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1

Efficiency Improvement through Reduction in Friction and Wear...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

killian.pdf More Documents & Publications Heavy Truck Friction & Wear Reduction Technologies Development of High Power Density Driveline for Vehicles Low-Friction Engineered...

2

Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Coatings Opportunities exist for friction reduction in piston rings and valve trains using durable, advanced material technologies, such as diamond-like carbon (DLC)...

3

Friction Reduction for Microhole CT Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this 24 month project focused on improving microhole coiled tubing drilling bottom hole assembly (BHA) reliability and performance, while reducing the drilling cost and complexity associated with inclined/horizontal well sections. This was to be accomplished by eliminating the need for a downhole drilling tractor or other downhole coiled tubing (CT) friction mitigation techniques when drilling long (>2,000 ft.) of inclined/horizontal wellbore. The technical solution to be developed and evaluated in this project was based on vibrating the coiled tubing at surface to reduce the friction along the length of the downhole CT drillstring. The Phase 1 objective of this project centered on determining the optimum surface-applied vibration system design for downhole CT friction mitigation. Design of the system would be based on numerical modeling and laboratory testing of the CT friction mitigation achieved with various types of surface-applied vibration. A numerical model was developed to predict how far downhole the surface-applied vibration would travel. A vibration test fixture, simulating microhole CT drilling in a horizontal wellbore, was constructed and used to refine and validate the numerical model. Numerous tests, with varying surface-applied vibration parameters were evaluated in the vibration test fixture. The data indicated that as long as the axial force on the CT was less than the helical buckling load, axial vibration of the CT was effective at mitigating friction. However, surface-applied vibration only provided a small amount of friction mitigation as the helical buckling load on the CT was reached or exceeded. Since it would be impractical to assume that routine field operations be conducted at less than the helical buckling load of the CT, it was determined that this technical approach did not warrant the additional cost and maintenance issues that would be associated with the surface vibration equipment. As such, the project was concluded following completion of Phase 1, and Phase 2 (design, fabrication, and testing of a prototype surface vibration system) was not pursued.

Ken Newman; Patrick Kelleher; Edward Smalley

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

TEXTURE-INDUCED CAVITATION BUBBLES AND FRICTION REDUCTION IN THE ELROD-ADAMS MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXTURE-INDUCED CAVITATION BUBBLES AND FRICTION REDUCTION IN THE ELROD-ADAMS MODEL Hugo M. Checoa, Friction reduction, Cavitation, Numerical simulation. Symbol Description a, b the pad occupies the region of textures µ dynamic viscosity cavitation boundary 0 cavitated region + pressurized region 1 INTRODUCTION

Buscaglia, Gustavo C.

5

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Engine Friction Reduction Technologies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about engine friction...

6

Plutonium Oxidation and Subsequent Reduction by Mn (IV) Minerals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium sorbed to rock tuff was preferentially associated with manganese oxides. On tuff and synthetic pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}), Pu(IV) or Pu(V) was initially oxidized, but over time Pu(IV) became the predominant oxidation state of sorbed Pu. Reduction of Pu(V/VI), even on non-oxidizing surfaces, is proposed to result from a lower Gibbs free energy of the hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species versus that of the Pu(V) or Pu(VI) surface species. This work suggests that despite initial oxidation of sorbed Pu by oxidizing surfaces to more soluble forms, the less mobile form of Pu, Pu(IV), will dominate Pu solid phase speciation during long term geologic storage. The safe design of a radioactive waste or spent nuclear fuel geologic repository requires a risk assessment of radionuclides that may potentially be released into the surrounding environment. Geochemical knowledge of the radionuclide and the surrounding environment is required for predicting subsurface fate and transport. Although difficult even in simple systems, this task grows increasingly complicated for constituents, like Pu, that exhibit complex environmental chemistries. The environmental behavior of Pu can be influenced by complexation, precipitation, adsorption, colloid formation, and oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions (1-3). To predict the environmental mobility of Pu, the most important of these factors is Pu oxidation state. This is because Pu(IV) is generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude less mobile than Pu(V) in most environments (4). Further complicating matters, Pu commonly exists simultaneously in several oxidation states (5, 6). Choppin (7) reported Pu may exist as Pu(IV), Pu(V), or Pu(VI) oxic natural groundwaters. It is generally accepted that plutonium associated with suspended particulate matter is predominantly Pu(IV) (8-10), whereas Pu in the aqueous phase is predominantly Pu(V) (2, 11-13). The influence of the character of Mn-containing minerals expected to be found in subsurface repository environments on Pu oxidation state distributions has been the subject of much recent research. Kenney-Kennicutt and Morse (14), Duff et al. (15), and Morgenstern and Choppin (16) observed oxidation of Pu facilitated by Mn(IV)-bearing minerals. Conversely, Shaughnessy et al. (17) used X-ray Absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to show reduction of Pu(VI) by hausmannite (Mn{sup II}Mn{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) and manganite ({gamma}-Mn{sup III}OOH) and Kersting et al., (18) observed reduction of Pu(VI) by pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}). In this paper, we attempt to reconcile the apparently conflicting datasets by showing that Mn-bearing minerals can indeed oxidize Pu, however, if the oxidized species remains on the solid phase, the oxidation step competes with the formation of Pu(IV) that becomes the predominant solid phase Pu species with time. The experimental approach we took was to conduct longer term (approximately two years later) oxidation state analyses on the Pu sorbed to Yucca Mountain tuff (initial analysis reported by Duff et al., (15)) and measure the time-dependant changes in the oxidation state distribution of Pu in the presence of the Mn mineral pyrolusite.

KAPLAN, DANIEL

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

7

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction Testing and Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction Testing and Analysis Overview Volvo Group Powertrain Engineering is interested will need to be constructed that can motor the engine and measure power losses using a torque sensor built

Demirel, Melik C.

8

Efficiency Improvement through Reduction in Friction and Wear in Powertrain Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency of truck drivelines through reduction of friction and parasitic losses in transmission and drive axles. Known efficiencies for these products exceeded 97 percent, so the task was not trivial. The project relied on a working relationship between modeling and hardware testing. Modeling was to shorten the development cycle by guiding the selection of materials, processes and strategies. Bench top and fixture tests were to validate the models. Modeling was performed at a world class, high academic level, but in the end, modeling did not impact the hardware development as much as intended. Insights leading to the most significant accomplishments came from bench top and fixture tests and full scale dynamometer tests. A key development in the project was the formulation of the implementation strategy. Five technical elements with potential to minimize friction and parasitic losses were identified. These elements included churning, lubrication, surface roughness, coatings and textures. An interesting fact is that both Caterpillar and Eaton independently converged on the same set of technical elements in formulating their implementation strategies. Exploiting technical elements of the implementation strategy had a positive impact on transmission and drive axle efficiencies. During one dynamometer test of an Eaton Best Tech 1 transmission, all three gear ranges tested: Under drive, direct drive and over drive, showed efficiencies greater than 99 percent. Technology boosts to efficiency for transmissions reached 1 percent, while efficiency improvements to drive axle pushed 2 percent. These advancements seem small, but the accomplishment is large considering that these products normally run at greater than 97 percent efficiency. Barriers and risks to implementing these technology elements are clear. Schemes using a low fill sump and spray tubes endanger the gears and bearings by lubricant starvation. Gear coatings have exhibited durability issues, stripping away under conditions less demanding than 750,000 miles in service on the road. Failed coatings compound the problem by contaminating the lubricant with hard particles. Under the most severe conditions, super finished surfaces may polish further, reaching a surface roughness unable to support the critical oil film thickness. Low viscosity and low friction lubricants may not protect the gears and bearings adequately leading to excessive pitting, wear and noise. Additives in low friction oils may not stay in solution or suspended thus settling to the bottom and unavailable when they are needed most. Technical barriers and risks can be overcome through engineering, but two barriers remain formidable: (1) cost of the technology and (2) convincing fleet owners that the technology provides a tangible benefit. Dry sumps lower lubricant operating temperatures so the removal of heat exchangers and hoses and reduced demand on engine cooling systems justify their use. The benefits of surface texturing are varied and remain unproven. Lubricant costs seem manageable, but the cost of super finishing and gear coating are high. These are issues of scale and processing technology. Going across the board with gear super finishing and coating will reduce costs. Pushing the envelope to applications with higher torque and higher power density should drive the adoption of these technologies. Fleet owners are an educated and seasoned lot. Only technology measureable in dollars returned is used on truck fleets. To convince fleet owners of the benefit of these technologies, new precision in measuring fuel efficiency must be introduced. Legislation for a minimum standard in truck miles per gallon would also enable the use of these technologies. Improving the efficiency of truck transmissions and axle will make a noticeable impact on the fuel consumption by heavy vehicles in the United States. However, the greatest benefit will come when all the individual efficiency technologies like hybrid power, aerodynamic fairings, auxiliary power units, super

Michael Killian

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2011 Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering Fall 2011 Heavy Duty Diesel Engine Friction the friction losses of a heavy duty diesel engine. In addition, a tear down procedure needed to be created needs Discussed test cell configuration with Diesel Combustion & Emissions Laboratory Performed

Demirel, Melik C.

10

LITERATURE REVIEW: REDUCTION OF NP(V) TO NP (IV)-ALTERNATIVES TO FERROUS SULFAMATE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The baseline approach to control of Np oxidation in UREX and PUREX separation processes is the reduction of Np(V) and Np(VI) to Np(IV) using ferrous sulfamate. Use of this reagent results in increased sulfur and iron concentrations in the liquid waste streams from the process. Presence of these two elements, especially sulfur, increases the complexity of the development of wasteforms for immobilizing these effluents. Investigations are underway to identify reductants that eliminate sulfur and iron from the Np reduction process. While there are a variety of chemical reductants that will reduce Np to Np(IV) in nitric acid media, the reaction rates for most are so slow that the reductants are not be feasible for use in an operating plant process. In an attempt to identify additional alternatives to ferrous sulfamate, a literature search and review was performed. Based on the results of the literature review, it is concluded that photochemical and catalytic processes should also be investigated to test the utility of these two approaches. The catalytic process could be investigated for use in conjunction with chemical oxidants to speed the reaction rates for reductants that react slowly, but would otherwise be appropriate replacements for ferrous sulfamate. The photochemical approach, which has received little attention during the past few decades, also shows promise, especially the photocatalytic approach that includes a catalyst, such as Pt supported on SiC, which can be used in tandem with an oxidant, for Np reduction.

Kessinger, G.; Kyser, E.; Almond, P.

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

11

In situ control of lubricant properties for reduction of power cylinder friction through thermal barrier coating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lowering lubricant viscosity to reduce friction generally carries a side effect of increased metal-metal contact in mixed or boundary lubrication, for example near top ring reversal along the engine cylinder liner. A ...

Molewyk, Mark Allen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Overview of Friction and Wear Reduction for Heavy Vehicles | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Enginesthewith2009Energy Friction and Wear

13

Human health benefits of ambient sulfate aerosol reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 call for about a 10 million ton reduction in annual SO{sub 2} emissions in the United States by the year 2010. Although the provisions apply nationwide, most of the reduction will take place in the eastern half of the United States, where use of high sulfur coal for electricity generation is most common. One potentially large benefit of Title IV is the expected reduction in adverse human health effects associated with exposure to ambient sulfate aerosols, a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when SO{sub 2} is present. Sulfate aerosols are a significant constituent of fine particulate (PM{sub 2.5}). This paper combines available epidemiologic evidence of health effects associated with sulfate aerosols and economic estimates of willingness to pay for reductions in risks or incidence of health effects with available estimates of the difference between expected ambient sulfate concentrations in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada with and without Title IV to estimate the expected health benefits of Title IV. The results suggest a mean annual benefit in the eastern United States of $10.6 billion (in 1994 dollars) in 1997 and $40.0 billion in 2010, with an additional $1 billion benefit each year in Ontario and Quebec provinces.

Chestnut, L.G. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Watkins, A.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Friction Reduction through Surface Modification (Agreement ID:23284) Project ID:18518  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about friction...

15

Department of Energy and Electrical Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction Testing and Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Energy and Electrical Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine and pumping frictional losses on Volvo-Mack's 11 liter Diesel Engine. Thermocouples and pressure transducers is to quantify friction losses on Volvo's current 11-liter engine model. Team members will remove hardware

Demirel, Melik C.

16

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

17

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

18

A numerical treatment of steady, frictional boundary currents in a homogeneous ocean applied to a semi-enclosed basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characterizing the models Page 27 Effects of pararnetcrs o" and y on reduction rate of residuals for the bottona-friction model 55 Effects of parameters o and y or reduction rate of res iduals for the lateral-friction naodcl 58 IV. Effects of parameters v.... E I Variable parameters characterizing the models Par a!net e r Description Order ? of-Magnitude Estimate Units the length ot a grid square the coefficient of botto!rI frictior the horizortal-cdd y vis cos ity 10 6 -6 10 C 111 ? 1 sec...

Jacobs, Clifford Albert

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

20

ON THE IDENTIFICATION AND HAPTIC DISPLAY OF FRICTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON THE IDENTIFICATION AND HAPTIC DISPLAY OF FRICTION A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT by Christopher Richard All Rights Reserved #12;iv Abstract Although friction is an important phenomenon and greatly affects the way in which individ- uals interact with the world, friction is all but absent from

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Friction Induced Skin Tags  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Duplantis KL, Jones BH. Friction blisters. Pathophysiology,Friction Induced Skin Tags Francisco Allegue MD 1 , Carmenetiopathogenic role for friction. Introduction Skin tags (

Allegue, Francisco; Fachal, Carmen; Pérez-Pérez, Lidia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston assembly in an engine. The model appears to produce the correct behavior, but we cannot quantify its strengths or weaknesses until our crank-angle-resolved measurements have been completed. Finally, we proposed and implemented a model for the effects of liner rotation on piston assembly friction. Here, we propose that the rotating liner design is analogous to the shaft-bushing mechanism. Therefore, we used the side-slip rolling friction model to simulate the effects of liner rotation. This model appears to be promising, but final analysis of its strengths and/or weaknesses must await our crank-angle-resolved measurements.

Ron Matthews

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Introduction Rolling and Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Kinematics Solutions Rolling and Friction in Discrete Element Simulations Matthew R of rolling resistance Creep-friction definition Creep-friction vs. Cattaneo-Mindlin friction Classification / papers / EMI2011.pdf #12;Introduction Kinematics Solutions Classification of rolling resistance Creep-friction

Kuhn, Matthew R.

24

Solid friction in gel electrophoresis S. F. Burlatskya)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid friction in gel electrophoresis S. F. Burlatskya) and John M. Deutch Department of Chemistry 1995 We study the influence of solid frictional forces acting on polymer chains moving in a random environment. We show that the total reduction in the chain tension resulting from the small friction between

Deutch, John

25

Quantum friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Brownian motion of a light quantum particle in a heavy classical gas is theoretically described and a new expression for the friction coefficient is obtained for arbitrary temperature. At zero temperature it equals to the de Broglie momentum of the mean free path divided by the mean free path. Alternatively, the corresponding mobility of the quantum particle in the classical gas is equal to the square of the mean free path divided by the Planck constant. The Brownian motion of a quantum particle in a quantum environment is also discussed.

R. Tsekov

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Friction in (im-)miscible polymer brush systems and the role of transverse polymer-tilting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction in (im-)miscible polymer brush systems and the role of transverse polymer-tilting Sissi de preferred solvent, leading to low friction and low wear rates. Here, we demonstrate, using molecular systems also show smaller friction than miscible systems, although the friction reduction is less than

Mueser, Martin

27

Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST 800-53 National Renewable EnergyReducingReduction

28

Rotating Liner Engine: Improving Efficiency of Heavy Duty Diesels by Significant Friction Reduction, and Extending the Life of Heavy Duty Engines.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work on converting a 4 cylinder Cummins ISB engine into a single cylinder Rotating Liner Engine functioning prototype that can be used to measure the friction benefits of rotating the cylinder liner in a high pressure compression ignition engine. A similar baseline engine was also prepared, and preliminary testing was done. Even though the fabrication of the single cylinder prototype was behind schedule due to machine shop delays, the fundamental soundness of the design elements are proven, and the engine has successfully functioned. However, the testing approach of the two engines, as envisioned by the original proposal, proved impossible due to torsional vibration resonance caused by the single active piston. A new approach for proper testing has been proposed,

Dardalis, Dimitrios

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Friction between Ring Polymer Brushes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction between ring-polymer brushes at melt densities sliding past each other are studied using extensive course-grained molecular dynamics simulations and scaling arguments, and the results are compared to the friction between linear-polymer brushes. We show that for a velocity range spanning over three decades, the frictional forces measured for ring-polymer brushes are half the corresponding friction in case of linear brushes. In the linear-force regime, the weak inter-digitation of two ring brushes compared to linear brushes also leads to a lower number of binary collisions between the monomers of opposing brushes. At high velocities, where the thickness of the inter-digitation layer between two opposing brushes is on the order monomer size regardless of brush topology, stretched segments of ring polymers take a double-stranded conformation. As a result, monomers of the double-stranded segments collide less with the monomers of the opposing ring brush even though a similar number of monomers occupies the inter-digitation layer for ring and linear-brush bilayers. The numerical data obtained from our simulations is consistent with the proposed scaling analysis. Conformation-dependent frictional reduction observed in ring brushes can have important consequences in non-equilibrium bulk systems.

A. Erbas; J. Paturej

2015-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

Skin friction blistering: computer model.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on blisters produced by friction. I. Results of linearDuplantis KL, Jones BH. Friction blisters. Pathophysiology,WA, Sulzberger MB. The friction blister. Mil Med 6. Cortese

Xing, Malcolm; Pan, Ning; Zhong, Wen; Maibach, Howard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Frictional Widgets: Enhancing Touch Interfaces with Programmable Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frictional Widgets: Enhancing Touch Interfaces with Programmable Friction Abstract Touch the design possibilities offered by augmenting touchscreens with programmable surface friction. Four exemplar of touch interactions can be enhanced when using a touchscreen with dynamically varied surface friction. We

Levesque, Vincent

32

Piston ring design for reduced friction in modern internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Piston ring friction losses account for approximately 20% of the total mechanical losses in modern internal combustion engines. A reduction in piston ring friction would therefore result in higher efficiency, lower fuel ...

Smedley, Grant, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Friction Tests in Magnesium Tube Hydroforming at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In metal forming, lubricants have a variety of functions. The top priority is usually reduction of friction in order to increase the formability of the materials and reduce tool wear. Because magnesium alloys have very poor formability at room temperature, it is essential to manufacture a part from Magnesium alloys at elevated temperatures. The aim of this paper is to present a friction test method to evaluate the performance of different kinds of lubricants and determine their coefficients of friction at elevated temperatures in tube hydroforming of magnesium alloys. A self-designed experimental apparatus is used to carry out the experiments of friction tests. The coefficient of friction between the tube and die at guiding zone is determined. The effects of the internal pressure, the axial feeding velocity and temperatures on the friction forces and coefficients of friction for different lubricants are discussed.

Hwang, Yeong-Maw; Wang, Kuo-Hsing; Kuo, Tsung-Yu [National Sun Yat-Sen University-Department of Mechanical and Electro-mechanical Engineering, No.70, Lien-Hai Rd., Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

34

Rotational Quantum Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the frictional forces due to quantum fluctuations acting on a small sphere rotating near a surface. At zero temperature, we find the frictional force near a surface to be several orders of magnitude larger than that for the sphere rotating in vacuum. For metallic materials with typical conductivity, quantum friction is maximized by matching the frequency of rotation with the conductivity. Materials with poor conductivity are favored to obtain large quantum frictions. For semiconductor materials that are able to support surface plasmon polaritons, quantum friction can be further enhanced by several orders of magnitude due to the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons.

Rongkuo Zhao; Alejandro Manjavacas; F. Javier García de Abajo; J. B. Pendry

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

35

Nanotribology and Nanoscale Friction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tribology is the science and technology of contacting solid surfaces in relative motion, including the study of lubricants, lubrication, friction, wear, and bearings. It is estimated that friction and wear cost the U.S. economy 6% of the gross national product (Persson, 2000). For example, 5% of the total energy generated in an automobile engine is lost to frictional resistance. The study of nanoscale friction has a technological impact in reducing energy loss in machines, in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), and in the development of durable, low-friction surfaces and ultra-thin lubrication films.

Guo, Yi [Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, New Jersey; Qu, Zhihua [University of Central Florida, Orlando; Braiman, Yehuda [ORNL; Zhang, Zhenyu [ORNL; Barhen, Jacob [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Micromachine friction test apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microelectromechanical (MEM) friction test apparatus is disclosed for determining static or dynamic friction in MEM devices. The friction test apparatus, formed by surface micromachining, is based on a friction pad supported at one end of a cantilevered beam, with the friction pad overlying a contact pad formed on the substrate. A first electrostatic actuator can be used to bring a lower surface of the friction pad into contact with an upper surface of the contact pad with a controlled and adjustable force of contact. A second electrostatic actuator can then be used to bend the cantilevered beam, thereby shortening its length and generating a relative motion between the two contacting surfaces. The displacement of the cantilevered beam can be measured optically and used to determine the static or dynamic friction, including frictional losses and the coefficient of friction between the surfaces. The test apparatus can also be used to assess the reliability of rubbing surfaces in MEM devices by producing and measuring wear of those surfaces. Finally, the friction test apparatus, which is small in size, can be used as an in situ process quality tool for improving the fabrication of MEM devices.

deBoer, Maarten P. (Albuquerque, NM); Redmond, James M. (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry A. (Cedar Crest, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Skin friction blistering: computer model.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K. L.Jones, B. H. , Friction blisters. Pathophysiology,and M.B. Sulzberger, The friction blister. Mil Med, 1972.on blisters produced by friction. II. The blister fluid. J

Xing, Malcolm; Pan, Ning; Zhong, Wen; Maibach, Howard

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Factors affecting piston ring friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The piston ring pack friction is a major contributor to the internal combustion engine mechanical friction loss. The oil control ring decides the oil supply to the top two rings in addition to being the major friction ...

Liao, Kai, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all energy intensive and could potentially add significant cost. A new concept for surface hardening of metallic materials and components is Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Compared to the current surface hardening technologies, FSP is more energy efficient has no emission or waste by products and may result in better tribological performance. FSP involves plunging a rotating tool to a predetermined depth (case layer thickness) and translating the FSP tool along the area to be processed. This action of the tool produces heating and severe plastic deformation of the processed area. For steel the temperature is high enough to cause phase transformation, ultimately forming hard martensitic phase. Indeed, FSP has been used for surface modification of several metals and alloys so as to homogenize the microstructure and refine the grain size, both of which led to improved fatigue and corrosion resistance. Based on the effect of FSP on near-surface layer material, it was expected to have beneficial effects on friction and wear performance of metallic materials. However, little or no knowledge existed on the impact of FSP concerning friction and wear performance the subject of the this project and final report. Specifically for steel, which is the most dominant tribological material, FSP can replace the current conventional surface hardening techniques used for friction and wear performance. Friction Stir Link Inc. (FSL) is teamed with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to develop and optimize FSP for friction and wear performance enhancement. The ultimate goal is to offer FSP and an effective alternative to some of the current energy intensive and high-cost surface hardening processes.

Mr. Christopher B. Smith; Dr. Oyelayo Ajayi

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Action of friction Frictional processes are not often considered in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Action of friction Frictional processes are not often considered in any detail in studies are switched off, the pressure falls to just 921mb. Frictional processes can be thought of in terms of changes. The first term on the right­hand­side represents barotropic damping by friction, and the second

Plant, Robert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Static Friction Phenomena The following static friction phenomena have a direct dependency on velocity.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coulomb Friction Viscous Friction Stribeck Friction Static Friction Phenomena The following static friction phenomena have a direct dependency on velocity. Static Friction Model: Friction force opposes the direction of motion when the sliding velocity is zero. Coulomb Friction Model: Friction force

Simpkins, Alex

42

Friction stir welding tool  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

Tolle, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Barnes, Timothy A. (Ammon, ID)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nonlinear friction in quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of nonlinear friction forces in quantum mechanics is studied via dissipative Madelung hydrodynamics. A new thermo-quantum diffusion equation is derived, which is solved for the particular case of quantum Brownian motion with a cubic friction. It is extended also by a chemical reaction term to describe quantum reaction-diffusion systems with nonlinear friction as well.

Roumen Tsekov

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Reactivity studies of a pseudo three-coordinate vanadium(II) complex: Synthesis of terminal oxo and sulfido complexes of vanadium(IV) and S?S and Se?Se reductive bond cleavage reactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terminal oxo and sulfido complexes in the form of (nacnac)V=E(Ntol{sub 2}) (nacnac = [ArNC(CH{sub 3})]{sub 2}CH{sup -}, Ar = 2,6-(CHMe{sub 2}){sub 2}C{sub 6}H{sub 3}, Ntol{sub 2} = {sup -}N(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}-4-Me), E = O (1), S (2)) were isolated from treatment of the masked three-coordinate vanadium(II) complex, (nacnac)V(Ntol{sub 2}), with C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NO and S{sub 8}, respectively. Both vanadium(IV) species, 1 and 2, have been characterized by room temperature X-band EPR spectroscopic studies, and in the case of complex 1, a single crystal molecular structure confirmed the presence of a terminal oxo moiety. Moreover, reaction of (nacnac)V(Ntol{sub 2}) with diphenyl-disulfide and diphenyl-diselenide results in the reductive cleavage of these compounds to produce the vanadium(III) complexes (nacnac)V(XPh)(Ntol{sub 2}) (X = S, (3), Se (4)). A molecular structure of the phenylsulfide complex, 3, confirmed formation of the d{sup 2} complex resulting from reductive cleavage of the S-S bond.

Tran, Ba L.; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Mindiola, Daniel J. (Indiana)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

45

Biotic and Abiotic Reduction and Solubilization of Pu(IV)O2•xH2O(am) as Affected by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the presence of hydrogen (H{sub 2}), the synthetic chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), and the electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens both reductively solubilized 100% of added 0.5 mM plutonium (IV) hydrous oxide (Pu(IV)O{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}) in {approx}24 h at pH 7 in a non-complexing buffer. In the absence of AQDS, bioreduction was much slower ({approx}22 days) and less extensive ({approx}83-94%). In the absence of DMRB but under comparable conditions, 89% (without AQDS) to 98% (with AQDS) of added 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was reductively solubilized over 418 days. Under comparable conditions but in the absence of EDTA, <0.001% of the 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was solubilized, with or without bacteria. However, Pu(aq) increased by as much as an order of magnitude in some EDTA-free treatments, both biotic and abiotic, and increases in solubility were associated with the production of both Pu(OH)3(am) and Pu(III)(aq). Incubation with DMRB in the absence of EDTA increased the polymeric and crystalline content of the PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} and also decreased Pu solubility in 6-N HCl. Results from an in vitro assay demonstrated electron transfer to PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} from the S. oneidensis outer-membrane c-type cytochrome MtrC, and EDTA increased the oxidation of MtrC by PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}. Our results suggest that PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} biotic and abiotic reduction and solubilization may be important in anoxic, reducing environments, especially where complexing ligands and electron shuttling compounds are present.

Plymale, Andrew E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.; Bolton, Harvey

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

46

PEBBLES Simulation of Static Friction and New Static Friction Benchmark  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pebble bed reactors contain large numbers of spherical fuel elements arranged randomly. Determining the motion and location of these fuel elements is required for calculating certain parameters of pebble bed reactor operation. This paper documents the PEBBLES static friction model. This model uses a three dimensional differential static friction approximation extended from the two dimensional Cundall and Strack model. The derivation of determining the rotational transformation of pebble to pebble static friction force is provided. A new implementation for a differential rotation method for pebble to container static friction force has been created. Previous published methods are insufficient for pebble bed reactor geometries. A new analytical static friction benchmark is documented that can be used to verify key static friction simulation parameters. This benchmark is based on determining the exact pebble to pebble and pebble to container static friction coefficients required to maintain a stable five sphere pyramid.

Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. This represents a substantial (30-40%) reduction of the ringpack friction alone. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. Further improvements via piston, lubricant, and surface designs offer additional opportunities. Tests of low-friction lubricants are in progress and preliminary results are very promising. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Piston friction studies indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% ARES engine efficiency. The design strategies developed in this study have promising potential for application in all modern reciprocating engines as they represent simple, low-cost methods to extract significant fuel savings. The current program has possible spinoffs and applications in other industries as well, including transportation, CHP, and diesel power generation. The progress made in this program has wide engine efficiency implications, and potential deployment of low-friction engine components or lubricants in the near term is possible as current investigations continue.

Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Friction of wood on steel.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis deals with the experimental description of friction between steel and wood materials, specifically laminated veneer lumber (LVL) and pine wood with two… (more)

Koubek, Radek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The role of crystallography and nanostructures on metallic friction.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In ductile metals, sliding contact is often accompanied by severe plastic deformation localized to a small volume of material adjacent to the wear surface. During the initial run-in period, hardness, grain structure and crystallographic texture of the surfaces that come into sliding contact undergo significant changes, culminating in the evolution of subsurface layers with their own characteristic features. Here, a brief overview of our ongoing research on the fundamental phenomena governing the friction-induced recrystallization in single crystal metals, and how these recrystallized structures with nanometer-size grains would in turn influence metallic friction will be presented. We have employed a novel combination of experimental tools (FIB, EBSD and TEM) and an analysis of the critical resolved shear stress (RSS) on the twelve slip systems of the FCC lattice to understand the evolution of these friction-induced structures in single crystal nickel. The later part of the talk deals with the mechanisms of friction in nanocrystalline Ni films. Analyses of friction-induced subsurfaces seem to confirm that the formation of stable ultrafine nanocrystalline layers with 2-10 nm grains changes the deformation mechanism from the traditional dislocation mediated one to that is predominantly controlled by grain boundaries, resulting in significant reductions in the coefficient friction.

Michael, Joseph Richard; Prasad, Somuri V.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha (New Mexico Institute of Mining & Technology, Socorro, NM); Kotula, Paul Gabriel

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Elastic model of dry friction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Friction of elastic bodies is connected with the passing through the metastable states that arise at the contact of surfaces rubbing against each other. Three models are considered that give rise to the metastable states. Friction forces and their dependence on the pressure are calculated. In Appendix A, the contact problem of elasticity theory is solved with adhesion taken into account.

Larkin, A. I.; Khmelnitskii, D. E., E-mail: dekl2@cam.ac.uk [Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (Russian Federation)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Low friction ring designs have already been recommended in a previous phase, with full-scale engine validation partially completed. Current accomplishments include the addition of several additional power cylinder design areas to the overall system analysis. These include analyses of lubricant and cylinder surface finish and a parametric study of piston design. The Waukesha engine was found to be already well optimized in the areas of lubricant, surface skewness and honing cross-hatch angle, where friction reductions of 12% for lubricant, and 5% for surface characteristics, are projected. For the piston, a friction reduction of up to 50% may be possible by controlling waviness alone, while additional friction reductions are expected when other parameters are optimized. A total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% efficiency. Key elements of the continuing work include further analysis and optimization of the engine piston design, in-engine testing of recommended lubricant and surface designs, design iteration and optimization of previously recommended technologies, and full-engine testing of a complete, optimized, low-friction power cylinder system.

Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

Implications of Strong-Rate-Weakening Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implications of Strong-Rate- Weakening Friction for the Length-Scale Dependence of the Strength · Rapid transitions between high static friction and very low dynamic friction · Leads to slip-pulse rupture · Slip pulses are extremely localized and have strong positive feedback between friction and slip

Greer, Julia R.

54

Modelling of friction stir welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis investigates the modelling of friction stir welding (FSW). FSW is a relatively new welding process where a rotating non-consumable tool is used to join two materials through high temperature deformation. The aim of the thesis...

Colegrove, Paul Andrew

55

Rubber friction and tire dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a simple rubber friction law, which can be used, e.g., in models of tire (and vehicle) dynamics. The friction law is tested by comparing numerical results to the full rubber friction theory (B.N.J. Persson, J. Phys.: Condensed Matter 18, 7789 (2006)). Good agreement is found between the two theories. We describe a two-dimensional (2D) tire model which combines the rubber friction model with a simple mass-spring description of the tire body. The tire model is very flexible and can be used to calculate accurate mu-slip (and the self-aligning torque) curves for braking and cornering or combined motion (e.g., braking during cornering). We present numerical results which illustrate the theory. Simulations of Anti-Blocking System (ABS) braking are performed using two simple control algorithms.

B. N. J. Persson

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

56

Friction Anisotropy: A unique and intrinsic property of decagonal quasicrystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quasi-Crystalline Low-Friction Coatings. Journal ofContact Mechanics, Friction and Adhesion with Application toEds. ), Fundamentals of Friction and Wear, Springer Berlin

Park, Jeong Young

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Epistemic Friction: Reflections on Knowledge, Truth, and Logic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Epistemic Friction: Re?ections on Knowledge, Truth,requires both freedom and friction. Freedom to set up ourprograms, etc. , and friction (constraint) coming from two

Sher, Gila

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Friction welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor and a ceramic electrode body connected by a friction weld between a portion of the body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect such a friction weld and a portion of the metal conductor.

Byrne, Stephen C. (Monroeville, PA); Ray, Siba P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Rapp, Robert A. (Columbus, OH)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Vacuum friction in rotating particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the frictional torque acting on particles rotating in empty space. At zero temperature, vacuum friction transforms mechanical energy into light emission and produces particle heating. However, particle cooling relative to the environment occurs at finite temperatures and low rotation velocities. Radiation emission is boosted and its spectrum significantly departed from a hot-body emission profile as the velocity increases. Stopping times ranging from hours to billions of years are predicted for materials, particle sizes, and temperatures accessible to experiment. Implications for the behavior of cosmic dust are discussed.

A. Manjavacas; F. J. García de Abajo

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

60

Low-Engine-Friction Technology for Advanced Natural-Gas Reciprocating Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis has been followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. In this program, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been adapted and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed ring-pack friction reduction of 30-40%, which translates to total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. The study on surface textures, including roughness characteristics, cross hatch patterns, dimples and grooves have shown that even relatively small-scale changes can have a large effect on ring/liner friction, in some cases reducing FMEP by as much as 30% from a smooth surface case. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Testing of low-friction lubricants showed that total engine FMEP reduced by up to {approx}16.5% from the commercial reference oil without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. Piston friction studies indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% ARES engine efficiency. The design strategies developed in this study have promising potential for application in all modern reciprocating engines as they represent simple, low-cost methods to extract significant fuel savings. The current program has possible spinoffs and applications in other industries as well, including transportation, CHP, and diesel power generation. The progress made in this program has wide engine efficiency implications, and potential deployment of low-friction engine components or lubricants in the near term is quite possible.

Victor Wong; Tian Tian; G. Smedley; L. Moughon; Rosalind Takata; J. Jocsak

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The Power of Friction: Quantifying the ``Goodness'' of Frictional Grasps \\Lambda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Power of Friction: Quantifying the ``Goodness'' of Frictional Grasps \\Lambda Marek Teichmann of fingers, coefficient of friction and the the goodness of a grasp. In particular, we give a general framework for defining a grasp metric that takes friction into account. Our approach rectifies a flaw

Mishra, Bud

62

Automotive friction-induced noises A. Elmaiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automotive friction-induced noises A. Elmaiana , J.-M. Duffala , F. Gautiera , C. Pezeratb and J, France 3143 #12;Friction-induced noises are numerous in the automotive field. They also involve a large friction-induced noises with simple structures and automotive materials. Qualitative sensitivity studies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

63

Pulling by Pushing, Slip with Infinite Friction,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pulling by Pushing, Slip with Infinite Friction, and Perfectly Rough Surfaces Kevin M. Lynch the two objects even with an infinite coefficient of friction. Thus the common conception that infinite friction prevents slip is in error. This paper shows examples of the phenomena with both quasi

64

Friction in full view A. P. Merklea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction in full view A. P. Merklea and L. D. Marksb Materials Science and Engineering proposed friction mechanisms explaining the unique tribological properties of graphite. Wear of graphite chemical or struc- tural information from the interface during a friction experi- ment. Examples

Marks, Laurence D.

65

The friction of wrinkles Hamid Mohammadi1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The friction of wrinkles Hamid Mohammadi1 and Martin H. M¨user2 1 Dept. of Applied Mathematics pattern has asymmetries not present in the counterbody. The instabilities then cause Coulomb's friction Likewise, the presence of friction - as observed for the much investigated keratocytes on silicon rubber15

Mueser, Martin

66

Tool Wear in Friction Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigated the wear of carbide tools used in friction drilling, a nontraditional hole-making process. In friction drilling, a rotating conical tool uses the heat generated by friction to soften and penetrate a thin workpiece and create a bushing without generating chips. The wear of a hard tungsten carbide tool used for friction drilling a low carbon steel workpiece has been investigated. Tool wear characteristics were studied by measuring its weight change, detecting changes in its shape with a coordinate measuring machine, and making observations of wear damage using scanning electron microscopy. Energy dispersive spectroscopy was applied to analyze the change in chemical composition of the tool surface due to drilling. In addition, the thrust force and torque during drilling and the hole size were measured periodically to monitor the effects of tool wear. Results indicate that the carbide tool is durable, showing minimal tool wear after drilling 11000 holes, but observations also indicate progressively severe abrasive grooving on the tool tip.

Miller, Scott F [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Shih, Albert J. [University of Michigan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Friction forces in cosmological models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the dynamics of test particles undergoing friction forces in a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) spacetime. The interaction with the background fluid is modeled by introducing a Poynting-Robertson-like friction force in the equations of motion, leading to measurable (at least in principle) deviations of the particle trajectories from geodesic motion. The effect on the peculiar velocities of the particles is investigated for various equations of state of the background fluid and different standard cosmological models. The friction force is found to have major effects on particle motion in closed FRW universes, where it turns the time-asymptotic value (approaching the recollapse) of the peculiar particle velocity from ultra-relativistic (close to light speed) to a co-moving one, i.e., zero peculiar speed. On the other hand, for open or flat universes the effect of the friction is not so significant, because the time-asymptotic peculiar particle speed is largely non-relativistic also in the geodesic case.

Donato Bini; Andrea Geralico; Daniele Gregoris; Sauro Succi

2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

68

Dynamical friction on satellite galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For a rigid model satellite, Chandrasekhar's dynamical friction formula describes the orbital evolution quite accurately, when the Coulomb logarithm is chosen appropriately. However, it is not known if the orbital evolution of a real satellite with the internal degree of freedom can be described by the dynamical friction formula. We performed N-body simulation of the orbital evolution of a self-consistent satellite galaxy within a self-consistent parent galaxy. We found that the orbital decay of the simulated satellite is significantly faster than the estimate from the dynamical friction formula. The main cause of this discrepancy is that the stars stripped out of the satellite are still close to the satellite, and increase the drag force on the satellite through two mechanisms. One is the direct drag force from particles in the trailing tidal arm, a non-axisymmetric force that slows the satellite down. The other is the indirect effect that is caused by the particles remaining close to the satellite after escape. The force from them enhances the wake caused in the parent galaxy by dynamical friction, and this larger wake in turn slows the satellite down more than expected from the contribution of its bound mass. We found these two have comparable effects, and the combined effect can be as large as 20% of the total drag force on the satellite.

Michiko Fujii; Yoko Funato; Junichiro Makino

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

69

Wall-pressure and PIV analysis for microbubble drag reduction investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

friction reductions were observed when the microbubbles were injected. Several measurements of wall-pressure were taken at various Reynolds numbers that ranged from 300 up to 6154. No significant drag reduction was observed for flows in the laminar range...

Dominguez Ontiveros, Elvis Efren

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Friction and Wear Reduction in Diesel Engine Valve Trains  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

commercial exhaust valve * Surface damage from 20,000 impacts displays micro-welding, plastic deformation, and transfer. 9 Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy...

71

Thermo-Wetting and Friction Reduction Characterization of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such surfaces include frost prevention on aircraft flight surfaces to self-cleaning features on solar energy panels [1,5]. One way to achieve superhydrophobicity is through the micro- geometry modification of low energy surfaces. Two models repre- sent the wetting behavior of such microtextured surfaces: the Wenzel

Hidrovo, Carlos H.

72

Efficiency Improvement through Reduction in Friction and Wear in Powertrain  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.Program - LibbyofThisStatement Tuesday,Department

73

Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCof Energy 12, 2004Department ofEnforcingVehicleof Energy

74

Heavy Truck Friction & Wear Reduction Technologies | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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75

An integrated surface technology for friction reduction in vehicles |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment ofEnergy Natural Gas:Austin,AnAn Exploration of

76

LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY IV ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab IV - 1 In the first laboratory, you studied the behavior of electric fields and their effect on the motion of electrons using a cathode ray tube (CRT). This beam of electrons is one example of an electric current ­ charges in motion. The current in the CRT was simple

Minnesota, University of

77

Rubber friction on smooth surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the sliding friction for viscoelastic solids, e.g., rubber, on hard flat substrate surfaces. We consider first the fluctuating shear stress inside a viscoelastic solid which results from the thermal motion of the atoms or molecules in the solid. At the nanoscale the thermal fluctuations are very strong and give rise to stress fluctuations in the MPa-range, which is similar to the depinning stresses which typically occur at solid-rubber interfaces, indicating the crucial importance of thermal fluctuations for rubber friction on smooth surfaces. We develop a detailed model which takes into account the influence of thermal fluctuations on the depinning of small contact patches (stress domains) at the rubber-substrate interface. The theory predicts that the velocity dependence of the macroscopic shear stress has a bell-shaped f orm, and that the low-velocity side exhibits the same temperature dependence as the bulk viscoelastic modulus, in qualitative agreement with experimental data. Finally, we discuss the influence of small-amplitude substrate roughness on rubber sliding friction.

B. N. J. Persson; A. I. Volokitin

2006-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

78

EVALUATION OF A LOW FRICTION - HIGH EFFICIENCY ROLLER BEARING ENGINE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Low Friction (High Efficiency Roller Bearing) Engine (LFE) report presents the work done by The Timken Company to conduct a technology demonstration of the benefits of replacing hydrodynamic bearings with roller bearings in the crankshaft and camshaft assemblies of an internal combustion engine for the purpose of collecting data sufficient to prove merit. The engines in the present study have been more extensively converted to roller bearings than any previous studies (40 needle roller bearings per engine) to gain understanding of the full potential of application of bearing technology. The project plan called for comparative testing of a production vehicle which was already respected for having demonstrated low engine friction levels with a rollerized version of that engine. Testing was to include industry standard tests for friction, emissions and fuel efficiency conducted on instrumented dynamometers. Additional tests for fuel efficiency, cold start resistance and other measures of performance were to be made in the actual vehicle. Comparative measurements of noise, vibration and harshness (NVH), were planned, although any work to mitigate the suspected higher NVH level in the rollerized engine was beyond the scope of this project. Timken selected the Toyota Avalon with a 3.5L V-6 engine as the test vehicle. In an attempt to minimize cost and fabrication time, a ‘made-from’ approach was proposed in which as many parts as possible would be used or modified from production parts to create the rollerized engine. Timken commissioned its test partner, FEV Engine Technology, to do a feasibility study in which they confirmed that using such an approach was possible to meet the required dimensional restrictions and tolerances. In designing the roller bearing systems for the crank and cam trains, Timken utilized as many production engine parts as possible. The crankshafts were produced from production line forgings, which use Timken steel, modified with special machining and heat treatment. Timken designed and manufactured all of the roller bearing related components such as the thrust bearing package. The production connecting rods and camshafts could not be used for the roller bearing engine, so new ones were produced according to the team’s designs using Timken steel. The remaining miscellaneous components were designed and procured by FEV. Timken prepared a display version of the crankshaft portion of the production engine without connecting rods which could be driven by a motor through a cogged-belt and electrically actuated clutch arrangement. A modified version was also made in which the engine was outfitted with roller bearings on the main bearing positions. Preliminary tests showed that the rollerized engine was running with 1/3 less friction than the standard display engine. Additional friction testing and noise characterization was cut short because of shipping damage to the rollerized engine display and because of other project priorities. The team did successfully demonstrate the ability to package roller bearings satisfactorily in numerous locations in a typical automotive engine. The scope of this project did not include durability demonstration and that subject would have to be addressed in any follow-on work. In the actual test phase, the rollerized engine did show significantly less friction in motored dynamometer tests compared to its production equivalent. The 5-10% improvement measured in this study was about half that seen in other studies. However, the fired test results did not show a reduction in friction which did not match prior experience or expectations. Subsequent teardown and inspection of the rollerized engine revealed potential sources of excessive friction in the experimental application. These features would be eliminated in a design not based on modification of production parts. The team is confident (based on experience) that friction reduction would be realized with proper modifications.

Kolarik, Robert V. II; Shattuck, Charles W.; Copper, Anthony P.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Rubber friction on (apparently) smooth lubricated surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study rubber sliding friction on hard lubricated surfaces. We show that even if the hard surface appears smooth to the naked eye, it may exhibit short wavelength roughness, which may give the dominant contribution to rubber friction. That is, the observed sliding friction is mainly due to the viscoelastic deformations of the rubber by the substrate surface asperities. The presented results are of great importance for rubber sealing and other rubber applications involving (apparently) smooth surfaces.

M. Mofidi; B. Prakash; B. N. J. Persson; O. Albohl

2007-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

80

Friction as Basis for a Phonon Maser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evidence is provided from experiment, for the hypothesis that defect organization (internal friction) is a means for operation of a phonon maser.

Randall D. Peters

2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Abstract--Friction modeling is essential for joint dynamic identification and control. Joint friction is composed of a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Friction modeling is essential for joint dynamic identification and control. Joint friction is composed of a viscous and a dry friction force. According to Coulomb law, dry friction depends linearly on the load in the transmission. However, in robotics field, a constant dry friction is frequently

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

82

Some Hamiltonian Models of Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical results on some models describing the motion of a tracer particle through a Bose-Einstein condensate are described. In the limit of a very dense, very weakly interacting Bose gas and for a very large particle mass, the dynamics of the coupled system is determined by classical non-linear Hamiltonian equations of motion. The particle's motion exhibits deceleration corresponding to friction (with memory) caused by the emission of Cerenkov radiation of gapless modes into the gas. Precise results are stated and outlines of proofs are presented. Some technical details are deferred to forthcoming papers.

Juerg Froehlich; Zhou Gang; Avy Soffer

2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

83

Energy conversion device and method of reducing friction therein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device configured for converting energy includes a first surface, a second surface configured for moving with respect to the first surface during operation of the device, and a coating disposed on at least one of the first surface and the second surface. The coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy represented by the general formula AlMgB.sub.14--X, wherein X is present in an amount of from 0 to 70 parts by weight based on 100 parts by weight of the ceramic alloy and is a doping agent selected from the group of Group IV elements and borides and nitrides thereof, and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon in a gradient concentration. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12.

Solovyeva, Lyudmila Mikhaylovna; Jansson, Kyle S; Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim; Zhu, Dong; Milner, Robert; Daughterty, Early Eugene; Higdon, Clifton Baxter; Elagamy, Kamel Abdel-Khalik; Hicks, Aaron Michael

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

84

Stress Wave Source Characterization: Impact, Fracture, and Sliding Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tremor like signals in friction experiments, Geophys. Res.analysis of the state- and rate-dependent friction law:Static friction, Physical Rev. B 59, 14313-14327. Bisschop,

McLaskey, Gregory Christofer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Dissimilar friction welding of titanium alloys to alloy 718  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of advanced, high-performance gas-turbine engines will require the utilization of elevated-temperature titanium-based materials, including conventional alloys, titanium aluminides, and titanium metal-matrix composites. The most efficient utilization of these materials in the engine compressor section would be achieved by directly joining these materials to existing nickel-base superalloys, such as Alloy 718. To date, the dissimilar welding of titanium alloys to nickel-based alloys has not been common practice because intermetallic compounds form in the weld and cause embrittlement. Special welding techniques must be developed to inhibit this compound formation and to provide high strength welds. In this investigation, a friction welding process was developed for joining titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) to nickel-based superalloy Alloy 718. An interlayer system comprised of copper and niobium sheet layers was employed as a diffusion barrier and weld deformation enhancer. A postweld heat treatment (PWHT, 700{degrees}C for 20 min in vacuum) under axial pressure (Ksi) was used to improve the joint strength consistency. The following conclusions can be drawn from this investigation: (1) A friction welding technique has been developed for joining titanium alloys (Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo and Ti-6Al-4V) to Alloy 718 using an interlayer system of niobium and copper. Joint strengths averaging approximately 50 Ksi were achieved. (2) Deformation was concentrated in the interlayers, especially the copper interlayer, during friction welding. Increased reduction in length (RIL) during friction welding resulted in a decrease in the interlayer thicknesses. (3) The EDS results showed that the niobium and copper interlayers prevent interdiffusion between the two parent metals, producing formation of detrimental phases.

Kuo, M.; Albright, C.E.; Baeslack, W.A. III

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Comparison of Frictional Heating Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to compare the predicted temperature rises using four well-known models for frictional heating under a few selected conditions in which similar variable inputs are provided to each model. Classic papers by Archard, Kuhlmann-Wilsdorf, Lim and Ashby, and Rabinowicz have been examined, and a spreadsheet (Excel ) was developed to facilitate the calculations. This report may be used in conjunction with that spreadsheet. It explains the background, assumptions, and rationale used for the calculations. Calculated flash temperatures for selected material combinations, under a range of applied loads and sliding speeds, are tabulated. The materials include AISI 52100 bearing steel, CDA 932 bronze, NBD 200 silicon nitride, Ti-6Al-4V alloy, and carbon-graphite material. Due to the assumptions made by the different models, and the direct way in which certain assumed quantities, like heat sink distances or asperity dimensions, enter into the calculations, frictional hearing results may differ significantly; however, they can be similar in certain cases in light of certain assumptions that are shared between the models.

Davies, Nicholas R [ORNL; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Friction Coefficient for Quarks in Supergravity Duals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study quarks moving in strongly-coupled plasmas that have supergravity duals. We compute the friction coefficient of strings dual to such quarks for general static supergravity backgrounds near the horizon. Our results also show that a previous conjecture on the bound has to be modified and higher friction coefficients can be achieved.

E. Antonyan

2006-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

88

Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in Commercial Gear Oils at Elevated Temperatures Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in...

89

Friction forces on phase transition fronts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In cosmological first-order phase transitions, the microscopic interaction of the phase transition fronts with non-equilibrium plasma particles manifests itself macroscopically as friction forces. In general, it is a nontrivial problem to compute these forces, and only two limits have been studied, namely, that of very slow walls and, more recently, ultra-relativistic walls which run away. In this paper we consider ultra-relativistic velocities and show that stationary solutions still exist when the parameters allow the existence of runaway walls. Hence, we discuss the necessary and sufficient conditions for the fronts to actually run away. We also propose a phenomenological model for the friction, which interpolates between the non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic values. Thus, the friction depends on two friction coefficients which can be calculated for specific models. We then study the velocity of phase transition fronts as a function of the friction parameters, the thermodynamic parameters, and the amount of supercooling.

Mégevand, Ariel, E-mail: megevand@mdp.edu.ar [IFIMAR (CONICET–UNMdP), Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, UNMdP, Deán Funes 3350, (7600) Mar del Plata (Argentina)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Viscous drag reduction in boundary layers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present volume discusses the development status of stability theory for laminar flow control design, applied aspects of laminar-flow technology, transition delays using compliant walls, the application of CFD to skin friction drag-reduction, active-wave control of boundary-layer transitions, and such passive turbulent-drag reduction methods as outer-layer manipulators and complex-curvature concepts. Also treated are such active turbulent drag-reduction technique applications as those pertinent to MHD flow drag reduction, as well as drag reduction in liquid boundary layers by gas injection, drag reduction by means of polymers and surfactants, drag reduction by particle addition, viscous drag reduction via surface mass injection, and interactive wall-turbulence control.

Bushnell, D.M.; Hefner, J.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Dynamical Friction on extended perturbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Following a wave-mechanical treatment we calculate the drag force exerted by an infinite homogeneous background of stars on a perturber as this makes its way through the system. We recover Chandrasekhar's classical dynamical friction (DF) law with a modified Coulomb logarithm. We take into account a range of models that encompasses all plausible density distributions for satellite galaxies by considering the DF exerted on a Plummer sphere and a perturber having a Hernquist profile. It is shown that the shape of the perturber affects only the exact form of the Coulomb logarithm. The latter converges on small scales, because encounters of the test and field stars with impact parameters less than the size of the massive perturber become inefficient. We confirm this way earlier results based on the impulse approximation of small angle scatterings.

O. Esquivel; B. Fuchs

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Pertechnetate (TcO4-) reduction by reactive ferrous iron forms...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The speciation of redox product Tc(IV) was not affected by reduction rate or Fe(II) mineralogy. Citation: Peretyazhko T, JM Zachara, RK Kukkadapu, SM Heald, IV Kutnyakov, CT...

93

Skin friction for steel piles in sand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SkiN FRICTION FOR STEZL PIIZS IN SAND A Theeia by I. H. Sulaiman Submittei io the graduate College of t, he Texan AAB Univen-ity in Ixantial fulfil. ment of bhe zequiremenbu for the degree of NASTZR 0F SCISNCZ May 196'7 bsrjor Subject...: Civil Engineering SKIN FRICTION FOR STEEL PILES IN SAND A Thesis by I. H. Sulaiman Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of C mmittee Head of Department Memb Member 111 Skin Friction For Steel Piles in Sand (May 1967) Ibr shim Hikmat...

Sulaiman, Ibrahim Hikmat

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

94

Friction Problems in Servomechanisms: Modeling and Compensation Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction Problems in Servomechanisms: Modeling and Compensation Techniques Jan Tommy Gravdahl of this presentation Introduction Friction models 1. Static models 2. Models with time delay 3. Dynamic models Friction compensation 1. Non-model based compensation 2. Compensation based on static friction models 3

Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

95

Postulated Mesoscale Quantum of Internal Friction Hysteresis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evidence is provided, from yet another experiment, for the existence of a mesoscale quantum of internal friction hysteresis, having the value of the electron rest energy divided by the fine structure constant.

Randall D. Peters

2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

96

Compton-Energy Scale of Friction Quantization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerous different experiments by the author, approaching nearly two decades of study, point strongly toward the possibility that friction operates around a mesoscale quantum of energy having the value 11 pJ.

Randall D. Peters

2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

97

Friction of Materials for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This brief overview of friction-related issues in materials for automobiles is invited for a special issue on automotive materials in the ASM journal AM&P. It describes a range of areas in a ground vehicle in which friction must be controlled or minimized. Applications range from piston rings to tires, and from brakes to fuel injector components. A perspective on new materials and lubricants, and the need for validation testing is presented.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Friction in Forming of UD Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inter-ply and tool/ply friction play a dominant role in hot stamp forming of UD fiber-reinforced thermoplastic laminates. This research treats friction measurements of a PEEK-AS4 composite system. To this end, an in-house developed friction tester is utilized to pull a laminate through two heat controlled clamping platens. The friction coefficient is determined by relating the clamp force to the pull force. The geometry of the gap between the clamping platens is monitored with micrometer accuracy. A first approach to describe the relation between the geometry and frictional behavior is undertaken by applying a standard thin-film theory for hydrodynamic lubrication. Experimental measurements showed that the thin-film theory does not entirely cover the underlying physics. Thus a second model is utilized, which employs a Leonov-model to describe the shear deformation of the matrix material, while its viscosity is described with a multi-mode Maxwell model. The combination of both models shows the potential to capture the complete frictional behavior.

Sachs, U.; Haanappel, S. P. [Thermoplastic Composite Research Center, University of Twente, Horst building, P.O. Box 217, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands); Akkerman, R. [Faculty of Engineering Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands); Thermoplastic Composite Research Center, University of Twente, Horst building, P.O. Box 217, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands); Thije, R. H. W. ten [Aniform Virtual Forming, Nieuwstraat 116, 7411 LP Deventer (Netherlands); Rooij, M. B. de [Faculty of Engineering Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500AE Enschede (Netherlands)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

99

Casimir Friction I: Friction of a vacuum on a spinning dielectric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce the concept of Casimir friction, i.e. friction due to quantum fluctuations. In this first article we describe the calculation of a constant torque, arising from the scattering of quantum fluctuations, on a dielectric rotating in an electromagnetic vacuum.

Yves Pomeau; David C. Roberts

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

100

Initial Development in Joining of ODS Alloys Using Friction Stir Welding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solid-state welding of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA956 sheets using friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated. Butt weld was successfully produced. The weld and base metals were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, and energy dispersion x-ray spectrum. Microhardness mapping was also conducted over the weld region. Analyses indicate that the distribution of the strengthening oxides was preserved in the weld. Decrease in microhardness of the weld was observed but was insignificant. The preliminary results seem to confirm the envisioned feasibility of FSW application to ODS alloy joining. For application to Gen IV nuclear reactor heat exchanger, further investigation is suggested.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Status of Stellite 6 friction testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past several years, researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, have been investigating the performance of motor-operated valves subjected to design basis flow and pressure loads. Part of this research addresses the friction that occurs at the interface between the valve disc and the valve body seats during operation of a gate valve. In most gate valves, these surfaces are hardfaced with Stellite 6, a cobalt-based alloy. Analytical methods exist for predicting the thrust needed to operate these valves at specific pressure conditions. To produce accurate valve thrust predictions, the analyst must have a reasonably accurate, though conservative, estimate of the coefficient of friction at the disc-to-seat interface. One of the questions that remains to be answered is whether, and to what extent, aging of the disc and seat surfaces effects the disc-to-seat coefficient of friction. Specifically, does the environment in a nuclear plants piping system cause the accumulation of an oxide film on these surfaces that increases the coefficient of friction; and if so, how great is the increase? This paper presents results of specimen tests addressing this issue, with emphasis on the following: (1) the characteristics and thickness of the oxide film that develops on Stellite 6 as it ages; (2) the change in the friction coefficient of Stellite 6 as it ages, including the question of whether the friction coefficient eventually reaches a plateau; and (3) the effect in-service cycling has on the characteristics and thickness of the oxide film and on the friction coefficient.

Watkins, J.C.; DeWall, K.G. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Weidenhamer, G.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Casimir Friction Force Between Polarizable Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work is a continuation of our recent series of papers on Casimir friction, for a pair of particles of low relative particle velocity. Each particle is modeled as a simple harmonic oscillator. Our basic method, as before, is the use of quantum mechanical statistical mechanics, involving the Kubo formula, at finite temperature. In this work we begin by analyzing the Casimir friction between two particles polarizable in all spatial directions, this being a generalization of our study in EPL 91, 60003 (2010), which was restricted to a pair of particles with longitudinal polarization only. For simplicity the particles are taken to interact via the electrostatic dipole-dipole interaction. Thereafter, we consider the Casimir friction between one particle and a dielectric half-space, and also the friction between two dielectric half-spaces. Finally, we consider general polarizabilities (beyond the simple one-oscillator form), and show how friction occurs at finite temperature when finite frequency regions of the imaginary parts of polarizabilities overlap.

Johan S. Hřye; Iver Brevik

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

103

Rubber friction: role of the flash temperature  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When a rubber block is sliding on a hard rough substrate, the substrate asperities will exert time-dependent deformations of the rubber surface resulting in viscoelastic energy dissipation in the rubber, which gives a contribution to the sliding friction. Most surfaces of solids have roughness on many different length scales, and when calculating the friction force it is necessary to include the viscoelastic deformations on all length scales. The energy dissipation will result in local heating of the rubber. Since the viscoelastic properties of rubber-like materials are extremely strongly temperature dependent, it is necessary to include the local temperature increase in the analysis. At very low sliding velocity the temperature increase is negligible because of heat diffusion, but already for velocities of order 0.01 m/s the local heating may be very important. Here I study the influence of the local heating on the rubber friction, and I show that in a typical case the temperature increase results in a decrease in rubber friction with increasing sliding velocity for v > 0.01 m/s. This may result in stick-slip instabilities, and is of crucial importance in many practical applications, e.g., for the tire-road friction, and in particular for ABS-breaking systems.

B. N. J. Persson

2006-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

104

Enhancement of disoriented chiral condensate domains with friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the effect of friction on domain formation in disoriented chiral condensate. Including a friction term, we solve the equation of motion of the linear sigma model fields, in the Hartree approximation. With boost-invariance and cylinderical symmetry, irrespective of friction, on average, we donot find any indication of domain like formation with quenched initial condition. However, with or without friction, some events can be found with large instabilities, indicating possible DCC domain formation in those events. With friction time scale during which instabilities grows increases. Correspondingly, with friction, it is possible to obtain large sized domains in some particular events.

A. K. Chaudhuri

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

105

Method and device for frictional welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel`s recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding, process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

Peacock, H.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Method and device for frictional welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical canister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained. 5 figs.

Peacock, H.B.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

107

Method and device for frictional welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

Peacock, Harold B. (867 N. Belair Rd., Evans, GA 30809)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Macroscopic approach to the Casimir friction force  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The general formula is derived for the vacuum friction force between two parallel perfectly flat planes bounding two material media separated by a vacuum gap and moving relative to each other with a constant velocity $\\mathbf{v}$. The material media are described in the framework of macroscopic electrodynamics whereas the nonzero temperature and dissipation are taken into account by making use of the Kubo formulae from non-equilibrium statistical thermodynamics. The formula obtained provides a rigorous basis for calculation of the vacuum friction force within the quantum field theory methods in the condensed matter physics. The revealed $v$-dependence of the vacuum friction force proves to be the following: for zero temperature ($T=0$) it is proportional to $(v/c)^3$ and for $T>0$ this force is linear in $(v/c)$.

V. V. Nesterenko; A. V. Nesterenko

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

109

Casimir friction at zero and finite temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Casimir friction problem for dielectric plates that move parallel to each other is treated by assuming one of the plates to be at rest. The other performs a closed loop motion in the longitudinal direction. Therewith by use of energy dissipation the formalism becomes more manageable and transparent than in the conventional setting where uniform sliding motion is assumed from $t=-\\infty$ to $t=+\\infty$. One avoids separating off a reversible interparticle force (independent of friction) from the total force. Moreover, the cases of temperatures $T=0$ and finite $T$ are treated on the same footing. For metal plates we find the friction force to be proportional to $v^3$ at $T=0$ while at finite $T$ it is proportional to $v$ for small $v$ as found earlier. Comparisons with earlier results of Pendry (1997, 2010) and Barton (2011) are made.

Johan S. Hřye; Iver Brevik

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

110

Friction and dilatancy in immersed granular matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The friction of a sliding plate on a thin immersed granular layer obeys Amonton-Coulomb law. We bring to the fore a large set of experimental results which indicate that, over a few decades of values, the effective dynamical friction-coefficient depends neither on the viscosity of the interstitial fluid nor on the size of beads in the sheared layer, which bears out the analogy with the solid-solid friction in a wide range of experimental parameters. We accurately determine the granular-layer dilatancy, which dependance on the grain size and slider velocity can be qualitatively accounted by considering the rheological behaviour of the whole slurry. However, additional results, obtained after modification of the grain surface by a chemical treatment, demonstrate that the theoretical description of the flow properties of granular matter, even immersed, requires the detailed properties of the grain surface to be taken into account.

Thibaut Divoux; Jean-Christophe Géminard

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

111

Dynamical friction in modified Newtonian dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have tested a previous analytical estimate of the dynamical friction timescale in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) with fully non-linear N-body simulations. The simulations confirm that the dynamical friction timescale is significantly shorter in MOND than in equivalent Newtonian systems, i.e. systems with the same phase-space distribution of baryons and additional dark matter. An apparent conflict between this result and the long timescales determined for bars to slow and mergers to be completed in previous N-body simulations of MOND systems is explained. The confirmation of the short dynamical-friction timescale in MOND underlines the challenge that the Fornax dwarf spheroidal poses to the viability of MOND.

C. Nipoti; L. Ciotti; J. Binney; P. Londrillo

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Negative skin friction at Keehi interchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is assumed to be the sum of the structural load, gt, a drag force, F'n, due to the fill within the pile group and a drag force F'n due to the negative skin friction of the soft layer. F = ()t + F'n + F"n (2. 1) where F'n is the weight of fill carried... of this method for an actual case. 2. 2. 3 Brome Brome (1969) describes the state of the practice in Sweden for the calculation of drag forces on piles due to negative skin friction. In Sweden most piles are driven to rock. The compression of the pile...

Porwoll, Hubert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

High fidelity frictional models for MEMS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goals of the present study are to: (1) determine how and why MEMS-scale friction differs from friction on the macro-scale, and (2) to begin to develop a capability to perform finite element simulations of MEMS materials and components that accurately predicts response in the presence of adhesion and friction. Regarding the first goal, a newly developed nanotractor actuator was used to measure friction between molecular monolayer-coated, polysilicon surfaces. Amontons law does indeed apply over a wide range of forces. However, at low loads, which are of relevance to MEMS, there is an important adhesive contribution to the normal load that cannot be neglected. More importantly, we found that at short sliding distances, the concept of a coefficient of friction is not relevant; rather, one must invoke the notion of 'pre-sliding tangential deflections' (PSTD). Results of a simple 2-D model suggests that PSTD is a cascade of small-scale slips with a roughly constant number of contacts equilibrating the applied normal load. Regarding the second goal, an Adhesion Model and a Junction Model have been implemented in PRESTO, Sandia's transient dynamics, finite element code to enable asperity-level simulations. The Junction Model includes a tangential shear traction that opposes the relative tangential motion of contacting surfaces. An atomic force microscope (AFM)-based method was used to measure nano-scale, single asperity friction forces as a function of normal force. This data is used to determine Junction Model parameters. An illustrative simulation demonstrates the use of the Junction Model in conjunction with a mesh generated directly from an atomic force microscope (AFM) image to directly predict frictional response of a sliding asperity. Also with regards to the second goal, grid-level, homogenized models were studied. One would like to perform a finite element analysis of a MEMS component assuming nominally flat surfaces and to include the effect of roughness in such an analysis by using a homogenized contact and friction models. AFM measurements were made to determine statistical information on polysilicon surfaces with different roughnesses, and this data was used as input to a homogenized, multi-asperity contact model (the classical Greenwood and Williamson model). Extensions of the Greenwood and Williamson model are also discussed: one incorporates the effect of adhesion while the other modifies the theory so that it applies to the case of relatively few contacting asperities.

Carpick, Robert W. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Bitsie, Fernando; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Corwin, Alex David; Ashurst, William Robert (Auburn University, Auburn, AL); Jones, Reese E.; Subhash, Ghatu S. (Michigan Technological Institute, Houghton, MI); Street, Mark D. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Sumali, Anton Hartono; Antoun, Bonnie R.; Starr, Michael James; Redmond, James Michael; Flater, Erin E. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI)

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

IMPROVING MIX DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF PERMEABLE FRICTION COURSE MIXTURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Permeable friction course (PFC), or new generation open-graded friction course (OGFC) mixtures, are hot mix asphalt (HMA) characterized by high total air voids (AV) content (minimum 18 %) as compared to the most commonly used dense-graded HMA...

Alvarez Lugo, Allex Eduardo

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

115

POLICY IV.4.1 Volume IV: Human Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POLICY IV.4.1 Volume IV: Human Resources Chapter 4: Classification Issuing Office: Human Resource Resource Services Originally Issued: August 19, 1968 Most Recently Revised: March 3, 2006 1 Classification Responsibilities 7 History 7 Official Documentation 7 Statement of Policy Human Resource Services classifies

116

Roles of Dry Friction in Fluctuating Motion of Adiabatic Piston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The motion of an adiabatic piston under dry friction is investigated to clarify the roles of dry friction in non-equilibrium steady states. We clarify that dry friction can reverse the direction of the piston motion and causes a discontinuity or a cusp-like singularity for velocity distribution functions of the piston. We also show that the heat fluctuation relation is modified under dry friction.

Tomohiko G. Sano; Hisao Hayakawa

2014-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

117

Demand Reduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

118

Friction Stir Welding John Hinch and John Rudge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction Stir Welding John Hinch and John Rudge September 11, 2002 1 Introduction Friction Stir Welding is an innovative technique for joining two pieces of metal. A rapidly rotating tool is pushed that a good model of friction stir welding should be able to predict - the power, the force, the temperature

Rudge, John

119

Enhancing Physicality in Touch Interaction with Programmable Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhancing Physicality in Touch Interaction with Programmable Friction Vincent LĂ©vesque1 , Louise possibilities and outcomes when touch interactions are enhanced with variable surface friction. In a series of four studies, we first confirm that variable friction gives significant performance advantages in low

Levesque, Vincent

120

Friction versus dilation revisited: Insights from theoretical and numerical models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction versus dilation revisited: Insights from theoretical and numerical models N. Makedonska,1 controlled by the frictional strength of the fault gouge, a granular layer that accumulates between the fault friction coefficient) of such granular layers is the systems resistance to dilation, a byprocess

Einat, Aharonov

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ORIGINAL PAPER Modeling of Thermal-Assisted Dislocation Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Modeling of Thermal-Assisted Dislocation Friction Y. Liao · L. D. Marks Received: 25+Business Media, LLC 2009 Abstract We generalize a model for friction at a sliding interface involving the motion of thermally activated friction. Going further, we suggest a plausible method for generalizing the fric- tional

Marks, Laurence D.

122

Dry friction avalanches: Experiment and theory Sergey V. Buldyrev,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dry friction avalanches: Experiment and theory Sergey V. Buldyrev,1 John Ferrante,2 and Fredy R and theoretical models are presented supporting the conjecture that dry friction stick-slip is described by self the variation of the friction force as a function of time. We study nominally flat surfaces of matching aluminum

Buldyrev, Sergey

123

Friction-Induced Vibrations in Railway Transportation Chandra Prakash Sharma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction-Induced Vibrations in Railway Transportation by Chandra Prakash Sharma B. Tech., Sardar;Abstract Controlling friction at the wheel-rail interface is indispensable for extending track life implementation of friction modifier system consists of a stick-tube assembly, attached through a bracket which

Phani, A. Srikantha

124

Friction and Adhesion Hysteresis between Surfactant Monolayers in Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction and Adhesion Hysteresis between Surfactant Monolayers in Water Wuge H. Briscoe Physical friction between two surfaces in adhesive contact with the loading­unloading adhesion hysteresis between them. We then examine in light of this model the observed low friction between two mica surfaces coated

Klein, Jacob

125

Analysis and Model-Based Control of Servomechanisms With Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis and Model-Based Control of Servomechanisms With Friction Evangelos G. Papadopoulos e Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, 15780 Athens, Greece Friction is responsible for several, model-based feedback compensation is studied for servomechanism tracking tasks. Several kinetic friction

Papadopoulos, Evangelos

126

Molecular friction and epitactic coupling between monolayers in supported bilayers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1535 Molecular friction and epitactic coupling between monolayers in supported bilayers R. Merkel un substrat de membrane couplée (Evans et Sackmann, 1988), on détermine la friction moléculaire coefficients de friction entre les couches en fixant la couche mononucléaire proximale sur le substrat par des

Boyer, Edmond

127

Friction as an activated process Ondej Soucek, Frantisek Gallovic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction as an activated process Ondej Soucek, Frantisek Gallovic Mathematical Institute University in Prague 30.11.2011 (Geodynamical seminar) Friction as an activated process 30.11.2011 1 / 19 #12 - non-smoothness of the "potentials" (Geodynamical seminar) Friction as an activated process 30

Cerveny, Vlastislav

128

Seismic Interstory Drift Demands in Steel Friction Damped Braced Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 2.4: Sumitomo friction damper and installation detail (Aiken and Kelly 1990) .... 9 Figure 2.5: Slotted bolted connection of Fitzgerald (1989) and typical force- displacement loop... a superior performance of friction damped braced frames (FDBFs) using this device compared to traditional earthquake resisting systems. Figure 2.2: Friction Damper of Pall (1982) 8 In Japan, Sumitomo Metal Industries developed...

Peternell Altamira, Luis E.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

129

Critical length limiting super-low friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the demonstration of super-low friction (superlubricity) in graphite at nanoscale, one of the main challenges in the field of nano- and micro-mechanics was to scale this phenomenon up. A key question to be addressed is to what extent superlubricity could persist, and what mechanisms could lead to its failure. Here, using an edge-driven Frenkel-Kontorova model, we establish a connection between the critical length above which superlubricity disappears and both intrinsic material properties and experimental parameters. A striking boost in dissipated energy with chain length emerges abruptly due to a high-friction stick-slip mechanism caused by deformation of the slider leading to a local commensuration with the substrate lattice. We derived a parameter-free analytical model for the critical length that is in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. Our results provide a new perspective on friction and nano-manipulation and can serve as a theoretical basis for designing nano-devices with super-low friction, such as carbon nanotubes.

Ming Ma; Andrea Benassi; Andrea Vanossi; Michael Urbakh

2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

130

Casimir Friction Force for Moving Harmonic Oscillators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Casimir friction is analyzed for a pair of dielectric particles in relative motion. We first adopt a microscopic model for harmonically oscillating particles at finite temperature T moving non-relativistically with constant velocity. We use a statistical-mechanical description where time-dependent correlations are involved. This description is physical and direct, and, in spite of its simplicity, is able to elucidate the essentials of the problem. This treatment elaborates upon, and extends, an earlier theory of ours back in 1992. The energy change Delta E turns out to be finite in general, corresponding to a finite friction force. In the limit of zero temperature the formalism yields, however, Delta E ->0, this being due to our assumption about constant velocity, meaning slowly varying coupling. For couplings varying more rapidly, there will also be a finite friction force at T=0. As second part of our work, we consider the friction problem using time-dependent perturbation theory. The dissipation, basically a second order effect, is obtainable with the use of first order theory, the reason being the absence of cross terms due to uncorrelated phases of eigenstates. The third part of the present paper is to demonstrate explicitly the equivalence of our results with those recently obtained by Barton (2010); this being not a trivial task since the formal results are seemingly quite different from each other.

Johan S. Hřye; Iver Brevik

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

131

LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lab IV - 1 LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY In this lab you will begin to use the principle of conservation of energy to determine the motion resulting from interactions that are difficult to analyze using force concepts alone. You will explore how conservation of energy is applied to real interactions. Keep

Minnesota, University of

132

Modelling of the Effects of Friction and Compression on Explosives ESGI80 Modelling of the Effects of Friction and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling of the Effects of Friction and Compression on Explosives ESGI80 Modelling of the Effects of Friction and Compression on Explosives Problem presented by John Curtis Atomic Weapons Establishment, based on the compression of a sample of the explosive. The study group identified frictional heating

Purvis, Richard

133

Shear Jamming in Granular Experiments without Basal Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jammed states of frictional granular systems can be induced by shear strain at densities below the isostatic jamming density ($\\phi_c$). It remains unclear, however, how much friction affects this so-called shear-jamming. Friction appears in two ways in this type of experiment: friction between particles, and friction between particles and the base on which they rest. Here, we study how particle-bottom friction, or basal friction, affects shear jamming in quasi-two dimensional experiments. In order to study this issue experimentally, we apply simple shear to a disordered packing of photoelastic disks. We can tune the basal friction of the particles by immersing the particles in a density matched liquid, thus removing the normal force, hence the friction, between the particles and base. We record the overall shear stress, and particle motion, and the photoelastic response of the particles. We compare the shear response of dry and immersed samples, which enables us to determine how basal friction affects shear jamming. Our findings indicate that changing the basal friction shifts the point of shear jamming, but it does not change the basic phenomenon of shear jamming.

Hu Zheng; Joshua A. Dijksman; Robert P. Behringer

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

134

The influence of surface topography on the forming friction of automotive aluminum sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in utilizing aluminum alloys in automobiles has increased in recent years as a result of the desire to lower automobile weight and, consequently, increase fuel economy. While aluminum alloy use in cast parts has increased, outer body panel applications are still being investigated. The industry is interested in improving the formability of these sheet alloys by a combination of alloy design and processing. A different avenue of improving the formability of these alloys may be through patterning of the sheet surface. Surface patterns hold the lubricant during the forming process, with a resulting decrease in the sheet-die surface contact. While it has been speculated that an optimum surface pattern would consist of discrete cavities, detailed investigation into the reduction of forming friction by utilizing discrete patterns is lacking. A series of discrete patterns were investigated to determine the dependence of the forming friction of automotive aluminum alloys on pattern lubricant carrying capacity and on material strength. Automotive aluminum alloys used in outer body panel applications were rolled on experimental rolls that had been prepared with a variety of discrete patterns. All patterns for each alloy were characterized before and after testing both optically and, to determine pattern lubricant capacity, using three dimensional laser profilometry. A draw bead simulation (DBS) friction tester was designed and fabricated to determine the forming friction of the patterned sheets. Tensile testing and frictionless DBS testing were performed to ascertain the material properties of each sheet. The most striking result of this work was the inversely linear dependence of forming friction on the lubricant carrying capacity of the discrete patterns.

Kramer, P.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

nuclear energy Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum...

136

Control of friction at the nanoscale  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus are described for control of friction at the nanoscale. A method of controlling frictional dynamics of a plurality of particles using non-Lipschitzian control includes determining an attribute of the plurality of particles; calculating an attribute deviation by subtracting the attribute of the plurality of particles from a target attribute; calculating a non-Lipschitzian feedback control term by raising the attribute deviation to a fractionary power .xi.=(2m+1)/(2n+1) where n=1, 2, 3 . . . and m=0, 1, 2, 3 . . . , with m strictly less than n and then multiplying by a control amplitude; and imposing the non-Lipschitzian feedback control term globally on each of the plurality of particles; imposing causes a subsequent magnitude of the attribute deviation to be reduced.

Barhen, Jacob; Braiman, Yehuda Y.; Protopopescu, Vladimir

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

137

The effect of friction on drum brakes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The boundary element method (BEM) has been developed for a long period of time. Cruse and Wilson developed an isoparametric quadratic element. Rizzo, Cruse, Rizzo and Shippy, and Swedlow and cruse applied the method to various problems. It shows that the BEM can provide a very good analytical result in the linear problem and it can reduce time in preparation of numerical data. Watson and Newcomb pointed out that the pressure distribution on the contact surface of the brake drum and the lining plate do not vary significantly along the axis. The deflection can be reduced by an appropriate design of the web; therefore, two dimensional analysis with the BEM is used in this analysis. Based on the authors` knowledge, this is the first paper to analyze the drum brake by using the BEM. The assumptions are the brake drum to be a rigid body, perfect interface contact between the drum and the shoe, the constant friction coefficient of the friction material and the thermal effect to be neglected. The two dimensional equations are derived based on the Somigliana`s identity. Since there is no shape function and no need of the Jacobin for the coordinate transform, to integrate numerically is easier and to write a computer code is simpler for the constant value element than the second order element. The linear element is inappropriate to treat the comer problem. Using the linear elements or second order elements creates discontinuous phenomena along the irregular boundary. The common nodal point has different normal vector and boundary conditions. It is necessary to have an extra equation to provide a unique solution for the final linear equation. Using the constant value element can get rid of this problem. The effect of the friction on the pressure distribution at the friction interface is studied. The calculated results of the pressure distribution are compared with the available data. The mathematical model can be used as a design tool to predict the performance of drum brakes.

Huang, Y.M.; Shyr, J.S. [National Taiwan Univ. (China)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Friction- and wear-reducing coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12. A method of coating a substrate includes cleaning the substrate, forming the first layer on the substrate, and depositing the second layer onto the first layer to thereby coat the substrate.

Zhu, Dong (Farmington Hills, MI); Milner, Robert (Warren, MI); Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim (Troy, MI)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

139

Mutual Friction in Superfluid Neutron Stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss vortex-mediated mutual friction in the two-fluid model for superfluid neutron star cores. Our discussion is based on the general formalism developed by Carter and collaborators, which makes due distinction between transport velocity and momentum for each fluid. This is essential for an implementation of the so-called entrainment effect, whereby the flow of one fluid imparts momentum in the other and vice versa. The mutual friction follows by balancing the Magnus force that acts on the quantised neutron vortices with a resistive force due to the scattering of electrons off of the magnetic field with which each vortex core is endowed. We derive the form of the macroscopic mutual friction force which is relevant for a model based on smooth-averaging over a collection of vortices. We discuss the coefficients that enter the expression for this force, and the timescale on which the two interpenetrating fluids in a neutron star core are coupled. This discussion confirms that our new formulation accords well with previous work in this area.

N. Andersson; T. Sidery; G. L. Comer

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

140

Some Hamiltonian models of friction II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present paper we consider the motion of a very heavy tracer particle in a medium of a very dense, non-interacting Bose gas. We prove that, in a certain mean-field limit, the tracer particle will be decelerated and come to rest somewhere in the medium. Friction is caused by emission of Cerenkov radiation of gapless modes into the gas. Mathematically, a system of semilinear integro-differential equations, introduced in Froehlich et al. ['Some hamiltonian models of friction,' J. Math. Phys. 52(8), 083508 (2011)], describing a tracer particle in a dispersive medium is investigated, and decay properties of the solution are proven. This work is an extension of Froehlich et al. ['Friction in a model of hamiltonian dynamics,' Commun. Math. Phys. 315(2), 401-444 (2012)]; it is an extension because no weak coupling limit for the interaction between tracer particle and medium is assumed. The technical methods used are dispersive estimates and a contraction principle.

Egli, Daniel; Gang Zhou [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Friction-Induced Fluid Heating in Nanoscale Helium Flows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the mechanism of friction-induced fluid heating in nanoconfinements. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the temperature variations of liquid helium in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. It is found that the fluid heating is dominated by different sources of friction as the external driving force is changed. For small external force, the fluid heating is mainly caused by the internal viscous friction in the fluid. When the external force is large and causes fluid slip at the surfaces of channel walls, the friction at the fluid-solid interface dominates over the internal friction in the fluid and is the major contribution to fluid heating. An asymmetric temperature gradient in the fluid is developed in the case of nonidentical walls and the general temperature gradient may change sign as the dominant heating factor changes from internal to interfacial friction with increasing external force.

Li Zhigang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

142

Dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Friction surfacing involves complex thermo-mechanical phenomena. In this study, the nature of dynamic recrystallization in friction surfaced austenitic stainless steel AISI 316L coatings was investigated using electron backscattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the alloy 316L undergoes discontinuous dynamic recrystallization under conditions of moderate Zener-Hollomon parameter during friction surfacing. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L friction surfaced coatings is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfacing leads to discontinuous dynamic recrystallization in alloy 316L. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Strain rates in friction surfacing exceed 400 s{sup -1}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Estimated grain size matches well with experimental observations in 316L coatings.

Puli, Ramesh, E-mail: rameshpuli2000@gmail.com; Janaki Ram, G.D.

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Friction (Chapter 5, section 8) & Circular Motion (Chapter 6,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Week 5 Friction (Chapter 5, section 8) & Circular Motion (Chapter 6, sections 1-2) Lecture Quiz 1 travels in time t is: A. x B. 1.5x C. 3x D. 4.5x E. 9x Forces of Friction When an object to the interactions between the object and its environment This resistance is called the force of friction Forces

144

Fact or friction: Inferring rheology from nonvolcanic tremor and low-frequency earthquakes on the deep San Andreas fault  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.5 Optimal friction coefficient . . . . . . . . . . . . . .effective coefficient of friction. Values for the tremor,procedure on each friction value for each catalogue. Maximum

Thomas, Amanda

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Effective friction law for smallscale fault heterogeneity in 3D dynamic rupture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective friction law for smallscale fault heterogeneity in 3D dynamic rupture S. Latour,1 M friction, we numerically construct effective friction laws that integrate the effects of smallscale, the static friction heterogeneities and the friction law. We first define a periodic smallscale heterogeneous

Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

146

Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs...

147

Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

II Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

148

Micro- and macroscale coefficients of friction of cementitious materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Millions of metric tons of cementitious materials are produced, transported and used in construction each year. The ease or difficulty of handling cementitious materials is greatly influenced by the material friction properties. In the present study, the coefficients of friction of cementitious materials were measured at the microscale and macroscale. The materials tested were commercially-available Portland cement, Class C fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag. At the microscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from the interaction forces between cementitious particles using an Atomic Force Microscope. At the macroscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from stresses on bulk cementitious materials under direct shear. The study indicated that the microscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.020 to 0.059, and the macroscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.56 to 0.75. The fly ash studied had the highest microscale coefficient of friction and the lowest macroscale coefficient of friction. -- Highlights: •Microscale (interparticle) coefficient of friction (COF) was determined with AFM. •Macroscale (bulk) COF was measured under direct shear. •Fly ash had the highest microscale COF and the lowest macroscale COF. •Portland cement against GGBFS had the lowest microscale COF. •Portland cement against Portland cement had the highest macroscale COF.

Lomboy, Gilson [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)] [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Sundararajan, Sriram, E-mail: srirams@iastate.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Wang, Kejin [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)] [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Friction of different monolayer lubricants in MEMs interfaces.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details results from our last year of work (FY2005) on friction in MEMS as funded by the Campaign 6 program for the Microscale Friction project. We have applied different monolayers to a sensitive MEMS friction tester called the nanotractor. The nanotractor is also a useful actuator that can travel {+-}100 {micro}m in 40 nm steps, and is being considered for several MEMS applications. With this tester, we can find static and dynamic coefficients of friction. We can also quantify deviations from Amontons' and Coulomb's friction laws. Because of the huge surface-to-volume ratio at the microscale, surface properties such as adhesion and friction can dominate device performance, and therefore such deviations are important to quantify and understand. We find that static and dynamic friction depend on the monolayer lubricant applied. The friction data can be modeled with a non-zero adhesion force, which represents a deviation from Amontons' Law. Further, we show preliminary data indicating that the adhesion force depends not only on the monolayer, but also on the normal load applied. Finally, we also observe slip deflections before the transition from static to dynamic friction, and find that they depend on the monolayer.

Carpick, Robert W. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Street, Mark D. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Ashurst, William Robert (Auburn University, Auburn, AL); Corwin, Alex David

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The influence of internal friction on rotordynamic instability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and suggest that subsynchronous vibration in rotating machinery can have numerous sources or causes. Also, subsynchronous whirl due to internal friction is not a highly repeatable phenomenon....

Srinivasan, Anand

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

151

Friction in a Model of Hamiltonian Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the motion of a heavy tracer particle weakly coupled to a dense ideal Bose gas exhibiting Bose-Einstein condensation. In the so-called mean-field limit, the dynamics of this system approaches one determined by nonlinear Hamiltonian evolution equations describing a process of emission of Cerenkov radiation of sound waves into the Bose-Einstein condensate along the particle's trajectory. The emission of Cerenkov radiation results in a friction force with memory acting on the tracer particle and causing it to decelerate until it comes to rest.

Juerg Froehlich; Zhou Gang; Avy Soffer

2011-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

152

Casimir friction: Relative motion more generally  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper extends our recent study on Casimir friction forces for dielectric plates moving parallel to each other [J. S. H{\\o}ye and I. Brevik, Eur. Phys. J. D {\\bf 68}, 61 (2014)], to the case where the plates are no longer restricted to rectilinear motion. Part of the mathematical formalism thereby becomes more cumbersome, but reduces in the end to the form that we could expect to be the natural one in advance. As an example, we calculate the Casimir torque on a planar disc rotating with constant angular velocity around its vertical symmetry axis next to another plate.

Johan S. Hřye; Iver Brevik

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

A Drucker-Prager model for elastic contact with friction; A Drucker-Prager model for elastic contact with friction.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In mumerical contact simulations with friction, the simple Coloumb law is usually employed. Standard plasticity models are difficult to use since the balance enforced… (more)

wu, yunxian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Nitrate reduction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

Dziewinski, Jacek J. (Los Alamos, NM); Marczak, Stanislaw (Los Alamos, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

FRICTION AND WEAR STUDY OF DISPERSED PHASE INTERMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN FERROUS MATRICES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rights. .j . J LBL-5771 FRICTION AND WEAR STUDY OF DISPERSEDS. THESIS) i LBL-5771 FRICTION AND WEAR STUDY OF DISPERSEDWilman, "A Theory of Friction and Wear During the Abrasion

Riddle, R.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Superhard and low-friction coatings and surface...

157

Weak formulations and solution multiplicity of equilibrium configurations with Coulomb friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Weak formulations and solution multiplicity of equilibrium configurations with Coulomb friction configurations of elastic struc- tures in contact with Coulomb friction. We obtain a variational formulation configurations with arbitrary small friction coefficients. We illustrate the result in two space dimensions

Bostan, Mihai

158

Unexpected formation of a trinuclear complex containing a Ta(IV)-Ta(IV) bond in the reactions of ButN=Ta(NMe2)3 with silanes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new trinuclear species containing a Ta(IV)-Ta(IV) bond, Ta{sub 3}({mu}-H)({mu}-NMe{sub 2})({mu}NBu{sup t}){sub 2}(NBu{sup t})(NMe{sub 2}){sub 5}, has been formed by reductive elimination of H{sub 2}. Ta{sub 2}H{sub 2}({mu}-NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(NBu{sup t}){sub 2} has also been isolated. O{sub 2} oxidizes the Ta(IV)-Ta(IV) bond to yield Ta{sub 3}({mu}{sub 3}-O)(H)({mu}NBu{sup t})({mu}-NMe{sub 2}){sub 2}(NMe{sub 2}){sub 4}(NBu{sup t}){sub 2} under ligand exchange. Delocalization of d electrons is discussed.

Cheng, Shu-Jian [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dougan, Brenda A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Steren, Carlos A. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Wang, Xiaoping [ORNL; Chen, Xue-Tai [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lin, Zhenyang [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Xue, Zi-Ling [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Friction and the Inverted Pendulum Stabilization Problem Sue Ann Campbell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction and the Inverted Pendulum Stabilization Problem Sue Ann Campbell Department of Applied. Keywords: inverted pendulum, friction, feedback control, stability analysis. 1 #12;INTRODUCTION to be the cause of failure of a feedback controller to stabilize a three link inverted pendulum system [2

Campbell, Sue Ann

160

Friction Stir Welding of Lightweight Vehicle Structures: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, LLC and Ford Motor Company was to establish friction stir welding (FSW) and friction stir processing as viable options for use in construction of lightweight substructures for trucks and cars, including engine cradles, suspension sub frames, instrument panel supports, and intake manifolds.

Sanella, M.L.

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Role of Friction in Materials Selection for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an invited article for a special issue of the ASM International monthly magazine that concerns "Automotive Materials and Applications." The article itself overviews frictional considerations in material selection for automobiles. It discusses implications for energy efficiency (engine friction) and safety (brakes) among other topics.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Quantized friction force: Lindbladian model satisfying Ehrenfest theorems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a quantum counterpart of classical friction, a dissipative force acting against the direction of motion with the magnitude proportional to particle's velocity. In particular, a Lindblad master equation is derived satisfying the appropriate dynamical relations for observables (i.e., the Ehrenfest theorems). These findings significantly advance a long search for a universal valid Lindbladian model of quantum friction.

Denys I. Bondar; Renan Cabrera; Andre Campos; Herschel A. Rabitz

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

163

METHODS PAPER Addressing Practical Challenges of Low Friction Coefficient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sensitive to the lubrication, environment, and contact conditions, and under nominally constant conditions Tribol Trans ASME 127:673­678, 2005), ``...the measurement of friction coefficient is extremely sensitive, friction coefficients range from about 0.2 to 1 for typical material pairs under standard conditions

Sawyer, Wallace

164

The nonlinear nature of friction Michael Urbakh1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and GPa (104 atmospheres) within microseconds. These are extreme conditions that cannot always be treated ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................... Tribology is the study of adhesion, friction, lubrication and wear of surfaces in relative motion areas. The development of durable and/or low-friction surfaces and thin lubricating films has become

La Rosa, Andres H.

165

Friction coefficient of soft contact lenses: measurements and modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, FL 32611, USA Received 12 October 2004; accepted 16 January 2005 Tribological conditions for contact elastohydrodynamic lubrication. Finally, the largest contributors to the friction force in these experiments were comfort is related to friction. The mechanical properties of hydro- gels are extremely sensitive to water

Sawyer, Wallace

166

Model coupling friction and adhesion for steel-concrete interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model coupling friction and adhesion for steel- concrete interfaces Michel Raous Laboratoire de: In this paper the interface behaviour between steel and concrete, during pull out tests, is numerically a variable friction coefficient in order to simulate the behaviour of the steel-concrete interface during

Boyer, Edmond

167

Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ... The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy enhance safety and security, and develop nuclear power as an energy source for industrial applications Information ... U.S. Department of Energy www.energy.gov DOE Office of Nuclear Energy www.nuclear

Kemner, Ken

169

E-Print Network 3.0 - asbestos-free friction lining Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

identification necessary. Off-line identification of friction is described by Armstrong 2... -feedback PD part and of an on-line friction compensation term, T f , which...

170

E-Print Network 3.0 - avoid friction induced Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

friction induced Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: avoid friction induced Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 INITIAL DEVELOPMENT OF A...

171

Ice friction: The effects of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of surface roughness, structure, and hydrophobicity on ice friction is studied systematically over a wide range of temperature and sliding speeds using several metallic interfaces. Hydrophobicity in combination with controlled roughness at the nanoscale is achieved by femtosecond laser irradiation to mimic the lotus effect on the slider's surface. The controlled roughness significantly increases the coefficient of friction at low sliding speeds and temperatures well below the ice melting point. However, at temperatures close to the melting point and relatively higher speeds, roughness and hydrophobicity significantly decrease ice friction. This decrease in friction is mainly due to the suppression of capillary bridges in spite of the presence of surface asperities that facilitate their formation. Finally, grooves oriented in the sliding direction also significantly decrease friction in the low velocity range compared to scratches and grooves randomly distributed over a surface.

Kietzig, Anne-Marie; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.; Englezos, Peter [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z3 (Canada)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Nonlocal microscopic theory of quantum friction between parallel metallic slabs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a new derivation of the friction force between two metallic slabs moving with constant relative parallel velocity, based on T=0 quantum-field theory formalism. By including a fully nonlocal description of dynamically screened electron fluctuations in the slab, and avoiding the usual matching-condition procedure, we generalize previous expressions for the friction force, to which our results reduce in the local limit. Analyzing the friction force calculated in the two local models and in the nonlocal theory, we show that for physically relevant velocities local theories using the plasmon and Drude models of dielectric response are inappropriate to describe friction, which is due to excitation of low-energy electron-hole pairs, which are properly included in nonlocal theory. We also show that inclusion of dissipation in the nonlocal electronic response has negligible influence on friction.

Despoja, Vito [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal, E-20018 San Sebastian, Basque Country (Spain); Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka 32, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales and Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad del Pais Vasco UPV/EHU, Apto. 1072, E-20080 San Sebastian, Basque Country (Spain); Echenique, Pedro M. [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal, E-20018 San Sebastian, Basque Country (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de Materiales and Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad del Pais Vasco UPV/EHU, Apto. 1072, E-20080 San Sebastian, Basque Country (Spain); Sunjic, Marijan [Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), P. Manuel de Lardizabal, E-20018 San Sebastian, Basque Country (Spain); Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, Bijenicka 32, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

REDUCTION CAPACITY OF SALTSTONE AND SALTSTONE COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The duration that saltstone retains its ability to immobilize some key radionuclides, such as technetium (Tc), plutonium (Pu), and neptunium (Np), depends on its capacity to maintain a low redox status (or low oxidation state). The reduction capacity is a measure of the mass of reductants present in the saltstone; the reductants are the active ingredients that immobilize Tc, Pu, and Np. Once reductants are exhausted, the saltstone loses its ability to immobilize these radionuclides. The reduction capacity values reported here are based on the Ce(IV)/Fe(II) system. The Portland cement (198 {micro}eq/g) and especially the fly ash (299 {micro}eq/g) had a measurable amount of reduction capacity, but the blast furnace slag (820 {micro}eq/g) not surprisingly accounted for most of the reduction capacity. The blast furnace slag contains ferrous iron and sulfides which are strong reducing and precipitating species for a large number of solids. Three saltstone samples containing 45% slag or one sample containing 90% slag had essentially the same reduction capacity as pure slag. There appears to be some critical concentration between 10% and 45% slag in the Saltstone formulation that is needed to create the maximum reduction capacity. Values from this work supported those previously reported, namely that the reduction capacity of SRS saltstone is about 820 {micro}eq/g; this value is recommended for estimating the longevity that the Saltstone Disposal Facility will retain its ability to immobilize radionuclides.

Roberts, K.; Kaplan, D.

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Frictional granular mechanics: A variational approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical properties of a cohesionless granular material are evaluated from grain-scale simulations. Intergranular interactions, including friction and sliding, are modeled by a set of contact rules based on the theories of Hertz, Mindlin, and Deresiewicz. A computer generated, three-dimensional, irregular pack of spherical grains is loaded by incremental displacement of its boundaries. Deformation is described by a sequence of static equilibrium configurations of the pack. A variational approach is employed to find the equilibrium configurations by minimizing the total work against the intergranular loads. Effective elastic moduli are evaluated from the intergranular forces and the deformation of the pack. Good agreement between the computed and measured moduli, achieved with no adjustment of material parameters, establishes the physical soundness of the proposed model.

Holtzman, R.; Silin, D.B.; Patzek, T.W.

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

175

Dynamical friction force exerted on spherical bodies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a rigorous calculation of the dynamical friction force exerted on a spherical massive perturber moving through an infinite homogenous system of field stars. By calculating the shape and mass of the polarization cloud induced by the perturber in the background system, which decelerates the motion of the perturber, we recover Chandrasekhar's drag force law with a modified Coulomb logarithm. As concrete examples we calculate the drag force exerted on a Plummer sphere or a sphere with the density distribution of a Hernquist profile. It is shown that the shape of the perturber affects only the exact form of the Coulomb logarithm. The latter converges on small scales, because encounters of the test and field stars with impact parameters less than the size of the massive perturber become inefficient. We confirm this way earlier results based on the impulse approximation of small angle scatterings.

O. Esquivel; B. Fuchs

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

Some Hamiltonian Models of Friction II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the present paper we consider the motion of a very heavy tracer particle in a medium of a very dense, non-interacting Bose gas. We prove that, in a certain mean-field limit, the tracer particle will be decelerated and come to rest somewhere in the medium. Friction is caused by emission of Cerenkov radiation of gapless modes into the gas. Mathematically, a system of semilinear integro-differential equations, introduced in [FSSG10], describing a tracer particle in a dispersive medium is investigated, and decay properties of the solution are proven. This work is an extension of [FGS10]; it is an extension because no weak coupling limit for the interaction between tracer particle and medium is assumed. The technical methods used are dispersive estimates and a contraction principle.

Daniel Egli; Gang Zhou

2011-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

177

High temperature low friction surface coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature, low friction, flexible coating for metal surfaces which are subject to rubbing contact includes a mixture of three parts graphite and one part cadmium oxide, ball milled in water for four hours, then mixed with thirty percent by weight of sodium silicate in water solution and a few drops of wetting agent. The mixture is sprayed 12-15 microns thick onto an electro-etched metal surface and air dried for thirty minutes, then baked for two hours at 65.degree. C. to remove the water and wetting agent, and baked for an additional eight hours at about 150.degree. C. to produce the optimum bond with the metal surface. The coating is afterwards burnished to a thickness of about 7-10 microns.

Bhushan, Bharat (Watervliet, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

KNMI publication; 196 -IV Rainfall generator for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KNMI publication; 196 - IV Rainfall generator for the Meuse basin Description of 20 000-year simulations R. Leander and T.A. Buishand De Bilt, 2008 #12;KNMI publication = KNMI publicatie; 196 - IV De, without prior permission in writing from the publisher. . . . . #12;KNMI-publication; 196-IV

Stoffelen, Ad

179

Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more road wheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the road wheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the road wheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded. 8 figs.

Davis, R.I.

1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

180

Power-law friction in closely-packed granular materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to understand the nature of friction in closely-packed granular materials, a discrete element simulation on granular layers subjected to isobaric plain shear is performed. It is found that the friction coefficient increases as the power of the shear rate, the exponent of which does not depend on the material constants. Using a nondimensional parameter that is known as the inertial number, the power-law can be cast in a generalized form so that the friction coefficients at different confining pressures collapse on the same curve. We show that the volume fraction also obeys a power-law.

Takahiro Hatano

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more roadwheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the roadwheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the roadwheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded.

Davis, Roy I. (Ypsilanti, MI)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effect of friction on disoriented chiral condensate formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have investigated the effect of friction on the DCC domain formation. We solve the Newton equation of motion for the O(4) fields, with quenched initial condition. The initial fields are randomly distributed in a Gaussian form. In one dimensional expansion, on the average, large DCC domains can not be formed. However, in some particular orbits, large instabilities may occur. This possibility also greatly diminishes with the introduction of friction. But, if the friction is large, the system may be overdamped and then, there is a possibility of large DCC domain formation in some events.

A. K. Chaudhuri

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

183

The ground state problem for a quantum Hamiltonian model describing friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ground state problem for a quantum Hamiltonian model describing friction Laurent Bruneau friction introduced in [4]. This model consists of a particle which interacts with a bosonic reservoir is violated in the case of linear friction, but satis#28;ed when the friction force is proportional

184

Friction Observer and Compensation for Control of Robots with Joint Torque Measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction Observer and Compensation for Control of Robots with Joint Torque Measurement Luc Le Tien-- In this paper we introduce a friction observer for robots with joint torque sensing (in particular for the DLR. The observer output corresponds to the low-pass filtered friction torque. It is used for friction compensation

De Luca, Alessandro

185

Friction dependence of shallow granular flows from discrete par-ticle simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction dependence of shallow granular flows from discrete par- ticle simulations Anthony Thornton relation for the macroscopic bed friction or basal roughness obtained from micro-scale discrete particle simulations of steady flows. We systematically vary the bed friction by changing the contact friction

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

186

Friction, Adhesion, and Deformation: Dynamic Measurements with the Atomic Force Phil Attard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction, Adhesion, and Deformation: Dynamic Measurements with the Atomic Force Microscope Phil. Adhesion Sci. Technol. 16, 753­791 (2002).) Running title: Friction, Adhesion, and Deformation Abstract for the friction force microscope, quantitative measurements of friction and the ef- fect of adhesion, measurement

Attard, Phil

187

Role of friction-induced torque in stick-slip motion J. Scheibert1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of friction-induced torque in stick-slip motion J. Scheibert1, and D.K. Dysthe1 1 PGP describing the kinematics of the transition from static friction to stick-slip motion of a linear elastic the precursors to frictional sliding and the periodic stick- slip motion are controlled by the amount of friction

188

Demonstrations: blocks on planes, scales, to find coefficients of static and kinetic friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demonstrations: ·blocks on planes, scales, to find coefficients of static and kinetic friction Text: Fishbane 5-1, 5-2 Problems: 18, 21, 28, 30, 34 from Ch. 5 What's important: ·frictional forces ·coefficients of static and kinetic friction Friction Where objects move in contact with other objects, we know

Boal, David

189

Hands-On and Minds-On Modeling Activities to Improve Students' Conceptions of Microscopic Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hands-On and Minds-On Modeling Activities to Improve Students' Conceptions of Microscopic Friction of microscopic friction. We will also present our investigation on the relative effectiveness of the use, it is possible to facilitate the refinement of students' ideas of microscopic friction. Keywords: friction

Zollman, Dean

190

Attractiveness of periodic orbits in parametrically forced systems with time-increasing friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Attractiveness of periodic orbits in parametrically forced systems with time- increasing friction with time-increasing friction Michele Bartuccelli,1,a) Jonathan Deane,1,b) and Guido Gentile2,c) 1 oscillator in the presence of friction, and study numerically how time-varying friction affects the dynamics

Bartuccelli, Michele

191

GENERALIZED NEWTON METHODS FOR THE 2DSIGNORINI CONTACT PROBLEM WITH FRICTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GENERALIZED NEWTON METHODS FOR THE 2D­SIGNORINI CONTACT PROBLEM WITH FRICTION K. KUNISCH AND G. STADLER Abstract. The 2D­Signorini contact problem with Tresca and Coulomb friction is discussed in infinite-dimensional Hilbert spaces. First, the problem with given friction (Tresca friction) is considered

Kunisch, Karl

192

Multiyear Program Plan: Reducing Friction and Wear in Heavy Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As described in its multiyear program plan for 1998-2000, the Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) envisions the development of a fuel-flexible, energy-efficient, near-zero-emissions, heavy-duty U.S. diesel engine technology devolving into all truck classes as a real and viable strategy for reducing energy requirements for commercial transport services and the rapidly growing multipurpose vehicle market (pickups, vans, and sport utility vehicles). Implementation of the OHVT program plan will have significant national benefits in energy savings, cleaner air, more jobs, and increased gross domestic product (GDP). Successful implementation will reduce the petroleum consumption of Class 1-8 trucks by 1.4 million barrels of oil per day by 2020 and over 1.8 million by 2030, amounting to a reduction in highway petroleum consumption of 13.2% and 18.6%, respectively. All types of regulated emissions will be reduced, that is, 20% drop in PM10 emissions (41,000 metric tons per year) by 203 0, 17% reduction in CO2 greenhouse gases (205 million metric tons per year), 7% reduction in NOx, 20% reduction in NMHC, and 30% reduction in CO. An increase of 15,000 jobs by 2020 is expected, as is an increase of $24 billion in GDP. The strategy of OHVT is to focus primarily on the diesel engine since it has numerous advantages. It has the highest efficiency of any engine today, 45% versus 30% for production gasoline engines; and it can be made more efficient at least to 55% and possibly up to 63%. It is the engine of choice for heavy vehicles (trucks), because it offers power, efficiency, durability, and reliability and is used extensively in rail, marine, and off-road applications. Its emission can be ultra-low to near zero, and the production infrastructure is already in place. The primary goals of OHVT are as follows: (1) Develop by 2002 the diesel-engine enabling technologies to support large-scale industry dieselization of light trucks, achieving a 35% fuel efficiency improvement over equivalent gasoline-fueled trucks. (2) Develop by 2004 the enabling technology for a Class 7-8 truck with a fuel efficiency of 10 mpg (at 65 mph) that will meet prevailing emission standards, using either diesel or a liquid alternative fuel. (3) Develop by 2006 diesel engines with fuel flexibility and a thermal efficiency of 55% with liquid alternative fuels, and a thermal efficiency of 55% with dedicated gaseous fuels. (4) Develop a methodology for analyzing and evaluating the operation of a heavy vehicle as an integrated system, considering such factors as engine efficiency; emissions; rolling resistance; aerodynamic drag; friction, wear, and lubrication effects; auxiliary power units; material substitutions for reducing weight; and other sources of parasitic energy losses. Overarching these considerations is the need to preserve system functionality, cost, competitiveness, reliability, durability, and safety.

R.R. Fessler; G.R. Fenske

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

193

COBRA-IV PC: A personal computer version of COBRA-IV-I for thermal-hydraulic analysis of rod bundle nuclear fuel elements and cores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

COBRA-IV PC is a modified version of COBRA-IV-I, adapted for use with most IBM PC and PC-compatible desktop computers. Like COBRA-IV-I, COBRA-IV PC uses the subchannel analysis approach to determine the enthalpy and flow distribution in rod bundles for both steady-state and transient conditions. The steady-state and transient solution schemes used in COBRA-IIIC are still available in COBRA-IV PC as the implicit solution scheme option. An explicit solution scheme is also available, allowing the calculation of severe transients involving flow reversals, recirculations, expulsions, and reentry flows, with a pressure or flow boundary condition specified. In addition, several modifications have been incorporated into COBRA-IV PC to allow the code to run on the PC. These include a reduction in the array dimensions, the removal of the dump and restart options, and the inclusion of several code modifications by Oregon State University, most notably, a critical heat flux correlation for boiling water reactor fuel and a new solution scheme for cross-flow distribution calculations. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Webb, B.J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced PADD IV refining capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced refining capacity in Petroleum Administration for Defense IV (PADD IV, part of the Rocky Mountain area) have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model, a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy constraints on emissions of nitrogen oxides and winter toxic air pollutants. The studies do not predict refinery closures in PADD IV. Rather, the reduced refining capacities provide an analytical framework for probing the flexibility of petroleum refining and distribution for winter demand conditions in the year 2000. Industry analysts have estimated that, for worst case scenarios, 20 to 35 percent of PADD IV refining capacity could be shut-down as a result of clean air and energy tax legislation. Given these industry projections, the study scenarios provide the following conclusions: The Rocky Mountain area petroleum system would have the capability to satisfy winter product demand with PADD IV refinery capacity shut-downs in the middle of the range of industry projections, but not in the high end of the range of projections. PADD IV crude oil production can be maintained by re-routing crude released from PADD IV refinery demands to satisfy increased crude oil demands in PADDs II (Midwest), III (Gulf Coast), and Washington. Clean Air Act product quality regulations generally do not increase the difficulty of satisfying emissions reduction constraints in the scenarios.

Hadder, G.R.; Chin, S.M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Friction Modeling and Compensation for an Industrial Robot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction Modeling and Compensation for an Industrial Robot Stephen M. Phillips and Kevin R. Ballou it is assumed to be unpredictable or insignificant. In experiments on the PUMA 560 robot arm, Armstrong' dem

196

Friction and Wear Enhancement of Titanium Alloy Engine Components...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation pm007blau2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Friction and...

197

Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels ...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

198

On the friction coefficient of straight-chain aggregates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A methodology to calculate the friction coefficient of an aggregate in the continuum regime is proposed. The friction coefficient and the monomer shielding factors, aggregate-average or individual, are related to the molecule-aggregate collision rate that is obtained from the molecular diffusion equation with an absorbing boundary condition on the aggregate surface. Calculated friction coefficients of straight chains are in very good agreement with previous results, suggesting that the friction coefficients may be accurately calculated from the product of the collision rate and an average momentum transfer,the latter being independent of aggregate morphology. Langevin-dynamics simulations show that the diffusive motion of straight-chain aggregates may be described either by a monomer-dependent or an aggregate-average random force, if the shielding factors are appropriately chosen.

Lorenzo Isella; Yannis Drossinos

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

199

Friction anisotropy: A unique and intrinsic property of decagonal quasicrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that friction anisotropy is an intrinsic property of the atomic structure of Al-Ni-Co decagonal quasicrystals and not only of clean and well-ordered surfaces that can be prepared in vacuum [J.Y. Park et al., Science309, 1354 (2005)]. Friction anisotropy is manifested in both nanometer-size contacts obtained with sharp atomic force microscope tips and macroscopic contacts produced in pin-on-disk tribometers. We show that the friction anisotropy, which is not observed when an amorphous oxide film covers the surface, is recovered when the film is removed due to wear. Equally important is the loss of the friction anisotropy when the quasicrystalline order is destroyed due to cumulative wear. These results reveal the intimate connection between the mechanical properties of these materials and their peculiar atomic structure.

Park, J. Y.; Ogletree, D.; Salmeron, M.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Rolling friction for hard cylinder and sphere on viscoelastic solid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the friction force acting on a hard cylinder or spherical ball rolling on a flat surface of a viscoelastic solid. The rolling friction coefficient depends non-linearly on the normal load and the rolling velocity. For a cylinder rolling on a viscoelastic solid characterized by a single relaxation time Hunter has obtained an exact result for the rolling friction, and our result is in very good agreement with his result for this limiting case. The theoretical results are also in good agreement with experiments of Greenwood and Tabor. We suggest that measurements of rolling friction over a wide range of rolling velocities and temperatures may constitute an useful way to determine the viscoelastic modulus of rubber-like materials.

B. N. J. Persson

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Frictional properties of faults: from observation on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frictional properties of faults: from observation on the Longitudinal Valley Fault, Taiwan myself lucky to do what I love and to wake up every day, happy and excited about the day to come

Winfree, Erik

202

Friction Stir and Ultrasonic Solid State Joining of Magnesium...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Ultrasonic Solid State Joining of Magnesium to Steel Friction Stir and Ultrasonic Solid State Joining of Magnesium to Steel 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

203

A laboratory study of the friction behavior of granular materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I report on laboratory experiments designed to investigate the microphysical processes that result in rate- and state-dependent friction behavior and experiments designed to match the boundary conditions used by numerical ...

Frye, Kevin M. (Kevin Michael), 1972-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Small mass asymptotic for the motion with vanishing friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the small mass asymptotic (Smoluchowski-Kramers approximation) for the Langevin equation with a variable friction coefficient. The friction coefficient is assumed to be vanishing within certain region. We introduce a regularization for this problem and study the limiting motion for the 1-dimensional case and a multidimensional model problem. The limiting motion is a Markov process on a projected space. We specify the generator and boundary condition of this limiting Markov process and prove the convergence.

Mark Freidlin; Wenqing Hu; Alexander Wentzell

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

205

EnvWiltonIV-EIS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia NanoparticlesSmartAffects the FutureEnrico RossiEnvironmentWilton IV

206

Alta IV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergy InformationTuriAlexandriaAlstom Energy SystemsAlta IIIAlta IV

207

Bar-Halo Friction in Galaxies II: Metastability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well-established that strong bars rotating in dense halos generally slow down as they lose angular momentum to the halo through dynamical friction. Angular momentum exchanges between the bar and halo particles take place at resonances. While some particles gain and others lose, friction arises when there is an excess of gainers over losers. This imbalance results from the generally decreasing numbers of particles with increasing angular momentum, and friction can therefore be avoided if there is no gradient in the density of particles across the major resonances. Here we show that anomalously weak friction can occur for this reason if the pattern speed of the bar fluctuates upwards. After such an event, the density of resonant halo particles has a local inflexion created by the earlier exchanges, and bar slowdown can be delayed for a long period; we describe this as a metastable state. We show that this behavior in purely collisionless N-body simulations is far more likely to occur in methods with adaptive resolution. We also show that the phenomenon could arise in nature, since bar-driven gas inflow could easily raise the bar pattern speed enough to reach the metastable state. Finally, we demonstrate that mild external, or internal, perturbations quickly restore the usual frictional drag, and it is unlikely therefore that a strong bar in a galaxy having a dense halo could rotate for a long period without friction.

J. A. Sellwood; Victor P. Debattista

2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

208

Yield criteria for quasibrittle and frictional materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new yield/damage function is proposed for modelling the inelastic behaviour of a broad class of pressure-sensitive, frictional, ductile and brittle-cohesive materials. The yield function allows the possibility of describing a transition between the shape of a yield surface typical of a class of materials to that typical of another class of materals. This is a fundamental key to model the behaviour of materials which become cohesive during hardening (so that the shape of the yield surface evolves from that typical of a granular material to that typical of a dense material), or which decrease cohesion due to damage accumulation. The proposed yield function is shown to agree with a variety of experimental data relative to soil, concrete, rock, metallic and composite powders, metallic foams, porous metals, and polymers. The yield function represents a single, convex and smooth surface in stress space approaching as limit situations well-known criteria and the extreme limits of convexity in the deviatoric plane. The yield function is therefore a generalization of several criteria, including von Mises, Drucker-Prager, Tresca, modified Tresca, Coulomb-Mohr, modified Cam-clay, and --concerning the deviatoric section-- Rankine and Ottosen. Convexity of the function is proved by developing two general propositions relating convexity of the yield surface to convexity of the corresponding function. These propositions are general and therefore may be employed to generate other convex yield functions.

Davide Bigoni; Andrea Piccolroaz

2010-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

209

Regeneration of anion exchange resins by catalyzed electrochemical reduction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Anion exchange resins sorbed with perchlorate may be regenerated by a combination of chemical reduction of perchlorate to chloride using a reducing agent and an electrochemical reduction of the oxidized reducing agent. Transitional metals including Ti, Re, and V are preferred chemical reagents for the reduction of perchlorate to chloride. Complexing agents such as oxalate are used to prevent the precipitation of the oxidized Ti(IV) species, and ethyl alcohol may be added to accelerate the reduction kinetics of perchlorate. The regeneration may be performed by continuously recycling the regenerating solution through the resin bed and an electrochemical cell so that the secondary waste generation is minimized.

Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Drag reduction in coal log pipelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is well-known that solutions of dissolved long-chain macromolecules produce lower friction or drag losses than with the solvent alone. In coal log pipeline (CLP), water is the conveying medium. Synthetic polymers such as poly(ethylene oxide) have been dissolved in water and tested for their extent of drag reduction as a function of concentration and other variables. Lab-scale experimental results for CLP indicate substantial drag reduction at low concentration levels of polymer. But, the macromolecules exhibit degradation under mechanical shear stresses. The large molecules break into smaller units. This degradation effect causes a loss of drag reduction. However, high levels of drag reduction can be maintained as follows: (1) by injecting polymer into the CLP at several locations along the pipeline, (2) by injecting polymer of different particle sizes, (3) by using more robust types of polymers, or (4) by using polymer-fiber mixtures. This report presents the value of drag-reducing agents in terms of pumping power net cost savings. In addition, this report outlines the environmental impact of drag reduction polymers, and end-of-pipeline water treatment processes. For an operating CLP, hundreds of miles in length, the use of poly(ethylene oxide) as a drag reducing agent provides significant pumping power cost savings at a minimal materials cost.

Marrero, T.R.; Liu, H. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Capsule Pipeline Research Center

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Energy-Dependence of Nucleus-Nucleus Potential and Friction Parameter in Fusion Reactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying a macroscopic reduction procedure on the improved quantum molecular dynamics (ImQMD) model, the energy dependences of the nucleus-nucleus potential, the friction parameter, and the random force characterizing a one-dimensional Langevin-type description of the heavy-ion fusion process are investigated. Systematic calculations with the ImQMD model show that the fluctuation-dissipation relation found in the symmetric head-on fusion reactions at energies just above the Coulomb barrier fades out when the incident energy increases. It turns out that this dynamical change with increasing incident energy is caused by a specific behavior of the friction parameter which directly depends on the microscopic dynamical process, i.e., on how the collective energy of the relative motion is transferred into the intrinsic excitation energy. It is shown microscopically that the energy dissipation in the fusion process is governed by two mechanisms: One is caused by the nucleon exchanges between two fusing nuclei, and the other is due to a rearrangement of nucleons in the intrinsic system. The former mechanism monotonically increases the dissipative energy and shows a weak dependence on the incident energy, while the latter depends on both the relative distance between two fusing nuclei and the incident energy. It is shown that the latter mechanism is responsible for the energy dependence of the fusion potential and explains the fading out of the fluctuation-dissipation relation.

Kai Wen; Fumihiko Sakata; Zhu-Xia Li; Xi-Zhen Wu; Ying-Xun Zhang; Shan-Gui Zhou

2014-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

212

On the role of Mn(IV) vacancies in the photoreductive dissolution of hexagonal birnessite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Photoreductive dissolution of layer type Mn(IV) oxides (birnessite) under sunlight illumination to form soluble Mn(II) has been observed in both field and laboratory settings, leading to a consensus that this process is a key driver of the biogeochemical cycling of Mn in the euphotic zones of marine and freshwater ecosystems. However, the underlying mechanisms for the process remain unknown, although they have been linked to the semiconducting characteristics of hexagonal birnessite, the ubiquitous Mn(IV) oxide produced mainly by bacterial oxidation of soluble Mn(II). One of the universal properties of this biogenic mineral is the presence of Mn(IV) vacancies, long-identified as strong adsorption sites for metal cations. In this paper, the possible role of Mn vacancies in photoreductive dissolution is investigated theoretically using quantum mechanical calculations based on spin-polarized density functional theory (DFT). Our DFT study demonstrates unequivocally that Mn vacancies significantly reduce the band-gap energy for hexagonal birnessite relative to a hypothetical vacancy-free MnO{sub 2} and thus would increase the concentration of photo-induced electrons available for Mn(IV) reduction upon illumination of the mineral by sunlight. Calculations of the charge distribution in the presence of vacancies, although not fully conclusive, show a clear separation of photo-induced electrons and holes, implying a slow recombination of these charge-carriers that facilitates the two-electron reduction of Mn(IV) to Mn(II).

Kwon, K.D.; Refson, K.; Sposito, G.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Superhydrophobic Friction Reduction Microtextured Surfaces Tae Jin KIM, Carlos H. HIDROVO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of microfluidic channels with different substrate surface topographies. Two different types of silicon substrates surfaces to self cleaning features on solar energy panels. Superhydrophobicity is mainly achieved

Hidrovo, Carlos H.

214

A Fresh Approach to Flow Turbulence Towards Reduction of Skin-friction Drag  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a major contributor to carbon emissions. Ever-growing strain on the global oil supply chain and stringent million tonnes in CO2 emissions annually as per current projections. Similar estimates for the shipping energy expenditure sector, accounting for 30% of global consumption. Consequently, this sector is also

215

Friction and Wear Reduction in Diesel Engine Valve Trains | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Electrical Resistivity StructureDepartment of Energy

216

June 25, 2002 Appendix IV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-picked oranges of various varieties are received ei- ther directly from the field or from local cold storage Received Inspection (Primary Culling) Cold Storage Package Re-sanitize Grading (2° Cull) Brush reduction at water rinse step. Ship/TransportCold Storage Metal Detector #12;Notes: June 25, 2002 Appendix

Heller, Barbara

217

IV. Environmental Impact, Setting, and Mitigation Measures LBNL LRDP EIR IV.G-1 ESA / 201074  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IV. Environmental Impact, Setting, and Mitigation Measures LBNL LRDP EIR IV.G-1 ESA / 201074 Public discusses existing surface water and groundwater conditions at LBNL and analyzes the potential Setting IV.G.2.1 Hydrologic Setting Surface Water LBNL is situated within Blackberry and Strawberry

Lee, Jason R.

218

Mechanical and metallurgical properties of MMC friction welds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanical and metallurgical properties of similar and dissimilar welds involving aluminum-based metal matrix composite (MMC) base material were investigated using factorial experimentation. The test materials comprised aluminum-based alloy 6061/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (W6A.10A-T6), aluminum Alloy 6061-T6 and AISI 304 stainless steel. Notch tensile strength increased when high friction pressures were employed during MMC/MMC, MMC/Alloy 6061, MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel and Alloy 6061/Alloy 6061 friction welding. In MMC/Alloy 6061 welds, notch tensile strength also increased when high forging pressures were employed. Applied oxide films on both the MMC and AISI stainless steel substrates had a markedly detrimental effect on dissimilar weld mechanical properties. The optimum notch tensile strength properties were produced when high friction pressure values were applied during dissimilar MMC/AISI 304 stainless steel welding. High friction pressure had two beneficial effects, i.e., it decreased the thickness of the FeAl{sub 3} intermetallic film and it promoted disruption and dispersal of oxide films at the joint interface. In direct contrast, the presence of thick anodized oxide films on the MMC substrate surface prior to friction welding had no observable influence on MMC/MMC weld mechanical properties.

Li, Z.; Maldonado, C.; North, T.H. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Science; Altshuller, B. [Alcan R and D Labs., Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Non-equilibrium phase transition in an exactly solvable driven Ising model with friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A driven Ising model with friction due to magnetic correlations has recently been proposed by Kadau et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 137205 (2008)). The non-equilibrium phase transition present in this system is investigated in detail using analytical methods as well as Monte Carlo simulations. In the limit of high driving velocities $v$ the model shows mean field behavior due to dimensional reduction and can be solved exactly for various geometries. The simulations are performed with three different single spin flip rates: the common Metropolis and Glauber rates as well as a multiplicative rate. Due to the non-equilibrium nature of the model all rates lead to different critical temperatures at $v>0$, while the exact solution matches the multiplicative rate. Finally, the cross-over from Ising to mean field behavior as function of velocity and system size is analysed in one and two dimensions.

Alfred Hucht

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Schroedinger equation with friction from the quantum trajectory perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Similarity of equations of motion for the classical and quantum trajectories is used to introduce a friction term dependent on the wavefunction phase into the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. The term describes irreversible energy loss by the quantum system. The force of friction is proportional to the velocity of a quantum trajectory. The resulting Schroedinger equation is nonlinear, conserves wavefunction normalization, and evolves an arbitrary wavefunction into the ground state of the system (of appropriate symmetry if applicable). Decrease in energy is proportional to the average kinetic energy of the quantum trajectory ensemble. Dynamics in the high friction regime is suitable for simple models of reactions proceeding with energy transfer from the system to the environment. Examples of dynamics are given for single and symmetric and asymmetric double well potentials.

Garashchuk, Sophya; Dixit, Vaibhav; Gu Bing; Mazzuca, James [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States)

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Irreversible work and inner friction in quantum thermodynamic processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the thermodynamics of closed quantum systems driven out of equilibrium by a change in a control parameter and undergoing a unitary process. We compare the work actually done on the system with the one that would be performed along ideal adiabatic and isothermal transformations. The comparison with the latter leads to the introduction of irreversible work, while that with the former leads to the introduction of inner friction. We show that these two quantities can be treated on equal footing, as both can be linked with the heat exchanged in thermalization processes and both can be expressed as relative entropies. Furthermore, we show that a specific fluctuation relation for the entropy production associated with the inner friction exists, which allows the inner friction to be written in terms of its cumulants.

F. Plastina; A. Alecce; T. J. G. Apollaro; G. Falcone; G. Francica; F. Galve; N. Lo Gullo; R. Zambrini

2014-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

222

Friction and Wear Behavior of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene as a Function of Crystallinity in the Presence of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction and Wear Behavior of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene as a Function: In this study, the friction and wear behavior of ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) were evaluated Words: ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), crystallinity, friction, wear, phospholipid

Lin, Zhiqun

223

Effects of mechanical properties and surface friction on elasto-plastic sliding contact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of mechanical properties and surface friction on elasto-plastic sliding contact S and many recent computational studies have established quantitative relationships between elasto-plastic systematically quantified the effect of the plastic deformation characteristics on the frictional sliding

Suresh, Subra

224

Usage of Friction-damped Braced Frames for Seismic Vibration Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study presents the results of experimental work that examines the functionality of friction-damped braced frames during seismic events. The simplicity and efficacy of this friction device as a means of passive vibration control suggest...

Fink, Brynnan 1992-

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

225

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte Solutions for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery . Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte Solutions for...

226

Generation IV Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems By Jacques Bouchard...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation IV Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems By Jacques Bouchard, French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, France and Ralph Bennett, Idaho National Laboratory. Generation IV...

227

Effects of the Exposure to Corrosive Salts on the Frictional Behavior of Gray Cast Iron and a Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The introduction of increasingly aggressive road-deicing chemicals has created significant and costly corrosion problems for the trucking industry. From a tribological perspective, corrosion of the sliding surfaces of brakes after exposure to road salts can create oxide scales on the surfaces that affect friction. This paper describes experiments on the effects of exposure to sodium chloride and magnesium chloride sprays on the transient frictional behavior of cast iron and a titanium-based composite sliding against a commercial brake lining material. Corrosion scales on cast iron initially act as abrasive third-bodies, then they become crushed, spread out, and behave as a solid lubricant. The composition and subsurface microstructures of the corrosion products on the cast iron were analyzed. Owing to its greater corrosion resistance, the titanium composite remained scale-free and its frictional response was markedly different. No corrosion scales were formed on the titanium composite after aggressive exposure to salts; however, a reduction in friction was still observed. Unlike the crystalline sodium chloride deposits that tended to remain dry, hygroscopic magnesium chloride deposits absorbed ambient moisture from the air, liquefied, and retained a persistent lubricating effect on the titanium surfaces.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL; Truhan, Jr., John J [ORNL; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

J. PHYS. IV FRANCE 7 (1997) Colloque C2, SupplBment au Journal d e Physique III d'avril 1997  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that significant reduction takes place in the presence of the cement additives blast furnace slag (BFS) and Na2SJ. PHYS. IV FRANCE 7 (1997) Colloque C2, SupplBment au Journal d e Physique III d'avril 1997 forms, where it is desirable to stabilizethe highly soluble form of Tc(VII),TcOg, by in situ reduction

Boyer, Edmond

229

Computational Investigation of Hardness Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083 and AA2139  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Investigation of Hardness Evolution During Friction-Stir Welding of AA5083 and AA2139 coupled thermo-mechanical finite-element analysis of the friction-stir welding (FSW) process developed, finite-element analysis, friction- stir welding, hardness prediction 1. Introduction Having a more mobile

Grujicic, Mica

230

Friction Stir Welding of Hydrided Titanium Alloys Mark Taylor, D.P. Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction Stir Welding of Hydrided Titanium Alloys Mark Taylor, D.P. Field Multi-Scale Engineering for Undergraduates program under grant number EEC-0754370 During Friction Stir Welding (FSW), a non-consumable tool-state welding process, much frictional heating and force is required of the tool. This steep demand on the tool

Collins, Gary S.

231

Friction and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Silica and CNT Nanofluids in a Tube Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction and Heat Transfer Characteristics of Silica and CNT Nanofluids in a Tube Flow MILIVOJE M@niu.edu * www.kostic.niu.edu Abstract: - An apparatus for exploring friction and heat transfer characteristics flow. Initial turbulent friction and heat transfer measurements for silica and carbon nanotube (CNT

Kostic, Milivoje M.

232

An accurate elasto-plastic frictional tangential forcedisplacement model for granular-flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An accurate elasto-plastic frictional tangential force­displacement model for granular for both elastic and plastic deformations together with interfacial friction occurring in collisions of spherical particles. This elasto-plastic frictional TFD model, with its force-driven version presented in [L

Vu-Quoc, Loc

233

Friction and curvature judgement Chris Christou (1) and Alan Wing (2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction and curvature judgement Chris Christou (1) and Alan Wing (2) (1) Optometry resistance to motion due to friction. This resistance creates a force vector which varies in direction with friction. But the vector also varies in direction with the curvature of the surface traversed by the finger

234

Friction experiments with elastography: the slow slip and the super-shear regimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction experiments with elastography: the slow slip and the super-shear regimes S. Cathelinea , S technique derived from elastography, is used to follow the dynamic of the interface failure in a friction by Amontons in 1699 [1], the resistance to slip of an interface can be modeled by two main frictional states

Boyer, Edmond

235

M.-T. DO, P. MARSAC, Y. DELANNE Prediction of Tire/Wet Road Friction from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.-T. DO, P. MARSAC, Y. DELANNE 1 Prediction of Tire/Wet Road Friction from Road Surface, validation of a contact model for the prediction of low-speed friction from road surface microtexture the friction ­ speed curve from road- and tire measurable parameters. The model development is briefly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

236

Dry friction between laser-patterned surfaces: Role of alignment, structural wavelength and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Dry friction between laser-patterned surfaces: Role of alignment, structural wavelength.gachot@mx.uni-saarland.de Abstract The ability to tune friction by tailoring surface topographies at micron length scales friction between laser-textured surfaces. Line-like laser patterns with varying structural wavelengths

Mueser, Martin

237

Dynamic Friction Models for Longitudinal Road/Tire Interaction: Experimental Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Friction Models for Longitudinal Road/Tire Interaction: Experimental Results C. Canudas dynamic friction force model for the longitudinal road/tire interaction for wheeled ground vehicles is val- idated via experiments with an actual passenger vehicle. Contrary to common static friction/slip maps

Tsiotras, Panagiotis

238

Collective friction coefficients in the relaxation time approximation F. A. Ivanyuk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collective friction coefficients in the relaxation time approximation F. A. Ivanyuk Institute components of the friction coefficient for various single-particle potentials and have found that the nondiagonal component of the friction coefficient depends generally on the diffuseness of the potential

Pomorski, Krzysztof

239

Brownian dynamics algorithm for bead-rod semiflexible chain with anisotropic friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brownian dynamics algorithm for bead-rod semiflexible chain with anisotropic friction Alberto of semiflexible bead-rod chain with anisotropic friction can mimic closely the hydrodynamics of a slender filament dependent anisotropic bead friction coefficients. The algorithm is an extension of that given previously

Natelson, Douglas

240

Long Term Friction: from Stick-Slip to Stable Sliding1 Christophe Voisin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Long Term Friction: from Stick-Slip to Stable Sliding1 Christophe Voisin1 , François Renard1 Abstract. We have devised an original laboratory experiment where we investigate6 the frictional behaviour, salt, an analogue for natural8 faults, allows for frictional processes plastic deformation and pressure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A parallel and multiscale strategy for the parametric study of transient dynamic problems with friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with friction P.-A. Boucard1, D. Odi`evre1 and F. Gatuingt1 LMT-Cachan (ENS Cachan/CNRS/Universit´e Paris 6/PRES with friction. Our approach is based on the multiscale LATIN method with domain decomposition. This is a mixed; transient dynamics; domain decomposition; contact; friction; parallel processing 1. INTRODUCTION Modeling

242

Analysis of a unilateral contact problem taking into account adhesion and friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of a unilateral contact problem taking into account adhesion and friction Elena Bonetti) adhesion and of the friction are taken into account. We describe the adhesion phenomenon in terms conditions, and friction by a nonlocal Coulomb law. All the constraints on the internal variables as well

Rossi, Riccarda

243

Noise and vibration for a self-excited mechanical system with friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Noise and vibration for a self-excited mechanical system with friction K. Soobbarayen1,a , S. The contact is modelled by introducing several local contact elements at the friction interface and a cubic contact law is used to describe the contact force. The classical Coulomb law is applied to model friction

Boyer, Edmond

244

Creeping Friction Dynamics and Molecular Dissipation Mechanisms in Glassy Polymers Scott Sills and Rene M. Overney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Creeping Friction Dynamics and Molecular Dissipation Mechanisms in Glassy Polymers Scott Sills kinetic friction between an atomic force microscopy tip and a surface of amorphous glassy polystyrene has of the friction results using the method of reduced variables revealed the dissipative behavior as an activated

245

Long term friction: From stick-slip to stable sliding Christophe Voisin,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long term friction: From stick-slip to stable sliding Christophe Voisin,1 Franc¸ois Renard,1 July 2007. [1] We have devised an original laboratory experiment where we investigate the frictional properties, salt, an analogue for natural faults, allows for frictional processes plastic deformation

246

Analysis of a unilateral contact problem taking into account adhesion and friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of a unilateral contact problem taking into account adhesion and friction Elena Bonetti) adhesion and of the friction are taken into account. We describe the adhesion phenomenon in terms conditions and the friction by a nonlocal Coulomb law. All the constraints on the internal variables as well

Rossi, Riccarda

247

Long Term Friction: from Stick-Slip to Stable Sliding Christophe Voisin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Long Term Friction: from Stick-Slip to Stable Sliding Christophe Voisin1 , François Renard1 where we investigate the frictional behaviour of a single crystal salt slider over a large number for friction and plastic deformation and pressure solution creep to be efficient on the same timescale. During

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

248

Internal Friction Controls the Speed of Protein Folding from a Compact Configuration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internal Friction Controls the Speed of Protein Folding from a Compact Configuration Suzette A is independent of the cosolutes used to adjust solvent friction. Therefore, interactions within the interior. Interestingly, we find a very strong temperature dependence in these "internal friction"-controlled dynamics

Roder, Heinrich

249

Friction of partially embedded vertically aligned carbon nanofibers inside Burak Aksak and Metin Sittia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction of partially embedded vertically aligned carbon nanofibers inside elastomers Burak Aksak partially embedded inside polyurethane eVACNFs are proposed as a robust high friction fibrillar material and selective oxygen plasma etching, fibers are partially released up to 5 m length. Macroscale friction

Goldstein, Seth Copen

250

Friction in Mid-latitude Bob Plant, Stephen Belcher, Bob Beare, Andy Brown  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction in Mid-latitude Cyclones Ian Boutle Bob Plant, Stephen Belcher, Bob Beare, Andy Brown #12;Motivation · Many studies have shown the significance of friction in formation and dissipation of cyclones Dt = + � . F . Diabatic Term: · Surface heat fluxes · Latent heat fluxes Frictional Term

Plant, Robert

251

FRICTION AND THE INVERTED PENDULUM STABILIZATION PROBLEM Sue Ann Campbell Stephanie Crawford Kirsten Morris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRICTION AND THE INVERTED PENDULUM STABILIZATION PROBLEM Sue Ann Campbell Stephanie Crawford of friction on the design and performance of feedback controllers that aim to stabilize the pendulum in the upright position. We show that a controller designed using a simple viscous friction model has poor

Morris, Kirsten

252

Journal of Sound and Vibration (1997) 202(2), 203218 SEMI-ACTIVE CONTROL OF FRICTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Sound and Vibration (1997) 202(2), 203­218 SEMI-ACTIVE CONTROL OF FRICTION DAMPERS P, U.S.A. (Received 22 January 1996, and in final form 21 October 1996) Semi-active control of friction dampers has been proposed to improve the energy dissipation characteristics of passive friction dampers

Dupont, Pierre

253

Dynamic Friction Models for Longitudinal Road/Tire Interaction: Theoretical Advances  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Friction Models for Longitudinal Road/Tire Interaction: Theoretical Advances C. Canudas we derive a new dynamic friction force model for the longitudinal road/tire interaction for wheeled-point friction problems, called the LuGre model [1]. By assuming a con- tact patch between the tire

Tsiotras, Panagiotis

254

Adaptive Friction Compensation for Servo J. Wang, S. S. Ge, and T. H. Lee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adaptive Friction Compensation for Servo Mechanisms J. Wang, S. S. Ge, and T. H. Lee Department@nus.edu.sg Abstract Friction exists in all machines having relative motion, and plays an important role in many servo, accurate friction modeling and effective compensation techniques have to be investigated. In this chapter

Ge, Shuzhi Sam

255

Nonlinear friction of a damped dimer sliding on a periodic substrate S. Gonalves,1,2,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear friction of a damped dimer sliding on a periodic substrate S. Gonçalves,1,2, * V. M, USA (Received 23 July 2004; published 12 November 2004) The nonlinear sliding friction of a dimer over that the friction force has an approximate v-3 depen- dence if the velocity is sufficiently large

Kenkre, V.M.

256

DISPLAY OF FRICTION IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS BASED ON HUMAN FINGER PAD CHARACTERISTICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISPLAY OF FRICTION IN VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS BASED ON HUMAN FINGER PAD CHARACTERISTICS A. Nahvi, J City, UT 84112 ABSTRACT A friction display system is proposed for virtual environ- ments. Since a user the frictional properties of the human finger pad on 9 subjects by simultaneously recording force and movement

Hollerbach, John M.

257

ACC03-ASME0018 Controller Design for Flexible Systems with Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACC03-ASME0018 Controller Design for Flexible Systems with Friction: Linear Programming Approach of friction is presented. A linear program- ming technique for finding an optimal control of linear flexible systems is extended to frictional systems. A floating oscillator is used in the development, where

Singh, Tarunraj

258

Friction, Frontogenesis, and the Stratification of the Surface Mixed Layer LEIF THOMAS*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction, Frontogenesis, and the Stratification of the Surface Mixed Layer LEIF THOMAS* Department restratification resulting from frontogenesis in regions of confluent flow. Frictional forces acting of friction versus frontogenesis in the restratification of the mixed layer and are tested using numerical

Thompson, Andrew

259

Internal friction in the ultrafast folding of the tryptophan cage q Linlin Qiu 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Internal friction in the ultrafast folding of the tryptophan cage q Linlin Qiu 1 , Stephen J. Hagen is a diffusional process, and the speed of folding is controlled by the frictional forces that act important source of friction in folding reactions. By contrast, our studies of the folding dynamics

Hagen, Stephen J.

260

Attractiveness of periodic orbits in parametrically forced systems with time-increasing friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Attractiveness of periodic orbits in parametrically forced systems with time-increasing friction-dimensional systems subject to a periodic force and study numer- ically how a time-varying friction affects oscillator in the presence of friction. We find that, if the damping coefficient increases in time up

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Nonmonotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Nonmonotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary the effective friction encountered by a mass sliding on a granular layer as a function of bed thickness and boundary roughness conditions. The observed friction has minima for a small number of layers before

Kudrolli, Arshad

262

A Concurrent Product-Development Approach for Friction-Stir Welded Vehicle-Underbody Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Concurrent Product-Development Approach for Friction-Stir Welded Vehicle-Underbody Structures M technologies such as friction-stir welding (FSW) have to be employed. However, since FSW is a relatively new-survivable and ballistic threat-resistant military vehicles, friction-stir welding, process development 1. Introduction

Grujicic, Mica

263

Acta Materialia 59 (2011) 2020-2028 Back of the envelope calculations in friction stir welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acta Materialia 59 (2011) 2020-2028 1 Back of the envelope calculations in friction stir welding: friction stir welding; modeling; theory; velocity field; peak temperature; torque; hardness; aluminum in friction stir welding (FSW) [1-53] have been tested against experimental data for the joining of aluminum

Cambridge, University of

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Statistical Analysis of High-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Friction Stir Welded AA5083-H321  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical Analysis of High-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Friction Stir Welded AA5083-H321 M. Grujicic AA5083, fatigue behavior, friction stir welding, maximum likelihood estimation 1. Introduction Friction stir welding (FSW) is a relatively new solid-state metal-joining process that was invented

Grujicic, Mica

265

Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction Stir Weld Failure Mechanisms in Aluminum-Armor Structures Under Ballistic Impact Loading and of the attendant ballistic-impact failure mechanisms in prototypical friction stir welding (FSW) joints found limit, failure mechanisms, friction stir welding 1. Introduction In the context of military tactical

Grujicic, Mica

266

Review: friction stir welding tools , H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review: friction stir welding tools R. Rai1 , A. De2 , H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia3 and T. DebRoy*1 Friction stir welding (FSW) is a widely used solid state joining process for soft materials ability, mechanisms of tool degradation and process economics. Keywords: Friction stir welding, Tool

Cambridge, University of

267

Coupling Boltzmann and Navier-Stokes equations by friction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to introduce and validate a coupled Navier-Stokes Boltzman approach for the calculation of hypersonic rarefied flows around maneuvering vehicles. The proposed strategy uses locally a kinetic model in the boundary layer coupled through wall friction forces to a global Navier-Stokes solver. Different numerical experiments illustrate the potentialities of the method. 29 refs., 24 figs.

Bourgat, J.F. [INRIA, Le Chesnay (France)] [INRIA, Le Chesnay (France); Le Tallec, P. [Universite Paris, Dauphine (France)] [Universite Paris, Dauphine (France); [INRIA, Le Chesnay (France); Tidriri, M.D. [ICASE, Hampton, VA (United States)] [ICASE, Hampton, VA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Brownian ratchet in a thermal bath driven by Coulomb friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rectification of unbiased fluctuations, also known as the ratchet effect, is normally obtained under statistical non-equilibrium conditions. Here we propose a new ratchet mechanism where a thermal bath solicits the random rotation of an asymmetric wheel, which is also subject to Coulomb friction due to solid-on-solid contacts. Numerical simulations and analytical calculations demonstrate a net drift induced by friction. If the thermal bath is replaced by a granular gas, the well known granular ratchet effect also intervenes, becoming dominant at high collision rates. For our chosen wheel shape the granular effect acts in the opposite direction with respect to the friction-induced torque, resulting in the inversion of the ratchet direction as the collision rate increases. We have realized a new granular ratchet experiment where both these ratchet effects are observed, as well as the predicted inversion at their crossover. Our discovery paves the way to the realization of micro and sub-micrometer Brownian motors in an equilibrium fluid, based purely upon nano-friction.

A. Gnoli; A. Petri; F. Dalton; G. Gradenigo; G. Pontuale; A. Sarracino; A. Puglisi

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

269

Wetting and friction on superoleophobic surfaces March 20, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

then focus on their friction properties, and es- tablish an important condition for their use as super-lubricating,15­18 . Similar surfaces can be produced to repel oil, but repelling both oil and water with the same surface is a true challenge since surfaces that repel water are usu- ally attracting oils. The recently introduced

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

270

Nanomanipulation Experiments Exploring Frictional and Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanomanipulation Experiments Exploring Frictional and Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotubes M that places the human operator directly into the feedback loop that controls surface manipulations. Using. The mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes have been demonstrated to be extraordinary. They have an elastic

Falvo, Michael

271

Sliding Friction with Polymer Brushes Rafael Tadmor,* Joanna Janik,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

across the polymer layers decays logarithmically with time, consistent with the relaxation of a network on the sliding velocity, an effect attributed to a velocity-dependent interpenetration of the opposing polymerSliding Friction with Polymer Brushes Rafael Tadmor,* Joanna Janik, and Jacob Klein Department

Klein, Jacob

272

Lateral position detection and control for friction stir systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A friction stir system for processing at least a first workpiece includes a spindle actuator coupled to a rotary tool comprising a rotating member for contacting and processing the first workpiece. A detection system is provided for obtaining information related to a lateral alignment of the rotating member. The detection system comprises at least one sensor for measuring a force experienced by the rotary tool or a parameter related to the force experienced by the rotary tool during processing, wherein the sensor provides sensor signals. A signal processing system is coupled to receive and analyze the sensor signals and determine a lateral alignment of the rotating member relative to a selected lateral position, a selected path, or a direction to decrease a lateral distance relative to the selected lateral position or selected path. In one embodiment, the friction stir system can be embodied as a closed loop tracking system, such as a robot-based tracked friction stir welding (FSW) or friction stir processing (FSP) system.

Fleming, Paul (Boulder, CO); Lammlein, David (Houston, TX); Cook, George E. (Brentwood, TN); Wilkes, Don Mitchell (Nashville, TN); Strauss, Alvin M. (Nashville, TN); Delapp, David (Ashland City, TN); Hartman, Daniel A. (Santa Fe, NM)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

273

TBM tunnel friction values for the Grizzly Powerhouse Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tunnel boring machine (TBM) driven water conveyance tunnels are becoming increasingly more common. Despite advances in tunnel engineering and construction technology, hydraulic performance data for TBM driven tunnels remains relatively unavailable. At the Grizzly Powerhouse Project, the TBM driven water conveyance tunnel was designed using friction coefficients developed from a previous PG&E project. A range of coefficients were selected to bound the possible hydraulic performance variations of the water conveyance system. These friction coefficients, along with the water conveyance systems characteristics, and expected turbine characteristics, were used in a hydraulic transient analysis to determine the expected system pressure fluctuations, and surge chamber performance. During startup test data, these performance characteristics were measured to allow comparison to the original design assumptions. During construction of the tunnel, plaster casts were made of the actual excavated tunnel unlined and fiber reinforced shotcrete lined surfaces. These castings were used to measure absolute roughness of the surfaces so that a friction coefficient could be developed using the Moody diagram and compare them against the design values. This paper compares the assumed frictional coefficient with computed coefficients from headlosses measured during startup testing, and plaster cast measurement calculations. In addition, a comparison of coefficients will be presented for an other TBM driven water conveyance tunnel constructed in the 1980`s.

Stutsman, R.D. [Ensign & Buckley Consulting Engineers, Larkspur, CA (United States); Rothfuss, B.D. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

Casimir Friction Force and Energy Dissipation for Moving Harmonic Oscillators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Casimir friction problem for a pair of dielectric particles in relative motion is analyzed, utilizing a microscopic model in which we start from statistical mechanics for harmonically oscillating particles at finite temperature moving nonrelativistically with constant velocity. The use of statistical mechanics in this context has in our opinion some definite advantages, in comparison with the more conventional quantum electrodynamic description of media that involves the use of a refractive index. The statistical-mechanical description is physical and direct, and the oscillator model, in spite of its simplicity, is nevertheless able to elucidate the essentials of the Casimir friction. As is known, there are diverging opinions about this kind of friction in the literature. Our treatment elaborates upon, and extends, an earlier theory presented by us back in 1992. There we found a finite friction force at any finite temperature, whereas at zero temperature the model led to a zero force. As an additional development in the present paper we evaluate the energy dissipation making use of an exponential cutoff truncating the relative motion of the oscillators. For the dissipation we also establish a general expression that is not limited to the simple oscillator model.

Johan S. Hřye; Iver Brevik

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

275

Smoluchowski-Kramers approximation in the case of variable friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the small mass asymptotics (Smoluchowski-Kramers approximation) for the Langevin equation with a variable friction coefficient. The limit of the solution in the classical sense does not exist in this case. We study a modification of the Smoluchowski-Kramers approximation. Some applications of the Smoluchowski-Kramers approximation to problems with fast oscillating or discontinuous coefficients are considered.

Mark Freidlin; Wenqing Hu

2012-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

276

TEMPORARILY ALLOYING TITANIUM TO FACILITATE FRICTION STIR WELDING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

Hovanski, Yuri

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

277

Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Frictional contact results in surface and subsurface damage that could influence the performance, aging, and reliability of moving mechanical assemblies. Changes in surface roughness, hardness, grain size and texture often occur during the initial run-in period, resulting in the evolution of subsurface layers with characteristic microstructural features that are different from those of the bulk. The objective of this LDRD funded research was to model friction-induced microstructures. In order to accomplish this objective, novel experimental techniques were developed to make friction measurements on single crystal surfaces along specific crystallographic surfaces. Focused ion beam techniques were used to prepare cross-sections of wear scars, and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and TEM to understand the deformation, orientation changes, and recrystallization that are associated with sliding wear. The extent of subsurface deformation and the coefficient of friction were strongly dependent on the crystal orientation. These experimental observations and insights were used to develop and validate phenomenological models. A phenomenological model was developed to elucidate the relationships between deformation, microstructure formation, and friction during wear. The contact mechanics problem was described by well-known mathematical solutions for the stresses during sliding friction. Crystal plasticity theory was used to describe the evolution of dislocation content in the worn material, which in turn provided an estimate of the characteristic microstructural feature size as a function of the imposed strain. An analysis of grain boundary sliding in ultra-fine-grained material provided a mechanism for lubrication, and model predictions of the contribution of grain boundary sliding (relative to plastic deformation) to lubrication were in good qualitative agreement with experimental evidence. A nanomechanics-based approach has been developed for characterizing the mechanical response of wear surfaces. Coatings are often required to mitigate friction and wear. Amongst other factors, plastic deformation of the substrate determines the coating-substrate interface reliability. Finite element modeling has been applied to predict the plastic deformation for the specific case of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated Ni alloy substrates.

Michael, Joseph Richard; Prasad, Somuri V.; Jungk, John Michael; Cordill, Megan J. (University of Minnesota); Bammann, Douglas J.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moody, Neville Reid; Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha (New Mexico Institure of Mining and Technology)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Microstructural issues in a friction-stir-welded aluminum alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent observations of microstructures associated with friction-stir welding (FSW) in a number of aluminum alloys have consistently demonstrated the actual weld zone to consist of a (dynamically) recrystallized grain structure resulting from the extreme, solid-state, plastic deformation characterizing the process. Because of solubilities associated with the various precipitates in 7075 and 6061 aluminum alloys, and the fact that the precipitates were either homogeneously distributed throughout both the original (unwelded) work-piece plates and the well zones (or formed varying densities of Widmanstaetten patterns within the original and recrystallized grains), it has been difficult to follow the stirring of stable, second-phase particles from the base metal (work-piece) into the weld zone. In the present investigation, a compositionally modified 1100 aluminum alloy (nominally 99.2% Al, 0.5% Fe, 0.15% Cu, 0.12% Si, 0.05 Mn, 0.04 Ti, balance in weight percent of Be and Mg), forming a stable microdendritic (second-phase), equiaxed, cell structure was friction-stir welded. These thermally stable, geometrically specific, precipitates in the base metal were compared with their disposition within the friction-stir-weld zone. In addition, as-cast plates of this alloy were cold-rolled 50% and friction-stir-welded in order to compare these two schedules (as-cast and 50% cold-rolled) in terms of residual hardness variations and related microstructural issues as well as the effect of prior deformation on the friction-stir welding process.

Flores, O.V.; Kennedy, C.; Murr, L.E.; Brown, D.; Pappu, S.; Nowak, B.M.; McClure, J.C. [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)] [Univ. of Texas, El Paso, TX (United States)

1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

279

Variable enstrophy flux and energy spectrum in two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiments and numerical simulations reveal that in the forward cascade regime, the energy spectrum of two-dimensional turbulence with Ekman friction deviates from Kraichnan's prediction of $k^{-3}$ power spectrum. In this letter we explain this observation using an analytic model based on variable enstrophy flux arising due to Ekman friction. We derive an expression for the enstrophy flux which exhibits a logarithmic dependence in the inertial range for the Ekman-friction dominated flows. The energy spectrum obtained using this enstrophy flux shows a power law scaling for large Reynolds number and small Ekman friction, but has an exponential behaviour for large Ekman friction and relatively small Reynolds number.

Mahendra K. Verma

2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

Compressive strength, plastic flow properties, and surface frictional effects of 1100, 3003 and 6061 aluminum alloys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to find aluminum alloys that are effective for use as wire vacuum seals in the 800MeV particle accelerator located at the Louis Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) in Los Alamos, NM. Three alloys, Al 1100, Al 3003, and Al 6061, are investigated under uniaxial compression to determine stresses for a given height reduction from 0 to 70 percent, and to find plastic flow and surface interaction effects. Right-circular cylindrical specimens are compressed on-end (cylindrically) and radially (for modeling as compressed wire). Aluminum 1100 and 3003 alloys are compared for length to diameter ratios of 1 and 2 for both compression types, and are then compared to results of radial compression of annealed small diameter Al 1100 wire currently used at LAMPE. The specimens are also compressed between three different platen surfaces, polished steel, etched steel, and aluminum 6061-T6, to determine effects of friction. The Al 3003 alloy exhibits 20 to 25% lower stresses at all height reductions than Al 1100 for both cylindrical and radial compression.

Pinkerton, G.W.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

nature physics | VOL 6 | MARCH 2010 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 155 How do you solve a problem like friction?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a problem like friction? I learned to respect friction, as a phenomenon with many nuances, when I friction between the ball and floor, work out, first, how far the ball goes before it is rolling. The first part, I quickly demonstrated, is easy. Assuming the force of sliding friction is independent

Loss, Daniel

282

High temperature low-cycle fatigue of friction welded joints - type 304-304 stainless steel and alloy 718-718 nickel base superalloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper assesses the high-temperature low-cycle fatigue of the Type 304 stainless steel and Alloy 718 superalloy friction-welded joints. Strain controlled low-cycle fatigue tests for 304-304 and 718-718 friction-welded specimens were carried out at 923 K in air to obtain the fatigue strength of the joints. These materials were selected as the cyclic hardening and softening materials, respectively. The 304-304 welded specimens showed inferior fatigue strength in comparison with the base metal while the 718-718 specimens exhibited fatigue strength equivalent to that of the base metal. The difference in the fatigue strength between the two materials is discussed from the viewpoint of the cyclic deformation behavior and strain reduction at weld interface.

Wakai, T. (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center); Sakane, M.; Ohnami, M. (Ritsumeikan Univ., Kyoto (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Okita, K. (Hyogo Prefectural Inst. of Industrial Research, Miki (Japan). Technical Center for Machinery and Metals); Fukuchi, Y. (Hyogo Prefectural Inst. of Industrial Research, Kobe (Japan))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Micro-beam friction liner and method of transferring energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A micro-beam friction liner adapted to increase performance and efficiency and reduce wear in a piezoelectric motor or actuator or other device using a traveling or standing wave to transfer energy in the form of torque and momentum. The micro-beam friction liner comprises a dense array of micro-beam projections having first ends fixed relative to a rotor and second ends projecting substantially toward a plurality of teeth of a stator, wherein the micro-beam projections are compressed and bent during piezoelectric movement of the stator teeth, thereby storing the energy, and then react against the stator teeth to convert the stored energy stored to rotational energy in the rotor.

Mentesana, Charles (Leawood, KS)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

284

Simple LMFBR axial-flow friction-factor correlation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complicated LMFBR axial lead-length averaged friction-factor correlations are reduced to an easy, ready-to-use function of bundle Reynolds number for wire-wrapped bundles. The function together with the power curves to calculate the associated constants are incorporated in a computer preprocessor, EZFRIC. The constants required for the calculation of the subchannels and bundle friction factors are derived and correlated into power curves of geometrical parameters. A computer program, FRIC, which can alternatively be used to accurately calculate these constants is also included. The accurate values of the constants and the corresponding values predicted by the power curves and percentage error of prediction are tabulated for a wide variety of geometries of interest.

Chan, Y.N.; Todreas, N.E.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Rack-and-pinion effects in molecular rolling friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rolling lubrication with spherical molecules working as 'nanobearings' has failed experimentally so far, without a full understanding of the physics involved and of the reasons why. Past model simulations and common sense have shown that molecules can only roll when they are not too closely packed to jam. The same type of model simulations now shows in addition that molecular rolling friction can develop deep minima once the molecule's peripheral 'pitch' can match the substrate periodicity, much as ordinary cogwheels do in a rack-and-pinion system. When the pinion-rack matching is bad, the driven molecular rolling becomes discontinuous and noisy, whence energy is dissipated and friction is large. This suggests experiments to be conducted by varying the rack-and-pinion matching. That could be pursued not only by changing molecules and substrates, but also by applying different sliding directions within the same system, or by applying pressure, to change the effective matching.

Oleg M. Braun; Erio Tosatti

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

286

Friction and the oscillatory motion of granular flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This contribution reports on numerical simulations of 2D granular flows on erodible beds. The broad aim is to investigate whether simple flows of model granular matter exhibits spontaneous oscillatory motion in generic flow conditions, and in this case, whether the frictional properties of the contacts between grains may affect the existence or the characteristics of this oscillatory motion. The analysis of different series of simulations show that the flow develops an oscillatory motion with a well-defined frequency which increases like the inverse of the velocity's square root. We show that the oscillation is essentially a surface phenomena. The amplitude of the oscillation is higher for lower volume fractions, and can thus be related to the flow velocity and grains friction properties. The study of the influence of the periodic geometry of the simulation cell shows no significant effect. These results are discussed in relation to sonic sands.

Lydie Staron

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

287

Friction Properties of Molybdenum Alloyed Steel at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high-temperature properties of steel surface can be improved by molybdenum surface alloying. Molybdenzing was carried out on carbon steel in the multi-function double glow plasma surface alloying furnace. The friction and wear tests were conducted on a high temperature ball-on-disk tribometer under the temperature of 25 deg. C{approx}600 deg. C. The contents of alloy element varied with alloyed layer were detected by SEM attached with EDS. The molybdenized layer is composed of the deposited layer and diffused layer. The micro-hardness of alloyed layer decreases from HV650 on the top layer to HV240. The friction coefficient of molybdenized layer decreases from 0.5{approx}0.6 to 0.2{approx}0.3 and wear rate decreases by 20% at elevated temperature after molybdenizing.

Li Jianliang; Xiong Dangsheng [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing, 210094 (China); Wu Hongyan [College of Math and Physics, Nanjing University of Information and Technology, Nanjing, 210044 (China)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

288

Friction vs Texture at the Approach of a Granular Avalanche  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a novel analysis of the granular texture of a granular bed close to stability limit. Our analysis is based on a unique criterion of friction mobilisation in a simulated two-dimensional packing. In this way, we recover the bimodal character of granular texture, and the coexistence of weak and strong phases in the sense of distinct contacts populations. Moreover, we show the existence of a well-defined subset of contacts within the weak contact network. These contacts are characterized by their important friction, and form a highly coherent population in terms of fabric. They play an antagonistic role with respect to force chains. We are thus able to discriminate between incoherent contacts and coherent contacts in the weak phase, and to specify the role that the latter plays in the destabilisation process.

Lydie Staron; Farhang Radjai

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

289

Liquid friction on charged surfaces: from hydrodynamic slippage to electrokinetics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrodynamic behavior at the vicinity of a confining wall is closely related to the friction properties of the liquid/solid interface. Here we consider, using Molecular Dynamics simulations, the electric contribution to friction for charged surfaces, and the induced modification of the hydrodynamic boundary condition at the confining boundary. The consequences of liquid slippage for electrokinetic phenomena, through the coupling between hydrodynamics and electrostatics within the electric double layer, are explored. Strong amplification of electro-osmotic effects is revealed, and the non-trivial effect of surface charge is discussed. This work allows to reconsider existing experimental data, concerning Zeta potentials of hydrophobic surfaces and suggest the possibility to generate ``giant'' electro-osmotic and electrophoretic effects, with direct applications in microfluidics.

Laurent Joly; Christophe Ybert; Emmanuel Trizac; Lyderic Bocquet

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

290

In-situ measurement of skin friction and point bearing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'-7. 80' Device Limiting Values (psf) 8 ft Pile Limiting Values (psf) 205 952 Unconfined Shear Strength (psf) 1095 1915 '/26 l 4I'26 l Srmur? taneous I-2-1 I-2-2 I-2-3 I-2-4 2 I gll 2'-8" 5 '-'4" 5 I 4II Tip = 1880 Friction.... 02 5. 26 2. 34 3. 74 3. 71 . 233 . 396 . 337 . 364 . 318 TABLE VI FRICTION DARING DATA Height of P P 'dy st P /P (lbs) (lbs) dy st Pile Displacement Velocity J' (fps) (sec/ft) , 0. 35 O I 21 811 2'-8" C I I II J -4 5'-4" 51...

Rehmet, Joseph Don

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

A novel system to study wear, friction, and lubricants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel enclosed (pressurized) multispecimen wear testing system was design and built to allow the fully computerized on-line measurement and control of friction, wear, and lubricants of different materials (metals, ceramics, composites, and plastics). This system is described in detail. The tribological parameters can be adjusted and controlled to reproduce the actual conditions that prevail in machine components. Several examples of the capabilities of the system are presented.

Maamouri, M.; Masson, J.F.; Marchand, N.J. (Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. de Metallurgie et de Genie des Materiaux)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Friction Control Solutions Inc FriCSo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpediaFredonia,Iowa BioProcessAreaFresnoFriction

293

U(VI) reduction to mononuclear U(VI) by desulfitobacterium spp.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bioreduction of U(VI) to U(IV) affects uranium mobility and fate in contaminated subsurface environments and is best understood in Gram-negative model organisms such as Geobacter and Shewanella spp. This study demonstrates that U(VI) reduction is a common trait of Gram-positive Desulfitobacterium spp. Five different Desulfitobacterium isolates reduced 100 {mu}M U(VI) to U(IV) in <10 days, whereas U(VI) remained soluble in abiotic and heat-killed controls. U(VI) reduction in live cultures was confirmed using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) analysis. Interestingly, although bioreduction of U(VI) is almost always reported to yield the uraninite mineral (UO{sub 2}), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis demonstrated that the U(IV) produced in the Desulfitobacterium cultures was not UO{sub 2}. The EXAFS data indicated that the U(IV) product was a phase or mineral composed of mononuclear U(IV) atoms closely surrounded by light element shells. This atomic arrangement likely results from inner-sphere bonds between U(IV) and C/N/O- or P/S-containing ligands, such as carbonate or phosphate. The formation of a distinct U(IV) phase warrants further study because the characteristics of the reduced material affect uranium stability and fate in the contaminated subsurface.

Fletcher, K. E.; Boyanov, M. I.; Thomas, S. H.; Wu, Q.; Kemner, K. M.; Loffler, F. E. (Biosciences Division); (Georgia Inst. of Tech.)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Solid Friction from stick-slip to pinning and aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the present state of understanding of solid friction at low velocities and for systems with negligibly small wear effects. We first analyze in detail the behavior of friction at interfaces between wacroscopic hard rough solids, whose main dynamical features are well described by the Rice-Ruina rate and state dependent constitutive law. We show that it results from two combined effects : (i) the threshold rheology of nanometer-thick junctions jammed under confinement into a soft glassy structure (ii) geometric aging, i.e. slow growth of the real arrea of contact via asperity creep interrupted by sliding. Closer analysis leads to identifying a second aging-rejuvenation process, at work within the junctions themselves. We compare the effects of structural aging at such multicontact, very highly confined, interfaces with those met under different confinement levels, namely boundary lubricated contacts and extended adhesive interfaces involving soft materials (hydrogels, elastomers). This leads us to propose a classification of frictional junctions in terms of the relative importance of jamming and adsoprtion-induced metastability.

Tristan Baumberger; Christiane Caroli

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

295

Hydrodynamics of rapidly rotating superfluid neutron stars with mutual friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study time evolutions of superfluid neutron stars, focussing on the nature of the oscillation spectrum, the effect of mutual friction force on the oscillations and the hydrodynamical spin-up phase of pulsar glitches. We linearise the dynamical equations of a Newtonian two-fluid model for rapidly rotating backgrounds. In the axisymmetric equilibrium configurations, the two fluid components corotate and are in beta-equilibrium. We use analytical equations of state that generate stratified and non-stratified stellar models, which enable us to study the coupling between the dynamical degrees of freedom of the system. By means of time evolutions of the linearised dynamical equations, we determine the spectrum of axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric oscillation modes, accounting for the contribution of the gravitational potential perturbations, i.e. without adopting the Cowling approximation. We study the mutual friction damping of the superfluid oscillations and consider the effects of the non-dissipative part of the mutual friction force on the mode frequencies. We also provide technical details and relevant tests for the hydrodynamical model of pulsar glitches discussed by Sidery, Passamonti and Andersson (2010). In particular, we describe the method used to generate the initial data that mimic the pre-glitch state, and derive the equations that are used to extract the gravitational-wave signal.

A. Passamonti; N. Andersson

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

Nuclear Waste Reduction  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Waste Reduction Pyroprocessing is a promising technology for recycling used nuclear fuel and improving the associated waste management options. The process...

297

Effects of Stone-Wales and vacancy defects in atomic-scale friction on defective graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphite is an excellent solid lubricant for surface coating, but its performance is significantly weakened by the vacancy or Stone-Wales (SW) defect. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite which contains a single defect or stacked defects. Our results suggest that the friction on defective graphite shows a strong dependence on defect location and type. The 5-7-7-5 structure of SW defect results in an effectively negative slope of friction. For defective graphite containing a defect in the surface, adding a single vacancy in the interior layer will decrease the friction coefficients, while setting a SW defect in the interior layer may increase the friction coefficients. Our obtained results may provide useful information for understanding the atomic-scale friction properties of defective graphite.

Sun, Xiao-Yu [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Key Laboratory of Hubei Province for Water Jet Theory and New Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wu, RunNi; Xia, Re [Key Laboratory of Hubei Province for Water Jet Theory and New Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chu, Xi-Hua; Xu, Yuan-Jie, E-mail: yj-xu@whu.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

298

Synergies Between Generation-IV and Advanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to these changes · Requires experimental data for validation Limited resources require careful selection both recognize potential risk to environment and public health Safety goals and requirements Waste minimization Regulatory reform #12;9/14/2004 16th TOFE: Gen IV + ARIES 11/17 Safety Common safety goal

299

Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

Not Available

1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

300

Interplay of friction and noise and enhancement of disoriented chiral condensate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the Langevin equation for the linear $\\sigma$ model, we have investigated the effect of friction and noise on the possible disoriented chiral condensate formation. Friction and noise are supposed to suppress longwavelength oscillations and growth of disoriented chiral condensate domains. Details simulation shows that for heavy ion collisions, interplay of friction and noise occur in such a manner that formation of disoriented chiral condensate domains are enhanced.

A. K. Chaudhuri

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy friction stir Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Young... conditions. Most works on internal friction have been done on dilute solid solution alloys. Some works have... . This is a multi-element alloy prepared by...

302

E-Print Network 3.0 - adhesive microstructure friction Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

at Berkeley Collection: Physics 20 How to get the yield locus of an adhesive powder from a single numerical experiment Summary: with experiments. The effect of friction...

303

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston/ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and emissions. A detailed set of piston/ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrated the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Various low-friction strategies and concepts have been explored, and engine experiments will validate these concepts. An iterative process of experimentation, simulation and analysis, will be followed with the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. As planned, MIT has developed guidelines for an initial set of low-friction piston-ring-pack designs. Current recommendations focus on subtle top-piston-ring and oil-control-ring characteristics. A full-scale Waukesha F18 engine has been installed at Colorado State University and testing of the baseline configuration is in progress. Components for the first design iteration are being procured. Subsequent work includes examining the friction and engine performance data and extending the analyses to other areas to evaluate opportunities for further friction improvement and the impact on oil consumption/emission and wear, towards demonstrating an optimized reduced-friction engine system.

Victor W. Wong; Tian Tian; Grant Smedley

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

304

Under the Saturn IV Rocket | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rocket October 10, 2013 - 12:05pm Addthis Under the Saturn IV Rocket Photo credit: Kelly Visconti Under the Saturn IV Rocket Photo credit: Kelly Visconti On the Road with...

305

Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

306

Curvature effect on tearing modes in presence of neoclassical friction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neoclassical physics (here associated to the poloidal variation of the magnetic field strength along field lines in a tokamak) is well known for driving self-generated plasma current and nonlinear magnetic islands associated to it in high performance, ITER relevant plasma discharges. It is demonstrated that the neoclassical friction between a magnetic perturbation and plasma flow already impacts magnetic islands in the linear regime, by inducing a weakening of curvature stabilization for tearing modes. This conclusion holds in particular for regimes where convection is influencing the pressure dynamics, as shown using a simple analytical model and confirmed in full Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics simulations.

Maget, Patrick; Mellet, Nicolas; Meshcheriakov, Dmytro; Garbet, Xavier [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)] [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France); Lütjens, Hinrich [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS (France)] [Centre de Physique Théorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS (France)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Fluctuations in a kinetic transport model for quantum friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a linear Boltzmann equation that arises in a model for quantum friction. It describes a particle that is slowed down by the emission of bosons. We study the stochastic process generated by this Boltzmann equation and we show convergence of its spatial trajectory to a multiple of Brownian motion with exponential scaling. The asymptotic position of the particle is finite in mean, even though its absolute value is typically infinite. This is contrasted to an approximation that neglects the influence of fluctuations, where the mean asymptotic position is infinite.

Roland Bauerschmidt; Wojciech de Roeck; Jürg Fröhlich

2014-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

308

Non-equilibrium Statistical Approach to Friction Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A geometric approach to the friction phenomena is presented. It is based on the holographic view which has recently been popular in the theoretical physics community. We see the system in one-dimension-higher space. The heat-producing phenomena are most widely treated by using the non-equilibrium statistical physics. We take 2 models of the earthquake. The dissipative systems are here formulated from the geometric standpoint. The statistical fluctuation is taken into account by using the (generalized) Feynman's path-integral.

Shoichi Ichinose

2014-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

Radiative friction on an excited atom moving in vacuum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is known that, when an excited atom spontaneously emits one photon, two effects are produced. First, the atom's internal and external states are entangled with the states of the emitted photon. Second, the atom receives a momentum transfered from the photon. In this work, the dynamics of such an atom in vacuum is studied. Through a specific calculation, it is demonstrated that these effects cause the atom to experience, on average, a friction force opposite to its initial velocity. Properties of the force are also discussed.

Wei Guo

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

Damping of Neutron Star Shear Modes by Superfluid Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The forced motion of superfluid vortices in shear oscillations of rotating solid neutron star matter produces damping of the mode. A simple model of the unpinning and repinning processes is described, with numerical calculations of the consequent energy decay times. These are of the order of 1 s or more for typical anomalous X-ray pulsars but become very short for the general population of radio pulsars. The superfluid friction processes considered here may also be significant for the damping of r-modes in rapidly rotating neutron stars.

P. B. Jones

2003-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

311

Frictional dissipation of polymeric solids vs interfacial glass transition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present single contact friction experiments between a glassy polymer and smooth silica substrates grafted with alkylsilane layers of different coverage densities and morphologies. This allows us to adjust the polymer/substrate interaction strength. We find that, when going from weak to strong interaction, the response of the interfacial junction where shear localizes evolves from that of a highly viscous threshold fluid to that of a plastically deformed glassy solid. This we analyse as resulting from an interaction-induced ``interfacial glass transition'' helped by pressure.

Lionel Bureau; Christiane Caroli; Tristan Baumberger

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

312

Evaluation of friction loss in flexible and galvanized duct  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/d ratios ranging from 1 to 5. Statistical analysis of the data indicated that there was a difference in the equivalent length mean data and that the interaction between r/d ratio and duct size, r/d ratio and duct type, and duct type and duct size.... . . 51 APPENDIX F ADC STANDARD REPORTING FORMS ()E AND ()E(M). . . 55 APPENDIX G EQUATIONS UTILIZED TO CONVERT FRICTION LOSS DATA TO EQUIVALENT LENGTHS APPENDIX H 58 RESULTS FROM AIR FLOW VOLUME REPRODUCIBILITY TEST. APPENDIX I 61 DATA...

Zimmermann, Carlos Michael Alberto

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

APD IV, 22-25 April 2013, NIST Bill David,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APD IV, 22-25 April 2013, NIST Bill David, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, 22-25 April 2013, NIST , but... RAL: Diamond & ISIS ISIS TSII Oxford Chemistry Oxford #12;APD IV, 22-ray diffractometer CMS @ CERN CMS @ CERN (II) WISH detectors PILATUS ISIS electronics PILATUS electronics #12;APD IV

Magee, Joseph W.

314

Precipitate stability and recrystallisation in the weld nuggets of friction stir welded Al-Mg-Si and Al-Mg-Sc alloys.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Precipitate stability and recrystallisation in the weld nuggets of friction stir welded Al Two different precipitate hardening aluminium alloys processed by friction stir welding were of continuous and discontinuous recrystallisation occurred in the weld nugget. Keywords friction stir welding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

315

MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF MICROBIAL TECHNETIUM REDUCTION FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial Tc(VII) reduction is an attractive alternative strategy for bioremediation of technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. Traditional ex situ remediation processes (e.g., adsorption or ion exchange) are often limited by poor extraction efficiency, inhibition by competing ions and production of large volumes of produced waste. Microbial Tc(VII) reduction provides an attractive alternative in situ remediation strategy since the reduced end-product Tc(IV) precipitates as TcO2, a highly insoluble hydrous oxide. Despite its potential benefits, the molecular mechanism of microbial Tc(VII) reduction remains poorly understood. The main goal of the proposed DOENABIR research project is to determine the molecular mechanism of microbial Tc(VII) reduction. Random mutagenesis studies in our lab have resulted in generation of a set of six Tc(VII) reduction-deficient mutants of Shewanella oneidensis. The anaerobic respiratory deficiencies of each Tc(VII) reduction-deficient mutant was determined by anaerobic growth on various combinations of three electron donors and 14 terminal electron acceptors. Results indicated that the electron transport pathways to Tc(VII), NO3 -, Mn(III) and U(VI) share common structural or regulatory components. In addition, we have recently found that wild-type Shewanella are also able to reduce Tc(IV) as electron acceptor, producing Tc(III) as an end-product. The recent genome sequencing of a variety of technetium-reducing bacteria and the anticipated release of several additional genome sequences in the coming year, provides us with an unprecedented opportunity to determine the mechanism of microbial technetium reduction across species and genus lines.

DiChristina, Thomas J. [Georgia Tech

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannealed DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1 to 10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rev min{sup -1} increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap shear strengths exceeding 10 {center_dot} 3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Hovanski, Yuri [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Grant, Glenn J [ORNL; Dahl, Michael E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Micro-origin of Macro-strength: Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents an analytical study about the behavior of arbitrary shaped and sized non-cohesive two-dimensional granular materials. Several mechanical properties and relations are unraveled by connecting micro and macro scales in an explicit fashion that, at the same time, provides the basis of an analytical-theoretical framework for the development of new multi-scale techniques. Furthermore, the work herein presented is based on three main ideas that are developed and connected progressively; namely, the obtention of explicit expressions that enable us to relate micro-scale parameters, such as contact forces and fabric, to stress as a macro (continuum) physical property. Then, with these powerful tools, physical connections and relations between the mentioned micro-parameters and macro-constitutive parameters, in specific, Mohr-Coulomb's mobilized internal friction angle, are established. Finally, a non-linear optimization problem, which includes physical constraints at the contact point level, is proposed and solved in order to find the limit (maximum) internal friction angle in terms of the aforementioned micro-parameters. Thus, throughout this theoretical study, some important features about strength, anisotropy, contact buckling, and non-uniqueness of systems of contact forces are extracted, allowing us to have a deeper insight, as well as, a better understanding of the mechanical behavior of such complex-to-model materials.

Alex X. Jerves; José E. Andrade

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

318

SECULAR DYNAMICAL ANTI-FRICTION IN GALACTIC NUCLEI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We identify a gravitational-dynamical process in near-Keplerian potentials of galactic nuclei that occurs when an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) is migrating on an eccentric orbit through the stellar cluster towards the central supermassive black hole. We find that, apart from conventional dynamical friction, the IMBH experiences an often much stronger systematic torque due to the secular (i.e., orbit-averaged) interactions with the cluster's stars. The force which results in this torque is applied, counterintuitively, in the same direction as the IMBH's precession and we refer to its action as 'secular dynamical anti-friction' (SDAF). We argue that SDAF, and not the gravitational ejection of stars, is responsible for the IMBH's eccentricity increase seen in the initial stages of previous N-body simulations. Our numerical experiments, supported by qualitative arguments, demonstrate that (1) when the IMBH's precession direction is artificially reversed, the torque changes sign as well, which decreases the orbital eccentricity; (2) the rate of eccentricity growth is sensitive to the IMBH migration rate, with zero systematic eccentricity growth for an IMBH whose orbit is artificially prevented from inward migration; and (3) SDAF is the strongest when the central star cluster is rapidly rotating. This leads to eccentricity growth/decrease for the clusters rotating in the opposite/same direction relative to the IMBH's orbital motion.

Madigan, Ann-Marie; Levin, Yuri, E-mail: madigan@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

319

Quantum Lubrication: Suppression of Friction in a First Principle Four Stroke Heat Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A quantum model of a heat engine resembling the Otto cycle is employed to explore strategies to suppress frictional losses. These losses are caused by the inability of the engine's working medium to follow adiabatically the change in the Hamiltonian during the expansion and compression stages. By adding external noise to the engine, frictional losses can be suppressed.

Tova Feldmann; Ronnie Kosloff

2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

Frictional powders: Ratcheting under periodic strain in 3D , C. T. David2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frictional powders: Ratcheting under periodic strain in 3D S. Luding1 , C. T. David2 , R. Garcia the (deviatoric) stress- strain relation a ratchet-like behavior is observed: Increasing the coefficient of friction leads to a transition from ratcheting to shake-down, i.e., the accumulation of strain stops

Luding, Stefan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Masatsu kakuhan setsugo "Friction Stir Welding Complete aspects of FSW" Japan Welding Society  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Masatsu kakuhan setsugo ­ "Friction Stir Welding ­ Complete aspects of FSW" Japan Welding Society years ago that the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) method was proposed by TWI. Because FSW is a solid state welding method, the peak temperature reached during FSW welding is lower than the traditional welding

Cambridge, University of

322

Recent Advances in Friction Stir Welding Process, Weldment Structure and Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent Advances in Friction Stir Welding ­ Process, Weldment Structure and Properties R. Nandan, T University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ, U.K. Abstract Friction stir welding is a refreshing approach flow during welding, elements of tool design, understanding defect formation and the structure

Cambridge, University of

323

Critical assessment: friction stir welding of H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia*1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Critical assessment: friction stir welding of steels H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia*1 and T. DebRoy2 The level of activity in research on the friction stir welding of steels is dwarfed when compared of Welding and Joining is to assess the state of the art, focusing on the knowledge base in the open

Cambridge, University of

324

Modeling of AA5083 Material-Microstructure Evolution During Butt Friction-Stir Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of AA5083 Material-Microstructure Evolution During Butt Friction-Stir Welding M. Grujicic yet a fairly comprehensive overview of the friction stir welding (FSW) process is provided-element procedure developed in our prior study. Particular attention is given to proper modeling of the welding work

Grujicic, Mica

325

PublishedbyManeyPublishing(c)IOMCommunicationsLtd Friction stir welding of dissimilar alloys a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PublishedbyManeyPublishing(c)IOMCommunicationsLtd Friction stir welding of dissimilar alloys ­ a perspective T. DebRoy*1 and H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia2 Friction stir welding does not involve bulk melting. The purpose of this special issue of Science and Technology of Welding and Joining was to assess the status

Cambridge, University of

326

Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modifications in the AA5083 Johnson-Cook Material Model for Use in Friction Stir Welding, material microstructure and properties in friction stir welding welds of AA5083 (a non welding, Johnson-Cook material model 1. Introduction In this study, an attempt is made to modify

Grujicic, Mica

327

Process Modeling of Ti-6Al-4V Linear Friction Welding (LFW)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Modeling of Ti-6Al-4V Linear Friction Welding (LFW) Mica Grujicic, G. Arakere, B finite-element analysis of the linear friction welding (LFW) process is combined with the basic physical in the open literature revealed that the weld region consists of a thermo- mechanically affected zone (TMAZ

Grujicic, Mica

328

Nonlinear shear wave interaction at a frictional interface: Energy dissipation and generation of harmonics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear shear wave interaction at a frictional interface: Energy dissipation and generation solids, brought into frictional contact by remote normal compression. A shear wave, either time har the partition of energy resulting from a time harmonic obliquely incident plane SH wave reflected and refracted

Norris, Andrew

329

High-resolution friction force microscopy under electrochemical control Aleksander Labuda,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-resolution friction force microscopy under electrochemical control Aleksander Labuda,1 William and development of a friction force microscope for high-resolution studies in electrochemical environments in liquids. The noise of the system is analyzed based on a methodology for the quantification of all

GrĂĽtter, Peter

330

A phenomenological model to describe turbulent friction in permeable-wall flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A phenomenological model to describe turbulent friction in permeable-wall flows C. Manes,1 L impermeable rough boundaries. A novel phenomenological model that describes such anomalous behavior), A phenomenological model to describe tur- bulent friction in permeable-wall flows, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, L14403

Katul, Gabriel

331

Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated) viewed as a heat engine converts heat energy extracted from the ocean to kinetic energy of the TC, which is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while

Wang, Yuqing

332

Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated as a heat engine converts heat energy extracted from the ocean into the kinetic energy of the TC, which is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while

Wang, Yuqing

333

Mass/ Inertia and Joint Friction Minimization for a Lowforce Fivedof Haptic Device*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mass/ Inertia and Joint Friction Minimization for a Low­force Five­dof Haptic Device* Kostas and joint friction for a low ­ force five ­ dof haptic device. The haptic device is optimized along a typical path with proper tolerances, rather than at some workspace operating point. The device, part

Papadopoulos, Evangelos

334

Finite Element Analysis of the Amontons-Coulomb's Model using Local and Global Friction Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In spite of the abundant number of experimental friction tests that have been reported, the contact with friction modeling persists to be one of the factors that determine the effectiveness of sheet metal forming simulation. This difficulty can be understood due to the nature of the friction phenomena, which comprises the interaction of different factors connected to both sheet and tools' surfaces. Although in finite element numerical simulations friction models are commonly applied at the local level, they normally rely on parameters identified based on global experimental tests results. The aim of this study is to analyze the applicability of the Amontons-Coulomb's friction coefficient identified using complementary tests: (i) load-scanning, at the local level and (ii) draw-bead, at the global level; to the numerical simulation of sheet metal forming processes.

Oliveira, M. C.; Menezes, L. F.; Ramalho, A. [CEMUC, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Coimbra, Polo II, Rua Luis Reis Santos, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Alves, J. L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Azurem, 4800-058, Guimaraes (Portugal)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

335

Looping and reconfiguration dynamics of a flexible chain with internal friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent past, experiments and simulations have suggested that apart from the solvent friction, friction arising from the protein itself plays an important role in protein folding by affecting the intra-chain loop formation dynamics. This friction is termed as internal friction in the literature. Using a flexible Gaussian chain with internal friction we analyze the intra- chain reconfiguration and loop formation times for all three topology classes namely end-to- end, end-to-interior and interior-to-interior. In a nutshell, bypassing expensive simulations we show how simple models like that of Rouse and Zimm can support the single molecule experiment and computer simulation results on intra-chain diffusion coefficients, looping time and even can predict the effects of tail length on the looping time.

Nairhita Samanta; Jayanta Ghosh; Rajarshi Chakrabarti

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

336

Friction Stir Welding of Mild Steel -Tool Durability and Steel Microstructure , H. K. D. H. Bhadeshia2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1" " Friction Stir Welding of Mild Steel - Tool Durability and Steel Microstructure A. De1 , H. K in the context of welding difficult aluminium alloys. We now apply this scheme to the friction stir welding and the consequences on the physical metallurgy of the steel. Introduction Friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminium

Cambridge, University of

337

Role of friction in pattern formation in oscillated granular layers Sung Joon Moon, # J. B. Swift, and Harry L. Swinney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of friction in pattern formation in oscillated granular layers Sung Joon Moon, # J. B. Swift grains. Our molecular dynamics simu­ lations reveal that friction is essential for realistic modeling at a container acceleration about 30% smaller than that observed in experiments and simulations with friction

Texas at Austin. University of

338

Friction anisotropy at Ni,,100...,,100... interfaces: Molecular dynamics studies Yue Qi and Yang-Tse Cheng  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction anisotropy at Ni,,100...Ă?,,100... interfaces: Molecular dynamics studies Yue Qi and Yang of Technology, Pasadena, California, 91125 Received 8 March 2002; published 30 August 2002 The friction theories predict that most perfect clean incommensurate interfaces would produce no static friction

Goddard III, William A.

339

Friction-induced vibration of a lubricated mechanical system J-J. Sinou*, J. Cayer-Barrioz and H. Berro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Friction-induced vibration of a lubricated mechanical system J-J. Sinou*, J. Cayer-Barrioz and H that incorporates realistic laws of local friction issued from previous experimental results. The objective or by themselves, such as friction-induced vibrations. In all cases, these vibrations are hardly controllable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

340

A LuGre Tire Friction Model with Exact Aggregate Dynamics Panagiotis Tsiotras, Efstathios Velenis and Michel Sorine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A LuGre Tire Friction Model with Exact Aggregate Dynamics Panagiotis Tsiotras, Efstathios Velenis and Michel Sorine Abstract-- The LuGre dynamic point contact friction model for the two-dimensional translation of a body on a surface has been used in the past to derive a model for the friction forces

Tsiotras, Panagiotis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Role of friction in pattern formation in oscillated granular layers Sung Joon Moon,* J. B. Swift, and Harry L. Swinney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of friction in pattern formation in oscillated granular layers Sung Joon Moon,* J. B. Swift as there are no elastic grains. Our molecular dynamics simulations reveal that friction is essential for realistic with friction. More importantly, even though square and hexagonal patterns form for a wide range

Texas at Austin. University of

342

Friction Stir Welding Download the files fswss.txt and fswdyn.txt from the course website. These files contain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction Stir Welding QUESTION 1 Download the files fswss.txt and fswdyn.txt from the course website. These files contain experimental data from a friction stir welding process of 6061 aluminum 0 2 1 0 F z b z b d z z a z a + = + + (3) #12;Friction Stir Welding QUESTION 2 Download the files

Landers, Robert G.

343

October 14 WA Division Newsletter Page 4 Tool durability and steel microstructure in friction stir welding of mild steel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scheme to assess tool durability and tool life in the friction stir welding (FSW) of difficult alumin referencing is freely avail- able at: http://tinyurl.com/mst-fsw. Tools for friction stir welding (FSWOctober 14 WA Division Newsletter Page 4 Tool durability and steel microstructure in friction stir

Cambridge, University of

344

Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

... Inside This Issue Fertilizer Loss in Rice Soils ........................................... 3 Beaumont Center Website ..................................................4 Rice Development Advisory Program ........................... 8 New Rice Batter... associated with fry- ing food in a 100% rice batter. One of the chief benefits that the author points out are a 55% reduction in ab- sorbed fats, compared with using traditional wheat batters. An additional benefit is a 60% reduction in acrylamides produced...

345

Dynamical friction of radio galaxies in galaxy clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The distribution of luminous radio galaxies in galaxy clusters has been observed to be concentrated in the inner region. We consider the role of dynamical friction of massive galaxies ($M\\sim 10^{12.5}$ M$_{\\odot}$), assuming them to be hosts of luminous radio galaxies, and show that beginning with a Navarro-Frenk-White density profile of a cluster of mass $M_{cl}\\sim 10^{15}$ M$_{\\odot}$ of concentration $c\\sim 5$ and collapsing at $z\\sim 1$, the density profile of radio galaxies evolve to a profile of concentration $c \\sim 25$, as observed, in a time scale of $t\\sim 3\\hbox{--}5$ Gyr.

Biman B. Nath

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

346

Lateral vibration effects in atomic-scale friction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of lateral vibrations on the stick-slip motion of a nanotip elastically pulled on a flat crystal surface is studied by atomic force microscopy measurements on a NaCl(001) surface in ultra-high vacuum. The slippage of the nanotip across the crystal lattice is anticipated at increasing driving amplitude, similarly to what is observed in presence of normal vibrations. This lowers the average friction force, as explained by the Prandtl-Tomlinson model with lateral vibrations superimposed at finite temperature. Nevertheless, the peak values of the lateral force, and the total energy losses, are expected to increase with the excitation amplitude, which may limit the practical relevance of this effect.

Roth, R. [Climate and Environment Physics, Physics Institute, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of Bern, Bern (Switzerland); Fajardo, O. Y.; Mazo, J. J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada and Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Meyer, E. [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, 4056 Basel (Switzerland); Gnecco, E. [Instituto Madrileńo de Estudios Avanzados en Nanociencia, IMDEA Nanociencia, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

347

Single-friction-surface triboelectric generator with human body conduit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a transparent single-friction-surface triboelectric generator (STEG) employing human body as the conduit, making the applications of STEG in portable electronics much more practical and leading to a significant output improvement. The STEG with micro-patterned polydimethylsiloxane surface achieved an output voltage of over 200 V with a current density of 4.7 ?A/cm{sup 2}. With human body conduit, the output current increased by 39% and the amount of charge that transferred increased by 34% compared to the results with grounded electrode. A larger increment of 210% and 81% was obtained in the case of STEG with a large-size flat polyethylene terephthalate surface.

Meng, Bo; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Han, Mengdi; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Haixia, E-mail: zhang-alice@pku.edu.cn [National Key Lab of Nano/Micro Fabrication Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [National Key Lab of Nano/Micro Fabrication Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

Lateral position detection and control for friction stir systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Friction stir methods are disclosed for processing at least one workpiece using a rotary tool with rotating member for contacting and processing the workpiece. The methods include oscillating the rotary tool laterally with respect to a selected propagation path for the rotating member with respect to the workpiece to define an oscillation path for the rotating member. The methods further include obtaining force signals or parameters related to the force experienced by the rotary tool at least while the rotating member is disposed at the extremes of the oscillation. The force signals or parameters associated with the extremes can then be analyzed to determine a lateral position of the selected path with respect to a target path and a lateral offset value can be determined based on the lateral position. The lateral distance between the selected path and the target path can be decreased based on the lateral offset value.

Fleming, Paul (Boulder, CO); Lammlein, David H. (Houston, TX); Cook, George E. (Brentwood, TN); Wilkes, Don Mitchell (Nashville, TN); Strauss, Alvin M. (Nashville, TN); Delapp, David R. (Ashland City, TN); Hartman, Daniel A. (Fairhope, AL)

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

349

Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

New Materials for NGNP/Gen IV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bounding conditions were briefly summarized for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) that is the leading candidate in the Department of Energy Generation IV reactor program. Metallic materials essential to the successful development and proof of concept for the NGNP were identified. The literature bearing on the materials technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was reviewed with emphasis on the needs identified for the NGNP. Several materials were identified for a more thorough study of their databases and behavioral features relative to the requirements ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH.

Robert W. Swindeman; Douglas L. Marriott

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

351

SECTION IV: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared0 ResourceAwards SAGE Awards ,# , onLightThe nature of theIV:

352

REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: SUMMARY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper briefly summarizes the series in which we consider the possibilities for losing, or compromising, key capabilities of the U.S. nuclear force in the face of modernization and reductions. The first of the three papers takes an historical perspective, considering capabilities that were eliminated in past force reductions. The second paper is our attempt to define the needed capabilities looking forward in the context of the current framework for force modernization and the current picture of the evolving challenges of deterrence and assurance. The third paper then provides an example for each of our undesirable outcomes: the creation of roach motels, box canyons, and wrong turns.

Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

353

ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket (NSB) Design is an alternate blanket concept of the ARIES-IV low activation helium-cooled reactor design. The reference design has the coolant routed in the poloidal direction and the inlet and outlet plena are located at the top and bottom of the torus. The NSB design has the high velocity coolant routed in the toroidal direction and the plena are located behind the blanket. This is of significance since the selected structural material is SiC-composite. The NSB is designed to have key high performance components with characteristic dimensions of no larger than 2 m. These components can be brazed to form the blanket module. For the diverter design, we eliminated the use of W as the divertor coating material by relying on the successful development of the gaseous divertor concept. The neutronics and thermal-hydraulic performance of both blanket concepts are similar. The selected blanket and divertor configurations can also meet all the projected structural, neutronics and thermal-hydraulics design limits and requirements. With the selected blanket and divertor materials, the design has a level of safety assurance rate of I (LSA-1), which indicates an inherently safe design.

Wong, C.P.C.; Redler, K.; Reis, E.E.; Will, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Cheng, E. [TSI Research, Inc. (United States); Hasan, C.M.; Sharafat, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Economics of Grade Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Study of the General Principles of the Economics to Be Effected By the Reduction of Grades, the Elimination of Rise and Fall and Curvature, and the Bettering of the Other Physical Condition on the ST. Louis & San Francisco Railroad Lines....

Neff, Paul J.

1914-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

355

Global Threat Reduction Initiative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Threat Reduction Initiative ­ Conversion Program: Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test the dual application of splitting the atom, U.S. policy towards civilian use of highly enriched uranium and test reactors fueled first with low enriched uranium (LEU) and then later with HEU. By the early 1970s

Kemner, Ken

356

A frictional model of a two-port unbounded ocean basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A FRICTIONAL MODEL OF A TWO-PORT UNBOUNDED OCEAN BASIN A Thesis by RICHARD T. WERT Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AE M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1968 Major... Subject: Physical Oceanography A FRICTIONAL MODEL OF A TWO-PORT UNBOUNDED OCEAN BASIN A Thesis by RICHARD T. WERT Approved as to style and content by: (Chairxnan of Coxnxnittee) (Head of the Departxnent) (M her) (Mexnber) May 1968 A Frictional...

Wert, Richard Thomas

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Ultra low friction carbon/carbon composites for extreme temperature applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A carbon/carbon composite in which a carbon matrix containing a controlled amount of boron or a boron compound is reinforced with carbon fiber exhibits a low coefficient of friction, i.e., on the order of 0.04 to 0.1 at temperatures up to 600.degree. C., which is one of the lowest frictional coefficients for any type of carbonaceous material, including graphite, glassy carbon, diamond, diamond-like carbon and other forms of carbon material. The high degree of slipperiness of the carbon composite renders it particularly adapted for limiting friction and wear at elevated temperatures such as in seals, bearings, shafts, and flexible joints

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Busch, Donald E. (Hinsdale, IL); Fenske, George R. (Downers Grove, IL); Lee, Sam (Gardena, CA); Shepherd, Gary (Los Alamitos, CA); Pruett, Gary J. (Cypress, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Japan Increase Cooperation on Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Prototypes China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum Renewed energy and enhanced coordination...

359

Friction Makes the World Go Round Even though there are many physical things that make everyday life possible, few are more important than  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction Makes the World Go Round K.G. Rowe Even though there are many physical things that make everyday life possible, few are more important than friction. Friction allows us to walk, drive cars or drive on really slick ice--this would be the case in a world without friction. The Study of Tire Rubber

Roy, Subrata

360

INVESTIGACI ON REVISTA MEXICANA DE FISICA 52 (5) 444452 OCTUBRE 2006 Reduction of friction in fluid transport: experimental investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) mediante el uso de soluciones polim´ericas o surfactantes es sin duda alguna la t´ecnica de reducci´on de

Aguilar, Guillermo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Investigation on the coprecipitation of transuranium elements from alkaline solutions by the method of appearing reagents. Study of the effects of waste components on decontamination from Np(IV) and Pu(IV)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The third stage of the study on the homogeneous coprecipitation of neptunium and plutonium from alkaline high-level radioactive waste solutions by the Method of Appearing Reagents has been completed. Alkaline radioactive wastes exist at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site. The recent studies investigated the effects of neptunium chemical reductants, plutonium(IV) concentration, and the presence of bulk tank waste solution components on the decontamination from tetravalent neptunium and plutonium achieved by homogeneous coprecipitation. Data on neptunium reduction to its tetravalent state in alkaline solution of different NaOH concentrations are given. Eleven reductants were tested to find those most suited to remove neptunium, through chemical reduction, from alkaline solution by homogeneous coprecipitation. Hydrazine, VOSO{sub 4}, and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 4} were found to be the most effective reductants. The rates of reduction with these reductants were comparable with the kinetics of carrier formation. Solution decontamination factors of about 400 were attained for 10{sup -6}M neptunium. Coprecipitation of plutonium(IV) with carriers obtained as products of thermal hydrolysis, redox transformations, and catalytic decomposition of [Co(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+}, [Fe(CN){sub 5}NO]{sup 2-}, Cr(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}, KMnO{sub 4}, and Li{sub 4}UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 3} was studied and results are described. Under optimum conditions, a 100-fold decrease of plutonium concentration was possible with each of these reagents.

Bessonov, A.A.; Budantseva, N.A.; Gelis, A.V.; Nikonov, M.V.; Shilov, V.P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute of Physical Chemistry

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Irradiation Alters MMP-2/TIMP-2 System and Collagen Type IV Degradation in Brain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the major consequences of radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the central nervous system. We examined the effects of whole-brain irradiation on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the brain. Methods and Materials: Animals received either whole-brain irradiation (a single dose of 10 Gy {gamma}-rays or a fractionated dose of 40 Gy {gamma}-rays, total) or sham-irradiation and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. mRNA expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs in the brain were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional activity of MMPs was measured by in situ zymography, and degradation of ECM was visualized by collagen type IV immunofluorescent staining. Results: A significant increase in mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was observed in irradiated brains compared to that in sham-irradiated controls. In situ zymography revealed a strong gelatinolytic activity in the brain 24 h postirradiation, and the enhanced gelatinolytic activity mediated by irradiation was significantly attenuated in the presence of anti-MMP-2 antibody. A significant reduction in collagen type IV immunoreactivity was also detected in the brain at 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the levels of collagen type IV were not significantly changed at 4 and 8 h after irradiation compared with the sham-irradiated controls. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates for the first time that radiation induces an imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels and suggests that degradation of collagen type IV, a major ECM component of BBB basement membrane, may have a role in the pathogenesis of brain injury.

Lee, Won Hee [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States); Warrington, Junie P.; Sonntag, William E. [Reynolds Oklahoma Center on Aging, Department of Geriatric Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Lee, Yong Woo, E-mail: ywlee@vt.edu [School of Biomedical Engineering and Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States); Department of Biomedical Sciences and Pathobiology, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Overview of reductants utilized in nuclear fuel reprocessing/recycling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most of the aqueous processes developed, or under consideration worldwide for the recycling of used nuclear fuel (UNF) utilize the oxido-reduction properties of actinides to separate them from other radionuclides. Generally, after acid dissolution of the UNF, (essentially in nitric acid solution), actinides are separated from the raffinate by liquid-liquid extraction using specific solvents, associated along the process, with a particular reductant that will allow the separation to occur. For example, the industrial PUREX process utilizes hydroxylamine as a plutonium reductant. Hydroxylamine has numerous advantages: not only does it have the proper attributes to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III), but it is also a non-metallic chemical that is readily decomposed to innocuous products by heating. However, it has been observed that the presence of high nitric acid concentrations or impurities (such as metal ions) in hydroxylamine solutions increase the likelihood of the initiation of an autocatalytic reaction. Recently there has been some interest in the application of simple hydrophilic hydroxamic ligands such as acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) for the stripping of tetravalent actinides in the UREX process flowsheet. This approach is based on the high coordinating ability of hydroxamic acids with tetravalent actinides (Np and Pu) compared with hexavalent uranium. Thus, the use of AHA offers a route for controlling neptunium and plutonium in the UREX process by complexant based stripping of Np(IV) and Pu(IV) from the TBP solvent phase, while U(VI) ions are not affected by AHA and remain solvated in the TBP phase. In the European GANEX process, AHA is also used to form hydrophilic complexes with actinides and strip them from the organic phase into nitric acid. However, AHA does not decompose completely when treated with nitric acid and hampers nitric acid recycling. In lieu of using AHA in the UREX + process, formohydroxamic acid (FHA), although not commercially available, hold promises as a replacement for AHA. FHA undergoes hydrolysis to formic acid which is volatile, thus allowing the recycling of nitric acid. Unfortunately, FHA powder was not stable in the experiments we ran in our laboratory. In addition, AHA and FHA also decompose to hydroxylamine which may undergo an autocatalytic reaction. Other reductants are available and could be extremely useful for actinides separation. The review presents the current plutonium reductants used in used nuclear fuel reprocessing and will introduce innovative and novel reductants that could become reducers for future research on UNF separation.

Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Catherine Riddle; Keri Campbell; Edward Mausolf

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Experimental investigation of energy dissipation behavior of the modified friction device  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As building materials become stronger, dynamic design and structural control are effective means of improving serviceability in the future's ever lighter structures. The recently proposed modified friction device (MFD) ...

Zahner, Robert Marne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Complex Non-Linear Modal Analysis for Mechanical Systems: Application to Turbomachinery Bladings With Friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex Non-Linear Modal Analysis for Mechanical Systems: Application to Turbomachinery Bladings of a turbomachinery blade, with dry-friction interfaces is proposed. In the latter, an original framework

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

366

Micro and nano mechanics of materials response during instrumented frictional sliding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the past decade, many computational studies have explored the mechanics of instrumented normal indentation. In contrast, very few studies have investigated quantitative aspects of frictional sliding contact in the ...

Bellemare, Simon C. (Simon Claude)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Role of Friction Stir Welding in Nuclear Fuel Plate Fabrication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The friction bonding process combines desirable attributes of both friction stir welding and friction stir processing. The development of the process is spurred on by the need to fabricate thin, high density, reduced enrichment fuel plates for nuclear research reactors. The work seeks to convert research and test reactors currently operating on highly enriched uranium fuel to operate on low enriched uranium fuel without significant loss in reactor performance, safety characteristics, or significant increase in cost. In doing so, the threat of global nuclear material proliferation will be reduced. Feasibility studies performed on the process show that this is a viable option for mass production of plate-type nuclear fuel. Adapting the friction stir weld process for nuclear fuel fabrication has resulted in the development of several unique ideas and observations. Preliminary results of this adaptation and process model development are discussed.

D Burkes; P Medvedev; M Chapple; A Amritkar; P Wells; I Charit

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Defining the role of elastic lubricants and micro textured surfaces in lubricated, sliding friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions for reducing friction in sliding, lubricated systems include modifying lubricant rheology using polymers and adding a micro-scale texture to the sliding surfaces, but the mechanism of how lubrication properties ...

Hupp, Sara J. (Sara Jean), 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Forced Response Analysis of Integrally Bladed Disks with Friction Ring Dampers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is proposed. In numerical applications, a representative compressor blisk featuring several rings the wheel of blisks. These are held in contact with the blisk due to centrifugal loads and friction

Boyer, Edmond

370

Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Lube Oil Performance and Engine Friction.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The feasibility of using a motored small, single-cylinder 517 cc Hatz 1D50 diesel engine to evaluate lube oil performance and engine friction at conditions typical… (more)

Rohr, William Fredrick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Friction and Adhesion Forces of Bacillus thuringiensis Spores on Planar Surfaces in Atmospheric Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The kinetic friction force and the adhesion force of Bacillus thuringiensis spores on planar surfaces in atmospheric systems were studied using atomic force microscopy. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on these forces varied for different surface properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and surface charge. The friction force of the spore was greater on a rougher surface than on mica, which is atomically flat. As RH increases, the friction force of the spores decreases on mica whereas it increases on rough surfaces. The influence of RH on the interaction forces between hydrophobic surfaces is not as strong as for hydrophilic surfaces. The friction force of the spore is linear to the sum of the adhesion force and normal load on the hydrophobic surface. The poorly defined surface structure of the spore and the adsorption of contaminants from the surrounding atmosphere are believed to cause a discrepancy between the calculated and measured adhesion forces.

Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Experimental study of friction noise of dry contact under light load  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

musical instruments such as violins, guitars, sound radiated by glass when rubbing a moist finger, tyres on frictional sound may also be mentioned (Othman et al., 1990-1) and an original device for measuring

Le-Bot, Alain

373

Aluminum reduction cell electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB[sub 2], for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints. 9 figs.

Goodnow, W.H.; Payne, J.R.

1982-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

374

Modcomp MAX IV System Processors reference guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A user almost always faces a big problem when having to learn to use a new computer system. The information necessary to use the system is often scattered throughout many different manuals. The user also faces the problem of extracting the information really needed from each manual. Very few computer vendors supply a single Users Guide or even a manual to help the new user locate the necessary manuals. Modcomp is no exception to this, Modcomp MAX IV requires that the user be familiar with the system file usage which adds to the problem. At General Atomics there is an ever increasing need for new users to learn how to use the Modcomp computers. This paper was written to provide a condensed Users Reference Guide'' for Modcomp computer users. This manual should be of value not only to new users but any users that are not Modcomp computer systems experts. This Users Reference Guide'' is intended to provided the basic information for the use of the various Modcomp System Processors necessary to, create, compile, link-edit, and catalog a program. Only the information necessary to provide the user with a basic understanding of the Systems Processors is included. This document provides enough information for the majority of programmers to use the Modcomp computers without having to refer to any other manuals. A lot of emphasis has been placed on the file description and usage for each of the System Processors. This allows the user to understand how Modcomp MAX IV does things rather than just learning the system commands.

Cummings, J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

Ren, Weiju

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

376

Hard and low friction nitride coatings and methods for forming the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved coating material possessing super-hard and low friction properties and a method for forming the same. The improved coating material includes the use of a noble metal or soft metal homogeneously distributed within a hard nitride material. The addition of small amounts of such metals into nitrides such as molybdenum nitride, titanium nitride, and chromium nitride results in as much as increasing of the hardness of the material as well as decreasing the friction coefficient and increasing the oxidation resistance.

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Urgen, Mustafa (Istanbul, TR); Cakir, Ali Fuat (Istanbul, TR); Eryilmaz, Osman Levent (Bolingbrook, IL); Kazmanli, Kursat (Istanbul, TR); Keles, Ozgul (Istanbul, TR)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Stellite 6 Friction Changes Due to Aging and In-Service Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the past several years, researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, under the sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have been investigating the ability of motor-operated valves to close or open when subjected to design basis flow and pressure loads. Part of this research addresses the friction that occurs at the interface between the valve disc and the valve body seats during operation of a gate valve. In most gate valves, these surfaces are hardfaced with Stellite 6, a cobalt-based alloy. The nuclear industry has developed methods to analytically predict the thrust needed to operate these valves at specific pressure conditions. To produce accurate valve thrust predictions; the analyst must have a reasonably accurate, though conservative, estimate of the coefficient of friction at the disc-to-seat interface. One of the questions that remains to be answered is whether, and to what extent, aging of the disc and seat surfaces affects the disc-to-seat coefficient of friction. Specifically, does the accumulation of a surface film due to aging of these surfaces increase the coefficient of friction and if so, how much? This paper presents results of specimen tests addressing this issue with emphasis on the following: • The change in the friction coefficient of Stellite 6 as it ages and whether the friction reaches a plateau. • The effect periodic gate valve cycling due to in-service testing has on the friction coefficient. • The results of an independent review of the test methods, processes, and the results of the research to date. • The status of ongoing aging and friction testing.

Watkins, John Clifford; DeWall, Kevin George

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Friction coefficients of sorghum grain on steel, teflon, and concrete surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRICTION COEFFICIENTS OF SORGHUM GRAIN ON STEEL, TEFLON, AND CONCRETE SURFACES A Thesis By QUAZI ANWAR HOSSAIN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A6M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE January 1967 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering FRICTION COEFFICIENTS OF SORGHUM GRMN ON STEEL, TEFLON, AND CONCRETE SURFACES A Thesis By QUAZI ANWAR HOSSAIN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairma Com ' ee) ead o D'epart nt...

Hossain, Quazi A

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Electric force microscopy of semiconductors: Theory of cantilever frequency fluctuations and noncontact friction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electric force microscope employs a charged atomic force microscope probe in vacuum to measure fluctuating electric forces above the sample surface generated by dynamics of molecules and charge carriers. We present a theoretical description of two observables in electric force microscopy of a semiconductor: the spectral density of cantilever frequency fluctuations (jitter), which are associated with low-frequency dynamics in the sample, and the coefficient of noncontact friction, induced by higher-frequency motions. The treatment is classical-mechanical, based on linear response theory and classical electrodynamics of diffusing charges in a dielectric continuum. Calculations of frequency jitter explain the absence of contributions from carrier dynamics to previous measurements of an organic field effect transistor. Calculations of noncontact friction predict decreasing friction with increasing carrier density through the suppression of carrier density fluctuations by intercarrier Coulomb interactions. The predicted carrier density dependence of the friction coefficient is consistent with measurements of the dopant density dependence of noncontact friction over Si. Our calculations predict that in contrast to the measurement of cantilever frequency jitter, a noncontact friction measurement over an organic semiconductor could show appreciable contributions from charge carriers.

Lekkala, Swapna; Marohn, John A.; Loring, Roger F., E-mail: roger.loring@cornell.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

380

Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

Zolotorev, Max; Sessler, Andrew; Penn, Gregory; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Charman, Andrew E.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Dynamical Friction and Resonance Trapping in Planetary Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A restricted planar circular three-body system, consisting of the Sun and two planets, is studied as a simple model for a planetary system. The mass of the inner planet is considered to be larger and the system is assumed to be moving in a uniform interplanetary medium with constant density. Numerical integrations of this system indicate a resonance capture when the dynamical friction of the interplanetary medium is taken into account. As a result of this resonance trapping, the ratio of orbital periods of the two planets becomes nearly commensurate and the eccentricity and semimajor axis of the orbit of the outer planet and also its angular momentum and total energy become constant. It appears from the numerical work that the resulting commensurability and also the resonant values of the orbital elements of the outer planet are essentially independent of the initial relative positions of the two bodies. The results of numerical integrations of this system are presented and the first-order partially averaged equations are studied in order to elucidate the behavior of the system while captured in resonance.

Nader Haghighipour

1998-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

382

MOOS-IvP Autonomy Tools Users Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This document describes fifteen MOOS-IvP autonomy tools. uHelmScope provides a run-time scoping window into the state of an active IvP Helm executing its mission. pMarineViewer is a geo-based GUI tool for rendering marine ...

Benjamin, Michael R.

2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

383

CALIBRATING C-IV-BASED BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the single-epoch black hole mass estimators based on the C IV {lambda}1549 broad emission line, using the updated sample of the reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei and high-quality UV spectra. By performing multi-component spectral fitting analysis, we measure the C IV line widths (FWHM{sub C{sub IV}} and line dispersion, {sigma}{sub C{sub IV}}) and the continuum luminosity at 1350 A (L{sub 1350}) to calibrate the C-IV-based mass estimators. By comparing with the H{beta} reverberation-based masses, we provide new mass estimators with the best-fit relationships, i.e., M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.50{+-}0.07}{sigma}{sub C{sub IV}{sup 2}} and M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.52{+-}0.09} FWHM{sub C{sub IV}{sup 0.56{+-}0.48}}. The new C-IV-based mass estimators show significant mass-dependent systematic difference compared to the estimators commonly used in the literature. Using the published Sloan Digital Sky Survey QSO catalog, we show that the black hole mass of high-redshift QSOs decreases on average by {approx}0.25 dex if our recipe is adopted.

Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Shin, Jaejin [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Denney, Kelly D., E-mail: pds2001@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jjshin@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kelly@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

384

CMAD IV 11/14/96 Information Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utilities, power pools, vendors etc.. #12;CMAD IV 11/14/96 #12; #12; GridCo LineCo PoolCo Energy Merchant INFO INFO INFO $ $ $ PWR PWR PWR #12;CMAD IV 11/14/96 "Future" Is At Hand · Federal Energy Regulatory protection and audit practices inadequate. · Internal priorities limiting attention to security concerns

California at Davis, University of

385

Exploring the Genome and Proteome of Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB2 for its Protein Complexes Involved in Metal Reduction and Dechlorination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Desulfitobacteria are of interest to DOE mission because of their ability to reduce many electron acceptors including Fe(III), U(VI), Cr(VI), As(V), Mn(IV), Se(VI), NO3- and well as CO2, sulfite, fumarate and humates, their ability to colonize more stressful environments because they form spores, fix nitrogen and they have the more protective Gram positive cell walls. Furthermore at least some of them reductively dechlorinate aromatic and aliphatic pollutants. Importantly, most of the metals and the organochlorine reductions are coupled to ATP production and support growth providing for the organism's natural selection at DOE's contaminant sites. This work was undertaken to gain insight into the genetic and metabolic pathways involved in dissimilatory metal reduction and reductive dechlorination, (ii) to discern the commonalities among these electron-accepting processes, (iii) to identify multi-protein complexes catalyzing these functions and (iv) to elucidate the coordination in expression of these pathways and processes.

Kim, Sang-Hoon, Christina Harzman, John K. Davis, Rachel Hutcheson, Joan B. Broderick, Terence L. Marsh, James M. Tiedje.

2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated “toolkit” consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

Timothy J. Leahy

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Subunit IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6f complex Chimeric fusions of subunit IV and PetL in the b6 f complex of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subunit IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6f complex - 1 - Chimeric fusions of subunit IV and Pet IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6 f complex Additional keywords : PetG, PetM, PetN, transmembrane topology, mass spectrometry, State Transitions, protein phosphorylation. #12;Subunit IV-PetL chimeras

388

Actinide Corroles: Synthesis and Characterization of Thorium(IV) and Uranium(IV) bis(-chloride) Dimers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first synthesis and structural characterization of actinide corroles is presented. Thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) macrocycles of Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole were synthesised and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, UV-Visible spectroscopy, variable-temperature 1H NMR, ESI mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry.

Ward, Ashleigh L.; Buckley, Heather L.; Gryko, Daniel T.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Arnold, John

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Measurement of local internal friction in metallic glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM), an advanced scanning probe microscopy technique, has been used to measure local elastic properties with a spatial resolution given by the tip-sample contact radius. AFAM is based on inducing out-of-plane vibrations in the specimen. The vibrations are sensed by the AFM cantilever from by the photodiode signal when its tip is in contact with the material under test. To measure local damping, the inverse quality factor Q{sup ?1} of the resonance curve is usually evaluated. Here, from the contact-resonance spectra obtained, we determine the real and imaginary part of the contact stiffness k* and from these two quantities the local damping factor Q{sub loc}{sup ?1} is obtained which is proportional to the imaginary part ? of the contact stiffness. The evaluation of the data is based on the cantilever's mass distribution with damped flexural modes and not on an effective point-mass approximation for the cantilever’s motion. The given equation is simple to use and has been employed to study the local Q{sub loc}{sup ?1} of amorphous PdCuSi metallic glass and its crystalline counterpart as a function of position of the AFM tip on the surface. The width of the distribution changes dramatically from the amorphous to the crystalline state as expected from the consequences of the potential-energy landscape picture. The center value of the distribution curve for Q{sub loc}{sup ?1} coincides very well with published data, based on global ultrasonic or internal friction measurements. This is compared to Q{sub loc}{sup ?1} measured in crystalline SrTiO{sub 3}, which exhibits a narrow distribution, as expected.

Wagner, H.; Büchsenschütz-Göbeler, M.; Luo, Y.; Samwer, K. [I. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August Universität, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Kumar, A. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102, Tamil Nadu (India); Arnold, W., E-mail: w.arnold@mx.uni-saarland.de [I. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August Universität, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Department of Materials and Materials Technology, Saarland University, Campus D 2.2, D-66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

390

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston/ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and emissions. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis, are being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston/ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrated the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Various low-friction strategies and ring-design concepts have been explored, and engine experiments have been done on a full-scale Waukesha VGF F18 in-line 6 cylinder power generation engine rated at 370 kW at 1800 rpm. Current accomplishments include designing and testing ring-packs using a subtle top-compression-ring profile (skewed barrel design), lowering the tension of the oil-control ring, employing a negative twist to the scraper ring to control oil consumption. Initial test data indicate that piston ring-pack friction was reduced by 35% by lowering the oil-control ring tension alone, which corresponds to a 1.5% improvement in fuel efficiency. Although small in magnitude, this improvement represents a first step towards anticipated aggregate improvements from other strategies. Other ring-pack design strategies to lower friction have been identified, including reduced axial distance between the top two rings, tilted top-ring groove. Some of these configurations have been tested and some await further evaluation. Colorado State University performed the tests and Waukesha Engine Dresser, Inc. provided technical support. Key elements of the continuing work include optimizing the engine piston design, application of surface and material developments in conjunction with improved lubricant properties, system modeling and analysis, and continued technology demonstration in an actual full-sized reciprocating natural-gas engine.

Victor W. Wong; Tian Tian; Grant Smedley; Jeffrey Jocsak

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

Aluminum reduction cell electrode  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces. 10 figs.

Payne, J.R.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

392

SciTech Connect: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technical Report: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling A...

393

Nondestructive, in-process inspection of inertia friction welding : an investigation into a new sensing technique.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the capabilities of a new sensor for in-process monitoring of quality during friction welding. The non-contact sensor is composed of microphones that are mounted in an aluminum ring which surrounds the weld joint. The sensor collects the acoustical energy (in the form of sound pressure) that is emitted during the plastic deformation and phase transformations (if applicable) in friction welding processes. The focus in this preliminary investigation is to search for and identify features within the acoustical emission that are indicative of bond quality. Bar-to-bar inertia friction welding (one form of friction welding) of copper to 304L stainless steel is used in this proof-of-concept study. This material combination exhibits only marginal weldability and is ideally suited for validating the capabilities of this new sensing technique. A probabilistic neural network is employed in this work to analyze the acoustical emission's frequency spectrum in an attempt to classify acceptable, conditional, and unacceptable welds. Our preliminary findings indicate that quality-based process features do exist within the frequency spectrum of the acoustical signature. The results from this analysis are presented. Future work in improving the sensing and interpretation of the data is discussed in an effort to develop a robust method of quality-based, in-process monitoring of friction welds.

Hartman, D. A. (Daniel A.); Cola, M. J. (Mark J.); Dave, V. R. (Vivek R.); Dozhier, N. G. (Nathan G.); Carpenter, R. W. (Robert W.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Special relativity as the limit of an Aristotelian universal friction theory under Reye's assumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work explores a classical mechanical theory under two further assumptions: (a) there is a universal dry friction force (Aristotelian mechanics), and (b) the variation of the mass of a body due to wear is proportional to the work done by the friction force on the body (Reye's hypothesis). It is shown that mass depends on velocity as in Special Relativity, and that the velocity is constant for a particular characteristic value. In the limit of vanishing friction the theory satisfies a relativity principle as bodies do not decelerate and, therefore, the absolute frame becomes unobservable. However, the limit theory is not Newtonian mechanics, with its Galilei group symmetry, but rather Special Relativity. This result suggests to regard Special Relativity as the limit of a theory presenting universal friction and exchange of mass-energy with a reservoir (vacuum). Thus, quite surprisingly, Special Relativity follows from the absolute space (ether) concept and could have been discovered following studies of Aristotelian mechanics and friction. We end the work confronting the full theory with observations. It predicts the Hubble law through tired light, and hence it is incompatible with supernova light curves unless both mechanisms of tired light (locally) and universe expansion (non-locally) are at work. It also nicely accounts for some challenging numerical coincidences involving phenomena under low acceleration.

E. Minguzzi

2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

395

Evaluation of microstructure and mechanical properties in friction stir processed SKD61 tool steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A SKD61 tool steel was friction stir processed using a polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tool. Microstructure, tensile properties and wear characteristic were evaluated. Fine grains with a martensite structure were produced in the friction stir processed zone, which led to the increase of the microindentation hardness. The grains became finer when the heat input was lowered. The transverse tensile strength of the friction stir processed zone was equal to that of base metal and all the tensile specimens fractured at base metal zone. The wear width and depth of the friction stir processed zone at the load of 1.96 N were 339 {mu}m and 6 {mu}m, as compared to 888 {mu}m and 42 {mu}m of the base metal, decreased by 62% and 86%. Findings of the present study suggest that low heat input is an effective method to produce a friction stir processed zone composed of relatively fine grain martensitic structure with good tensile properties and wear characteristic.

Chen, Y.C., E-mail: armstrong@hit.edu.cn [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Nakata, K. [Joining and Welding Research Institute, Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

c-Type Cytochrome-Dependent Formation of U(IV) Nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modern approaches for bioremediation of radionuclide contaminated environments are based on the ability of microorganisms to effectively catalyze changes in the oxidation states of metals that in turn influence their solubility. Although microbial metal reduction has been identified as an effective means for immobilizing highly-soluble uranium(VI) complexes in situ, the biomolecular mechanisms of U(VI) reduction are not well understood. Here, we show that c-type cytochromes of a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are essential for the reduction of U(VI) and formation of extracelluar UO2 nanoparticles. In particular, the outer membrane (OM) decaheme cytochrome MtrC, previously implicated in Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reduction, directly transferred electrons to U(VI). Additionally, deletions of mtrC and/or omcA significantly affected the in vivo U(VI) reduction rate relative to wild type MR-1. Similar to the wild type, the mutants accumulated UO2 nanoparticles extracellularly to high densities in association with an exopolymeric substance (EPS). In wild type cells, this UO2-EPS matrix exhibited glycocalyx-like properties, contained multiple elements of the OM, polysaccharide, and heme containing proteins. Using a novel combination of methods including synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high resolution immune-electron microscopy, we demonstrate a close association of the extracellular UO2 nanoparticles with MtrC and OmcA. This is the first study to directly localize the OM-associated cytochromes with EPS, which contains biogenic UO2 nanoparticles. In the environment, such association of UO2 nanoparticles with biopolymers may exert a strong influence on subsequent behavior including susceptibility to oxidation by O2 or transport in soils and sediments.

Marshall, Matthew J.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kennedy, David W.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Lai, Barry; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Simonson, Cody J.; Saffarini, Daad; Romine, Margaret F.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

397

Economic Analysis of Commercial Idling Reduction Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies: Which idling reduction system is most economical for truck owners? Economic Analysis of Commercial Idling Reduction Technologies: Which idling reduction system...

398

Dissimilar Friction Stir Welds in Al5186-Al2024: The Effect of Process Parameters on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of tool traverse and rotation speeds on the microstructures and mechanical properties are quantified for welds between non-age-hardening Al5083 and age hardening Al2024 and compared to single alloy joints made from each of the two constituents. In this paper, we report the results of microstructural, mechanical property investigations of Al5186-Al2024 friction stir welds produced using various rotations and traveling speeds of the tool to investigate the effects of the welding parameters on the joint strength. Metallographic studies by optical microscopy, electron probe microscopy, and the utilization of the X-ray diffraction technique have been conducted. It was found that the weld properties were dominated by the thermal input rather than the mechanical deformation by the tool. In particular the larger stresses under the weld tool on the AA5186 side compared to the AA2024 side are related to a transient reduction in yield stress due to dissolution of the hardening precipitates during welding prior to natural aging after welding.

Mousavi, S. A. A. Akbari; ShamAbadi, S. H. [School of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, University College of Engineering, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

399

Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of Platinum(IV) Carbamate Complexes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity of eight new platinum(IV) complexes having the general formula cis,cis,trans-[Pt(NH[subscript 3)[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 2](O[subscript 2]CNHR)[subscript 2

Wilson, Justin Jeff

400

Analise Matematica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biologica, Eng. Quimica, Quimica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An´alise Matem´atica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biol´ogica, Eng. Qu´imica, Qu´imica 1o ¯ Semestre -- 31

Dias, Esmeralda Sousa

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Analise Matematica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biologica, Eng. Quimica, Quimica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An´alise Matem´atica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biol´ogica, Eng. Qu´imica, Qu´imica 1o ¯ Semestre -- 27

Dias, Esmeralda Sousa

402

Analise Matematica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biologica, Eng. Quimica, Quimica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An´alise Matem´atica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biol´ogica, Eng. Qu´imica, Qu´imica 2o ¯ Semestre -- 28

Dias, Esmeralda Sousa

403

Analise Matematica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biologica, Eng. Quimica, Quimica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An´alise Matem´atica IV Eng. Ambiente, Eng. Biol´ogica, Eng. Qu´imica, Qu´imica 1o ¯ Semestre -- 6

Dias, Esmeralda Sousa

404

action phase iv: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on all fields of N4 vector multiplet. We also consider the derivation of leading low-enrgy effective action at two loops. I. L. Buchbinder 2004-02-12 256 Painleve IV and...

405

Cotton responses to mepiquat chloride and PGR-IV treatments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant growth regulators (PGRS) are applied to cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) to control vegetative growth, increase yields and hasten maturity. Two of these PGRS, mepiquat chloride (MC) and PGR-IV, affect plant growth in different ways. MC inhibits...

Biles, Stephen Paul

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Effects of Energy Removal on...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

on Physical Systems. Held under the auspices of the Annex IV initiative to the IEA Ocean Energy Systems, the webinar will be on February 3, 2015, from 8:00 to 9:30 AM PST...

407

Temperature and water vapor pressure effects on the friction coefficient of hydrogenated diamondlike carbon films.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microtribological measurements of a hydrogenated diamondlike carbon film in controlled gaseous environments show that water vapor plays a significant role in the friction coefficient. These experiments reveal an initial high friction transient behavior that does not reoccur even after extended periods of exposure to low partial pressures of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. Experiments varying both water vapor pressure and sample temperature show trends of a decreasing friction coefficient as a function of both the decreasing water vapor pressure and the increasing substrate temperature. Theses trends are examined with regard to first order gas-surface interactions. Model fits give activation energies on the order of 40 kJ/mol, which is consistent with water vapor desorption.

Dickrell, P. L.; Sawyer, W. G.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Erdemir, A.; Energy Technology; Univ. of Florida

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Driven translocation of a polymer: role of pore friction and crowding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Force-driven translocation of a macromolecule through a nanopore is investigated by taking into account the monomer-pore friction as well as the "crowding" of monomers on the {\\it trans} - side of the membrane which counterbalance the driving force acting in the pore. The set of governing differential-algebraic equations for the translocation dynamics is derived and solved numerically. The analysis of this solution shows that the crowding of monomers on the trans side hardly affects the dynamics, but the monomer-pore friction can substantially slow down the translocation process. Moreover, the translocation exponent $\\alpha$ in the translocation time - vs. - chain length scaling law, $\\tau \\propto N^{\\alpha}$, becomes smaller when monomer-pore friction coefficient increases. This is most noticeable for relatively strong forces. Our findings may explain the variety of $\\alpha$ values which were found in experiments and computer simulations.

Johan L. A. Dubbeldam; V. G. Rostiashvili; T. A. Vilgis

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Identification of Friction Parameters from the Inverse Analysis of a Direct Extrusion Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work proposes to use a special upsetting test and an optimal direct extrusion one performed to identify the constitutive equation of the material behavior and the friction coefficients directly from the load-stroke curves. The proposed friction test has the advantage to permit to take into account contact phenomena corresponding to new specimen surfaces created during a real bulk cold forming process. A lot of numerical simulations are made with the commercial software FORGE2 in order to study the influence of some design and process parameters. Different friction laws will be identified starting from the classical Coulomb and Tresca ones. All the parameter identifications are made using the Inverse Analysis principle.

Adinel, Gavrus; Thien, Pham Duc [LGCGM Laboratory, EA 3913, INSA de RENNES, UEB, CS70839, F-35708, Rennes-Cedex 7 (France); Henri, Francillette [SCR/CM, UMR 6226, INSA de RENNES, UEB, CS70839, F-35708, Rennes-Cedex 7 (France)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

Large Wind Property Tax Reduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In 2001, North Dakota established property tax reductions for commercial wind turbines constructed before 2011. Originally, the law reduced the taxable value of centrally-assessed* wind turbines...

411

Nonlinear noise reduction for electrocardiograms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear noise reduction for electrocardiograms Thomas Schreiber Physics Department, University time series. The underlying physiological process, the electrochemical excitation of cardiac tissue

Kaplan, Daniel T.

412

SCR Technologies for NOx Reduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SCR Technology for NOx Reduction Outline Necessity of NOx Exhaust Gas Aftertreatment Air-assisted Dosing Systems (HD applications) Field experience with DENOXTRONIC for MDHD...

413

Assessments of fluid friction factors for use in leak rate calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leak before Break procedures require estimates of leakage, and these in turn need fluid friction to be assessed. In this paper available data on flow rates through idealized and real crack geometries are reviewed in terms of a single friction factor k It is shown that for {lambda} < 1 flow rates can be bounded using correlations in terms of surface R{sub a} values. For {lambda} > 1 the database is less precise, but {lambda} {approx} 4 is an upper bound, hence in this region flow calculations can be assessed using 1 < {lambda} < 4.

Chivers, T.C. [Berkeley Technology Centre, Glos (United Kingdom)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Casimir Friction in Terms of Moving Harmonic Oscillators: Equivalence Between Two Different Formulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Casimir friction problem can be dealt with in a simplified way by considering two harmonic oscillators moving with constant relative velocity. Recently we calculated the energy dissipation for such a case, [EPL {\\bf 91}, 60003 (2010); Europ. Phys. J. D {\\bf 61}, 335 (2011)]. A recent study of Barton [New J. Phys. {\\bf 12}, 113044 (2010)] seemingly leads to a different result for the dissipation. If such a discrepancy really were true, it would imply a delicate difficulty for the basic theory of Casimir friction. In the present note we show that the expressions for the dissipation are in fact physically equivalent, at T=0.

Johan S. Hřye; Iver Brevik

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

415

Friction as a probe of surface properties of a polymer glass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We probe the temperature dependence of friction at the interface between a glassy poly(methylmethacrylate) lens and a flat substrate coated with a methyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer. The monolayer exhibits density defects which act as pinning sites for the polymer chains. We show that the shear response of such an interface supports the existence, at the surface of the glassy polymer, of a nanometer-thick layer of mobile chains. Friction can be ascribed to the interplay between viscouslike dissipation in this layer and depinning of chains adsorbed on the substrate. We further show that the pinning dynamics is controlled by \\beta rotational motions localized at the interface.

Lionel Bureau

2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

416

Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Addendum Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Addendum Document states additional...

417

Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on High-Stability-Low-Cost Supports Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on...

418

Development of a Robust and Cost-Effective Friction Stir Welding Process for Use in Advanced Military Vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of a Robust and Cost-Effective Friction Stir Welding Process for Use in Advanced potential). Unfortu- nately, these alloys are not very amenable to conventional fusion-based welding technologies and in-order to obtain high-quality welds, solid-state joining technologies such as Friction stir

Grujicic, Mica

419

Friction and wear behavior of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene as a function of polymer crystallinity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction and wear behavior of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene as a function of polymer-grade ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) (GUR 1050 resin) were evaluated as a function replacements; Ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE); Crystallinity; Friction; Wear 1. Introduction

Lin, Zhiqun

420

Influence of orographic and canopy conditions on friction velocities observed during frontal events using Doppler sodar observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodar friction velocities, obtained during frontal events traversing areas characterized by different orographic and canopy conditions (flat, bare ground, small hills and valleys with agricultural crops and trees, agricultural crops and forest on a flat ground, bare ground on the side of a mountain), are compared in order to identify the influence of topography on this parameter. For some case studies, sounding and sodar data are combined in order to provide a relation between the friction velocity and the low-level jet presence. For the cases analyzed in this paper, the following results are obtained: the frontal passage is associated with a decrease of the horizontal wind speed (about 50% in magnitude) in the surface layer, and an increase of the friction velocity before the frontal passage followed by a decrease just at the time of the frontal passage or with a little delay. Friction velocity is more intense in the cold side of the low-level jet and its maximum represents 2% of the low-level jet maximum magnitude. As it concerns the influence of the terrain conditions on friction velocity, mountain effects yield to more intense friction-velocity values and to a superposition of an oscillating behavior on the time variation of friction velocity, while forest effects induce a shift of the frontal signature on the time variation of friction velocity at higher height levels. 25 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

Kotroni, V.; Amory-Mazaudier, C. (CRPE, Saint-Maur des Fosses (France))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The development of an experimental procedure to determine the amount of active internal friction in a rotor-bearing system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The logarithmic decrement as calculated by the time response is used to determine the active friction force. By affecting the vibrational mode shape (by the use of weights at each end), the free-free rotor can simulate the frictional characteristics of a rotor...

Parker, Jeffrey Scott

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

The Rate-and State-Dependence of Sea Ice Friction Ben Lishman, Peter Sammonds, Daniel Feltham, and Alex Wilchinsky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for further work. 2. Experimental programme To produce a quantitative constitutive description of ice frictionPOAC09-66 The Rate- and State- Dependence of Sea Ice Friction Ben Lishman, Peter Sammonds, Daniel Feltham, and Alex Wilchinsky Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, and Centre for Polar Observation

Feltham, Daniel

423

Development of statistical wet weather model to evaluate frictional properties at the pavement-tire interface on hot mix asphalt concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Skid resistance on wet pavements is influenced by friction at the tire-pavement interface as well as overall hot mix asphalt (HMA) performance. It is important to control aggregate, asphalt, and mix properties to achieve desirable frictional...

Bedi, Harpreet

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Livestock Odor Reduction Demonstration Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock Odor Reduction Demonstration Project Objectives The 1996 and 1997 Iowa General Assembly-share basis to livestock producers and operators selected to carry out various demonstration projects. Organization The Livestock Odor Reduction Demonstration Project was administered by ISU Extension. Stewart

Lin, Zhiqun

425

Environmental Sustainability Paper Usage / Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;carbon footprint and develop carbon reduction projects around IT and staff/student behaviour change is supported by the Environmental Sustainability Manager and is seen as a key link to the University's Carbon Management Programme (e.g. to produce a forecast of carbon reductions as required by the Carbon Trust

426

Comprehensive Poverty Reduction Strategies in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comprehensive Poverty Reduction Strategies in Canada: Policy or Window Dressing? Charles Plante, Upstream: Institute for a Healthy Society #12;Overview What is poverty? Current state of poverty in Saskatchewan What is a Comprehensive Poverty Reduction Strategy (CPRS)? Are CPRS effective at reducing

Peak, Derek

427

Force microscopy of layering and friction in an ionic liquid Judith Hotha,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shape of the force vs. distance curve is explained by a model for the interaction between tip, gold of the compliant force sensor between branches of the oscillatory force curve. Frictional force between-viscosity, yet load- bearing lubricant [1-4]. The load-bearing ability stems from the formation of solvation

Mueser, Martin

428

Fretting Corrosion Damage of Total Hip Prosthesis: Friction Coefficient and Damage Rate Constant Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fretting Corrosion Damage of Total Hip Prosthesis: Friction Coefficient and Damage Rate Constant Building, University Park 16802 PA USA 4 Chair Professor Center for Research Excellence in Corrosion hip prosthesis. Fretting corrosion tests were conducted with stainless steel and poly (methyl

Boyer, Edmond

429

Frictional heating and convective cooling of polycrystalline diamond drag tools during rock cutting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical-analytical model is developed to predict temperatures in stud-mounted polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drag tools during rock cutting. Experimental measurements of the convective heat transfer coefficient for PDC cutters are used in the model to predict temperatures under typical drilling conditions with fluid flow. The analysis compares favorably with measurements of frictional temperatures in controlled cutting tests on Tennessee marble. It is shown that mean cutter wearflat temperatures can be maintained below the critical value of 750{sup 0}C only under conditions of low friction at the cutter/rock interface. This is true, regardless of the level of convective cooling. In fact, a cooling limit is established above which increases in convective cooling do not further reduce cutter temperatures. The ability of liquid drilling fluids to reduce interface friction is thus shown to be far more important in preventing excessive temperatures than their ability to provide cutter cooling. Due to the relatively high interface friction developed under typical air drilling conditions, it is doubtful that temperatures can be kept subcritical at high rotary speeds in some formations when air is employed as the drilling fluid, regardless of the level of cooling achieved.

Ortega, A.; Glowka, D.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

"Information-Friction" and its implications on minimum energy required for communication  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Just as there are frictional losses associated with moving masses on a surface, what if there were frictional losses associated with moving information on a substrate? Indeed, many modes of communication suffer from such frictional losses. We propose to model these losses as proportional to "bit-meters," i.e., the product of mass of information (i.e., the number of bits) and the distance of information transport. We use this "information- friction" model to understand fundamental energy requirements on encoding and decoding in communication circuitry. First, for communication across a binary input AWGN channel, we arrive at fundamental limits on bit-meters (and thus energy consumption) for decoding implementations that have a predetermined input-independent length of messages. For encoding, we relax the fixed-length assumption and derive bounds for flexible-message- length implementations. Using these lower bounds we show that the total (transmit + encoding + decoding) energy-per-bit must diverge to infinity as the target error probability is lowered to zero. Further, the closer the communication rate is maintained to the channel capacity (as the target error-probability is lowered to zero), the faster the required decoding energy diverges to infinity.

Pulkit Grover

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Torsion Spring Oscillator with Dry Friction Summary of the Principal Formulas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Torsion Spring Oscillator with Dry Friction ­ Problems Summary of the Principal Formulas of the angle m which sets the limits of the dead zone on both sides of the middle position at which the spring the situation characteris- tic of measuring instruments using a needle, such as moving-coil galvanometers

Butikov, Eugene

432

Modification of boundary lubrication by oil-soluble friction modifier Yingxi Zhua  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modification of boundary lubrication by oil-soluble friction modifier additives Yingxi Zhua in lubricants of the type used at the wet clutch interface in automatic transmissions has been studied using in the boundary lubrication regime and compared to a fully-formulated automatic transmission fluid (ATF). 1

Granick, Steve

433

Calibration of the torsional spring constant and the lateral photodiode response of frictional force microscopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calibration of the torsional spring constant and the lateral photodiode response of frictional simultaneously calibrates the photodiode response to the angular deflection of the cantilever. It does not rely steps: the calibration of the lateral photodiode response to convert the measured volts to the angle

Attard, Phil

434

Analytical and Experimental Study of Annular Two-Phase Flow Friction Pressure Drop Under Microgravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to design reliable two-phase systems. The main objective of this present research is to develop a new mathematical model that can accurately predict the annular two-phase friction pressure drop to optimize the design of two-phase systems. The two-phase flow...

Nguyen, Ngoc Thanh

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

435

Wear 260 (2006) 12951304 On the friction and wear performance of boric acid lubricant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effective in terms of both friction and wear performance. Based on the success of the combined lubricant experiments, the boric acid was then mixed with canola oil to form a completely natural lubricant combination the undesirable effects of wear, lubricants are generally applied along the interface of contacting materials

Sawyer, Wallace

436

Quantitative Model of Price Diffusion and Market Friction Based on Trading as a Mechanistic Random Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantitative Model of Price Diffusion and Market Friction Based on Trading as a Mechanistic Random 2002; published 13 March 2003) We model trading and price formation in a market under the assumption for the most basic properties of markets, such as the diffusion rate of prices (which is the standard measure

437

Error Estimation And Accurate Mapping Based ALE Formulation For 3D Simulation Of Friction Stir Welding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Welding Simon Guerdoux, Lionel Fourment* CEMEF, Mines cle Paris, BP 207, 06 904 Sophia Antipolis Ceclex) formulation is developed to simulate the different stages of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process standard approaches. The proposed ALE formulation is applied to FSW simulation. Steady state welding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

438

Computational Analysis of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Analysis of Material Flow During Friction Stir Welding of AA5059 Aluminum Alloys M welding (FSW) process are investigated computationally. Within the numerical model of the FSW process component. The employed coupled Eulerian/Lagrangian computational analysis of the welding process

Grujicic, Mica

439

Multiple pass and multiple layer friction stir welding and material enhancement processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Processes for friction stir welding, typically for comparatively thick plate materials using multiple passes and multiple layers of a friction stir welding tool. In some embodiments a first portion of a fabrication preform and a second portion of the fabrication preform are placed adjacent to each other to form a joint, and there may be a groove adjacent the joint. The joint is welded and then, where a groove exists, a filler may be disposed in the groove, and the seams between the filler and the first and second portions of the fabrication preform may be friction stir welded. In some embodiments two portions of a fabrication preform are abutted to form a joint, where the joint may, for example, be a lap joint, a bevel joint or a butt joint. In some embodiments a plurality of passes of a friction stir welding tool may be used, with some passes welding from one side of a fabrication preform and other passes welding from the other side of the fabrication preform.

Feng, Zhili (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; David, Stan A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Frederick, David Alan (Harriman, TN) [Harriman, TN

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

440

Heat transfer and friction characteristics of air flow in microtubes Chien-Yuh Yang a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat transfer and friction characteristics of air flow in microtubes Chien-Yuh Yang a, , Chia September 2011 Keywords: Microtube Heat transfer Liquid Crystal Thermography a b s t r a c t Several researches dealing with the single-phase forced convection heat transfer inside microchannels have been

Kandlikar, Satish

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Quantum mechanical aspects of friction and electric resistance in microscopic problems with applications to radiation physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Friction incorporates the close connection between classical mechanics in irreversible thermodynamics. The translation to a quantum mechanical foundation is not trivial and requires a generalization of the Lagrange function. A change to electromagnetic circuits appears to more adequate, since the electric analogue (Ohms law) is related to scatter of electrons at lattice vibrations.

Ulmer, W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

FRICTION FACTOR IN HIGH PRESSURE NATURAL GAS PIPELINES FROM ROUGHNESS MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRICTION FACTOR IN HIGH PRESSURE NATURAL GAS PIPELINES FROM ROUGHNESS MEASUREMENTS DETERMINATION DU and Technology, Norway ABSTRACT Pressure drop experiments on natural gas flow at 80 to 120 bar pressure and high of natural gas at typical operating pressures (100-180 bar). At such Reynolds numbers the classical Colebrook

Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

443

Friction factor for turbulent flow in rough pipes from Heisenberg's closure hypothesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the main results of the analysis of the friction factor for turbulent pipe flow reported in G. Gioia and P. Chakraborty (GC), Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 044502 (1996) can be recovered by assuming the Heisenberg closure hypothesis for the turbulent spectrum. This highlights the structural features of the turbulent spectrum underlying GC's analysis.

Esteban Calzetta

2009-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

444

Ab-initio friction forces on the nanoscale: A DFT study of fcc Cu(111)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While there are a number of models that tackle the problem of calculating friction forces on the atomic level, providing a completely parameter-free approach remains a challenge. Here we present a quasi-static model to obtain an approximation to the nanofrictional response of dry, wearless systems based on quantum mechanical all-electron calculations. We propose a mechanism to allow dissipative sliding, which relies on atomic relaxations. We define two different ways of calculating the mean nanofriction force, both leading to an exponential friction-versus-load behavior for all sliding directions. Since our approach does not impose any limits on lengths and directions of the sliding paths, we investigate arbitrary sliding directions for an fcc Cu(111) interface and detect two periodic paths which form the upper and lower bound of nanofriction. For long aperiodic paths the friction force convergences to a value in between these limits. For low loads we retrieve the Derjaguin generalization of Amontons-Coulomb kinetic friction law which appears to be valid all the way down to the nanoscale. We observe a non-vanishing Derjaguin-offset even for atomically flat surfaces in dry contact.

Michael Wolloch; Gregor Feldbauer; Peter Mohn; Josef Redinger; András Vernes

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

445

Variation, jumps, market frictions and high frequency data in financial econometrics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variation, jumps, market frictions and high frequency data in financial econometrics Ole E the econometrics of non-parametric estimation of the components of the variation of asset prices. This very active and order books. In our view the interaction of the new data sources with new econometric methodology

Wolfe, Patrick J.

446

Dynamics of static friction between steel and silicon Zhiping Yang, H. P. Zhang, and M. Marder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of static friction between steel and silicon Zhiping Yang, H. P. Zhang, and M. Marder 4, 2008) We conducted experiments in which steel and silicon or quartz are clamped together. Even experiments where silicon and quartz are clamped on steel, motion is measured down to the nanometer scale

Texas at Austin. University of

447

Linear elastic fracture mechanics predicts the propagation distance of frictional slip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When a frictional interface is subject to a localized shear load, it is often (experimentally) observed that local slip events initiate at the stress concentration and propagate over parts of the interface by arresting naturally before reaching the edge. We develop a theoretical model based on linear elastic fracture mechanics to describe the propagation of such precursory slip. The model's prediction of precursor lengths as a function of external load is in good quantitative agreement with laboratory experiments as well as with dynamic simulations, and provides thereby evidence to recognize frictional slip as a fracture phenomenon. We show that predicted precursor lengths depend, within given uncertainty ranges, mainly on the kinetic friction coefficient, and only weakly on other interface and material parameters. By simplifying the fracture mechanics model we also reveal sources for the observed non-linearity in the growth of precursor lengths as a function of the applied force. The discrete nature of precursors as well as the shear tractions caused by frustrated Poisson's expansion are found to be the dominant factors. Finally, we apply our model to a different, symmetric set-up and provide a prediction of the propagation distance of frictional slip for future experiments.

David S. Kammer; Mathilde Radiguet; Jean-Paul Ampuero; Jean-François Molinari

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

448

Impact of Friction and Scale-Dependent Initial Stress on Radiated Energy-Moment Scaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Shaw Lamont­Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, New York, USA The radiated energy coming271 Impact of Friction and Scale-Dependent Initial Stress on Radiated Energy-Moment Scaling Bruce E of elucidat- ing their radiated energy-moment scaling. We find, contrary to expectations, that apparent stress

Shaw, Bruce E.

449

Correlations to predict frictional pressure loss of hydraulic-fracturing slurry in coiled tubing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compared with conventional-tubing fracturing, coiled-tubing (CT) fracturing has several advantages. CT fracturing has become an effective stimulation technique for multizone oil and gas wells. It is also an attractive production-enhancement method for multiseam coalbed-methane wells, and wells with bypassed zones. The excessive frictional pressure loss through CT has been a concern in fracturing. The small diameter of the string limits the cross-sectional area open to flow. Furthermore, the tubing curvature causes secondary flow and results in extra flow resistance. This increased frictional pressure loss results in high surface pumping pressure. The maximum possible pump rate and sand concentration, therefore, have to be reduced. To design a CT fracturing job properly, it is essential to predict the frictional pressure loss through the tubing accurately. This paper presents correlations for the prediction of frictional pressure loss of fracturing slurries in straight tubing and CT. They are developed on the basis of full-scale slurry-flow tests with 11/2-in. CT and slurries prepared with 35 lbm/1,000 gal of guar gel. The extensive experiments were conducted at the full-scale CT-flow test facility. The proposed correlations have been verified with the experimental data and actual field CT-fracturing data. Case studies of wells recently fractured are provided to demonstrate the application of the correlations. The correlations will be useful to the CT engineers in their hydraulics design calculations.

Shah, S.; Zhoi, Y.X.; Bailey, M.; Hernandez, J. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Multilayer friction and attachment effects on energy dissipation in graphene nanoresonators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multilayer friction and attachment effects on energy dissipation in graphene nanoresonators Sung graphene monolayers, as well as extrinsic attachment or clamping strength between graphene and a model silicon substrate on the energy dissipation Q-factors of oscillating graphene nanoresonators. Both

Lin, Xi

451

Molecular simulation study of nanoscale friction for alkyl monolayers on Si,,111...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To calculate friction in MD simulations, two Si 111 surfaces coated with the alkyl monolayers were slid against is critical to the design of coatings for microelectromechanical systems. © 2002 American Institute of Physics, such as membranes, gears, motors, pumps and valves.1­3 The integration of miniaturized mechanical components

Zhang, Luzheng

452

Analysis of Instabilities and Their Impact on Friction Factor in Hole-Pattern Seals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The determination of the leakage and consequently the friction factor is an important part of analyzing the flow through a seal. This is done experimentally by means of a flat plate tester, which allows for the simplified representation of the seal...

Sekaran, Aarthi 1985-

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

453

Assessing the frictional and baroclinic contributions to stratified wake formation: a parameter space study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The baroclinic and surface-frictional contributions to stratified wake formation are considered as a function of the non-dimensional height ( = Nho/U) and aspect-ratio ( = ho/L) of the barrier. Numerical simulations are computed for a wide range...

Smith, Jamie Brooke

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

454

Low fault friction in Iran implies localized deformation for the ArabiaEurasia collision zone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low fault friction in Iran implies localized deformation for the Arabia­Eurasia collision zone P velocity field of the present-day deformation in Iran is modeled using a 3-dimensional (3D) finite element of the kinematics in Iran, but the complex velocity field of the surrounding South Caspian basin cannot be fitted

Vernant, Philippe

455

Molecular simulation study of nanoscale friction between alkyl monolayers on Si,,111... immersed in solvents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of friction at different interfaces in various solvents is very important to micro- or nanoelectro- mechanical.1063/1.1578055 I. INTRODUCTION Micro- or nanoelectromechanical systems MEMS/ NEMS are the integration/hydrophobic hydrophilic/hydrophilic hydro- philic/hydrophobic interfaces in water.8,13 Thus, it is ex- pected

Zhang, Luzheng

456

Endonuclease IV of Escherichia coli is induced by paraquat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The addition of paraquat (methyl viologen) to a growing culture of Escherichia coli K-12 led within 1 hr to a 10- to 20-fold increase in the level of endonuclease IV, a DNase for apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. The induction was blocked by chloramphenicol. Increases of 3-fold or more were also seen with plumbagin, menadione, and phenazine methosulfate. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produced no more than a 2-fold increase in endonuclease IV activity. The following agents had no significant effect: streptonigrin, nitrofurantoin, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, ..gamma.. rays, 260-nm UV radiation, methyl methanesulfonate, mitomycin C, and ascorbate. Paraquat, plumbagin, menadione, and phenazine methosulfate are known to generate superoxide radical anions via redox cycling in vivo. A mutant lacking superoxide dismutase was unusually sensitive to induction by paraquat. In addition, endonuclease IV could be induced by merely growing the mutant in pure O/sub 2/. The levels of endonuclease IV in uninduced or paraquat-treated cells were unaffected by mutations of oxyR, a H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-inducible gene that governs an oxidative-stress regulon. The results indicate that endonuclease IV is an inducible DNA-repair enzyme and that its induction can be mediated via the production of superoxide radicals.

Chan, E.; Weiss, B.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

International Conference on Mechanical Engineering, December 26-28, 2001, Dhaka, Bangladesh/pp. IV 37-40 Section IV: Fluid Mechanics 37  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/pp. IV 37-40 Section IV: Fluid Mechanics 37 ROLES OF PRESSURE AND FLOW RATE IN DEFINING THE RADIUS-28 Section IV: Fluid Mechanics 38 Hurst et al. (1961) introduced a radius of drainage formula. This formula4th International Conference on Mechanical Engineering, December 26-28, 2001, Dhaka, Bangladesh

Hossain, M. Enamul

458

Studies of the frictional heating of polycrystalline diamond compact drag tools during rock cutting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical-analytical model is developed to analyze temperatures in polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drag tools subject to localized frictional heating at a worn flat area and convective cooling at exposed lateral surfaces. Experimental measurements of convective heat transfer coefficients of PDC cutters in a uniform crossflow are presented and used in the model to predict temperatures under typical drilling conditions with fluid flow. The analysis compares favorably with measurements of frictional temperatures in controlled cutting tests on Tennessee marble. It is found that average temperatures at the wearflat contact zone vary directly with frictional force per unit area and are proportional to the one-half power of the cutting speed at the velocities investigated. Temperatures are found to be much more sensitive to decreases in the dynamic friction by lubrication than to increases in convective cooling rates beyond currently achievable levels with water or drilling fluids. It is shown that use of weighted drilling fluids may actually decrease cooling rates compared to those achieved with pure water. It is doubtful that tool temperatures can be kept below critical levels (750/sup 0/C) if air is employed as the drilling fluid. The degree of tool wear is found to have a major influence on the thermal response of the friction contact zone, so that for equal heating per contact area, a worn tool will run much hotter than a sharp tool. It is concluded that tool temperatures may be kept below critical levels with conventional water or mud cooling as long as the fluid provides good cutter-rock lubrication.

Ortega, A.; Glowka, D.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Is the friction angle the maximum slope of a free surface of a non cohesive material?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting from a symmetric triangular pile with a horizontal basis and rotating the basis in the vertical plane, we have determined the evolution of the stress distribution as a function of the basis inclination using Finite Elements method with an elastic-perfectly plastic constitutive model, defined by its friction angle, without cohesion. It is found that when the yield function is the Drucker-Prager one, stress distribution satisfying equilibrium can be found even when one of the free-surface slopes is larger than the friction angle. This means that piles with a slope larger than the friction angle can be (at least) marginally stable and that slope rotation is not always a destabilising perturbation direction. On the contrary, it is found that the slope cannot overpass the friction angle when a Mohr-Coulomb yield function is used. Theoretical explanation of these facts is given which enlightens the role plaid by the intermediate principal stress in both cases of the Mohr-Coulomb criterion and of the Drucker-Prager one. It is then argued that the Mohr-Coulomb criterion assumes a spontaneous symmetry breaking, as soon as the two smallest principal stresses are different ; this is not physical most likely; so this criterion shall be replaced by a Drucker-Prager criterion in the vicinity of the equality, which leads to the previous anomalous behaviour ; so these numerical computations enlighten the avalanche process: they show that no dynamical angle larger than the static one is needed to understand avalanching. It is in agreement with previous experimental results. Furthermore, these results show that the maximum angle of repose can be modified using cyclic rotations; we propose a procedure that allows to achieve a maximum angle of repose to be equal to the friction angle .

A. Modaressi; P. Evesque

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

460

Determination of kinetic coefficients for the simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uranium contamination of groundwaters and surface waters near abandoned mill tailings piles is a serious concern in many areas of the western United States. Uranium usually exists in either the U(IV) or the U(VI) oxidation state. U(VI) is soluble in water and, as a result, is very mobile in the environment. U(IV), however, is generally insoluble in water and, therefore, is not subject to aqueous transport. In recent years, researchers have discovered that certain anaerobic microorganisms, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, can mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). Although the ability of this microorganism to reduce U(VI) has been studied in some detail by previous researchers, the kinetics of the reactions have not been characterized. The purpose of this research was to perform kinetic studies on Desulfovibrio desulficans bacteria during simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium and to determine the phase in which uranium exists after it has been reduced and precipitated from solution. The studies were conducted in a laboratory-scale chemostat under substrate-limited growth conditions with pyruvate as the substrate. Kinetic coefficients for substrate utilization and cell growth were calculated using the Monod equation. The maximum rate of substrate utilization (k) was determined to be 4.70 days{sup {minus}1} while the half-velocity constant (K{sub s}) was 140 mg/l COD. The yield coefficient (Y) was determined to be 0.17 mg cells/mg COD while the endogenous decay coefficient (k{sub d}) was calculated as 0.072 days{sup {minus}1}. After reduction, U(IV) Precipitated from solution in the uraninite (UO{sub 2}) phase. Uranium removal efficiency as high as 90% was achieved in the chemostat.

Tucker, M.D.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Automatic generation and analysis of solar cell IV curves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A photovoltaic system includes multiple strings of solar panels and a device presenting a DC load to the strings of solar panels. Output currents of the strings of solar panels may be sensed and provided to a computer that generates current-voltage (IV) curves of the strings of solar panels. Output voltages of the string of solar panels may be sensed at the string or at the device presenting the DC load. The DC load may be varied. Output currents of the strings of solar panels responsive to the variation of the DC load are sensed to generate IV curves of the strings of solar panels. IV curves may be compared and analyzed to evaluate performance of and detect problems with a string of solar panels.

Kraft, Steven M.; Jones, Jason C.

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

462

Tethys and Annex IV Progress Report for FY 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System, dubbed “Tethys” after the mythical Greek titaness of the seas, is being developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). Functioning as a smart database, Tethys enables its users to identify key words or terms to help gather, organize and make available information and data pertaining to the environmental effects of MHK and offshore wind (OSW) energy development. By providing and categorizing relevant publications within a simple and searchable database, Tethys acts as a dissemination channel for information and data which can be utilized by regulators, project developers and researchers to minimize the environmental risks associated with offshore renewable energy developments and attempt to streamline the permitting process. Tethys also houses a separate content-related Annex IV data base with identical functionality to the Tethys knowledge base. Annex IV is a collaborative project among member nations of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ocean Energy Systems – Implementing Agreement (OES-IA) that examines the environmental effects of ocean energy devices and projects. The U.S. Department of Energy leads the Annex IV working with federal partners such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While the Annex IV database contains technical reports and journal articles, it is primarily focused on the collection of project site and research study metadata forms (completed by MHK researchers and developers around the world, and collected by PNNL) which provide information on environmental studies and the current progress of the various international MHK developments in the Annex IV member nations. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the content, accessibility and functionality enhancements made to the Annex IV and Tethys knowledge bases in FY12.

Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase IV Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Novel furnace designs based on Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) technology were developed under subcontract by Techint Technologies, Coraopolis, PA, to fully exploit the energy and environmental capabilities of DOC technology and to provide a competitive offering for new furnace construction opportunities. Capital cost, fuel, oxygen and utility costs, NOx emissions, oxide scaling performance, and maintenance requirements were compared for five DOC-based designs and three conventional air5-fired designs using a 10-year net present value calculation. A furnace direct completely with DOC burners offers low capital cost, low fuel rate, and minimal NOx emissions. However, these benefits do not offset the cost of oxygen and a full DOC-fired furnace is projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is roughly $6/lb NOx, compared with an estimated $3/lb. NOx for equ8pping a conventional furnace with selective catalytic reduction (SCCR) technology. A furnace fired with DOC burners in the heating zone and ambient temperature (cold) air-fired burners in the soak zone offers low capital cost with less oxygen consumption. However, the improvement in fuel rate is not as great as the full DOC-fired design, and the DOC-cold soak design is also projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The NOx improvement with the DOC-cold soak design is also not as great as the full DOC fired design, and the incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is nearly $9/lb NOx. These results indicate that a DOC-based furnace design will not be generally competitive with conventional technology for new furnace construction under current market conditions. Fuel prices of $7/MMBtu or oxygen prices of $23/ton are needed to make the DOC furnace economics favorable. Niche applications may exist, particularly where access to capital is limited or floor space limitations are critical. DOC technology will continue to have a highly competitive role in retrofit applications requiring increases in furnace productivity.

Riley, M.F.

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

464

Nevada State Energy Reduction Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As mandated by the Nevada statutes, the Nevada Energy Office prepared a state energy reduction plan which requires state agencies, departments, and other entities in the Executive Branch to reduce...

465

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction is a technical paper that addresses the operating and economic advantages associated with the program to lower the steam operating pressure. Evaluation of a testing program will be discussed. The paper...

Sylva, D. M.

466

IV.1. UNITARY GROUPS AND BASE CHANGE Michael Harris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IV.1. UNITARY GROUPS AND BASE CHANGE Michael Harris 1. Classification of unitary groups over number-split and we set (G) = 1. Typeset by AMS-TEX 1 #12;2 MICHAEL HARRIS Returning to the real case, we set (U(p, q

Harris, Michael - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

467

I.V. Stasyuk, O.V. Velychko CONFIGURATIONAL MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Complex formation reactions of metal ions and ligand groups are of great importance due to pollution of environment by heavy metal (including actinides) species. In general this type of reaction can be described' & $ % I.V. Stasyuk, O.V. Velychko CONFIGURATIONAL MODEL OF METAL ION COMPLEX FORMATION IN WATER

468

UNIVERSITE MONTESQUIEU BORDEAUX IV ECOLE DOCTORALE de SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES, GESTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLANIFICATION URBAINE SUR LES PRIX IMMOBILIERS ET FONCIERS EN ZONE LITTORALE : LE CAS DU BASSIN D'ARCACHON ThčseUNIVERSITE MONTESQUIEU ­ BORDEAUX IV ECOLE DOCTORALE de SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES, GESTION ET professionnalisme dans la gestion administrative. Un grand merci ŕ Sébastien Lavaud pour son énorme patience face ŕ

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

469

GEODESIC FRCHET DISTANCE WITH POLYGONAL OBSTACLES Atlas F. Cook IV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEODESIC FR�CHET DISTANCE WITH POLYGONAL OBSTACLES Atlas F. Cook IV Carola Wenk Abstract We present the first algorithm to compute the geodesic Fréchet distance between two polygonal curves in a plane of from a point source). This shortest path map supports geodesic distance queries from any point s ab

Texas at San Antonio, University of

470

Constraints to Stop Deforestation FB IV Informatik, Universitat Trier,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraints to Stop Deforestation H. Seidl FB IV ­ Informatik, Universit¨at Trier, D­54286 Trier, Universitetsparken 1, DK­2100 Copenhagen �, Denmark. rambo@diku.dk Abstract Wadler's deforestation algorithm, deforestation must terminate on all programs. Several techniques exist to ensure termination of de­ forestation

Seidl, Helmut

471

Constraints to Stop HigherOrder Deforestation FB IV Informatik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constraints to Stop Higher­Order Deforestation H. Seidl FB IV ­ Informatik Universit¨at Trier, D of Copenhagen Universitetsparken 1, DK­2100 Copenhagen �, Denmark rambo@diku.dk Abstract Wadler's deforestation in a compiler, it must terminate on all programs. Several techniques to ensure termi­ nation of deforestation

Seidl, Helmut

472

221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field Early development of quantum mechanics was led by the fact that electro- magnetic radiation (electric current den- sity) jµ = (, j/c). For a point particle of charge e, the charge density is = e

Murayama, Hitoshi

473

Economic Impact Report BInghamton UnIvERsIty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Impact Report 2007 #12;BInghamton UnIvERsIty 8:1 return on investment The term "return will be returned to the state economy and $6 to the local economy -- delivering an economic impact of $8.65 billion as an engine of economic growth that improves the financial health of our region and state. EconomIc Impact

Suzuki, Masatsugu

474

A VACANCY MODEL IN SOLID HELIUM IV B. CASTAING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

536 A VACANCY MODEL IN SOLID HELIUM IV B. CASTAING Groupe de Physique des Solides de l here a new approach to the problem of vacancies in solid Helium 4, describing them as small liquid droplets. In this model the vacancy effective mass is very small : 0.1 mHe, where mHe is the atomic mass

Boyer, Edmond

475

Oxidative Reforming of Biodiesel Over Molybdenum (IV) Oxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxidative Reforming of Biodiesel Over Molybdenum (IV) Oxide Jessica Whalen, Oscar Marin Flores, Su University INTRODUCTION Energy consumption continues to skyrocket worldwide. Biodiesel is a renewable fuel as potential feedstock in solid oxide fuel cells. Petroleum based fuels become scarcer daily, and biodiesel

Collins, Gary S.

476

Baeyer-Villiger Oxidation over Sn(IV) Phosphonates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

attractive feature of these catalysts is that the reaction can be carried out under solvent-free conditions using aqueous H2O2 (30 %) as the oxidant. Various Sn(IV) phosphonates have been synthesized using phosphonic acid in different solvent systems...

Samarajeeewa, Sandani

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

477

Plasma-assisted catalytic reduction system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Non-thermal plasma gas treatment is combined with selective catalytic reduction to enhance NO{sub x} reduction in oxygen-rich vehicle engine exhausts. 8 figs.

Vogtlin, G.E.; Merritt, B.T.; Hsiao, M.C.; Wallman, P.H.; Penetrante, B.M.

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

478

Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid. Electrocatalytic Reactivity for Oxygen Reduction of Palladium-Modified...

479

Facile and controllable electrochemical reduction of graphene...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and controllable electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide and its applications. Facile and controllable electrochemical reduction of graphene oxide and its applications....

480

Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation...

482

Friction of a slider on a granular layer: Non-monotonic thickness dependence and effect of boundary conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the effective friction encountered by a mass sliding on a granular layer as a function of bed thickness and boundary roughness conditions. The observed friction has minima for a small number of layers before it increases and saturates to a value which depends on the roughness of the sliding surface. We use an index-matched interstitial liquid to probe the internal motion of the grains with fluorescence imaging in a regime where the liquid has no significant effect on the measured friction. The shear profiles obtained as a function of depth show decrease in slip near the sliding surface as the layer thickness is increased. We propose that the friction depends on the degree of grain confinement relative to the sliding surfaces.

Saloome Siavoshi; Ashish V. Orpe; Arshad Kudrolli

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

483

Brittle and Ductile Friction and the Physics of Tectonic Tremor 1. Geophysics Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory 3. United States Geological Survey, Menlo Park 4Brittle and Ductile Friction and the Physics of Tectonic Tremor 1. Geophysics Group, Los Alamos

Daub,Eric G.

484

Friction Stir Welding Of Ma957 Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Ferritic Steel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 1-in. (25.4 mm) diameter yttria-dispersion-strengthened MA957 ferritic steel alloy tube with a 0.125" (3.18 mm) wall thickness was successfully plasticized by friction stir welding. The pin tool was a W-Re tool with 0.125" (3.17 mm) diameter tip. It showed no discernable wear for the total 12" (305 mm) of weld. Weld conditions were 1000 and 1400 RPM, 4 in/min (101 mm/min), with and without preheating to 135şC. Metallographic analysis of the post friction-stir welded material showed a decrease in material hardness to 225±22 HV compared to the parent material at 373±21 HV. All weld conditions produced plasticization; however, improved plasticization was observed for preheated samples

Howard, Stanley M.; Jasthi, Bharat K.; Arbegast, William J.; Grant, Glenn J.; Koduri, Santhosh K.; Herling, Darrell R.; Gelles, David S.

2005-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

485

Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welding: a review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant amounts of residual stresses are often generated during welding and result in critical degradation of the structural integrity and performance of components. Neutron diffraction has become a well established technique for the determination of residual stresses in welds because of the unique deep penetration, three-dimensional mapping capability, and volume averaged bulk measurements characteristic of the scattering neutron beam. Friction stir welding has gained prominence in recent years. The authors reviewed a number of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welds and highlighted examples addressing how the microstructures and residual stresses are correlated with each other. An example of in situ neutron diffraction measurement result shows the evolution of the residual stresses during welding.

Woo, Wan Chuck [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Wang, Xun-Li [ORNL; David, Stan A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Initial increase, ''peaking effect'', in the internal friction of copper following pulsed neutron and electron irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under certain experimental conditions the internal friction in metals can first increase and following prolonged irradiation decrease. Many models have been proposed to account for this ''peaking effect''; however, in many of the cases, no effort is made to distinguish between the influence of interstitials and/or vacancies. To determine the nature of the point defect responsible for the peaking effect in high purity copper, we have performed a series of pulsed irradiations using neutrons and electrons. In all of the experiments an initial very rapid rise in the internal friction and Young's modulus was observed. These data show that a fast diffusing defect is responsible for the peaking effect: i.e. the interstitial.

Simpson, H.M.; Parkin, D.M.; Goldstone, J.A.; Hemsky, J.W.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Nonlinear analysis of time series of vibration data from a friction brake: SSA, PCA, and MFDFA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use the methodology of singular spectrum analysis (SSA), principal component analysis (PCA), and multi-fractal detrended fluctuation analysis (MFDFA), for investigating characteristics of vibration time series data from a friction brake. SSA and PCA are used to study the long time-scale characteristics of the time series. MFDFA is applied for investigating all time scales up to the smallest recorded one. It turns out that the majority of the long time-scale dynamics, that is presumably dominated by the structural dynamics of the brake system, is dominated by very few active dimensions only and can well be understood in terms of low dimensional chaotic attractors. The multi-fractal analysis shows that the fast dynamical processes originating in the friction interface are in turn truly multi-scale in nature.

Nikolay K. Vitanov; Norbert P. Hoffmann; Boris Wernitz

2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

488

The friction factor of two-dimensional rough-boundary turbulent soap film flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use momentum transfer arguments to predict the friction factor $f$ in two-dimensional turbulent soap-film flows with rough boundaries (an analogue of three-dimensional pipe flow) as a function of Reynolds number Re and roughness $r$, considering separately the inverse energy cascade and the forward enstrophy cascade. At intermediate Re, we predict a Blasius-like friction factor scaling of $f\\propto\\textrm{Re}^{-1/2}$ in flows dominated by the enstrophy cascade, distinct from the energy cascade scaling of $\\textrm{Re}^{-1/4}$. For large Re, $f \\sim r$ in the enstrophy-dominated case. We use conformal map techniques to perform direct numerical simulations that are in satisfactory agreement with theory, and exhibit data collapse scaling of roughness-induced criticality, previously shown to arise in the 3D pipe data of Nikuradse.

Nicholas Guttenberg; Nigel Goldenfeld

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

489

EFFECT OF TOOL FEATURE ON THE JOINT STRENGTH OF DISSIMILAR FRICTION STIR LAP WELDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several variations of friction stir tools were used to investigate the effects on the joint strengths of dissimilar friction stir lap welds. In the present lap weld configuration the top sheet was a 2.32 mm thick Mg (AZ 31) alloy. The bottom sheet consisted of two different steels, a (i) 0.8 mm thick electro-galvanized (EG) mild steel, or a (ii) 1.5 mm thick hot dip galvanized (HDG) high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel. Initially the tool shape was modified to accommodate the material, at which point the tool geometry was fixed. With a fixed tool geometry an additional feature was added to the pin bottom on one of the tools by incorporating a short hard insert, which would act as a stronger bottom sheet cutter. The effects of such modification on the unguided lap shear strength, and associated microstructural changes are discussed in this study.

Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Mattlin, Karl F.

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

490

Casimir Friction Force and Energy Dissipation for Moving Harmonic Oscillators. II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a second in a series devoted to the study of a two-oscillator system in linear relative motion (the first one published as a letter in Europhys. Lett. 91, 60003 (2010)). The main idea behind considering this kind of system is to use it as a simple model for Casimir friction. In the present paper we extend our previous theory so as to obtain the change in the oscillator energy to second order in the perturbation, even though we employ first order perturbation theory only. The results agree with, and confirm, our earlier results obtained via different routes. The friction force is finite at finite temperatures, whereas in the case of two oscillators moving with constant relative velocity the force becomes zero at zero temperature, due to slowly varying coupling.

Johan S. Hřye; I. Brevik

2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

491

Cherenkov friction on a neutral particle moving parallel to a dielectric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on a fully relativistic framework and the assumption of local equilibrium, we describe a simple mechanism of quantum friction for a particle moving parallel to a dielectric. The Cherenkov effect explains how the bare ground state becomes globally unstable and how fluctuations of the electromagnetic field and the particle's dipole are converted into pairs of excitations. Modelling the particle as a silver nano-sphere, we investigate the spectrum of the force and its velocity dependence. We find that the damping of the plasmon resonance in the silver particle has a relatively strong impact near the Cherenkov threshold velocity. We also present an expansion of the friction force near the threshold velocity for both damped and undamped particles.

Gregor Pieplow; Carsten Henkel

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

492

Attractiveness of periodic orbits in parametrically forced systemswith time-increasing friction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider dissipative one-dimensional systems subject to a periodic force and study numerically how a time-varying friction affects the dynamics. As a model system, particularly suited for numerical analysis, we investigate the driven cubic oscillator in the presence of friction. We find that, if the damping coefficient increases in time up to a final constant value, then the basins of attraction of the leading resonances are larger than they would have been if the coefficient had been fixed at that value since the beginning. From a quantitative point of view, the scenario depends both on the final value and the growth rate of the damping coefficient. The relevance of the results for the spin-orbit model are discussed in some detail.

Michele Bartuccelli; Jonathan Deane; Guido Gentile

2012-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

493

Dynamical friction in constant density cores: a failure of the Chandrasekhar formula  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using analytic calculations and N-body simulations we show that in constant density (harmonic) cores, sinking satellites undergo an initial phase of very rapid (super-Chandrasekhar) dynamical friction, after which they experience no dynamical friction at all. For density profiles with a central power law profile of log-slope, $-\\alpha$, the infalling satellite heats the background and causes $\\alpha$ to decrease. For $\\alpha < 0.5$ initially, the satellite generates a small central constant density core and stalls as in the $\\alpha = 0$ case. We discuss some astrophysical applications of our results to decaying satellite orbits, galactic bars and mergers of supermassive black hole binaries. In a companion paper we show that a central constant density core can provide a natural solution to the timing problem for Fornax's globular clusters.

J. I. Read; Tobias Goerdt; Ben Moore; A. P. Pontzen; Joachim Stadel; George Lake

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

494

Heat transfer and friction in a square channel with one-wall or two-wall rib turbulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

walls 83 66 Ribbed side Nusselt number ratio versus friction factor ratio for broken ribs on one wall 84 67 Smooth side Nusselt number ratio versus friction factor ratio for broken ribs on one wall . , 68 Ribbed side Nusselt number ratio versus... on one wall . 95 96 97 INTRODUCTION Early heat transfer study shows that roughening the surface is an effective way to enhance the heat transfer from a surface. Modern turbine design applies turbulence promoters/ribs inside cooling passages...

Huang, Jie Joy

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

An experimental and analytical study of annular two phase flow friction pressure drop in a reduced acceleration field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the same mass fluxes and mass qualities. The reduced acceleration pressure drops were found to be 45% greater overall than the 1-g pressure drops. In addition, the reduced acceleration flows were modeled using a universal velocity profile integral... approach to determine the liquid film thickness and the interfacial friction factor. The reduced acceleration annular flow interfacial friction factors were compared with current models for vertical up-flow in a 1-g environment. The reduced acceleration...

Wheeler, Montgomery

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl{sub 2} eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

Shen, Junjun, E-mail: junjun.shen@hzg.de; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Materials Mechanics, Solid-State Joining Processes, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

497

A robotic crawler exploiting directional frictional interactions: experiments, numerics, and derivation of a reduced model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present experimental and numerical results for a model crawler which is able to extract net positional changes from reciprocal shape changes, i.e. 'breathing-like' deformations, thanks to directional, frictional interactions with a textured solid substrate, mediated by flexible inclined feet. We also present a simple reduced model that captures the essential features of the kinematics and energetics of the gait, and compare its predictions with the results from experiments and from numerical simulations.

Giovanni Noselli; Antonio DeSimone

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

498

Characterization of boron carbide particulate reinforced in situ copper surface composites synthesized using friction stir processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Friction stir processing has evolved as a novel solid state technique to fabricate surface composites. The objective of this work is to apply the friction stir processing technique to fabricate boron carbide particulate reinforced copper surface composites and investigate the effect of B{sub 4}C particles and its volume fraction on microstructure and sliding wear behavior of the same. A groove was prepared on 6 mm thick copper plates and packed with B{sub 4}C particles. The dimensions of the groove was varied to result in five different volume fractions of B{sub 4}C particles (0, 6, 12, 18 and 24 vol.%). A single pass friction stir processing was done using a tool rotational speed of 1000 rpm, travel speed of 40 mm/min and an axial force of 10 kN. Metallurgical characterization of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites was carried out using optical microscope and scanning electron microscope. The sliding wear behavior was evaluated using a pin-on-disk apparatus. Results indicated that the B{sub 4}C particles significantly influenced the area, dispersion, grain size, microhardness and sliding wear behavior of the Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composites. When the volume fraction of B{sub 4}C was increased, the wear mode changed from microcutting to abrasive wear and wear debris was found to be finer. Highlights: • Fabrication of Cu/B{sub 4}C surface composite by friction stir processing • Analyzing the effect of B{sub 4}C particles on the properties of Cu/B4C surface composite • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles reduced the area of surface composite. • Increased volume fraction of B{sub 4}C particles enhanced the microhardness and wear rate. • B{sub 4}C particles altered the wear mode from microcutting to abrasive.

Sathiskumar, R., E-mail: sathiscit2011@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Murugan, N., E-mail: murugan@cit.edu.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Coimbatore Institute of Technology, Coimbatore, 641 014 Tamil Nadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, V V College of Engineering, Tisaiyanvilai, 627 657 Tamil Nadu (India); Vijay, S.J., E-mail: vijayjoseph@karunya.edu [Centre for Research in Metallurgy (CRM), School of Mechanical Sciences, Karunya University, Coimbatore, 641 114 Tamil Nadu (India)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

499

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z