National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for friction reduction iv

  1. Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings Opportunities exist for friction reduction in piston rings and valve trains using durable, advanced material technologies, such as diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings, and new lubricants. PDF icon deer12_gangopadhyay.pdf More Documents & Publications Low-Friction Hard Coatings Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Modified PAG (polyalkylene

  2. An integrated surface technology for friction reduction in vehicles |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy integrated surface technology for friction reduction in vehicles An integrated surface technology for friction reduction in vehicles 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon pmp_08_hsu.pdf More Documents & Publications An Integrated Surface Technology for Optimum Performance Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Friction Reduction through Surface

  3. Engine Friction Reduction Through Surface Finish and Coatings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Opportunities exist for friction reduction in piston rings and valve trains using durable, advanced material technologies, such as diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings, and new ...

  4. Heavy Truck Friction & Wear Reduction Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Friction & Wear Reduction Technologies Heavy Truck Friction & Wear Reduction Technologies 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon vssp_20_killian.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Can hard coatings and lubricant anti-wear additives work together? Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of High Power Density

  5. Overview of Friction and Wear Reduction for Heavy Vehicles | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Friction and Wear Reduction for Heavy Vehicles Overview of Friction and Wear Reduction for Heavy Vehicles 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon vss_12_fenske.pdf More Documents & Publications Parasitic Energy Losses Low-Friction Engineered Surfaces DOE/DOD Parasitic Energy Loss Collaboration

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Engine Friction Reduction Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and vehicle technologies office annual merit review and peer evaluation meeting about engine friction...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Engine Friction Reduction Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about engine friction...

  8. Plutonium Oxidation and Subsequent Reduction by Mn (IV) Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KAPLAN, DANIEL

    2005-09-13

    Plutonium sorbed to rock tuff was preferentially associated with manganese oxides. On tuff and synthetic pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}), Pu(IV) or Pu(V) was initially oxidized, but over time Pu(IV) became the predominant oxidation state of sorbed Pu. Reduction of Pu(V/VI), even on non-oxidizing surfaces, is proposed to result from a lower Gibbs free energy of the hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species versus that of the Pu(V) or Pu(VI) surface species. This work suggests that despite initial oxidation of sorbed Pu by oxidizing surfaces to more soluble forms, the less mobile form of Pu, Pu(IV), will dominate Pu solid phase speciation during long term geologic storage. The safe design of a radioactive waste or spent nuclear fuel geologic repository requires a risk assessment of radionuclides that may potentially be released into the surrounding environment. Geochemical knowledge of the radionuclide and the surrounding environment is required for predicting subsurface fate and transport. Although difficult even in simple systems, this task grows increasingly complicated for constituents, like Pu, that exhibit complex environmental chemistries. The environmental behavior of Pu can be influenced by complexation, precipitation, adsorption, colloid formation, and oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions (1-3). To predict the environmental mobility of Pu, the most important of these factors is Pu oxidation state. This is because Pu(IV) is generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude less mobile than Pu(V) in most environments (4). Further complicating matters, Pu commonly exists simultaneously in several oxidation states (5, 6). Choppin (7) reported Pu may exist as Pu(IV), Pu(V), or Pu(VI) oxic natural groundwaters. It is generally accepted that plutonium associated with suspended particulate matter is predominantly Pu(IV) (8-10), whereas Pu in the aqueous phase is predominantly Pu(V) (2, 11-13). The influence of the character of Mn-containing minerals expected to be found in subsurface repository environments on Pu oxidation state distributions has been the subject of much recent research. Kenney-Kennicutt and Morse (14), Duff et al. (15), and Morgenstern and Choppin (16) observed oxidation of Pu facilitated by Mn(IV)-bearing minerals. Conversely, Shaughnessy et al. (17) used X-ray Absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to show reduction of Pu(VI) by hausmannite (Mn{sup II}Mn{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) and manganite ({gamma}-Mn{sup III}OOH) and Kersting et al., (18) observed reduction of Pu(VI) by pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}). In this paper, we attempt to reconcile the apparently conflicting datasets by showing that Mn-bearing minerals can indeed oxidize Pu, however, if the oxidized species remains on the solid phase, the oxidation step competes with the formation of Pu(IV) that becomes the predominant solid phase Pu species with time. The experimental approach we took was to conduct longer term (approximately two years later) oxidation state analyses on the Pu sorbed to Yucca Mountain tuff (initial analysis reported by Duff et al., (15)) and measure the time-dependant changes in the oxidation state distribution of Pu in the presence of the Mn mineral pyrolusite.

  9. Efficiency Improvement through Reduction in Friction and Wear in Powertrain Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Killian

    2009-09-30

    The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency of truck drivelines through reduction of friction and parasitic losses in transmission and drive axles. Known efficiencies for these products exceeded 97 percent, so the task was not trivial. The project relied on a working relationship between modeling and hardware testing. Modeling was to shorten the development cycle by guiding the selection of materials, processes and strategies. Bench top and fixture tests were to validate the models. Modeling was performed at a world class, high academic level, but in the end, modeling did not impact the hardware development as much as intended. Insights leading to the most significant accomplishments came from bench top and fixture tests and full scale dynamometer tests. A key development in the project was the formulation of the implementation strategy. Five technical elements with potential to minimize friction and parasitic losses were identified. These elements included churning, lubrication, surface roughness, coatings and textures. An interesting fact is that both Caterpillar and Eaton independently converged on the same set of technical elements in formulating their implementation strategies. Exploiting technical elements of the implementation strategy had a positive impact on transmission and drive axle efficiencies. During one dynamometer test of an Eaton Best Tech 1 transmission, all three gear ranges tested: Under drive, direct drive and over drive, showed efficiencies greater than 99 percent. Technology boosts to efficiency for transmissions reached 1 percent, while efficiency improvements to drive axle pushed 2 percent. These advancements seem small, but the accomplishment is large considering that these products normally run at greater than 97 percent efficiency. Barriers and risks to implementing these technology elements are clear. Schemes using a low fill sump and spray tubes endanger the gears and bearings by lubricant starvation. Gear coatings have exhibited durability issues, stripping away under conditions less demanding than 750,000 miles in service on the road. Failed coatings compound the problem by contaminating the lubricant with hard particles. Under the most severe conditions, super finished surfaces may polish further, reaching a surface roughness unable to support the critical oil film thickness. Low viscosity and low friction lubricants may not protect the gears and bearings adequately leading to excessive pitting, wear and noise. Additives in low friction oils may not stay in solution or suspended thus settling to the bottom and unavailable when they are needed most. Technical barriers and risks can be overcome through engineering, but two barriers remain formidable: (1) cost of the technology and (2) convincing fleet owners that the technology provides a tangible benefit. Dry sumps lower lubricant operating temperatures so the removal of heat exchangers and hoses and reduced demand on engine cooling systems justify their use. The benefits of surface texturing are varied and remain unproven. Lubricant costs seem manageable, but the cost of super finishing and gear coating are high. These are issues of scale and processing technology. Going across the board with gear super finishing and coating will reduce costs. Pushing the envelope to applications with higher torque and higher power density should drive the adoption of these technologies. Fleet owners are an educated and seasoned lot. Only technology measureable in dollars returned is used on truck fleets. To convince fleet owners of the benefit of these technologies, new precision in measuring fuel efficiency must be introduced. Legislation for a minimum standard in truck miles per gallon would also enable the use of these technologies. Improving the efficiency of truck transmissions and axle will make a noticeable impact on the fuel consumption by heavy vehicles in the United States. However, the greatest benefit will come when all the individual efficiency technologies like hybrid power, aerodynamic fairings, auxiliary power units, super

  10. LITERATURE REVIEW: REDUCTION OF NP(V) TO NP (IV)-ALTERNATIVES TO FERROUS SULFAMATE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessinger, G.; Kyser, E.; Almond, P.

    2009-09-28

    The baseline approach to control of Np oxidation in UREX and PUREX separation processes is the reduction of Np(V) and Np(VI) to Np(IV) using ferrous sulfamate. Use of this reagent results in increased sulfur and iron concentrations in the liquid waste streams from the process. Presence of these two elements, especially sulfur, increases the complexity of the development of wasteforms for immobilizing these effluents. Investigations are underway to identify reductants that eliminate sulfur and iron from the Np reduction process. While there are a variety of chemical reductants that will reduce Np to Np(IV) in nitric acid media, the reaction rates for most are so slow that the reductants are not be feasible for use in an operating plant process. In an attempt to identify additional alternatives to ferrous sulfamate, a literature search and review was performed. Based on the results of the literature review, it is concluded that photochemical and catalytic processes should also be investigated to test the utility of these two approaches. The catalytic process could be investigated for use in conjunction with chemical oxidants to speed the reaction rates for reductants that react slowly, but would otherwise be appropriate replacements for ferrous sulfamate. The photochemical approach, which has received little attention during the past few decades, also shows promise, especially the photocatalytic approach that includes a catalyst, such as Pt supported on SiC, which can be used in tandem with an oxidant, for Np reduction.

  11. Assessing the potential visibility benefits of Clean Air Act Title IV emission reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trexler, E.C. Jr.; Shannon, J.D.

    1995-06-01

    Assessments are made of the benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Title IV (COVE), Phase 2, SO2 and NOX reduction provisions, to the visibility in typical eastern and western Class 1 areas. Probable bands of visibility impairment distribution curves are developed for Shenandoah National Park, Smoky Mountain National Park and the Grand Canyon National Park, based on the existing emissions, ``Base Case``, and for the COVE emission reductions, ``CAAA Case``. Emission projections for 2010 are developed with improved versions of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission projection models. Source-receptor transfer matrices created with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model are used with existing emission inventories and with the emission projections to calculate atmospheric concentrations of sulfate and nitrate at the receptors of interest for existing and projected emission scenarios. The Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) is then used to develop distributions of visibility impairment. VASM combines statistics of observed concentrations of particulate species and relative humidity with ASTRAP calculations of the relative changes in atmospheric sulfate and nitrate particulate concentrations in a Monte Carlo approach to produce expected distributions of hourly particulate concentrations and RH. Light extinction relationships developed in theoretical and field studies are then used to calculate the resulting distribution of visibility impairment. Successive Monte Carlo studies are carried out to develop sets of visibility impairment distributions with and without the COVE emission reductions to gain insight into the detectability of expected visibility improvements.

  12. Study on reduction and back extraction of Pu(IV) by urea derivatives in nitric acid conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, G.A.; Xiao, S.T.; Yan, T.H.; Lin, R.S.; Zhu, Z.W.

    2013-07-01

    The reduction kinetics of Pu(IV) by hydroxyl-semicarbazide (HSC), hydroxyurea (HU) and di-hydroxyurea (DHU) in nitric acid solutions were investigated separately with adequate kinetic equations. In addition, counter-current cascade experiments were conducted for Pu split from U in nitric acid media using three kinds of reductant, respectively. The results show that urea derivatives as a kind of novel salt-free reductant can reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III) rapidly in the nitric acid solutions. The stripping experimental results showed that Pu(IV) in the organic phase can be stripped rapidly to the aqueous phase by the urea derivatives, and the separation factors of plutonium /uranium can reach more than 10{sup 4}. This indicates that urea derivatives is a kind of promising salt-free agent for uranium/plutonium separation. In addition, the complexing effect of HSC with Np(IV) was revealed, and Np(IV) can be back-extracted by HSC with a separation factor of about 20.

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Engine Friction Reduction – Part II (Base fluid and additive technologies)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and vehicle technologies office annual merit review and peer evaluation meeting about engine friction...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Friction Reduction through Surface Modification (Agreement ID:23284) Project ID:18518

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about friction...

  15. Rotating Liner Engine: Improving Efficiency of Heavy Duty Diesels by Significant Friction Reduction, and Extending the Life of Heavy Duty Engines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dardalis, Dimitrios

    2013-12-31

    This report describes the work on converting a 4 cylinder Cummins ISB engine into a single cylinder Rotating Liner Engine functioning prototype that can be used to measure the friction benefits of rotating the cylinder liner in a high pressure compression ignition engine. A similar baseline engine was also prepared, and preliminary testing was done. Even though the fabrication of the single cylinder prototype was behind schedule due to machine shop delays, the fundamental soundness of the design elements are proven, and the engine has successfully functioned. However, the testing approach of the two engines, as envisioned by the original proposal, proved impossible due to torsional vibration resonance caused by the single active piston. A new approach for proper testing has been proposed,

  16. Micromachine friction test apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    deBoer, Maarten P.; Redmond, James M.; Michalske, Terry A.

    2002-01-01

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) friction test apparatus is disclosed for determining static or dynamic friction in MEM devices. The friction test apparatus, formed by surface micromachining, is based on a friction pad supported at one end of a cantilevered beam, with the friction pad overlying a contact pad formed on the substrate. A first electrostatic actuator can be used to bring a lower surface of the friction pad into contact with an upper surface of the contact pad with a controlled and adjustable force of contact. A second electrostatic actuator can then be used to bend the cantilevered beam, thereby shortening its length and generating a relative motion between the two contacting surfaces. The displacement of the cantilevered beam can be measured optically and used to determine the static or dynamic friction, including frictional losses and the coefficient of friction between the surfaces. The test apparatus can also be used to assess the reliability of rubbing surfaces in MEM devices by producing and measuring wear of those surfaces. Finally, the friction test apparatus, which is small in size, can be used as an in situ process quality tool for improving the fabrication of MEM devices.

  17. Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mr. Christopher B. Smith; Dr. Oyelayo Ajayi

    2012-01-31

    Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all energy intensive and could potentially add significant cost. A new concept for surface hardening of metallic materials and components is Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Compared to the current surface hardening technologies, FSP is more energy efficient has no emission or waste by products and may result in better tribological performance. FSP involves plunging a rotating tool to a predetermined depth (case layer thickness) and translating the FSP tool along the area to be processed. This action of the tool produces heating and severe plastic deformation of the processed area. For steel the temperature is high enough to cause phase transformation, ultimately forming hard martensitic phase. Indeed, FSP has been used for surface modification of several metals and alloys so as to homogenize the microstructure and refine the grain size, both of which led to improved fatigue and corrosion resistance. Based on the effect of FSP on near-surface layer material, it was expected to have beneficial effects on friction and wear performance of metallic materials. However, little or no knowledge existed on the impact of FSP concerning friction and wear performance the subject of the this project and final report. Specifically for steel, which is the most dominant tribological material, FSP can replace the current conventional surface hardening techniques used for friction and wear performance. Friction Stir Link Inc. (FSL) is teamed with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to develop and optimize FSP for friction and wear performance enhancement. The ultimate goal is to offer FSP and an effective alternative to some of the current energy intensive and high-cost surface hardening processes.

  18. Friction stir welding tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolle; Charles R. , Clark; Denis E. , Barnes; Timothy A.

    2008-04-15

    A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

  19. Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon pm026_ajayi_2010_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Boundary Layer Lubrication Mechanisms Overview of Friction and Wear Reduction for Heavy Vehicles DOE/DOD Parasitic Energy Loss Collaboration

  20. Friction and Wear Enhancement of Titanium Alloy Engine Components |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon pm007_blau_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Friction and Wear Enhancement of Titanium Alloy Engine Components Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Friction Reduction through Surface Modification (Agreement ID:23284) Project ID:18518 Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Can hard coatings and lubricant anti-wear additives

  1. Friction and Wear Enhancement of Titanium Alloy Engine Components |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon pm007_blau_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Friction and Wear Enhancement of Titanium Alloy Engine Components Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Can hard coatings and lubricant anti-wear additives work together? Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Friction Reduction through Surface Modification

  2. Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R.; Rafi, H. Khalid; Ram, G.D. Janaki; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan; Nagalakshmi, R.

    2012-08-15

    Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

  3. LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

    2006-03-31

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. This represents a substantial (30-40%) reduction of the ringpack friction alone. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. Further improvements via piston, lubricant, and surface designs offer additional opportunities. Tests of low-friction lubricants are in progress and preliminary results are very promising. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Piston friction studies indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% ARES engine efficiency. The design strategies developed in this study have promising potential for application in all modern reciprocating engines as they represent simple, low-cost methods to extract significant fuel savings. The current program has possible spinoffs and applications in other industries as well, including transportation, CHP, and diesel power generation. The progress made in this program has wide engine efficiency implications, and potential deployment of low-friction engine components or lubricants in the near term is possible as current investigations continue.

  4. LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

    2005-09-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Low friction ring designs have already been recommended in a previous phase, with full-scale engine validation partially completed. Current accomplishments include the addition of several additional power cylinder design areas to the overall system analysis. These include analyses of lubricant and cylinder surface finish and a parametric study of piston design. The Waukesha engine was found to be already well optimized in the areas of lubricant, surface skewness and honing cross-hatch angle, where friction reductions of 12% for lubricant, and 5% for surface characteristics, are projected. For the piston, a friction reduction of up to 50% may be possible by controlling waviness alone, while additional friction reductions are expected when other parameters are optimized. A total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% efficiency. Key elements of the continuing work include further analysis and optimization of the engine piston design, in-engine testing of recommended lubricant and surface designs, design iteration and optimization of previously recommended technologies, and full-engine testing of a complete, optimized, low-friction power cylinder system.

  5. Friction welded nonconsumable electrode assembly and use thereof for electrolytic production of metals and silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Byrne, Stephen C. (Monroeville, PA); Ray, Siba P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Rapp, Robert A. (Columbus, OH)

    1984-01-01

    A nonconsumable electrode assembly suitable for use in the production of metal by electrolytic reduction of a metal compound dissolved in a molten salt, the assembly comprising a metal conductor and a ceramic electrode body connected by a friction weld between a portion of the body having a level of free metal or metal alloy sufficient to effect such a friction weld and a portion of the metal conductor.

  6. Proposed Rules IV. Conclusion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vol. 81, No. 44 Monday, March 7, 2016 Proposed Rules IV. Conclusion For the ... Dated at Rockville, Maryland, this 29th day of February, 2016. For the Nuclear Regulatory ...

  7. Low-Engine-Friction Technology for Advanced Natural-Gas Reciprocating Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Victor Wong; Tian Tian; G. Smedley; L. Moughon; Rosalind Takata; J. Jocsak

    2006-11-30

    This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis has been followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. In this program, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been adapted and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed ring-pack friction reduction of 30-40%, which translates to total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. The study on surface textures, including roughness characteristics, cross hatch patterns, dimples and grooves have shown that even relatively small-scale changes can have a large effect on ring/liner friction, in some cases reducing FMEP by as much as 30% from a smooth surface case. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Testing of low-friction lubricants showed that total engine FMEP reduced by up to {approx}16.5% from the commercial reference oil without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. Piston friction studies indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% ARES engine efficiency. The design strategies developed in this study have promising potential for application in all modern reciprocating engines as they represent simple, low-cost methods to extract significant fuel savings. The current program has possible spinoffs and applications in other industries as well, including transportation, CHP, and diesel power generation. The progress made in this program has wide engine efficiency implications, and potential deployment of low-friction engine components or lubricants in the near term is quite possible.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Friction Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Can hard coatings and lubricant anti-wear additives work together? An integrated surface technology for...

  9. Welding - Friction Stir - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Find More Like This Return to Search Welding - Friction Stir Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Friction welding that uses a contact rotating tool creates frictional heating of an adjacent work piece. The process employs a mixer where the two pieces touch, an area called the plastic zone, to avoid the undesirable joining (e.g. alloying) of the two work pieces.Description First, a

  10. Flexible Hybrid Friction Stir Joining Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flexible Hybrid Friction Stir Joining Technology Improved Efficiency and Flexibility through the Development of Hybrid Friction Stir Joining Technology Welding is one of the most important and widely used fabrica- tion technologies in modern industry. Traditional fusion welding processes (e.g. arc welding and laser welding) require signifcant heat inputs and frequently lead to property deterioration, such as cracking and porosity during solidifcation. Friction Stir Welding (FSW) is a solid-state

  11. Type IV COPV Cold Gas Operation Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Type IV COPV Cold Gas Operation Challenges DAVID W. GOTTHOLD November 30, 2015 1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Cold Gas Motivation and Challenges November 30, 2015 2 200 K H 2 Lower pressure Higher density H 2 CGO ~25% CF savings Cost Savings from reduced CF use Cold gas operation allows for reduced pressures for the same volume for significant CF and cost reductions. Materials properties change significantly at cold gas temperatures and must be studied. Example: HDPE DBT ~ 200 K Higher

  12. Proposed Rules IV. Conclusion

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    686 Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 44 / Monday, March 7, 2016 / Proposed Rules IV. Conclusion For the reasons cited in this document, the NRC is denying PRM- 50-106. The NRC is denying this petition because the current regulations already address environmental qualification in both mild and design basis event conditions of electrical equipment located both inside and outside of the containment building that is important to safety, and the petitioners did not provide significant new or

  13. Energy conversion device and method of reducing friction therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Solovyeva, Lyudmila Mikhaylovna; Jansson, Kyle S; Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim; Zhu, Dong; Milner, Robert; Daughterty, Early Eugene; Higdon, Clifton Baxter; Elagamy, Kamel Abdel-Khalik; Hicks, Aaron Michael

    2013-10-08

    A device configured for converting energy includes a first surface, a second surface configured for moving with respect to the first surface during operation of the device, and a coating disposed on at least one of the first surface and the second surface. The coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy represented by the general formula AlMgB.sub.14--X, wherein X is present in an amount of from 0 to 70 parts by weight based on 100 parts by weight of the ceramic alloy and is a doping agent selected from the group of Group IV elements and borides and nitrides thereof, and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon in a gradient concentration. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12.

  14. Using Nanotechnology to Fight Friction and Wear | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Nanotechnology to Fight Friction and Wear Tiny diamonds wrapped in graphene help achieve "superlubricity," in which friction drops to near zero. Graphene "nanoscrolls" could...

  15. Defining the Mechanisms of Friction: A Grand Challenge in Interfacial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Defining the Mechanisms of Friction: A Grand Challenge in Interfacial Mechanics. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Defining the Mechanisms of Friction: A Grand Challenge...

  16. Material flow during friction stir welding: A thermo-mechanically...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Material flow during friction stir welding: A thermo-mechanically fully coupled CFD study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Material flow during friction stir welding: A...

  17. Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide Title Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication...

  18. Flexible Friction Stir Joining Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhili; Lim, Yong Chae; Mahoney, Murray; Sanderson, Samuel; Larsen, Steve; Steel, Russel; Fleck, Dale; Fairchild, Doug P; Wasson, Andrew J; Babb, Jon; Higgins, Paul

    2015-07-23

    Reported herein is the final report on a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Manufacturing Office (AMO) project with industry cost-share that was jointly carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company (ExxonMobil), and MegaStir Technologies (MegaStir). The project was aimed to advance the state of the art of friction stir welding (FSW) technology, a highly energy-efficient solid-state joining process, for field deployable, on-site fabrications of large, complex and thick-sectioned structures of high-performance and high-temperature materials. The technology innovations developed herein attempted to address two fundamental shortcomings of FSW: 1) the inability for on-site welding and 2) the inability to weld thick section steels, both of which have impeded widespread use of FSW in manufacturing. Through this work, major advance has been made toward transforming FSW technology from a “specialty” process to a mainstream materials joining technology to realize its pervasive energy, environmental, and economic benefits across industry.

  19. Shiloh IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shiloh IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EDF Renewable Energy Developer EDF Renewable Energy Energy Purchaser Pacific...

  20. Miravalles IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information Name Miravalles IV Facility Geothermal Power Plant Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Coordinates 10.5251574, -85.254136 Loading map......

  1. Friction forces on atoms after acceleration

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Intravaia, Francesco; Mkrtchian, Vanik E.; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Scheel, Stefan; Dalvit, Diego A. R.; Henkel, Carsten

    2015-05-12

    The aim of this study is to revisit the calculation of atom–surface quantum friction in the quantum field theory formulation put forward by Barton (2010 New J. Phys. 12 113045). We show that the power dissipated into field excitations and the associated friction force depend on how the atom is boosted from being initially at rest to a configuration in which it is moving at constant velocity (v) parallel to the planar interface. In addition, we point out that there is a subtle cancellation between the one-photon and part of the two-photon dissipating power, resulting in a leading order contributionmore » to the frictional power which goes as v4. These results are also confirmed by an alternative calculation of the average radiation force, which scales as v3.« less

  2. Method and device for frictional welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peacock, H.B.

    1991-01-01

    A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel`s recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding, process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

  3. Method and device for frictional welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peacock, Harold B. (867 N. Belair Rd., Evans, GA 30809)

    1992-01-01

    A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

  4. Method and device for frictional welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peacock, H.B.

    1992-10-13

    A method is described for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical canister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained. 5 figs.

  5. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle...

  6. Friction Control Solutions Inc FriCSo | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Friction Control Solutions Inc FriCSo Jump to: navigation, search Name: Friction Control Solutions Inc. (FriCSo) Place: Farmington Hills, Michigan Zip: 48331 Product: FriCSo offers...

  7. Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide Title Nanoscale friction properties of graphene and graphene oxide Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2015 Authors Berman, D, Erdemir, A, Zinovev, AV, Sumant, AV Journal Diamond and Related materials Volume 54 Start Page 91 Pagination 7 Date Published 04012015 Keywords adhesion, AFM lateral force, friction, oxidation Abstract Achieving superlow friction and wear at the micro/nano-scales through

  8. Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future ...

  9. Flexible Hybrid Friction Stir Joining Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid Friction Stir Joining Technology Flexible Hybrid Friction Stir Joining Technology PDF icon flexible_hybrid_friction.pdf More Documents & Publications Class Patent Waiver W(C)2009-001 Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry ITP Energy Intensive Processes: Energy-Intensive Processes Portfolio: Addressing Key Energy Challenges Across U.S. Industry

  10. Control of friction at the nanoscale

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barhen, Jacob; Braiman, Yehuda Y.; Protopopescu, Vladimir

    2010-04-06

    Methods and apparatus are described for control of friction at the nanoscale. A method of controlling frictional dynamics of a plurality of particles using non-Lipschitzian control includes determining an attribute of the plurality of particles; calculating an attribute deviation by subtracting the attribute of the plurality of particles from a target attribute; calculating a non-Lipschitzian feedback control term by raising the attribute deviation to a fractionary power .xi.=(2m+1)/(2n+1) where n=1, 2, 3 . . . and m=0, 1, 2, 3 . . . , with m strictly less than n and then multiplying by a control amplitude; and imposing the non-Lipschitzian feedback control term globally on each of the plurality of particles; imposing causes a subsequent magnitude of the attribute deviation to be reduced.

  11. Friction- and wear-reducing coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Dong (Farmington Hills, MI); Milner, Robert (Warren, MI); Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim (Troy, MI)

    2011-10-18

    A coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12. A method of coating a substrate includes cleaning the substrate, forming the first layer on the substrate, and depositing the second layer onto the first layer to thereby coat the substrate.

  12. Friction-Induced Fluid Heating in Nanoscale Helium Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhigang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-05-21

    We investigate the mechanism of friction-induced fluid heating in nanoconfinements. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the temperature variations of liquid helium in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. It is found that the fluid heating is dominated by different sources of friction as the external driving force is changed. For small external force, the fluid heating is mainly caused by the internal viscous friction in the fluid. When the external force is large and causes fluid slip at the surfaces of channel walls, the friction at the fluid-solid interface dominates over the internal friction in the fluid and is the major contribution to fluid heating. An asymmetric temperature gradient in the fluid is developed in the case of nonidentical walls and the general temperature gradient may change sign as the dominant heating factor changes from internal to interfacial friction with increasing external force.

  13. Friction in surface micromachined interfaces. (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Friction in surface micromachined interfaces. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Friction in surface micromachined interfaces. No abstract prepared. Authors: de Boer, Maarten Pieter Publication Date: 2005-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 969592 Report Number(s): SAND2005-5095C TRN: US201001%%715 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics Conference on Friction,

  14. Friction and Wear Enhancement of Titanium Alloy Engine Components...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Friction and Wear Enhancement of Titanium Alloy Engine Components Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Can hard coatings and lubricant anti-wear additives work together? ...

  15. Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components Friction Modeling for Lubricated Engine and Drivetrain Components 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs...

  16. Friction of different monolayer lubricants in MEMs interfaces.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpick, Robert W. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Street, Mark D.; Ashurst, William Robert; Corwin, Alex David

    2006-01-01

    This report details results from our last year of work (FY2005) on friction in MEMS as funded by the Campaign 6 program for the Microscale Friction project. We have applied different monolayers to a sensitive MEMS friction tester called the nanotractor. The nanotractor is also a useful actuator that can travel {+-}100 {micro}m in 40 nm steps, and is being considered for several MEMS applications. With this tester, we can find static and dynamic coefficients of friction. We can also quantify deviations from Amontons' and Coulomb's friction laws. Because of the huge surface-to-volume ratio at the microscale, surface properties such as adhesion and friction can dominate device performance, and therefore such deviations are important to quantify and understand. We find that static and dynamic friction depend on the monolayer lubricant applied. The friction data can be modeled with a non-zero adhesion force, which represents a deviation from Amontons' Law. Further, we show preliminary data indicating that the adhesion force depends not only on the monolayer, but also on the normal load applied. Finally, we also observe slip deflections before the transition from static to dynamic friction, and find that they depend on the monolayer.

  17. Micro- and macroscale coefficients of friction of cementitious materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomboy, Gilson; Sundararajan, Sriram; Wang, Kejin

    2013-12-15

    Millions of metric tons of cementitious materials are produced, transported and used in construction each year. The ease or difficulty of handling cementitious materials is greatly influenced by the material friction properties. In the present study, the coefficients of friction of cementitious materials were measured at the microscale and macroscale. The materials tested were commercially-available Portland cement, Class C fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag. At the microscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from the interaction forces between cementitious particles using an Atomic Force Microscope. At the macroscale, the coefficient of friction was determined from stresses on bulk cementitious materials under direct shear. The study indicated that the microscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.020 to 0.059, and the macroscale coefficient of friction ranged from 0.56 to 0.75. The fly ash studied had the highest microscale coefficient of friction and the lowest macroscale coefficient of friction. -- Highlights: Microscale (interparticle) coefficient of friction (COF) was determined with AFM. Macroscale (bulk) COF was measured under direct shear. Fly ash had the highest microscale COF and the lowest macroscale COF. Portland cement against GGBFS had the lowest microscale COF. Portland cement against Portland cement had the highest macroscale COF.

  18. Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This study was conducted to understand how to increase engine efficiency by reducing parasitic boundary regime friction losses and enable operation with lower viscosity oils while ...

  19. Demand Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Grantees may use funds to coordinate with electricity supply companies and utilities to reduce energy demands on their power systems. These demand reduction programs are usually coordinated through...

  20. Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Superhard and low-friction coatings and surface...

  1. Friction Stir Welding of Lightweight Vehicle Structures: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanella, M L

    2008-08-31

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, LLC and Ford Motor Company was to establish friction stir welding (FSW) and friction stir processing as viable options for use in construction of lightweight substructures for trucks and cars, including engine cradles, suspension sub frames, instrument panel supports, and intake manifolds.

  2. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  3. Nonlocal microscopic theory of quantum friction between parallel metallic slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despoja, Vito

    2011-05-15

    We present a new derivation of the friction force between two metallic slabs moving with constant relative parallel velocity, based on T=0 quantum-field theory formalism. By including a fully nonlocal description of dynamically screened electron fluctuations in the slab, and avoiding the usual matching-condition procedure, we generalize previous expressions for the friction force, to which our results reduce in the local limit. Analyzing the friction force calculated in the two local models and in the nonlocal theory, we show that for physically relevant velocities local theories using the plasmon and Drude models of dielectric response are inappropriate to describe friction, which is due to excitation of low-energy electron-hole pairs, which are properly included in nonlocal theory. We also show that inclusion of dissipation in the nonlocal electronic response has negligible influence on friction.

  4. Tuning the reactivity of mononuclear nonheme manganese(iv)-oxo complexes by triflic acid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Junying; Yoon, Heejung; Lee, Yong -Min; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-04-14

    Triflic acid (HOTf)-bound nonheme Mn(IV)-oxo complexes, [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2 (L = N4Py and Bn-TPEN; N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine and Bn-TPEN = N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine), were synthesized by adding HOTf to the solutions of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+ complexes and were characterized by various spectroscopies. The one-electron reduction potentials of the MnIV(O) complexes exhibited a significant positive shift upon binding of HOTf. The driving force dependences of electron transfer (ET) from electron donors to the MnIV(O) and MnIV(O)–(HOTf)2 complexes were examined and evaluated in light of the Marcus theory of ET to determine the reorganization energies of ET. The smaller reorganization energies and much more positive reduction potentialsmore » of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2 complexes resulted in greatly enhanced oxidation capacity towards one-electron reductants and para-X-substituted-thioanisoles. The reactivities of the Mn(IV)-oxo complexes were markedly enhanced by binding of HOTf, such as a 6.4 × 105-fold increase in the oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reaction (i.e., sulfoxidation). Such a remarkable acceleration in the OAT reaction results from the enhancement of ET from para-X-substituted-thioanisoles to the MnIV(O) complexes as revealed by the unified ET driving force dependence of the rate constants of OAT and ET reactions of [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2. In contrast, deceleration was observed in the rate of H-atom transfer (HAT) reaction of [(L)MnIV(O)]2+–(HOTf)2 complexes with 1,4-cyclohexadiene as compared with those of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+ complexes. Thus, the binding of two HOTf molecules to the MnIV(O) moiety resulted in remarkable acceleration of the ET rate when the ET is thermodynamically feasible. When the ET reaction is highly endergonic, the rate of the HAT reaction is decelerated due to the steric effect of the counter anion of HOTf.« less

  5. Tuning the reactivity of mononuclear nonheme manganese(iv)-oxo complexes by triflic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Junying; Yoon, Heejung; Lee, Yong -Min; Seo, Mi Sook; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Nam, Wonwoo

    2015-04-14

    Triflic acid (HOTf)-bound nonheme Mn(IV)-oxo complexes, [(L)MnIV(O)]2+(HOTf)2 (L = N4Py and Bn-TPEN; N4Py = N,N-bis(2-pyridylmethyl)-N-bis(2-pyridyl)methylamine and Bn-TPEN = N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(2-pyridylmethyl)ethane-1,2-diamine), were synthesized by adding HOTf to the solutions of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+ complexes and were characterized by various spectroscopies. The one-electron reduction potentials of the MnIV(O) complexes exhibited a significant positive shift upon binding of HOTf. The driving force dependences of electron transfer (ET) from electron donors to the MnIV(O) and MnIV(O)(HOTf)2 complexes were examined and evaluated in light of the Marcus theory of ET to determine the reorganization energies of ET. The smaller reorganization energies and much more positive reduction potentials of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+(HOTf)2 complexes resulted in greatly enhanced oxidation capacity towards one-electron reductants and para-X-substituted-thioanisoles. The reactivities of the Mn(IV)-oxo complexes were markedly enhanced by binding of HOTf, such as a 6.4 105-fold increase in the oxygen atom transfer (OAT) reaction (i.e., sulfoxidation). Such a remarkable acceleration in the OAT reaction results from the enhancement of ET from para-X-substituted-thioanisoles to the MnIV(O) complexes as revealed by the unified ET driving force dependence of the rate constants of OAT and ET reactions of [(L)MnIV(O)]2+(HOTf)2. In contrast, deceleration was observed in the rate of H-atom transfer (HAT) reaction of [(L)MnIV(O)]2+(HOTf)2 complexes with 1,4-cyclohexadiene as compared with those of the [(L)MnIV(O)]2+ complexes. Thus, the binding of two HOTf molecules to the MnIV(O) moiety resulted in remarkable acceleration of the ET rate when the ET is thermodynamically feasible. When the ET reaction is highly endergonic, the rate of the HAT reaction is decelerated due to the steric effect of the counter anion of HOTf.

  6. High temperature low friction surface coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhushan, Bharat (Watervliet, NY)

    1980-01-01

    A high temperature, low friction, flexible coating for metal surfaces which are subject to rubbing contact includes a mixture of three parts graphite and one part cadmium oxide, ball milled in water for four hours, then mixed with thirty percent by weight of sodium silicate in water solution and a few drops of wetting agent. The mixture is sprayed 12-15 microns thick onto an electro-etched metal surface and air dried for thirty minutes, then baked for two hours at 65.degree. C. to remove the water and wetting agent, and baked for an additional eight hours at about 150.degree. C. to produce the optimum bond with the metal surface. The coating is afterwards burnished to a thickness of about 7-10 microns.

  7. Frictional granular mechanics: A variational approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holtzman, R.; Silin, D.B.; Patzek, T.W.

    2009-10-16

    The mechanical properties of a cohesionless granular material are evaluated from grain-scale simulations. Intergranular interactions, including friction and sliding, are modeled by a set of contact rules based on the theories of Hertz, Mindlin, and Deresiewicz. A computer generated, three-dimensional, irregular pack of spherical grains is loaded by incremental displacement of its boundaries. Deformation is described by a sequence of static equilibrium configurations of the pack. A variational approach is employed to find the equilibrium configurations by minimizing the total work against the intergranular loads. Effective elastic moduli are evaluated from the intergranular forces and the deformation of the pack. Good agreement between the computed and measured moduli, achieved with no adjustment of material parameters, establishes the physical soundness of the proposed model.

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office: Parasitic Loss Reduction | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Fuel Efficiency & Emissions » Vehicle Technologies Office: Parasitic Loss Reduction Vehicle Technologies Office: Parasitic Loss Reduction Heavy vehicles lose a tremendous amount of energy to wind resistance and drag, braking, and rolling resistance. Such non-engine losses can account for an approximate 45% decrease in efficiency. Other sources of energy loss include: friction and wear in the power train, thermal (heat) loads, operation of auxiliary loads (air conditioning,

  9. Frictional anisotropy under boundary lubrication: effect of surface texture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajayi, O. O.; Erck, R. A.; Lorenzo-Martin, C.; Fenske, G. R.; Energy Systems

    2009-06-15

    The friction coefficient was measured under boundary lubrication with a ball-on-flat contact configuration in unidirectional sliding. The ball was smooth and hardened 52100 steel. Discs were made from case-carburized and hardened 4620, annealed 1080, and 1018 steels with directionally ground surfaces. A synthetic lubricant of stock polyalphaolefin was used for testing. During testing with each material, a frictional spike was observed whenever the ball slid parallel to the grinding ridge on the disc surface. The average friction coefficient for all tests was about 0.1, which is typical for the boundary lubrication regime. The magnitude of the frictional spikes, which reached as high as a friction coefficient of 0.25, and their persistence depended on the hardness of the disc surface. On the basis of elastohydrodynamic theory, coupled with the observation of severe plastic deformation on the ridges parallel to the sliding direction, the frictional spike could be due to localized plastic deformation on the disc surface at locations of minimal thickness for the lubricant fluid film. This hypothesis was further supported by lack of frictional spikes in tests using discs coated with a thin film of diamond-like carbon, in which plastic deformation is minimal.

  10. Anaerobic U(IV) Bio-oxidation and the Resultant Remobilization of Uranium in Contaminated Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coates, John D.

    2005-06-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites is based on immobilizing U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Due to the use of nitric acid in the processing of nuclear fuels, nitrate is often a co-contaminant found in many of the environments contaminated with uranium. Recent studies indicate that nitrate inhibits U(VI) reduction in sediment slurries. However, the mechanism responsible for the apparent inhibition of U(VI) reduction is unknown, i.e. preferential utilization of nitrate as an electron acceptor, direct biological oxidation of U(IV) coupled to nitrate reduction, and/or abiotic oxidation by intermediates of nitrate reduction. Recent studies indicates that direct biological oxidation of U(IV) coupled to nitrate reduction may exist in situ, however, to date no organisms have been identified that can grow by this metabolism. In an effort to evaluate the potential for nitrate-dependent bio-oxidation of U(IV) in anaerobic sedimentary environments, we have initiated the enumeration of nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing bacteria. Sediments, soils, and groundwater from uranium (U) contaminated sites, including subsurface sediments from the NABIR Field Research Center (FRC), as well as uncontaminated sites, including subsurface sediments from the NABIR FRC and Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant, Texas, lake sediments, and agricultural field soil, sites served as the inoculum source. Enumeration of the nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing microbial population in sedimentary environments by most probable number technique have revealed sedimentary microbial populations ranging from 9.3 x 101 - 2.4 x 103 cells (g sediment)-1 in both contaminated and uncontaminated sites. Interestingly uncontaminated subsurface sediments (NABIR FRC Background core FB618 and Longhorn Texas Core BH2-18) both harbored the most numerous nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing population 2.4 x 103 cells (g sediment)-1. The nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing microbial population in groundwaters is less numerous ranging from 0 cells mL-1 (Well FW300, Uncontaminated Background NABIR FRC) to 4.3 x 102 cells mL-1 (Well TPB16, Contaminated Area 2 NABIR FRC). The presence of nitrate-dependent U(IV) oxidizing bacteria supports our hypothesis that bacteria capable of anaerobic U(IV) oxidation are ubiquitous and indigenous to sedimentary and groundwater environments.

  11. Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, R.I.

    1990-10-16

    A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more road wheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the road wheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the road wheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded. 8 figs.

  12. Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Roy I. (Ypsilanti, MI)

    1990-01-01

    A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more roadwheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the roadwheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the roadwheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded.

  13. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

    2009-11-13

    Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

  14. Friction, Wear, and Lubrication Technologies | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tour the Tribology Labs Tribology Laboratory Photo Tour Friction, Wear, and Lubrication Technologies Friction, Wear, and Lubrication Technologies Frictional losses in an engine waste fuel - as much as 10 to 20 percent of the total fuel energy, depending on factors such as engine size, type, driving conditions and weather. Reducing these losses by just 10 percent can reduce U.S. fuel consumption by 100,000 barrels of oil per day and reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 40,000 tonnes per day.

  15. Electronic contribution to friction on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Applied Science and Technology Graduate Group, UC Berkeley; Dept. of Materials Sciences and Engineering, UC Berkeley; Salmeron, Miquel; Qi, Yabing; Park, J.Y.; Hendriksen, B.L.M.; Ogletree, D.F.; Salmeron, Miquel

    2008-04-15

    The electronic contribution to friction at semiconductor surfaces was investigated by using a Pt-coated tip with 50nm radius in an atomic force microscope sliding against an n-type GaAs(100) substrate. The GaAs surface was covered by an approximately 1 nm thick oxide layer. Charge accumulation or depletion was induced by the application of forward or reverse bias voltages. We observed a substantial increase in friction force in accumulation (forward bias) with respect to depletion (reverse bias). We propose a model based on the force exerted by the trapped charges that quantitatively explains the experimental observations of excess friction.

  16. SECTION IV: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    collisions... IV-3 R. D. DuBois, A. C. F. Santos, R. Olson, V. Horvat, R. L. Watson, A. N. Perumal, and Y. Peng...

  17. Friction Stir and Ultrasonic Solid State Joining of Magnesium...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Ultrasonic Solid State Joining of Magnesium to Steel Friction Stir and Ultrasonic Solid State Joining of Magnesium to Steel 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  18. Low-Friction Hard Coatings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon pm030_erdemir_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Low-Friction Hard Coatings Super Hard Coating Systems

  19. Using Nanotechnology to Fight Friction and Wear | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Argonne scientists look to the tiny particles of nanotechnology to help tame the negative consequences of friction and wear and achieve the rarified state of "superlubricity." PDF icon Nano Sheet_using nanotechnology

  20. Friction of partially embedded vertically aligned carbon nanofibers inside elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aksak, Burak; Sitti, Metin; Cassell, Alan; Li, Jun; Meyyappan, Meyya; Callen, Phillip [NanoRobotics Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California 94035 (United States); NASA Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas 77058 (United States)

    2007-08-06

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers partially embedded inside polyurethane (eVACNFs) are proposed as a robust high friction fibrillar material with a compliant backing. Carbon nanofibers with 50-150 nm in diameter and 20-30 {mu}m in length are vertically grown on silicon and transferred completely inside an elastomer by vacuum molding. By using time controlled and selective oxygen plasma etching, fibers are partially released up to 5 {mu}m length. Macroscale friction experiments show that eVACNFs exhibit reproducible effective friction coefficients up to 1. Besides high friction, the proposed fabrication method improves fiber-substrate bond strength, and enables uniform height nanofibers with a compliant backing.

  1. Feasibility of Observing Small Differences in Friction Mean Effective

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pressure Between Different Lubricating Oil Formations using Small, Single-Cylinder Motored Engine Rig (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Feasibility of Observing Small Differences in Friction Mean Effective Pressure Between Different Lubricating Oil Formations using Small, Single-Cylinder Motored Engine Rig Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Feasibility of Observing Small Differences in Friction Mean Effective Pressure Between Different Lubricating Oil Formations

  2. Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in Commercial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gear Oils at Elevated Temperatures | Department of Energy of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in Commercial Gear Oils at Elevated Temperatures Friction of Steel Sliding Under Boundary Lubrication Regime in Commercial Gear Oils at Elevated Temperatures This study was conducted to understand how to increase engine efficiency by reducing parasitic boundary regime friction losses and enable operation with lower viscosity oils while maintaining engine durability. PDF icon

  3. Surface Texturing for Friction Control | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Surface Texturing for Friction Control Surface Texturing for Friction Control 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon pm025_fenske_2010_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Erosion of Radiator Materials by Nanofluids Evaluation of the Fuel Economy Impacts of Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) using Engine-in-the-Loop Codes and Standards to Support Vehicle Electrification

  4. SECTION IV: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND MATERIALS SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systematics of K and L x-ray satellite spectra.......................................................................... IV-1 V. Horvat and R. L. Watson Kα x-ray satellite distribution of Ar produced in heavy ion collisions..................................... IV-3 V. Horvat, R.L. Watson, and Y. Peng Kα x-ray satellite and hypersatellite intensity distributions of vanadium metal and oxides excited in heavy ion

  5. Multiyear Program Plan: Reducing Friction and Wear in Heavy Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.R. Fessler; G.R. Fenske

    1999-12-13

    As described in its multiyear program plan for 1998-2000, the Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) envisions the development of a fuel-flexible, energy-efficient, near-zero-emissions, heavy-duty U.S. diesel engine technology devolving into all truck classes as a real and viable strategy for reducing energy requirements for commercial transport services and the rapidly growing multipurpose vehicle market (pickups, vans, and sport utility vehicles). Implementation of the OHVT program plan will have significant national benefits in energy savings, cleaner air, more jobs, and increased gross domestic product (GDP). Successful implementation will reduce the petroleum consumption of Class 1-8 trucks by 1.4 million barrels of oil per day by 2020 and over 1.8 million by 2030, amounting to a reduction in highway petroleum consumption of 13.2% and 18.6%, respectively. All types of regulated emissions will be reduced, that is, 20% drop in PM10 emissions (41,000 metric tons per year) by 203 0, 17% reduction in CO2 greenhouse gases (205 million metric tons per year), 7% reduction in NOx, 20% reduction in NMHC, and 30% reduction in CO. An increase of 15,000 jobs by 2020 is expected, as is an increase of $24 billion in GDP. The strategy of OHVT is to focus primarily on the diesel engine since it has numerous advantages. It has the highest efficiency of any engine today, 45% versus 30% for production gasoline engines; and it can be made more efficient at least to 55% and possibly up to 63%. It is the engine of choice for heavy vehicles (trucks), because it offers power, efficiency, durability, and reliability and is used extensively in rail, marine, and off-road applications. Its emission can be ultra-low to near zero, and the production infrastructure is already in place. The primary goals of OHVT are as follows: (1) Develop by 2002 the diesel-engine enabling technologies to support large-scale industry dieselization of light trucks, achieving a 35% fuel efficiency improvement over equivalent gasoline-fueled trucks. (2) Develop by 2004 the enabling technology for a Class 7-8 truck with a fuel efficiency of 10 mpg (at 65 mph) that will meet prevailing emission standards, using either diesel or a liquid alternative fuel. (3) Develop by 2006 diesel engines with fuel flexibility and a thermal efficiency of 55% with liquid alternative fuels, and a thermal efficiency of 55% with dedicated gaseous fuels. (4) Develop a methodology for analyzing and evaluating the operation of a heavy vehicle as an integrated system, considering such factors as engine efficiency; emissions; rolling resistance; aerodynamic drag; friction, wear, and lubrication effects; auxiliary power units; material substitutions for reducing weight; and other sources of parasitic energy losses. Overarching these considerations is the need to preserve system functionality, cost, competitiveness, reliability, durability, and safety.

  6. Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Lubricant-Friendly, Superhard and Low-Friction Coatings by Design Superhard and low-friction coatings and surface treatments can help improve fuel economy and durability in engines. PDF icon deer08_erdemir.pdf More Documents & Publications Low-Friction Hard Coatings Low-Friction Engineered Surfaces Ultra-Fast Chemical Conversion Surfaces

  7. Making appropriate comparisons of estimated and actual costs of reducing SO{sub 2} emissions under Title IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, A.E.

    1998-12-31

    A current sentiment within some parts of the environmental policy community is that market-based regulatory approaches such as emissions trading have proven so effective that actual costs will be only a small fraction of what ex ante cost estimation procedures would project. With this line of reasoning, some have dismissed available cost estimates for major proposed new regulations, such as the new PM and ozone NAAQS, as not meaningful for policy decisions. The most commonly used evidence in support of this position is the experience with SO{sub 2} reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. In Title IV, a market for emissions allowances has been used to achieve reductions in sulfur dioxides (SO{sub 2}) to ameliorate acid rain. It is commonly asserted today that the cost of achieving the SO{sub 2} emissions reductions has been only one-tenth or less of what Title IV was originally expected to cost. This paper demonstrates that, to the contrary, actual costs for SO{sub 2} reductions remain roughly in line with original estimates associated with Title IV. Erroneous conclusions about Title IV`s costs are due to inappropriate comparisons of a variety of different measures that appear to be comparable only because they are all stated in dollars per ton. Program cost estimates include the total costs of a fully-implemented regulatory program. The very low costs of Title IV that are commonly cited today are neither directly reflective of a fully implemented Title IV, (which is still many years away) nor reflective of all the costs already incurred. Further, a careful review of history finds that the initial cost estimates that many cite were never associated with Title IV. Technically speaking, people are comparing the estimated control costs for the most-costly power plant associated with earlier acid rain regulatory proposals with prices from a market that do not directly reflect total costs.

  8. Nitrate reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dziewinski, Jacek J. (Los Alamos, NM); Marczak, Stanislaw (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01

    Nitrates are reduced to nitrogen gas by contacting the nitrates with a metal to reduce the nitrates to nitrites which are then contacted with an amide to produce nitrogen and carbon dioxide or acid anions which can be released to the atmosphere. Minor amounts of metal catalysts can be useful in the reduction of the nitrates to nitrites. Metal salts which are formed can be treated electrochemically to recover the metals.

  9. SECTION IV: ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND MATERIALS SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ATOMIC, MOLECULAR AND MATERIALS SCIENCE A semiempirical scaling law for target K x-ray production in heavy ion collisions... IV-1 R. L. Watson, Y. Peng, V. Horvat, and A....

  10. Appendix IV Closed Corrective Action Units

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    IV Closed Corrective Action Units Revision No.: 26 July 2009 Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) FFACO Appendix IV - Closed Corrective Action Units Owner: NNSA / Industrial Sites - DP CAU Number: 34 Area 3 Contaminated Waste Sites CAU Notice of Completion: 6/25/2002 Submitted as CADD/CR. CR regulatory milestone not established prior to CADD/CR submittal. CAS Number CAS Description Functional Category Map Name General Location Mud Pit Mud Disposal Crater Yucca Flat U-3ag at Mud

  11. LLNL Small-Scale Friction sensitivity (BAM) Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, L.R.; Foltz, M.F.

    1996-06-01

    Small-scale safety testing of explosives, propellants and other energetic materials, is done to determine their sensitivity to various stimuli including friction, static spark, and impact. Testing is done to discover potential handling problems for either newly synthesized materials of unknown behavior, or materials that have been stored for long periods of time. This report describes the existing {open_quotes}BAM{close_quotes} Small-Scale Friction Test, and the methods used to determine the friction sensitivity pertinent to handling energetic materials. The accumulated data for the materials tested is not listed here - that information is in a database. Included is, however, a short list of (1) materials that had an unusual response, and (2), a few {open_quotes}standard{close_quotes} materials representing the range of typical responses usually seen.

  12. Wear and friction behavior of metal impregnated microporous carbon composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goller, G.; Koty, D.P.; Tewari, S.N.; Singh, M.; Tekin, A.

    1996-11-01

    Metal-matrix composites have been prepared by pressure-infiltration casting of copper-base alloy melts into microporous carbon preforms. The carbon preforms contained varying proportions of amorphous carbon and graphite. Load dependence of the wear and friction behavior of the composite pins has been examined under ambient conditions against cast-iron plates, using a pin-on-plate reciprocating wear tester. The wear resistance of the composite is significantly improved, as compared with the base alloy. Contrary to the normally expected behavior, the addition of graphite to the amorphous carbon does not reduce the friction coefficient, especially at high loads. The wear and friction behavior of the composites is very sensitive to the size and distribution of the microstructural constituents.

  13. Medicine Bow Wind Farm IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IV Jump to: navigation, search Name Medicine Bow Wind Farm IV Facility Medicine Bow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Platte...

  14. Periodic Trends in Highly Dispersed Groups IV and V Supported...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Periodic Trends in Highly Dispersed Groups IV and V Supported Metal Oxide Catalysts for ... Title: Periodic Trends in Highly Dispersed Groups IV and V Supported Metal Oxide Catalysts ...

  15. Victory Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Victory Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm II Facility Victory Gardens- Phase IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status...

  16. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and Environmental Effects Research Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and...

  17. Cerium(IV), Neptunium(IV), and Plutonium(IV) 1,2-phenyldiphosphonates: Correlations and Differences between Early Transuranium Elements and Their Proposed Surrogates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diwu, Juan; Wang, Shuao; Liao, Zuolei; Burns, Peter C.; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2010-10-04

    The in situ hydrothermal reduction of Np(VI) to Np(IV) and Pu(VI) to Pu(IV) in the presence of 1,2-phenylenediphosphonic acid (PhP2) results in the crystallization of Np[C6H4(PO3H)2]22H2O (NpPhP2) and Pu[C6H4(PO3H)(PO3H2)][C6H4(PO3H)(PO3)]2H2O (PuPhP2), respectively. Similar reactions have been explored with Ce(IV) resulting in the isolation of the Ce(IV) phenylenediphosphonate Ce[C6H4(PO3H)(PO3H2)][C6H4(PO3H)(PO3)]2H2O (CePhP2). Single crystal diffraction studies reveal that although all these three compounds all crystallize in the triclinic space group P1-, only PuPhP2 and CePhP2 are isotypic, whereas NpPhP2 adopts a distinct structure. In the cerium and plutonium compounds edge-sharing dimers of MO8 polyhedra are bridged by the diphosphonate ligand to create one-dimensional chains. NpPhP2 also forms chains. However, the NpO8 units are monomeric. The protonation of the ligands is also different in the two structure types. Furthermore, the NpO8 polyhedra are best described as square antiprisms (D4d), whereas the CeO8 and PuO8 units are trigonal dodecahedra (D2d). Bond-valence parameters of Ro = 1.972 and b = 0.538 have been derived for Np4+ using a combination of the data reported in this work with that available in crystallographic databases. The UV-vis-NIR absorption spectra of NpPhP2 and PuPhP2 are also reported and used to confirm the tetravalent oxidation states.

  18. FRICTION STIR SPOT WELDING OF 6016 ALUMINUM ALLOY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Rajiv S.; Webb, S.; Freeney, T. A.; Chen, Y. L.; Gayden, X.; Grant, Glenn J.; Herling, Darrell R.

    2007-01-08

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) of 6016 aluminum alloy was evaluated with conventional pin tool and new off-center feature tools. The off-center feature tool provides significant control over the joint area. The tool rotation rate was varied between 1000 and 2500 rpm. Maximum failure strength was observed in the tool rotation range of 1200-1500 rpm. The results are interpreted in the context of material flow in the joint and influence of thermal input on microstructural changes. The off-center feature tool concept opens up new possibilities for plunge-type friction stir spot welding.

  19. Friction stir weld tools having fine grain structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grant, Glenn J.; Frye, John G.; Kim, Jin Yong; Lavender, Curt A.; Weil, Kenneth Scott

    2016-03-15

    Tools for friction stir welding can be made with fewer process steps, lower cost techniques, and/or lower cost ingredients than other state-of-the-art processes by utilizing improved compositions and processes of fabrication. Furthermore, the tools resulting from the improved compositions and processes of fabrication can exhibit better distribution and homogeneity of chemical constituents, greater strength, and/or increased durability. In one example, a friction stir weld tool includes tungsten and rhenium and is characterized by carbide and oxide dispersoids, by carbide particulates, and by grains that comprise a solid solution of the tungsten and rhenium. The grains do not exceed 10 micrometers in diameter.

  20. Evidence for pre-sliding tangential deflections in MEMS friction.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Evidence for pre-sliding tangential deflections in MEMS friction. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence for pre-sliding tangential deflections in MEMS friction. No abstract prepared. Authors: Baker, Michael Sean ; Luck, David L. ; Ashurst, William Robert ; de Boer, Maarten Pieter Publication Date: 2003-03-01 OSTI Identifier: 923858 Report Number(s): SAND2003-1702C TRN: US200805%%22 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference

  1. Reductive Capacity Measurement of Waste Forms for Secondary Radioactive Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Yang, Jungseok; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2015-09-28

    The reductive capacities of dry ingredients and final solid waste forms were measured using both the Cr(VI) and Ce(IV) methods and the results were compared. Blast furnace slag (BFS), sodium sulfide, SnF2, and SnCl2 used as dry ingredients to make various waste forms showed significantly higher reductive capacities compared to other ingredients regardless of which method was used. Although the BFS exhibits appreciable reductive capacity, it requires greater amounts of time to fully react. In almost all cases, the Ce(IV) method yielded larger reductive capacity values than those from the Cr(VI) method and can be used as an upper bound for the reductive capacity of the dry ingredients and waste forms, because the Ce(IV) method subjects the solids to a strong acid (low pH) condition that dissolves much more of the solids. Because the Cr(VI) method relies on a neutral pH condition, the Cr(VI) method can be used to estimate primarily the waste form surface-related and readily dissolvable reductive capacity. However, the Cr(VI) method does not measure the total reductive capacity of the waste form, the long-term reductive capacity afforded by very slowly dissolving solids, or the reductive capacity present in the interior pores and internal locations of the solids.

  2. Formability of Direct Cast Mg Sheet and Friction Stir and Ultrasonic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Formability of Direct Cast Mg Sheet and Friction Stir and Ultrasonic Joining of Magnesium to Steel Formability of Direct Cast Mg Sheet and Friction Stir and Ultrasonic Joining of...

  3. Stability of Y Ti O Precipitates in Friction Stir Welded Nanostructure...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Stability of Y Ti O Precipitates in Friction Stir Welded Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Stability of Y Ti O Precipitates in Friction Stir...

  4. Friction stir method for forming structures and materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Zhili (Knoxville, TN); David, Stan A. (Knoxville, TN); Frederick, David Alan (Harriman, TN)

    2011-11-22

    Processes for forming an enhanced material or structure are disclosed. The structure typically includes a preform that has a first common surface and a recess below the first common surface. A filler is added to the recess and seams are friction stir welded, and materials may be stir mixed.

  5. Lateral position detection and control for friction stir systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, Paul (Boulder, CO); Lammlein, David (Houston, TX); Cook, George E. (Brentwood, TN); Wilkes, Don Mitchell (Nashville, TN); Strauss, Alvin M. (Nashville, TN); Delapp, David (Ashland City, TN); Hartman, Daniel A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2010-12-14

    A friction stir system for processing at least a first workpiece includes a spindle actuator coupled to a rotary tool comprising a rotating member for contacting and processing the first workpiece. A detection system is provided for obtaining information related to a lateral alignment of the rotating member. The detection system comprises at least one sensor for measuring a force experienced by the rotary tool or a parameter related to the force experienced by the rotary tool during processing, wherein the sensor provides sensor signals. A signal processing system is coupled to receive and analyze the sensor signals and determine a lateral alignment of the rotating member relative to a selected lateral position, a selected path, or a direction to decrease a lateral distance relative to the selected lateral position or selected path. In one embodiment, the friction stir system can be embodied as a closed loop tracking system, such as a robot-based tracked friction stir welding (FSW) or friction stir processing (FSP) system.

  6. Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael, Joseph Richard; Prasad, Somuri V.; Jungk, John Michael; Cordill, Megan J.; Bammann, Douglas J.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moody, Neville Reid; Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha (New Mexico Institure of Mining and Technology)

    2006-12-01

    Frictional contact results in surface and subsurface damage that could influence the performance, aging, and reliability of moving mechanical assemblies. Changes in surface roughness, hardness, grain size and texture often occur during the initial run-in period, resulting in the evolution of subsurface layers with characteristic microstructural features that are different from those of the bulk. The objective of this LDRD funded research was to model friction-induced microstructures. In order to accomplish this objective, novel experimental techniques were developed to make friction measurements on single crystal surfaces along specific crystallographic surfaces. Focused ion beam techniques were used to prepare cross-sections of wear scars, and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and TEM to understand the deformation, orientation changes, and recrystallization that are associated with sliding wear. The extent of subsurface deformation and the coefficient of friction were strongly dependent on the crystal orientation. These experimental observations and insights were used to develop and validate phenomenological models. A phenomenological model was developed to elucidate the relationships between deformation, microstructure formation, and friction during wear. The contact mechanics problem was described by well-known mathematical solutions for the stresses during sliding friction. Crystal plasticity theory was used to describe the evolution of dislocation content in the worn material, which in turn provided an estimate of the characteristic microstructural feature size as a function of the imposed strain. An analysis of grain boundary sliding in ultra-fine-grained material provided a mechanism for lubrication, and model predictions of the contribution of grain boundary sliding (relative to plastic deformation) to lubrication were in good qualitative agreement with experimental evidence. A nanomechanics-based approach has been developed for characterizing the mechanical response of wear surfaces. Coatings are often required to mitigate friction and wear. Amongst other factors, plastic deformation of the substrate determines the coating-substrate interface reliability. Finite element modeling has been applied to predict the plastic deformation for the specific case of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated Ni alloy substrates.

  7. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earths history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U), i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earths crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.

  8. Uranium isotopes fingerprint biotic reduction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stylo, Malgorzata; Neubert, Nadja; Wang, Yuheng; Monga, Nikhil; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Weyer, Stefan; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2015-04-20

    Knowledge of paleo-redox conditions in the Earth’s history provides a window into events that shaped the evolution of life on our planet. The role of microbial activity in paleo-redox processes remains unexplored due to the inability to discriminate biotic from abiotic redox transformations in the rock record. The ability to deconvolute these two processes would provide a means to identify environmental niches in which microbial activity was prevalent at a specific time in paleo-history and to correlate specific biogeochemical events with the corresponding microbial metabolism. Here, we demonstrate that the isotopic signature associated with microbial reduction of hexavalent uranium (U),more » i.e., the accumulation of the heavy isotope in the U(IV) phase, is readily distinguishable from that generated by abiotic uranium reduction in laboratory experiments. Thus, isotope signatures preserved in the geologic record through the reductive precipitation of uranium may provide the sought-after tool to probe for biotic processes. Because uranium is a common element in the Earth’s crust and a wide variety of metabolic groups of microorganisms catalyze the biological reduction of U(VI), this tool is applicable to a multiplicity of geological epochs and terrestrial environments. The findings of this study indicate that biological activity contributed to the formation of many authigenic U deposits, including sandstone U deposits of various ages, as well as modern, Cretaceous, and Archean black shales. In addition, engineered bioremediation activities also exhibit a biotic signature, suggesting that, although multiple pathways may be involved in the reduction, direct enzymatic reduction contributes substantially to the immobilization of uranium.« less

  9. Drag reduction in coal log pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marrero, T.R.; Liu, H.

    1996-12-31

    It is well-known that solutions of dissolved long-chain macromolecules produce lower friction or drag losses than with the solvent alone. In coal log pipeline (CLP), water is the conveying medium. Synthetic polymers such as poly(ethylene oxide) have been dissolved in water and tested for their extent of drag reduction as a function of concentration and other variables. Lab-scale experimental results for CLP indicate substantial drag reduction at low concentration levels of polymer. But, the macromolecules exhibit degradation under mechanical shear stresses. The large molecules break into smaller units. This degradation effect causes a loss of drag reduction. However, high levels of drag reduction can be maintained as follows: (1) by injecting polymer into the CLP at several locations along the pipeline, (2) by injecting polymer of different particle sizes, (3) by using more robust types of polymers, or (4) by using polymer-fiber mixtures. This report presents the value of drag-reducing agents in terms of pumping power net cost savings. In addition, this report outlines the environmental impact of drag reduction polymers, and end-of-pipeline water treatment processes. For an operating CLP, hundreds of miles in length, the use of poly(ethylene oxide) as a drag reducing agent provides significant pumping power cost savings at a minimal materials cost.

  10. Cours-IV/Clavin2015.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jump across an hydrodynamic discontinuity IV 1) U L U b - U L Flame Unburnt mixture at rest Burnt gas Zoom T b T u d L Temperature u + 0 u u U L b U b p + u 2 + 0 w +...

  11. Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-29

    The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

  12. PART IV … REPRESENTATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    K, Page i PART IV - REPRESENTATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS SECTION K REPRESENTATIONS, CERTIFICATIONS, AND OTHER STATEMENTS OF OFFERORS K-1 FAR 52.204-8 ANNUAL REPRESENTATIONS AND CERTIFICATIONS (DEC 2014) .................. 131 K-2 FAR 52.204-16 COMMERCIAL AND GOVERNMENT ENTITY CODE REPORTING (JUL 2015) ...................................................................................................................................................................... 135 K-3 FAR 52.209-7 INFORMATION

  13. PART IV … REPRESENTATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    K, Page i PART IV - REPRESENTATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS SECTION K REPRESENTATIONS, CERTIFICATIONS, AND OTHER STATEMENTS OF OFFERORS K-1 FAR 52.204-8 ANNUAL REPRESENTATIONS AND CERTIFICATIONS (DEC 2014) .................. 131 K-2 FAR 52.204-16 COMMERCIAL AND GOVERNMENT ENTITY CODE REPORTING (JUL 2015) ...................................................................................................................................................................... 135 K-3 FAR 52.209-7 INFORMATION

  14. Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittenhouse, P.; Ren, W.

    2005-03-29

    A Gen IV Materials Handbook is being developed to provide an authoritative single source of highly qualified structural materials information and materials properties data for use in design and analyses of all Generation IV Reactor Systems. The Handbook will be responsive to the needs expressed by all of the principal government, national laboratory, and private company stakeholders of Gen IV Reactor Systems. The Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan provided here addresses the purpose, rationale, attributes, and benefits of the Handbook and will detail its content, format, quality assurance, applicability, and access. Structural materials, both metallic and ceramic, for all Gen IV reactor types currently supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) will be included in the Gen IV Materials Handbook. However, initial emphasis will be on materials for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Descriptive information (e.g., chemical composition and applicable technical specifications and codes) will be provided for each material along with an extensive presentation of mechanical and physical property data including consideration of temperature, irradiation, environment, etc. effects on properties. Access to the Gen IV Materials Handbook will be internet-based with appropriate levels of control. Information and data in the Handbook will be configured to allow search by material classes, specific materials, specific information or property class, specific property, data parameters, and individual data points identified with materials parameters, test conditions, and data source. Details on all of these as well as proposed applicability and consideration of data quality classes are provided in the Implementation Plan. Website development for the Handbook is divided into six phases including (1) detailed product analysis and specification, (2) simulation and design, (3) implementation and testing, (4) product release, (5) project/product evaluation, and (6) product maintenance and enhancement. Contracting of development of the Handbook website is discussed in terms of host server options, cost, technology, developer background and cooperative nature, and company stability. One of the first and most important activities in website development will be the generation of a detailed Handbook product requirements document including case diagrams and functional requirements tables. The Implementation Plan provides a detailed overview of the organizational structure of the Handbook and details of Handbook preparation, publication, and distribution. Finally, the Implementation Plan defines Quality Assurance requirements for the Handbook.

  15. Effects of the Exposure to Corrosive Salts on the Frictional Behavior of Gray Cast Iron and a Titanium-Based Metal Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, Peter Julian; Truhan, Jr., John J; Kenik, Edward A

    2007-01-01

    The introduction of increasingly aggressive road-deicing chemicals has created significant and costly corrosion problems for the trucking industry. From a tribological perspective, corrosion of the sliding surfaces of brakes after exposure to road salts can create oxide scales on the surfaces that affect friction. This paper describes experiments on the effects of exposure to sodium chloride and magnesium chloride sprays on the transient frictional behavior of cast iron and a titanium-based composite sliding against a commercial brake lining material. Corrosion scales on cast iron initially act as abrasive third-bodies, then they become crushed, spread out, and behave as a solid lubricant. The composition and subsurface microstructures of the corrosion products on the cast iron were analyzed. Owing to its greater corrosion resistance, the titanium composite remained scale-free and its frictional response was markedly different. No corrosion scales were formed on the titanium composite after aggressive exposure to salts; however, a reduction in friction was still observed. Unlike the crystalline sodium chloride deposits that tended to remain dry, hygroscopic magnesium chloride deposits absorbed ambient moisture from the air, liquefied, and retained a persistent lubricating effect on the titanium surfaces.

  16. Micro-beam friction liner and method of transferring energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mentesana, Charles

    2007-07-17

    A micro-beam friction liner adapted to increase performance and efficiency and reduce wear in a piezoelectric motor or actuator or other device using a traveling or standing wave to transfer energy in the form of torque and momentum. The micro-beam friction liner comprises a dense array of micro-beam projections having first ends fixed relative to a rotor and second ends projecting substantially toward a plurality of teeth of a stator, wherein the micro-beam projections are compressed and bent during piezoelectric movement of the stator teeth, thereby storing the energy, and then react against the stator teeth to convert the stored energy stored to rotational energy in the rotor.

  17. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Frederick, Alan; Grant, Glenn J.; Dahl, Michael E.

    2009-09-15

    Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannneled DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1-10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rpm increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap-shear strengths exceeding 10.3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

  18. Regeneration of anion exchange resins by catalyzed electrochemical reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    Anion exchange resins sorbed with perchlorate may be regenerated by a combination of chemical reduction of perchlorate to chloride using a reducing agent and an electrochemical reduction of the oxidized reducing agent. Transitional metals including Ti, Re, and V are preferred chemical reagents for the reduction of perchlorate to chloride. Complexing agents such as oxalate are used to prevent the precipitation of the oxidized Ti(IV) species, and ethyl alcohol may be added to accelerate the reduction kinetics of perchlorate. The regeneration may be performed by continuously recycling the regenerating solution through the resin bed and an electrochemical cell so that the secondary waste generation is minimized.

  19. Adiabatic two-phase frictional pressure drops in microchannels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revellin, Remi; Thome, John R. [EPFL, STI ISE LTCM, ME Gl 464, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-07-15

    Two-phase pressure drops were measured over a wide range of experimental test conditions in two sizes of microchannels (sight glass tubes 0.509 and 0.790 mm) for two refrigerants (R-134a and R-245fa). Similar to the classic Moody diagram in single-phase flow, three zones were distinguishable when plotting the variation of the two-phase friction factor versus the two-phase Reynolds number: a laminar regime for Re{sub TP} < 2000, a transition regime for 2000 {<=} Re{sub TP} < 8000 and a turbulent regime for Re{sub TP} {>=} 8000. The laminar zone yields a much sharper gradient than in single-phase flow. The transition regime is not predicted well by any of the prediction methods for two-phase frictional pressure drops available in the literature. This is not unexpected since only a few data are available for this region in the literature and most methods ignore this regime, jumping directly from laminar to turbulent flow at Re{sub TP} = 2000. The turbulent zone is best predicted by the Mueller-Steinhagen and Heck correlation. Also, a new homogeneous two-phase frictional pressure drop has been proposed here with a limited range of application. (author)

  20. In vitro removal of actinide (IV) ions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weitl, Frederick L. (Martinez, CA); Raymond, Kenneth N. (Berkeley, CA)

    1982-01-01

    A compound of the formula: ##STR1## wherein X is hydrogen or a conventional electron-withdrawing group, particularly --SO.sub.3 H or a salt thereof; n is 2, 3, or 4; m is 2, 3, or 4; and p is 2 or 3. The present compounds are useful as specific sequestering agents for actinide (IV) ions. Also described is a method for the 2,3-dihydroxybenzamidation of azaalkanes.

  1. Generation IV International Forum Framework Agreement Extended to 2025

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) “Framework Agreement for International Collaboration on Research and Development of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems” was recently extended to 2025, paving the way for continued collaboration among participating countries.

  2. Effects of Stone-Wales and vacancy defects in atomic-scale friction on defective graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiao-Yu; Wu, RunNi; Xia, Re; Chu, Xi-Hua; Xu, Yuan-Jie

    2014-05-05

    Graphite is an excellent solid lubricant for surface coating, but its performance is significantly weakened by the vacancy or Stone-Wales (SW) defect. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite which contains a single defect or stacked defects. Our results suggest that the friction on defective graphite shows a strong dependence on defect location and type. The 5-7-7-5 structure of SW defect results in an effectively negative slope of friction. For defective graphite containing a defect in the surface, adding a single vacancy in the interior layer will decrease the friction coefficients, while setting a SW defect in the interior layer may increase the friction coefficients. Our obtained results may provide useful information for understanding the atomic-scale friction properties of defective graphite.

  3. Simple rule can be used to calculate friction loss in piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durand, A.A.

    1997-05-26

    A simple rule for calculating friction loss in piping has been developed. Called the Rule of Fours, it is designed to be easily memorized for use in the field. For determining pressure loss in piping, friction-loss tables are often more convenient than calculating the Reynolds number or finding the friction factor on a Moody chart, then calculating the friction loss by the Darcy or Fanning relationships. Friction-loss tables can be found in the Crane Technical Paper, Hydraulic Institute Engineering Data Book, and several other references. There are occasions, however, when such tables are not readily available to the engineer trying to estimate pressure drop in fluid flowing through pipelines. Because friction loss is essentially a point function, it is only necessary to determine the pressure drop for a given set of conditions. The author has developed a simple rule for such calculations.

  4. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon lm030_hovanski_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 9. Joining FY 2008

  5. SECTION IV. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IV. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE Cross Sections for Cu K-Vacancy Production in Fast Heavy Ion Collisions R.L. Watson, J.M. Blackadar and V. Horvat Enhancement of the Cu Kα x-ray Diagram Lines in Fast Heavy Ion Collisions R.L. Watson, V. Horvat and J.M. Blackadar K-shell Ionization by Secondary Electrons V. Horvat, R.L. Watson and J.M. Blackadar Target-atom Inner-shell Vacancy Distributions Created in Collisions with Heavy Ion Projectiles V. Horvat, R.L. Watson and J.M. Blackadar Systematics of

  6. New Materials for NGNP/Gen IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Swindeman; Douglas L. Marriott

    2009-12-18

    The bounding conditions were briefly summarized for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) that is the leading candidate in the Department of Energy Generation IV reactor program. Metallic materials essential to the successful development and proof of concept for the NGNP were identified. The literature bearing on the materials technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was reviewed with emphasis on the needs identified for the NGNP. Several materials were identified for a more thorough study of their databases and behavioral features relative to the requirements ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH.

  7. Part IV Council on Environmental Quality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    79 Wednesday, No. 247 December 24, 2014 Part IV Council on Environmental Quality Revised Draft Guidance for Federal Departments and Agencies on Consideration of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the Effects of Climate Change in NEPA Reviews; Notice VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:20 Dec 23, 2014 Jkt 235001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\24DEN2.SGM 24DEN2 mstockstill on DSK4VPTVN1PROD with NOTICES2 77802 Federal Register / Vol. 79, No. 247 / Wednesday, December 24, 2014 / Notices 1 A

  8. Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju

    2009-12-01

    This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

  9. Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

    2013-05-07

    A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

  10. Curvature effect on tearing modes in presence of neoclassical friction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maget, Patrick; Mellet, Nicolas; Meshcheriakov, Dmytro; Garbet, Xavier; Lütjens, Hinrich

    2013-11-15

    Neoclassical physics (here associated to the poloidal variation of the magnetic field strength along field lines in a tokamak) is well known for driving self-generated plasma current and nonlinear magnetic islands associated to it in high performance, ITER relevant plasma discharges. It is demonstrated that the neoclassical friction between a magnetic perturbation and plasma flow already impacts magnetic islands in the linear regime, by inducing a weakening of curvature stabilization for tearing modes. This conclusion holds in particular for regimes where convection is influencing the pressure dynamics, as shown using a simple analytical model and confirmed in full Magneto-Hydro-Dynamics simulations.

  11. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Santella, M. L.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2009-12-28

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  12. Friction Stir Welding High Strength Low Alloy Steel using a Multilayer...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Relation: Conference: 10th International Friction Stir Welding Symposium, Beijing, China, 20140519, 20140523 Research Org: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Sponsoring Org:...

  13. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Hovanski, Yuri [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Grant, Glenn J [ORNL; Dahl, Michael E [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannealed DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1 to 10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rev min{sup -1} increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap shear strengths exceeding 10 {center_dot} 3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

  14. EERE Success Story-Ionic Liquids Used as Wear Reduction, Wins R&D 100

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Award | Department of Energy Ionic Liquids Used as Wear Reduction, Wins R&D 100 Award EERE Success Story-Ionic Liquids Used as Wear Reduction, Wins R&D 100 Award October 16, 2014 - 11:19am Addthis Partnered with Shell Global Solutions, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed ionic liquids (salts in a liquid state at ambient temperatures) that can be used as friction and wear reduction additives for lubricating oils. The ionic liquids create nanostructured protective

  15. Ionic Liquids Used as Wear Reduction, Wins R&D 100 Award | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Liquids Used as Wear Reduction, Wins R&D 100 Award Ionic Liquids Used as Wear Reduction, Wins R&D 100 Award October 16, 2014 - 11:19am Addthis Partnered with Shell Global Solutions, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed ionic liquids (salts in a liquid state at ambient temperatures) that can be used as friction and wear reduction additives for lubricating oils. The ionic liquids create nanostructured protective films on lubricated metal surfaces, reducing

  16. Atomic-scale friction modulated by potential corrugation in multi-layered graphene materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Chunqiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-03-21

    Friction is an important issue that has to be carefully treated for the fabrication of graphene-based nano-scale devices. So far, the friction mechanism of graphene materials on the atomic scale has not yet been clearly presented. Here, first-principles calculations were employed to unveil the friction behaviors and their atomic-scale mechanism. We found that potential corrugations on sliding surfaces dominate the friction force and the friction anisotropy of graphene materials. Higher friction forces correspond to larger corrugations of potential energy, which are tuned by the number of graphene layers. The friction anisotropy is determined by the regular distributions of potential energy. The sliding along a fold-line path (hollow-atop-hollow) has a relatively small potential energy barrier. Thus, the linear sliding observed in macroscopic friction experiments may probably be attributed to the fold-line sliding mode on the atomic scale. These findings can also be extended to other layer-structure materials, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) and graphene-like BN sheets.

  17. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling Not Available...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling Not Available 14 SOLAR ENERGY; SOLAR ENERGY; EDUCATION; BIOMASS; CURRICULUM GUIDES; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; METHANE; OCEAN THERMAL POWER PLANTS; RENEWABLE...

  18. Under the Saturn IV Rocket | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Under the Saturn IV Rocket Under the Saturn IV Rocket October 10, 2013 - 12:05pm Addthis Under the Saturn IV Rocket <em>Photo credit: Kelly Visconti</em> Under the Saturn IV Rocket Photo credit: Kelly Visconti On the Road with Kelly Visconti I went to Space Camp! In January I went to the Davidson Space and Rocket Center (the home of Space Camp) in Huntsville Alabama for a workshop sponsored by the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO). Over 350 people from private

  19. Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, the ... Forum 39th Policy Group Meeting China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International ...

  20. Lateral position detection and control for friction stir systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, Paul (Boulder, CO); Lammlein, David H. (Houston, TX); Cook, George E. (Brentwood, TN); Wilkes, Don Mitchell (Nashville, TN); Strauss, Alvin M. (Nashville, TN); Delapp, David R. (Ashland City, TN); Hartman, Daniel A. (Fairhope, AL)

    2011-11-08

    Friction stir methods are disclosed for processing at least one workpiece using a rotary tool with rotating member for contacting and processing the workpiece. The methods include oscillating the rotary tool laterally with respect to a selected propagation path for the rotating member with respect to the workpiece to define an oscillation path for the rotating member. The methods further include obtaining force signals or parameters related to the force experienced by the rotary tool at least while the rotating member is disposed at the extremes of the oscillation. The force signals or parameters associated with the extremes can then be analyzed to determine a lateral position of the selected path with respect to a target path and a lateral offset value can be determined based on the lateral position. The lateral distance between the selected path and the target path can be decreased based on the lateral offset value.

  1. Single-friction-surface triboelectric generator with human body conduit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Bo; Cheng, Xiaoliang; Zhang, Xiaosheng; Han, Mengdi; Liu, Wen; Zhang, Haixia

    2014-03-10

    We present a transparent single-friction-surface triboelectric generator (STEG) employing human body as the conduit, making the applications of STEG in portable electronics much more practical and leading to a significant output improvement. The STEG with micro-patterned polydimethylsiloxane surface achieved an output voltage of over 200 V with a current density of 4.7 ?A/cm{sup 2}. With human body conduit, the output current increased by 39% and the amount of charge that transferred increased by 34% compared to the results with grounded electrode. A larger increment of 210% and 81% was obtained in the case of STEG with a large-size flat polyethylene terephthalate surface.

  2. Friction and wear in hot forging of steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daouben, E.; Dubar, L.; Dubar, M.; Deltombe, R.; Dubois, A.; Truong-Dinh, N.; Lazzarotto, L.

    2007-04-07

    In the field of hot forging of steels, the mastering of wear phenomena enables to save cost production, especially concerning tools. Surfaces of tools are protected thanks to graphite. The existing lubrication processes are not very well known: amount and quality of lubricant, lubrication techniques have to be strongly optimized to delay wear phenomena occurrence. This optimization is linked with hot forging processes, the lubricant layers must be tested according to representative friction conditions. This paper presents the first part of a global study focused on wear phenomena encountered in hot forging of steels. The goal is the identification of reliable parameters, in order to bring knowledge and models of wear. A prototype testing stand developed in the authors' laboratory is involved in this experimental analysis. This test is called Warm and Hot Upsetting Sliding Test (WHUST). The stand is composed of a heating induction system and a servo-hydraulic system. Workpieces taken from production can be heated until 1200 deg. C. A nitrided contactor representing the tool is heated at 200 deg. C. The contactor is then coated with graphite and rubs against the workpiece, leaving a residual track on it. Friction coefficient and surface parameters on the contactor and the workpiece are the most representative test results. The surface parameters are mainly the sliding length before defects occurrence, and the amplitude of surface profile of the contactor. The developed methodology will be first presented followed by the different parts of the experimental prototype. The results of experiment show clearly different levels of performance according to different lubricants.

  3. Friction, impact, and electrostatic discharge sensitivities of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, P.S.; Hall, G.F.

    1985-05-31

    Impact, friction, and electrostatic discharge sensitivities of energetic materials (explosives and pyrotechnics) used or manufactured at Mound were tested by the ''one-shot'' method. The Bruceton statistical method was used to derive 50% initiation levels, and the results were compared. The materials tested include: PETN, HMX, Plastic Bonded Explosives (PBX), CP, TATB, RX26BB, RX26BH, barium styphnate, LX-15, LX-16, Ti/KClO/sub 4/, TiH/sub 0.65//KClO/sub 4/, TiH/sub 1.65//KClO/sub 4/, Fe/KClO/sub 4/, TiH/sub 1.75//B/CaCrO/sub 4/, Ti/B/CaCrO/sub 4/, B/CaCrO/sub 4/, TiH/sub 0.65//2B, TiH/sub 0.65//3B, 2Ti/B, TiH/sub 1.67//2B, Ti/2B, TiH/sub 1/67//3B, Ti/B, and Ti/3B. Some samples were investigated for aging effects, physical variables, and the effect of manufacturing paramters on sensitivities. The results show that in both friction and impact tests, CP and barium styphnate are the most sensitive; TiH/sub 1.65/KClO/sub 4/, LX-15, TATB and its related materials are the least sensitive; and other materials such as PETN and HMX are in the mid-range. In the electrostatic tests of Ti-based pyrotechnics, a decrease of sensitivity with increasing hydrogen concentration was observed. 20 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Dynamical friction in multi-component evolving globular clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alessandrini, Emiliano; Lanzoni, Barbara; Miocchi, Paolo; Ciotti, Luca; Ferraro, Francesco R.

    2014-11-10

    We use the Chandrasekhar formalism and direct N-body simulations to study the effect of dynamical friction on a test object only slightly more massive than the field stars, orbiting a spherically symmetric background of particles with a mass spectrum. The main goal is to verify whether the dynamical friction time (t {sub DF}) develops a non-monotonic radial dependence that could explain the bimodality of the blue straggler radial distributions observed in globular clusters. In these systems, in fact, relaxation effects lead to a mass and velocity radial segregation of the different mass components, so that mass-spectrum effects on t {sub DF} are expected to be dependent on radius. We find that in spite of the presence of different masses, t {sub DF} is always a monotonic function of radius, at all evolutionary times and independently of the initial concentration of the simulated cluster. This is because the radial dependence of t {sub DF} is largely dominated by the total mass density profile of the background stars (which is monotonically decreasing with radius). Hence, a progressive temporal erosion of the blue straggler star (BSS) population at larger and larger distances from the cluster center remains the simplest and the most likely explanation of the shape of the observed BSS radial distributions, as suggested in previous works. We also confirm the theoretical expectation that approximating a multi-mass globular cluster as made of (averaged) equal-mass stars can lead to significant overestimations of t {sub DF} within the half-mass radius.

  5. CALIBRATING C-IV-BASED BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Daeseong; Woo, Jong-Hak; Shin, Jaejin [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Denney, Kelly D., E-mail: pds2001@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: woo@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jjshin@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: kelly@dark-cosmology.dk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark)

    2013-06-20

    We present the single-epoch black hole mass estimators based on the C IV {lambda}1549 broad emission line, using the updated sample of the reverberation-mapped active galactic nuclei and high-quality UV spectra. By performing multi-component spectral fitting analysis, we measure the C IV line widths (FWHM{sub C{sub IV}} and line dispersion, {sigma}{sub C{sub IV}}) and the continuum luminosity at 1350 A (L{sub 1350}) to calibrate the C-IV-based mass estimators. By comparing with the H{beta} reverberation-based masses, we provide new mass estimators with the best-fit relationships, i.e., M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.50{+-}0.07}{sigma}{sub C{sub IV}{sup 2}} and M{sub BH}{proportional_to}L{sub 1350}{sup 0.52{+-}0.09} FWHM{sub C{sub IV}{sup 0.56{+-}0.48}}. The new C-IV-based mass estimators show significant mass-dependent systematic difference compared to the estimators commonly used in the literature. Using the published Sloan Digital Sky Survey QSO catalog, we show that the black hole mass of high-redshift QSOs decreases on average by {approx}0.25 dex if our recipe is adopted.

  6. Reducing Nitrogen Oxide Emissions: 1996 Compliance with Title IV Limits

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to summarize the existing federal nitrogen oxide (Nox) regulations and the 1996 performance of the 239 Title IV generating units. It also reviews the basics of low-Nox burner technology and presents cost and performance data for retrofits at Title IV units.

  7. An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy J. Leahy

    2010-06-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated toolkit consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

  8. Ultra low friction carbon/carbon composites for extreme temperature applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Busch, Donald E. (Hinsdale, IL); Fenske, George R. (Downers Grove, IL); Lee, Sam (Gardena, CA); Shepherd, Gary (Los Alamitos, CA); Pruett, Gary J. (Cypress, CA)

    2001-01-01

    A carbon/carbon composite in which a carbon matrix containing a controlled amount of boron or a boron compound is reinforced with carbon fiber exhibits a low coefficient of friction, i.e., on the order of 0.04 to 0.1 at temperatures up to 600.degree. C., which is one of the lowest frictional coefficients for any type of carbonaceous material, including graphite, glassy carbon, diamond, diamond-like carbon and other forms of carbon material. The high degree of slipperiness of the carbon composite renders it particularly adapted for limiting friction and wear at elevated temperatures such as in seals, bearings, shafts, and flexible joints

  9. Actinide Corroles: Synthesis and Characterization of Thorium(IV) and Uranium(IV) bis(-chloride) Dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Ashleigh L.; Buckley, Heather L.; Gryko, Daniel T.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Arnold, John

    2013-12-01

    The first synthesis and structural characterization of actinide corroles is presented. Thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) macrocycles of Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole were synthesised and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, UV-Visible spectroscopy, variable-temperature 1H NMR, ESI mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry.

  10. Irradiation Alters MMP-2/TIMP-2 System and Collagen Type IV Degradation in Brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Won Hee; Warrington, Junie P.; Sonntag, William E.; Lee, Yong Woo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the major consequences of radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the central nervous system. We examined the effects of whole-brain irradiation on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the brain. Methods and Materials: Animals received either whole-brain irradiation (a single dose of 10 Gy {gamma}-rays or a fractionated dose of 40 Gy {gamma}-rays, total) or sham-irradiation and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. mRNA expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs in the brain were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional activity of MMPs was measured by in situ zymography, and degradation of ECM was visualized by collagen type IV immunofluorescent staining. Results: A significant increase in mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was observed in irradiated brains compared to that in sham-irradiated controls. In situ zymography revealed a strong gelatinolytic activity in the brain 24 h postirradiation, and the enhanced gelatinolytic activity mediated by irradiation was significantly attenuated in the presence of anti-MMP-2 antibody. A significant reduction in collagen type IV immunoreactivity was also detected in the brain at 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the levels of collagen type IV were not significantly changed at 4 and 8 h after irradiation compared with the sham-irradiated controls. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates for the first time that radiation induces an imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels and suggests that degradation of collagen type IV, a major ECM component of BBB basement membrane, may have a role in the pathogenesis of brain injury.

  11. Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotorev, Max; Sessler, Andrew; Penn, Gregory; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Charman, Andrew E.

    2012-03-20

    CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

  12. Atomic friction at exposed and buried graphite step edges: Experiments and simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Zhijiang; Martini, Ashlie

    2015-06-08

    The surfaces of layered materials such as graphite exhibit step edges that affect friction. Step edges can be exposed, where the step occurs at the outmost layer, or buried, where the step is underneath another layer of material. Here, we study friction at exposed and buried step edges on graphite using an atomic force microscope (AFM) and complementary molecular dynamics simulations of the AFM tip apex. Exposed and buried steps exhibit distinct friction behavior, and the friction on either step is affected by the direction of sliding, i.e., moving up or down the step, and the bluntness of the tip. These trends are analyzing in terms of the trajectory of the AFM tip as it moves over the step, which is a convolution of the topography of the surface and the tip shape.

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office: Parasitic Loss Reduction Research...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    loss, including: friction and wear in the power train, thermal (heat) loads, operation of auxiliary loads (air conditioning, heaters, refrigeration, etc.), and engine idling. ...

  14. Hard and low friction nitride coatings and methods for forming the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Urgen, Mustafa (Istanbul, TR); Cakir, Ali Fuat (Istanbul, TR); Eryilmaz, Osman Levent (Bolingbrook, IL); Kazmanli, Kursat (Istanbul, TR); Keles, Ozgul (Istanbul, TR)

    2007-05-01

    An improved coating material possessing super-hard and low friction properties and a method for forming the same. The improved coating material includes the use of a noble metal or soft metal homogeneously distributed within a hard nitride material. The addition of small amounts of such metals into nitrides such as molybdenum nitride, titanium nitride, and chromium nitride results in as much as increasing of the hardness of the material as well as decreasing the friction coefficient and increasing the oxidation resistance.

  15. Friction stir welding and processing of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Weiju

    2014-11-11

    A method of welding including forming a filler material of a first oxide dispersoid metal, the first oxide dispersoid material having first strengthening particles that compensate for decreases in weld strength of friction stir welded oxide dispersoid metals; positioning the filler material between a first metal structure and a second metal structure each being comprised of at least a second oxide dispersoid metal; and friction welding the filler material, the first metal structure and the second metal structure to provide a weld.

  16. Material flow during friction stir welding: A thermo-mechanically fully

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    coupled CFD study (Conference) | SciTech Connect Material flow during friction stir welding: A thermo-mechanically fully coupled CFD study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Material flow during friction stir welding: A thermo-mechanically fully coupled CFD study Authors: Chen, Gaoqiang [1] ; Feng, Zhili [1] ; Shi, Qingyu [2] ; Zhu, Yucan [2] + Show Author Affiliations ORNL Tsinghua University, Beijing, China Publication Date: 2014-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1159431 DOE Contract Number:

  17. Formability of Direct Cast Mg Sheet and Friction Stir and Ultrasonic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Joining of Magnesium to Steel | Department of Energy Formability of Direct Cast Mg Sheet and Friction Stir and Ultrasonic Joining of Magnesium to Steel Formability of Direct Cast Mg Sheet and Friction Stir and Ultrasonic Joining of Magnesium to Steel 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon lm011_smith_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office: 2010

  18. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Steels Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon lm_14_grant.pdf More Documents & Publications Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 9. Joining Pulse Pressure Forming of Lightweight Materials, Development of High Strength Superplastic

  19. Friction Stir and Ultrasonic Solid State Joining of Magnesium to Steel |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy and Ultrasonic Solid State Joining of Magnesium to Steel Friction Stir and Ultrasonic Solid State Joining of Magnesium to Steel 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon lm030_hovanski_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications FSW & USW Solid State Joining of Magnesium to Steel Formability of Direct Cast Mg Sheet and Friction Stir and Ultrasonic Joining of Magnesium to Steel

  20. Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing for High Structural Performance Through Microstructural Control

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing as a potential route to achieve high performing structures James Withers MER Corporation Rajiv S. Mishra Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA US DOE workshop on Advanced Methods for Manufacturing (AMM) September 29, 2015 Acknowledgement - DOE STTR Contract No. DE-SC0013783; Dr. Alison Hahn, Program Manager Presentation outline  Grand challenges confronting

  1. Nanoscale wear and kinetic friction between atomically smooth surfaces sliding at high speeds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajauria, Sukumar Canchi, Sripathi V. Schreck, Erhard; Marchon, Bruno

    2015-02-23

    The kinetic friction and wear at high sliding speeds is investigated using the head-disk interface of hard disk drives, wherein the head and the disk are less than 10?nm apart and move at sliding speeds of 510?m/s relative to each other. While the spacing between the sliding surfaces is of the same order of magnitude as various AFM based fundamental studies on friction, the sliding speed is nearly six orders of magnitude larger, allowing a unique set-up for a systematic study of nanoscale wear at high sliding speeds. In a hard disk drive, the physical contact between the head and the disk leads to friction, wear, and degradation of the head overcoat material (typically diamond like carbon). In this work, strain gauge based friction measurements are performed; the friction coefficient as well as the adhering shear strength at the head-disk interface is extracted; and an experimental set-up for studying friction between high speed sliding surfaces is exemplified.

  2. TOTAL SES SL EJ//EK EN IV EN III

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SL EJEK EN IV EN III NN (Engineering) NQ (ProfTechAdmin) NU (TechAdminSupport) RETIREMENT ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE IMMEDIATELY 11 13.9% ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE BY 3272014 29 36.7%...

  3. Generation IV International Forum 39th Policy Group Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) will hold the third GIF Symposium, May 19-20, 2015, in conjunction with the International Conference on Nuclear Engineering (ICONE-23), at Makuhari Messe in Chiba, Japan.

  4. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. IV. Statistical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Quasar Lens Search. IV. Statistical Lens Sample from the Fifth Data Release Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Sloan Digital Sky Survey...

  5. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this

  6. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Industry | Department of Energy Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Adaptive Management in the Marine Renewable Energy Industry March 15, 2016 11:00AM to 12:30PM EDT On February 24, 2016, Environmental Interactions of Marine Renewable Energy Technologies hosted workshops on environmental impacts of marine renewable energy, in advance of the 2016 International Conference on Ocean Energy in

  7. Table IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: Stationary | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: Stationary Table IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: Stationary "Technical targets for fuel cell membranes in stationary applications defined by the High Temperature Working Group (February 2003). " PDF icon technical_targets_membr_stat.pdf More Documents & Publications Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive Table III: Technical Targets for Catalyst Coated Membranes (CCMs): Stationary Table I: Technical Targets for

  8. Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Future Collaboration | Department of Energy Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration December 31, 2013 - 12:14pm Addthis GIF Policy Group Meeting in Brussels, Belgium, November 2013 GIF Policy Group Meeting in Brussels, Belgium, November 2013 Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear

  9. Measurement of local internal friction in metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, H.; Bchsenschtz-Gbeler, M.; Luo, Y.; Samwer, K.; Kumar, A.; Arnold, W.

    2014-04-07

    Atomic force acoustic microscopy (AFAM), an advanced scanning probe microscopy technique, has been used to measure local elastic properties with a spatial resolution given by the tip-sample contact radius. AFAM is based on inducing out-of-plane vibrations in the specimen. The vibrations are sensed by the AFM cantilever from by the photodiode signal when its tip is in contact with the material under test. To measure local damping, the inverse quality factor Q{sup ?1} of the resonance curve is usually evaluated. Here, from the contact-resonance spectra obtained, we determine the real and imaginary part of the contact stiffness k* and from these two quantities the local damping factor Q{sub loc}{sup ?1} is obtained which is proportional to the imaginary part ? of the contact stiffness. The evaluation of the data is based on the cantilever's mass distribution with damped flexural modes and not on an effective point-mass approximation for the cantilevers motion. The given equation is simple to use and has been employed to study the local Q{sub loc}{sup ?1} of amorphous PdCuSi metallic glass and its crystalline counterpart as a function of position of the AFM tip on the surface. The width of the distribution changes dramatically from the amorphous to the crystalline state as expected from the consequences of the potential-energy landscape picture. The center value of the distribution curve for Q{sub loc}{sup ?1} coincides very well with published data, based on global ultrasonic or internal friction measurements. This is compared to Q{sub loc}{sup ?1} measured in crystalline SrTiO{sub 3}, which exhibits a narrow distribution, as expected.

  10. Reduction-in-Force

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reduction in force (RIF) is a set of regulations and procedures that are used to determine whether an employee keeps his or her present position, or whether the employee has a right to another...

  11. Paperwork Reduction Act

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Paperwork Reduction Act requires that all federal websites request permission from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) before collecting information from 10 or more members of the public....

  12. NREL Funding Reductions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Funding Reductions to Further Impact Lab's Work Force For more information contact: Robert Noun 303-275-3062 Golden, Colo., December 22, 1995 -- The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) announced today that it will further reduce its work force as a result of continuing reductions of its fiscal year 1996 federal funding for renewable energy research and development. On November 2, the laboratory announced plans to reduce its 900 person regular work force

  13. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: SUMMARY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-16

    This paper briefly summarizes the series in which we consider the possibilities for losing, or compromising, key capabilities of the U.S. nuclear force in the face of modernization and reductions. The first of the three papers takes an historical perspective, considering capabilities that were eliminated in past force reductions. The second paper is our attempt to define the needed capabilities looking forward in the context of the current framework for force modernization and the current picture of the evolving challenges of deterrence and assurance. The third paper then provides an example for each of our undesirable outcomes: the creation of roach motels, box canyons, and wrong turns.

  14. Automatic generation and analysis of solar cell IV curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraft, Steven M.; Jones, Jason C.

    2014-06-03

    A photovoltaic system includes multiple strings of solar panels and a device presenting a DC load to the strings of solar panels. Output currents of the strings of solar panels may be sensed and provided to a computer that generates current-voltage (IV) curves of the strings of solar panels. Output voltages of the string of solar panels may be sensed at the string or at the device presenting the DC load. The DC load may be varied. Output currents of the strings of solar panels responsive to the variation of the DC load are sensed to generate IV curves of the strings of solar panels. IV curves may be compared and analyzed to evaluate performance of and detect problems with a string of solar panels.

  15. Paperwork Reduction Act Forms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    You may need to fill out one or several of these forms depending on the nature of your survey or usability project. See the Paperwork Reduction Act Web page for more information about the process. Contact the Web Usability Coordinator if you have questions about which forms to complete.

  16. Tethys and Annex IV Progress Report for FY 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-09-01

    The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System, dubbed “Tethys” after the mythical Greek titaness of the seas, is being developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). Functioning as a smart database, Tethys enables its users to identify key words or terms to help gather, organize and make available information and data pertaining to the environmental effects of MHK and offshore wind (OSW) energy development. By providing and categorizing relevant publications within a simple and searchable database, Tethys acts as a dissemination channel for information and data which can be utilized by regulators, project developers and researchers to minimize the environmental risks associated with offshore renewable energy developments and attempt to streamline the permitting process. Tethys also houses a separate content-related Annex IV data base with identical functionality to the Tethys knowledge base. Annex IV is a collaborative project among member nations of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ocean Energy Systems – Implementing Agreement (OES-IA) that examines the environmental effects of ocean energy devices and projects. The U.S. Department of Energy leads the Annex IV working with federal partners such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While the Annex IV database contains technical reports and journal articles, it is primarily focused on the collection of project site and research study metadata forms (completed by MHK researchers and developers around the world, and collected by PNNL) which provide information on environmental studies and the current progress of the various international MHK developments in the Annex IV member nations. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the content, accessibility and functionality enhancements made to the Annex IV and Tethys knowledge bases in FY12.

  17. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part IV. Sun schooling × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for

  18. Influence of the chemical surface structure on the nanoscale friction in plasma nitrided and post-oxidized ferrous alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freislebem, Mrcia; Menezes, Caren M.; Cemin, Felipe; Costi, Fernanda B.; Ferreira, Patrcia A.; Aguzzoli, Csar; Baumvol, Israel J. R.; Alvarez, Fernando; Figueroa, Carlos A.

    2014-09-15

    Friction is a ubiquitous phenomenon in everyday activities spanning from vehicles where efficient brakes are mandatory up to mechanical devices where its minimum effects are pursued for energy efficiency issues. Recently, theoretical models succeed correlating the friction behavior with energy transference via phonons between sliding surfaces. Therefore, considering that the energy losses by friction are prompted through phonons, the chemical surface structure between sliding surfaces is very important to determine the friction phenomenon. In this work, we address the issue of friction between a conical diamond tip sliding on different functionalized flat steel surfaces by focusing the influence of the chemical bonds in the outermost layers on the sliding resistance. This geometry allows probing the coupling of the sharp tip with terminator species on the top and underneath material surface at in-depth friction measurements from 20 to 200?nm. Experimentally, the friction coefficient decreases when nitrogen atoms are substituted for oxygen in the iron network. This effect is interpreted as due to energy losses through phonons whilst lower vibrational frequency excitation modes imply lower friction coefficients and a more accurate adjustment is obtained when a theoretical model with longitudinal adsorbate vibration is used.

  19. Reduction/Transformation Operators

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-09-01

    RTOp (reduction/transformation operators) is a collection of C++ software that provides the basic mechanism for implementinig vector operations in a flexible and efficient manner. This is the main interface utilized by Thyra to allow for the specification of specific vector reduction and/or transformation operations. The RTOp package contains three different types of software. (a) a small number of interoperability interfaces. (b) support software including code for the parallel SPMD mode based on only Teuchos::Comm(and notmore » MPl directly(, and (c) a library of pre-implemented RTOp subclasses for everything from simple AXPYs and norms, to more specialized vector operations. RTOp allows an algorithm developer to implement their own RTOp subclasses in a way that is independent from any specific serial, parallel, out-of-core or other type of vector implementation. RTOp is a required package by Thyra and MOOCHO. (c)« less

  20. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodnow, W.H.; Payne, J.R.

    1982-09-14

    The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB[sub 2], for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints. 9 figs.

  1. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodnow, Warren H. (Palo Alto, CA); Payne, John R. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1982-01-01

    The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB.sub.2, for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints.

  2. Global Threat Reduction Initiative

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Current Status of Gap and U.S.-Origin Nuclear Fuel Removals 2011 Jeff Galan, Deputy Project Manager U.S.-Origin Nuclear Remove Program National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 2 GTRI Mission and Goals GTRI is: A part of President Obama's comprehensive strategy to prevent nuclear terrorism; and The key organization responsible for implementing the U.S. HEU minimization policy. GTRI MISSION Reduce

  3. Uranium Reduction by Clostridia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, A.J.; Dodge, Cleveland J.; Gillow, Jeffrey B.

    2006-04-05

    The FRC groundwater and sediment contain significant concentrations of U and Tc and are dominated by low pH, and high nitrate and Al concentrations where dissimilatory metal reducing bacterial activity may be limited. The presence of Clostridia in Area 3 at the FRC site has been confirmed and their ability to reduce uranium under site conditions will be determined. Although the phenomenon of uranium reduction by Clostridia has been firmly established, the molecular mechanisms underlying such a reaction are not very clear. The authors are exploring the hypothesis that U(VI) reduction occurs through hydrogenases and other enzymes (Matin and Francis). Fundamental knowledge of metal reduction using Clostridia will allow us to exploit naturally occurring processes to attenuate radionuclide and metal contaminants in situ in the subsurface. The outline for this report are as follows: (1) Growth of Clostridium sp. under normal culture conditions; (2) Fate of metals and radionuclides in the presence of Clostridia; (3) Bioreduction of uranium associated with nitrate, citrate, and lepidocrocite; and (4) Utilization of Clostridium sp. for immobilization of uranium at the FRC Area 3 site.

  4. Parameter extraction from I-V characteristics of PV devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macabebe, Erees Queen B.; Sheppard, Charles J.; Dyk, E. Ernest van

    2011-01-15

    Device parameters such as series and shunt resistances, saturation current and diode ideality factor influence the behaviour of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of solar cells and photovoltaic modules. It is necessary to determine these parameters since performance parameters are derived from the I-V curve and information provided by the device parameters are useful in analyzing performance losses. This contribution presents device parameters of CuIn(Se,S){sub 2}- and Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}-based solar cells, as well as, CuInSe{sub 2}, mono- and multicrystalline silicon modules determined using a parameter extraction routine that employs Particle Swarm Optimization. The device parameters of the CuIn(Se,S){sub 2}- and Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}-based solar cells show that the contribution of recombination mechanisms exhibited by high saturation current when coupled with the effects of parasitic resistances result in lower maximum power and conversion efficiency. Device parameters of photovoltaic modules extracted from I-V characteristics obtained at higher temperature show increased saturation current. The extracted values also reflect the adverse effect of temperature on parasitic resistances. The parameters extracted from I-V curves offer an understanding of the different mechanisms involved in the operation of the devices. The parameter extraction routine utilized in this study is a useful tool in determining the device parameters which reveal the mechanisms affecting device performance. (author)

  5. Water Use Reduction | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facilities Water Use Reduction Water Use Reduction Water Use Reduction Water Use Reduction The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides agencies with guidance and...

  6. Multiple pass and multiple layer friction stir welding and material enhancement processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Zhili (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; David, Stan A. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Frederick, David Alan (Harriman, TN) [Harriman, TN

    2010-07-27

    Processes for friction stir welding, typically for comparatively thick plate materials using multiple passes and multiple layers of a friction stir welding tool. In some embodiments a first portion of a fabrication preform and a second portion of the fabrication preform are placed adjacent to each other to form a joint, and there may be a groove adjacent the joint. The joint is welded and then, where a groove exists, a filler may be disposed in the groove, and the seams between the filler and the first and second portions of the fabrication preform may be friction stir welded. In some embodiments two portions of a fabrication preform are abutted to form a joint, where the joint may, for example, be a lap joint, a bevel joint or a butt joint. In some embodiments a plurality of passes of a friction stir welding tool may be used, with some passes welding from one side of a fabrication preform and other passes welding from the other side of the fabrication preform.

  7. Correlations to predict frictional pressure loss of hydraulic-fracturing slurry in coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, S.; Zhoi, Y.X.; Bailey, M.; Hernandez, J.

    2009-08-15

    Compared with conventional-tubing fracturing, coiled-tubing (CT) fracturing has several advantages. CT fracturing has become an effective stimulation technique for multizone oil and gas wells. It is also an attractive production-enhancement method for multiseam coalbed-methane wells, and wells with bypassed zones. The excessive frictional pressure loss through CT has been a concern in fracturing. The small diameter of the string limits the cross-sectional area open to flow. Furthermore, the tubing curvature causes secondary flow and results in extra flow resistance. This increased frictional pressure loss results in high surface pumping pressure. The maximum possible pump rate and sand concentration, therefore, have to be reduced. To design a CT fracturing job properly, it is essential to predict the frictional pressure loss through the tubing accurately. This paper presents correlations for the prediction of frictional pressure loss of fracturing slurries in straight tubing and CT. They are developed on the basis of full-scale slurry-flow tests with 11/2-in. CT and slurries prepared with 35 lbm/1,000 gal of guar gel. The extensive experiments were conducted at the full-scale CT-flow test facility. The proposed correlations have been verified with the experimental data and actual field CT-fracturing data. Case studies of wells recently fractured are provided to demonstrate the application of the correlations. The correlations will be useful to the CT engineers in their hydraulics design calculations.

  8. Overview of reductants utilized in nuclear fuel reprocessing/recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Paviet-Hartmann; Catherine Riddle; Keri Campbell; Edward Mausolf

    2013-10-01

    Most of the aqueous processes developed, or under consideration worldwide for the recycling of used nuclear fuel (UNF) utilize the oxido-reduction properties of actinides to separate them from other radionuclides. Generally, after acid dissolution of the UNF, (essentially in nitric acid solution), actinides are separated from the raffinate by liquid-liquid extraction using specific solvents, associated along the process, with a particular reductant that will allow the separation to occur. For example, the industrial PUREX process utilizes hydroxylamine as a plutonium reductant. Hydroxylamine has numerous advantages: not only does it have the proper attributes to reduce Pu(IV) to Pu(III), but it is also a non-metallic chemical that is readily decomposed to innocuous products by heating. However, it has been observed that the presence of high nitric acid concentrations or impurities (such as metal ions) in hydroxylamine solutions increase the likelihood of the initiation of an autocatalytic reaction. Recently there has been some interest in the application of simple hydrophilic hydroxamic ligands such as acetohydroxamic acid (AHA) for the stripping of tetravalent actinides in the UREX process flowsheet. This approach is based on the high coordinating ability of hydroxamic acids with tetravalent actinides (Np and Pu) compared with hexavalent uranium. Thus, the use of AHA offers a route for controlling neptunium and plutonium in the UREX process by complexant based stripping of Np(IV) and Pu(IV) from the TBP solvent phase, while U(VI) ions are not affected by AHA and remain solvated in the TBP phase. In the European GANEX process, AHA is also used to form hydrophilic complexes with actinides and strip them from the organic phase into nitric acid. However, AHA does not decompose completely when treated with nitric acid and hampers nitric acid recycling. In lieu of using AHA in the UREX + process, formohydroxamic acid (FHA), although not commercially available, hold promises as a replacement for AHA. FHA undergoes hydrolysis to formic acid which is volatile, thus allowing the recycling of nitric acid. Unfortunately, FHA powder was not stable in the experiments we ran in our laboratory. In addition, AHA and FHA also decompose to hydroxylamine which may undergo an autocatalytic reaction. Other reductants are available and could be extremely useful for actinides separation. The review presents the current plutonium reductants used in used nuclear fuel reprocessing and will introduce innovative and novel reductants that could become reducers for future research on UNF separation.

  9. Electrolytic oxide reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Barnes, Laurel A; Williamson, Mark A; Willit, James L; Berger, John F

    2015-04-28

    An electrolytic oxide reduction system according to a non-limiting embodiment of the present invention may include a plurality of anode assemblies, a plurality of cathode assemblies, and a lift system configured to engage the anode and cathode assemblies. The cathode assemblies may be alternately arranged with the anode assemblies such that each cathode assembly is flanked by two anode assemblies. The lift system may be configured to selectively engage the anode and cathode assemblies so as to allow the simultaneous lifting of any combination of the anode and cathode assemblies (whether adjacent or non-adjacent).

  10. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, John R. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1983-09-20

    The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces.

  11. Safety evaluation of RTG launches aboard Titan IV launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosko, Robert J.; Loughin, Stephen

    1997-01-10

    The analytical tool used to evaluate accidents aboard a Titan IV launch vehicle involving a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) is discussed. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program-Titan IV version (LASEP-T) uses a Monte Carlo approach to determine the response of an RTG to various threatening environments. The threatening environments arise from a complex interplay of probabilistic and deterministic processes, and are therefore parameterized by a set of random variables with probability distributions. The assessment of the RTG response to a given environment is based on both empirical data and theoretical modeling. Imbedding detailed, complex response models into the LASEP-T calculation was not practical. Simpler response models have been constructed to capture both the inherent variability due to the phenomenology of the accident scenario along with the uncertainty of predicting response behavior. The treatment of variability and uncertainty as it pertains to the launch accident evaluation of RTG response will be discussed.

  12. Method of synthesis of anhydrous thorium(IV) complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Cantat, Thibault

    2013-04-30

    Method of producing anhydrous thorium(IV) tetrahalide complexes, utilizing Th(NO.sub.3).sub.4(H.sub.2O).sub.x, where x is at least 4, as a reagent; method of producing thorium-containing complexes utilizing ThCl.sub.4(DME).sub.2 as a precursor; method of producing purified ThCl.sub.4(ligand).sub.x compounds, where x is from 2 to 9; and novel compounds having the structures: ##STR00001##

  13. Aluminum reduction cell electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, J.R.

    1983-09-20

    The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces. 10 figs.

  14. Analysis of the raw data of sample plots in NFIMAP Cycle IV ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    raw data of sample plots in NFIMAP Cycle IV (English version) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Analysis of the raw data of sample plots in NFIMAP Cycle IV...

  15. Sensitivities of I-V Parameters in C-Si PV Modules of Hygrothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensitivities of I-V Parameters in C-Si PV Modules of Hygrothermal Stress Sensitivities of I-V Parameters in C-Si PV Modules of Hygrothermal Stress Presented at the PV Module ...

  16. Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    IV, V,and VI) using a liquid core waveguide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low-level detection and quantification of Plutonium(III, IV, V,and VI) using a ...

  17. Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using a1.0-meter Liquid Core Waveguide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Detection and Quantification of Pu(III, IV, V, and VI) Using ...

  18. Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Charter of the Generation IV Roadmap Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group (FCCG) is to (1) examine the fuel cycle implications for alternative nuclear power scenarios in terms of Generation IV goals and ...

  19. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Effects of Energy Removal on Physical Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please mark your calendars for the next Annex IV Environmental webinar titled: Effects of Energy Removal on Physical Systems. Held under the auspices of the Annex IV initiative to the IEA Ocean...

  20. Heat Transfer and Friction-Factor Methods Turbulent Flow Inside Pipes 3d Rough

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-01-21

    Three-dimensional roughened internally enhanced tubes have been shown to be one of the most energy efficient for turbulent, forced convection applications. However, there is only one prediction method presented in the open literature and that is restricted to three-dimensional sand-grain roughness. Other roughness types are being proposed: hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. There are no validated heat-transfer and friction-factor prediction methods for these different roughness shapes that can be used inmore » the transition and fully rough region. This program calculates the Nusselt number and friction factor values, for a broad range of three-dimensional roughness types such as hemispherical sectors, truncated cones, and full and truncated pyramids. Users of this program are heat-exchangers designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  1. Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welding: a review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, Wan Chuck [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Wang, Xun-Li [ORNL; David, Stan A [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Significant amounts of residual stresses are often generated during welding and result in critical degradation of the structural integrity and performance of components. Neutron diffraction has become a well established technique for the determination of residual stresses in welds because of the unique deep penetration, three-dimensional mapping capability, and volume averaged bulk measurements characteristic of the scattering neutron beam. Friction stir welding has gained prominence in recent years. The authors reviewed a number of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welds and highlighted examples addressing how the microstructures and residual stresses are correlated with each other. An example of in situ neutron diffraction measurement result shows the evolution of the residual stresses during welding.

  2. Thermal Management in Friction-Stir Welding of Precipitation-Hardening Aluminum Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyay, Piyush; Reynolds, Anthony

    2015-05-25

    Process design and implementation in FSW is mostly dependent on empirical information gathered through experience. Basic science of friction stir welding and processing can only be complete when fundamental interrelationships between process control parameters and response variables and resulting weld microstructure and properties are established to a reasonable extent. It is known that primary process control parameters like tool rotation and translation rate and forge axis force have complicated and interactive relationships to the process response variables such as peak temperature, time at temperature etc. Of primary influence to the other process response parameters are temperature and its gradient at the deformation and heat affected zones. Through review of pertinent works in the literature and some experimental results from boundary condition work performed in precipitation hardening aluminum alloys this paper will partially elucidate the nature and effects of temperature transients caused by variation of thermal boundaries in Friction Stir Welding.

  3. UCRL-ID-124563 LLNL Small-scale Friction Sensitivity (BAM) Test

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    4563 LLNL Small-scale Friction Sensitivity (BAM) Test . * - L. Richard Simpson M. Frances Foltz June 1996 DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government Neither the United States Government nor the University of California nor any o f their employes, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibifity for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness o f any information, apparatus, product, or

  4. Eutectic structures in friction spot welding joint of aluminum alloy to copper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Junjun, E-mail: junjun.shen@hzg.de; Suhuddin, Uceu F. H.; Cardillo, Maria E. B.; Santos, Jorge F. dos [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Institute of Materials Research, Materials Mechanics, Solid-State Joining Processes, Max-Planck-Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2014-05-12

    A dissimilar joint of AA5083 Al alloy and copper was produced by friction spot welding. The Al-MgCuAl{sub 2} eutectic in both coupled and divorced manners were found in the weld. At a relatively high temperature, mass transport of Cu due to plastic deformation, material flow, and atomic diffusion, combined with the alloy system of AA5083 are responsible for the ternary eutectic melting.

  5. Near Zero Friction from Nanoscale Lubricants | U.S. DOE Office of Science

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    (SC) Near Zero Friction from Nanoscale Lubricants Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) ASCR Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of ASCR Funding Opportunities Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Community Resources Contact Information Advanced Scientific Computing Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-21/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-7486 F: (301) 903-4846 E: Email Us More Information »

  6. Stability of Y Ti O Precipitates in Friction Stir Welded Nanostructured Ferritic Alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, Xinghua; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Miller, Michael K; David, Stan A; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFAs), which have complex microstructures consisting of ultrafine ferritic grains with a dispersion of stable oxide particles and nanoclusters (NC), are promising materials for fuel cladding and structural applications in the next generation nuclear reactor. This study evaluates microstructure of friction stir welded NFA using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography (APT) techniques. APT results revealed NCs are coarsened and inhomogeneously distributed in the stir zone. Three hypotheses on coarsening of NC are presented.

  7. Characterization of Multilayered Multipass Friction Stir Weld on ASTM A572 G50 Steel

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Yu, Xinghua; Qiao, Dongxiao; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2014-01-01

    A multilayered multipass friction stir weld (MM-FSW) on ASTM A572 Grade 50 steel was characterized to understand its potential application for thick-section structures. The 15-mm-thick section was fabricated by stacking up three steel plates and then friction stir welding the plates together in a total of 5 passes. The unique butt/lap joint configuration encountered in the multilayer weld was examined to understand the effect of tool rotation direction on the joint quality especially the formation of hooking defect. Charpy V-notch impact toughness tests showed generally higher impact toughness energy for the stir zone than the base metal with a ductilemore » fracture mode. The microhardness value was measured from 195 to 220 HV in the stir zone, while the base metal showed an average value of 170 HV. The microstructure in the stir zone and the adjacent heat affected zone was quantified using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) including Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The increased toughness and hardness were correlated with the refined microstructure in stir zone, resulting from severe plastic deformation and subsequent dynamic recrystallization during friction stir welding.« less

  8. Characterization of Multilayered Multipass Friction Stir Weld on ASTM A572 G50 Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Yong Chae [ORNL; Sanderson, Samuel [MegaStir Technologies LLC; Mahoney, Murray [Consultant; Yu, Xinghua [ORNL; Qiao, Dongxiao [ORNL; Wang, Yanli [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A multilayered multipass friction stir weld (MM-FSW) on ASTM A572 Grade 50 steel was characterized to understand its potential application for thick-section structures. The 15-mm-thick section was fabricated by stacking up three steel plates and then friction stir welding the plates together in a total of 5 passes. The unique butt/lap joint configuration encountered in the multilayer weld was examined to understand the effect of tool rotation direction on the joint quality especially the formation of hooking defect. Charpy V-notch impact toughness tests showed generally higher impact toughness energy for the stir zone than the base metal with a ductile fracture mode. The microhardness value was measured from 195 to 220 HV in the stir zone, while the base metal showed an average value of 170 HV. The microstructure in the stir zone and the adjacent heat affected zone was quantified using Optical and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) including Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). The increased toughness and hardness were correlated with the refined microstructure in stir zone, resulting from severe plastic deformation and subsequent dynamic recrystallization during friction stir welding.

  9. Generation of defects in model lubricant monolayers and their contribution to energy dissipation in friction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmeron, Miquel

    2000-06-15

    The structural, mechanical (friction) and spectroscopic properties of model lubricant films made of self-assembled and Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers on quartz, mica and gold have been investigated with atomic force microscopy, surface forces apparatus and sum frequency generation. In these films, the molecules tend to form densely packed structures, with the alkane chains mostly vertical and parallel to each other. The SFG results suggest that under moderate pressures of a few tens of MPa, the methyl end group of the alkane chains is rotated to accommodate a terminal gauche distortion. The molecule,however, retains its upright close packed structure with a lattice periodicity when ordered, which can be resolved by AFM. At pressures above 0.1 GPa, changes in the form of collective molecular tilts take place that lower the height of the monolayer. Only certain angles of tilt are allowed that are explained by the interlocking of methylene units in neighboring chains. The discrete angular tilts are accompanied by increases in friction. A model based on the van derWaals attractive energy between chains is used to explain the stability of the films and to estimate the cohesive energy changes during tilt and, from that, the increases in friction force.

  10. Explicit Solvent Simulations of Friction between Brush Layers of Charged and Neutral Bottle-Brush Macromolecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrillo, Jan-Michael; Brown, W Michael; Dobrynin, Andrey

    2012-01-01

    We study friction between charged and neutral brush layers of bottle-brush macromolecules using molecular dynamics simulations. In our simulations the solvent molecules were treated explicitly. The deformation of the bottle-brush macromolecules under the shear were studied as a function of the substrate separation and shear stress. For charged bottle-brush layers we study effect of the added salt on the brush lubricating properties to elucidate factors responsible for energy dissipation in charged and neutral brush systems. Our simulations have shown that for both charged and neutral brush systems the main deformation mode of the bottle-brush macromolecule is associated with the backbone deformation. This deformation mode manifests itself in the backbone deformation ratio, , and shear viscosity, , to be universal functions of the Weissenberg number W. The value of the friction coefficient, , and viscosity, , are larger for the charged bottle-brush coatings in comparison with those for neutral brushes at the same separation distance, D, between substrates. The additional energy dissipation generated by brush sliding in charged bottle-brush systems is due to electrostatic coupling between bottle-brush and counterion motion. This coupling weakens as salt concentration, cs, increases resulting in values of the viscosity, , and friction coefficient, , approaching corresponding values obtained for neutral brush systems.

  11. Partial return yoke for MICE step IV and final step

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witte, H.; Plate, S.; Berg, J. S.; Tarrant, J.; Bross, A.

    2015-05-03

    This paper reports on the progress of the design and construction of a retro-fitted return yoke for the international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). MICE is a proof-of-principle experiment aiming to demonstrate ionization cooling experimentally. In earlier studies we outlined how a partial return yoke can be used to mitigate stray magnetic field in the experimental hall; we report on the progress of the construction of the partial return yoke for MICE Step IV. We also discuss an extension of the Partial Return Yoke for the final step of MICE; we show simulation results of the expected performance.

  12. A rationalization of the Type IV loading dependence in the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kärger-Pfeifer classification of self-diffusivities | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome rationalization of the Type IV loading dependence in the Kärger-Pfeifer classification of self-diffusivities Previous Next List Rajamani Krishna, Jasper M. van Baten, Microporous Mesoporous Mater., 142, 745-748 (2011) DOI: 10.1016/j.micromeso.2011.01.002 Full-size image (41 K) Abstract: Kärger and Pfeifer (1987) [1] have listed five different types of

  13. EXHIBIT IV DOE/EV-0003/29 ORNL-5734

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    v EXHIBIT IV - DOE/EV-0003/29 ORNL-5734 Radiological Survey of the Former Kellex Research Facility, Jersey City, New Jersey 6. A. Berven H. W. Dickson W. A. Goldsmith W. M. Johnson W. D. Cottrell R. W. Doane F. F. Haywood M. T. Ryan W. H. Shinpaugh DOE/EV-0005/29 ORNL-5734 Dist. Category UC-70 Contract No. W-7405-eng-26 Health and Safety Research Division RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE FORMER KELLEX RESEARCH FACILITY, JERSEY CITY, NEW JERSEY B. A. Berven W. D. Cottrell H. W. Dickson R. W. Doane W.

  14. IvPE-cEAEs?nILE!! P

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Cw-rent: _______ rT--- Owner contacted 0 yes J7' j-r~~; if ye.. date contacted ___ IvPE-cEAEs?nILE!! P Research & Development 0 Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage 0 Prime ,!Z! Subcontract& JZl Purchase Order q Facility Type q Manufacturing q University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other --------------------- [7 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee,

  15. PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT OF 1995

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Chief Information Officer PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT OF 1995 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY INFORMATION COLLECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Chris Rouleau, PRA Officer Records Management Division Office of the Associate Chief Information Officer for IT Planning, Architecture and E-Government Office of the Chief Information Officer Office of the Chief Information Officer 2/16/2010 2 TOPICS  Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 - Law  Paperwork Reduction Act - Overview  Information Collection

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: National Idling Reduction Network...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Idling Reduction Network News Archives Vehicle Technologies Office: National Idling Reduction Network News Archives The National Idling Reduction Network brings together trucking...

  17. National Idling Reduction Network News- June 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

  18. National Idling Reduction Network News- October 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

  19. National Idling Reduction Network News- December 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

  20. National Idling Reduction Network News- August 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

  1. National Idling Reduction Network News- February 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

  2. National Idling Reduction Network News- January 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

  3. National Idling Reduction Network News- August 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

  4. National Idling Reduction Network News- October 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events.

  5. Foreign Trip Report MATGEN-IV Sep 24- Oct 26, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Caro, M S

    2007-10-30

    Gen-IV activities in France, Japan and US focus on the development of new structural materials for Gen-IV nuclear reactors. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) F/M steels have raised considerable interest in nuclear applications. Promising collaborations can be established seeking fundamental knowledge of relevant Gen-IV ODS steel properties (see attached travel report on MATGEN- IV 'Materials for Generation IV Nuclear Reactors'). Major highlights refer to results on future Ferritic/Martensitic steel cladding candidates (relevant to Gen-IV materials properties for LFR Materials Program) and on thermodynamic and mechanic behavior of metallic FeCr binary alloys, base matrix for future candidate steels (for the LLNL-LDRD project on Critical Issues on Materials for Gen-IV Reactors).

  6. The dependence of C IV broad absorption line properties on accompanying Si IV and Al III absorption: relating quasar-wind ionization levels, kinematics, and column densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R.; Hall, P. B.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Myers, Adam D.; Pris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; York, Don

    2014-08-20

    We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line of sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines of sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.

  7. Generation IV PR and PP Methods and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bari,R.A.

    2008-10-13

    This paper presents an evaluation methodology for proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR&PP) of Generation IV nuclear energy systems (NESs). For a proposed NES design, the methodology defines a set of challenges, analyzes system response to these challenges, and assesses outcomes. The challenges to the NES are the threats posed by potential actors (proliferant States or sub-national adversaries). The characteristics of Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate the response of the system and determine its resistance against proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and terrorism threats. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of six measures for PR and three measures for PP, which are the high-level PR&PP characteristics of the NES. The methodology is organized to allow evaluations to be performed at the earliest stages of system design and to become more detailed and more representative as design progresses. Uncertainty of results are recognized and incorporated into the evaluation at all stages. The results are intended for three types of users: system designers, program policy makers, and external stakeholders. Particular current relevant activities will be discussed in this regard. The methodology has been illustrated in a series of demonstration and case studies and these will be summarized in the paper.

  8. Safety evaluation of RTG launches aboard Titan IV launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosko, R.J.; Loughin, S.

    1997-01-01

    The analytical tool used to evaluate accidents aboard a Titan IV launch vehicle involving a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) is discussed. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program-Titan IV version (LASEP-T) uses a Monte Carlo approach to determine the response of an RTG to various threatening environments. The threatening environments arise from a complex interplay of probabilistic and deterministic processes, and are therefore parameterized by a set of random variables with probability distributions. The assessment of the RTG response to a given environment is based on both empirical data and theoretical modeling. Imbedding detailed, complex response models into the LASEP-T calculation was not practical. Simpler response models have been constructed to capture both the inherent variability due to the phenomenology of the accident scenario along with the uncertainty of predicting response behavior. The treatment of variability and uncertainty as it pertains to the launch accident evaluation of RTG response will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on High-Stability-Low-Cost Supports Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on...

  10. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Idle Reduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits

  11. Single-Phase, Turbulent Heat-Transfer Friction-Factor Data Base Flow Enhanced Tb

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-01-21

    Heat-exchanger designers need to know what type of performance improvement can be obtained before they will consider enhanced tubes. In particular, they need access to the heat-transfer coefficients and friction-factor values of enhanced tube types that are commercially available. To compile these data from the numerous publications and reports in the open literature is a formidable task that can discourage the designer from using them. A computer program that contains a comprehensive data base withmore » a search feature would be a handy tool for the designer to obtain an estimate of the performance improvement that can be obtained with a particular enhanced tube geometry. In addition, it would be a valuable tool for researchers who are developing and/or validating new prediction methods. This computer program can be used to obtain friction-factor and/or heat-transfer data for a broad range of internally enhanced tube geometries with forced-convective turbulent flow. The program has search features; that is the user can select data for tubes with a particular enhancement geometry range or data obtained from a particular source or publication. The friction factor data base contains nearly 5,000 points and the heat-transfer data base contains more than 4,700 points. About 360 different tube geometries are included from the 36 different sources. Data for tubes with similar geometries and the same and/or different types can be easily extracted with the sort feature of this data base and compared. Users of the program are heat-exchanger designers, enhanced tubing suppliers, and research organizations or academia who are developing or validating prediction methods.« less

  12. ACME-III and ACME-IV Final Campaign Reports

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biraud, S. C.

    2016-01-01

    The goals of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s third and fourth Airborne Carbon Measurements (ACME) field campaigns, ACME-III and ACME-IV, are: 1) to measure and model the exchange of CO2, water vapor, and other greenhouse gases by the natural, agricultural, and industrial ecosystems of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) region; 2) to develop quantitative approaches to relate these local fluxes to the concentration of greenhouse gases measured at the Central Facility tower and in the atmospheric column above the ARM SGP Central Facility, 3) to develop and test bottom-up measurement and modeling approaches to estimate regional scale carbon balances, and 4) to develop and test inverse modeling approaches to estimate regional scale carbon balance and anthropogenic sources over continental regions. Regular soundings of the atmosphere from near the surface into the mid-troposphere are essential for this research.

  13. Magnetic mirror cavities as terahertz radiation sources and a means of quantifying radiation friction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holkundkar, Amol R. E-mail: amol.holkundkar@gmail.com; Harvey, Chris

    2014-10-15

    We propose a radiation source based on a magnetic mirror cavity. Relativistic electrons are simulated entering the cavity and their trajectories and resulting emission spectra are calculated. The uniformity of the particle orbits is found to result in a frequency comb in terahertz range, the precise energies of which are tunable by varying the electron's γ-factor. For very high energy particles, radiation friction causes the spectral harmonics to broaden and we suggest this as a possible way to verify competing classical equations of motion.

  14. Method for producing ceramic composition having low friction coefficient at high operating temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lankford, Jr., James (San Antonio, TX)

    1988-01-01

    A method for producing a stable ceramic composition having a surface with a low friction coefficient and high wear resistance at high operating temperatures. A first deposition of a thin film of a metal ion is made upon the surface of the ceramic composition and then a first ion implantation of at least a portion of the metal ion is made into the near surface region of the composition. The implantation mixes the metal ion and the ceramic composition to form a near surface composite. The near surface composite is then oxidized sufficiently at high oxidizing temperatures to form an oxide gradient layer in the surface of the ceramic composition.

  15. Comparing Laser Welding Technologies with Friction Stir Welding for Production of Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Carsley, John; Carlson, Blair; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan; Pilli, Siva Prasad

    2014-01-15

    A comparison of welding techniques was performed to determine the most effective method for producing aluminum tailor-welded blanks for high volume automotive applications. Aluminum sheet was joined with an emphasis on post weld formability, surface quality and weld speed. Comparative results from several laser based welding techniques along with friction stir welding are presented. The results of this study demonstrate a quantitative comparison of weld methodologies in preparing tailor-welded aluminum stampings for high volume production in the automotive industry. Evaluation of nearly a dozen welding variations ultimately led to down selecting a single process based on post-weld quality and performance.

  16. An analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening and frictional effects for normal and oblique impacts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brake, M. R. W.

    2015-02-17

    Impact between metallic surfaces is a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in the design and analysis of mechanical systems. We found that to model this phenomenon, a new formulation for frictional elastic–plastic contact between two surfaces is developed. The formulation is developed to consider both frictional, oblique contact (of which normal, frictionless contact is a limiting case) and strain hardening effects. The constitutive model for normal contact is developed as two contiguous loading domains: the elastic regime and a transitionary region in which the plastic response of the materials develops and the elastic response abates. For unloading, the constitutive model ismore » based on an elastic process. Moreover, the normal contact model is assumed to only couple one-way with the frictional/tangential contact model, which results in the normal contact model being independent of the frictional effects. Frictional, tangential contact is modeled using a microslip model that is developed to consider the pressure distribution that develops from the elastic–plastic normal contact. This model is validated through comparisons with experimental results reported in the literature, and is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than 10 other normal contact models and three other tangential contact models found in the literature.« less

  17. An analytical elastic plastic contact model with strain hardening and frictional effects for normal and oblique impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brake, M. R. W.

    2015-02-17

    Impact between metallic surfaces is a phenomenon that is ubiquitous in the design and analysis of mechanical systems. We found that to model this phenomenon, a new formulation for frictional elasticplastic contact between two surfaces is developed. The formulation is developed to consider both frictional, oblique contact (of which normal, frictionless contact is a limiting case) and strain hardening effects. The constitutive model for normal contact is developed as two contiguous loading domains: the elastic regime and a transitionary region in which the plastic response of the materials develops and the elastic response abates. For unloading, the constitutive model is based on an elastic process. Moreover, the normal contact model is assumed to only couple one-way with the frictional/tangential contact model, which results in the normal contact model being independent of the frictional effects. Frictional, tangential contact is modeled using a microslip model that is developed to consider the pressure distribution that develops from the elasticplastic normal contact. This model is validated through comparisons with experimental results reported in the literature, and is demonstrated to be significantly more accurate than 10 other normal contact models and three other tangential contact models found in the literature.

  18. EIS-0402: Remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California | Department of Energy 02: Remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, California EIS-0402: Remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, California Summary DOE is preparing an EIS for cleanup of Area IV, including the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), as well as the Northern Buffer Zone of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) in eastern Ventura County, California, approximately 29 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. (DOE's

  19. EIS-0469: Wilton IV Wind Energy Center; Burleigh County, North Dakota |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9: Wilton IV Wind Energy Center; Burleigh County, North Dakota EIS-0469: Wilton IV Wind Energy Center; Burleigh County, North Dakota Summary Western Area Power Administration is evaluating the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting NextEra Energy Resources proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, near Bismarck, North Dakota, to Western's existing Wilton/Baldwin substation and allowing NextEra's existing wind projects in this area to operate above 50

  20. Single-layer MoS{sub 2} roughness and sliding friction quenching by interaction with atomically flat substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quereda, J.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Agrat, N.; Rubio-Bollinger, G.

    2014-08-04

    We experimentally study the surface roughness and the lateral friction force in single-layer MoS{sub 2} crystals deposited on different substrates: SiO{sub 2}, mica, and hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN). Roughness and sliding friction measurements are performed by atomic force microscopy. We find a strong dependence of the MoS{sub 2} roughness on the underlying substrate material, being h-BN the substrate which better preserves the flatness of the MoS{sub 2} crystal. The lateral friction also lowers as the roughness decreases, and attains its lowest value for MoS{sub 2} flakes on h-BN substrates. However, it is still higher than for the surface of a bulk MoS{sub 2} crystal, which we attribute to the deformation of the flake due to competing tip-to-flake and flake-to-substrate interactions.

  1. Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 and Hot-Stamp Boron Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, Michael L.; Frederick, Alan; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.

    2008-05-16

    Friction stir spot welds were made in two high-strength steels: DP780, and a hot-stamp-boron steel with tensile strength of 1500 MPa. The spot welds were made at either 800 or 1600 rpm using either of two polycrystalline boron nitride tools. One stir tool, BN77, had the relatively common pin-tool shape. The second tool, BN46, had a convex rather than a concave shoulder profile and a much wider and shorter pin. The tools were plunged to preprogrammed depths either at a continuous rate (1-step schedule) or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate. In all cases, the welds were completed in 4s. The range of lap-shear values were compared to values required for resistance spot welds on the same steels. The minimum value of 10.3 kN was exceeded for friction stir spot welding of DP780 using a 2-step schedule and either the BN77- or the BN46-type stir tool. The respective minimum value of 12 kN was also exceeded for the HSB steel using the 2-step process and the BN46 stir tool.

  2. Technical Session IV Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    IV Talks Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Technical Session IV Talks Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Future Light Sources (Ben-Zvi) .pdf file (6.2MB

  3. Plutonium(IV) precipitates formed in alkaline media in the presence of various anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krot, N.N.; Shilov, V.P.; Yusov, A.B.; Tananaev, I.G.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Yu.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

    1998-09-01

    The tendency of Pu(IV) to hydrolyze and form true solutions, colloid solutions, or insoluble precipitates has been known since the Manhattan Project. Since then, specific studies have been performed to examine in detail the equilibria of Pu(IV) hydrolytic reactions in various media. Great attention also has been paid to the preparation, structure, and properties of Pu(IV) polymers or colloids. These compounds found an important application in sol-gel technology for the preparation of nuclear fuel materials. A most important result of these works was the conclusion that Pu(IV) hydroxide, after some aging, consists of very small PuO{sub 2} crystallites and should therefore be considered to be Pu(IV) hydrous oxide. However, studies of the properties and behavior of solid Pu(IV) hydroxide in complex heterogeneous systems are rare. The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the composition and properties of Pu(IV) hydrous oxide or other compounds formed in alkaline media under different conditions. Such information is important to understand Pu(IV) behavior and the forms of its existence in the Hanford Site alkaline tank waste sludge. This knowledge then may be applied in assessing plutonium criticality hazards in the storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes as well as in understanding its contribution to the transuranic waste inventory (threshold at 100 nCi/g or about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M) of the separate solution and solid phases.

  4. Rapid, Enhanced IV Characterization of Multi-Junction PV Devices under One Sun at NREL: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, Tom; France, Ryan; Steiner, Myles

    2015-09-15

    Multi-junction technology is rapidly advancing, which puts increasing demands on IV characterization resources. We report on a tool and procedure for fast turn-around of IV data under the reference conditions, but also under controlled variations from the reference conditions. This enhanced data set can improve further iterations of device optimization.

  5. Reduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pressure gradient, analogous to particle pinches. 10 This effect is predicted by straightforward calculations using the quasi- linear transport approximation. This paper follows...

  6. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

  7. Microbial reduction of iron ore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

    1989-11-14

    A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

  8. Paperwork Reduction Act Form | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Form Paperwork Reduction Act Form Collection Discontinuation Form PDF icon Paperwork Reduction Act Form More Documents & Publications OMB83 D Discontinuance Form OMB 83 C Paperwork Reduction Act Submission (OMB 83-I)

  9. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K.; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Irsigler, Andre; LaRue, Huachun; Brzeski, Jan; Mcginnis, Karen A.; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Chandler, Vicki L.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2014-10-01

    Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic ana- lyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two sub- types of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  10. Analysis of Cadmium in Undissolved Anode Materials of Mark-IV Electrorefiner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tae-Sic Yoo; Guy L. Fredrickson; DeeEarl Vaden; Brian R. Westphal

    2013-10-01

    The Mark-IV electrorefiner (Mk-IV ER) contains an electrolyte/molten cadmium system for refining uranium electrochemically. Typically, the anode of the Mk-IV ER consists of the chopped sodium-bonded metallic driver fuels, which have been primarily U-10Zr binary fuels. Chemical analysis of the residual anode materials after electrorefining indicates that a small amount of cadmium is removed from the Mk-IV ER along with the undissolved anode materials. Investigation of chemical analysis data indicates that the amount of cadmium in the undissolved anode materials is strongly correlated with the anode rotation speeds and the residence time of the anode in the Mk-IV ER. Discussions are given to explain the prescribed correlation.

  11. Cost analysis for compliance with EPA's regional NOx emissions reductions for fossil-fired power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.; Mann, A.; Ward, J.; Ramezan, M.

    1999-07-01

    To achieve a more stringent ambient-air ozone standard promulgated in 1997, the U.S. EPA has established summer NOx emissions limits for fossil-fired electric power generating units in the Ozone Transport Rulemaking region, consisting of 22 eastern and midwestern states and the District of Columbia. These jurisdictions are required to submit State Implementation Plans by September 1999 in response to EPA's rule, with compliance required by 2007. There are 1757 affected units in this region. In the present study, projected state-by-state growth rates for power production are used to estimate power production and NOx emissions by unit in the year 2007. NOx emissions reductions expected by January 1, 2000 due to Title IV compliance are estimated, leaving a substantial balance of emissions reductions to be achieved by post-combustion NOx control. Cost estimates are developed for achieving these remaining reductions.

  12. State reactions to Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.A.

    1995-12-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 represents a bold step in application of environmental regulation. By setting up a national free market in sulfur dioxide emission allowances, Congress has adopted the position that environmental protection and good economics are not necessarily in opposition. In fact, by carefully crafting legislation these two goals may work in aide of each other. Title IV is intended to achieve a significant reduction in the incidence of acid rain at minimal cost for the nation as a whole. On the other hand, states have traditionally had the greater responsibility for direct regulation of electric utility operations. A national free market in pollution is not welcomed by many state regulatory agencies. Some states are concerned about losing in-state markets for coal; others are unwilling to {open_quotes}import{close_quotes} pollution through the purchase of allowances. A number of states have reacted by passing regulations which limit utilities` choices in developing compliance plans. The Illinois Coal Act, for example, specifically requires two of the largest Illinois coal-fired power plants to install scrubbers and prohibits any plant from reducing its use of Illinois-mined coal by more than 10 percent per year. In December of 1993 the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois ruled, in the case of Alliance for Clean Coal v. Craig, that the Illinois Coal Act violates the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution and permanently enjoined the Illinois Commerce Commission from enforcing it. The state appealed that decision but in January of 1995 the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit upheld the District Court`s opinion. This paper will show that the argument that should be of particular interest from an economics perspective. Finally, the paper will attempt to draw conclusions regarding how state regulators may legitimately integrate the trading of emission allowances into their current regulatory schemes.

  13. Diesel Idling Reduction | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Idling Reduction Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Diesel Idling Reduction AgencyCompany Organization: US EPA, NY SERDA Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency...

  14. Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Methods and Emissions Reduction Performance of In-Use Diesel Retrofit Technologies from the National Clean Diesel Campaign Characterizing Test Methods and Emissions Reduction ...

  15. Economic Analysis of Commercial Idling Reduction Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Economic Analysis of Commercial Idling Reduction Technologies: Which idling reduction ... A Key Enabler of Expanded U.S. Trade and Economic Growth Comparing Emissions Benefits from ...

  16. Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA309 Reviewers Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA309 Reviewers The ...

  17. Plasma-assisted catalytic reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogtlin, G.E.; Merritt, B.T.; Hsiao, M.C.; Wallman, P.H.; Penetrante, B.M.

    1998-01-27

    Non-thermal plasma gas treatment is combined with selective catalytic reduction to enhance NO{sub x} reduction in oxygen-rich vehicle engine exhausts. 8 figs.

  18. Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels as Reductants...

  19. Table3_EntityReductions.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carbon Dioxide Equivalent) Reduction Type 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 ... CONNECTIVITY SOLUTONS MANUFACTURING Inc. Reduction Type 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 ...

  20. Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction Download presentation slides from the June 19,...

  1. Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems...

  2. Impact of tool wear on joint strength in friction stir spot welding of DP 980 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, Michael; Ridges, Chris; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Santella, M. L.; Steel, Russel

    2011-09-14

    Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, using a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re, and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re. The sheet material used for all wear testing was 1.4 mm DP 980. Lap shear testing was used to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. The Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

  3. Analysis of Wear Mechanisms in Low Friction, Nanocomposite AlMgB14-TiB2 Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Bruce A; Harringa, J; Anderegg, A; Russell, A M; Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Higdon, Clifton; Elmoursi, Alaa A

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in coating science and technology offer new opportunities to enhance the energy-efficiency and performance of industrial machinery such as hydraulic fluid pumps and motors. The lubricated friction and wear characteristics of two wear-resistant coatings, diamond-like carbon and a nanocomposite material based on AlMgB{sub 14}-50 vol.% TiB{sub 2}, were compared in pin-on-disk tribotests using Mobil DTE-24{trademark} oil as the lubricant. In each case, the pins were fixed 9.53 mm diameter spheres of AISI 52100 steel, the load was 10 N, and the speed 0.5 m/s in all tests. Average steady-state friction coefficient values of 0.10 and 0.08 were measured for the DLC and nanocomposite, respectively. The coatings and their 52100 steel counterfaces were analyzed after the tests by X-ray photoelectron and Auger spectroscopy for evidence of material transfer or tribo-chemical reactions. The low-friction behavior of the boride nanocomposite coating is due to the formation of lubricative boric acid, B(OH){sub 3}. In contrast, the low-friction behavior of the DLC coating is related to the relatively low dielectric constant of the oil-based lubricant, leading to desorption of surface hydrogen from the coating.

  4. Microstructural characterization in dissimilar friction stir welding between 304 stainless steel and st37 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jafarzadegan, M.; State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding Production Technology, School of Materials Science and Eng., Harbin Institute of Technology, P.O. Box: 150001, Harbin ; Feng, A.H.; Abdollah-zadeh, A.; Saeid, T.; Shen, J.; Assadi, H.

    2012-12-15

    In the present study, 3 mm-thick plates of 304 stainless steel and st37 steel were welded together by friction stir welding at a welding speed of 50 mm/min and tool rotational speed of 400 and 800 rpm. X-ray diffraction test was carried out to study the phases which might be formed in the welds. Metallographic examinations, and tensile and microhardness tests were used to analyze the microstructure and mechanical properties of the joint. Four different zones were found in the weld area except the base metals. In the stir zone of the 304 stainless steel, a refined grain structure with some features of dynamic recrystallization was evidenced. A thermomechanically-affected zone was characterized on the 304 steel side with features of dynamic recovery. In the other side of the stir zone, the hot deformation of the st37 steel in the austenite region produced small austenite grains and these grains transformed to fine ferrite and pearlite and some products of displacive transformations such as Widmanstatten ferrite and martensite by cooling the material after friction stir welding. The heat-affected zone in the st37 steel side showed partially and fully refined microstructures like fusion welding processes. The recrystallization in the 304 steel and the transformations in the st37 steel enhanced the hardness of the weld area and therefore, improved the tensile properties of the joint. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW produced sound welds between st37 low carbon steel and 304 stainless steel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SZ of the st37 steel contained some products of allotropic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The material in the SZ of the 304 steel showed features of dynamic recrystallization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The finer microstructure in the SZ increased the hardness and tensile strength.

  5. MODELING OF HIGH SPEED FRICTION STIR SPOT WELDING USING A LAGRANGIAN FINITE ELEMENT APPROACH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, Michael; Karki, U.; Woodward, C.; Hovanski, Yuri

    2013-09-03

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining steels of very high strength, while also being very flexible in terms of controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding (RSW) if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low so that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 11-14 kN. Therefore, in the current work tool speeds of 3000 rpm and higher were employed, in order to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. The FSSW process was modeled using a finite element approach with the Forge software package. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to model the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate [3]. The modeling approach can be described as two-dimensional, axisymmetric, but with an aspect of three dimensions in terms of thermal boundary conditions. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field which was two dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed using a virtual rotational velocity component from the tool surface. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to model the evolution of material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures and the movement of the joint interface with reasonable accuracy for the welding of a dual phase 980 steel.

  6. Electrochemical and spectroscopic evidence on the one-electron reduction of U(VI) to U(V) on magnetite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Ke; Ilton, Eugene S.; Antonio, Mark R.; Li, Zhongrui; Cook, Peter J.; Becker, Udo

    2015-05-19

    Reduction of U(VI) to U(IV) on mineral surfaces has been considered as a one-step two electron process. However, stabilized U(V), with no evidence of U(IV), found in recent studies indicates U(VI) can undergo a one electron reduction to U(V) without further progression to U(IV). We investigated the mechanisms of uranium reduction by reducing U(VI) electrochemically on a magnetite electrode at pH 3.4 . The one electron reduction of U(VI) was first confirmed using the cyclic voltammetry method. Formation of nano-size uranium precipitates on the surface of magnetite at reducing potentials and dissolution of the solids at oxidizing potentials were observed by in situ electrochemical AFM. XPS analysis of the magnetite electrodes polarized in uranium solutions at voltages from 0.1 ~ 0.9 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) showed the presence of only U(V) and U(VI). The highest amount of U(V) relative to U(VI) was prepared at 0.7 V, where the longest average UOaxial distance of 2.05 0.01 was evident in the same sample revealed by EXAFS analysis. The results demonstrate that the electrochemical reduction of U(VI) on magnetite only yields U(V), even at a potential of 0.9 V, which favors the one-electron reduction mechanism. U(V) did not disproportionate but stabilized on magnetite through precipitation of mixed-valence state U(VI)/U(V) solids.

  7. Global Threat Reduction Initiative | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    An overview of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative, U.S.-Origin Nuclear Fuel Removals.

  8. Idling Reduction for Personal Vehicles

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    - Idling Reduction for Personal Vehicles Idling your vehicle-running your engine when you're not driving it-truly gets you nowhere. Idling reduces your vehicle's fuel economy, costs you money, and creates pollution. Idling for more than 10 seconds uses more fuel and produces more emissions that contribute to smog and climate change than stopping and restarting your engine does. Researchers estimate that idling from heavy-duty and light- duty vehicles combined wastes about 6 billion gallons of

  9. The reduction of packaging waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raney, E.A.; Hogan, J.J.; McCollom, M.L.; Meyer, R.J.

    1994-04-01

    Nationwide, packaging waste comprises approximately one-third of the waste disposed in sanitary landfills. the US Department of Energy (DOE) generated close to 90,000 metric tons of sanitary waste. With roughly one-third of that being packaging waste, approximately 30,000 metric tons are generated per year. The purpose of the Reduction of Packaging Waste project was to investigate opportunities to reduce this packaging waste through source reduction and recycling. The project was divided into three areas: procurement, onsite packaging and distribution, and recycling. Waste minimization opportunities were identified and investigated within each area, several of which were chosen for further study and small-scale testing at the Hanford Site. Test results, were compiled into five ``how-to`` recipes for implementation at other sites. The subject of the recipes are as follows: (1) Vendor Participation Program; (2) Reusable Containers System; (3) Shrink-wrap System -- Plastic and Corrugated Cardboard Waste Reduction; (4) Cardboard Recycling ; and (5) Wood Recycling.

  10. INFLUENCE OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC ORGANIC LIGANDS ON THE STABILITY AND MOBILITY OF REDUCED TC(IV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathalie A. Wall; Baohua Gu

    2012-12-20

    The primary objectives were (1) to quantify the interactions of organic ligands with Tc(IV) through the generation of thermodynamic (complexation) and kinetic parameters needed to assess and predict the mobility of reduced Tc(IV) at DOE contaminated sites; and (2) to determine the impact of organic ligands on the mobility and fate of reduced Tc(IV) under field geochemical conditions.

  11. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-11: Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery - EOR thermal processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venezuela

    2000-04-06

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Tenth Amendment anti Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Energy Agreement. This report is presented in sections (for each of the six Tasks) and each section contains one or more reports that were prepared to describe the results of the effort under each of the Tasks. A statement of each Task, taken from the Agreement Between Project Managers, is presented on the first page of each section. The Tasks are numbered 68 through 73. The first through tenth report on research performed under Annex IV Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report Number IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, IV-8, IV-9, IV-10 contain the results of the first 67 Tasks. These reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, December 1989, October 1991, February 1993, March 1995, and December 1997, respectively.

  12. Water Use Reduction Case Studies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facilities Water Use Reduction Water Use Reduction Case Studies Water Use Reduction Case Studies These case studies offer examples of water use reduction projects implemented...

  13. The reduction of Np(VI) and Pu(VI) by organic chelating agents.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, D.T.; Aase, S.B.; Banaszak, J.E.

    1998-03-19

    The reduction of NpO{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} by oxalate. citrate, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) was investigated in low ionic strength media and brines. This was done to help establish the stability of the An(VI) oxidation state in the presence of organic complexants. The stability of the An(VI) oxidation state depended on the pH and relative strength of the various oxidation state-specific complexes. At low ionic strength and pH 6, NpO{sub 2}O{sup 2+} was rapidly reduced to form NpO{sub 2}{sup +} organic complexes. At longer times, Np(IV) organic complexes were observed in the presence of citrate. PuO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was predominantly reduced to Pu{sup 4+}, resulting in the formation of organic complexes or polymeric/hydrolytic precipitates. The relative rates of reduction to the An(V) complex were EDTA > citrate > oxalate. Subsequent reduction to An(IV) complexes, however, occurred in the following order: citrate > EDTA > oxalate because of the stability of the An(V)-EDTA complex. The presence of organic complexants led to the rapid reduction of NpO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and PuO{sub 2}P{sup 2+} in G-seep brine at pHs 5 and 7. At pHs 8 and 10 in ERDA-6 brine, carbonate and hydrolytic complexes predominated and slowed down or prevented the reduction of An(VI) by the organics present.

  14. Technical Session IV Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Meetings BES Home 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Technical Session IV Talks Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Future Light Sources (Ben-Zvi) .pdf file (6.2MB...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  16. NAC 445B.352 et seq - Air Pollution Control: Class IV Operating...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    52 et seq - Air Pollution Control: Class IV Operating Permits Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: NAC 445B.352...

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - Roberts, IV and Stewardship (SSAB April 2010).ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Independent Verification and Independent Verification and Stewardship April 29, 2010 Sarah Roberts, CHP Acting Program Director, ORISE IEAV Benefits of IV "IV is an important quality assurance step that ensures cleanup goals have been achieved" (DOE Lessons Learned from Independent have been achieved (DOE Lessons Learned from Independent Verification Activities, July 2008) * Offers a cost-effective way to provide assurance that the site was successfully remediated to the risk-based

  18. HEAT INPUT AND POST WELD HEAT TREATMENT EFFECTS ON REDUCED-ACTIVATION FERRITIC/MARTENSITIC STEEL FRICTION STIR WELDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Wei; Chen, Gaoqiang; Chen, Jian; Yu, Xinghua; Frederick, David Alan; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels are an important class of structural materials for fusion reactor internals developed in recent years because of their improved irradiation resistance. However, they can suffer from welding induced property degradations. In this paper, a solid phase joining technology friction stir welding (FSW) was adopted to join a RAFM steel Eurofer 97 and different FSW parameters/heat input were chosen to produce welds. FSW response parameters, joint microstructures and microhardness were investigated to reveal relationships among welding heat input, weld structure characterization and mechanical properties. In general, FSW heat input results in high hardness inside the stir zone mostly due to a martensitic transformation. It is possible to produce friction stir welds similar to but not with exactly the same base metal hardness when using low power input because of other hardening mechanisms. Further, post weld heat treatment (PWHT) is a very effective way to reduce FSW stir zone hardness values.

  19. Characterization of Residual Stress as a Function of Friction Stir Welding Parameters in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steel MA956

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brewer, Luke N.; Bennett, Martin S.; Baker, B. W.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kolbus, Lindsay M.

    2015-09-08

    This article characterizes the residual stresses generated by friction stir welding of oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA956 over a series of welding conditions. A plate of MA956 steel was friction stir welded at three conditions: 500 rpm/25 millimeters per minute (mmpm), 400 rpm/50 mmpm and 400 rpm/100 mmpm. The residual stresses across these welds were measured using both x-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Longitudinal residual stresses up to eighty percent of the yield strength were observed for the 400 rpm/100 mmpm condition. Increasing the traverse rate while holding the rotational speed fixed increased the residual stress levels in the stir zone and at the stir zone-thermomechanically affected zone interface. The stress profiles displayed the characteristic M shape, and the asymmetry between advancing and retreating stress peaks was limited, occurring mainly on the root side of the weld. The large magnitude of the stresses was maintained throughout the thickness of the plates.

  20. Growth kinetics of AlFe intermetallic compounds during annealing treatment of friction stir lap welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Movahedi, M., E-mail: m_movahedi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kokabi, A.H., E-mail: kokabi@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seyed Reihani, S.M., E-mail: reihani@sharif.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9466, Azadi Ave., Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Najafi, H., E-mail: hossein.najafi@epfl.ch [Institute of Condensed Matter Physics (ICMP), EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Farzadfar, S.A., E-mail: seyed-amir.farzadfar@mail.mcgill.ca [McGill University, Department of Materials Engineering, Montreal, QC H3A 2B2 (Canada); Cheng, W.J., E-mail: d9603505@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, C.J., E-mail: cjwang@mail.ntust.edu.tw [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we explored the growth kinetics of the AlFe intermetallic (IM) layer at the joint interface of the St-12/Al-5083 friction stir lap welds during post-weld annealing treatment at 350, 400 and 450 C for 30 to 180 min. Optical microscope (OM), field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEG-SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) were employed to investigate the structure of the weld zone. The thickness and composition of the IM layers were evaluated using image analysis system and electron back-scatter diffraction (EBSD), respectively. Moreover, kernel average misorientation (KAM) analysis was performed to evaluate the level of stored energy in the as-welded state. The results showed that the growth kinetics of the IM layer was not governed by a parabolic diffusion law. Presence of the IM compounds as well as high stored energy near the joint interface of the as-welded sample was recognized to be the origin of the observed deviation from the parabolic diffusion law. - Highlights: This work provided a new insight into growth kinetics of AlFe IM thickness. The growth kinetics of IM layer was not governed by a parabolic diffusion law. IM near the joint interface was the origin of deviation from the parabolic law. High stored energy at joint interface was origin of deviation from parabolic law.

  1. Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

    2012-04-16

    Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

  2. Joint strength in high speed friction stir spot welded DP 980 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saunders, Nathan; Miles, Michael; Hartman, Trent; Hovanski, Yuri; Hong, Sung Tae; Steel, Russell

    2014-05-01

    High speed friction stir spot welding was applied to 1.2 mm thick DP 980 steel sheets under different welding conditions, using PCBN tools. The range of vertical feed rates used during welding was 2.5 mm 102 mm per minute, while the range of spindle speeds was 2500 6000 rpm. Extended testing was carried out for five different sets of welding conditions, until tool failure. These welding conditions resulted in vertical welding loads of 3.6 8.2 kN and lap shear tension failure loads of 8.9 11.1 kN. PCBN tools were shown, in the best case, to provide lap shear tension fracture loads at or above 9 kN for 900 spot welds, after which tool failure caused a rapid drop in joint strength. Joint strength was shown to be strongly correlated to bond area, which was measured from weld cross sections. Failure modes of the tested joints were a function of bond area and softening that occurred in the heat-affected zone.

  3. Joining aluminum to titanium alloy by friction stir lap welding with cutting pin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Yanni [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Li, Jinglong, E-mail: lijinglg@nwpu.edu.cn [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)] [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Xiong, Jiangtao [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China); Huang, Fu; Zhang, Fusheng; Raza, Syed Hamid [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)] [Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Friction Welding Technologies, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi'an 710072 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Aluminum 1060 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V plates were lap joined by friction stir welding. A cutting pin of rotary burr made of tungsten carbide was employed. The microstructures of the joining interface were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Joint strength was evaluated by a tensile shear test. During the welding process, the surface layer of the titanium plate was cut off by the pin, and intensively mixed with aluminum situated on the titanium plate. The microstructures analysis showed that a visible swirl-like mixed region existed at the interface. In this region, the Al metal, Ti metal and the mixed layer of them were all presented. The ultimate tensile shear strength of joint reached 100% of 1060Al that underwent thermal cycle provided by the shoulder. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FSW with cutting pin was successfully employed to form Al/Ti lap joint. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Swirl-like structures formed due to mechanical mixing were found at the interface. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-strength joints fractured at Al suffered thermal cycle were produced.

  4. Wear testing of friction stir spot welding tools for joining of DP 980 Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridges, Chris; Miles, Michael; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Steel, Russell

    2011-06-06

    Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Several tooling materials have been evaluated in prior studies, including silicon nitride and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN). Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, where a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) was used in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re (designated as Q60), and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re (designated at Q70). The sheet material used for all wear testing was DP 980. Tool profiles were measured periodically during the testing process in order to show the progression of wear as a function of the number of spots produced. Lap shear testing was done each time a tool profile was taken in order to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. For the welding parameters chosen for this study the Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

  5. Microstructure characterization of the stir zone of submerged friction stir processed aluminum alloy 2219

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Xiuli, E-mail: feng.97@osu.edu [Welding Engineering Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States); State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Liu, Huijie, E-mail: liuhj@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Welding and Joining, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Lippold, John C., E-mail: lippold.1@osu.edu [Welding Engineering Program, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Aluminum alloy 2219-T6 was friction stir processed using a novel submerged processing technique to facilitate cooling. Processing was conducted at a constant tool traverse speed of 200 mm/min and spindle rotation speeds in the range from 600 to 800 rpm. The microstructural characteristics of the base metal and processed zone, including grain structure and precipitation behavior, were studied using optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Microhardness maps were constructed on polished cross sections of as-processed samples. The effect of tool rotation speed on the microstructure and hardness of the stir zone was investigated. The average grain size of the stir zone was much smaller than that of the base metal, but the hardness was also lower due to the formation of equilibrium ? precipitates from the base metal ?? precipitates. Stir zone hardness was found to decrease with increasing rotation speed (heat input). The effect of processing conditions on strength (hardness) was rationalized based on the competition between grain refinement strengthening and softening due to precipitate overaging. - Highlights: SZ grain size (? 1 ?m) is reduced by over one order of magnitude relative to the BM. Hardness in the SZ is lower than that of the precipitation strengthened BM. Metastable ?? in the base metal transforms to equilibrium ? in the stir zone. Softening in the SZ results from a decrease of precipitation strengthening.

  6. Joining of 14YWT and F82H by Friction Stir Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoelzer, David T [ORNL] [ORNL; Unocic, Kinga A [ORNL] [ORNL; Sokolov, Mikhail A [ORNL] [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of using friction stir welding (FSW) to join specimens of the advanced oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) 14YWT nanostructured ferritic alloy (NFA) and a plate of F82H tempered martensitic steel (TMS) was investigated. The sample used in the FSW experiment consisted of spot welding four specimens 14YWT prepared from prior tested dual notch fracture toughness bend bars in a corresponding slot that was machined in the F82H plate. The FSW run was successfully performed on the sample using a polycrystalline boron nitride tool (PCBN) that resulted in joints showing good bonding between butt joints of 14YWT specimens and 14YWT specimens and F82H plate. The joints were characterized by light microscopy and SEM analysis and were observed to be relatively narrow in width. The ultra-fine grain size associated with 14YWT increased by a factor of up to 3 while that of F82H was refined by a considerable amount in the thermomechanically affected zones (TMAZ) due to FSW. In addition, porosity was observed in the TMAZ of 14YWT on the advancing side of the FSW joint and at the interface between F82H and 14YWT. Vickers hardness (VH) measurements showed a decrease of ~120 VH from ~500 VH (~20% decrease) for 14YWT and an increase of ~220 VH from ~220 VH (~100% increase) for F82H in the FSW zones. Further refinements in the FSW process will be required to minimize defects including porosity.

  7. EPA Source Reduction Assistance Grant Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is accepting applications for the Source Reduction Assistance Grant Program to support pollution prevention/source reduction and/or resource conservation projects that reduce or eliminate pollution at the source.

  8. Patent: Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride | DOEpatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride Citation Details Title: Microbial reductive dehalogenation of vinyl chloride

  9. Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NEPA/309 Reviewers | Department of Energy Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers The environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) provides a valuable opportunity for Federal agency NEPA/309 reviewers to incorporate pollution prevention and environmental impact reduction into actions (or projects). This Environmental

  10. Greenhouse Gas Reductions: SF6

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Anderson, Diana

    2013-04-19

    Argonne National Laboratory is leading the way in greenhouse gas reductions, particularly with the recapture and recycling of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). SF6 is a gas used in industry as an anti-arcing agent. It is an extremely potent greenhouse gas ? one pound of SF6 is equivalent to 12 tons of carbon dioxide. While the U.S. does not currently regulate SF6 emissions, Argonne is proactively and voluntarily recovering and recycling to reduce SF6 emissions. Argonne saves over 16,000 tons of SF6 from being emitted into the atmosphere each year, and by recycling the gas rather than purchasing it new, we save taxpayers over $208,000 each year.

  11. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-01-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  12. Electrolyte treatment for aluminum reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Brooks, Richard J. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Seattle, WA); Juric, Drago D. (Bulleen, AU)

    2002-01-01

    A method of treating an electrolyte for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum employing an anode and a cathode, the alumina dissolved in the electrolyte, the treating improving wetting of the cathode with molten aluminum during electrolysis. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten electrolyte comprised of ALF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF and LiF, and treating the electrolyte by providing therein 0.004 to 0.2 wt. % of a transition metal or transition metal compound for improved wettability of the cathode with molten aluminum during subsequent electrolysis to reduce alumina to aluminum.

  13. Continuous reduction of uranium tetrafluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMint, A.L.; Maxey, A.W.

    1993-10-21

    Operation of a pilot-scale system for continuous metallothermic reduction of uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4} or green salt) has been initiated. This activity is in support of the development of a cost- effective process to produce uranium-iron (U-Fe) alloy feed for the Uranium-Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (U-AVLIS) program. To date, five runs have been made to reduce green salt (UF{sub 4}) with magnesium. During this quarter, three runs were made to perfect the feeding system, examine feed rates, and determine the need for a crust breaker/stirrer. No material was drawn off in any of the runs; both product metal and by-product salt were allowed to accumulate in the reactor.

  14. LIQUID PHASE FISCHER-TROPSCH (III & IV) DEMONSTRATION IN THE LAPORTE ALTERNATIVE FUELS DEVELOPMENT UNIT. Final Topical Report. Volume I/II: Main Report. Task 1: Engineering Modifications (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration) and Task 2: AFDU Shakedown, Operations, Deactivation (Shut-Down) and Disposal (Fischer-Tropsch III & IV Demonstration).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1999-06-01

    Slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch technology was successfully demonstrated in DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) at LaPorte, Texas. Earlier work at LaPorte, with iron catalysts in 1992 and 1994, had established proof-of-concept status for the slurry phase process. The third campaign (Fischer-Tropsch III), in 1996, aimed at aggressively extending the operability of the slurry reactor using a proprietary cobalt catalyst. Due to an irreversible plugging of catalyst-wax separation filters as a result of unexpected catalyst fines generation, the operations had to be terminated after seven days on-stream. Following an extensive post-run investigation by the participants, the campaign was successfully completed in March-April 1998, with an improved proprietary cobalt catalyst. These runs were sponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Air Products & Chemicals, Inc., and Shell Synthetic Fuels, Inc. (SSFI). A productivity of approximately 140 grams (gm) of hydrocarbons (HC)/ hour (hr)-liter (lit) of expanded slurry volume was achieved at reasonable system stability during the second trial (Fischer-Tropsch IV). The productivity ranged from 110-140 at various conditions during the 18 days of operations. The catalyst/wax filters performed well throughout the demonstration, producing a clean wax product. For the most part, only one of the four filter housings was needed for catalyst/wax filtration. The filter flux appeared to exceed the design flux. A combination of use of a stronger catalyst and some innovative filtration techniques were responsible for this success. There was no sign of catalyst particle attrition and very little erosion of the slurry pump was observed, in contrast to the Fischer-Tropsch III operations. The reactor operated hydrodynamically stable with uniform temperature profile and gas hold-ups. Nuclear density and differential pressure measurements indicated somewhat higher than expected gas hold-up (45 - 50 vol%) during Fischer-Tropsch IV operations. The high gas hold-up was confirmed by a dynamic gas disengagement test conducted at the end of the run. Heat transfer in the reactor was better than expected. Heat, mass and elemental balance calculations indicated excellent closure. After the initial learning curve with system dynamics, the plant was restarted very quickly (24 hours and 17 hours) following two plant trips. This demonstrates the ease and flexibility of the slurry technology. In-situ reduction of catalyst pre-cursor was completed successfully during F-T IV operations. Water measurements proved to be inaccurate due to wax/oil contamination of the analytical system. However, the reduction appeared to proceed well as close to expected syngas conversion was obtained at the beginning of the run. The selectivity to wax was lower than expected, with higher methane selectivity. Returning to the baseline condition indicated a productivity decline from 135-140 to 125-130 gm HC/hr-lit. of reactor volume in two weeks of operation. This may be a result of some catalyst loss from the reactor as well as initial catalyst deactivation. Significant quantities of product and samples were collected for further processing and analysis by the participants. Gas, liquid and solid phase mixing were studied as planned at two operating conditions using radioactive materials. A large amount of data were collected by ICI Tracerco using 43 detectors around the reactor. The data are being analyzed by Washington University as part of the Hydrodynamic Program with DOE.

  15. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  16. Microstructural Examination to Aid in Understanding Friction Bonding Fabrication Technique for Monolithic Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen L. Shropshire

    2008-04-01

    Monolithic nuclear fuel is currently being developed for use in research reactors, and friction bonding (FB) is a technique being developed to help in this fuel’s fabrication. Since both FB and monolithic fuel are new concepts, research is needed to understand the impact of varying FB fabrication parameters on fuel plate characteristics. This thesis research provides insight into the FB process and its application to the monolithic fuel design by recognizing and understanding the microstructural effects of varying fabrication parameters (a) FB tool load, and (b) FB tool face alloy. These two fabrication parameters help drive material temperature during fabrication, and thus the material properties, bond strength, and possible formation of interface reaction layers. This study analyzed temperatures and tool loads measured during those FB processes and examined microstructural characteristics of materials and bonds in samples taken from the resulting fuel plates. This study shows that higher tool load increases aluminum plasticization and forging during FB, and that the tool face alloy helps determine the tool’s heat extraction efficacy. The study concludes that successful aluminum bonds can be attained in fuel plates using a wide range of FB tool loads. The range of tool loads yielding successful uranium-aluminum bonding was not established, but it was demonstrated that such bonding can be attained with FB tool load of 48,900 N (11,000 lbf) when using a FB tool faced with a tungsten alloy. This tool successfully performed FB, and with better results than tools faced with other materials. Results of this study correlate well with results reported for similar aluminum bonding techniques. This study’s results also provide support and validation for other nuclear fuel development studies and conclusions. Recommendations are offered for further research.

  17. A new friction factor correlation for laminar, single-phase flows through rock fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazridoust, K. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY); Ahmadi, G. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY); Smith, D.H.

    2006-09-30

    Single-phase flow through fractured media occurs in various situations, such as transport of dissolved contaminants through geological strata, sequestration of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs, and in primary oil recovery. In the present study, fluid flows through a rock fracture were simulated. The fracture geometry was obtained from the CT scans of a rock fracture produced by the Brazilian method in a sandstone sample. A post-processing code using a CAD package was developed and used to generate the three-dimensional fracture from the CT scan data. Several sections along the fracture were considered and the GambitTM code was used to generate unstructured grids for flow simulations. FLUENTTM was used to analyze the flow conditions through the fracture section for different flow rates. Because of the small aperture of the fractures, the gravitational effects could be neglected. It was confirmed that the pressure drop was dominated by the smallest aperture passages of the fracture. The accuracy of parallel plate models for estimating the pressure drops through fractures was studied. It was shown that the parallel plate flow model with the use of an appropriate effective fracture aperture and inclusion of the tortuosity factor could provide reasonable estimates for pressure drops in the fracture. On the basis of the CFD simulation data, a new expression for the friction factor for flows through fractures was developed. The new model predictions were compared with the simulation results and favorable agreement was found. It was shown that when the length of the fracture and the mean and standard deviation of the fracture are known, the pressure loss as a function of the flow rate could be estimated. These findings may prove useful for design of lab experiments, computational studied of flows through real rock fractures, or inclusions in simulators for large-scale flows in highly fractured rocks.

  18. Mutual passivation of group IV donors and isovalent nitrogen in diluted GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x} alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, K.M.; Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Shan, W.; Beeman, J.; Mars, D.E.; Chamberlin, D.R.; Scarpulla, M.A.; Dubon, O.D.; Ridgway, M.C.; Geisz, J.F.

    2003-07-23

    We demonstrate the mutual passivation of electrically active group IV donors and isovalent N atoms in the GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x} alloy system. This phenomenon occurs through the formation of a donor-nitrogen bond in the nearest neighbor IV{sub Ga}-N{sub As} pairs. In Si doped GaInN{sub 0.017}As{sub 0.983} the electron concentration starts to decrease rapidly at an annealing temperature of 700 C from {approx} 3 x 10{sup 19}cm{sup -3} in the as-grown state to less than 10{sup 16}cm{sup -3} after an annealing at 900 C for 10 s. At the same time annealing of this sample at 950 C increases the gap by about 35 meV, corresponding to a reduction of the concentration of the active N atoms by an amount very close to the total Si concentration. We also show that the formation of Si{sub Ga}-N{sub As} pairs is controlled by the diffusion of Si via Ga vacancies to the nearest N{sub As} site. The general nature of this mutual passivation effect is confirmed by our study of Ge doped GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x} layers formed by N and Ge co-implantation in GaAs followed by pulsed laser melting.

  19. NOx reduction methods and apparatuses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkyn, Russell G.; Barlow, Stephan E.; Balmer, M. Lou; Maupin, Gary D.

    2004-10-26

    A NO.sub.x reduction method includes treating a first gas containing NO.sub.x, producing a second gas containing NO.sub.2, reducing a portion of the NO.sub.2 in the second gas to N.sub.2, and producing a third gas containing less NO.sub.x than the first gas, substantially all of the third gas NO.sub.x being NO. The method also includes treating the third gas, producing a fourth gas containing NO.sub.2, reducing a portion of the NO.sub.2 in the fourth gas to N.sub.2, and producing a fifth gas containing less NO.sub.x than the third gas, substantially all of the fifth gas NO.sub.x being NO. Treating the first and/or third gas can include treatment with a plasma. Reducing a portion of the NO.sub.2 in the second and/or fourth gas can include reducing with a catalyst. The method can further include controlling energy consumption of the plasmas independent of each other.

  20. PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

    2005-04-01

    The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) and provided information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 2 efforts also included preparation of a draft topical report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region'', which is nearing completion. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The video will be completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in the next quarter. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. The addition of the Canadian province of Alberta to the PCOR Partnership region expanded the decision support system (DSS) geographic information system database. Task 5 screened and qualitatively assessed sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

  1. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-NSA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsAIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-NSA ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-NSA 2005.04.25 - 2006.04.24 Lead Scientist : Jimmy Voyles For data sets, see below. Abstract ARM conducted a special series of radiosonde launches in support of validation studies for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-SGP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsAIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-SGP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-SGP 2005.08.04 - 2006.04.19 Lead Scientist : Jimmy Voyles For data sets, see below. Abstract ARM conducted a special series of radiosonde launches in support of validation studies for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua

  3. ARM - Field Campaign - AIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-TWP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IV and V-TWP ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : AIRS Validation Soundings Phase IV and V-TWP 2005.07.03 - 2006.05.05 Lead Scientist : Jimmy Voyles For data sets, see below. Abstract ARM conducted a special series of radiosonde launches in support of validation studies for the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite (http://www-airs.jpl.nasa.gov). The AIRS

  4. Periodic Trends in Highly Dispersed Groups IV and V Supported Metal Oxide

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Catalysts for Alkene Epoxidation with H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Periodic Trends in Highly Dispersed Groups IV and V Supported Metal Oxide Catalysts for Alkene Epoxidation with H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Periodic Trends in Highly Dispersed Groups IV and V Supported Metal Oxide Catalysts for Alkene Epoxidation with H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] Authors: Thornburg, Nicholas E. ; Thompson, Anthony B. ; Notestein,

  5. EIS-0402: Remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is preparing an EIS for cleanup of Area IV, including the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), as well as the Northern Buffer Zone of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) in eastern Ventura County, California, approximately 29 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. (DOE’s operations bordered the Northern Buffer Zone. DOE is responsible for soil cleanup in Area IV and the Northern Buffer Zone.) In the EIS, DOE will evaluate reasonable alternatives for disposition of radiological facilities and support buildings, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, and disposal of all resulting waste at permitted facilities.

  6. CONSTRUCTION OF WEB-ACCESSIBLE MATERIALS HANDBOOK FORGENERATION IV NUCLEAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju

    2005-01-01

    The development of a web-accessible materials handbook in support of the materials selection and structural design for the Generation IV nuclear reactors is being planned. Background of the reactor program is briefly introduced. Evolution of materials handbooks for nuclear reactors over years is reviewed in light of the trends brought forth by the rapid advancement in information technologies. The framework, major features, contents, and construction considerations of the web-accessible Gen IV Materials Handbook are discussed. Potential further developments and applications of the handbook are also elucidated.

  7. Sensitivities of I-V Parameters in C-Si PV Modules of Hygrothermal Stress |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Sensitivities of I-V Parameters in C-Si PV Modules of Hygrothermal Stress Sensitivities of I-V Parameters in C-Si PV Modules of Hygrothermal Stress Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado PDF icon pvmrw13_ps4_espec_suzuki.pdf More Documents & Publications The Acceleration of Degradation by HAST and Air-HAST in c-Si PV Modules Agenda for the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013, Golden, Colorado Thermal

  8. TURBULENCE-INDUCED RELATIVE VELOCITY OF DUST PARTICLES. IV. THE COLLISION KERNEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Liubin; Padoan, Paolo E-mail: ppadoan@icc.ub.edu

    2014-12-20

    Motivated by its importance for modeling dust particle growth in protoplanetary disks, we study turbulence-induced collision statistics of inertial particles as a function of the particle friction time, ?{sub p}. We show that turbulent clustering significantly enhances the collision rate for particles of similar sizes with ?{sub p} corresponding to the inertial range of the flow. If the friction time, ?{sub p,} {sub h}, of the larger particle is in the inertial range, the collision kernel per unit cross section increases with increasing friction time, ?{sub p,} {sub l}, of the smaller particle and reaches the maximum at ?{sub p,} {sub l} = ?{sub p,} {sub h}, where the clustering effect peaks. This feature is not captured by the commonly used kernel formula, which neglects the effect of clustering. We argue that turbulent clustering helps alleviate the bouncing barrier problem for planetesimal formation. We also investigate the collision velocity statistics using a collision-rate weighting factor to account for higher collision frequency for particle pairs with larger relative velocity. For ?{sub p,} {sub h} in the inertial range, the rms relative velocity with collision-rate weighting is found to be invariant with ?{sub p,} {sub l} and scales with ?{sub p,} {sub h} roughly as ? ?{sub p,h}{sup 1/2}. The weighting factor favors collisions with larger relative velocity, and including it leads to more destructive and less sticking collisions. We compare two collision kernel formulations based on spherical and cylindrical geometries. The two formulations give consistent results for the collision rate and the collision-rate weighted statistics, except that the spherical formulation predicts more head-on collisions than the cylindrical formulation.

  9. Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Stability-Low-Cost Supports | Department of Energy Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on High-Stability-Low-Cost Supports Contiguous Platinum Monolayer Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts on High-Stability-Low-Cost Supports Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 - October 1, 2009 PDF icon adzic_bnl_kickoff.pdf More Documents & Publications Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

  10. LAB-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF PLUTONIUM PURIFICATION BY ANION EXCHANGE, PLUTONIUM (IV) OXALATE PRECIPITATION, AND CALCINATION TO PLUTONIUM OXIDE TO SUPPORT THE MOX FEED MISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowder, M.; Pierce, R.

    2012-08-22

    H-Canyon and HB-Line are tasked with the production of PuO{sub 2} from a feed of plutonium metal. The PuO{sub 2} will provide feed material for the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility. After dissolution of the Pu metal in H-Canyon, the solution will be transferred to HB-Line for purification by anion exchange. Subsequent unit operations include Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination to form PuO{sub 2}. This report details the results from SRNL anion exchange, precipitation, filtration, calcination, and characterization tests, as requested by HB-Line1 and described in the task plan. This study involved an 80-g batch of Pu and employed test conditions prototypical of HB-Line conditions, wherever feasible. In addition, this study integrated lessons learned from earlier anion exchange and precipitation and calcination studies. H-Area Engineering selected direct strike Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation to produce a more dense PuO{sub 2} product than expected from Pu(III) oxalate precipitation. One benefit of the Pu(IV) approach is that it eliminates the need for reduction by ascorbic acid. The proposed HB-Line precipitation process involves a digestion time of 5 minutes after the time (44 min) required for oxalic acid addition. These were the conditions during HB-line production of neptunium oxide (NpO{sub 2}). In addition, a series of small Pu(IV) oxalate precipitation tests with different digestion times were conducted to better understand the effect of digestion time on particle size, filtration efficiency and other factors. To test the recommended process conditions, researchers performed two nearly-identical larger-scale precipitation and calcination tests. The calcined batches of PuO{sub 2} were characterized for density, specific surface area (SSA), particle size, moisture content, and impurities. Because the 3013 Standard requires that the calcination (or stabilization) process eliminate organics, characterization of PuO{sub 2} batches monitored the presence of oxalate by thermogravimetric analysis-mass spectrometry (TGA-MS). To use the TGA-MS for carbon or oxalate content, some method development will be required. However, the TGA-MS is already used for moisture measurements. Therefore, SRNL initiated method development for the TGA-MS to allow quantification of oxalate or total carbon. That work continues at this time and is not yet ready for use in this study. However, the collected test data can be reviewed later as those analysis tools are available.

  11. The value of numerical modeling in understanding the complete load/deformation behavior of cohesive-frictional materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potyondy, D.O.; Fairhurst, C.E.

    1999-07-01

    The post-peak load/deformation behavior of cohesive-frictional materials is an integral part of the overall response of a specimen to compressive loading. A more comprehensive understanding of the pre- and post-peak behavior is necessary. Recent developments in numerical modeling that allow study of the overall response of a synthetic material containing discrete heterogeneities and discontinuities both at the micro (particle) scale and at the larger scale of jointed rock masses can greatly aid the interpretation and application of laboratory test results on these materials.

  12. PROCESSING, MICROSTRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTY CORRELATION IN Al-B4C SURFACE COMPOSITE PRODUCED VIA FRICTION STIR PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komarasamy, Mageshwari; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Baumann, John A.; Grant, Glenn J.; Hovanski, Yuri

    2013-01-29

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was employed to prepare surface composites (SC) composed of B4C particles in 5024 Al matrix. The processing parameters, such as hole pattern and geometry,and the number of FSP passes, were optimized to obtain uniform powder distribution. The micrographs revealed a homogeneous distribution of the particles with good interfacial bonding. The hardness of the composite was uniform across the processed region which again indicates the uniformity of powder distribution. The modulus of the surface composite was measured using strain gage and showed a significant improvement. This improvement in modulus lies in the load sharing capability from the soft matrix to the hard particles.

  13. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Catalyst Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Feng; Kim, Do Heui; Luo, Jinyong; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Currier, Neal; Kamasamudram, Krishna; Kumar, Ashok; Li, Junhui; Stafford, Randy; Yezerets, Aleksey; Castagnola, Mario; Chen, Hai Ying; Hess, Howard ..

    2012-12-31

    Two primary NOx after-treatment technologies have been recognized as the most promising approaches for meeting stringent NOx emission standards for diesel vehicles within the Environmental Protection Agencys (EPAs) 2007/2010 mandated limits, NOx Storage Reduction (NSR) and NH3 selective catalytic reduction (SCR); both are, in fact being commercialized for this application. However, in looking forward to 2015 and beyond with expected more stringent regulations, the continued viability of the NSR technology for controlling NOx emissions from lean-burn engines such as diesels will require at least two specific, significant and inter-related improvements. First, it is important to reduce system costs by, for example, minimizing the precious metal content while maintaining, even improving, performance and long-term stability. A second critical need for future NSR systems, as well as for NH3 SCR, will be significantly improved higher and lower temperature performance and stability. Furthermore, these critically needed improvements will contribute significantly to minimizing the impacts to fuel economy of incorporating these after-treatment technologies on lean-burn vehicles. To meet these objectives will require, at a minimum an improved scientific understanding of the following things: i) the various roles for the precious and coinage metals used in these catalysts; ii) the mechanisms for these various roles; iii) the effects of high temperatures on the active metal performance in their various roles; iv) mechanisms for higher temperature NOx storage performance for modified and/or alternative storage materials; v) the interactions between the precious metals and the storage materials in both optimum NOx storage performance and long term stability; vi) the sulfur adsorption and regeneration mechanisms for NOx reduction materials; vii) materials degradation mechanisms in CHA-based NH3 SCR catalysts. The objective of this CRADA project between PNNL and Cummins, Inc. is to develop a fundamental understanding of the above-listed issues. Model catalysts that are based on literature formulations are the focus of the work being carried out at PNNL. In addition, the performance and stability of more realistic high temperature NSR catalysts, supplied by JM, are being studied in order to provide baseline data for the model catalysts that are, again, based on formulations described in the open literature. For this short summary, we will primarily highlight representative results from our recent studies of the stability of candidate high temperature NSR materials.

  14. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    36, July 2012 More Documents & Publications Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233...

  15. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Waste Characterization Glovebox Operations, EP-WCRR-WO-DOP-0233 The documents ...

  16. Report: Technical Uncertainty and Risk Reduction

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TECHNICAL UNCERTAINTY AND RISK REDUCTION Background In FY 2007 EMAB was tasked to assess EM's ability to reduce risk and technical uncertainty. Board members explored this topic...

  17. Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report Storage - Challenges and Opportunities Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Pressure Company

  18. National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    http:www.climatetrust.orgapply.html Efficiency Maine Small Business Low ... Clean Diesel Program (including Locomotive Engine Idle Reduction Grant Sub- Program) 3.5 ...

  19. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Ten-Year Program Plan Fiscal Year 2005, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-03-01

    As reflected in the U.S. ''National Energy Policy'', nuclear energy has a strong role to play in satisfying our nation's future energy security and environmental quality needs. The desirable environmental, economic, and sustainability attributes of nuclear energy give it a cornerstone position, not only in the U.S. energy portfolio, but also in the world's future energy portfolio. Accordingly, on September 20, 2002, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced that, ''The United States and nine other countries have agreed to develop six Generation IV nuclear energy concepts''. The Secretary also noted that the systems are expected to ''represent significant advances in economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance, and waste minimization''. The six systems and their broad, worldwide research and development (R&D) needs are described in ''A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'' (hereafter referred to as the Generation IV Roadmap). The first 10 years of required U.S. R&D contributions to achieve the goals described in the Generation IV Roadmap are outlined in this Program Plan.

  20. Definition of the Floating System for Phase IV of OC3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J.

    2010-05-01

    Phase IV of the IEA Annex XXIII Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3) involves the modeling of an offshore floating wind turbine. This report documents the specifications of the floating system, which are needed by the OC3 participants for building aero-hydro-servo-elastic models.

  1. TOTAL SES EJ/EK EN V EN IV EN III

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    EJEK EN V EN IV EN III NN (Engineering) NQ (ProfTechAdmin) NU (TechAdmin Support) ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE IMMEDIATELY 9 11.8% ELIGIBLE TO RETIRE BY 3272014 23 30.3% Males 50 65.8%...

  2. Environmental Effects of Marine Energy Development Around the World. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, L.; Whiting, J.; Geerlofs, S.; Grear, M.; Blake, K.; Coffey, A.; Massaua, M.; Brown-Saracino, J.; Battey, H.

    2013-01-01

    This Annex IV report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment addressing the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines, the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals, and the effects of energy removal on physical systems.

  3. Uranium(IV) Interaction with Aqueous/Solid Interfaces Studied by Nonlinear Optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geiger, Franz

    2015-03-27

    This is the Final Technical Report for "Uranium(IV) Interaction with Aqueous/Solid Interfaces Studied by Nonlinear Optics", by Franz M. Geiger, PI, from Northwestern University, IL, USA, Grant Number SC0004101 and/or DE-PS02-ER09-07.

  4. REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

    2013-09-09

    This is the first of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. This paper examines the circumstances and consequences of the elimination of ? The INF-range Pershing II ballistic missile and Gryphon Ground-Launched Cruise Missile (GLCM), deployed by NATO under a dual-track strategy to counter Soviet intermediate-range missiles while pursuing negotiations to limit or eliminate all of these missiles. ? The Short-Range Attack Missile (SRAM), which was actually a family of missiles including SRAM A, SRAM B (never deployed), and SRAM II and SRAM T, these last two cancelled during an over-budget/behind-schedule development phase as part of the Presidential Nuclear Initiatives of 1991 and 1992. ? The nuclear-armed version of the Tomahawk Land-Attack Cruise Missile (TLAM/N), first limited to shore-based storage by the PNIs, and finally eliminated in deliberations surrounding the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review Report. ? The Missile-X (MX), or Peacekeeper, a heavy MIRVed ICBM, deployed in fixed silos, rather than in an originally proposed mobile mode. Peacekeeper was likely intended as a bargaining chip to facilitate elimination of Russian heavy missiles. The plan failed when START II did not enter into force, and the missiles were eliminated at the end of their intended service life. ? The Small ICBM (SICBM), or Midgetman, a road-mobile, single-warhead missile for which per-unit costs were climbing when it was eliminated under the PNIs. Although there were liabilities associated with each of these systems, there were also unique capabilities; this paper lays out the pros and cons for each. Further, we articulate the capabilities that were eliminated with these systems.

  5. Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, William R; Burchell, Timothy D; Halsey, William; Hayner, George; Katoh, Yutai; Klett, James William; McGreevy, Timothy E; Nanstad, Randy K; Ren, Weiju; Snead, Lance Lewis; Stoller, Roger E; Wilson, Dane F

    2005-12-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

  6. Experimental investigation on heat transfer and frictional characteristics of vertical upward rifled tube in supercritical CFB boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Dong; Pan, Jie; Zhu, Xiaojing; Bi, Qincheng; Chen, Tingkuan; Zhou, Chenn Q.

    2011-02-15

    Water wall design is a key issue for supercritical Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boiler. On account of the good heat transfer performance, rifled tube is applied in the water wall design of a 600 MW supercritical CFB boiler in China. In order to investigate the heat transfer and frictional characteristics of the rifled tube with vertical upward flow, an in-depth experiment was conducted in the range of pressure from 12 to 30 MPa, mass flux from 230 to 1200 kg/(m{sup 2} s), and inner wall heat flux from 130 to 720 kW/m{sup 2}. The wall temperature distribution and pressure drop in the rifled tube were obtained in the experiment. The normal, enhanced and deteriorated heat transfer characteristics were also captured. In this paper, the effects of pressure, inner wall heat flux and mass flux on heat transfer characteristics are analyzed, the heat transfer mechanism and the frictional resistance performance are discussed, and the corresponding empirical correlations are presented. The experimental results show that the rifled tube can effectively prevent the occurrence of departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) and keep the tube wall temperature in a permissible range under the operating condition of supercritical CFB boiler. (author)

  7. Characterization of Residual Stress as a Function of Friction Stir Welding Parameters in Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) Steel MA956

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brewer, Luke N.; Bennett, Martin S.; Baker, B. W.; Payzant, E. Andrew; Kolbus, Lindsay M.

    2015-09-08

    This article characterizes the residual stresses generated by friction stir welding of oxide dispersion strengthened steel MA956 over a series of welding conditions. A plate of MA956 steel was friction stir welded at three conditions: 500 rpm/25 millimeters per minute (mmpm), 400 rpm/50 mmpm and 400 rpm/100 mmpm. The residual stresses across these welds were measured using both x-ray and neutron diffraction techniques. Longitudinal residual stresses up to eighty percent of the yield strength were observed for the 400 rpm/100 mmpm condition. Increasing the traverse rate while holding the rotational speed fixed increased the residual stress levels in the stirmore » zone and at the stir zone-thermomechanically affected zone interface. The stress profiles displayed the characteristic M shape, and the asymmetry between advancing and retreating stress peaks was limited, occurring mainly on the root side of the weld. The large magnitude of the stresses was maintained throughout the thickness of the plates.« less

  8. Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction Technologies Program Utah Clean Cities Transportation Sector Petroleum Reduction ...

  9. Section IV

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Target-atom Inner-shell Vacancy Distributions Created in Collisions With Heavy Ion Projectiles V. Horvat, R.L. Watson and J.M. Blackadar K-shell Ionization by Secondary Electrons...

  10. Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.Y. Sohn

    2008-03-31

    The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

  11. Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

  12. NO{sub x} reduction RACT compliance requires careful technology selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heckler, G.B.

    1996-05-01

    After the Clean Air Act Amendments passed in 1990, Title I (Attainment and Maintenance of Ambient Air Quality Standards) and Title IV (Acid Deposition Control) of the Act required power plants to submit and implement compliance plans for NO{sub x} and volatile organic compounds (VOC) emissions, among other pollutants. This legislation affected PECO Energy Co.`s Eddystone Generating Station, requiring the utility to comply with the Act under reasonably available control technology (RACT) rules established by the state of Pennsylvania. After carefully considering alternatives aligned with the RACT rules for Pennsylvania, PECO adopted a compliance strategy and submitted it to the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PaDEP) for review and approval. Under the case-by-case RACT proposals, the proposed NO{sub x} reduction technology for Units 3 and 4 was to rehabilitate existing OFA ports which had been bricked over. Each of the four corners of these units was originally constructed with an OFA port located in the boiler side walls. Also under the case-by-case RACT proposals, the proposed NO{sub x} reduction technology for the A, B and C auxiliary boilers was to install low-NO{sub x} burners. Under presumptive RACT proposals, PECO proposed low-NO{sub x} burners with close-coupled OFA (CCOFA) and separated OFA (SOFA) as the proposed NO{sub x}-reduction technology for Units 1 and 2. For the combustion turbines PECO proposed to reduce NO{sub x} by limiting the annual capacity factor to 5 percent or less on a 12-month rolling basis. After considering technological and economic feasibility, the utility proposed no VOC reductions because none of the available VOC reduction technologies fell within RACT guidelines.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A METHODOLOGY TO ASSESS PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, R.; Bari, R.; Peterson, P.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Kalenchuk, D.

    2004-10-06

    Enhanced proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR&PP) is one of the technology goals for advanced nuclear concepts, such as Generation IV systems. Under the auspices of the Generation IV International Forum, the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology of the U.S. DOE, the Office of Nonproliferation Policy of the National Nuclear Security Administration, and participating organizations from six other countries are sponsoring an international working group to develop an evaluation methodology for PR&PP. This methodology will permit an objective PR&PP comparison between alternative nuclear systems (e.g., different reactor types or fuel cycles) and support design optimization to enhance robustness against proliferation, theft and sabotage. The paper summarizes the proposed assessment methodology including the assessment framework, measures used to express the PR&PP characteristics of the system, threat definition, system element and target identification, pathway identification and analysis, and estimation of the measures.

  14. Modeling brittle fracture, slip weakening, and variable friction in geomaterials with an embedded strong discontinuity finite element.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regueiro, Richard A.; Borja, R. I.; Foster, C. D.

    2006-10-01

    Localized shear deformation plays an important role in a number of geotechnical and geological processes. Slope failures, the formation and propagation of faults, cracking in concrete dams, and shear fractures in subsiding hydrocarbon reservoirs are examples of important effects of shear localization. Traditional engineering analyses of these phenomena, such as limit equilibrium techniques, make certain assumptions on the shape of the failure surface as well as other simplifications. While these methods may be adequate for the applications for which they were designed, it is difficult to extrapolate the results to more general scenarios. An alternative approach is to use a numerical modeling technique, such as the finite element method, to predict localization. While standard finite elements can model a wide variety of loading situations and geometries quite well, for numerical reasons they have difficulty capturing the softening and anisotropic damage that accompanies localization. By introducing an enhancement to the element in the form of a fracture surface at an arbitrary position and orientation in the element, we can regularize the solution, model the weakening response, and track the relative motion of the surfaces. To properly model the slip along these surfaces, the traction-displacement response must be properly captured. This report focuses on the development of a constitutive model appropriate to localizing geomaterials, and the embedding of this model into the enhanced finite element framework. This modeling covers two distinct phases. The first, usually brief, phase is the weakening response as the material transitions from intact continuum to a body with a cohesionless fractured surface. Once the cohesion has been eliminated, the response along the surface is completely frictional. We have focused on a rate- and state-dependent frictional model that captures stable and unstable slip along the surface. This model is embedded numerically into the element using a generalized trapezoidal formulation. While the focus is on the constitutive model of interest, the framework is also developed for a general surface response. This report summarizes the major research and development accomplishments for the LDRD project titled 'Cohesive Zone Modeling of Failure in Geomaterials: Formulation and Implementation of a Strong Discontinuity Model Incorporating the Effect of Slip Speed on Frictional Resistance'. This project supported a strategic partnership between Sandia National Laboratories and Stanford University by providing funding for the lead author, Craig Foster, during his doctoral research.

  15. C IV and C III] reverberation mapping of the luminous quasar PG 1247+267

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trevese, D.; Saturni, F. G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Roma La Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, I-00185 Roma (Italy); Perna, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universit di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Vagnetti, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Dadina, M. [INAF-IASF Bologna, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2014-11-10

    So far the masses of about 50 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have been measured through the reverberation mapping technique (RM). Most measurements have been performed for objects of moderate luminosity and redshift, based on H?, which is also used to calibrate the scaling relation that allows single-epoch (SE) mass determination based on AGN luminosity and the width of different emission lines. Due to the complex structure and gas dynamics of the relevant emission region, the SE masses obtained from the C IV(1549 ) line show a large spread around the mean values. Direct RM measures of C IV exist for only six AGNs of low luminosity and redshift, and only one luminous quasar. Since 2003, we have collected photometric and spectroscopic observations of PG1247+267, the most luminous quasar ever analyzed for RM. We provide light curves for the continuum and for C IV(1549 ) and C III](1909 ), and measures of the reverberation time lags based on the SPEAR method. The sizes of the line emission regions assume a ratio of R {sub C} {sub III]}/R {sub C} {sub IV} ? 2, similar to the case of Seyfert galaxies, indicating for the first time a similar ionization stratification in a luminous quasar and low-luminosity nuclei. Due to the relatively small size of the broad line region and the relatively narrow line widths, we estimate a small mass and an anomalously high Eddington ratio. We discuss the possibility that either the shape of the emission region or an amplification of the luminosity caused by gravitational lensing may be partly responsible for the result.

  16. High Resolution Structure of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Type IV Pilus: A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Membrane-bound Fibrous Assembly Structure of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Type IV Pilus: A Membrane-bound Fibrous Assembly Membrane proteins are notoriously difficult to crystallize, and fiber-forming proteins were actually declared "uncrystallizable" by the eminent x-ray crystallographer Sir Lawrence Bragg. Supported by the facilities and staff at SSRL, a team of researchers has recently determined structures that solved both problems by defining the atomic structure of the

  17. EIS-0469: Wilton IV Wind Energy Center; Burleigh County, North Dakota

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Western Area Power Administration is evaluating the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting NextEra Energy Resources proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, near Bismarck, North Dakota, to Western’s existing Wilton/Baldwin substation and allowing NextEra’s existing wind projects in this area to operate above 50 annual MW. Western is preparing a Supplemental Draft EIS to address substantial changes to the proposal, including 30 turbine locations and 5 alternate turbine locations in Crofte Township.

  18. GEN IV MATERIALS HANDBOOK BETA RELEASE FOR STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju; Luttrell, Claire

    2006-09-12

    Development of the Gen IV Materials Handbook is briefly summarized up to date. Current status of the Handbook website construction is described. The developed Handbook components and access control of the beta version are discussed for the present evaluation release. Detailed instructions and examples are given to provide guidance for evaluators to browse the constructed parts and use all the currently developed functionalities of the Handbook in evaluation.

  19. Request for Proposal No. DE-SOL-0007749 PART IV - REPRESENTATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    IV - REPRESENTATIONS AND INSTRUCTIONS SECTION K REPRESENTATIONS, CERTIFICATIONS, AND OTHER STATEMENTS OF OFFERORS K-1 FAR 52.204-8 ANNUAL REPRESENTATIONS AND CERTIFICATIONS (NOV 2014) ...................... 1 K-2 FAR 52.204-16 COMMERCIAL AND GOVERNMENT ENTITY CODE REPORTING (NOV 2014) 5 K-3 FAR 52.209-7 INFORMATION REGARDING RESPONSIBILITY MATTERS (JUL 2013) ............... 6 K-4 FAR 52.230-1 COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS NOTICES AND CERTIFICATION (MAY 2012)

  20. Energy Efficiency Interest Rate Reduction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For new and existing home purchases that are rated 6 Star or 5 Star Plus, applicants are eligible for an interest rate reduction for the first $200,000 of the loan amount, with a blended interest...

  1. December 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is the December 2015 edition of the National Idling Reduction Network News, an e-newsletter that reports solicitations for funding, regulatory changes, awards and recognition, reports and other resources of interest, upcoming meetings and events, and manufacturers’ announcements.

  2. Extreme Balance of System Hardware Cost Reduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On September 1, 2011, DOE announced $42.4 million in funding over three years for the Extreme Balance of System Hardware Cost Reduction (BOS-X) funding opportunity. Part of the SunShot Systems...

  3. August 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is the August 2015 edition of the National Idling Reduction Network News, an e-newsletter that reports solicitations for funding, regulatory changes, awards and recognition, reports and other resources of interest, upcoming meetings and events, and manufacturers’ announcements.

  4. April 2015 National Idling Reduction Network News

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is the April 2015 edition of the National Idling Reduction Network News, an e-newsletter that reports solicitations for funding, regulatory changes, awards and recognition, reports and other resources of interest, upcoming meetings and events, and manufacturers’ announcements.

  5. Fundamental Understanding of Crack Growth in Structural Components of Generation IV Supercritical Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iouri I. Balachov; Takao Kobayashi; Francis Tanzella; Indira Jayaweera; Palitha Jayaweera; Petri Kinnunen; Martin Bojinov; Timo Saario

    2004-11-17

    This work contributes to the design of safe and economical Generation-IV Super-Critical Water Reactors (SCWRs) by providing a basis for selecting structural materials to ensure the functionality of in-vessel components during the entire service life. During the second year of the project, we completed electrochemical characterization of the oxide film properties and investigation of crack initiation and propagation for candidate structural materials steels under supercritical conditions. We ranked candidate alloys against their susceptibility to environmentally assisted degradation based on the in situ data measure with an SRI-designed controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) arrangement. A correlation between measurable oxide film properties and susceptibility of austenitic steels to environmentally assisted degradation was observed experimentally. One of the major practical results of the present work is the experimentally proven ability of the economical CDE technique to supply in situ data for ranking candidate structural materials for Generation-IV SCRs. A potential use of the CDE arrangement developed ar SRI for building in situ sensors monitoring water chemistry in the heat transport circuit of Generation-IV SCWRs was evaluated and proved to be feasible.

  6. Speciation model selection by Monte Carlo analysis of optical absorption spectra: Plutonium(IV) nitrate complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, John M.; Veirs, D. Kirk; Vaughn, Randolph B.; Cisneros, Michael R.; Smith, Coleman A.

    2000-06-01

    Standard modeling approaches can produce the most likely values of the formation constants of metal-ligand complexes if a particular set of species containing the metal ion is known or assumed to exist in solution equilibrium with complexing ligands. Identifying the most likely set of species when more than one set is plausible is a more difficult problem to address quantitatively. A Monte Carlo method of data analysis is described that measures the relative abilities of different speciation models to fit optical spectra of open-shell actinide ions. The best model(s) can be identified from among a larger group of models initially judged to be plausible. The method is demonstrated by analyzing the absorption spectra of aqueous Pu(IV) titrated with nitrate ion at constant 2 molal ionic strength in aqueous perchloric acid. The best speciation model supported by the data is shown to include three Pu(IV) species with nitrate coordination numbers 0, 1, and 2. Formation constants are {beta}{sub 1}=3.2{+-}0.5 and {beta}{sub 2}=11.2{+-}1.2, where the uncertainties are 95% confidence limits estimated by propagating raw data uncertainties using Monte Carlo methods. Principal component analysis independently indicates three Pu(IV) complexes in equilibrium. (c) 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  7. Reduction of metal oxides through mechanochemical processing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Senkov, Oleg N. (Moscow, ID)

    2000-01-01

    The low temperature reduction of a metal oxide using mechanochemical processing techniques. The reduction reactions are induced mechanically by milling the reactants. In one embodiment of the invention, titanium oxide TiO.sub.2 is milled with CaH.sub.2 to produce TiH.sub.2. Low temperature heat treating, in the range of 400.degree. C. to 700.degree. C., can be used to remove the hydrogen in the titanium hydride.

  8. Engineering MulticomponentNanocatalystsfor Oxygen Reduction (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Engineering MulticomponentNanocatalystsfor Oxygen Reduction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Engineering MulticomponentNanocatalystsfor Oxygen Reduction Authors: Guo, Shaojun [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory [Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2014-03-27 OSTI Identifier: 1126640 Report Number(s): LA-UR-13-28233 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: 247th ACS National

  9. Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction Download presentation slides from the June 19, 2012, Fuel Cell Technologies Program webinar, "BNL's Low-Platinum Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEVs)." PDF icon BNL's Low-Platinum Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles (FCEVs) Webinar Slides More Documents & Publications Contiguous Platinum

  10. NNSA approves LANL workforce reduction plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NNSA approves LANL workforce reduction plan NNSA approves LANL workforce reduction plan Eligible employees may begin applying for voluntary separation on March 5. March 1, 2012 Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory Aerial view of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Fred deSousa Communications Office (505) 665-3430 Email Program opens March 5, ends April 5 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, March 1, 2012-A plan to reduce the Laboratory workforce by between 400 and 800 employees this spring

  11. NREL: Sustainable NREL - Greenhouse Gas Reduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Greenhouse Gas Reduction A leader in federal greenhouse gas (GHG) management, NREL has conducted GHG inventories, developed reduction goals, and reported emissions since 2000. NREL was the first federal facility to become a partner in the Environmental Protection Agency's Climate Leaders program, and has played a critical support role in the development of federal guidelines for GHG accounting and reporting through DOE's Federal Energy Management Program. Carbon Neutrality NREL is committed to

  12. Lab announces plans for workforce reduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plans for workforce reduction Lab announces plans for workforce reduction The Lab has submitted a plan to reduce its workforce by between 400 and 800 employees this spring through a voluntary separation program. February 21, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los

  13. Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technology | Department of Energy Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology January 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative technology that could potentially help some coal-based power generation facilities comply with anticipated new mercury emissions standards was successfully demonstrated in a recently concluded milestone project at a Michigan power

  14. Energy Reduction at HQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HQ Energy Reduction at HQ The Department of Energy (DOE) is setting an example for the entire Federal Government with aggressive but achievable goals for energy reduction at all DOE facilities, including its headquarters facilities in the Forrestal Building in downtown Washington, DC, and Germantown, MD. Tips for Saving Energy Employees at the Department's Headquarters facilities are advised to be aware of several actions that can add up to significant energy and monetary savings and help the

  15. National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2010 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2010 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon apr10_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - October

  16. National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2009 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2009 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon june09_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - Early Spring 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - October

  17. National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon june11_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2012

  18. National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2010 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy November 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2010 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon nov10_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2009 National Idling Reduction

  19. National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2009 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy October 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2009 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon oct09_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - August

  20. National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2010 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0 National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2010 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon apr10_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - Early Spring 2009

  1. National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2011 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2011 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon apr11_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2012

  2. National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2012 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2012 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon apr12_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2011

  3. National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2013 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2013 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon apr13_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium

  4. National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2014 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2014 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon apr14_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2013

  5. National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2011 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2011 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon aug11_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2011

  6. National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2012 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2012 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon aug12_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2012

  7. National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2013 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2013 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon aug13_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2011

  8. National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2010 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 0 National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2010 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon dec10_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2013

  9. National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2011 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 1 National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2011 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon dec11_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011

  10. National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2012 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 2 National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2012 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon dec12_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2010

  11. National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2013 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 3 National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2013 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon dec13_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2014

  12. National Idling Reduction Network News - Early Spring 2009 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Early Spring 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - Early Spring 2009 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon early_spring09_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News

  13. National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2010 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 0 National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2010 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon feb10_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2010

  14. National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2011 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 1 National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2011 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon feb11_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2011

  15. National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2013 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 3 National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2013 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon feb13_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium

  16. National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2014 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 4 National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2014 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon feb14_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2013

  17. National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2009 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 09 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2009 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon jan09_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - Early Spring 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2009

  18. National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2010 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 0 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2010 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon jan10_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - March

  19. National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2011 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 1 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2011 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon jan11_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - August

  20. National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2013 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 3 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2013 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon jan13_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - August

  1. National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2014 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 4 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2014 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon jan14_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2009

  2. National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2009 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    09 National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2009 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon july09_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - November

  3. National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2010 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0 National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2010 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon july10_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - Early Spring 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - June

  4. National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2011 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2011 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon july11_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - April

  5. National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2012 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2012 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon july12_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2012

  6. National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2013 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2013 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon july13_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2013

  7. National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2010 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2010 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon june10_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - Early Spring

  8. National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon june11_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - December

  9. National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2012 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2012 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon june12_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium National Idling Reduction Network News - November

  10. National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2013 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2013 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon june13_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium

  11. National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2010 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2010 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon mar10_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - Early Spring 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2010

  12. National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2011 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2011 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon mar11_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2011

  13. National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2012 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2012 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon mar12_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2013

  14. National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2013 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2013 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon mar13_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011

  15. National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2014 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    4 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2014 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon mar14_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2012

  16. National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2010 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0 National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2010 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon may10_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2013

  17. National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2011 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2011 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon may11_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2011

  18. National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2012 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2 National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2012 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon may12_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium

  19. National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2013 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2013 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon may13_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - April 2013

  20. National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2009 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 09 National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2009 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon nov09_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - Early Spring 2009

  1. National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2010 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 0 National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2010 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon nov10_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium

  2. National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2011 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 1 National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2011 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon nov11_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2010

  3. National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2012 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 2 National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2012 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon nov12_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - Early Spring 2009

  4. National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2013 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 3 National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2013 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon nov13_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2014

  5. National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2011 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 1 National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2011 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon oct11_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2011

  6. National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2012 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 2 National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2012 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon oct12_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - Early Spring 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2009

  7. National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2013 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 3 National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2013 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon oct13_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2010

  8. National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2009 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 09 National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2009 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon sep09_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2009

  9. National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2010 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 0 National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2010 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon sep10_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - May 2010 National Idling Reduction Network News - August 2011

  10. National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2011 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 1 National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2011 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon sep11_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2010

  11. National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2012 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 2 National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2012 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon sep12_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - February 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - April

  12. National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2013 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy 3 National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2013 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon sep13_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2013 National Idling Reduction Network News - March

  13. National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Compendium National Idling Reduction Network News Compendium Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon idling_newsletter_portfolio.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - January 2014 National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2012 National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2013

  14. Control system to reduce the effects of friction in drive trains of continuous-path-positioning systems. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, W.L.

    1980-12-01

    An improved continuous-path-positioning servo-control system is provided for reducing the effects of friction arising at very low cutting speeds in the drive trains of numerically controlled cutting machines, and the like. The improvement comprises a feed forward network for altering the gain of the servo-control loop at low positioning velocities to prevent stick-slip movement of the cutting tool holder being positioned by the control system. The feed forward network shunts conventional lag-compensators in the control loop, or loops, so that the error signal used for positioning varies linearly when the value is small, but being limited for larger values. Thus, at higher positioning speeds there is little effect of the added component upon the control being achieved.

  15. Study of Mechanical Properties and Characterization of Pipe Steel welded by Hybrid (Friction Stir Weld + Root Arc Weld) Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Yong Chae; Sanderson, Samuel; Mahoney, Murray; Wasson, Andrew J; Fairchild, Doug P; Wang, Yanli; Feng, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) has recently attracted attention as an alternative construction process for gas/oil transportation applications due to advantages compared to fusion welding techniques. A significant advantage is the ability of FSW to weld the entire or nearly the entire wall thickness in a single pass, while fusion welding requires multiple passes. However, when FSW is applied to a pipe or tube geometry, an internal back support anvil is required to resist the plunging forces exerted during FSW. Unfortunately, it may not be convenient or economical to use internal backing support due to limited access for some applications. To overcome this issue, ExxonMobil recently developed a new concept, combining root arc welding and FSW. That is, a root arc weld is made prior to FSW that supports the normal loads associated with FSW. In the present work, mechanical properties of a FSW + root arc welded pipe steel are reported including microstructure and microhardness.

  16. Experimental studies on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of laminar flow through a circular tube fitted with regularly spaced helical screw-tape inserts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivashanmugam, P.; Suresh, S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620 015, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2007-02-15

    Experimental investigation of heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of circular tube fitted with full-length helical screw element of different twist ratio, and helical screw inserts with spacer length 100, 200, 300 and 400mm have been studied with uniform heat flux under laminar flow condition. The experimental data obtained are verified with those obtained from plain tube published data. The effect of spacer length on heat transfer augmentation and friction factor, and the effect of twist ratio on heat transfer augmentation and friction factor have been presented separately. The decrease in Nusselt number for the helical twist with spacer length is within 10% for each subsequent 100mm increase in spacer length. The decrease in friction factor is nearly two times lower than the full length helical twist at low Reynolds number, and four times lower than the full length helical twist at high Reynolds number for all twist ratio. The regularly spaced helical screw inserts can safely be used for heat transfer augmentation without much increase in pressure drop than full length helical screw inserts. (author)

  17. Experimental studies on heat transfer and friction factor characteristics of forced circulation solar water heater system fitted with helical twisted tapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaisankar, S.; Radhakrishnan, T.K.; Sheeba, K.N.

    2009-11-15

    Experimental investigation of heat transfer, friction factor and thermal performance of twisted tape solar water heater with various twist ratios has been conducted and the results are compared with plain tube collector for the same operating conditions with Reynolds number varied from 3000 to 23,000. Experimental data from plain tube collector is validated with the fundamental equations and found that the discrepancy is less than {+-}5.35% and {+-}8.80% for Nusselt number and friction factor, respectively. Correlations have been developed for Nusselt number and friction factor with various twist ratios (Y = 3, 4, 5, 6) and are compared with the experimental values. Results conclude that, heat transfer and pressure drop are higher in twisted tape collector compared to the plain one. Among the various twist ratios, the minimum twist ratio 3 is found to enhance the heat transfer and pressure drop due to swirl generation. As the twist ratio increases, the swirl generation decreases and minimizes the heat transfer and friction factor. (author)

  18. Environmental effects of marine energy development around the world. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, Luke; Whiting, Johnathan; Geerlofs, Simon; Grear, Molly; Blake, Kara ); Coffey, Anna; Massaua, Meghan; Brown-Saracino, Jocelyn; Battey, Hoyt )

    2013-01-15

    Annex IV is an international collaborative project to examine the environmental effects of marine energy devices among countries through the International Energy Agency’s Ocean Energy Systems Initiative (OES). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) serves as the Operating Agent for the Annex, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly the Minerals Management Service), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Numerous ocean energy technologies and devices are being developed around the world, and the few data that exist about the environmental effects of these technologies are dispersed among countries and developers. The purpose of Annex IV is to facilitate efficient government oversight of the development of ocean energy systems by compiling and disseminating information about the potential environmental effects of marine energy technologies and to identify methods of monitoring for these effects. Beginning in 2010, this three-year effort produced a publicly available searchable online database of environmental effects information (Tethys). It houses scientific literature pertaining to the environmental effects of marine energy systems, as well as metadata on international ocean energy projects and research studies. Two experts’ workshops were held in Dublin, Ireland (September 2010 and October 2012) to engage with international researchers, developers, and regulators on the scope and outcomes of the Annex IV project. Metadata and information stored in the Tethys database and feedback obtained from the two experts’ workshops were used as resources in the development of this report. This Annex IV final report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment that survey, compile, and analyze the best available information in one coherent location. These case studies address 1) the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines; 2) the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals; and 3) the effects of energy removal on physical systems. Each case study contains a description of environmental monitoring efforts and research studies, lessons learned, and analysis of remaining information gaps. The information collected through the Annex IV effort and referenced in this report, can be accessed on the Tethys database at http://mhk.pnnl.gov/wiki/index.php/Tethys_ Home.

  19. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szigethy, Geza

    2009-08-12

    Nuclear power is an attractive alternative to hydrocarbon-based energy production at a time when moving away from carbon-producing processes is widely accepted as a significant developmental need. Hence, the radioactive actinide power sources for this industry are necessarily becoming more widespread, which is accompanied by the increased risk of exposure to both biological and environmental systems. This, in turn, requires the development of technology designed to remove such radioactive threats efficiently and selectively from contaminated material, whether that be contained nuclear waste streams or the human body. Raymond and coworkers (University of California, Berkeley) have for decades investigated the interaction of biologically-inspired, hard Lewis-base ligands with high-valent, early-actinide cations. It has been established that such ligands bind strongly to the hard Lewis-acidic early actinides, and many poly-bidentate ligands have been developed and shown to be effective chelators of actinide contaminants in vivo. Work reported herein explores the effect of ligand geometry on the linear U(IV) dioxo dication (uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}). The goal is to utilize rational ligand design to develop ligands that exhibit shape selectivity towards linear dioxo cations and provides thermodynamically favorable binding interactions. The uranyl complexes with a series of tetradentate 3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (3,2-HOPO) ligands were studied in both the crystalline state as well as in solution. Despite significant geometric differences, the uranyl affinities of these ligands vary only slightly but are better than DTPA, the only FDA-approved chelation therapy for actinide contamination. The terepthalamide (TAM) moiety was combined into tris-beidentate ligands with 1,2- and 3,2-HOPO moieties were combined into hexadentate ligands whose structural preferences and solution thermodynamics were measured with the uranyl cation. In addition to achieving coordinative saturation, these ligands exhibited increased uranyl affinity compared to bis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligands. This result is due in part to their increased denticity, but is primarily the result of the presence of the TAM moiety. In an effort to explore the relatively unexplored coordination chemistry of Pu(IV) with bidentate moieties, a series of Pu(IV) complexes were also crystallized using bidentate hydroxypyridinone and hydroxypyrone ligands. The geometries of these complexes are compared to that of the analogous Ce(IV) complexes. While in some cases these showed the expected structural similarities, some ligand systems led to significant coordination changes. A series of crystal structure analyses with Ce(IV) indicated that these differences are most likely the result of crystallization condition differences and solvent inclusion effects.

  20. Temperature and Material Flow Prediction in Friction-Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miles, Michael; Karki, U.; Hovanski, Yuri

    2014-10-01

    Friction-stir spot welding (FSSW) has been shown to be capable of joining advanced high-strength steel, with its flexibility in controlling the heat of welding and the resulting microstructure of the joint. This makes FSSW a potential alternative to resistance spot welding if tool life is sufficiently high, and if machine spindle loads are sufficiently low that the process can be implemented on an industrial robot. Robots for spot welding can typically sustain vertical loads of about 8 kN, but FSSW at tool speeds of less than 3000 rpm cause loads that are too high, in the range of 1114 kN. Therefore, in the current work, tool speeds of 5000 rpm were employed to generate heat more quickly and to reduce welding loads to acceptable levels. Si3N4 tools were used for the welding experiments on 1.2-mm DP 980 steel. The FSSW process was modeled with a finite element approach using the Forge* software. An updated Lagrangian scheme with explicit time integration was employed to predict the flow of the sheet material, subjected to boundary conditions of a rotating tool and a fixed backing plate. Material flow was calculated from a velocity field that is two-dimensional, but heat generated by friction was computed by a novel approach, where the rotational velocity component imparted to the sheet by the tool surface was included in the thermal boundary conditions. An isotropic, viscoplastic Norton-Hoff law was used to compute the material flow stress as a function of strain, strain rate, and temperature. The model predicted welding temperatures to within percent, and the position of the joint interface to within 10 percent, of the experimental results.

  1. Reactions of platinum in oxygen- and hydrogen-treated Pt/. gamma. -Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts. I. Temperature-programmed reduction, adsorption, and redispersion of platinum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lieske, H.; Lietz, G.; Spindler, H.; Voelter, J.

    1983-05-01

    Alumina-supported platinum (Pt/..gamma..-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) catalysts with and without chloride (Cl) were treated at different temperatures in oxygen (O) or hydrogen (H/sub 2/) and were studied by temperature-programmed reduction and by hydrogen adsorption. Two surface oxides, ..cap alpha..- and ..beta..-(PtO/sub 2/)/sub s/, and two chloride-containing surface complexes, (Pt/sup IV/(OH)/sub x/Cl/sub y/)/sub s/ and (Pt/sup IV/O/sub x/Cl/sub y/)/sub s/, could be found and a comprehensive scheme of surface reactions is proposed. Redispersion of Pt in oxygen is possible only in the presence of chloride and is connected with the formation of (Pt/sup IV/O/sub x/Cl/sub y/)/sub s/. A model for the redispersion is proposed. 7 figures.

  2. Paperwork Reduction Act Submission (OMB 83-I) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Submission (OMB 83-I) Paperwork Reduction Act Submission (OMB 83-I) Paperwork Reduction Act Submission (OMB 83-I) PDF icon Paperwork Reduction Act Submission (OMB 83-I) More Documents & Publications 83-I Paperwork Reduction Act Submission form Notice of OMB Action Approving DOE Submission to Extend Information Collection Request Title: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants Information Collection Requests/Paper Reduction Act

  3. Effects of dissimilatory sulfate reduction on iron (hydr)oxide reduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and microbial community development | Argonne National Laboratory Effects of dissimilatory sulfate reduction on iron (hydr)oxide reduction and microbial community development May 14, 2014 Tweet EmailPrint Aquatic and terrestrial environments are dynamic systems where coupled microbiological, geochemical, and hydrological processes define the complex interactions that drive the biogeochemical cycling of the major and minor elements. For example, microbial iron and sulfate reduction profoundly

  4. Energy Savings from Industrial Water Reductions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, Prakash; McKane, Aimee; de Fontaine, Andre

    2015-08-03

    Although it is widely recognized that reducing freshwater consumption is of critical importance, generating interest in industrial water reduction programs can be hindered for a variety of reasons. These include the low cost of water, greater focus on water use in other sectors such as the agriculture and residential sectors, high levels of unbilled and/or unregulated self-supplied water use in industry, and lack of water metering and tracking capabilities at industrial facilities. However, there are many additional components to the resource savings associated with reducing site water use beyond the water savings alone, such as reductions in energy consumption, greenhouse gas emissions, treatment chemicals, and impact on the local watershed. Understanding and quantifying these additional resource savings can expand the community of businesses, NGOs, government agencies, and researchers with a vested interest in water reduction. This paper will develop a methodology for evaluating the embedded energy consumption associated with water use at an industrial facility. The methodology developed will use available data and references to evaluate the energy consumption associated with water supply and wastewater treatment outside of a facility’s fence line for various water sources. It will also include a framework for evaluating the energy consumption associated with water use within a facility’s fence line. The methodology will develop a more complete picture of the total resource savings associated with water reduction efforts and allow industrial water reduction programs to assess the energy and CO2 savings associated with their efforts.

  5. Porosity reduction in Monterey Formation, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Compton, J.S.

    1987-05-01

    Porosity and grain density were determined for different lithologies from throughout a 1.2-km thick section of the Monterey and Sisquoc formations in the Santa Maria basin area, California. Porosity reduction by physical and chemical compaction in the predominantly siliceous sediment is controlled largely by the bulk sediment composition and silica phase transformations. Physical compaction of sediment grains from increasing overburden pressure is responsible for most of the gradual porosity reduction with increasing burial depth in opal-A siliceous ooze and diatomite. The porous, incompressible diatom frustule maintains a high porosity relative to clayey and calcareous sediment. Therefore, a positive correlation exists between porosity and biogenic silica (diatom) content of the sediment. During the opal-A to opal-CT silica phase transformation, solution of the porous diatom frustule and precipitation of cryptocrystalline opal-CT results in a porosity reduction that roughly correlates with the biogenic silica content of the sediment. Local porosity reduction occurs in pore-filling dolomite and chert nodules. Dry bulk density as well as porosity reduction tend to increase with sediment depth. Dolomite and organic matter have the most significant influence on the bulk density because of their respective high and low density. The maximum burial depth of the uplifted and eroded section is estimated by overlapping the porosity-depth relation of average deep-sea siliceous ooze.

  6. Study of the I-V characteristics of nanostructured Pd films on a Si substrate after vacuum annealing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomilin, S. V., E-mail: tomilin_znu@mail.ru; Yanovsky, A. S.; Tomilina, O. A.; Mikaelyan, G. R. [Zaporozhye National University, Department of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

    2013-06-15

    The I-V characteristics of nanostructured Pd films on a Si substrate are investigated. The nanostructures (nanoislands) are formed by the vacuum annealing of continuous ultrathin Pd films sputtered onto a substrate. The shape of the I-V characteristics of the investigated Si substrate-Pd film system is shown to be heavily dependent on the degree of film nanostructuring. The surface morphology of the films is studied using scanning electron microscopy.

  7. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13010: Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage Systems - Current Performance and Cost

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record Record #: 13010 Date: June 11, 2013 Title: Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage Systems - Current Performance and Cost Originators: Scott McWhorter and Grace Ordaz Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: July 17, 2013 Item: This record summarizes the current status of the projected capacities and manufacturing costs of Type IV, 350- and 700-bar compressed hydrogen storage systems, storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen, for onboard light-duty automotive

  8. Direct electrochemical reduction of metal-oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Redey, Laszlo I.; Gourishankar, Karthick

    2003-01-01

    A method of controlling the direct electrolytic reduction of a metal oxide or mixtures of metal oxides to the corresponding metal or metals. A non-consumable anode and a cathode and a salt electrolyte with a first reference electrode near the non-consumable anode and a second reference electrode near the cathode are used. Oxygen gas is produced and removed from the cell. The anode potential is compared to the first reference electrode to prevent anode dissolution and gas evolution other than oxygen, and the cathode potential is compared to the second reference electrode to prevent production of reductant metal from ions in the electrolyte.

  9. Low-Cost Radon Reduction Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, William B.; Francisco, Paul W.; Merrin, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the research was to conduct a primary scoping study on the impact of air sealing between the foundation and the living space on radon transport reduction across the foundation-living space floor assembly. Fifteen homes in the Champaign, Illinois area participated in the study. These homes were instrumented for hourly continuous radon measurements and simultaneous temperature and humidity the foundation was improved. However, this improved isolation did not lead to significant reductions in radon concentration in the living space. Other factors such as outdoor temperature were shown to have an impact on radon concentration.

  10. National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2009 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy December 2009 National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2009 Newsletter with information on idling reduction regulations, idling reduction grants, idling reduction general news, summary of state ani-idling regulations, and upcoming meetings and events. PDF icon dec09_network_news.pdf More Documents & Publications National Idling Reduction Network News - March 2011 National Idling Reduction Network News - October 2009 National Idling Reducti

  11. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Idle Reduction Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School Bus Idle Reduction Strategies on Digg Find

  14. Generic process for preparing a crystalline oxide upon a group IV semiconductor substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKee, Rodney A. (Kingston, TN); Walker, Frederick J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chisholm, Matthew F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01

    A process for growing a crystalline oxide epitaxially upon the surface of a Group IV semiconductor, as well as a structure constructed by the process, is described. The semiconductor can be germanium or silicon, and the crystalline oxide can generally be represented by the formula (AO).sub.n (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m in which "n" and "m" are non-negative integer repeats of planes of the alkaline earth oxides or the alkaline earth-containing perovskite oxides. With atomic level control of interfacial thermodynamics in a multicomponent semiconductor/oxide system, a highly perfect interface between a semiconductor and a crystalline oxide can be obtained.

  15. Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation (4A) Handbook Version 4.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju

    2013-09-01

    This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

  16. Mechanisms Governing the Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasudevan, Vijay; Carroll, Laura; Sham, Sam

    2015-04-06

    This research project, which includes collaborators from INL and ORNL, focuses on the study of alloy 617 and alloy 800H that are candidates for applications as intermediate heat exchangers in GEN IV nuclear reactors, with an emphasis on the effects of grain size, grain boundaries and second phases on the creep properties; the mechanisms of dislocation creep, diffusional creep and cavitation; the onset of tertiary creep; and theoretical modeling for long-term predictions of materials behavior and for high temperature alloy design.

  17. Suirr 300, 955 L*Enfwu Plaza. S. Iv.. Washingron. D.C. 200242174.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Suirr 300, 955 L*Enfwu Plaza. S. Iv.. Washingron. D.C. 200242174. 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 M r. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear M r. Wallo: I ELIMINATION~RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND "NIY$RfITIES / t kphonc (202) d.t%xO The attached elimination recommendation was prepared lin accordance with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September! The recommenda includes 26

  18. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Storage/Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (LNT) Materials Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx StorageReduction (NSR) Materials Deactivation Mechanisms of Base MetalZeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction...

  19. Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction Dynamometer Evaluation of Plasma-Catalyst for Diesel NOx Reduction 2003 DEER Conference Presentation: Ford Motor Company PDF...

  20. Selective reduction of NOx in oxygen rich environments with plasma...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    reduction of NOx in oxygen rich environments with plasma-assisted catalysis: Catalyst development and mechanistic studies Selective reduction of NOx in oxygen rich environments...

  1. International Carbon Reduction Offset Alliance ICROA | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carbon Reduction Offset Alliance ICROA Jump to: navigation, search Name: International Carbon Reduction & Offset Alliance (ICROA) Place: United Kingdom Sector: Carbon Product:...

  2. Emissions Reduction Experience with Johnson Matthey EGRT on Off...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduction Experience with Johnson Matthey EGRT on Off-Road Equipment Emissions Reduction Experience with Johnson Matthey EGRT on Off-Road Equipment Poster presentation at the 2007...

  3. Functionality of Commercial NOx Storage-Reduction Catalysts and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Functionality of Commercial NOx Storage-Reduction Catalysts and the Development of a Representative Model Functionality of Commercial NOx Storage-Reduction Catalysts and the...

  4. Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Materials Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Materials 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

  5. Catalytic reduction system for oxygen-rich exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogtlin, G.E.; Merritt, B.T.; Hsiao, M.C.; Wallman, P.H.; Penetrante, B.M.

    1999-04-13

    Non-thermal plasma gas treatment is combined with selective catalytic reduction to enhance NO{sub x} reduction in oxygen-rich vehicle engine exhausts. 8 figs.

  6. MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF MICROBIAL TECHNETIUM REDUCTION FINAL REPORT...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF MICROBIAL TECHNETIUM REDUCTION FINAL REPORT Microbial Tc(VII) reduction is an attractive alternative strategy for bioremediation of...

  7. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Storage/Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx StorageReduction (NSR) Materials Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx StorageReduction (NSR) ...

  8. Low Temperature Combustion and Diesel Emission Reduction Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Diesel Emission Reduction Research Low Temperature Combustion and Diesel Emission Reduction Research Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. ...

  9. Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Storage/Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Enhanced High and Low Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Materials Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx StorageReduction (NSR) ...

  10. Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique ...

  11. Webinar: Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique Webinar: Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique ...

  12. 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report 2013 Hydrogen Compression, Storage, and Dispensing Cost Reduction Workshop Final Report...

  13. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Battery Status and Cost Reduction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Status and Cost Reduction Prospects EV Everywhere Grand Challenge - Battery Status and Cost Reduction Prospects Presentation given by technology manager David Howell at the EV...

  14. Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Waste Heat Reduction and...

  15. DOE Retrospective Review Plan and Burden Reduction Report - December...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Retrospective Review Plan and Burden Reduction Report - December 18, 2012 DOE Retrospective Review Plan and Burden Reduction Report - December 18, 2012 DOE EO 13563 December 2012...

  16. Benefits and Drawbacks of Compression Ratio Reduction in PCCI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Compression Ratio Reduction in PCCI Combustion Application in an Advanced LD Diesel Engine Benefits and Drawbacks of Compression Ratio Reduction in PCCI Combustion ...

  17. The two-electron reduction mechanism of ethylene carbonate: a...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: The two-electron reduction mechanism of ethylene carbonate: a quantum chemistry study. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The two-electron reduction ...

  18. China-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Quantifying Emission Reduction Opportunities in Emerging Economies AgencyCompany...

  19. Cost reduction ideas for LNG terminals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habibullah, A.; Weldin, F.

    1999-07-01

    LNG projects are highly capital intensive and this has long been regarded as being inevitable. However, recent developments are forcing the LNG industry to aggressively seek cost reductions. For example, the gas-to-liquids (GTL) process is increasingly seen as a potential rival technology and is often being touted as an economically superior alternative fuel source. Another strong driving force behind needed cost reductions is the low crude oil price which seems to have settled in the $10--13/bb. range. LNG is well positioned as the fuel of choice for environmentally friendly new power projects. As a result of the projected demand for power especially in the Pacific Rim countries several LNG terminal projects are under consideration. Such projects will require a new generation of LNG terminal designs emphasizing low cost, small scale and safe and fully integrated designs from LNG supply to power generation. The integration of the LNG terminal with the combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power plant offers substantial cost savings opportunities for both plants. Various cost reduction strategies and their impact on the terminal design are discussed including cost reduction due to integration.

  20. Waste reduction through consumer education. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, E.Z.

    1996-05-01

    The Waste Reduction through Consumer Education research project was conducted to determine how environmental educational strategies influence purchasing behavior in the supermarket. The objectives were to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate consumer education strategies for waste reduction. The amount of waste generated by packaging size and form, with an adjustment for local recyclability of waste, was determined for 14 product categories identified as having more waste generating and less waste generating product choices (a total of 484 products). Using supermarket scan data and shopper identification numbers, the research tracked the purchases of shoppers in groups receiving different education treatments for 9 months. Statistical tests applied to the purchase data assessed patterns of change between the groups by treatment period. Analysis of the data revealed few meaningful statistical differences between study groups or changes in behavior over time. Findings suggest that broad brush consumer education about waste reduction is not effective in changing purchasing behaviors in the short term. However, it may help create a general awareness of the issues surrounding excess packaging and consumer responsibility. The study concludes that the answer to waste reduction in the future may be a combination of voluntary initiatives by manufacturers and retailers, governmental intervention, and better-informed consumers.

  1. Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library

  2. Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction, and Recycling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE Pollution Prevention, Waste Reduction and Recycling Program supports Executive Order (E.O.) 13693, Planning for Federal Sustainability in the Next Decade; DOE Order 436.1, Department Sustainability; and, the Department’s Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP). Under this Program, Headquarters assists DOE Field and Program Offices in the implementation of the specific goals identified in both of the Orders.

  3. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA); Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  4. Plasma-assisted catalytic storage reduction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA); Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A two-stage method for NO.sub.x reduction in an oxygen-rich engine exhaust comprises a plasma oxidative stage and a storage reduction stage. The first stage employs a non-thermal plasma treatment of NO.sub.x gases in an oxygen-rich exhaust and is intended to convert NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons. The second stage employs a lean NO.sub.x trap to convert such NO.sub.2 to environmentally benign gases that include N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O. By preconverting NO to NO.sub.2 in the first stage with a plasma, the efficiency of the second stage for NO.sub.x reduction is enhanced. For example, an internal combustion engine exhaust is connected by a pipe to a first chamber in which a non-thermal plasma converts NO to NO.sub.2 in the presence of O.sub.2 and hydrocarbons, such as propene. A flow of such hydrocarbons (C.sub.x H.sub.y) is input from usually a second pipe into at least a portion of the first chamber. The NO.sub.2 from the plasma treatment proceeds to a storage reduction catalyst (lean NO.sub.x trap) that converts NO.sub.2 to N.sub.2, CO.sub.2, and H.sub.2 O, and includes a nitrate-forming catalytic site. The hydrocarbons and NO.sub.x are simultaneously reduced while passing through the lean-NO.sub.x trap catalyst. The method allows for enhanced NO.sub.x reduction in vehicular engine exhausts, particularly those having relatively high sulfur contents.

  5. Palladium catalyzed coupling reactions: mechanism of reductive elimination. Progress report, October 1, 1979-September 30, 1980. [Ethane elimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stille, J.K.

    1980-09-01

    The 1,1-reductive elimination of ethane from three cis-bis(phosphine)-dimethylpalladium complexes, L/sub 2/Pd(CH/sub 3/)/sub 2/ (L = PPh/sub 3/, PPh/sub 2/,CH/sub 3/ and L/sub 2/ = Ph/sub 2/PCH/sub 2/CH/sub 2/PPh/sub 2/), and three trans analogs (L = PPh/sub 3/, PPh/sub 2/CH/sub 3/ and L/sub 2/ = 2,11-bis(diphenylphosphinomethyl)benzo(c)phenanthrene (TRANSPHOS)) was carried out. The three cis complexes underwent reductive elimination in the presence of coordinating solvents (DMSO, DMF, and THF). The trans complexes which could isomerize to cis (L = PPh/sub 3/, PPh/sub 2/CH/sub 3/) did so in polar solvents and then underwent reductive elimination. TRANSPHOS dimethylpalladium would not undergo reductive elimination of ethane. The eliminations from the cis isomers were intramolecular and displayed first order kinetics. Although TRANSPHOS dimethylpalladium(II) would not undergo a 1,1-reductive elimination of ethane, the addition of CD/sub 3/I to a DMSO solution of this complex at 25/sup 0/C rapidly produced CD/sub 3/-CH/sub 3/, implicating a transient palladium(IV) intermediate. E- and Z-bromostyrylbis(diphenylmethylphosphine)palladium(0) react with methyl lithium in THF at ambient temperature to give the E- and Z- propenylbenzenes, respectively. At -78/sup 0/C, the intermediate E- and Z-styrylmethylbis(diphenylmethylphosphine)palladium(II) complexes (9a,b) can be isolated. On raising the temperature of solutions of 9a,b in THF, E- and Z-propenylbenzenes are produced. The reductive elimination reaction is intramolecular and first order in dialkylpalladium(II) complex.

  6. Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrocarbons | Department of Energy 4 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Argonne National Laboratory PDF icon 2004_deer_marshall.pdf More Documents & Publications Bifunctional Catalysts for the Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by Hydrocarbons Selectlive Catalytic Reducution of NOx wilth Diesel-Based Fuels as Reductants Engine and Reactor Evaluations of HC-SCR for Diesel NOx Reduction

  7. 83-I Paperwork Reduction Act Submission form | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    83-I Paperwork Reduction Act Submission form 83-I Paperwork Reduction Act Submission form PDF icon 83-I Paperwork Reduction Act Submission form.pdf More Documents & Publications Paperwork Reduction Act Submission (OMB 83-I) Notice of OMB Action Approving DOE Submission to Extend Information Collection Request Title: OE Recovery Act Financial Assistance Grants Instructions for the Supporting Statement - Revision

  8. Use of Textured Surfaces to Mitigate Sliding Friction and Wear of Lubricated and Non-Lubricated Contacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, Peter Julian

    2012-03-01

    If properly employed, the placement of three-dimensional feature patterns, also referred to as textures, on relatively-moving, load-bearing surfaces can be beneficial to their friction and wear characteristics. For example, geometric patterns can function as lubricant supply channels or depressions in which to trap debris. They can also alter lubricant flow in a manner that produces thicker load-bearing films locally. Considering the area occupied by solid areas and spaces, textures also change the load distribution on surfaces. At least ten different attributes of textures can be specified, and their combinations offer wide latitude in surface engineering. By employing directional machining and grinding procedures, texturing has been used on bearings and seals for well over a half century, and the size scales of texturing vary widely. This report summarizes past work on the texturing of load-bearing surfaces, including past research on laser surface dimpling of ceramics done at ORNL. Textured surfaces generally show most pronounced effects when they are used in conformal or nearly conformal contacts, like that in face seals. Combining textures with other forms of surface modification and lubrication methods can offer additional benefits in surface engineering for tribology. As the literature and past work at ORNL shows, texturing does not always provide benefits. Rather, the selected pattern and arrangement of features must be matched to characteristics of the proposed application, bearing materials, and lubricants.

  9. A frictional work predictive method for the initiation of solid high explosives from low-pressure impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidester, S.K.; Green, L.G.; Lee, C.G.

    1993-07-01

    The goal of these tests was to provide information that would aid in the prediction of HE response in accident situations where the initiating stimulus was less than that required for direct shock initiation. Before these tests were run, a prediction of threshold impact velocity was made (70m/s) using a rough average of previously reported threshold factional work from skid tests (1 cal/cm{sub 2}) and the experimental value for coefficient of friction of 0.5({plus_minus}) measured in the same tests for PBX-9404. The actual testing proved the threshold impact velocity to be much less, and the pretest prediction was not only wrong, it was not conservative. This work presents a methodology for more accurately predicting the reaction threshold for HE involved in an accident such as an airplane crash or a severe land transportation accident. The main focus of this work is on LX-10-1 (94.5% 5.5% Viton A binder, density 1.86g/cm{sup 3}). Additional work was done on LX-17 (92.5% TATB, 7.5% KelF binder, density 1.90g/cm{sub 3}), a very insensitive explosive. The explicit two-dimensional finite element code, DYNA2D, was used to model the tests and predict the HE response. The finite element mesh of the projectile and target were generated using MAZE. The post-processing of the DYNA2D analysis was done with ORION.

  10. Effect of tool pin features on process response variables during friction stir welding of dissimilar aluminum alloys

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rabby, Reza; Tang, Wei; Reynolds, A. P.

    2015-07-01

    In this article, the effect of pin features and orientation/placement of the materials on advancing side were investigated for friction stir welding (FSW) of dissimilar aluminum alloys AA2050 and AA6061. Pins for FSW were produced with a 2.12 mm pitch thread having three flats/flutes. Three sets of rotational speed/welding speed were used to perform a series of welds in a butt joint arrangement. The results show that, joint quality, process response variables and welding temperature are highly affected by pin features and material orientation in FSW. Defect free joints with effective material transportation in the weld nugget zone were obtainedmore » when welding was performed with AA2050 on the advancing side. The tool also encounters less in-plane reaction force for welding with 2050 on the advancing side. Pin with thread+3 flats produces quality welds at low rotational and travel speed regardless of the location of alloys on advancing or retreating side.« less

  11. Site Environmental Report For Calendar Year 2012. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David

    2013-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2012 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2012 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  12. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Dassler, David

    2012-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2011 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2011 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  13. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2010. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2011-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2010 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2010 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  14. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2010-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2009 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2009 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  15. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ning; Rutherford, Phil; Amar, Ravnesh

    2009-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2008 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended by the DOE. The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2008 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  16. NSIDC Data Center: Energy Reduction Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-05-01

    The Green Data Center Project was a successful effort to significantly reduce the energy use of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC). Through a full retrofit of a traditional air conditioning system, the cooling energy required to meet the data center’s constant load has been reduced by over 70% for summer months and over 90% for cooler winter months. This significant reduction is achievable through the use of airside economization and a new indirect evaporative cooling cycle. One of the goals of this project was to create awareness of simple and effective energy reduction strategies for data centers. Although this particular project was able to maximize the positive effects of airside economization and indirect evaporative cooling because of its geographic location, similar strategies may also be relevant for many other sites and data centers in the United States.

  17. Modelling Hydrogen Reduction and Hydrodeoxygenation of Oxygenates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y.; Xu, Q.; Cheah, S.

    2013-01-01

    Based on Density Functional Theory (DFT) simulations, we have studied the reduction of nickel oxide and biomass derived oxygenates (catechol, guaiacol, etc.) in hydrogen. Both the kinetic barrier and thermodynamic favorability are calculated with respect to the modeled reaction pathways. In early-stage reduction of the NiO(100) surface by hydrogen, the pull-off of the surface oxygen atom and simultaneous activation of the nearby Ni atoms coordinately dissociate the hydrogen molecules so that a water molecule can be formed, leaving an oxygen vacancy on the surface. In hydrogen reaction with oxygenates catalyzed by transition metals, hydrogenation of the aromatic carbon ring normally dominates. However, selective deoxygenation is of particular interest for practical application such as biofuel conversion. Our modeling shows that doping of the transition metal catalysts can change the orientation of oxygenates adsorbed on metal surfaces. The correlation between the selectivity of reaction and the orientation of adsorption are discussed.

  18. Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Platinum Monolayer Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction Reaction Radoslav Adzic Co-workers: Jia Wang, Miomir Vukmirovic, Kotaro Sasaki, Stoyan Bliznakov, Yun Cai, Yu Zhang, Kurian Kuttiyiel, Kuanping Gong, YongMan Choi, Ping Liu, Hideo Naohara 1 Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 1 Toyota Motor Corporation, Susono, Japan Webinar June 19, 2012 Outline - Introduction on fuel cells, electrocatalysis, existing developments and remaining obstacles to

  19. National Idling Reduction Network News - July 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 SOLICITATIONS FOR FUNDING AND AWARDS [Brown text indicates a new entry, or updated information, since last month.] ORGANIZATION PROJECT FUNDING DEADLINE WEBSITE California Air Resources Board (CARB) California - Hybrid Truck and Bus Voucher Incentive Project (HVIP) $9.8 million First come, first served. http://www.californiahvip.org CARB Clean Vehicle Rebate Project $4.1 million First come, first served. www.cvrp.energycenter.org Wisconsin Department of Commerce Diesel Truck Idling Reduction

  20. National Idling Reduction Network News - June 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 SOLICITATIONS FOR FUNDING AND AWARDS [Brown text indicates a new entry, or updated information, since last month.] ORGANIZATION PROJECT FUNDING DEADLINE WEBSITE California Air Resources Board (CARB) California - Hybrid Truck and Bus Voucher Incentive Project (HVIP) $9.8 million First come, first served. http://www.californiahvip.org CARB Clean Vehicle Rebate Project $4.1 million First come, first served. www.cvrp.energycenter.org Wisconsin Department of Commerce Diesel Truck Idling Reduction

  1. National Idling Reduction Network News - November 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 SOLICITATIONS FOR FUNDING AND AWARDS [Brown text indicates a new entry since last month.] ORGANIZATION PROJECT FUNDING DEADLINE WEBSITE Alabama Department of Environmental Management Diesel Emissions Reduction Grant Program $116,000 Rolling deadline until funds are awarded. http://www.adem.alabama.gov/newsEven ts/pressreleases/2012/DERAPublicServiceA nnouncement.pdf Arkansas Department of Environmental Quality Business Assistance Program, Environmental Loans for Small Businesses Indeterminate

  2. National Idling Reduction Network News - September 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 SOLICITATIONS FOR FUNDING AND AWARDS [Brown text indicates a new entry, or updated information, since last month.] ORGANIZATION PROJECT FUNDING DEADLINE WEBSITE California Air Resources Board (CARB) Clean Vehicle Rebate Project $4.1 million First come, first served. http://energycenter.org/index.php/incentiv e-programs/clean-vehicle-rebate-project Wisconsin Department of Commerce Diesel Truck Idling Reduction Grant Program $2 million First come, first served.

  3. Biomass Engineering: Size reduction, drying and densification

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Biomass Engineering: Size reduction, drying and densification March 25th, 2015 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Technology Review Area: Feedstock Supply and Logistics Jaya Shankar Tumuluru (PI) Research Team: Neal Yancey, Craig C Conner, Tyler Westover, Richard McCulloch, Kara Cafferty, and Mitch Plummer Organization: Biofuels and Renewable Energy Technology, Idaho National Laboratory DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO)

  4. Bibliography of greenhouse-gas reduction strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompkins, M.M.; Mintz, M.M.

    1995-03-01

    A bibliography of greenhouse-gas reduction strategies has been compiled to assist the Climate change Action Plan Task Force in their consideration of strategies to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions from personal motor vehicles. The document contains a summary of the literature, including it major directions and implications; and annotated listing of 32 recent pertinent documents; and a listing of a larger group of related reports.

  5. Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    (WCRRF)Technical Safety Requirements (TSR), ABD-WFM-006, Revision 2.1 | Department of Energy The documents included in this listing are additional references not included in the Phase 2 Radiological Release at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Attachment F: Bibliography and References report. The documents were examined and used to develop the final report. PDF icon Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF)Technical Safety Requirements (TSR), ABD-WFM-006, Revision

  6. Arms Reduction Treaties | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Arms Reduction Treaties | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at

  7. Benchmark Development in Support of Generation-IV Reactor Validation (IRPhEP 2010 Handbook)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs

    2010-06-01

    The March 2010 edition of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) Handbook includes additional benchmark data that can be implemented in the validation of data and methods for Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactor designs. Evaluations supporting sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) efforts include the initial isothermal tests of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site, the Zero Power Physics Reactor (ZPPR) 10B and 10C experiments at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the burn-up reactivity coefficient of Japans JOYO reactor. An assessment of Russias BFS-61 assemblies at the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) provides additional information for lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) systems. Benchmarks in support of the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) project include evaluations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments performed at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) in Switzerland and the start-up core physics tests of Japans High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor. The critical configuration of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the INL which used ternary ceramic fuel, U(18)O2-CaO-ZrO2, is of interest for fuel cycle research and development (FCR&D) and has some similarities to inert-matrix fuels that are of interest in GEN-IV advanced reactor design. Two additional evaluations were revised to include additional evaluated experimental data, in support of light water reactor (LWR) and heavy water reactor (HWR) research; these include reactor physics experiments at Brazils IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor Facility and the French High Flux Reactor (RHF), respectively. The IRPhEP Handbook now includes data from 45 experimental series (representing 24 reactor facilities) and represents contributions from 15 countries. These experimental measurements represent large investments of infrastructure, experience, and cost that have been evaluated and preserved as benchmarks for the validation of methods and collection of data in support of current and future reactor design and development.

  8. Structure and Function of Microbial Metal-Reduction Proteins (Other) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Other: Structure and Function of Microbial Metal-Reduction Proteins Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure and Function of Microbial Metal-Reduction Proteins In this project, we proposed (i) identification of metal-reduction genes, (ii) development of new threading techniques and (iii) fold recognition and structure prediction of metal-reduction proteins. However, due to the reduction of the budget, we revised our plan to focus on two specific aims of (i)

  9. Progress Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits Progress Update: Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Emission Reduction Specialists PDF icon 2004_deer_sloan.pdf More Documents & Publications Creating Mobile Emission Reduction Credits ADEC II Universal SCR Retrofit System for On-road and Off-road Diesel Engines SCR & DPF RETROFITS FOR MOBILE DIESEL ENGINES

  10. Economic Analysis of Commercial Idling Reduction Technologies: Which idling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    reduction system is most economical for truck owners? | Department of Energy Analysis of Commercial Idling Reduction Technologies: Which idling reduction system is most economical for truck owners? Economic Analysis of Commercial Idling Reduction Technologies: Which idling reduction system is most economical for truck owners? Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24, 2006, Detroit, Michigan. Sponsored by the U.S. DOE's EERE FreedomCar and Fuel Partnership and 21st Century Truck

  11. Structure and Function of Microbial Metal-Reduction Proteins (Other) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Other: Structure and Function of Microbial Metal-Reduction Proteins Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure and Function of Microbial Metal-Reduction Proteins In this project, we proposed (i) identification of metal-reduction genes, (ii) development of new threading techniques and (iii) fold recognition and structure prediction of metal-reduction proteins. However, due to the reduction of the budget, we revised our plan to focus on two specific aims of (i)

  12. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Laws and Incentives

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Conserve Fuel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Laws and Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Laws and Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Laws and Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Laws and Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Laws and Incentives on Delicious

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Programs at Tennessee Schools

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Idle Reduction Programs at Tennessee Schools to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Programs at Tennessee Schools on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Programs at Tennessee Schools on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Programs at Tennessee Schools on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Programs at Tennessee Schools on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle

  14. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Conserve Fuel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Related Links on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data

  15. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Strategies Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Medium-Duty Vehicle Idle Reduction Strategies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data

  16. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Heavy-Duty Trucks Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for Heavy-Duty Trucks on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Onboard Idle Reduction Equipment for

  17. Mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Picardal, F.W.

    1992-12-31

    Nine bacteria were tested for the ability to dehalogenate tetrachloromethane (CT), tetrachloroethene (PCE), and 1, 1, 1-trichloroethane (TCA) under anaerobic conditions. Three bacteria were able to reductively dehalogenate CT. Dehalogenation ability was not readily linked to a common metabolism or changes in culture redox potential. None of the bacteria tested were able to dehalogenate PCE or TCA. One of the bacteria capable of dehalogenating CT, Shewanella putrefaciens, was chosen as a model organism to study mechanisms of bacterially catalyzed reductive dehalogenation. The effect of a variety of alternate electron acceptors on CT dehalogenation ability by S. putrefaciens was determined. oxygen and nitrogen oxides were inhibitory but Fe (III), trimethylamine oxide, and fumarate were not. A model of the electron transport chain of S. putrefaciens was developed to explain inhibition patterns. A period of microaerobic growth prior to CT exposure increased the ability of S. putrefaciens to dehalogenate CT. A microaerobic growth period also increased cytochrome concentrations. A relationship between cytochrome content and dehalogenation ability was developed from studies in which cytochrome concentrations in S. putrefaciens were manipulated by changing growth conditions. Stoichiometry studies using {sup 14}C-CT suggested that CT was first reduced to form a trichloromethyl radical. Reduction of the radical to produce chloroform and reaction of the radical with cellular biochemicals explained observed product distributions. Carbon dioxide or other fully dehalogenated products were not found.

  18. Shipment and Disposal of Solidified Organic Waste (Waste Type IV) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Amico, E. L; Edmiston, D. R.; O'Leary, G. A.; Rivera, M. A.; Steward, D. M.

    2006-07-01

    In April of 2005, the last shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site to the WIPP was completed. With the completion of this shipment, all transuranic waste generated and stored at Rocky Flats was successfully removed from the site and shipped to and disposed of at the WIPP. Some of the last waste to be shipped and disposed of at the WIPP was waste consisting of solidified organic liquids that is identified as Waste Type IV in the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC) document. Waste Type IV waste typically has a composition, and associated characteristics, that make it significantly more difficult to ship and dispose of than other Waste Types, especially with respect to gas generation. This paper provides an overview of the experience gained at Rocky Flats for management, transportation and disposal of Type IV waste at WIPP, particularly with respect to gas generation testing. (authors)

  19. Field Sampling Plan for the Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04 Remedial Action, Phase IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Wells

    2006-11-14

    This Field Sampling Plan outlines the collection and analysis of samples in support of Phase IV of the Waste Area Group 10, Operable Units 6-05 and 10-04 remedial action. Phase IV addresses the remedial actions to areas with the potential for unexploded ordnance at the Idaho National Laboratory Site. These areas include portions of the Naval Proving Ground, the Arco High-Altitude Bombing Range, and the Twin Buttes Bombing Range. The remedial action consists of removal and disposal of ordnance by high-order detonation, followed by sampling to determine the extent, if any, of soil that might have been contaminated by the detonation activities associated with the disposal of ordnance during the Phase IV activities and explosives during the Phase II activities.

  20. Environmental assessment for operations, upgrades, and modifications in SNL/NM Technical Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    The proposed action for this EA for Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico Technical Area IV, includes continuing existing operations, modification of an existing accelerator (Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II) to support defnese-related Z-pinch experiments, and construction of two transformer oil storage tanks to support the expansion of the Advanced Pulsed Power Research Module, a single pulse accelerator. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE believes that the proposed action is not a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA and CEQ NEPA implementing regulations in 40 CFR 1508.18 and 1508.27. Therefore, an environmental impact statement is not required, and a Finding of No Significant Impact is issued.