricardo M. Letelier; W. Scott Pegau

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Impact of Precipitation on Aerosol Spectral Optical Depth and Retrieved Size Distributions: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A case study is presented on the impact of two isolated, strong thundershowers during a prevailing dry, sunny season on the spectral optical depths and inferred columnar size characteristics of atmospheric aerosols at a tropical station. Results ...

Auromeet Saha; K. Krishna Moorthy

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Depth-Dependent Studies of Tidally Induced Residual Currents on the Sides of Georges Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a depth-dependent tidal model, the tidally induced residual currents on the northern and southern sections of Georges Bank are computed and the effects of various physical parameters on the current are examined. Because of significant on-...

Kim-Tai Tee

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Impacts of Shortwave Penetration Depth on Large-Scale Ocean Circulation and Heat Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of changes in shortwave radiation penetration depth on the global ocean circulation and heat transport is studied using the GFDL Modular Ocean Model (MOM4) with two independent parameterizations that use ocean color to estimate the ...

Colm Sweeney; Anand Gnanadesikan; Stephen M. Griffies; Matthew J. Harrison; Anthony J. Rosati; Bonita L. Samuels

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

An Evaluation of Depth Resolution Requirements for Optical Profiling in Coastal Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wave perturbations induce uncertainties in subsurface quantities determined from the extrapolation of optical measurements taken at different depths. An analysis of these uncertainties was made using data collected in the northern Adriatic Sea ...

Giuseppe Zibordi; Davide D'Alimonte; Jean-Franois Berthon

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Comparison of Cirrus Height and Optical Depth Derived from Satellite and Aircraft Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the International Cirrus Experiment (ICE'89) simultaneous measurements of Cirrus cloud-top height and optical depth by satellite and aircraft have been taken. Data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) onboard the NOAA ...

M. Kstner; K. T. Kriebel; R. Meerktter; W. Renger; G. H. Ruppersberg; P. Wendling

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Intrusion Depth of Density Currents Flowing into Stratified Water Bodies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theory and laboratory experiments are presented describing the depth at which a density current intrudes into a linearly stratified water column, as a function of the entrainment ratio E, the buoyancy flux in the dense current B, and the ...

Mathew Wells; Parthiban Nadarajah

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Variations in Mixed-Layer Depths Arising from Inhomogeneous Surface Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current approaches to parameterizations of sub-grid-scale variability in surface sensible heat fluxes in general circulation models normally neglect the associated variability in mixed-layer depths. Observations and a numerical mesoscale model ...

J. C. Doran; S. Zhong

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Laboratory Model of Thermocline Depth and Exchange Fluxes across Circumpolar Fronts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory experiment has been constructed to investigate the possibility that the equilibrium depth of a circumpolar front is set by a balance between the rate at which potential energy is created by mechanical and buoyancy forcing and the ...

Claudia Cenedese; John Marshall; J. A. Whitehead

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Comparison and Uncertainty of Aerosol Optical Depth Estimates Derived from Spectral and Broadband Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental comparison of spectral aerosol optical depth ?a,? derived from measurements by two spectral radiometers [a LI-COR, Inc., LI-1800 spectroradiometer and a Centre Suisse d'Electronique et de Microtechnique (CSEM) SPM2000 sun ...

Thomas Carlund; Tomas Landelius; Weine Josefsson

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Broadband Extinction Method to Determine Aerosol Optical Depth from Accumulated Direct Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are two important problems in the aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals from hourly/daily/monthly accumulated pyrheliometer data, that is, how to select a suitable cosine of the solar zenith angle (?0) and how to eliminate or minimize ...

Jinhuan Qiu

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use of Rapid Temperature Measurements at a 2-Meter Depth to Augment Deeper Temperature Gradient Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

417

Retrieval of Optical Depth for Heavy Smoke Aerosol Plumes: Uncertainties and Sensitivities to the Optical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with uncertainties in the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-based retrieval of optical depth for heavy smoke aerosol plumes generated from forest fires that occurred in Canada due to a lack of knowledge on ...

Jeff Wong; Zhanqing Li

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Bottom Stress in Wind-Driven Depth-Averaged Coastal Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship between depth-averaged velocity and bottom stress for purely wind-driven flows in unstratified coastal waters is examined using a one-dimensional (vertically resolving) current model. Results indicate that conventional drag laws ...

Harry L. Jenter; Ole Secher Madsen

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Potential for Improved Boundary Layer Cloud Optical Depth Retrievals from the Multiple Directions of MISR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) views the earth with nine cameras, ranging from a 70 zenith angle viewing forward through nadir to 70 viewing aft. MISR does not have an operational cloud optical depth retrieval algorithm, but ...

K. Franklin Evans; Alexander Marshak; Tams Vrnai

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Remote Sensing of Cirrus Cloud Particle Size and Optical Depth Using Polarimetric Sensor Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a conceptual approach toward the remote sensing of cirrus cloud particle size and optical depth using the degree of polarization and polarized reflectance associated with the first three Stokes parameters, I, Q, and U, for the ...

S. C. Ou; K. N. Liou; Y. Takano; R. L. Slonaker

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evaluations of Mesoscale Models' Simulations of Near-Surface Winds, Temperature Gradients, and Mixing Depths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoscale meteorological models are being used to provide inputs of winds, vertical temperature and stability structure, mixing depths, and other parameters to atmospheric transport and dispersion models. An evaluation methodology is suggested ...

Steven R. Hanna; Ruixin Yang

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Instrumentation to Measure the Depth/Time Fluctuations in Acoustic Pulses Propagated through Arctic Internal Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instrumentation for measuring the evolution of volume-scattered acoustic signals in both depth and time is described. Measurements were taken for 12 days during the spring of 1985 with transmitters and receivers suspended beneath arctic pack ice ...

Terry E. Ewart; Stephen A. Reynolds

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Case Study of the Morning Evolution of the Convective Boundary Layer Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the importance of the convective boundary layer depth (CBLD) in determining pollutant concentrations near the surface, a study of the morning evolution of the convective boundary layer was carried out at the Central Nuclear de Almaraz, ...

Jos A. Garc; Mar L. Cancillo; Jos L. Cano

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Application of Sun/star photometry to derive the aerosol optical depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols play a crucial role in the radiative transfer and chemical processes that control the Earth's climate. Aerosol optical depth and other related aerosol characteristics are widely known during daytime through Sun photometers, and so ...

D. Perez-Ramirez; B. Ruiz; J. Aceituno; F. J. Olmo; L. Alados-Arboledas

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Wave- and Wind-Driven Flow in Water of Finite Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors first derive both Coriolis-induced and viscosity-induced stresses for arbitrary water depth and arbitrary wave direction. Opportunity is taken here to succinctly and rigorously derive the Longuet-Higgins virtual tangential stress due ...

Zhigang Xu; A. J. Bowen

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Spatial Inhomogeneities and the Spectral Behavior of Atmospheric Aerosol Optical Depth over the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the results of investigations into atmospheric aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the Atlantic Ocean are discussed. The data were collected during five shipboard expeditions that took place between 1989 and 1996. Measurements were ...

Sergey M. Sakerin; Dmitry M. Kabanov

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Optical Depth of Overcast Cloud across Canada: Estimates Based on Surface Pyranometer and Satellite Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Overcast cloud optical depths ? are inferred from hourly, broadband surface pyranometer measurements of global irradiance for 21 Canadian stations. A radiative transfer model that treats the atmosphere as plane-parallel and horizontally ...

H. W. Barker; T. J. Curtis; E. Leontieva; K. Stamnes

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

429

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0...

430

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory and Developmental...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory and Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

431

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Dry Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

432

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1940's: 4,232 ...

433

U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

434

Efficient Depth of Field Rasterization Using a Tile Test Based on Half-Space Culling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For depth of field (DOF) rasterization, it is often desired to have an efficient tile versus triangle test, which can conservatively compute which samples on the lens that need to execute the sample-in-triangle test. We present a novel test for this, ... Keywords: I.3.7 [Computer Graphics]: Three-Dimensional Graphics and RealismVisible line/surface algorithms, culling, depth of field, rasterization

Tomas Akenine-Mller; Robert Toth; Jacob Munkberg; Jon Hasselgren

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Non-destructive in-situ method and apparatus for determining radionuclide depth in media  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A non-destructive method and apparatus which is based on in-situ gamma spectroscopy is used to determine the depth of radiological contamination in media such as concrete. An algorithm, Gamma Penetration Depth Unfolding Algorithm (GPDUA), uses point kernel techniques to predict the depth of contamination based on the results of uncollided peak information from the in-situ gamma spectroscopy. The invention is better, faster, safer, and/cheaper than the current practice in decontamination and decommissioning of facilities that are slow, rough and unsafe. The invention uses a priori knowledge of the contaminant source distribution. The applicable radiological contaminants of interest are any isotopes that emit two or more gamma rays per disintegration or isotopes that emit a single gamma ray but have gamma-emitting progeny in secular equilibrium with its parent (e.g., .sup.60 Co, .sup.235 U, and .sup.137 Cs to name a few). The predicted depths from the GPDUA algorithm using Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) simulations and laboratory experiments using .sup.60 Co have consistently produced predicted depths within 20% of the actual or known depth.

Xu, X. George (Clifton Park, NY); Naessens, Edward P. (West Point, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Design and Evaluation of Daylighting Applications of Holographic Glazings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design and Evaluation of Daylighting Applications of Holographic Glazings Design and Evaluation of Daylighting Applications of Holographic Glazings Title Design and Evaluation of Daylighting Applications of Holographic Glazings Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-44167 Year of Publication 1996 Authors Papamichael, Konstantinos M., Charles K. Ehrlich, and Gregory J. Ward Call Number LBNL-44167 Abstract When combined with appropriate electric lighting dimming controls, the use of daylight for ambient and task illumination can significantly reduce energy requirements in commercial buildings. While skylights can effectively illuminate any part of one-story buildings, conventional side windows can illuminate only a 15 ft - 20 ft (4.6 m - 6.1 m) depth of the building perimeter. Even so, the overall efficacy of daylight is limited, because side windows produce uneven distributions of daylight. Achieving adequate illumination at distances further away from the window results in excessive illumination near the window, which increases cooling loads from the associated solar heat gain. As a result, the use of larger apertures and/or higher transmittance glazings, to introduce daylight deeper than 15 ft - 20 ft (4.6 m - 6.1 m), may prove ineffective with respect to saving energy, because cooling load penalties may exceed the electric lighting savings.

437

Microsoft Word - S05827_WCR_Final.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

UC-1-P-1SRC Data UC-1-P-1SRC Data This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Well Completion Report for CAU 443 CNTA December 2009 Doc. No. S05827 Page D-1 Table D-1. UC-1-P-1SRC Chronology Date Time Depth (ft bgs) Activity 05/23/09 13:30 - 18:30 NA Position workover rig over the hole and pulled out about 50 ft of 4.5-in. casing. A steel die fell into hole and indications were that casing had separated during initial pulling. 05/24/09 06:00 - 09:00 NA Workover rig moves off the hole after pulling out about 480 ft of 4.5-in. casing. About 440 ft of casing had separated and is still in the hole. 05/26/09 14:35 NA DRI runs downhole camera into hole - too murky to see anything. 05/27/09 09:45 NA After pumping two water truck loads of water down the borehole, DRI reran the downhole camera into the borehole.

438

Evaluation of city well 1, Klamath Falls, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A city-wide geothermal space heating project is currently under development at Klamath Falls, Oregon. The first phase of the project will require two production wells. Geothermally heated water will be used to heat 14 city, county, state, and federal buildings. At peak load the heating system will require approximately 750 gpm of 200{sup 0}F (or greater) geothermal brine. The first production well was spudded on August 29, 1979. During drilling a major lost circulation zone was encountered between 340 and 360 ft depth. At this time the well was cleaned, reamed, cased to 300 ft, and then pump tested. The well was pumped for a total of 15 1/2 hr. A maximum flow rate of 680, with 77 ft of drawdown, was held constant for 7 1/2 hr. Discharge temperature was approximately 218{sup 0}F. Three observation wells were monitored to determine the impact of producing large quantities of brine on the many private geothermal wells already in use for space heating. Preliminary indications are that the water level decline in the area will be small (2 to 3 ft). However, further testing is recommended to determine the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on the water level decline.

Benson, S.M.; Goranson, C.B.; Schroeder, R.C.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured-geothermal resources in Texas. 1990 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In a five-county area of South Texas, geopressured-geothermal reservoirs in the upper Wilcox Group colocated with heavy-oil reservoirs in the overlying Jackson Group. In 1990, research at the Bureau of Economic Geology concentrated on evaluating the potential of using geopressured-geothermal water for hot-water flooding of heavy-oil reservoirs. Favorable geothermal reservoirs are defined by thick deltaic sandstones and growth-fault-bounded compartments. Potential geothermal reservoirs are present at a depth of 11,000 ft (3,350 m) to 15,000 ft (4,570 m) and contain water at temperatures of 350 F (177 C) to 383 F (195 C) in Fandango field, Zapata County. One potential geothermal reservoir sandstone in the upper Wilcox (R sandstone) is composed of a continuous sand body 100 ft (30 m) to greater than 200 ft (>61 m) thick. Fault blocks average 2 to 4 mi{sup 2} (5.2 to 10.4 km{sup 2}) in area.

Raney, J.A.; Seni, S.J.; DuBar, J.R.; Walter, T.G.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Geothermal Exploratory-Well Project: city of Alamosa, Colorado. Final report, September 1980-April 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Exploratory Well Project for the City of Alamosa, Colorado is summarized. In September, 1980, the City of Alamosa made application to the US Department of Energy for a program which, in essence, provided for the Department of Energy to insure that the City would not risk more than 10% of the total cost in the well if the well was a failure. If the well was a complete success, such as 650 gpm and 230/sup 0/F temperature, the City was responsible for 80% of the costs for drilling the well and there would be no further obligation from the Department of Energy. The well was drilled in November and early December, 1981, and remedial work was done in May and June 1982. The total drilled depth was 7118 ft. The well was cased to 4182 ft., with a slotted liner to 6084 ft. The maximum down hole temperature recorded was 190/sup 0/F at 6294 ft. Testing immediately following the remedial work indicated the well had virtually no potential to produce water.

Phetteplace, D.R.; Kunze, J.F.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 423: Area 3 Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Corrective Action Plan provides the closure methods for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 423: Area 3 Building 03-60 Underground Discharge Point (UDP), Tonoopah Test Range, Nevada. CAU 423 consists of the UDP and an associated discharge pipeline extending from Building 03-60. Corrective action investigations were completed in January 1998, and are documented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (US DOE, 1998). Results indicate an asymmetrical hydrocarbon plume, measuring 11 meters (m) 35 ft in length, 6 m (20 ft) in width, and 4 to 20 m (14 to 65 ft) in depth, has formed beneath the UDP and migrated westward. Petroleum hydrocarbon levels were identified above the 100 miligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) action level specified in Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 445A (NAC 1996). The highest petroleum hydrocarbon concentration detected was 2,4000 mg/kg at 6 m, 20 ft, below surface grade as diesel. Corrective actions will consist of administrative controls and in place closure of th e UDP and its associated discharge pipeline.

Bechtel Nevada

1998-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

Open cycle - OTEC turbine design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design of a low-pressure, open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system (OTEC) is described. Near-surface ocean water at 80 F is allowed to expand in a one-half psi evaporator for passage through a turbine cold water (40 F), pumped upward from a 3,000 ft depth, is used to recondense the steam. Plans for a 2.5-3 MWe prototype plant, as a proof-of-principle project for a 100 MWe plant, include seawater pumps driven off the generator shaft, potable water as a by-product of the condensor, ease of access for O and M, and an integrated, gear-driven deaerator system with reinjection into the warm seawater discharge. An inlet flow of 3,000,000 cu ft/sec, a single stage vertical turbine with 40 ft fiber reinforced composite blades, 200 rpm operation on a 65 ft diameter disk, and an overall efficiency of 3% are features of the 100 MWe plant. A flowfield analysis, a velocity triangle analysis, and a structural dynamics analysis are outlined, along with materials applications and manufacturing process considerations in blade design. The 3MWe OTEC will be one-sixth the size of a 100MWe OTEC.

Coleman, W.H. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Lester, PA); Rogers, J.D. (TM Development, Inc., Chester, PA); Thompson, D.F. (Delaware University, Newark, DE)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Industrial food processing and space heating with geothermal heat. Final report, February 16, 1979-August 31, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A competitive aware for a cost sharing program was made to Madison County, Idaho to share in a program to develop moderate-to-low temperature geothermal energy for the heating of a large junior college, business building, public shcools and other large buildings in Rexburg, Idaho. A 3943 ft deep well was drilled at the edge of Rexburg in a region that had been probed by some shallower test holes. Temperatures measured near the 4000 ft depth were far below what was expected or needed, and drilling was abandoned at that depth. In 1981 attempts were made to restrict downward circulation into the well, but the results of this effort yielded no higher temperatures. The well is a prolific producer of 70/sup 0/F water, and could be used as a domestic water well.

Kunze, J.F.; Marlor, J.K.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Hot dry rock energy project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A proof-of-concept experimental project by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory endeavors to establish the feasibility of exploitation of the thermal energy contained in the earth's crust where such energy and a transporting fluid have not been juxtaposed in nature. A region of high heat flow and apparently unfaulted basement rock formation was selected. Two boreholes, drilled to a total depth of about 3 km (10,000 ft) and penetrating about 2.5 km (7500 ft) into the Precambrian formation, to a rock temperature of 200/sup 0/C, have been connected at depth by a hydraulically fractured zone to form the heat extraction surface. Energy was extracted at a rate of 3.2 MW(t) with water temperature of 132/sup 0/C during a 96-h preliminary circulating test run performed late in September 1977. This paper traces the progress of the project, summarizes procedures and salient events, and references detailed reports and specialized topics.

Hendron, R.H.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 25 Vehicle Washdown. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was performed during March 1999 at each CAS. Soil samples were collected at each CAS using a direct-push method. Soil samples were collected from the surface to depths of up to 2.7 m (9 ft) below ground surface. In addition, the gravel sump at CAS 25-07-02 (F and J Roads Pad) was sampled using a backhoe. Soil samples were collected from depths of 0 to 0.6 m (0 to 2 ft) below the gravel layer in the sump.

D. S. Tobiason

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Surveys of Velocity Downstream of Albeni Falls Dam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Seattle District, is studying the potential to locate fish bypass systems at Albeni Falls Dam. The USACE requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to survey velocity magnitude and direction in the dam tailrace. The empirical data collected will be used to support future numerical modeling, physical modeling, and evaluation of fish bypass system alternatives. In May 2010, PNNL conducted velocity surveys of the Albeni Falls Dam using a boat-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler. The surveys were conducted over three days (May 25 through 27). During the survey period, total river discharge at the dam varied between 30.2 and 31.0 kcfs. A small amount of spill discharge, 2 kcfs, was present on two days (May 26 and 27). This report presents data plots showing measured velocity direction and magnitude averaged over the entire depth and over 5-ft depth increments from 5 to 30 ft.

Perkins, William A.; Titzler, P. Scott; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Kallio, Sara E.; Bellgraph, Brian J.

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Depth profiling the optical absorption and thermal reflection coefficient via an analysis based on the method of images (abstract)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of depth profiling optical absorption in a thermally depth variable solid is a problem of direct interest for the analysis of complex structured materials. In this work

J. F. Power

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Importance of Using Observations of Mixing Depths in order to Avoid Large Prediction Errors by a Transport and Dispersion Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixing depth of the boundary layer is an input to most atmospheric transport and dispersion (ATD) models, which obtain mixing depths in one of four ways: 1) observations by radiosondes, sodars, or other devices; 2) simulations by regional or ...

J. M. White; J. F. Bowers; S. R. Hanna; J. K. Lundquist

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

ARM: 10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

10-minute Raman Lidar: aerosol depolarization profiles and single layer cloud optical depths from first Turner algorithm

Rob Newsom; John Goldsmith

450

Depth Profiles of Radionuclides Induced in Shielding Concrete of the 12 GeV Proton Accelerator Facility at KEK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Depth Profiles of Radionuclides Induced in Shielding Concrete of the 12 GeV Proton Accelerator Facility at KEK

Miura, T; Ishihama, S; Ohotsuka, N; Kunifuda, T

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Exploration and Resource Assessment at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho Using an Integrated Team Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Air Force is facing a number of challenges as it moves into the future, one of the biggest being how to provide safe and secure energy to support base operations. A team of scientists and engineers met at Mountain Home Air Force Base near Boise, Idaho, to discuss the possibility of exploring for geothermal resources under the base. The team identified that there was a reasonable potential for geothermal resources based on data from an existing well. In addition, a regional gravity map helped identify several possible locations for drilling a new well. The team identified several possible sources of funding for this wellthe most logical being to use U.S. Department of Energy funds to drill the upper half of the well and U.S. Air Force funds to drill the bottom half of the well. The well was designed as a slimhole well in accordance with State of Idaho Department of Water Resources rules and regulations. Drilling operations commenced at the Mountain Home site in July of 2011 and were completed in January of 2012. Temperatures increased gradually, especially below a depth of 2000 ft. Temperatures increased more rapidly below a depth of 5500 ft. The bottom of the well is at 5976 ft, where a temperature of about 140C was recorded. The well flowed artesian from a depth below 5600 ft, until it was plugged off with drilling mud. Core samples were collected from the well and are being analyzed to help understand permeability at depth. Additional tests using a televiewer system will be run to evaluate orientation and directions at fractures, especially in the production zone. A final report on the well exploitation will be forthcoming later this year. The Air Force will use it to evaluate the geothermal resource potential for future private development options at Mountain Home AFB.

Joseph C. Armstrong; Robert P. Breckenridge; Dennis L. Nielson; John W. Shervais; Thomas R. Wood

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho Geothermal Resource Assessment and Future Recommendations  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Air Force is facing a number of challenges as it moves into the future, one of the biggest being how to provide safe and secure energy to support base operations. A team of scientists and engineers met at Mountain Home Air Force Base in early 2011 near Boise, Idaho, to discuss the possibility of exploring for geothermal resources under the base. The team identified that there was a reasonable potential for geothermal resources based on data from an existing well. In addition, a regional gravity map helped identify several possible locations for drilling a new well. The team identified several possible sources of funding for this wellthe most logical being to use U.S. Department of Energy funds to drill the upper half of the well and U.S. Air Force funds to drill the bottom half of the well. The well was designed as a slimhole well in accordance with State of Idaho Department of Water Resources rules and regulations. Drilling operations commenced at the Mountain Home site in July of 2011 and were completed in January of 2012. Temperatures increased gradually, especially below a depth of 2000 ft. Temperatures increased more rapidly below a depth of 5500 ft. The bottom of the well is at 5976 ft, where a temperature of about 140C was recorded. The well flowed artesian from a depth below 5600 ft, until it was plugged off with drilling mud. Core samples were collected from the well and are being analyzed to help understand permeability at depth. Additional tests using a televiewer system will be run to evaluate orientation and directions at fractures, especially in the production zone. A final report on the well exploitation will be forthcoming later this year. The Air Force will use it to evaluate the geothermal resource potential for future private development options at Mountain Home Air Force Base. In conclusion, Recommendation for follow-up efforts include the following:

Joseph C. Armstrong; Robert P. Breckenridge; Dennis L. Nielson; John W. Shervais; Thomas R. Wood

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Description of a high temperature downhole fluid sampler  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Downhole fluid samplers have been used for years with limited success in high temperature geothermal wells. This paper discusses the development and operating principles of a high temperature downhole fluid sampler, reliable at obtaining samples at temperatures of up to 350/sup 0/C. The sampler was used successfully for recovering a brine sample from a depth of 10,200 ft in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project well.

Solbau, R.; Weres, O.; Hansen, L.; Dudak, B.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Completion report: Raft River Geothermal Injection Well Six (RRGI-6)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Raft River Geothermal Injection Well Six (RRGI-6) is an intermediate-depth injection well designed to accept injection water in the 600 to 1000 m (2000 to 3500 ft) depth range. It has one barefoot leg, and it was drilled so that additional legs can be added later; if there are problems with intermediate-depth injection, one or more additional legs could be directionally drilled from the current well bore. Included are the reports of daily drilling records of drill bits, casings, and loggings, and descriptions of cementing, coring, and containment.

Miller, L.G.; Prestwich, S.M.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Daily snow depth measurements from 195 stations in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a database containing daily measurements of snow depth at 195 National Weather Service (NWS) first-order climatological stations in the United States. The data have been assembled and made available by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) in Asheville, North Carolina. The 195 stations encompass 388 unique sampling locations in 48 of the 50 states; no observations from Delaware or Hawaii are included in the database. Station selection criteria emphasized the quality and length of station records while seeking to provide a network with good geographic coverage. Snow depth at the 388 locations was measured once per day on ground open to the sky. The daily snow depth is the total depth of the snow on the ground at measurement time. The time period covered by the database is 1893--1992; however, not all station records encompass the complete period. While a station record ideally should contain daily data for at least the seven winter months (January through April and October through December), not all stations have complete records. Each logical record in the snow depth database contains one station`s daily data values for a period of one month, including data source, measurement, and quality flags.

Allison, L.J. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Easterling, D.R.; Jamason, P.; Bowman, D.P.; Hughes, P.Y.; Mason, E.H. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Asheville, NC (United States). National Climatic Data Center

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

The depth of the oil/brine interface and crude oil leaks in SPR caverns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monitoring wellhead pressure evolution is the best method of detecting crude oil leaks in SPR caverns while oil/brine interface depth measurements provide additional insight. However, to fully utilize the information provided by these interface depth measurements, a thorough understanding of how the interface movement corresponds to cavern phenomena, such as salt creep, crude oil leakage, and temperature equilibration, as well as to wellhead pressure, is required. The time evolution of the oil/brine interface depth is a function of several opposing factors. Cavern closure due to salt creep and crude oil leakage, if present, move the interface upward. Brine removal and temperature equilibration of the oil/brine system move the interface downward. Therefore, the relative magnitudes of these factors determine the net direction of interface movement. Using a mass balance on the cavern fluids, coupled with a simplified salt creep model for closure in SPR caverns, the movement of the oil/brine interface has been predicted for varying cavern configurations, including both right-cylindrical and carrot-shaped caverns. Three different cavern depths and operating pressures have been investigated. In addition, the caverns were investigated at four different points in time, allowing for varying extents of temperature equilibration. Time dependent interface depth changes of a few inches to a few feet were found to be characteristic of the range of cases studied. 5 refs, 19 figs., 1 tab.

Heffelfinger, G.S.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Extraction of depth-dependent perturbation factors for silicon diodes using a plastic scintillation detector  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: This work presents the experimental extraction of the perturbation factor in megavoltage electron beams for three models of silicon diodes (IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded) using a plastic scintillation detector (PSD). Methods: The authors used a single scanning PSD mounted on a high-precision scanning tank to measure depth-dose curves in 6-, 12-, and 18-MeV clinical electron beams. They also measured depth-dose curves using the IBA Dosimetry, EFD and SFD, and the PTW 60012 unshielded diodes. The authors used the depth-dose curves measured with the PSD as a perturbation-free reference to extract the perturbation factors of the diodes. Results: The authors found that the perturbation factors for the diodes increased substantially with depth, especially for low-energy electron beams. The experimental results show the same trend as published Monte Carlo simulation results for the EFD diode; however, the perturbations measured experimentally were greater. They found that using an effective point of measurement (EPOM) placed slightly away from the source reduced the variation of perturbation factors with depth and that the optimal EPOM appears to be energy dependent. Conclusions: The manufacturer recommended EPOM appears to be incorrect at low electron energy (6 MeV). In addition, the perturbation factors for diodes may be greater than predicted by Monte Carlo simulations.

Lacroix, Frederic; Guillot, Mathieu; McEwen, Malcolm; Gingras, Luc; Beaulieu, Luc [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal (CHUM), 1560 Sherbrooke est, Montreal, Quebec H2L 4M1, Canada and Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, Pavillon Roger-Gaudry (D-428), 2900 Boul. Edouard-Montpetit, Montreal, Quebec H3T 1J4 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4, Quebec, Canada and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Ionizing Radiation Standards, Institute for National Measurement Standards, National Research Council (NRC), Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada); Departement de Physique, de Genie Physique et d'Optique, Universite Laval, Quebec G1K 7P4, Quebec, Canada and Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Quebec (CHUQ), Quebec, Quebec G1R 2J6 (Canada)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

458

In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs In-Depth: Cleantech at the National Labs January 7, 2014 - 5:30pm Addthis These solar power collection dishes at Sandia National Labs' National Solar Thermal Test Facility are capable of some of the highest solar to electricity conversion. In January 2008, this technology set a new solar-to-grid system conversion efficiency record of 31.25 percent net efficiency rate; the technology is still available to benefit the U.S. by delivering power at all hours of the day by implementing thermal energy storage. CSP with storage provides important benefits to integrate more renewable energy to our electric power supply by mitigating resource variability and satisfying peak demand after sunset. | Photo courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories.

459

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent magnetization in an exchange-biased sample. These results provide atomic-level insights into the mechanism of exchange bias, specifically the involvement of mutual interactions between two kinds of uncompensated spins in the antiferromagnet and spins in the ferromagnet.

460

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, MISR, and MODIS Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Joint histograms of Cloud Top Height (CTH) and Optical Depth (OD) derived by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are being widely used by the climate modeling community in evaluating global climate models. Similar joint histograms of CTH-OD are now being produced by the NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments. There are notable differences in the histograms being produced by these three projects. In this poster we analyze some of the differences and discuss how the

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print Depth Profile of Uncompensated Spins in an Exchange-Bias System Print The phenomenon known as exchange bias at the interface between a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet is currently a subject of intense research because of its applications in the magnetic recording and read-head industries. An international collaboration headed by researchers from the University of California, San Diego, has used resonant x-ray scattering and polarized-neutron reflectometry to determine the depth-dependent magnetization in an exchange-biased sample. These results provide atomic-level insights into the mechanism of exchange bias, specifically the involvement of mutual interactions between two kinds of uncompensated spins in the antiferromagnet and spins in the ferromagnet.

462

A multi-detector, digitizer based neutron depth profiling device for characterizing thin film materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron depth profiling (NDP) is a mature, nondestructive technique used to characterize the concentration of certain light isotopes in a material as a function of depth by measuring the residual energy of charged particles in neutron induced reactions. Historically, NDP has been performed using a single detector, resulting in low intrinsic detection efficiency, and limiting the technique largely to high flux research reactors. In this work, we describe a new NDP instrument design with higher detection efficiency by way of spectrum summing across multiple detectors. Such a design is capable of acquiring a statistically significant charged particle spectrum at facilities limited in neutron flux and operation time.

Mulligan, P. L.; Cao, L. R.; Turkoglu, D. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

463

Comparison of two hot dry rock geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal energy reservoirs were created by hydraulic fracturing of granite at 2.7 to 3.0 km (9000 to 10,000 ft) at the Fenton Hill site, near the Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico. Both reservoirs are research reservoirs, in the sense that both are fairly small, generally yielding 5 MWt or less, and are intended to serve as the basic building blocks of commercial-sized reservoirs, consisting of 10 to 15 similar fractures that would yield approximately 35 MWt over a 10 to 20 yr period. Both research reservoirs were created in the same well-pair, with energy extraction well number 1 (EE-1) serving as the injection well, and geothermal test well number 2 (GT-2) serving as the extraction, or production, well. The first reservoir was created in the low permeability host rock by fracturing EE-1 at a depth of 2.75 km (9020 ft) where the indigenous temperature was 185/sup 0/C (364/sup 0/F). A second, larger reservoir was formed by extending a small, existing fracture at 2.93 km (9620 ft) in the injection well about 100 m deeper and 10/sup 0/C hotter than the first reservoir. The resulting large fracture propagated upward to about 2.6 km (8600 ft) and appeared to Rave an inlet-to-outlet spacing of 300m (1000 ft), more then three times that of the first fracture. Comparisons are made with the first reservoir. Evaluation of the new reservoir was accomplished in two steps: (1) with a 23-day heat extraction experiment that began October 23, 1979, and (2) a second, longer-term heat extraction experiment still in progress, which as of November 25, 1980 has been in effect for 260 days. The results of this current experiment are compared with earlier experiments.

Murphy, H.D.; Tester, J.W.; Potter, R.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probing the Depths of CSP-M: A new fdr-compliant Validation Tool Michael Leuschel and Marc Fontaine,fontaine}@cs.uni-duesseldorf.de Abstract. We present a new animation and model checking tool for CSP. The tool covers the CSP-M language in the source code, has an LTL model checker and can be used for combined CSP B specifications. During

Southampton, University of

465

{sup 152}Eu depths profiles granite and concrete cores exposed to the Hiroshima atomic bomb  

SciTech Connect

Two granite and two concrete core samples were obtained within 500 m from the hypocenter of the Hiroshima atomic bomb, and the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu was measured to evaluate the incident neutron spectrum. The granite cores were obtained from a pillar of the Motoyasu Bridge located 101 m from the hypocenter and from a granite rock in the Shirakami Shrine (379 m); the concrete cores were obtained from a gate in the Gokoku Shrine (398 m) and from top of the Hiroshima bank (250 m). The profiles of the specific activities of the cores were measured to a depth of 40 cm from the surface using low background germanium (Ge) spectrometers. According to the measured depth profiles, relaxation lengths of incident neutrons were derived as 13.6 cm for Motoyasu Bridge pillar (granite), 12.2 cm for Shirakami Shrine core (granite), and 9.6 cm for concrete cores of Gokoku Shrine and Hiroshima Bank. In addition, a comparison of the granite cores in Hiroshima showed good agreement with Nagasaki data. Present results indicates that the depth profile of {sup 152}Eu reflects incident neutrons not so high but in the epithermal region. 19 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs.

Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan); Oka, Takamitsu [Kure Univ. (Japan)] [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Spatial-Temporal Fusion for High Accuracy Depth Maps Using Dynamic MRFs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Time-of-flight range sensors and passive stereo have complimentary characteristics in nature. To fuse them to get high accuracy depth maps varying over time, we extend traditional spatial MRFs to dynamic MRFs with temporal coherence. This new model allows ... Keywords: Stereo, MRFs, time-of-flight sensor, data fusion, global optimization.

Jiejie Zhu; Liang Wang; Jizhou Gao; Ruigang Yang

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Using hydrodynamic modeling for estimating flooding and water depths in grand bay, alabama  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a methodology for using hydrodynamic modeling to estimate inundation areas and water depths during a hurricane event. The Environmental Fluid Dynamic Code (EFDC) is used in this research. EFDC is one of the most commonly applied models ... Keywords: EFDC, flooding, grand bay, grid generation, hydrodynamics, inundation, modeling

Vladimir J. Alarcon; William H. McAnally

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The relationship between tibetan snow depth, ENSO, river discharge and the monsoons of Bangladesh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The relationship between tibetan snow depth, ENSO, river discharge and the monsoons of Bangladesh, we examine the interannual variability of the monsoon rains of Bangladesh, an area greatly affected of Bengal storm surge. For the twentieth century, we found Bangladesh monsoon rainfall (BMR

469

A Generalized Depth-Integrated Model of the Oceanic Mixed Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generalized depth-integrated model of the oceanic mixed layer is developed by considering the heat and energy budgets of the upper ocean. Unlike the KrausTurner-type bulk models, the assumptions of an a priori well mixed layer and a positive ...

P. Ravindran; Daniel G. Wright; Trevor Platt; Shubha Sathyendranath

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Remote sensing of breaking wave phase speeds with application to non-linear depth inversions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote sensing of breaking wave phase speeds with application to non-linear depth inversions high-resolution remote sensing video and surface elevation records from fixed, in-situ wave gages. Wave phase speeds are extracted from the remote sensing data using a feature tracking technique, and local

Haller, Merrick

471

Maximum Neutral Buoyancy Depth of Juvenile Chinook Salmon: Implications for Survival during Hydroturbine Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the maximum depth at which juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha can acclimate by attaining neutral buoyancy. Depth of neutral buoyancy is dependent upon the volume of gas within the swim bladder, which greatly influences the occurrence of injuries to fish passing through hydroturbines. We used two methods to obtain maximum swim bladder volumes that were transformed into depth estimations - the increased excess mass test (IEMT) and the swim bladder rupture test (SBRT). In the IEMT, weights were surgically added to the fishes exterior, requiring the fish to increase swim bladder volume in order to remain neutrally buoyant. SBRT entailed removing and artificially increasing swim bladder volume through decompression. From these tests, we estimate the maximum acclimation depth for juvenile Chinook salmon is a median of 6.7m (range = 4.6-11.6 m). These findings have important implications to survival estimates, studies using tags, hydropower operations, and survival of juvenile salmon that pass through large Kaplan turbines typical of those found within the Columbia and Snake River hydropower system.

Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Depth control of remotely operated underwater vehicles using an adaptive fuzzy sliding mode controller  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sliding mode control, due to its robustness against modelling imprecisions and external disturbances, has been successfully employed to the dynamic positioning of remotely operated underwater vehicles. In order to improve the performance of the complete ... Keywords: Adaptive algorithms, Depth control, Fuzzy logic, Nonlinear control, Remotely operated vehicles, Sliding modes

Wallace M. Bessa; Max S. Dutra; Edwin Kreuzer

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Nonlinear Properties of Random Gravity Waves in Water of Finite Depth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The weakly nonlinear theory for a stationary and homogeneous field of random gravity waves in water of finite depth is developed to the third order. This describes the second-order nonlinearities as a bound wavefield that can be expressed in ...

A. K. Laing

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Low-Frequency Pycnocline Depth Variability at Ocean Weather Station P in the Northeast Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-frequency variability of the depth of the main pycnocline at Ocean Weather Station P and over the northeast Pacific is examined in terms of the one-dimensional response to local Ekman pumping according to the Hasselmann stochastic climate ...

Patrick F. Cummins; Gary S. E. Lagerloef

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Stable Boundary Layer Depth from High-Resolution Measurements of the Mean Wind Profile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The depth h of the stable boundary layer (SBL) has long been an elusive measurement. In this diagnostic study the use of high-quality, high-resolution (?z = 10 m) vertical profile data of the mean wind U(z) and streamwise variance ?u2(z) is ...

Yelena L. Pichugina; Robert M. Banta

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

A satisfiability algorithm for constant depth boolean circuits with unbounded fan-in gates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Boolean Circuits with Unbounded Fan-In Gates A dissertationAC 0 by allowing unbounded fan-in M OD m 1 , . . . , M OD mSince each gate in ? has fan-in at most k and ? has depth D

Matthews, William Grant

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

IEA BESTEST Multi-Zone Non-Airflow In-Depth Diagnostic Cases: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper documents a set of in-depth diagnostic test cases for multi-zone heat transfer models that do not include the heat and mass transfer effects of airflow between zones. The multi-zone non-airflow test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST (Judkoff and Neymark 1995a).

Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Alexander, D.; Felsmann, C.; Strachan, P.; Wijsman, A.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Electronic equilibrium as a function of depth in tissue from Cobalt-60 point source exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has set the basic criteria for assessing skin dose stemming from hot particle contaminations. Compliance with IO CFR 20. 1 01 requires that exposure to the skin be evaluated over a I CM2 area at a depth of 0.007 cm. Skin exposure can arise from both the beta and gamma components of radioactive particles and gamma radiation can contribute significantly to skin doses. The gamma component of dose increases dramatically when layers of protective clothing are interposed between the hot particle source and the skin, and in cases where the hot particle is large in comparison to the range of beta particles. Once the protective clothing layer is thicker than the maximum range of the beta particles, skin dose is due solely to gamma radiation. Charged particle equilibrium is not established at shallow depths. The degree of electronic equilibrium establishment must be assessed for shallow doses to prevent the overassessment of skin dose because conventional fluence-to-dose conversion factors are not applicable. To assess the effect of electronic equilibrium, selected thicknesses of tissue equivalent material were interposed between radiochromic dye film and a 6OCo hot particle source and dose was measured as a function of depth. These measured values were then compared to models which are used to calculate charged particle equilibrium. The Miller-Reece model was found to agree closely with the experimental data while the Lantz-Lambert model overestimated dose at shallow depths.

Myrick, Jo Ann

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Subcentimeter depth resolution using a single-photon counting time-of-flight laser ranging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a single-mode telecommunications fiber to the rest of the optical ranging system. This type of detector of of the reflected laser sig- nal, which is focused into a multimode optical fiber. An in-line bandpass interferenceSubcentimeter depth resolution using a single-photon counting time-of-flight laser ranging system

Buller, Gerald S.

480

Dust Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieval over a Desert Surface Using the SEVIRI Window Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a new algorithm to retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) over a desert using the window channels centered at 8.7, 10.8, and 12.0 ?m of the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) instrument on board the Meteosat ...

Bart De Paepe; Steven Dewitte

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ft depth ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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481

Property:Description | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This is a property of type Text. This is a property of type Text. Pages using the property "Description" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Automated data acquisition and control system 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Automated data acquisition and control system 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Automated data acquisition and control system 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Automated data acquisition and control system 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Automated data acquisition and control system 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Automated data acquisition and control system 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Automated data acquisition and control system A Alden Large Flume + Differential pressure transducers, acoustic profiling, propeller meters, load cells, computer data acquisition systems.

482

Property:Programmable Wavemaking | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programmable Wavemaking Programmable Wavemaking Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Programmable Wavemaking Property Type String Pages using the property "Programmable Wavemaking" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Yes + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Yes + A Alden Large Flume + Yes + Alden Small Flume + Yes + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + No + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + Yes + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + Yes + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + Yes + Chase Tow Tank + Yes + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + Yes +

483

CX-004740: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40: Categorical Exclusion Determination 40: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004740: Categorical Exclusion Determination Install Amonix Panels at National Solar Thermal Test Facility CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11/23/2010 Location(s): New Mexico Office(s): Sandia Site Office Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) proposes to install Amonix solar systems at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF). The proposed activities would involve the installation of 7 to 9 solar arrays at the NSTTF. Each 72-feet (ft) by 49-ft array would be mounted onto a large steel pipe, anchored into a concrete pedestal; approximately 6-ft in diameter. Each pipe would extend 18-ft into the ground and 20-ft in height from ground level. Each array would be spaced 110-ft North to South and 140-ft East to West on center.

484

Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.2 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.5 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.4 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 0.6 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.2 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.5 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.4 + A Alden Large Flume + 0.0 + Alden Small Flume + 0.2 + Alden Wave Basin + 0.3 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.6 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.6 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.6 +

485

Property:Overseeing Organization | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overseeing Organization Overseeing Organization Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Overseeing Organization Property Type Page Pages using the property "Overseeing Organization" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) + A Alden Large Flume + Alden Research Laboratory, Inc +

486

Property:Length(m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Length(m) Length(m) Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String, and provides a complied list of the lengths of various hydrodynamic testing facilities. Pages using the property "Length(m)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 45.1 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 63.4 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 77.4 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 61.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 45.1 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 63.4 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 105.2 + A Alden Large Flume + 24.4 + Alden Small Flume + 17.1 + Alden Tow Tank + 30.5 + Alden Wave Basin + 33.5 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 121.9 + Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + 9.8 + C Carderock Circulating Water Channel + 18.3 + Carderock Large Cavitation Tunnel + 13.1 +

487

Buildings Included on EMS Reports"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Buildings Included on EMS Reports" "Site","Property Name","Property ID","GSF","Incl. in Water Baseline (CY2007)","Water Baseline (sq. ft.)","Water CY2008 (sq. ft.)","Water CY2009 (sq. ft.)","Water Notes","Incl. in Energy Baseline (CY2003)","Energy Baseline (sq. ft.)","CY2008 Energy (sq. ft.)","CY2009 Energy (sq. ft.)","Energy Notes","Included as Existing Building","CY2008 Existing Building (sq. ft.)","Reason for Building Exclusion" "Column Totals",,"Totals",115139,,10579,10579,22512,,,3183365,26374,115374,,,99476 "Durango, CO, Disposal/Processing Site","STORAGE SHED","DUD-BLDG-STORSHED",100,"no",,,,,"no",,,,"OSF","no",,"Less than 5,000 GSF"

488

Property:Simulated Beach | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Simulated Beach Simulated Beach Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Simulated Beach Property Type String Pages using the property "Simulated Beach" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + No + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + No + A Alden Large Flume + No + Alden Small Flume + No + Alden Wave Basin + Yes + B Breakwater Research Facility + No + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + Yes + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + Yes + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + Yes + Chase Tow Tank + No + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + No + Coastal Inlet Model Facility + No +

489

Data:8544a14f-595a-4526-bb6c-5b96bac6052d | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

95a-4526-bb6c-5b96bac6052d 95a-4526-bb6c-5b96bac6052d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: A & N Electric Coop Effective date: 2008/01/02 End date if known: Rate name: Former Delmarva Power Territory: Public Lighting Service-Outdoor Lighting-Mercury Vapor-Existing Pole-175 W Sector: Lighting Description: Estimated Monthly Average Usage: 70kWh Additional Monthly Charges: Ornamental or Decorative Luminaires, $2.12 Poles Wood 25ft - 40 ft, $4.23 Fiberglass or Aluminum, Embedded, less than 25 ft, $4.23 Fiberglass or Aluminum, Embedded,25 ft- 35 ft, $8.47 Fiberglass or Aluminum, Bolt Base, without foundation, 25 ft- 35 ft, $9.42

490

Property:Available Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sensors Sensors Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Available Sensors Property Type Text Pages using the property "Available Sensors" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... A Alden Large Flume + Pressure Range(psi), Velocity, Displacement, ...

491

Assess in-depth contributions of selected scenarios to goals across sectors  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in-depth contributions of selected scenarios to goals across sectors in-depth contributions of selected scenarios to goals across sectors Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3c LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and previous sustainable development efforts in the country 2.3. Assess public and private sector capacity to support initiatives 2.4. Assess and improve the national GHG inventory and other

492

Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Effective Evaluation of the Effective Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings J. Woods, J. Winkler, and D. Christensen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5500-57441 January 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Moisture Penetration Depth Model for Estimating Moisture Buffering in Buildings J. Woods, J. Winkler, and D. Christensen National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. BE12.0201

493

Exact method for determining subsurface radioactivity depth profiles from gamma spectroscopy measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subsurface radioactivity may be due to transport of radionuclides from a contaminated surface into the solid volume, as occurs for radioactive fallout deposited on soil, or from fast neutron activation of a solid volume, as occurs in concrete blocks used for radiation shielding. For purposes including fate and transport studies of radionuclides in the environment, decommissioning and decontamination of radiation facilities, and nuclear forensics, an in situ, nondestructive method for ascertaining the subsurface distribution of radioactivity is desired. The method developed here obtains a polynomial expression for the radioactivity depth profile, using a small set of gamma-ray count rates measured by a collimated detector directed towards the surface at a variety of angles with respect to the surface normal. To demonstrate its capabilities, this polynomial method is applied to the simple case where the radioactivity is maximal at the surface and decreases exponentially with depth below the surface, and to the ...

Van Siclen, Clinton DeW

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Interferometric measurement of melt depth in silicon using femtosecond infrared Cr:forsterite laser  

SciTech Connect

Interferometric microscopy technique combined with high power infrared Cr:forsterite laser system was applied to investigate femtosecond laser induced melting of silicon. Optically polished wafer of single crystalline silicon of 400 {mu}m thickness was irradiated with 100 fs pump pulses at second harmonic wavelength of 620 nm. We used infrared probe pulses at main wavelength of 1240 nm, whose photon energy was less than the band gap width E{sub g} = 1.12eV of silicon, and the penetration depth of probe essentially exceeded the sample thickness. Unlike many previous experiments with Ti:sapphire lasers it allowed us to probe the heated area from the rear side of the sample and obtain the data on melt depth after laser irradiation.

Ashitkov, Sergey I.; Ovchinnikov, Andrey V.; Agranat, Mikhail B. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

495

Surface hardening of titanium alloys with melting depth controlled by heat sink  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for forming a hard surface coating on titanium alloys includes providing a piece of material containing titanium having at least a portion of one surface to be hardened. The piece having a portion of a surface to be hardened is contacted on the backside by a suitable heat sink such that the melting depth of said surface to be hardened may be controlled. A hardening material is then deposited as a slurry. Alternate methods of deposition include flame, arc, or plasma spraying, electrodeposition, vapor deposition, or any other deposition method known by those skilled in the art. The surface to be hardened is then selectively melted to the desired depth, dependent on the desired coating thickness, such that a molten pool is formed of the piece surface and the deposited hardening material. Upon cooling a hardened surface is formed.

Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR); Turner, Paul C. (Albany, OR)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

[Geothermal system temperature-depth database and model for data analysis]. 5. quarterly technical progress report  

SciTech Connect

During this first quarter of the second year of the contract activity has involved several different tasks. The author has continued to work on three tasks most intensively during this quarter: the task of implementing the data base for geothermal system temperature-depth, the maintenance of the WWW site with the heat flow and gradient data base, and finally the development of a modeling capability for analysis of the geothermal system exploration data. The author has completed the task of developing a data base template for geothermal system temperature-depth data that can be used in conjunction with the regional data base that he had already developed and is now implementing it. Progress is described.

Blackwell, D.D.

1998-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

497

Small-angle Compton Scattering to Determine the Depth of a Radioactive Source in Matter  

SciTech Connect

A gamma-ray peak in a spectrum is often accompanied by a discontinuity in the Compton continuum at the peak. The Compton continuum results from Compton scattering in the detector. The discontinuity at a peak results from small-angle Compton scattering by the gamma rays in matter situated directly between the gamma-ray source and the detector. The magnitude of this discontinuity with respect to the gamma-ray peak is therefore an indicator of the amount of material or shielding between the gamma-ray source and the detector. This small-angle scattering was used to determine the depth of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) solution standards in a concrete floor mockup. The empirical results of the use of this small-angle scattering discontinuity in a concrete floor experiment will be described. A Monte Carlo calculation of the experiment will also be described. In addition, the depth determined from small-angle scattering was used in conjunction with differential attenuation to more accurately measure the uranium content of the mockup. Following these empirical results, the theory of small-angle scattering will be discussed. The magnitude of the discontinuity compared to the peak count rate is directly related to the depth of the gamma-ray source in matter. This relation can be described by relatively simple mathematical expressions. This is the first instance that we are aware of in which the small-angle Compton scattering has been used to determine the depth of a radioactive source. Furthermore this is the first development of the theoretical expressions for the magnitude of the small-angle scattering discontinuity.

Oberer, R. B.; Gunn, C. A.; Chiang, L. G.; Valiga, R. E.; Cantrell, J. A.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Method for the depth corrected detection of ionizing events from a co-planar grids sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the detection of ionizing events utilizing a co-planar grids sensor comprising a semiconductor substrate, cathode electrode, collecting grid and non-collecting grid. The semiconductor substrate is sensitive to ionizing radiation. A voltage less than 0 Volts is applied to the cathode electrode. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the cathode is applied to the non-collecting grid. A voltage greater than the voltage applied to the non-collecting grid is applied to the collecting grid. The collecting grid and the non-collecting grid are summed and subtracted creating a sum and difference respectively. The difference and sum are divided creating a ratio. A gain coefficient factor for each depth (distance between the ionizing event and the collecting grid) is determined, whereby the difference between the collecting electrode and the non-collecting electrode multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient is the depth corrected energy of an ionizing event. Therefore, the energy of each ionizing event is the difference between the collecting grid and the non-collecting grid multiplied by the corresponding gain coefficient. The depth of the ionizing event can also be determined from the ratio.

De Geronimo, Gianluigi (Syosset, NY); Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Carini, Gabriella (Port Jefferson, NY)

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

499

Geologic investigation of Playa Lakes, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada : data report.  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface geological investigations have been conducted at two large playa lakes at the Tonopah Test Range in central Nevada. These characterization activities were intended to provide basic stratigraphic-framework information regarding the lateral distribution of ''hard'' and ''soft'' sedimentary materials for use in defining suitable target regions for penetration testing. Both downhole geophysical measurements and macroscopic lithilogic descriptions were used as a surrogate for quantitative mechanical-strength properties, although some quantitative laboratory strength measurements were obtained as well. Both rotary (71) and core (19) holes on a systematic grid were drilled in the southern half of the Main Lake; drill hole spacings are 300 ft north-south and 500-ft east-west. The drilled region overlaps a previous cone-penetrometer survey that also addressed the distribution of hard and soft material. Holes were drilled to a depth of 40 ft and logged using both geologic examination and down-hole geophysical surveying. The data identify a large complex of very coarse-grained sediment (clasts up to 8 mm) with interbedded finer-grained sands, silts and clays, underlying a fairly uniform layer of silty clay 6 to 12 ft thick. Geophysical densities of the course-grained materials exceed 2.0 g/cm{sup 2}, and this petrophysical value appears to be a valid discriminator of hard vs. soft sediments in the subsurface. Thirty-four holes, including both core and rotary drilling, were drilled on a portion of the much larger Antelope Lake. A set of pre-drilling geophysical surveys, including time-domain electromagnetic methods, galvanic resistivity soundings, and terrain-conductivity surveying, was used to identify the gross distribution of conductive and resistive facies with respect to the present lake outline. Conductive areas were postulated to represent softer, clay-rich sediments with larger amounts of contained conductive ground water. Initial drilling, consisting of cored drill holes to 100-ft (33-m) depth, confirmed both the specific surface geophysical measurements and the more general geophysical model of the subsurface lake facies. Good agreement of conductive regions with drill holes containing little to no coarse-grained sediments was observed, and vice-versa. A second phase of grid drilling on approximately 300-ft (100-m) centers was targeted a delineating a region of sufficient size containing essentially no coarse-grained ''hard'' material. Such a region was identified in the southwestern portion of Antelope Lake.

Rautman, Christopher Arthur

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Geothermal reservoir assessment: Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Unit. Final report, September 1977-July 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three exploratory geothermal wells were drilled in the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal resource area in southwestern Utah to obtain new subsurface data for inclusion in the US DOE's geothermal reservoir assessment program. Existing data from prior investigations which included the drilling of an earlier exploratory well at the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area was also provided. Two of the wells were abandoned before reaching target depth because of severe lost circulation and hole sloughing problems. The two completed holes reached depths of 5221 ft. and 7735 ft., respectively, and a maximum reservoir temperature of 353/sup 0/F at 7320 ft. was measured. The deepest well flow was tested at the rate of 47,000 lbs/h with a wellhead temperature of 200/sup 0/F and pressure of 3 psig. Based upon current economics, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale geothermal resource is considered to be sub-commercial for the generation of electrical power. A synopsis is given of the exploratory drilling activities and results containing summary drilling, testing, geologic and geochemical information from four exploratory geothermal wells.

Ash, D.L.; Dondanville, R.F.; Gulati, M.S.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z