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1

friction stir welding iv table of contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction Stir Welding—After a Decade of Development [pp. 3-18] William Arbegast . Friction Stir Welding of an Aluminum Coal Hopper Railcar [pp. 19-28

2

Plutonium Oxidation and Subsequent Reduction by Mn (IV) Minerals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium sorbed to rock tuff was preferentially associated with manganese oxides. On tuff and synthetic pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}), Pu(IV) or Pu(V) was initially oxidized, but over time Pu(IV) became the predominant oxidation state of sorbed Pu. Reduction of Pu(V/VI), even on non-oxidizing surfaces, is proposed to result from a lower Gibbs free energy of the hydrolyzed Pu(IV) surface species versus that of the Pu(V) or Pu(VI) surface species. This work suggests that despite initial oxidation of sorbed Pu by oxidizing surfaces to more soluble forms, the less mobile form of Pu, Pu(IV), will dominate Pu solid phase speciation during long term geologic storage. The safe design of a radioactive waste or spent nuclear fuel geologic repository requires a risk assessment of radionuclides that may potentially be released into the surrounding environment. Geochemical knowledge of the radionuclide and the surrounding environment is required for predicting subsurface fate and transport. Although difficult even in simple systems, this task grows increasingly complicated for constituents, like Pu, that exhibit complex environmental chemistries. The environmental behavior of Pu can be influenced by complexation, precipitation, adsorption, colloid formation, and oxidation/reduction (redox) reactions (1-3). To predict the environmental mobility of Pu, the most important of these factors is Pu oxidation state. This is because Pu(IV) is generally 2 to 3 orders of magnitude less mobile than Pu(V) in most environments (4). Further complicating matters, Pu commonly exists simultaneously in several oxidation states (5, 6). Choppin (7) reported Pu may exist as Pu(IV), Pu(V), or Pu(VI) oxic natural groundwaters. It is generally accepted that plutonium associated with suspended particulate matter is predominantly Pu(IV) (8-10), whereas Pu in the aqueous phase is predominantly Pu(V) (2, 11-13). The influence of the character of Mn-containing minerals expected to be found in subsurface repository environments on Pu oxidation state distributions has been the subject of much recent research. Kenney-Kennicutt and Morse (14), Duff et al. (15), and Morgenstern and Choppin (16) observed oxidation of Pu facilitated by Mn(IV)-bearing minerals. Conversely, Shaughnessy et al. (17) used X-ray Absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) to show reduction of Pu(VI) by hausmannite (Mn{sup II}Mn{sub 2}{sup III}O{sub 4}) and manganite ({gamma}-Mn{sup III}OOH) and Kersting et al., (18) observed reduction of Pu(VI) by pyrolusite (Mn{sup IV}O{sub 2}). In this paper, we attempt to reconcile the apparently conflicting datasets by showing that Mn-bearing minerals can indeed oxidize Pu, however, if the oxidized species remains on the solid phase, the oxidation step competes with the formation of Pu(IV) that becomes the predominant solid phase Pu species with time. The experimental approach we took was to conduct longer term (approximately two years later) oxidation state analyses on the Pu sorbed to Yucca Mountain tuff (initial analysis reported by Duff et al., (15)) and measure the time-dependant changes in the oxidation state distribution of Pu in the presence of the Mn mineral pyrolusite.

KAPLAN, DANIEL

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

3

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction Testing and Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Spring 2012 Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine Friction Reduction Testing and Analysis Overview Volvo Group Powertrain Engineering is interested in increasing fuel efficiency through the reduction of parasitic friction and pumping losses. A test cell

Demirel, Melik C.

4

Reductive Disslocation of Pu(IV) by Clostridium sp. Under Anaerobic Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An anaerobic, gram positive, spore-forming bacterium Clostridium sp., common in soils and wastes, capable of reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II), Mn(IV) to Mn(II), Tc(VII) to Tc(IV), and U(VI) to U(IV), reduced Pu(IV) to Pu(III). Addition of 242Pu (IV)-nitrate to the bacterial growth medium at pH 6.4 resulted in the precipitation of Pu as amorphous Pu(OH)4 due to hydrolysis and polymerization reactions. The Pu (1 x 10-5 M) had no effect upon growth of the bacterium as evidenced by glucose consumption; carbon dioxide and hydrogen production; a decrease in pH of the medium from 6.4 to 3.0 due to production of acetic and butyric acids from glucose fermentation; and a change in the Eh of the culture medium from +50 to -180 mV. Commensurate with bacterial growth, Pu was rapidly solubilized as evidenced by an increase in Pu concentration in solution which passed through a 0.03 {mu}m filtration. Selective solvent extraction of the culture by thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) indicated the presence of a reduced Pu species in the soluble fraction. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopic (XANES) analysis of Pu in the culture sample at the Pu LIII absorption edge (18.054 keV) showed a shift of -3 eV compared to a Pu(IV) standard indicating reduction of Pu(IV) to Pu(III). These results suggest that, although Pu generally exists as insoluble Pu(IV) in the environment, under appropriate conditions, anaerobic microbial activity could affect the long-term stability and mobility of Pu by its reductive dissolution.

Francis,A.; Dodge, C.; Gillow, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Efficiency Improvement through Reduction in Friction and Wear in Powertrain Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to improve the efficiency of truck drivelines through reduction of friction and parasitic losses in transmission and drive axles. Known efficiencies for these products exceeded 97 percent, so the task was not trivial. The project relied on a working relationship between modeling and hardware testing. Modeling was to shorten the development cycle by guiding the selection of materials, processes and strategies. Bench top and fixture tests were to validate the models. Modeling was performed at a world class, high academic level, but in the end, modeling did not impact the hardware development as much as intended. Insights leading to the most significant accomplishments came from bench top and fixture tests and full scale dynamometer tests. A key development in the project was the formulation of the implementation strategy. Five technical elements with potential to minimize friction and parasitic losses were identified. These elements included churning, lubrication, surface roughness, coatings and textures. An interesting fact is that both Caterpillar and Eaton independently converged on the same set of technical elements in formulating their implementation strategies. Exploiting technical elements of the implementation strategy had a positive impact on transmission and drive axle efficiencies. During one dynamometer test of an Eaton Best Tech 1 transmission, all three gear ranges tested: Under drive, direct drive and over drive, showed efficiencies greater than 99 percent. Technology boosts to efficiency for transmissions reached 1 percent, while efficiency improvements to drive axle pushed 2 percent. These advancements seem small, but the accomplishment is large considering that these products normally run at greater than 97 percent efficiency. Barriers and risks to implementing these technology elements are clear. Schemes using a low fill sump and spray tubes endanger the gears and bearings by lubricant starvation. Gear coatings have exhibited durability issues, stripping away under conditions less demanding than 750,000 miles in service on the road. Failed coatings compound the problem by contaminating the lubricant with hard particles. Under the most severe conditions, super finished surfaces may polish further, reaching a surface roughness unable to support the critical oil film thickness. Low viscosity and low friction lubricants may not protect the gears and bearings adequately leading to excessive pitting, wear and noise. Additives in low friction oils may not stay in solution or suspended thus settling to the bottom and unavailable when they are needed most. Technical barriers and risks can be overcome through engineering, but two barriers remain formidable: (1) cost of the technology and (2) convincing fleet owners that the technology provides a tangible benefit. Dry sumps lower lubricant operating temperatures so the removal of heat exchangers and hoses and reduced demand on engine cooling systems justify their use. The benefits of surface texturing are varied and remain unproven. Lubricant costs seem manageable, but the cost of super finishing and gear coating are high. These are issues of scale and processing technology. Going across the board with gear super finishing and coating will reduce costs. Pushing the envelope to applications with higher torque and higher power density should drive the adoption of these technologies. Fleet owners are an educated and seasoned lot. Only technology measureable in dollars returned is used on truck fleets. To convince fleet owners of the benefit of these technologies, new precision in measuring fuel efficiency must be introduced. Legislation for a minimum standard in truck miles per gallon would also enable the use of these technologies. Improving the efficiency of truck transmissions and axle will make a noticeable impact on the fuel consumption by heavy vehicles in the United States. However, the greatest benefit will come when all the individual efficiency technologies like hybrid power, aerodynamic fairings, auxiliary power units, super

Michael Killian

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

Friction Stir Welding IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... TMS has recently partnered with Wiley for the publication of proceedings, texts, and references. This title is now available directly through the ...

7

Friction Stir Processing of Ti-6Al-4V for Grain Size Reduction in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Ti alloys, such as Ti-6Al-4V, fusion welding results in coarse-grained microstructure ... Friction Stir Spot Welding of Magnesium to Aluminum Alloys with a Cold ...

8

Heterogeneous catalysis in fluoride melts: reduction of uranium(V) and niobium(IV) by hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reduction of uranium(V) or niobium(IV) dissolved in fluoride melts at 550/sup 0/C by hydrogen gas in the absence of catalysts exhibits zero-order kinetics, i.e., the quantity reduced per unit time is independent of the concentration of dissolved species or the hydrogen gas partial pressure. Platinum catalysts accelerate the reaction rate 10- to 100-fold and, with uranium(V), the catalyzed reaction exhibits first-order kinetics, suggesting that the catalyzed reaction may be diffusion limited. Platinum was catalytically active when present as platinum black powder, sponge, sheet or powder that has sintered to or alloyed with the gold reaction crucible.

Kelmers, A.D.; Bennett, M.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Assessing the potential visibility benefits of Clean Air Act Title IV emission reductions  

SciTech Connect

Assessments are made of the benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Title IV (COVE), Phase 2, SO2 and NOX reduction provisions, to the visibility in typical eastern and western Class 1 areas. Probable bands of visibility impairment distribution curves are developed for Shenandoah National Park, Smoky Mountain National Park and the Grand Canyon National Park, based on the existing emissions, ``Base Case``, and for the COVE emission reductions, ``CAAA Case``. Emission projections for 2010 are developed with improved versions of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission projection models. Source-receptor transfer matrices created with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model are used with existing emission inventories and with the emission projections to calculate atmospheric concentrations of sulfate and nitrate at the receptors of interest for existing and projected emission scenarios. The Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) is then used to develop distributions of visibility impairment. VASM combines statistics of observed concentrations of particulate species and relative humidity with ASTRAP calculations of the relative changes in atmospheric sulfate and nitrate particulate concentrations in a Monte Carlo approach to produce expected distributions of hourly particulate concentrations and RH. Light extinction relationships developed in theoretical and field studies are then used to calculate the resulting distribution of visibility impairment. Successive Monte Carlo studies are carried out to develop sets of visibility impairment distributions with and without the COVE emission reductions to gain insight into the detectability of expected visibility improvements.

Trexler, E.C. Jr. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Shannon, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

11

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

12

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study  

SciTech Connect

Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

13

REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Final Technical Report discusses the progress was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project regarding a new technique for decreasing engine friction and wear via liner rotation. The experimental subtasks involved quantifying the reduction in engine friction for a prototype rotating liner engine relative to a comparable baseline engine. Both engine were single cylinder conversions of nominally identical production four-cylinder engines. Hot motoring tests were conducted initially and revealed that liner rotation decreased engine friction by 20% under motoring conditions. A well-established model was used to estimate that liner rotation should decrease the friction of a four-cylinder engine by 40% under hot motoring conditions. Hot motoring tear-down tests revealed that the crankshaft and valve train frictional losses were essentially the same for the two engines, as expected. However, the rotating liner engine had much lower (>70%) piston assembly friction compared to the conventional engine. Finally, we used the Instantaneous IMEP method to compare the crank-angle resolved piston assembly friction for the two engines. Under hot motoring conditions, these measurements revealed a significant reduction in piston assembly friction, especially in the vicinity of compression TDC when the lubrication regime transitions from hydrodynamic through mixed and into boundary friction. We have some remaining problems with these measurements that we expect to solve during the next few weeks. We will then perform these measurements under firing conditions. We also proposed to improve the state-of-the-art of numerical modeling of piston assembly friction for conventional engines and then to extend this model to rotating liner engines. Our research team first modeled a single ring in the Purdue ring-liner test rig. Our model showed good agreement with the test rig data for a range of speeds and loads. We then modeled a complete piston assembly in an engine. The model appears to produce the correct behavior, but we cannot quantify its strengths or weaknesses until our crank-angle-resolved measurements have been completed. Finally, we proposed and implemented a model for the effects of liner rotation on piston assembly friction. Here, we propose that the rotating liner design is analogous to the shaft-bushing mechanism. Therefore, we used the side-slip rolling friction model to simulate the effects of liner rotation. This model appears to be promising, but final analysis of its strengths and/or weaknesses must await our crank-angle-resolved measurements.

Ron Matthews

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the use of Virtual Environments: Task 1 Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK B204 The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. Specifically, this project will test the suitability of Immersive Projection Display (IPD) technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups.

Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Shaw, T.S.; Winters, J.W.; Trikouros, N.; Hess, C.

2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

15

Methods for Measuring Friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Selected solid friction tests per ASTM standards...for Coefficient of Friction Vinyl and wool tiles (preparation only) Any apparatus E 303 (E-17 on traveled surfaces) Measuring Surface

16

Micromachine friction test apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectromechanical (MEM) friction test apparatus is disclosed for determining static or dynamic friction in MEM devices. The friction test apparatus, formed by surface micromachining, is based on a friction pad supported at one end of a cantilevered beam, with the friction pad overlying a contact pad formed on the substrate. A first electrostatic actuator can be used to bring a lower surface of the friction pad into contact with an upper surface of the contact pad with a controlled and adjustable force of contact. A second electrostatic actuator can then be used to bend the cantilevered beam, thereby shortening its length and generating a relative motion between the two contacting surfaces. The displacement of the cantilevered beam can be measured optically and used to determine the static or dynamic friction, including frictional losses and the coefficient of friction between the surfaces. The test apparatus can also be used to assess the reliability of rubbing surfaces in MEM devices by producing and measuring wear of those surfaces. Finally, the friction test apparatus, which is small in size, can be used as an in situ process quality tool for improving the fabrication of MEM devices.

deBoer, Maarten P. (Albuquerque, NM); Redmond, James M. (Albuquerque, NM); Michalske, Terry A. (Cedar Crest, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Factors affecting piston ring friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The piston ring pack friction is a major contributor to the internal combustion engine mechanical friction loss. The oil control ring decides the oil supply to the top two rings in addition to being the major friction ...

Liao, Kai, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Welding – Friction Stir  

Friction welding that uses a contact rotating tool creates frictional heating of an adjacent work piece. The process employs a mixer where the two pieces touch, an area called the plastic zone, to avoid the undesirable joining (e.g. alloying) of the ...

19

An Additive Friction Stir Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction Stir Processing to Enable High Peak Combustion Pressures in Mid-sized and Heavy Duty Diesel Engines · Friction Stir Spot Welding of Magnesium to ...

20

Friction Stir Processing for Efficient Manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

Friction at contacting surfaces in relative motion is a major source of parasitic energy loss in machine systems and manufacturing processes. Consequently, friction reduction usually translates to efficiency gain and reduction in energy consumption. Furthermore, friction at surfaces eventually leads to wear and failure of the components thereby compromising reliability and durability. In order to reduce friction and wear in tribological components, material surfaces are often hardened by a variety of methods, including conventional heat treatment, laser surface hardening, and thin-film coatings. While these surface treatments are effective when used in conjunction with lubrication to prevent failure, they are all energy intensive and could potentially add significant cost. A new concept for surface hardening of metallic materials and components is Friction Stir Processing (FSP). Compared to the current surface hardening technologies, FSP is more energy efficient has no emission or waste by products and may result in better tribological performance. FSP involves plunging a rotating tool to a predetermined depth (case layer thickness) and translating the FSP tool along the area to be processed. This action of the tool produces heating and severe plastic deformation of the processed area. For steel the temperature is high enough to cause phase transformation, ultimately forming hard martensitic phase. Indeed, FSP has been used for surface modification of several metals and alloys so as to homogenize the microstructure and refine the grain size, both of which led to improved fatigue and corrosion resistance. Based on the effect of FSP on near-surface layer material, it was expected to have beneficial effects on friction and wear performance of metallic materials. However, little or no knowledge existed on the impact of FSP concerning friction and wear performance the subject of the this project and final report. Specifically for steel, which is the most dominant tribological material, FSP can replace the current conventional surface hardening techniques used for friction and wear performance. Friction Stir Link Inc. (FSL) is teamed with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to develop and optimize FSP for friction and wear performance enhancement. The ultimate goal is to offer FSP and an effective alternative to some of the current energy intensive and high-cost surface hardening processes.

Mr. Christopher B. Smith; Dr. Oyelayo Ajayi

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Cost effective energy strategies for the reduction of CO[sub 2] emissions in the United States: Country report for ETSAP Annex IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy system of the United States of America was analyzed using MARKAL. The time period of the study was 1990--2030. Projected energy demands over this period for a Reference Scenario were largely modeled after the US Energy Information Administration's 1992 Annual Energy Outlook for 1990--2010 and from the National Energy Strategy for the period 2010--2030. Expectations of maximum growth rates of conservation and renewable energy technologies were based on the same sources. Reductions in CO[sub 2] emissions were achieved by setting absolute constraints on total emissions levels by year and by carbon taxes. A 10% reduction in CO[sub 2] emissions was near the limit of technical feasibility for this scenario. This resulted in an overall cost increase of $1.1 trillion present value, but marginal costs on CO[sub 2] emissions reductions ranged up to $3300/ton. Over 70% of the CO[sub 2] emissions reduction occurred in electrical generation, partly resulting from decreases in demand for electricity. Additional scenarios were run for conditions of low economic growth and with the addition of carbon sequestering technologies.

Morris, S.C.; Marcuse, J.L.W.; Goldstein, G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Cost effective energy strategies for the reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in the United States: Country report for ETSAP Annex IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy system of the United States of America was analyzed using MARKAL. The time period of the study was 1990--2030. Projected energy demands over this period for a Reference Scenario were largely modeled after the US Energy Information Administration`s 1992 Annual Energy Outlook for 1990--2010 and from the National Energy Strategy for the period 2010--2030. Expectations of maximum growth rates of conservation and renewable energy technologies were based on the same sources. Reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions were achieved by setting absolute constraints on total emissions levels by year and by carbon taxes. A 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions was near the limit of technical feasibility for this scenario. This resulted in an overall cost increase of $1.1 trillion present value, but marginal costs on CO{sub 2} emissions reductions ranged up to $3300/ton. Over 70% of the CO{sub 2} emissions reduction occurred in electrical generation, partly resulting from decreases in demand for electricity. Additional scenarios were run for conditions of low economic growth and with the addition of carbon sequestering technologies.

Morris, S.C.; Marcuse, J.L.W.; Goldstein, G.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Friction stir welding tool  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A friction stir welding tool is described and which includes a shank portion; a shoulder portion which is releasably engageable with the shank portion; and a pin which is releasably engageable with the shoulder portion.

Tolle; Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID), Clark; Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID), Barnes; Timothy A. (Ammon, ID)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

INTERNAL FRICTION TO BERYLLIUM  

SciTech Connect

The internal friction in Be wire specimens was measured using a simple, inverted, torsional-pendulum system. Temperatures at liquid nitrogen to 735 deg C at a frequency of about 1 cps were used. (R.E.U.)

Ang, C.; Kamber, K.T.

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Topological Complexity of Frictional Interfaces: Friction Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through research conducted in this study, a network approach to the correlation patterns of void spaces in rough fractures (crack type II) was developed. We characterized friction networks with several networks characteristics. The correlation among network properties with the fracture permeability is the result of friction networks. The revealed hubs in the complex aperture networks confirmed the importance of highly correlated groups to conduct the highlighted features of the dynamical aperture field. We found that there is a universal power law between the nodes' degree and motifs frequency (for triangles it reads T(k)\\proptok{\\beta} ({\\beta} \\approx2\\pm0.3)). The investigation of localization effects on eigenvectors shows a remarkable difference in parallel and perpendicular aperture patches. Furthermore, we estimate the rate of stored energy in asperities so that we found that the rate of radiated energy is higher in parallel friction networks than it is in transverse directions. The final part of our research highlights 4 point sub-graph distribution and its correlation with fluid flow. For shear rupture, we observed a similar trend in sub-graph distribution, resulting from parallel and transversal aperture profiles (a superfamily phenomenon).

H. O. Ghaffari; R. P. Young

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

26

Biotic and Abiotic Reduction and Solubilization of Pu(IV)O2•xH2O(am) as Affected by Anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the presence of hydrogen (H{sub 2}), the synthetic chelating agent ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), and the electron shuttle anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria (DMRB) Shewanella oneidensis and Geobacter sulfurreducens both reductively solubilized 100% of added 0.5 mM plutonium (IV) hydrous oxide (Pu(IV)O{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}) in {approx}24 h at pH 7 in a non-complexing buffer. In the absence of AQDS, bioreduction was much slower ({approx}22 days) and less extensive ({approx}83-94%). In the absence of DMRB but under comparable conditions, 89% (without AQDS) to 98% (with AQDS) of added 0.5 mM PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} was reductively solubilized over 418 days. Under comparable conditions but in the absence of EDTA, Pu(aq) increased by as much as an order of magnitude in some EDTA-free treatments, both biotic and abiotic, and increases in solubility were associated with the production of both Pu(OH)3(am) and Pu(III)(aq). Incubation with DMRB in the absence of EDTA increased the polymeric and crystalline content of the PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} and also decreased Pu solubility in 6-N HCl. Results from an in vitro assay demonstrated electron transfer to PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} from the S. oneidensis outer-membrane c-type cytochrome MtrC, and EDTA increased the oxidation of MtrC by PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)}. Our results suggest that PuO{sub 2} {lg_bullet} xH{sub 2}O{sub (am)} biotic and abiotic reduction and solubilization may be important in anoxic, reducing environments, especially where complexing ligands and electron shuttling compounds are present.

Plymale, Andrew E.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Heald, Steve M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Resch, Charles T.; Moore, Dean A.; Bolton, Harvey

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

Friction-Stir Processing (Models)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2009... investigating the dynamic stress strain response of HSLA-65 under conditions ... Survey of Current Modeling Techniques for Friction Stir Welding: Dave ... friction stir welding (FSW) demands an appropriate level of accuracy, ...

28

Friction Stir Welding of Pipeline Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Friction Stir Welding and Processing VII. Presentation Title, Friction Stir ...

29

ALUMINIUM REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY: IV: Lining and Cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Now, the finite element analysis techniques (FEA) are widely used in the ... The effect of this material on the ledge profile and thermal distribution were discussed

30

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. This represents a substantial (30-40%) reduction of the ringpack friction alone. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. Further improvements via piston, lubricant, and surface designs offer additional opportunities. Tests of low-friction lubricants are in progress and preliminary results are very promising. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Piston friction studies indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% ARES engine efficiency. The design strategies developed in this study have promising potential for application in all modern reciprocating engines as they represent simple, low-cost methods to extract significant fuel savings. The current program has possible spinoffs and applications in other industries as well, including transportation, CHP, and diesel power generation. The progress made in this program has wide engine efficiency implications, and potential deployment of low-friction engine components or lubricants in the near term is possible as current investigations continue.

Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Friction surfaced Stellite6 coatings  

SciTech Connect

Solid state Stellite6 coatings were deposited on steel substrate by friction surfacing and compared with Stellite6 cast rod and coatings deposited by gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred arc welding processes. Friction surfaced coatings exhibited finer and uniformly distributed carbides and were characterized by the absence of solidification structure and compositional homogeneity compared to cast rod, gas tungsten arc and plasma transferred coatings. Friction surfaced coating showed relatively higher hardness. X-ray diffraction of samples showed only face centered cubic Co peaks while cold worked coating showed hexagonally close packed Co also. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stellite6 used as coating material for friction surfacing. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Friction surfaced (FS) coatings compared with casting, GTA and PTA processes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Finer and uniformly distributed carbides in friction surfaced coatings. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absence of melting results compositional homogeneity in FS Stellite6 coatings.

Rao, K. Prasad; Damodaram, R. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering - Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Rafi, H. Khalid, E-mail: khalidrafi@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Ram, G.D. Janaki [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India); Reddy, G. Madhusudhan [Metal Joining Group, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL) Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500 058 (India); Nagalakshmi, R. [Welding Research Institute, Bharat Heavy Electricals Limited, Tiruchirappalli 620 014 (India)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Friction Stir Welding and Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 4, 2013 ... Material flow is a key phenomenon to obtain sound joints by friction stir welding ( FSW). In this study, the material flow during FSW was ...

33

Friction and wear performance of low-friction carbon coatings under oil lubrication.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amorphous carbon coatings with very low friction properties were recently developed at Argonne National Laboratory. These coatings have shown good promise in mitigating excessive wear and scuffing problems associated with low-lubricity diesel fuels. To reduce the negative effect of sulfur and other lubricant additives in poisoning the after-treatment catalyst, a lubricant formulation with a low level of sulfur may be needed. Exclusion of proven sulfur-containing extreme pressure (EP) and antiwear additives from oils will require other measures to ensure durability of critical lubricated components. The low-friction carbon coating has the potential for such applications. In the present study, we evaluated the friction and wear attributes of three variations of the coating under a boundary lubrication regime. Tests were conducted with both synthetic and mineral oil lubricants using a ball-on-flat contact configuration in reciprocating sliding. Although the three variations of the coating provided modest reductions in friction coefficient, they all reduced wear substantially compared to an uncoated surface. The degradation mode of oxidative wear on the uncoated surface was replaced by a polishing wear mode on the coated surfaces.

Kovalchenko, A.; Ajayi, O. O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

34

Friction Stir Welding and Processing VI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010 ... Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Advanced Materials for Coal and Nuclear Power Applications · Friction Stir Welding of 25 mm Thick Al ...

35

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis is being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Low friction ring designs have already been recommended in a previous phase, with full-scale engine validation partially completed. Current accomplishments include the addition of several additional power cylinder design areas to the overall system analysis. These include analyses of lubricant and cylinder surface finish and a parametric study of piston design. The Waukesha engine was found to be already well optimized in the areas of lubricant, surface skewness and honing cross-hatch angle, where friction reductions of 12% for lubricant, and 5% for surface characteristics, are projected. For the piston, a friction reduction of up to 50% may be possible by controlling waviness alone, while additional friction reductions are expected when other parameters are optimized. A total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% efficiency. Key elements of the continuing work include further analysis and optimization of the engine piston design, in-engine testing of recommended lubricant and surface designs, design iteration and optimization of previously recommended technologies, and full-engine testing of a complete, optimized, low-friction power cylinder system.

Victor Wong; Tian Tian; Luke Moughon; Rosalind Takata; Jeffrey Jocsak

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

36

Friction microprobe investigation of particle layer effects on sliding friction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interfacial particles (third-bodies), resulting from wear or external contamination, can alter and even dominate the frictional behavior of solid-solid sliding in the absence of effective particle removal processes (e.g., lubricant flow). A unique friction microprobe, developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was used to conduct fine- scale friction studies using 1.0 mm diameter stainless steel spheres sliding on several sizes of loose layers of fine aluminum oxide powders on both aluminum and alumina surfaces. Conventional, pin-on-disk experiments were conducted to compare behavior with the friction microprobe results. The behavior of the relatively thick particle layers was found to be independent of the nature of underlying substrate, substantiating previous work by other investigators. The time-dependent behavior of friction, for a spherical macrocontact starting from rest, could generally be represented by a series of five rather distinct phases involving static compression, slider breakaway, transition to steady state, and dynamic layer instability. A friction model for the steady state condition, which incorporates lamellar powder layer behavior, is described.

Blau, P.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Pityriasis rubra pilaris, type IV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pityriasis rubra pilaris, type IV Jennifer Bragg MD,rubra pilaris (PRP), type IV (circumscribed juvenile).Type IV PRP develops in prepubertal children, is typically

Bragg, Jennifer; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka; Orlow, Seth J; Schaffer, Julie V

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Instantaneous engine frictional torque, its components and piston assembly friction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this report is to document the work done to determine the instantaneous frictional torque of internal combustion engine by using a new approach known as (P-[omega]) method developed at Wayne State University. The emphasis has been to improve the accuracy of the method, and apply it to both diesel and gasoline engines under different operating conditions. Also work included an investigation to determine the effect of using advanced materials and techniques to coat the piston rings on the instantaneous engine frictional torque and the piston assembly friction. The errors in measuring the angular velocity, [omega], have been determined and found to be caused by variations in the divisions within one encoder, encoder-to-encoder variations, misalignment within the encoder itself and misalignment between the encoder and crankshaft. The errors in measuring the cylinder gas pressure, P, have been determined and found to be caused by transducer-to-transducer variations, zero drift, thermal stresses and lack of linearity. The ability of the (P-[omega]) method in determining the frictional torque of many engine components has been demonstrated. These components include valve train, fuel injection pump with and without fuel injection, and piston with and without different ring combinations. The emphasis in this part of the research program has been on the piston-ring assembly friction. The effects of load and other operating variables on IFT have been determined. The motoring test, which is widely used in industry to measure engine friction has been found to be inaccurate. The errors have been determined at different loads.

Nichols, F.A. (ed.) (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Henein, N.A. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Center for Automotive Research)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Fluctuating-friction molecular motors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We show that the correlated stochastic fluctuation of the friction coefficient can give rise to long-range directional motion of a particle undergoing Brownian random walk in a constant periodic energy potential landscape. The occurrence of this motion requires the presence of two additional independent bodies interacting with the particle via friction and via the energy potential, respectively, which can move relative to each other. Such three-body system generalizes the classical Brownian ratchet mechanism, which requires only two interacting bodies. In particular, we describe a simple two-level model of fluctuating-friction molecular motor that can be solved analytically. In our previous work [M.K., L.M and D.P. 2000 J. Nonlinear Opt. Phys. Mater. 9 157] this model has been first applied to understanding the fundamental mechanism of the photoinduced reorientation of dye-doped liquid crystals. Applications of the same idea to other fields such as molecular biology and nanotechnology can however be envisioned. As an example, in this paper we work out a model of the actomyosin system based on the fluctuating-friction mechanism. PACS numbers: 05.40.+j, 42.70.Df, 87.10.+eFluctuating-friction molecular motors 2 1.

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Photovoltaic I-V curve measurement techniques  

SciTech Connect

Performance evaluation of photovoltaic (PV) arrays under actual field conditions provides important feedback to the module design process. One of the principal methods for assessing an array's performance is to plot its current, I, versus voltage, V, curve. Following a brief review of techniques for measuring the I-V curve, a new, capacitive-based approach is presented. It uses a rapid sweep of the I-V curve that substantially reduces the average power transfer between array and load, and in turn, substantially reduces the size and weight of the curve tracer. Both theoretical and practical aspects of the approach are presented for a 10-kW unit. Performance is verified by comparison with I-V curves obtained by using a conventional load. The agreement is found to be excellent. Approximately an order of magnitude reduction in size, weight and power consumption over conventional units was realized with the experimental I-V curve tracer.

Cox, C.H.; Warner, T.H.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Generation IV Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an international initiative. A group of ten nations, including France, Japan, Russia, Korea, China, and Canada, are participating in the planning and development of Generation IV...

42

Friction Stir Welding and Processing VII  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sponsorship, TMS Materials Processing and Manufacturing Division .... Processing and Characterization of Cu-Mo Composite Via Additive Friction Stir ...

43

Available Technologies: Electronic Control of Friction on ...  

... motor vehicles, and tools. Existing methods of friction control involve permanently modifying surfaces by adding lubricant layers and hard ...

44

Low-Engine-Friction Technology for Advanced Natural-Gas Reciprocating Engines  

SciTech Connect

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston and piston ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and wear. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis has been followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. In this program, a detailed set of piston and piston-ring dynamic and friction models have been adapted and applied that illustrate the fundamental relationships among mechanical, surface/material and lubricant design parameters and friction losses. Demonstration of low-friction ring-pack designs in the Waukesha VGF 18GL engine confirmed ring-pack friction reduction of 30-40%, which translates to total engine FEMP (friction mean effective pressure) reduction of 7-10% from the baseline configuration without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. The study on surface textures, including roughness characteristics, cross hatch patterns, dimples and grooves have shown that even relatively small-scale changes can have a large effect on ring/liner friction, in some cases reducing FMEP by as much as 30% from a smooth surface case. The measured FMEP reductions were in good agreement with the model predictions. The combined analysis of lubricant and surface design indicates that low-viscosity lubricants can be very effective in reducing friction, subject to component wear for extremely thin oils, which can be mitigated with further lubricant formulation and/or engineered surfaces. Hence a combined approach of lubricant design and appropriate wear reduction offers improved potential for minimum engine friction loss. Testing of low-friction lubricants showed that total engine FMEP reduced by up to {approx}16.5% from the commercial reference oil without significantly increasing oil consumption or blow-by flow. Piston friction studies indicate that a flatter piston with a more flexible skirt, together with optimizing the waviness and film thickness on the piston skirt offer significant friction reduction. Combined with low-friction ring-pack, material and lubricant parameters, a total power cylinder friction reduction of 30-50% is expected, translating to an engine efficiency increase of two percentage points from its current baseline towards the goal of 50% ARES engine efficiency. The design strategies developed in this study have promising potential for application in all modern reciprocating engines as they represent simple, low-cost methods to extract significant fuel savings. The current program has possible spinoffs and applications in other industries as well, including transportation, CHP, and diesel power generation. The progress made in this program has wide engine efficiency implications, and potential deployment of low-friction engine components or lubricants in the near term is quite possible.

Victor Wong; Tian Tian; G. Smedley; L. Moughon; Rosalind Takata; J. Jocsak

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

Fluctuating-friction molecular motors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the correlated stochastic fluctuation of the friction coefficient can give rise to long-range directional motion of a particle undergoing Brownian random walk in a constant periodic energy potential landscape. The occurrence of this motion requires the presence of two additional independent bodies interacting with the particle via friction and via the energy potential, respectively, which can move relative to each other. Such three-body system generalizes the classical Brownian ratchet mechanism, which requires only two interacting bodies. In particular, we describe a simple two-level model of fluctuating-friction molecular motor that can be solved analytically. In our previous work [M.K., L.M and D.P. 2000 J. Nonlinear Opt. Phys. Mater. vol. 9, 157] this model has been first applied to understanding the fundamental mechanism of the photoinduced reorientation of dye-doped liquid crystals. Applications of the same idea to other fields such as molecular biology and nanotechnology can however be envisioned. As an example, in this paper we work out a model of the actomyosin system based on the fluctuating-friction mechanism.

Lorenzo Marrucci; Domenico Paparo; Markus Kreuzer

2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

46

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV. ... NIST announces the Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV to be held on November 2, 3 and 4, 2011. ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

47

EVALUATION OF A LOW FRICTION - HIGH EFFICIENCY ROLLER BEARING ENGINE  

SciTech Connect

This Low Friction (High Efficiency Roller Bearing) Engine (LFE) report presents the work done by The Timken Company to conduct a technology demonstration of the benefits of replacing hydrodynamic bearings with roller bearings in the crankshaft and camshaft assemblies of an internal combustion engine for the purpose of collecting data sufficient to prove merit. The engines in the present study have been more extensively converted to roller bearings than any previous studies (40 needle roller bearings per engine) to gain understanding of the full potential of application of bearing technology. The project plan called for comparative testing of a production vehicle which was already respected for having demonstrated low engine friction levels with a rollerized version of that engine. Testing was to include industry standard tests for friction, emissions and fuel efficiency conducted on instrumented dynamometers. Additional tests for fuel efficiency, cold start resistance and other measures of performance were to be made in the actual vehicle. Comparative measurements of noise, vibration and harshness (NVH), were planned, although any work to mitigate the suspected higher NVH level in the rollerized engine was beyond the scope of this project. Timken selected the Toyota Avalon with a 3.5L V-6 engine as the test vehicle. In an attempt to minimize cost and fabrication time, a ‘made-from’ approach was proposed in which as many parts as possible would be used or modified from production parts to create the rollerized engine. Timken commissioned its test partner, FEV Engine Technology, to do a feasibility study in which they confirmed that using such an approach was possible to meet the required dimensional restrictions and tolerances. In designing the roller bearing systems for the crank and cam trains, Timken utilized as many production engine parts as possible. The crankshafts were produced from production line forgings, which use Timken steel, modified with special machining and heat treatment. Timken designed and manufactured all of the roller bearing related components such as the thrust bearing package. The production connecting rods and camshafts could not be used for the roller bearing engine, so new ones were produced according to the team’s designs using Timken steel. The remaining miscellaneous components were designed and procured by FEV. Timken prepared a display version of the crankshaft portion of the production engine without connecting rods which could be driven by a motor through a cogged-belt and electrically actuated clutch arrangement. A modified version was also made in which the engine was outfitted with roller bearings on the main bearing positions. Preliminary tests showed that the rollerized engine was running with 1/3 less friction than the standard display engine. Additional friction testing and noise characterization was cut short because of shipping damage to the rollerized engine display and because of other project priorities. The team did successfully demonstrate the ability to package roller bearings satisfactorily in numerous locations in a typical automotive engine. The scope of this project did not include durability demonstration and that subject would have to be addressed in any follow-on work. In the actual test phase, the rollerized engine did show significantly less friction in motored dynamometer tests compared to its production equivalent. The 5-10% improvement measured in this study was about half that seen in other studies. However, the fired test results did not show a reduction in friction which did not match prior experience or expectations. Subsequent teardown and inspection of the rollerized engine revealed potential sources of excessive friction in the experimental application. These features would be eliminated in a design not based on modification of production parts. The team is confident (based on experience) that friction reduction would be realized with proper modifications.

Kolarik, Robert V. II; Shattuck, Charles W.; Copper, Anthony P.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

Adaptive friction compensation for permanent magnet linear synchronous motor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper discussed an adaptive friction compensation scheme based on Coulomb friction and a parameter identifier. The model reference adaptive system based on Coulomb friction was designed to compensate the friction on-line. The designed model reference ... Keywords: friction compensation, model reference adaptive control, parameter identification, permanent magnet linear synchronous motor (PMLSM)

Wang Li-Mei; Wu Lin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Generation -IV Reactor Concepts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Thomas H. Fanning Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA The Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) is a multi-national research and development (R&D) collaboration. The GIF pursues the development of advanced, next generation reactor technology with goals to improve: a) sustainability (effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste) b) economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources) c) safety and reliability (e.g., no need for offsite emergency response), and d) proliferation resistance and physical protection The GIF Technology Roadmap exercise selected six generic systems for further study: the Gas- cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),

50

Friction Stir Welding: High Temperature Materials I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Friction Stir Welding of Pipeline Steels: Murray Mahoney1; Samuel .... Over 135 feet of weld length was achieved with a single W-based tool ...

51

Friction Stir Welding: High Temperature Materials II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Enhanced Friction Stir Welding of Titanium Using Elemental Foils: Richard Fonda 1; Keith Knipling1; 1Naval Research Laboratory

52

Across Inertia Friction Welded Alloy 720Li  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

kinetic energy stored in the rotating flywheel is dissipated as heat through friction/ shearing at the weld interface. In this way, it is possible to join advanced ...

53

Generation IV (Gen IV) - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation IV (Gen Generation IV (Gen IV) Generation IV Overview Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr Major Programs Generation IV (Gen IV) Development of next generation nuclear systems featuring significant advances in sustainability, economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Bookmark and Share Generation IV Fact Sheet (73 KB) Overview Generation IV nuclear energy systems target significant advances over current-generation and evolutionary systems in the areas of sustainability, safety and reliability, and economics. These systems are to be deployable by 2030 in both industrialized and developing countries. Development of Generation IV systems is an international initiative. A

54

Stabilizing stick-slip friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even the most regular stick-slip frictional sliding is always stochastic, with irregularity in both the intervals between slip events and the sizes of the associated stress drops. Applying small-amplitude oscillations to the shear force, we show, experimentally and theoretically, that the stick-slip periods synchronize. We further show that this phase-locking is related to the inhibition of slow rupture modes which forces a transition to fast rupture, providing a possible mechanism for observed remote triggering of earthquakes. Such manipulation of collective modes may be generally relevant to extended nonlinear systems driven near to criticality.

Rosario Capozza; Shmuel M. Rubinstein; Itay Barel; Michael Urbakh; Jay Fineberg

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

55

Energy conversion device and method of reducing friction therein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device configured for converting energy includes a first surface, a second surface configured for moving with respect to the first surface during operation of the device, and a coating disposed on at least one of the first surface and the second surface. The coating includes a first layer of a ceramic alloy represented by the general formula AlMgB.sub.14--X, wherein X is present in an amount of from 0 to 70 parts by weight based on 100 parts by weight of the ceramic alloy and is a doping agent selected from the group of Group IV elements and borides and nitrides thereof, and a second layer disposed on the first layer and including carbon in a gradient concentration. The coating has a hardness of from 10 to 20 GPa and a coefficient of friction of less than or equal to 0.12.

Solovyeva, Lyudmila Mikhaylovna; Jansson, Kyle S; Elmoursi, Alaa AbdelAzim; Zhu, Dong; Milner, Robert; Daughterty, Early Eugene; Higdon, Clifton Baxter; Elagamy, Kamel Abdel-Khalik; Hicks, Aaron Michael

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

56

Friction Stir Welding and Processing III TABLE OF CONTENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction Stir Welding of Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys [pp. 35] R. Cook ... Fatigue of Pre-Corroded 2024-T3 Friction Stir Welds: Experiment and Prediction [pp. 43

57

Material Flow and Texture in Friction Extruded Wire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Material Flow and Texture in Friction Extruded Wire ... conducted during friction extrusion of AA6061 wire with AA2195 as a marker insert.

58

Slippery When Stacked: NIST Theorists Quantify the Friction of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Slippery When Stacked: NIST Theorists Quantify the Friction of Graphene. ... Effect of elastic deformation on frictional properties of few-layer graphene. ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

59

Main Results of Grossversuch IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main results of a randomized hail suppression experiment, Grossversuch IV, are presented in this paper. Grossversuch IV tested the “Soviet” hail prevention method during five years (1977–81). The field experiment took place in central ...

B. Federer; A. Waldvogel; W. Schmid; H. H. Schiesser; F. Hampel; Marianne Schweingruber; W. Stahel; J. Bader; J. F. Mezeix; Nadie Doras; G. D'Aubigny; G. DerMegreditchian; D. Vento

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Spectrophotometric determination of uranium(IV) with Arsenazo III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectrophotometric procedure was developed for determining U(IV) in the presence of U(VI) by forming a colored complex with Arsenazo III in 4M HCl. The results compare satisfactorily with U(IV) determinations by ceric titration. Total uranium can be determined after reduction of U(VI) with metallic zinc. The concentration range for the absorbance cell solution is 0 to 2 ..mu..g U(IV)/mL. Other tetravalent ions, such as thorium, zirconium, hafnium, plutonium, and neptunium, will interfere.

Baumann, E.W.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

* ^ -^. «*'*: IV: .<:.**  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

* ^ -^. «*'*: IV: .<:.**,.,? '* -^^V; , *"'^"T-'^T * .^'^ **'*--'"-* *'*V-; "'^ v ^V ^^-^^;-'jl^'-^^i5^^v>^Ll-';.i»S-'^^^ * . '"* L"".'"-'?_,. -*'-_*:'?'. v>;': |: ,^% ;'. >' 4-.**;- *"-.''' * Lite -^ t.-^»!, m ". *Bfc' Table 8. Foreign Crude Oil and Natural Gas Liquids Reserve Interest for FRS Companies, 1983 and Percent Change from 1982 Crude Oil and Reserves Total OECD Foreign___Canada___Europe Africa___Mtdeast Other Eastern Hemisphere Other Western Hemisphere 1983 (million barrels) Total Crude and |GL

62

Modeling the effect of engine assembly mass on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, an analytical model is developed to estimate the impact of reducing engine assembly mass (the term engine assembly refers to the moving components of the engine system, including crankshafts, valve train, pistons, and connecting rods) on engine friction and vehicle fuel economy. The relative changes in frictional mean effective pressure and fuel economy are proportional to the relative change in assembly mass. These changes increase rapidly as engine speed increases. Based on the model, a 25% reduction in engine assembly mass results in a 2% fuel economy improvement for a typical mid-size passenger car over the EPA Urban and Highway Driving Cycles.

An, Feng [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States); Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Model of Unemployment with Matching Frictions and Job Rationing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stochastic general equilibrium model in which large, monopolistic firms face a labor market with matching frictions,

Michaillat, Pascal

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Surprising Coordination Geometry Differences in Ce(IV)- and Pu(IV)-Maltol Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Differences in Ce(IV)- and Pu(IV)-Maltol Complexes [1] Gézacoordination behavior of Pu(IV), single crystal X-rayhave been determined for Pu(IV) and Ce(IV) complexes with

Szigethy, Geza; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Does Ekman Friction Suppress Baroclinic Instability?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of Ekman friction on baroclinic instability is reexamined in order to address questions raised by Farrell concerning the existence of normal mode instability in the atmosphere. As the degree of meridional confinement is central to the ...

Shian-Jiann Lin; Raymond T. Pierrehumbert

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Normal Mode Initialization with Elementary Surface Friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various normal-mode initialization techniques are applied to a simple 12-level linear model with boundary layer friction, and results are compared to exact solutions of the model. It is found that Machenhauer's initialization scheme gives an ...

Bradley A. Ballish; Ferdinand Baer

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Friction Stir Welding and Processing II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jan 1, 2007 ... Friction Stir Welding and Processing II by K.V. Jata, M.W. Mahoney, R.S. Mishra, S.L. Semiatin, and T. Lienert, editors ...

68

Friction Stir Welding: Light Materials II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013... interests to automotive industry due to fuel economy and emission regulation. .... a mixture solution of ice and water to freeze the microstructure. ... for the friction stir weld tool, have produced joints of adequate performance, ...

69

Frictional forces in helical buckling of tubing  

SciTech Connect

Previous analyses of helical buckling of tubing have not considered frictional forces. This paper describes the modifications to helical buckling theory necessary to include friction. The first need is a relationship between the buckling force and the casing to tubing contact force. This contact force is determined through use of the principle of virtual work. The next need is the relationship between the friction forces, the buckling force, and the geometry of the tubing helix. Differential equations are derived and solved for two cases of interest: buckling during the landing of the tubing and thermal and differential pressure loading subsequent to landing. Several example problems are examined to evaluate the relative importance of friction.

Mitchell, R.F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Novel reactions of a neutral organic reductant : reductive coupling and nanoparticle synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recently developed bis-pyridinylidene neutral organic electron donor captured our interest as a potential source of new chemistries for reductive coupling and the synthesis of group IV nanoparticles. This super electron ...

Mork, Anna Jolene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Enhancing Thermal Conductivity and Reducing Friction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory currently has several projects underway to develop advanced fluids, films, coatings, and Laboratory currently has several projects underway to develop advanced fluids, films, coatings, and processes to improve thermal conductivity and reduce friction. These measures are helping to increase energy efficiency for next-generation transportation applications. Superhard and Slick Coating (SSC) Opportunity: Friction, wear, and lubrication strongly affect the energy efficiency, durability, and environmental compatibility of

72

REDUCED ENGINE FRICTION AND WEAR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress was made on experimental and numerical subtasks during the second 6-month period of this project. One of the experimental subtasks scheduled for completion during the first 6 months was delayed due to a delay in receiving the prototype RLE face seal from the vendor. This component was acquired and testing was completed during the second 6 months. The test results indicate that this face seal fulfills the engineering objectives. The other experimental subtask scheduled for completion during the second 6-month period was final assembly of the prototype rotating liner engine. This subtask was completed on schedule. No results from this subtask were scheduled for this reporting period. One numerical subtask, development of the governing equations, was scheduled for completion during the first 6-month period but was completed during the second 6 months. However, we expect to re-explore these as we learn more throughout the course of the project. Two other numerical subtasks were scheduled to begin during the second 6 months: formulating the numerical equations governing piston assembly friction and coding/testing the resulting model. These subtasks were not scheduled for completion during this reporting period. Satisfactory progress was made.

Ron Matthews

2003-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

73

dBASE IV basics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user`s manual for dBASE IV. dBASE IV is a popular software application that can be used on your personal computer to help organize and maintain your database files. It is actually a set of tools with which you can create, organize, select and manipulate data in a simple yet effective manner. dBASE IV offers three methods of working with the product: (1) control center: (2) command line; and (3) programming.

O`Connor, P.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Session IV - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2011 ... Nanotechnology for Energy, Healthcare and Industry : Session IV ... and at conferences for economic development and job creation through ...

75

Status of Stellite 6 friction testing  

SciTech Connect

For the past several years, researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, have been investigating the performance of motor-operated valves subjected to design basis flow and pressure loads. Part of this research addresses the friction that occurs at the interface between the valve disc and the valve body seats during operation of a gate valve. In most gate valves, these surfaces are hardfaced with Stellite 6, a cobalt-based alloy. Analytical methods exist for predicting the thrust needed to operate these valves at specific pressure conditions. To produce accurate valve thrust predictions, the analyst must have a reasonably accurate, though conservative, estimate of the coefficient of friction at the disc-to-seat interface. One of the questions that remains to be answered is whether, and to what extent, aging of the disc and seat surfaces effects the disc-to-seat coefficient of friction. Specifically, does the environment in a nuclear plants piping system cause the accumulation of an oxide film on these surfaces that increases the coefficient of friction; and if so, how great is the increase? This paper presents results of specimen tests addressing this issue, with emphasis on the following: (1) the characteristics and thickness of the oxide film that develops on Stellite 6 as it ages; (2) the change in the friction coefficient of Stellite 6 as it ages, including the question of whether the friction coefficient eventually reaches a plateau; and (3) the effect in-service cycling has on the characteristics and thickness of the oxide film and on the friction coefficient.

Watkins, J.C.; DeWall, K.G. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Weidenhamer, G.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Initial Development in Joining of ODS Alloys Using Friction Stir Welding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid-state welding of oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) alloy MA956 sheets using friction stir welding (FSW) was investigated. Butt weld was successfully produced. The weld and base metals were characterized using optical microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, and energy dispersion x-ray spectrum. Microhardness mapping was also conducted over the weld region. Analyses indicate that the distribution of the strengthening oxides was preserved in the weld. Decrease in microhardness of the weld was observed but was insignificant. The preliminary results seem to confirm the envisioned feasibility of FSW application to ODS alloy joining. For application to Gen IV nuclear reactor heat exchanger, further investigation is suggested.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lab IV - 1 LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY In this lab you will begin to use the principle of conservation of energy to determine the motion resulting from interactions that are difficult to analyze using force concepts alone. You will explore how conservation of energy is applied to real interactions. Keep

Minnesota, University of

78

EnvWiltonIV-EIS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Draft EIS Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Draft EIS Western Area Power Administration (Western) prepared this draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) in response to a request from NextEra Energy Resources, LLC (NextEra), on behalf of its subsidiary Wilton Wind IV, LLC (Wilton IV), to interconnect its proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center (Project) to Western's power transmission system. The proposed Project is a wind turbine generation facility located in Burleigh County, North Dakota. It would consist of 62 wind turbine generators, with a total nameplate capacity of approximately 99 MW. NextEra has also requested that the existing interconnection contracts for the Wilton Wind I Energy Center (formerly known as Burleigh County Wind), Wilton Wind II Energy Center, and the Baldwin Wind Energy Center (together called the Existing Projects) be modified to lift their administrative 50 average annual MW production caps.

79

Method and device for frictional welding  

SciTech Connect

A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

Peacock, Harold B. (867 N. Belair Rd., Evans, GA 30809)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Method and device for frictional welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical canister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel's recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained. 5 figs.

Peacock, H.B.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CAM/LIFTER forces and friction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the procedures used to measure the cam/lifter forces and friction. The present effort employed a Cummins LTA-10, and focuses on measurements and dynamic modeling of the injector train. The program was sponsored by the US Department of Energy in support of advanced diesel engine technology. The injector train was instrumented to record the instantaneous roller speed, roller pin friction torque, pushrod force, injector link force and cam speed. These measurements, together with lift profiles for pushrod and injector link displacement, enabled the friction work loss in the injector train to be determined. Other significant design criteria such as camshaft roller follower slippage and maximum loads on components were also determined. Future efforts will concentrate on the dynamic model, with tests run as required for correlation.

Gabbey, D.J.; Lee, J.; Patterson, D.J.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Method and device for frictional welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for friction welding that produces a seal having essentially no gas porosity, comprises two rotationally symmetric, generally cylindrical members, spaced apart and coaxially aligned, that are rotated with respect to each other and brought together under high pressure. One member is preferably a generally cylindrical cannister that stores uranium within its hollow walls. The other member is preferably a generally cylindrical, hollow weld ring. An annular channel formed in the weld ring functions as an internal flash trap and is uniquely designed so that substantially all of the welding flash generated from the friction welding is directed into the channel`s recessed bottom. Also, the channel design limits distortion of the two members during the friction welding, process, further contributing to the complete seal that is obtained.

Peacock, H.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Rigidity sensing by stochastic sliding friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sliding friction force exerted by stochastic linkers interacting with a moving filament is calculated. The elastic properties of the substrate on which the linkers are anchored are shown to strongly influence the friction force. In some cases, the force is maximal for a finite substrate rigidity. Collective effects give rise to a dynamical instability resulting in a stick-slip behaviour, which is substrate-sensitive. The relevance of these results for the motility of crawling cells powered by an actin retrograde flow is discussed.

Pierre Sens

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

Comments on “Frictional Dissipation in a Precipitating Atmosphere”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pauluis et al. argue that frictional dissipation of energy around falling hydrometeors is an important entropy source in the tropical atmosphere. Their calculations suggest that the frictional dissipation around hydrometeors is about ? of the ...

Nilton O. Rennó

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Friction Control Solutions Inc FriCSo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Friction Control Solutions Inc FriCSo Friction Control Solutions Inc FriCSo Jump to: navigation, search Name Friction Control Solutions Inc. (FriCSo) Place Farmington Hills, Michigan Zip 48331 Product FriCSo offers surface engineering solutions to reduce friction between metal parts and its resulting costs. Main market targeted is engine manufacturing for the shipping and military industries. References Friction Control Solutions Inc. (FriCSo)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Friction Control Solutions Inc. (FriCSo) is a company located in Farmington Hills, Michigan . References ↑ "Friction Control Solutions Inc. (FriCSo)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Friction_Control_Solutions_Inc_FriCSo&oldid=345507"

86

Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Nickel Based Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Joining and Sustaining of Superalloys. Presentation Title, Friction Stir Welding ...

87

Fundamentals of Friction Stir Welding and Processing Short Course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Meeting Home · Meeting Registration · Curriculum · About the Presenters · Housing · Sponsor · Download Flyer. Fundamentals of Friction Stir Welding and ...

88

Wind Waves and Moveable-Bed Bottom Friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of moveable-bed bottom friction for wave observations and wave modeling are investigated using a state-of-the-art bottom friction model. This model combines the hydrodynamic friction model of Madsen et al. with a moveable-bed roughness ...

Hendrik L. Tolman

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Alta IV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IV IV Jump to: navigation, search Name Alta IV Facility Alta IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Terra-Gen Power Developer Terra-Gen Power Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi Pass CA Coordinates 35.01917213°, -118.3031845° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.01917213,"lon":-118.3031845,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF Pa(IV), Np(IV), AND Pu(IV) BOROHYDRIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a ( I V ) , N p ( I V ) , AND Pu(IV) BOROHYDRIDES Rodney H.borohydrides of Pa, Np, and Pu have been pre­ pared and someU(BH. ,)Pu(BHi<)ii are much more volatile

Banks, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The influence of surface topography on the forming friction of automotive aluminum sheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interest in utilizing aluminum alloys in automobiles has increased in recent years as a result of the desire to lower automobile weight and, consequently, increase fuel economy. While aluminum alloy use in cast parts has increased, outer body panel applications are still being investigated. The industry is interested in improving the formability of these sheet alloys by a combination of alloy design and processing. A different avenue of improving the formability of these alloys may be through patterning of the sheet surface. Surface patterns hold the lubricant during the forming process, with a resulting decrease in the sheet-die surface contact. While it has been speculated that an optimum surface pattern would consist of discrete cavities, detailed investigation into the reduction of forming friction by utilizing discrete patterns is lacking. A series of discrete patterns were investigated to determine the dependence of the forming friction of automotive aluminum alloys on pattern lubricant carrying capacity and on material strength. Automotive aluminum alloys used in outer body panel applications were rolled on experimental rolls that had been prepared with a variety of discrete patterns. All patterns for each alloy were characterized before and after testing both optically and, to determine pattern lubricant capacity, using three dimensional laser profilometry. A draw bead simulation (DBS) friction tester was designed and fabricated to determine the forming friction of the patterned sheets. Tensile testing and frictionless DBS testing were performed to ascertain the material properties of each sheet. The most striking result of this work was the inversely linear dependence of forming friction on the lubricant carrying capacity of the discrete patterns.

Kramer, P.A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Shiloh IV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shiloh IV Shiloh IV Facility Shiloh IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EDF Renewable Energy Developer EDF Renewable Energy Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Location Birds Landing CA Coordinates 38.13891092°, -121.8480349° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.13891092,"lon":-121.8480349,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

93

Some Hamiltonian models of friction II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper we consider the motion of a very heavy tracer particle in a medium of a very dense, non-interacting Bose gas. We prove that, in a certain mean-field limit, the tracer particle will be decelerated and come to rest somewhere in the medium. Friction is caused by emission of Cerenkov radiation of gapless modes into the gas. Mathematically, a system of semilinear integro-differential equations, introduced in Froehlich et al. ['Some hamiltonian models of friction,' J. Math. Phys. 52(8), 083508 (2011)], describing a tracer particle in a dispersive medium is investigated, and decay properties of the solution are proven. This work is an extension of Froehlich et al. ['Friction in a model of hamiltonian dynamics,' Commun. Math. Phys. 315(2), 401-444 (2012)]; it is an extension because no weak coupling limit for the interaction between tracer particle and medium is assumed. The technical methods used are dispersive estimates and a contraction principle.

Egli, Daniel; Gang Zhou [Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH Zurich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Instantaneous engine frictional torque, its components and piston assembly friction. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this report is to document the work done to determine the instantaneous frictional torque of internal combustion engine by using a new approach known as (P-{omega}) method developed at Wayne State University. The emphasis has been to improve the accuracy of the method, and apply it to both diesel and gasoline engines under different operating conditions. Also work included an investigation to determine the effect of using advanced materials and techniques to coat the piston rings on the instantaneous engine frictional torque and the piston assembly friction. The errors in measuring the angular velocity, {omega}, have been determined and found to be caused by variations in the divisions within one encoder, encoder-to-encoder variations, misalignment within the encoder itself and misalignment between the encoder and crankshaft. The errors in measuring the cylinder gas pressure, P, have been determined and found to be caused by transducer-to-transducer variations, zero drift, thermal stresses and lack of linearity. The ability of the (P-{omega}) method in determining the frictional torque of many engine components has been demonstrated. These components include valve train, fuel injection pump with and without fuel injection, and piston with and without different ring combinations. The emphasis in this part of the research program has been on the piston-ring assembly friction. The effects of load and other operating variables on IFT have been determined. The motoring test, which is widely used in industry to measure engine friction has been found to be inaccurate. The errors have been determined at different loads.

Nichols, F.A. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Henein, N.A. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Center for Automotive Research

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Experimental Study on Friction Welding of 6063 Aluminium Alloy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction pressure, upset pressure, burn-off length is varied and rotational speed and ... and Microstructure of Tandem Submerged Arc Welded X80 Pipeline Steel.

96

Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Advanced Materials for Coal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Friction Stir Welding and Processing of Advanced Materials for Coal and Nuclear Power Applications. Author(s), Glenn J. Grant, Scott Weil, ...

97

Development of Friction Stir Welding Technology for Coal and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Development of Friction Stir Welding Technology for Coal and ... Abstract Scope, Most ferritic/martensitic steels used in coal and nuclear plant ...

98

Friction Stir Processing as a Base Metal Preparation Technique for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of fusion zone and heat affected zone grain refinement is a unique ... Friction Stir Spot Welding of Magnesium to Aluminum Alloys with a Cold ...

99

Fabrication of surface composite via additive friction stir technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this presentation additive friction stir technology is demonstrated as viable surface composite ... Conditioning of Composite Lubricant Powder for Cold Spray .

100

Allocation Reductions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allocation Allocation Reductions Quarterly Allocation Reductions MPP (or computational) repositories that haven't used significant amounts of time are adjusted at certain times by transferring a part of the unused balance to the corresponding DOE Office reserve. The following schedule will be used for allocation year 2014 (which runs 14 January 2014 through 132January 2015). On April 9: if usage is less than 10% remove 25% of the unused balance On July 9: if usage is less than 25% remove 25% of the unused balance if usage is less than 10% remove 50% of the unused balance On October 8: if usage is less than 50% remove 25% of the unused balance if usage is less than 25% remove 75% of the unused balance if usage is less than 10% remove 90% of the unused balance On November 5:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Friction and lubrication in metal rolling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ellipticity 'IjJ (appendix E). (= a/ c in chapter 3) , real area of contact ratio. length of arc of contact in rolling (chapters 4 and 5). semi-axis of Hertz contact ellipse in transverse direction (appendix E). half indenter spacing (chapter 3). half... the friction and lubrication conditions are especially critical. This is confirm~d by Cheng [15], who discusses the practical requirements of an aluminium foil rolling lubricant and is demonstrated in a theoretical analysis of foil rolling by Fleck and J...

Sutcliffe, Michael Patrick Forbes

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

102

Surface Wind over Tropical Oceans: Diagnosis of the Momentum Balance, and Modeling the Linear Friction Coefficient  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous diagnostic studies of surface wind momentum balances over tropical oceans showed that, under a linear friction assumption, the meridional friction coefficient is two to three times larger than the zonal friction coefficient, and that ...

John C. H. Chiang; Stephen E. Zebiak

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

PREPARATION OF URANIUM(IV) NITRATE SOLUTIONS  

SciTech Connect

A procedure was developed for the preparation of uranium(IV) nitrate solutions in dilute nitric acid. Zinc metal was used as a reducing agent for uranium(VI) in dilute sulfuric acid. The uranium(IV) was precipitated as the hydrated oxide and dissolved in nitric acid. Uranium(IV) nitrate solutions were prepared at a maximum concentration of 100 g/l. The uranium(VI) content was less than 2% of the uranium(IV). (auth)

Ondrejcin, R.S.

1961-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: IV ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FUNDAMENTALS OF GAMMA TITANIUM ALUMINIDES: Session IV: Microstructure/Property Relationships--Strength, Plasticity, and Toughness. Sponsored by: ...

105

HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS: IV: BSCCO and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS: Session IV: BSCCO and TBCCO Conductor Development. Sponsored by: Jt. EMPMD/SMD Superconducting ...

106

IV  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of the DOE Team, if applicable 0 Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Energy Efficient Building Systems Regional Innovation Cluster Initiative A joint FOA published by: The Department of...

107

IV  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of 99 of 99 Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Energy Efficient Building Systems Regional Innovation Cluster Initiative A joint FOA published by: The Department of Energy The Department of Commerce-Economic Development Administration The Department of Commerce-National Institute of Standards and Technology The Small Business Administration The Department of Labor The Department of Education

108

IV  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplement to the Draft Solar PEIS iii October 2011 CONTENTS 1 2 3 NOTATION ........................................................................................................................ ix 4 5 ENGLISH/METRIC AND METRIC/ENGLISH EQUIVALENTS .................................. xiii 6 7 1 INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................... 1-1 8

109

Swept measurement of high power I-V curves  

SciTech Connect

Performance evaluation of photovoltaic (PV) arrays under a variety of conditions provides important information for the design and maintenance of PV systems. One of the principal methods for assessing an array's performance is to plot its current, I, versus voltage, V, curve. Following a brief review of techniques for measuring the I-V curve, a new capacitive-based approach is presented. It uses a rapid sweep of the I-V curve which substantially reduces the average power transfer between array and load, and in turn, substantially reduces the size and weight of the curve tracer. Both theoretical and practical aspects of the approach are presented for a 10-kW unit. Performance is verified by comparison with I-V curves obtained by using a conventional load. The agreement is found to be excellent. Approximately an order of magnitude reduction in size, weight and power consumption over conventional units was realized with the experimental I-V curve tracer.

Cox, C.H.; Warner, T.H.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Swept measurement of high-power I-V curves  

SciTech Connect

Performance evaluation of photovoltaic (PV) arrays under a variety of conditions provides important information for the design and maintenance of PV systems. One of the principal methods for assessing an arrays's performance is to plot its current, I, versus voltage, V, curve. Following a brief review of techniques for measuring the I-V curve, a new capacitive-based approach is presented. It uses a rapid sweep of the I-V curve which substantially reduces the average power transfer between array and load, and in turn, substantially reduces the size and weight of the curve tracer. Both theoretical and practical aspects of the approach are presented for a 10-kW unit. Performance is verified by comparison with I-V curves obtained by using a conventional load. The agreement is found to be excellent. Approximately an order of magnitude reduction in size, weight and power consumption over conventional units was realized with the experimental I-V curve tracer.

Cox, C.H. III; Warner, T.H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Friction Stir Welding of Lightweight Vehicle Structures: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UTBattelle, LLC and Ford Motor Company was to establish friction stir welding (FSW) and friction stir processing as viable options for use in construction of lightweight substructures for trucks and cars, including engine cradles, suspension sub frames, instrument panel supports, and intake manifolds.

Sanella, M.L.

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Hydraulic Control of Sill Flow with Bottom Friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydraulics of strait and sill flow with friction is examined using a reduced gravity model. It is shown that friction moves the critical (or control) point from the sill to a location downstream. If the strait has constant width, the control ...

L. J. Pratt

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Modeling of Slurry Friction Loss of Hydraulic Fracturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the research on theoretical model of hydraulic fracturing has experienced development. But there is little progress in the research on slurry friction loss in the fracturing string, which is the key to guide the design and construction ... Keywords: slurry, friction loss, momentum transfer

Yongming Li; Hu Mao; Fengsheng Yao; Song Wang; Jinzhou Zhao

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Role of Friction in Materials Selection for Automotive Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an invited article for a special issue of the ASM International monthly magazine that concerns "Automotive Materials and Applications." The article itself overviews frictional considerations in material selection for automobiles. It discusses implications for energy efficiency (engine friction) and safety (brakes) among other topics.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

EPRI MOV Performance Prediction Program: Friction Separate Effects Test Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coefficient of sliding friction between the internal components of a gate valve is an important factor in determining the thrust required to operate the valve. An EPRI test program measured coefficients of friction between typical gate valve internal materials using specimens that duplicated the contact configurations occurring in valves.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Decade of Progress in Friction Stirring of High-Temperature ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction Stir Processing to Enable High Peak Combustion Pressures in Mid-sized and Heavy Duty Diesel Engines · Friction Stir Spot Welding of Magnesium to ...

118

Evolution of microstructure and mechanical properties in linear friction welded waspaloy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Ni-base superalloy, Waspaloy, was linear friction welded (LFWed) under various processing conditions. Specifically, axial shortening, in which all linear friction welding (LFW) parameters such… (more)

Chamanfar, Ahmad

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

WEB RESOURCE: Generation IV Systems and Materials - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007... Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials for Nuclear Power ... The presentation covers: the Generation IV initiative, Generation IV ...

120

The effect of Coulombic friction on spatial displacement statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phenomenon of Coulombic friction enters the stochastic description of dry friction between two solids and the statistic characterization of vibrating granular media. Here we analyze the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation including both velocity and spatial components, exhibiting a formal connection to a quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator in the presence of a delta potential. Numerical solutions for the resulting spatial displacement statistics show a crossover from exponential to Gaussian displacement statistics. We identify a transient intermediate regime that exhibits multiscaling properties arising from the contribution of Coulombic friction. The possible role of these effects during observations in diffusion experiments is shortly discussed.

Andreas M. Menzel; Nigel Goldenfeld

2010-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The effect of Coulombic friction on spatial displacement statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phenomenon of Coulombic friction enters the stochastic description of dry friction between two solids and the statistic characterization of vibrating granular media. Here we analyze the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation including both velocity and spatial components, exhibiting a formal connection to a quantum mechanical harmonic oscillator in the presence of a delta potential. Numerical solutions for the resulting spatial displacement statistics show a crossover from exponential to Gaussian displacement statistics. We identify a transient intermediate regime that exhibits multiscaling properties arising from the contribution of Coulombic friction. These results are relevant to recent experimental studies of the displacement of colloidal particles along bilayer membrane tubes.

Menzel, Andreas M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welding techniques were developed to successfully join several advanced high strength steels. Two distinct tool materials were evaluated to determine the effect of tool materials on the process parameters and joint properties. Welds were characterized primarily via lap shear, microhardness, and optical microscopy. Friction stir spot welds were compared to the resistance spot welds in similar strength alloys by using the AWS standard for resistance spot welding high strength steels. As further comparison, a primitive cost comparison between the two joining processes was developed, which included an evaluation of the future cost prospects of friction stir spot welding in advanced high strength steels.

Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.; Santella, M. L.

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

123

Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more roadwheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the roadwheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the roadwheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded.

Davis, Roy I. (Ypsilanti, MI)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Adaptive controller for regenerative and friction braking system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative and friction braking system for a vehicle having one or more road wheels driven by an electric traction motor includes a driver responsive device for producing a brake demand signal having a magnitude corresponding to the level of braking force selected by the driver and friction and regenerative brakes operatively connected with the road wheels of the vehicle. A system according to this invention further includes control means for operating the friction and regenerative braking subsystems so that maximum brake torques sustainable by the road wheels of the vehicle without skidding or slipping will not be exceeded. 8 figs.

Davis, R.I.

1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

125

Linear Instability with Ekman and Interior Friction. Part I: Quasigeostrophic Eigenanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The eigenvalue problems for the original Eady model and a modified Eady model (the G model) are examined with no friction, Ekman friction only, and both Ekman and interior friction. When both Ekman and interior friction are included in the models,...

Richard Grotjahn; Min Chen; Joseph Tribbia

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced PADD IV refining capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studies of Rocky Mountain area petroleum product availability with reduced refining capacity in Petroleum Administration for Defense IV (PADD IV, part of the Rocky Mountain area) have been performed with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Refinery Yield Model, a linear program which has been updated to blend gasolines to satisfy constraints on emissions of nitrogen oxides and winter toxic air pollutants. The studies do not predict refinery closures in PADD IV. Rather, the reduced refining capacities provide an analytical framework for probing the flexibility of petroleum refining and distribution for winter demand conditions in the year 2000. Industry analysts have estimated that, for worst case scenarios, 20 to 35 percent of PADD IV refining capacity could be shut-down as a result of clean air and energy tax legislation. Given these industry projections, the study scenarios provide the following conclusions: The Rocky Mountain area petroleum system would have the capability to satisfy winter product demand with PADD IV refinery capacity shut-downs in the middle of the range of industry projections, but not in the high end of the range of projections. PADD IV crude oil production can be maintained by re-routing crude released from PADD IV refinery demands to satisfy increased crude oil demands in PADDs II (Midwest), III (Gulf Coast), and Washington. Clean Air Act product quality regulations generally do not increase the difficulty of satisfying emissions reduction constraints in the scenarios.

Hadder, G.R.; Chin, S.M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

LOW ENERGY PROCESSES IN ELECTRONIC MATERIALS: IV ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LOW ENERGY PROCESSES IN ELECTRONIC MATERIALS: Session IV: Plasma ... Goorsky, H.P. Gillis, A.M. Andrews, University of California, Los Angeles, CA.

128

Vehicle Technologies Office: Parasitic Loss Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parasitic Loss Reduction Parasitic Loss Reduction Heavy vehicles lose a tremendous amount of energy to wind resistance and drag, braking, and rolling resistance. Such non-engine losses can account for an approximate 45% decrease in efficiency. Other sources of energy loss include: friction and wear in the power train, thermal (heat) loads, operation of auxiliary loads (air conditioning, heaters, refrigeration, etc.), and engine idling. The parasitic loss activity identifies methodologies that may reduce energy losses, and tests those in the laboratory. Promising technologies are then prototyped and tested onboard heavy vehicles. Once validated, technologies must be tested on-road to obtain durability, reliability, and life-cycle cost data for the developmental component and/or design strategy.

129

Frictionally Modified Rotating Hydraulic Channel Exchange and Ocean Outflows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments of two-layer exchange through channels of circular and half-circular cross section are described. Simple theoretical limits on exchange for the circular channels are obtained from models involving either friction or ...

Gregory C. Johnson; Daniel R. Ohlsen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Trapped Lee Wave Interference in the Presence of Surface Friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trapped lee wave interference over double bell-shaped obstacles in the presence of surface friction is examined. Idealized high-resolution numerical experiments with the nonhydrostatic Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) ...

Ivana Stiperski; Vanda Grubiši?

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Frictional Nearshore Response to Forcing by Synoptic Scale Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytic barotropic model was used to study the nearshore frictional response to synoptic-scale wind forcing. The results depend only on the region where the surface and bottom Ekman layers interact strongly and the water is consequently well ...

Gary T. Mitchum; Allan J. Clarke

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Small mass asymptotic for the motion with vanishing friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the small mass asymptotic (Smoluchowski-Kramers approximation) for the Langevin equation with a variable friction coefficient. The friction coefficient is assumed to be vanishing within certain region. We introduce a regularization for this problem and study the limiting motion for the 1-dimensional case and a multidimensional model problem. The limiting motion is a Markov process on a projected space. We specify the generator and boundary condition of this limiting Markov process and prove the convergence.

Mark Freidlin; Wenqing Hu; Alexander Wentzell

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

133

Multiyear Program Plan: Reducing Friction and Wear in Heavy Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As described in its multiyear program plan for 1998-2000, the Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) envisions the development of a fuel-flexible, energy-efficient, near-zero-emissions, heavy-duty U.S. diesel engine technology devolving into all truck classes as a real and viable strategy for reducing energy requirements for commercial transport services and the rapidly growing multipurpose vehicle market (pickups, vans, and sport utility vehicles). Implementation of the OHVT program plan will have significant national benefits in energy savings, cleaner air, more jobs, and increased gross domestic product (GDP). Successful implementation will reduce the petroleum consumption of Class 1-8 trucks by 1.4 million barrels of oil per day by 2020 and over 1.8 million by 2030, amounting to a reduction in highway petroleum consumption of 13.2% and 18.6%, respectively. All types of regulated emissions will be reduced, that is, 20% drop in PM10 emissions (41,000 metric tons per year) by 203 0, 17% reduction in CO2 greenhouse gases (205 million metric tons per year), 7% reduction in NOx, 20% reduction in NMHC, and 30% reduction in CO. An increase of 15,000 jobs by 2020 is expected, as is an increase of $24 billion in GDP. The strategy of OHVT is to focus primarily on the diesel engine since it has numerous advantages. It has the highest efficiency of any engine today, 45% versus 30% for production gasoline engines; and it can be made more efficient at least to 55% and possibly up to 63%. It is the engine of choice for heavy vehicles (trucks), because it offers power, efficiency, durability, and reliability and is used extensively in rail, marine, and off-road applications. Its emission can be ultra-low to near zero, and the production infrastructure is already in place. The primary goals of OHVT are as follows: (1) Develop by 2002 the diesel-engine enabling technologies to support large-scale industry dieselization of light trucks, achieving a 35% fuel efficiency improvement over equivalent gasoline-fueled trucks. (2) Develop by 2004 the enabling technology for a Class 7-8 truck with a fuel efficiency of 10 mpg (at 65 mph) that will meet prevailing emission standards, using either diesel or a liquid alternative fuel. (3) Develop by 2006 diesel engines with fuel flexibility and a thermal efficiency of 55% with liquid alternative fuels, and a thermal efficiency of 55% with dedicated gaseous fuels. (4) Develop a methodology for analyzing and evaluating the operation of a heavy vehicle as an integrated system, considering such factors as engine efficiency; emissions; rolling resistance; aerodynamic drag; friction, wear, and lubrication effects; auxiliary power units; material substitutions for reducing weight; and other sources of parasitic energy losses. Overarching these considerations is the need to preserve system functionality, cost, competitiveness, reliability, durability, and safety.

R.R. Fessler; G.R. Fenske

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

134

Simple frictional analysis of helical buckling of tubing  

SciTech Connect

Previous analyses of helical buckling of tubing have not considered frictional forces. In this paper, differential equations are derived and solved for two simplified cases of interest: downward motion of the tubing-e.g., when buckling occurs during the landing of the tubing-and upward motion of the tubing-e.g., when buckling occurs as a result of thermal and differential pressure loading subsequent to landing. While somewhat more complicated than the conventional frictionless buckling equations, these solutions are still suitable for hand calculations. These solutions, however, do not represent general solutions to buckling with friction. Load reversals and lateral frictional forces add complications that would require computer analysis. Several examples are examined to evaluate the relative importance of friction, which has a significant impact on tubing length change for loaded cases. For instance, the choice of a conservative value for the friction coefficient may allow the solution of a difficult seal-design problem by reducing a large predicted length change. Friction also has an important effect on set-down loads. Frictionless buckling calculations do not give conservative results for this problem.

Mitchell, R.F.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

SF6 Emission Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emission Reduction Steve Lowder Bonneville Power Administration 2010.09 slide 1 Emission Reduction Emission Reduction is the reason for why we do all of this - because:...

136

State of Asian Elephant Conservation in 2003 i Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;State of Asian Elephant Conservation in 2003 i Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv Conservation Direct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv Executive Summary: The state of wild Asian elephant conservation in 2003

New, Mark

137

Microsoft PowerPoint - Roberts, IV and Stewardship (SSAB April...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Stewardship April 29, 2010 Sarah Roberts, CHP Acting Program Director, ORISE IEAV Benefits of IV "IV is an important quality assurance step that ensures cleanup goals have...

138

Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Tempeartures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Neptunium and Plutonium. Edited by OECD Nuclear EnergyComplexation of Plutonium(IV) with Fluoride at Variablehigher temperatures. Key Words: Plutonium (IV) / Fluoride /

Moore, Dean A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Generation IV International Forum | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forum Forum Generation IV International Forum January 14, 2005 - 9:50am Addthis Remarks of Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham National Press Club It is a pleasure to be here today, to welcome the representatives of the Generation IV International Forum to their first Washington, D.C., meeting. Very early in my tenure as U.S. Secretary of Energy, I took part in the formation of the Generation IV initiative, and the signing of the organization's charter - which provided the framework for international cooperative research on advanced nuclear energy systems that are safe, reliable, economical and proliferation resistant... to help ensure that nuclear power has a vital and viable role in the world's energy future. I last met with the Generation IV International Forum two years ago in

140

COLORIMETRIC DETERMINATION OF URANIUM(IV)  

SciTech Connect

A colorimetric method was developed for the determination of uranium(IV) in the presence of uranium(VI), nitric acid, hydroxylamine sulfate, and hydrazine. A coefficient of variation of 2.4% (n = 25) was obtained. (auth)

Dorsett, R.S.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Gas pressure reduction circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note describes passive pressure reduction devices for use with sensitive instruments. Two gas circuits are developed which not only provide a pressure reduction under flow demand

D. W. Guillaume; D. DeVries

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Roasting, Reduction and Smelting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Researches on Reduction Roasting of Low-grade Manganese Oxide Ores Using Biomass Charcoal as Reductant: Yuanbo Zhang1; Daoxian ...

143

Friction, Brownian Motion, and Energy Dissipation Mechanisms in Adsorbed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Friction, Brownian Motion, and Energy Dissipation Mechanisms in Adsorbed Friction, Brownian Motion, and Energy Dissipation Mechanisms in Adsorbed Molecules and Molecularly Thin Films: Heating, Electrostatic and Magnetic Effects January 15, 2014 4:00PM to 5:00PM Presenter Jacqueline Krim, North Carolina State University Location Building 440, Room A105-106 Type Seminar Series NST Nanoscience Colloquium Abstract: In the study of friction at the nanoscale, phononic, electrostatic, conduction electron and magnetic effects all contribute to the dissipation mechanisms [1,2]. Electrostatic and magnetic contributions are increasingly alluded to in the current literature, but remain poorly characterized. I will first overview the nature of these various contributions, and then report on our observations of magnetic and electrostatic contributions to

144

Texture-induced modulations of friction force: the fingerprint effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dry solid friction is often accompanied by force modulations originating from stick-slip instabilities. Here a distinct, quasi-static mechanism is evidenced leading to quasi-periodic force oscillations during sliding contact between an elastomer block, whose surface is patterned with parallel grooves, and finely abraded glass slides. The dominant oscillation frequency is set by the ratio between the sliding velocity and the period of the grooves. A mechanical model is proposed that provides a quantitative prediction for the amplitude of the force modulations as a function of the normal load, the period of the grooves and the roughness characteristics of the substrate. The model's main ingredient is the non-linearity of the friction law. Since such non-linearity is ubiquitous for soft solids, this "fingerprint effect" should be relevant to a large class of frictional configurations and might in particular have important consequences in human (or humanoid) active digital touch.

E. Wandersman; R. Candelier; G. Debregeas; Alexis Prevost

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

145

Intramolecular Reduction of Oxyferryl Myoglobin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Intramolecular Reduction of Oxyferryl Iron in Horse Heart Myoglobin of Intramolecular Reduction of Oxyferryl Iron in Horse Heart Myoglobin Craig Fenwick, Stephen Marmor, K. Govindaraju, Ann M. English, James F. Wishart and Ji Sun J. Am. Chem. Soc. 116, 3169-3170 (1994) Abstract: The observed rate constant (kobs), as determined by pulse radiolysis, for intramolecular electron transfer (ET) from a5RuII bound at His48 to the ferric heme of horse heart myoglobin was 0.059 ± 0.003 s-1 at 25 °C, pH 7.0. This value is essentially identical to that previously reported in the literature for sperm whale myoglobin. Following oxidation by H2O2 of the ferric heme to oxyferryl heme (FeIV=O), kobs for intramolecular ET from a5RuII(His48) to heme increased to 0.19 ± 0.02 s-1 at a driving force of 0.96 eV. However, at the same driving force, a rate

146

Young modulus dependence of nanoscopic friction coefficient in hard coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with miniature moving parts, such as micro- electromechanical systems and hard-disk drives.1,2 A betterYoung modulus dependence of nanoscopic friction coefficient in hard coatings Elisa Riedoa with varying hardness obtained by different growth temperatures. For the CrN films, we show that the changes

Brune, Harald

147

Friction stir method for forming structures and materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for forming an enhanced material or structure are disclosed. The structure typically includes a preform that has a first common surface and a recess below the first common surface. A filler is added to the recess and seams are friction stir welded, and materials may be stir mixed.

Feng, Zhili (Knoxville, TN); David, Stan A. (Knoxville, TN); Frederick, David Alan (Harriman, TN)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

148

Seismic Interstory Drift Demands in Steel Friction Damped Braced Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the last 35 years, several researchers have proposed, developed and tested different friction devices for seismic control of structures. Their research has demonstrated that such devices are simple, economical, practical, durable and very effective. However, research on passive friction dampers, except for few instances, has not been given appropriate attention lately. This has caused some of the results of old studies to become out-of-date, lose their validity in the context of today's design philosophies or to fall short on the expectations of this century's structural engineering. An analytical study on the behavior of friction devices and the effect they have on the structures into which they are incorporated has been undertaken to address the new design trends, codes, evaluation criteria and needs of today's society. The present study consists of around 7,000 structural analyses that are used to show the excellent seismic performance and economic advantages of Friction Damped Braced Frames. It serves, at the same time, to improve our understanding on their dynamic behavior. Finally, this thesis also sets the basis for future research on the application of this type of seismic energy dissipating systems.

Peternell Altamira, Luis E.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

TEMPORARILY ALLOYING TITANIUM TO FACILITATE FRICTION STIR WELDING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While historically hydrogen has been considered an impurity in titanium, when used as a temporary alloying agent it promotes beneficial changes to material properties that increase the hot-workability of the metal. This technique known as thermohydrogen processing was used to temporarily alloy hydrogen with commercially pure titanium sheet as a means of facilitating the friction stir welding process. Specific alloying parameters were developed to increase the overall hydrogen content of the titanium sheet ranging from commercially pure to 30 atomic percent. Each sheet was evaluated to determine the effect of the hydrogen content on process loads and tool deformation during the plunge phase of the friction stir welding process. Two materials, H-13 tool steel and pure tungsten, were used to fabricate friction stir welding tools that were plunged into each of the thermohydrogen processed titanium sheets. Tool wear was characterized and variations in machine loads were quantified for each tool material and weld metal combination. Thermohydrogen processing was shown to beneficially lower plunge forces and stabilize machine torques at specific hydrogen concentrations. The resulting effects of hydrogen addition to titanium metal undergoing the friction stir welding process are compared with modifications in titanium properties documented in modern literature. Such comparative analysis is used to explain the variance in resulting process loads as a function of the initial hydrogen concentration of the titanium.

Hovanski, Yuri

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

150

Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.  

SciTech Connect

Frictional contact results in surface and subsurface damage that could influence the performance, aging, and reliability of moving mechanical assemblies. Changes in surface roughness, hardness, grain size and texture often occur during the initial run-in period, resulting in the evolution of subsurface layers with characteristic microstructural features that are different from those of the bulk. The objective of this LDRD funded research was to model friction-induced microstructures. In order to accomplish this objective, novel experimental techniques were developed to make friction measurements on single crystal surfaces along specific crystallographic surfaces. Focused ion beam techniques were used to prepare cross-sections of wear scars, and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and TEM to understand the deformation, orientation changes, and recrystallization that are associated with sliding wear. The extent of subsurface deformation and the coefficient of friction were strongly dependent on the crystal orientation. These experimental observations and insights were used to develop and validate phenomenological models. A phenomenological model was developed to elucidate the relationships between deformation, microstructure formation, and friction during wear. The contact mechanics problem was described by well-known mathematical solutions for the stresses during sliding friction. Crystal plasticity theory was used to describe the evolution of dislocation content in the worn material, which in turn provided an estimate of the characteristic microstructural feature size as a function of the imposed strain. An analysis of grain boundary sliding in ultra-fine-grained material provided a mechanism for lubrication, and model predictions of the contribution of grain boundary sliding (relative to plastic deformation) to lubrication were in good qualitative agreement with experimental evidence. A nanomechanics-based approach has been developed for characterizing the mechanical response of wear surfaces. Coatings are often required to mitigate friction and wear. Amongst other factors, plastic deformation of the substrate determines the coating-substrate interface reliability. Finite element modeling has been applied to predict the plastic deformation for the specific case of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated Ni alloy substrates.

Michael, Joseph Richard; Prasad, Somuri V.; Jungk, John Michael; Cordill, Megan J. (University of Minnesota); Bammann, Douglas J.; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Moody, Neville Reid; Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha (New Mexico Institure of Mining and Technology)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Solar and seasonal dependence of ion frictional heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Ion frictional heating constitutes one of the principal mechanisms whereby energy, originating in the solar wind, is deposited into the Earth's ionosphere and ultimately the neutral atmosphere. Common programme observations by the EISCAT UHF radar system, spanning the years 1984 to 1995, provide the basis for a comprehensive statistical study of ion frictional heating, results of which are documented in this and a previous paper by the authors. In the present work, the authors demonstrate the solar and seasonal dependence of the universal time distribution of frictional heating, and explain these results with reference to corresponding dependences of the ion velocity. Although EISCAT observes a signi®cant increase in the occurrence of enhanced ion velocities associated with increased solar activity, the latter characterised according to the prevailing 10.7 cm solar ¯ux, this is not re¯ected to such an extent in the occurrence of frictional heating. It is suggested that this is a consequence of the decreased neutral atmosphere response times associated with active solar conditions, resulting from the higher ionospheric plasma densities present. Seasonal e€ects on the diurnal distribution of ion frictional heating are well explained by corresponding variations in ionospheric convection, the latter principally a result of geometrical factors. It is noted that, over the entire dataset, the variations in the unperturbed F-region ion temperature, required to implement the identi®cation criterion for ion heating, are highly correlated with model values of thermospheric temperature. Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; plasma temperature and density). 1

J. A. Davies; M. Lester; I. W. Mccrea

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Reductive dissolution approaches to removal of uranium from contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Traditional approaches to uranium recovery from ores have employed oxidation of U(IV) minerals to form the uranyl cation which is subsequently complexed by carbonate or maintained in solution by strong acids. Reductive approaches for uranium decontamination have been limited to removing soluble uranium from solutions by formation of U{sup 4+} which readily hydrolyses and precipitates. As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration, we have developed a reductive approach to solubilization of uranium from contaminated soils which employs reduction to destabilize U(VI) solid and sorbed species, and strong chelators for U(IV) to prevent hydrolysis and solubilize the reduced from. This strategy has particular application to sites where the uranium is present primarily as intractable U(VI) phases and where high fractions of the contamination must be removed to meet regulatory requirements.

Brainard, J.R.; Iams, H.D.; Strietelmeier, B.A.; Del-Rio Garcia, M.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Mountain View IV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IV IV Facility Mountain View IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner AES Wind Generation Developer AES Wind Generation Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location White Water CA Coordinates 33.95475187°, -116.7015839° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.95475187,"lon":-116.7015839,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

154

Pomeroy IV Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IV Wind Farm IV Wind Farm Facility Pomeroy IV Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner MidAmerican Energy Developer MidAmerican Energy Energy Purchaser MidAmerican Energy Location Pomeroy IA Coordinates 42.570484°, -94.702506° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.570484,"lon":-94.702506,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

155

Meadow Lake IV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Meadow Lake IV Meadow Lake IV Facility Meadow Lake IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer EDP Renewables Location Brookston IN Coordinates 40.601111°, -86.864167° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.601111,"lon":-86.864167,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

156

Annex IV Environmental Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annex IV Environmental Webinar Annex IV Environmental Webinar Annex IV Environmental Webinar January 23, 2014 12:00PM to 1:30PM EST Online The Energy Department will present a live webcast on Instrumentation for Monitoring Around Marine Renewable Energy Devices, highlighting themes that arose during a related workshop. Webinar presentations will include discussion on monitoring of near-field interactions between marine mammals and marine renewable energy converters, determining the distribution and habitat use of marine animals in the vicinity of marine renewable energy converters, and characterizing sound produced by marine renewable energy converters. 12:00 to 1:30 p.m. Eastern Standard Time 9:00 to 10:30 a.m. Pacific Standard Time Join Lync Meeting Join by phone866-528-1882 or 509-375-4555

157

Aluminum Reduction Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing the Power Modulation Window of Aluminium Smelter Pots with Shell Heat Exchanger Technology · Initiatives To Reduction Of Aluminum Potline ...

158

Aluminum Reduction Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... GHG Measurement and Inventory for Aluminum Production · HEX Retrofit Enables Smelter Capacity Expansion · HF Emission Reduction from ...

159

Cobalt Reduction Sourcebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many nuclear utilities have a cobalt reduction plan in place for each plant. However, establishing a cobalt reduction plan is a challenging and often plant-specific task. This document seeks to provide a general approach to not only minimizing elemental cobalt transport to Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) reactors, but also to help prioritize cobalt reduction actions for optimum dose rate reduction.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

160

MCNP variance reduction overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MCNP code is rich in variance reduction features. Standard variance reduction methods found in most Monte Carlo codes are available as well as a number of methods unique to MCNP. We discuss the variance reduction features presently in MCNP as well as new ones under study for possible inclusion in future versions of the code.

Hendricks, J.S.; Booth, T.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect

A Gen IV Materials Handbook is being developed to provide an authoritative single source of highly qualified structural materials information and materials properties data for use in design and analyses of all Generation IV Reactor Systems. The Handbook will be responsive to the needs expressed by all of the principal government, national laboratory, and private company stakeholders of Gen IV Reactor Systems. The Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan provided here addresses the purpose, rationale, attributes, and benefits of the Handbook and will detail its content, format, quality assurance, applicability, and access. Structural materials, both metallic and ceramic, for all Gen IV reactor types currently supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) will be included in the Gen IV Materials Handbook. However, initial emphasis will be on materials for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Descriptive information (e.g., chemical composition and applicable technical specifications and codes) will be provided for each material along with an extensive presentation of mechanical and physical property data including consideration of temperature, irradiation, environment, etc. effects on properties. Access to the Gen IV Materials Handbook will be internet-based with appropriate levels of control. Information and data in the Handbook will be configured to allow search by material classes, specific materials, specific information or property class, specific property, data parameters, and individual data points identified with materials parameters, test conditions, and data source. Details on all of these as well as proposed applicability and consideration of data quality classes are provided in the Implementation Plan. Website development for the Handbook is divided into six phases including (1) detailed product analysis and specification, (2) simulation and design, (3) implementation and testing, (4) product release, (5) project/product evaluation, and (6) product maintenance and enhancement. Contracting of development of the Handbook website is discussed in terms of host server options, cost, technology, developer background and cooperative nature, and company stability. One of the first and most important activities in website development will be the generation of a detailed Handbook product requirements document including case diagrams and functional requirements tables. The Implementation Plan provides a detailed overview of the organizational structure of the Handbook and details of Handbook preparation, publication, and distribution. Finally, the Implementation Plan defines Quality Assurance requirements for the Handbook.

Rittenhouse, P.; Ren, W.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

162

Influence of environmental parameters on the frictional behavior of DLC coatings  

SciTech Connect

In a previous studies it was shown that diamond like carbon (DLC) films possess low friction coefficient (f) and excellent wear resistance. The reduction in f was found to be consistent with a ``wear induced graphitization`` mechanism of the DLC structure. A recent study showed that operational parameters (sliding velocity and loading level) influence the tribological behavior of DLC film through control of the kinetics of the graphitization process. The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of environmental parameters (humidity and temperature) on the tribological behavior of DLC film and provide further support to the wear induced graphitization mechanism. Ion beam deposition was utilized to deposit DLC on a SiC substrate. Pin-on-disc experiments were conducted by varying humidity (0%, 40% and 100%) and temperature ({minus}10 C and 25 C). As-deposited DLC and wear debris was characterized by transmission electron microscopy. It was found that lower humidity increases the graphitization rate more than likely due to the reduction in the effect by the water molecules. A decreased graphitization rate was observed at lower temperature and higher humidity and can be attributed to suppression of temperature rise at hot spots. The present findings are consistent with and further verify the wear induced graphitization mechanism.

Liu, Y. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Mechanical Engineering Dept.; Erdemir, A.; Meletis, E.I. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Friction-induced Resonance of a Stochastic Oscillator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the friction coefficient on the long-time behavior of the output signal of a harmonic oscillator with fluctuating frequency subjected to an external periodic force and an additive thermal noise is considered. The colored fluctuations of the oscillator frequency are modeled as a three-level Markovian telegraph noise. The main purpose of this work is to demonstrate, based on exact expressions, that the resonance is manifested in the dependence of the response function and the complex susceptibility of the oscillator upon the friction coefficient. The advantage of the latter effect is that the control parameter is the damping coefficient, which can easily be varied in possible experiments as well as potential technological applications.

Laas, K.; Mankin, R. [Institute of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Tallinn University 25 Narva Road, 10120 Tallinn (Estonia)

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

164

Friction Factor Measurements in an Equally Spaced Triangular Tube Array  

SciTech Connect

Friction factor data for adiabatic cross-flow of water in a staggered tube array was obtained over a Reynolds number range (based on hydraulic diameter and gap velocity) of about 10,000 to 250,000. The tubes were 12.7mm (0.5 inch) outer diameter, in a uniformly spaced triangular arrangement with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.5. The friction factor was compared to several literature correlations, and was found to be best matched by the Idelchik correlation. Other correlations were found to vary significantly from the test data. Based on the test data, a new correlation is proposed for this tube bundle geometry which covers the entire Reynolds number range tested.

Vassallo P, Symolon P

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

165

Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannneled DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1-10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rpm increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap-shear strengths exceeding 10.3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Frederick, Alan; Grant, Glenn J.; Dahl, Michael E.

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Micro-beam friction liner and method of transferring energy  

SciTech Connect

A micro-beam friction liner adapted to increase performance and efficiency and reduce wear in a piezoelectric motor or actuator or other device using a traveling or standing wave to transfer energy in the form of torque and momentum. The micro-beam friction liner comprises a dense array of micro-beam projections having first ends fixed relative to a rotor and second ends projecting substantially toward a plurality of teeth of a stator, wherein the micro-beam projections are compressed and bent during piezoelectric movement of the stator teeth, thereby storing the energy, and then react against the stator teeth to convert the stored energy stored to rotational energy in the rotor.

Mentesana, Charles (Leawood, KS)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

Rack-and-pinion effects in molecular rolling friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rolling lubrication with spherical molecules working as 'nanobearings' has failed experimentally so far, without a full understanding of the physics involved and of the reasons why. Past model simulations and common sense have shown that molecules can only roll when they are not too closely packed to jam. The same type of model simulations now shows in addition that molecular rolling friction can develop deep minima once the molecule's peripheral 'pitch' can match the substrate periodicity, much as ordinary cogwheels do in a rack-and-pinion system. When the pinion-rack matching is bad, the driven molecular rolling becomes discontinuous and noisy, whence energy is dissipated and friction is large. This suggests experiments to be conducted by varying the rack-and-pinion matching. That could be pursued not only by changing molecules and substrates, but also by applying different sliding directions within the same system, or by applying pressure, to change the effective matching.

Oleg M. Braun; Erio Tosatti

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

168

Solid Friction from stick-slip to pinning and aging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the present state of understanding of solid friction at low velocities and for systems with negligibly small wear effects. We first analyze in detail the behavior of friction at interfaces between wacroscopic hard rough solids, whose main dynamical features are well described by the Rice-Ruina rate and state dependent constitutive law. We show that it results from two combined effects : (i) the threshold rheology of nanometer-thick junctions jammed under confinement into a soft glassy structure (ii) geometric aging, i.e. slow growth of the real arrea of contact via asperity creep interrupted by sliding. Closer analysis leads to identifying a second aging-rejuvenation process, at work within the junctions themselves. We compare the effects of structural aging at such multicontact, very highly confined, interfaces with those met under different confinement levels, namely boundary lubricated contacts and extended adhesive interfaces involving soft materials (hydrogels, elastomers). This leads us to propose a classification of frictional junctions in terms of the relative importance of jamming and adsoprtion-induced metastability.

Tristan Baumberger; Christiane Caroli

2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

169

Determination of Friction Coefficient in Unconfined Compression of Brain Tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unconfined compression tests are more convenient to perform on cylindrical samples of brain tissue than tensile tests in order to estimate mechanical properties of the brain tissue because they allow for homogeneous deformations. The reliability of these tests depends significantly on the amount of friction generated at the specimen/platen interface. Thus, there is a crucial need to find an approximate value of the friction coefficient in order to predict a possible overestimation of stresses during unconfined compression tests. In this study, a combined experimental-computational approach was adopted to estimate the dynamic friction coefficient mu of porcine brain matter against metal platens in compressive tests. Cylindrical samples of porcine brain tissue were tested up to 30% strain at variable strain rates, both under bonded and lubricated conditions in the same controlled environment. It was established that mu was equal to 0.09 +/- 0.03, 0.18 +/- 0.04, 0.18 +/- 0.04 and 0.20 +/- 0.02 at strain rates of...

Rashid, Badar; Gilchrist, Michael; 10.1016/j.jmbbm.2012.05.001

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Adiabatic two-phase frictional pressure drops in microchannels  

SciTech Connect

Two-phase pressure drops were measured over a wide range of experimental test conditions in two sizes of microchannels (sight glass tubes 0.509 and 0.790 mm) for two refrigerants (R-134a and R-245fa). Similar to the classic Moody diagram in single-phase flow, three zones were distinguishable when plotting the variation of the two-phase friction factor versus the two-phase Reynolds number: a laminar regime for Re{sub TP} < 2000, a transition regime for 2000 {<=} Re{sub TP} < 8000 and a turbulent regime for Re{sub TP} {>=} 8000. The laminar zone yields a much sharper gradient than in single-phase flow. The transition regime is not predicted well by any of the prediction methods for two-phase frictional pressure drops available in the literature. This is not unexpected since only a few data are available for this region in the literature and most methods ignore this regime, jumping directly from laminar to turbulent flow at Re{sub TP} = 2000. The turbulent zone is best predicted by the Mueller-Steinhagen and Heck correlation. Also, a new homogeneous two-phase frictional pressure drop has been proposed here with a limited range of application. (author)

Revellin, Remi; Thome, John R. [EPFL, STI ISE LTCM, ME Gl 464, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Use of Friction Stir Welding and Friction Stir Processing for Advanced Nuclear Fuels and Materials Joining Applications  

SciTech Connect

Application of the latest developments in materials technology may greatly aid in the successful pursuit of next generation reactor and transmutation technologies. One such area where significant progress is needed is joining of advanced fuels and materials. Rotary friction welding, also referred to as friction stir welding (FSW), has shown great promise as a method for joining traditionally difficult to join materials such as aluminum alloys. This relatively new technology, first developed in 1991, has more recently been applied to higher melting temperature alloys such as steels, nickel-based and titanium alloys. An overview of the FSW technology is provided and two specific nuclear fuels and materials applications where the technique may be used to overcome limitations of conventional joining technologies are highlighted.

J. I. Cole; J. F. Jue

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Recycling, Source Reduction,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type:" ,"Emission Reductions by Gas in U.S. Units:" ,"Year","Carbon Dioxide (CO2)",,"Methane (CH4)",,"Perfluoromethane (CF4)",,"Perfluoroethane (C2F6)" ,,"short...

173

Aluminum Reduction Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased Energy Efficiency and Reduced HF Emissions with New Heat Exchanger · Industrial Test of Low-voltage Energy-saving Aluminum Reduction ...

174

Lattice Reduction - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lattice reduction`);" }} {PARA 0 "> " 0 "" {MPLTEXT 1 0 6 " fi;" }}{PARA 0 "> " 0 "" { MPLTEXT 1 0 13 " if dd then" }}{PARA 0 "> " 0 "" {MPLTEXT 1 0 27 " \\+ uu ...

175

PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT SUBMISSION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

19. Certification for Paperwork Reduction Act Submissions On behalf of this Federal agency, I certify that the collection of information encompassed ...

176

Creep-Fatigue and Thermo-Mechanical Fatigue of Friction-Welded ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thus, this method is an attractive welding process for the joining of new generation nickel based superalloys. In addition, friction welding also provides the ability ...

177

Establishing W-Based Friction Stir Welding Tool Life for Thick ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over 135 feet of weld length was achieved with a single W-based tool and the ultimate tensile strength throughout ... Friction Stir Welding of Pipeline Steels.

178

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

SciTech Connect

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston/ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and emissions. A detailed set of piston/ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrated the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Various low-friction strategies and concepts have been explored, and engine experiments will validate these concepts. An iterative process of experimentation, simulation and analysis, will be followed with the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. As planned, MIT has developed guidelines for an initial set of low-friction piston-ring-pack designs. Current recommendations focus on subtle top-piston-ring and oil-control-ring characteristics. A full-scale Waukesha F18 engine has been installed at Colorado State University and testing of the baseline configuration is in progress. Components for the first design iteration are being procured. Subsequent work includes examining the friction and engine performance data and extending the analyses to other areas to evaluate opportunities for further friction improvement and the impact on oil consumption/emission and wear, towards demonstrating an optimized reduced-friction engine system.

Victor W. Wong; Tian Tian; Grant Smedley

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Effect of Friction Stir Processing and Subsequent Rolling on the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

fan arrangements of Al3Zr particles, triggered by enhanced grain boundary migration due ... the deformation during friction stirring, the fan arrangements of Al3Zr ...

180

Iron Corrosion Observations: Pu(VI)-Fe Reduction Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iron and Pu Reduction: (1) Very different appearances in iron reaction products were noted depending on pH, brine and initial iron phase; (2) Plutonium was associated with the Fe phases; (3) Green rust was often noted at the higher pH; (4) XANES established the green rust to be an Fe2/3 phase with a bromide center; and (5) This green rust phase was linked to Pu as Pu(IV).

Reed, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean-Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Tests of alternative reductants in the second uranium purification cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Miniature mixer-settler tests of the second uranium purification cycle show that plutonium cannot be removed by hydroxylamine-hydrazine (NH/sub 2/OH-N/sub 2/H/sub 4/) because the acidity is too high, or by 2,5-di-t-pentylhydroquinone because HNO/sub 3/ oxidizes the hydroquinone. Plutonium can be removed satisfactorily when U(IV)-hydrazine is used as the reductant.

Thompson, M.C.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Operator strength reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operator strength reduction is a technique that improves compiler-generated code by reformulating certain costly computations in terms of less expensive ones. A common case arises in array addressing expressions used in loops. The compiler can replace ... Keywords: loops, static single assignment form, strength reduction

Keith D. Cooper; L. Taylor Simpson; Christopher A. Vick

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Transparent partial order reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Partial Order Reduction (POR) techniques improve the basic model checking algorithm by reducing the numbers of states and transitions explored in verifying a property of the model. In the "ample set" POR framework for the verification of an LTL¿X ... Keywords: Invisibility, Model checking, Partial order reduction, Transparent, Verification

Stephen F. Siegel

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Friction stir welding tool and process for welding dissimilar materials  

SciTech Connect

A friction stir welding tool and process for lap welding dissimilar materials are detailed. The invention includes a cutter scribe that penetrates and extrudes a first material of a lap weld stack to a preselected depth and further cuts a second material to provide a beneficial geometry defined by a plurality of mechanically interlocking features. The tool backfills the interlocking features generating a lap weld across the length of the interface between the dissimilar materials that enhances the shear strength of the lap weld.

Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J; Jana, Saumyadeep; Mattlin, Karl F

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

185

Identification and compensation of friction for a dual stage positioning system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motion control systems are usually designed to track trajectories and/or regulate about a desired point. Most of the other objectives, like minimizing the tracking time or minimizing the energy expended, are secondary which quantify the above described objectives. The control problem in hard disk drives is tracking and seeking the desired tracks. Recent increase in the storage capacity demands higher accuracy of the read/write head. Dual stage actuators as compared to conventional single actuator increases the accuracy of the read/write head in hard disk drives. A scaled up version of the dual stage actuator is considered as the test bed for this thesis. Friction is present in all electromechanical systems. This thesis deals with modelling of the dual stage actuator test bed. A linear model predicts the behavior of the ?ne stage. Friction is signi?cant in the coarse stage. Considerable time has been spent to model the coarse stage as a friction based model. Initially, static friction models were considered to model the friction. Dynamic models, which describe friction better when crossing zero velocity were considered. By analyzing several experimental data it was concluded that the friction was dependent on position and velocity as compared to conventional friction models which are dependent on the direction of motion. Static and Coulomb friction were modelled as functions of velocity and position. This model was able to predict the behavior of the coarse stage satisfactorily for various initial conditions. A friction compensation scheme based on the modelled friction is used to linearize the system based on feedback linearization techniques.

Thimmalapura, Satish Voddina

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

New Materials for NGNP/Gen IV  

SciTech Connect

The bounding conditions were briefly summarized for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) that is the leading candidate in the Department of Energy Generation IV reactor program. Metallic materials essential to the successful development and proof of concept for the NGNP were identified. The literature bearing on the materials technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was reviewed with emphasis on the needs identified for the NGNP. Several materials were identified for a more thorough study of their databases and behavioral features relative to the requirements ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH.

Robert W. Swindeman; Douglas L. Marriott

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

187

Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation  

SciTech Connect

This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Aluminum Reduction Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013... and academia from all over the world meet each other and share information. ... Trend and market demand, Energy saving initiatives in Reduction Process, ... An improved finite element model for thermal balance analysis of ...

189

Reduction-in-Force  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reduction in force (RIF) is a set of regulations and procedures that are used to determine whether an employee keeps his or her present position, or whether the employee has a right to another...

190

Numerical tests of dynamical friction in gravitational inhomogeneous systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, I test by numerical simulations the results of Del Popolo & Gambera (1998),dealing with the extension of Chandrasekhar and von Neumann's analysis of the statistics of the gravitational field to systems in which particles (e.g., stars, galaxies) are inhomogeneously distributed. The paper is an extension of that of Ahmad & Cohen (1974), in which the authors tested some results of the stochastic theory of dynamical friction developed by Chandrasekhar & von Neumann (1943) in the case of homogeneous gravitational systems. It is also a continuation of the work developed in Del Popolo (1996a,b), which extended the results of Ahmad & Cohen (1973), (dealing with the study of the probability distribution of the stochastic force in homogeneous gravitational systems) to inhomogeneous gravitational systems. Similarly to what was done by Ahmad & Cohen (1974) in the case of homogeneous systems, I test, by means of the evolution of an inhomogeneous system of particles, that the theoretical rate of force fluctuation d F/dt describes correctly the experimental one, I find that the stochastic force distribution obtained for the evolved system is in good agreement with the Del Popolo & Gambera (1998) theory. Moreover, in an inhomogeneous background the friction force is actually enhanced relative to the homogeneous case.

A. Del Popolo

2003-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

191

Friction Stir Spot Welding of DP780 Carbon Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welds were made in uncoated and galvannealed DP780 sheets using polycrystalline boron nitride stir tools. The tools were plunged at either a single continuous rate or in two segments consisting of a relatively high rate followed by a slower rate of shorter depth. Welding times ranged from 1 to 10 s. Increasing tool rotation speed from 800 to 1600 rev min{sup -1} increased strength values. The 2-segment welding procedures also produced higher strength joints. Average lap shear strengths exceeding 10 {center_dot} 3 kN were consistently obtained in 4 s on both the uncoated and the galvannealed DP780. The likelihood of diffusion and mechanical interlocking contributing to bond formation was supported by metallographic examinations. A cost analysis based on spot welding in automobile assembly showed that for friction stir spot welding to be economically competitive with resistance spot welding the cost of stir tools must approach that of resistance spot welding electrode tips.

Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Hovanski, Yuri [ORNL; Frederick, David Alan [ORNL; Grant, Glenn J [ORNL; Dahl, Michael E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Human Error Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing human error is recognized in the power-generation industry as a key factor in reducing safety-related events as well as improving asset availability. Achieving a sustainable culture change that leads to human error reduction in plant operations and maintenance remains a significant challenge to the industry. This report presents a behavior-based approach to human performance improvement and error reduction. The report explains fundamental elements of culture change and describes proven practices...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

193

Reliable solution of an unilateral contact problem with friction and uncertain data in thermo-elasticity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unilateral contact problem with friction and with uncertain input data in quasi-coupled thermo-elasticity is analysed. As uncertain data coefficients of stress-strain law, coefficients of thermal conductivity, body and surface forces, thermal sources ... Keywords: Coulomb friction, finite element analysis, radioactive waste repositories, steady-state heat flow, unilateral contact

I. Hlavá?ek; J. Nedoma

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Linear Instability with Ekman and Interior Friction. Part II: Initial Value Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Normal-mode and nonmodal growth are investigated using initial value models. The initial value problems for the Eady and a generalized Eady model (the G model) are solved with no friction and with both Ekman and interior friction. The nonmodel ...

Richard Grotjahn; Roderick Pedersen; Joseph Tribbia

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Sensitivity of the Latitude of the Surface Westerlies to Surface Friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity to surface friction of the latitude of the surface westerlies and the associated eddy-driven midlatitude jet is studied in an idealized dry GCM. The westerlies move poleward as the friction is reduced in strength. An increase in ...

Gang Chen; Isaac M. Held; Walter A. Robinson

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Friction control using ultrasonic oscillation for rolling-element linear-motion guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports a friction-control method for rolling-element linear-motion guides used for precision positioning. In general, static friction greater than dynamic friction generates stick-slip motion and diminishes the positioning accuracy. Two ultrasonic actuators excite both the rail and the carriage of the guide to give relative displacements to bearing surfaces. In order to effectively propagate the vibration over the entire rail without damping, the actuator drives at that frequency with a half wavelength corresponding to the distances between the rail mounting bolts. This also minimizes undesirable vibration of the machine structure. Moreover, the bearing surfaces of the carriage are resonated by a second ultrasonic actuator. The experiments using a force sensor showed that the static and dynamic friction forces were reduced by approximately 25% at any place on the 600-mm-long rail. Moreover, excitation only at very low velocity decreased the static friction peak.

Oiwa, Takaaki [Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 432-8651 (Japan)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF MICROBIAL TECHNETIUM REDUCTION FINAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial Tc(VII) reduction is an attractive alternative strategy for bioremediation of technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. Traditional ex situ remediation processes (e.g., adsorption or ion exchange) are often limited by poor extraction efficiency, inhibition by competing ions and production of large volumes of produced waste. Microbial Tc(VII) reduction provides an attractive alternative in situ remediation strategy since the reduced end-product Tc(IV) precipitates as TcO2, a highly insoluble hydrous oxide. Despite its potential benefits, the molecular mechanism of microbial Tc(VII) reduction remains poorly understood. The main goal of the proposed DOENABIR research project is to determine the molecular mechanism of microbial Tc(VII) reduction. Random mutagenesis studies in our lab have resulted in generation of a set of six Tc(VII) reduction-deficient mutants of Shewanella oneidensis. The anaerobic respiratory deficiencies of each Tc(VII) reduction-deficient mutant was determined by anaerobic growth on various combinations of three electron donors and 14 terminal electron acceptors. Results indicated that the electron transport pathways to Tc(VII), NO3 -, Mn(III) and U(VI) share common structural or regulatory components. In addition, we have recently found that wild-type Shewanella are also able to reduce Tc(IV) as electron acceptor, producing Tc(III) as an end-product. The recent genome sequencing of a variety of technetium-reducing bacteria and the anticipated release of several additional genome sequences in the coming year, provides us with an unprecedented opportunity to determine the mechanism of microbial technetium reduction across species and genus lines.

DiChristina, Thomas J. [Georgia Tech

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Roadmap Integration Team Presentation Generation IV Roadmap Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Presentation Presentation Generation IV Roadmap Overview NERAC Meeting: Washington, D.C. April 15, 2002 Roadmap Integration Team Presentation Definition - Generation IV Generation IV is: "...the next generation of nuclear energy systems that can be licensed, constructed, and operated in a manner that will provide a competitively priced and reliable supply of energy to the country where such systems are deployed, while addressing nuclear safety, waste, proliferation and public perception concerns." Roadmap Integration Team Presentation Objective - Gen IV Technology Roadmap The Technology Roadmap: * Describes systems deployable by 2030 or earlier * Determines which systems offer significant advances towards:

199

EIS-0469: Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is evaluating the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting NextEra Energy Resources proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, near Bismarck, North Dakota, to...

200

High Resolution Structure of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Type IV...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae Type IV Pilus: A Membrane-bound Fibrous Assembly Membrane proteins are notoriously difficult to crystallize, and fiber-forming proteins were...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Power Plant Applications. Author(s), Xingshuo Wen, Laura J. Carroll, ...

202

IV1. Yoon and E. Crosbie  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19 19 IV1. Yoon and E. Crosbie May 1988 The APS Beam Transfer Line from Linac to Booster Synchrotron In this note, we describe the recently designed APS beam transport system to the booster synchrotron. Another transfer system which guides the beam from the booster to the storage ring is described in ref. 1, and therefore it not be treated here. The system of interest consists of two parts; the transfer line LTOA from the injector linac to the positron accumulator ring (PAR) and the transfer line ATOB from the accumulator ring to booster synchrotron. For the design, we assumed that the rms transverse emittance of the Jinac output beam is about 1.1 mm mrad at 450 MeV andthe energy spread is :11%. The plan view of the designed beam transfer line is shown in Fig. 1. In this figure, B1 bends the

203

Summary and Evaluation of NRC-Sponsored Stellite 6 Aging and Friction Tests  

SciTech Connect

This report describes four sets of tests sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The tests support research addressing the need to provide assurance that motor-operated valves are able to perform their intended safety function, usually to open or close against specified (design basis) flow and pressure loads. One of the parameters that affects a gate valve's operability is the friction between the disc seats and the valve body seats. In most gate valves, these surfaces are hardfaced with Stellite 6, a cobalt-based alloy. The tests described in this report investigate the changes that occur in the friction as the Stellite 6 surfaces develop an oxide film as they age. Stellite 6 specimens were aged in a corrosion autoclave, the oxide films were examined and characterized, and the specimens were subjected to friction testing in a friction autoclave. A very thin oxide film formed after only a fe w days of natural aging. Even a very thin oxide film caused an increase in friction. The surface structure of the oxide film was dominated by a hard crystalline structure, such that the friction response was analogous to rubbing two pieces of sandpaper together. In the limited data provided by naturally aged specimens (78 days maximum exposure, very thin oxide films), the friction increased with greater aging time, approaching an as-yet-undetermined plateau. Although the thickness of the oxide film increased with greater aging time, the mechanical properties of the oxide film (larger granules with greater aging time) appeared to play a greater role in the friction response. Friction testing of specimens subjected to simulated in-service testing strokes at intervals during the aging process showed only a slight decrease in friction, compared to other specimens. Results from specimens subjected to accelerated aging were inconclusive, because of differences in the structure and comp osition of the oxide films, compared to naturally aged specimens. For the naturally aged specimens, the highest friction occurred on the first stroke. The first stroke smeared the oxide film and dislodged some of the granules, so that subsequent strokes saw lower friction values and less variation in the friction. This result underscores the importance of planning in-plant tests so that data are collected from the first stroke following a period of inactivity.

J. C. Watkins; K. G. DeWall; D. Bramwell

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Global Threat Reduction Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

comprehensive comprehensive strategy to prevent nuclear terrorism; and  The key organization responsible for implementing the U.S. HEU minimization policy. GTRI MISSION Reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. DOE STRATEGIC GOAL 2.2 Prevent the acquisition of nuclear and radiological materials for use in weapons of mass destruction and other acts of terrorism Protect high priority nuclear and radiological materials from theft and sabotage These efforts result in threat reduction by improving security on the bomb material remaining at civilian sites - each vulnerable building that is protected reduces the risk until a permanent threat reduction solution can be implemented.

205

REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: SUMMARY  

SciTech Connect

This paper briefly summarizes the series in which we consider the possibilities for losing, or compromising, key capabilities of the U.S. nuclear force in the face of modernization and reductions. The first of the three papers takes an historical perspective, considering capabilities that were eliminated in past force reductions. The second paper is our attempt to define the needed capabilities looking forward in the context of the current framework for force modernization and the current picture of the evolving challenges of deterrence and assurance. The third paper then provides an example for each of our undesirable outcomes: the creation of roach motels, box canyons, and wrong turns.

Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

206

Numerical tests of dynamical friction in gravitational inhomogeneous systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, I test by numerical simulations the results of Del Popolo & Gambera (1998),dealing with the extension of Chandrasekhar and von Neumann's analysis of the statistics of the gravitational field to systems in which particles (e.g., stars, galaxies) are inhomogeneously distributed. The paper is an extension of that of Ahmad & Cohen (1974), in which the authors tested some results of the stochastic theory of dynamical friction developed by Chandrasekhar & von Neumann (1943) in the case of homogeneous gravitational systems. It is also a continuation of the work developed in Del Popolo (1996a,b), which extended the results of Ahmad & Cohen (1973), (dealing with the study of the probability distribution of the stochastic force in homogeneous gravitational systems) to inhomogeneous gravitational systems. Similarly to what was done by Ahmad & Cohen (1974) in the case of homogeneous systems, I test, by means of the evolution of an inhomogeneous system of particles, that the theoretical ...

Popolo, A D

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Frictionally induced ignition processes in drop and skid tests  

SciTech Connect

The standard LANL/Pantex drop and skid tests rely on subjective assessment of reaction violence to quantify the response of the charge, and completely miss nonpropagating hot-spot ignition sites. Additionally, large variations in test results have been observed, which we propose is due to a misunderstanding of the basic physical processes that lead to threshold ignition in these tests. The tests have been redesigned to provide control of these mechanisms and to permit direct observation of hot spots at the impact site, allowing us to follow the progression of the outcome as the drop height and ignition source density are varied. The results confirm that frictional interactions between high-melting-point solids are the dominant ignition mechanism, not just at the threshold, but in fact at all realistic drop heights.

Dickson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Novak, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Integrated modeling and testing of a micro hinged structure for sliding friction measurement  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the design, modeling, and initial evaluation of a hinged structure for friction measurement in surface micromachining technology. While the area requirements are small, the present structure allows a much larger velocity and pressure range to be evaluated as compared to comb drive structures. The device consists of a cantilevered driver beam connected to a friction pad through a strategically located hinge. AC excitation of the beam flexure forces axial sliding of the friction pad due to beam foreshortening. Normal force is controlled by DC voltage on wings adjacent to the friction pad. While the achievable slip is small (10--30 nm), it is sufficient to disengage contacting asperities and engage new points of contact, and thus should be representative of frictional processes. Furthermore, the design enables the friction pad contact area to remain relatively constant over the excitation cycle. Computer simulation results are provided to mimic on-going experimental work. Increased friction forces are shown to enhance the size of hysteresis loops relating beam deflection to driver voltage.

Redmond, J.M.; Boer, M.P. de; Michalske, T.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Anti-friction properties of ester additives during hot rolling of aluminum{copyright}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heavy esters of polyhydric alcohols, such as glycerol and synthetic polyols, are commonly used as additives in aluminum hot rolling lubricants. The presence of several hydroxyl groups allows a varying degree of esterification leading to the formation of full and partial esters. These esters are rarely separated from the main additive, and thus may be present in the finished rolling lubricant, affecting its anti-friction properties. The objective of this work was to examine the anti-friction properties of these potential ester contaminants during rolling on a laboratory hot rolling mill. Two lubricant application methods were examined; as emulsion and direct (neat oil) application. The anti-friction properties of additives were found to depend on their chemical structure and the lubricant applications method. In emulsified oils, partial esters of glycerol were found to greatly reduce friction in comparison to triglycerides, while the partial esters of synthetic polyols exhibited only a weak anti-friction effect. There was no frictional advantage observed which could be associated with using the partial esters in direct application mode. Moreover, under these conditions, the anti-friction properties of the completely esterified synthetic polyols were significantly lower than those of triglycerides, while in emulsions they were comparable. 11 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Januszkiewicz, K.R.; Bekmesian, G.; Heenan, D.F. [Alcan International Limited, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Assessment of NOx Reduction Potential from Combustion Modifications at Illinois Power -- Baldwin Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclone boilers have recently become regulated with respect to NOx emissions due to the adoption of Title IV -- Group 2 NOx emission limits for cyclones of 0.86 lb/MBtu. This project explored the NOx reduction potential of cyclone biasing on a bituminous coal-fired cyclone boiler.

1998-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

211

Ultra low friction carbon/carbon composites for extreme temperature applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbon/carbon composite in which a carbon matrix containing a controlled amount of boron or a boron compound is reinforced with carbon fiber exhibits a low coefficient of friction, i.e., on the order of 0.04 to 0.1 at temperatures up to 600.degree. C., which is one of the lowest frictional coefficients for any type of carbonaceous material, including graphite, glassy carbon, diamond, diamond-like carbon and other forms of carbon material. The high degree of slipperiness of the carbon composite renders it particularly adapted for limiting friction and wear at elevated temperatures such as in seals, bearings, shafts, and flexible joints

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Busch, Donald E. (Hinsdale, IL); Fenske, George R. (Downers Grove, IL); Lee, Sam (Gardena, CA); Shepherd, Gary (Los Alamitos, CA); Pruett, Gary J. (Cypress, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Reducing Nitrogen Oxide Emissions: 1996 Compliance with Title IV Limits  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The purpose of this article is to summarize the existing Federal Nox regulations and the 1996 performance of the 239 Title IV generating units. It also reviews the basics of low-Nox burner technology and presents cost and performance data for retrofits at Title IV units.

Information Center

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

CMAD IV 11/14/96 Information Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilities, power pools, vendors etc.. #12;CMAD IV 11/14/96 #12; #12; GridCo LineCo PoolCo Energy Merchant INFO INFO INFO $ $ $ PWR PWR PWR #12;CMAD IV 11/14/96 "Future" Is At Hand · Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) 889 ­ information on transmission availability and prices. ­ equal access for wholesale

California at Davis, University of

214

Salton Sea IV Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IV Geothermal Facility IV Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Salton Sea IV Geothermal Facility General Information Name Salton Sea IV Geothermal Facility Facility Salton Sea IV Sector Geothermal energy Location Information Address 6922 Crummer Rd. Location Calipatria, California Zip 92233 Coordinates 33.157511158558°, -115.63861370087° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.157511158558,"lon":-115.63861370087,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

215

An Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology for Generation IV Nuclear Systems  

SciTech Connect

The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) Risk and Safety Working Group (RSWG) was created to develop an effective approach for the safety of Generation IV advanced nuclear energy systems. Early work of the RSWG focused on defining a safety philosophy founded on lessons learned from current and prior generations of nuclear technologies, and on identifying technology characteristics that may help achieve Generation IV safety goals. More recent RSWG work has focused on the definition of an integrated safety assessment methodology for evaluating the safety of Generation IV systems. The methodology, tentatively called ISAM, is an integrated “toolkit” consisting of analytical techniques that are available and matched to appropriate stages of Generation IV system concept development. The integrated methodology is intended to yield safety-related insights that help actively drive the evolving design throughout the technology development cycle, potentially resulting in enhanced safety, reduced costs, and shortened development time.

Timothy J. Leahy

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Aluminum reduction cell electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB[sub 2], for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints. 9 figs.

Goodnow, W.H.; Payne, J.R.

1982-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

217

Thermochemical nitrate reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with {approximately}3 wt% NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200{degrees}C to 350{degrees}C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia {approx} methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics.

Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Experimental investigation of energy dissipation behavior of the modified friction device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As building materials become stronger, dynamic design and structural control are effective means of improving serviceability in the future's ever lighter structures. The recently proposed modified friction device (MFD) ...

Zahner, Robert Marne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Friction and Adhesion Forces of Bacillus thuringiensis Spores on Planar Surfaces in Atmospheric Systems  

SciTech Connect

The kinetic friction force and the adhesion force of Bacillus thuringiensis spores on planar surfaces in atmospheric systems were studied using atomic force microscopy. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on these forces varied for different surface properties including hydrophobicity, roughness, and surface charge. The friction force of the spore was greater on a rougher surface than on mica, which is atomically flat. As RH increases, the friction force of the spores decreases on mica whereas it increases on rough surfaces. The influence of RH on the interaction forces between hydrophobic surfaces is not as strong as for hydrophilic surfaces. The friction force of the spore is linear to the sum of the adhesion force and normal load on the hydrophobic surface. The poorly defined surface structure of the spore and the adsorption of contaminants from the surrounding atmosphere are believed to cause a discrepancy between the calculated and measured adhesion forces.

Kweon, Hyojin [Georgia Institute of Technology; Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

An Analytic Theory on How Friction Affects Free Internal Waves in the Equatorial Waveguide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study theoretically the effects of linear (Rayleigh) friction on free internal waves in the equatorial wayeguide. The waves may be vertically propagating or in standing vertical modes. Analytic solutions on a beta-plane show that the ...

Harold O. Mofjeld

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cooperative and submolecular dissipation mechanisms of sliding friction in complex organic systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- oretical friction dissipation models3 and computer simulations4 have significantly improved. Gao and J. P. Harmon, Thermochim. Acta 284, 85 1996 . 16 A. Wypych, E. Duval, G. Boiteux, J. Ulanski

222

A Physically Consistent Formulation of Lateral Friction in Shallow-Water Equation Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissipation in numerical ocean models has two purposes: to simulate processes in which the friction is physically relevant and to prevent numerical instability by suppressing accumulation of energy in the smallest resolved scales. This study ...

Alexander F. Shchepetkin; James J. O'Brien

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Usage of Friction-damped Braced Frames for Seismic Vibration Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents the results of experimental work that examines the functionality of friction-damped braced frames during seismic events. The simplicity and efficacy of this friction device as a means of passive vibration control suggest that it may have notable implications in the field of structural engineering. Little scholarship has been devoted to this issue in recent years, and further research to advance our understanding of its possible implementations is necessary. To measure the functionality of this type of frame, this study first examines and compares virtual models of a building modeling the effect of friction damping versus that same building without such damping. It then corroborates these findings by presenting the results of physical experimentation on a scale model of the building, both with and without damping. The validation of the virtual models by the physical model provides credence to the usage of friction-damped braced frames as a seismic energy dissipating system.

Fink, Brynnan 1992-

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Dimensionally Consistent Similarity Relation of Ocean Surface Friction Coefficient in Mixed Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applying wavelength scaling, dimensionally consistent expressions of the ocean surface friction coefficient can be developed for both wind sea and mixed sea in the ocean. For a wind sea with a monopeak wave spectrum, the natural choice of the ...

Paul A. Hwang; Héctor García-Nava; Francisco J. Ocampo-Torres

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Defining the role of elastic lubricants and micro textured surfaces in lubricated, sliding friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions for reducing friction in sliding, lubricated systems include modifying lubricant rheology using polymers and adding a micro-scale texture to the sliding surfaces, but the mechanism of how lubrication properties ...

Hupp, Sara J. (Sara Jean), 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Stellite 6 Friction Changes Due to Aging and In-Service Testing  

SciTech Connect

For the past several years, researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, under the sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have been investigating the ability of motor-operated valves to close or open when subjected to design basis flow and pressure loads. Part of this research addresses the friction that occurs at the interface between the valve disc and the valve body seats during operation of a gate valve. In most gate valves, these surfaces are hardfaced with Stellite 6, a cobalt-based alloy. The nuclear industry has developed methods to analytically predict the thrust needed to operate these valves at specific pressure conditions. To produce accurate valve thrust predictions; the analyst must have a reasonably accurate, though conservative, estimate of the coefficient of friction at the disc-to-seat interface. One of the questions that remains to be answered is whether, and to what extent, aging of the disc and seat surfaces affects the disc-to-seat coefficient of friction. Specifically, does the accumulation of a surface film due to aging of these surfaces increase the coefficient of friction and if so, how much? This paper presents results of specimen tests addressing this issue with emphasis on the following: • The change in the friction coefficient of Stellite 6 as it ages and whether the friction reaches a plateau. • The effect periodic gate valve cycling due to in-service testing has on the friction coefficient. • The results of an independent review of the test methods, processes, and the results of the research to date. • The status of ongoing aging and friction testing.

Watkins, John Clifford; DeWall, Kevin George

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hard and low friction nitride coatings and methods for forming the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved coating material possessing super-hard and low friction properties and a method for forming the same. The improved coating material includes the use of a noble metal or soft metal homogeneously distributed within a hard nitride material. The addition of small amounts of such metals into nitrides such as molybdenum nitride, titanium nitride, and chromium nitride results in as much as increasing of the hardness of the material as well as decreasing the friction coefficient and increasing the oxidation resistance.

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Urgen, Mustafa (Istanbul, TR); Cakir, Ali Fuat (Istanbul, TR); Eryilmaz, Osman Levent (Bolingbrook, IL); Kazmanli, Kursat (Istanbul, TR); Keles, Ozgul (Istanbul, TR)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The U.S. Generation IV Implementation Strategy  

SciTech Connect

This report has been prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to respond to Congressional direction contained in Senate Report 107-220 from the Senate Committee on Appropriations regarding the Energy and Water Development Appropriations for 2003. In that report, the Committee instructed the Department to prepare a report regarding how it intends to carry out the results of the Generation IV Roadmap. This report is the U.S. Department of Energy's response to the Congressional directive. It summarizes results from the Generation IV Technology Roadmap and the strategy for implementing of the Generation IV program in the United States. Planning for the implementation of the Generation IV program is based on (1) the long-term outlook for nuclear energy in the United States, (2) the advice of the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee during the two-year development of the Generation IV Technology Roadmap, and (3) the need for the Generation IV program to be integrated with other nuclear energy research programs of the Department. Considerable emphasis is given to developing the priorities and necessary timelines for the U.S. Generation IV Program, as well as developing international R&D cooperation that will benefit the program and strengthen U.S. leadership in nuclear technology R&D.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Enhancing trappable antiproton populations through deceleration and frictional cooling  

SciTech Connect

CERN currently delivers antiprotons for trapping experiments with the Antiproton Decelerator (AD), which slows the antiprotons down to about 5 MeV.This energy is currently too high for direct trapping, and thick foils are used to slow down the beam to energies which can be trapped.To allow further deceleration to $\\sim 100 \\;\\mbox{keV}$, CERN is initiating the construction of ELENA,consisting of a ring which will combine RF deceleration and electron cooling capabilities. We describe a simple frictionalcooling scheme that can serve to provide significantly improved trapping efficiency, either directly from the AD or first usinga standard deceleration mechanism (induction linac or RFQ). This scheme could be implemented in a short time.The device itself is short in length, uses accessible voltages, and at reasonable cost could serve in the interim beforeELENA becomes operational, or possibly in lieu of ELENA for some experiments. Simple theory and simulations provide a preliminary assessment of theconcept and its strengths and limitations, and highlight important areas for experimental studies, in particular to pin down the level of multiplescattering for low-energy antiprotons. We show that the frictional cooling scheme can provide a similar energy spectrum to that of ELENA,but with higher transverse emittances.

Zolotorev, Max; Sessler, Andrew; Penn, Gregory; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Charman, Andrew E.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

230

Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEA Development Phase IV: Resource Production and Power Plant Construction GEA Development Phases The Geothermal Energy Association's (GEA) Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions are a guideline for geothermal developers to use when submitting geothermal resource development information to GEA for public dissemination in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Update. GEA's Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation

231

EIS-0402: Santa Susana Field Laboratory Area IV, California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL Area IV). SSFL Area IV, occupying approximately 290 acres of the total 2,852-acre SSFL site is located in the hills between Chatsworth and Simi Valley, CA, and was developed as a remote site to test rocket engines and conduct nuclear research. This EIS will evaluate alternatives for disposition of radiological facilities and support buildings, remediation of the affected environment, and disposal of all resulting waste at existing, approved sites.

232

Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.6 Ligand Design for Pu(IV) …. ……..………………………. ………………………ligands used in UO 22+ and Pu(IV) structural studies …….. 23Raymond group ligands for Pu(IV) decorporation …… 208

Szigethy, Geza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

On the longest perpetual reductions in orthogonal expression reduction systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study perpetual reductions in orthogonal (or conflict-free) fully extended expression reduction systems (OERS). ERS is a formalism for rewriting that subsumes term rewriting systems (TRSs) and the &lgr;-calculus. We design a strategy ... Keywords: &lgr;-calculus, perpetual reductions, rewrite systems, strong normalization

Zurab Khasidashvili

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

NETL: Turbine Projects - Emissions Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Reduction Turbine Projects Emissions Reduction Pre-Mixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels DataFact Sheets Low-NOX Emissions in a Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustor Design...

235

Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration December 31, 2013 - 12:14pm Addthis GIF Policy Group Meeting in Brussels, Belgium, November 2013 GIF Policy Group Meeting in Brussels, Belgium, November 2013 Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Reactor Technologies The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) held its 36th Policy Group (PG) meeting on November 21-22 in Brussels, Belgium. The PG reviewed progress on a number of on-going actions and received progress reports from the GIF Experts Group (EG) and the GIF Senior Industry Advisory Panel (SIAP).

236

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new installations in the short term. DOE needs to give those immediate objectives the highest priority and any additional support they require to assure their success. DOE is pursuing two initiatives to encourage a greater use of nuclear energy systems. The initiatives have been reviewed by NERAC Subcommittee on Generation IV Technology Planning (GRNS) and they are: * A Near Term Development (NTD) Roadmap which is in the process of being

237

Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride at elevated temperatures was studied by solvent extraction technique. A solution of NaBrO3 was used as holding oxidant to maintain the oxidation state of plutonium throughout the experiments. The distribution ratio of Pu(IV) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of fluoride were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 and 1:2 Pu(IV)-F- complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase under the experimental conditions, were calculated from the effect of fluoride ions on the distribution ratio. The thermodynamic parameters, including enthalpy and entropy of complexation between Pu(IV) and fluoride at 25 degrees C - 55 degrees C were calculated from the stability constants at different temperatures by using the Van’t Hoff equation.

Xia, Yuanxian; Rao, Linfeng; Friese, Judah I.; Moore, Dean A.; Bachelor, Paula P.

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

238

Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of Platinum(IV) Carbamate Complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity of eight new platinum(IV) complexes having the general formula cis,cis,trans-[Pt(NH[subscript 3)[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 2](O[subscript 2]CNHR)[subscript 2

Wilson, Justin Jeff

239

Victory Gardens I and IV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Victory Gardens I and IV Victory Gardens I and IV Jump to: navigation, search Name Victory Gardens I and IV Facility Victory Gardens I and IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Zond Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

240

facial reduction and extended duals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facial reduction and extended duals Here we study two fundamental approaches ...... denberghe, and Henry Wolkowicz, editors, Handbook of semidefinite ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

ALUMINIUM REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY: V: Fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ALUMINIUM REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY: Session V: Fundamentals. Sponsored by: LMD Aluminum Committee Program Organizer: Harald A. Øye, Institute of ...

242

LOW-ENGINE-FRICTION TECHNOLOGY FOR ADVANCED NATURAL-GAS RECIPROCATING ENGINES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program aims at improving the efficiency of advanced natural-gas reciprocating engines (ANGRE) by reducing piston/ring assembly friction without major adverse effects on engine performance, such as increased oil consumption and emissions. An iterative process of simulation, experimentation and analysis, are being followed towards achieving the goal of demonstrating a complete optimized low-friction engine system. To date, a detailed set of piston/ring dynamic and friction models have been developed and applied that illustrated the fundamental relationships between design parameters and friction losses. Various low-friction strategies and ring-design concepts have been explored, and engine experiments have been done on a full-scale Waukesha VGF F18 in-line 6 cylinder power generation engine rated at 370 kW at 1800 rpm. Current accomplishments include designing and testing ring-packs using a subtle top-compression-ring profile (skewed barrel design), lowering the tension of the oil-control ring, employing a negative twist to the scraper ring to control oil consumption. Initial test data indicate that piston ring-pack friction was reduced by 35% by lowering the oil-control ring tension alone, which corresponds to a 1.5% improvement in fuel efficiency. Although small in magnitude, this improvement represents a first step towards anticipated aggregate improvements from other strategies. Other ring-pack design strategies to lower friction have been identified, including reduced axial distance between the top two rings, tilted top-ring groove. Some of these configurations have been tested and some await further evaluation. Colorado State University performed the tests and Waukesha Engine Dresser, Inc. provided technical support. Key elements of the continuing work include optimizing the engine piston design, application of surface and material developments in conjunction with improved lubricant properties, system modeling and analysis, and continued technology demonstration in an actual full-sized reciprocating natural-gas engine.

Victor W. Wong; Tian Tian; Grant Smedley; Jeffrey Jocsak

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

243

Global Threat Reduction Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonproliferation Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1 The Current Status of Gap and U.S.-Origin Nuclear Fuel Removals 2011 Jeff Galan, Deputy Project Manager U.S.-Origin Nuclear Remove Program National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 2 GTRI Mission and Goals GTRI is: A part of President Obama's comprehensive strategy to prevent nuclear terrorism; and The key organization responsible for implementing the U.S. HEU minimization policy. GTRI MISSION Reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. DOE STRATEGIC GOAL 2.2 Prevent the acquisition of nuclear and radiological materials for use in weapons of mass destruction and other

244

Aluminum reduction cell electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces. 10 figs.

Payne, J.R.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

Site Energy Reduction Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DuPont’s Sabine River Works site is the largest energy consuming location within DuPont. In the year 2000, each production area was encouraged to reduce energy costs. By 2003 site energy consumption was down 16% on an absolute basis and 12% on a BTU/LB basis. By 2004, overall progress had slowed, energy consumption increased slightly, and area results were mixed. It was time to shake things up with a new perspective. A coordinated site energy program was launched. In 2005, the first full year of the unified program, the site saved $6.9 MM from energy reduction projects. The rate of improvement is accelerating in 2006 with $3.6 MM in energy projects being implemented in the first four months.

Jagen, P. R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Dose Reduction Techniques  

SciTech Connect

As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

WAGGONER, L.O.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

247

Velocity-Dependent Friction and Diffusion for Grains in Neutral Gases, Dusty Plasmas and Active Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A self-consistent and universal description of friction and diffusion for Brownian particles (grains) in different systems, as a gas with Boltzmann collisions, dusty plasma with ion absorption by grains, and for active particles (e.g., cells in biological systems) is suggested on the basis of the appropriate Fokker-Planck equation. Restrictions for application of the Fokker-Planck equation to the problem of velocity-dependent friction and diffusion coefficients are found. General description for this coefficient is formulated on the basis of master equation. Relation of the diffusion coefficient in the coordinate and velocity spaces is found for active (capable to transfer momentum to the ambient media) and passive particles in the framework of the Fokker-Planck equation. The problem of anomalous space diffusion is formulated on the basis of the appropriate probability transition (PT) function. The method of partial differentiation is avoided to construct the correct probability distributions for arbitrary distances, what is important for applications to different stochastic problems. Generale equation for time-dependent PT function is formulated and discussed. Generalized friction in the velocity space is determined and applied to describe the friction force itself as well as the drag force in the case of a non-zero driven ion velocity in plasmas. The negative friction due to ion scattering on grains exists and can be realized for the appropriate experimental conditions.

S. A. Trigger; G. J. F. van Heijst; P. P. J. M. Schram

2004-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Velocity-Dependent Friction and Diffusion for Grains in Neutral Gases, Dusty Plasmas and Active Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A self-consistent and universal description of friction and diffusion for Brownian particles (grains) in different systems, as a gas with Boltzmann collisions, dusty plasma with ion absorption by grains, and for active particles (e.g., cells in biological systems) is suggested on the basis of the appropriate Fokker-Planck equation. Restrictions for application of the Fokker-Planck equation to the problem of velocity-dependent friction and diffusion coefficients are found. General description for this coefficient is formulated on the basis of master equation. Relation of the diffusion coefficient in the coordinate and velocity spaces is found for active (capable to transfer momentum to the ambient media) and passive particles in the framework of the Fokker-Planck equation. The problem of anomalous space diffusion is formulated on the basis of the appropriate probability transition (PT) function. The method of partial differentiation is avoided to construct the correct probability distributions for arbitrary distances, what is important for applications to different stochastic problems. Generale equation for time-dependent PT function is formulated and discussed. Generalized friction in the velocity space is determined and applied to describe the friction force itself as well as the drag force in the case of a non-zero driven ion velocity in plasmas. The negative friction due to ion scattering on grains exists and can be realized for the appropriate experimental conditions.

S. A. Trigger; G. J. F. Van Heijst; P. P. J. M. Schram

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Wall-pressure and PIV analysis for microbubble drag reduction investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of microbubbles injection in the boundary layer of a turbulent channel flow are investigated. Electrolysis demonstrated to be an effective method to produce microbubbles with an average diameter of 30 ??m and allowed the placement of microbubbles at desired locations within the boundary layer. Measurement of velocity fluctuations and the instantaneous wall shear stress were carried out in a channel flow facility. The wall shear stress is an important parameter that can help with the characterization of the boundary layer. This parameter can be obtained indirectly by the measurement of the flow pressure at the wall. The wall shear stress in the channel was measured by means of three different independent methods: measurement of the pressure gradient by a differential pressure transducer, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), and an optical wall shear stress sensor. The three methods showed reasonable agreement of the wall shear stress values for single-phase flow. However, differences as skin friction reductions were observed when the microbubbles were injected. Several measurements of wall-pressure were taken at various Reynolds numbers that ranged from 300 up to 6154. No significant drag reduction was observed for flows in the laminar range; however, a drag reduction of about 16% was detected for turbulent Reynolds numbers. The wall-pressure measurements were shown to be a powerful tool for the measurement of drag reduction, which could help with the design of systems capable of controlling the skin friction based on feedback given by the wall-pressure signal. The proposed measurement system designed in this work has capabilities for application in such diverse fields as multiphase flows, drag reduction, stratified flows, heat transfer among others. The synchronization between independent systems and apparatus has the potential to bring insight about the complicated phenomena involved in the nature of fluid flows.

Dominguez Ontiveros, Elvis Efren

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

CAM/LIFTER forces and friction. Final report, September 15, 1988--November 30, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details the procedures used to measure the cam/lifter forces and friction. The present effort employed a Cummins LTA-10, and focuses on measurements and dynamic modeling of the injector train. The program was sponsored by the US Department of Energy in support of advanced diesel engine technology. The injector train was instrumented to record the instantaneous roller speed, roller pin friction torque, pushrod force, injector link force and cam speed. These measurements, together with lift profiles for pushrod and injector link displacement, enabled the friction work loss in the injector train to be determined. Other significant design criteria such as camshaft roller follower slippage and maximum loads on components were also determined. Future efforts will concentrate on the dynamic model, with tests run as required for correlation.

Gabbey, D.J.; Lee, J.; Patterson, D.J.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Energy Reduction at HQ | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Reduction at HQ Energy Reduction at HQ Aviation Management Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Electric Metering Facilities Initiatives Recycling Programs Services...

252

Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase IV Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel furnace designs based on Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) technology were developed under subcontract by Techint Technologies, Coraopolis, PA, to fully exploit the energy and environmental capabilities of DOC technology and to provide a competitive offering for new furnace construction opportunities. Capital cost, fuel, oxygen and utility costs, NOx emissions, oxide scaling performance, and maintenance requirements were compared for five DOC-based designs and three conventional air5-fired designs using a 10-year net present value calculation. A furnace direct completely with DOC burners offers low capital cost, low fuel rate, and minimal NOx emissions. However, these benefits do not offset the cost of oxygen and a full DOC-fired furnace is projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is roughly $6/lb NOx, compared with an estimated $3/lb. NOx for equ8pping a conventional furnace with selective catalytic reduction (SCCR) technology. A furnace fired with DOC burners in the heating zone and ambient temperature (cold) air-fired burners in the soak zone offers low capital cost with less oxygen consumption. However, the improvement in fuel rate is not as great as the full DOC-fired design, and the DOC-cold soak design is also projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The NOx improvement with the DOC-cold soak design is also not as great as the full DOC fired design, and the incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is nearly $9/lb NOx. These results indicate that a DOC-based furnace design will not be generally competitive with conventional technology for new furnace construction under current market conditions. Fuel prices of $7/MMBtu or oxygen prices of $23/ton are needed to make the DOC furnace economics favorable. Niche applications may exist, particularly where access to capital is limited or floor space limitations are critical. DOC technology will continue to have a highly competitive role in retrofit applications requiring increases in furnace productivity.

Riley, M.F.

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

Sodium compatibility studies of low friction carbide coatings for reactor application  

SciTech Connect

Design requirements for low friction materials in FFTF have led to an experimental sodium compatibility program, the objective of which is to select and qualify a low friction coating for the fuel assembly duct load pad. Results are given for chromium carbide and titanium carbide-based coatings on stainless steel exposed to 1160 deg F sodium for several thousand hours. A chromium carbide coating (with a nichrome binder) having an average corrosion rate of approximately 0.25 mpy exhibits optimum sodium compatibility behavior of the materials examined. Both plasma-sprayed chromium carbide and titanium carbide based coatings were found to be unstable when exposed to sodium. (auth)

Whitlow, G.A.; Miller, R.L.; Schrock, S.L.; Wu, P.C.S.

1973-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Unstructured finite volume discretisation of bed friction and convective flux in solute transport models linked to the shallow water equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The finite volume discretisation of the shallow water equations has been the subject of many previous studies, most of which deal with a well-balanced conservative discretisation of the convective flux and bathymetry. However, the bed friction discretisation ... Keywords: Bed friction, Depth averaged models, Finite volume method, High order schemes, Scalar transport, Shallow water equations, Unstructured mesh

L. Cea; M. E. Vázquez-Cendón

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Integrating complementarity into the 2D displacement discontinuity boundary element method to model faults and fractures with frictional contact properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a two-dimensional displacement discontinuity method (DDM) in combination with a complementarity solver to simulate quasi-static slip on cracks as models for faults and fractures in an otherwise homogeneous, isotropic, linear elastic material. ... Keywords: Boundary element model, Complementarity, Friction, Frictional strength

Elizabeth Ritz; Ovunc Mutlu; David D. Pollard

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

On a solvability of hydro-mechanical problem based on contact problem with visco-plastic friction in Bingham rheology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the solvability and numerical solution of contact problem with a local visco-plastic friction in the visco-plastic Bingham rheology. The model problem discussed represents a simple hydro-mechanical model of the global project on ... Keywords: Bingham rheology, Contact problems with friction, FEM, Geomechanics, Hydromechanics, Variational inequalities, Visco-plasticity

Ji?í Nedoma; Luboš Tomášek

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Microsoft Word - Wilton IV DEIS_ 03 12 13.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Draft Environmental Impact Statement DOE/EIS-0469 March 2013 COVER SHEET Lead Federal Agency: U.S. Department of Energy, Western Area Power Administration Title: Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Wilton IV Wind Energy Center For additional information on this Draft Environmental Impact Statement contact: Mr. Matt Marsh Upper Great Plains Regional Office Western Area Power Administration P.O. Box 35800, Billings, MT 59107-5800 MMarsh@wapa.gov, (800) 358-3415 For general information on the U.S. Department of Energy's National Environmental Policy Act process please contact: Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance (GC-54) U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 (202) 586-4600

258

Gen IV public comments-G Vine.PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation IV Goals and Roadmap Generation IV Goals and Roadmap Public meeting, Thursday, Nov. 16, 2000 JW Marriott, Washington DC Gary Vine, EPRI I'd like to cite two regulatory landmarks established during the U.S. DOE/Industry ALWR Program, 1983-98, the intent of which should be incorporated into the goal setting for all future reactors. These are followed by four specific comments on the Generation IV goals. A. ALWR goals are Industry goals, and must be kept distinct from regulatory requirements. The ALWR Program was very careful to maintain and preserve clear separation between regulatory requirements and industry goals, as expressed in the EPRI ALWR Utility Requirements Document. The industry needed to decide how to comply with regulations in the most cost-effective way, and needed to strategically design-in the extra margins needed for investment protection, operational

259

Foote Creek Rim IV Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IV Wind Farm IV Wind Farm Facility Foote Creek Rim IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Caithness Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser Bonneville Power Admin Location Carbon County WY Coordinates 41.626456°, -106.202095° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.626456,"lon":-106.202095,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

260

Tethys and Annex IV Progress Report for FY 2012  

SciTech Connect

The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System, dubbed “Tethys” after the mythical Greek titaness of the seas, is being developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). Functioning as a smart database, Tethys enables its users to identify key words or terms to help gather, organize and make available information and data pertaining to the environmental effects of MHK and offshore wind (OSW) energy development. By providing and categorizing relevant publications within a simple and searchable database, Tethys acts as a dissemination channel for information and data which can be utilized by regulators, project developers and researchers to minimize the environmental risks associated with offshore renewable energy developments and attempt to streamline the permitting process. Tethys also houses a separate content-related Annex IV data base with identical functionality to the Tethys knowledge base. Annex IV is a collaborative project among member nations of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ocean Energy Systems – Implementing Agreement (OES-IA) that examines the environmental effects of ocean energy devices and projects. The U.S. Department of Energy leads the Annex IV working with federal partners such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While the Annex IV database contains technical reports and journal articles, it is primarily focused on the collection of project site and research study metadata forms (completed by MHK researchers and developers around the world, and collected by PNNL) which provide information on environmental studies and the current progress of the various international MHK developments in the Annex IV member nations. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the content, accessibility and functionality enhancements made to the Annex IV and Tethys knowledge bases in FY12.

Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Heterogeneous Reduction of PuO2 with Fe(II): Importance of the Fe(III) Reaction Product  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Heterogeneous reduction of actinides in higher and more soluble oxidation states to lower more insoluble oxidation states by reductants such as Fe(II) has been the subject of intensive study for more than two decades. However, Fe(II)-induced reduction of sparingly soluble Pu(IV) to the more soluble lower oxidation state Pu(III) has been much less studied even though such reactions can potentially increase the mobility of Pu in the subsurface. Thermodynamic calculations are presented that show how differences in the free energy of various possible solid-phase Fe(III) reaction products can greatly influence aqueous Pu(III) concentrations resulting from reduction of PuO2(am) by Fe(II). We present the first experimental evidence that reduction of PuO2(am) to Pu(III) by Fe(II) was enhanced when the Fe(III) mineral goethite was spiked into the reaction. The effect of goethite on reduction of Pu(IV) was demonstrated by measuring the time-dependence of total aqueous Pu concentration, its oxidation state, and system pe/pH. We also re-evaluated established protocols for determining Pu(III) [(Pu(III) + Pu(IV)) - Pu(IV)] by using thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) in toluene extractions; the study showed that it is important to eliminate dissolved oxygen from the TTA solutions for accurate determinations. More broadly, this study highlights the importance of the Fe(III) reaction product in actinide reduction rate and extent by Fe(II).

Felmy, Andrew R.; Moore, Dean A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Qafoku, Odeta; Rai, Dhanpat; Buck, Edgar C.; Ilton, Eugene S.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Plutonium(V/VI) Reduction by the Metal-Reducing Bacteria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examined the ability of the metal-reducing bacteria Geobacter metallireducens GS-15 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to reduce Pu(VI) and Pu(V). Cell suspensions of both bacteria reduced oxidized Pu [a mixture of Pu(VI) and Pu(V)] to Pu(IV). The rate of plutonium reduction was similar to the rate of U(VI) reduction obtained under similar conditions for each bacteria. The rates of Pu(VI) and U(VI) reduction by cell suspensions of S. oneidensis were slightly higher than the rates observed with G. metallireducens. The reduced form of Pu was characterized as aggregates of nanoparticulates of Pu(IV). Transmission electron microscopy images of the solids obtained from the cultures after the reduction of Pu(VI) and Pu(V) by S. oneidensis show that the Pu precipitates have a crystalline structure. The nanoparticulates of Pu(IV) were precipitated on the surface of or within the cell walls of the bacteria. The production of Pu(III) was not observed, which indicates that Pu(IV) was the stable form of reduced Pu under these experimental conditions. Experiments examining the ability of these bacteria to use Pu(VI) as a terminal electron acceptor for growth were inconclusive. A slight increase in cell density was observed for both G. metallireducens and S. oneidensis when Pu(VI) was provided as the sole electron acceptor; however, Pu(VI) concentrations decreased similarly in both the experimental and control cultures. Effective bioremediation and waste management strategies

Gary A. Icopini; Joe G. Lack; Larry E. Hersman; Mary P. Neu; Hakim Boukhalfa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Yale's Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yale's Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategy ...creating a sustainable future August 2007 #12;Yale is a greenhouse gas re- duction goal. This goal has guided the development of an aggressive and in- formed to similar commitments to greenhouse gas reductions by other institutions of higher learning nationally

Haller, Gary L.

264

Energy Efficiency Interest Rate Reduction Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interest Rate Reduction Program Energy Efficiency Interest Rate Reduction Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial...

265

National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Staff ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Staff. National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (731.05). Dr. John (Jack) R. Hayes, Jr. ...

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

266

Synthesis of superlow friction carbon films from highly hydrogenated methane plasmas.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study, we investigated the friction and wear performance of diamondlike carbon films (DLC) derived from increasingly hydrogenated methane plasmas. The films were deposited on steel substrates by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process at room temperature and the tribological tests were performed in dry nitrogen. Tests results revealed a close correlation between the hydrogen in source gas plasma and the friction and wear coefficients of the DLC films. Specifically, films grown in plasmas with higher hydrogen-to-carbon ratios had much lower friction coefficients and wear rates than did films derived from source gases with lower hydrogen-to-carbon ratios. The lowest friction coefficient (0.003) was achieved with a film derived from 25% methane--75% hydrogen, while a coefficient of 0.015 was found for films derived from pure methane. Similar correlations were observed for wear rates. Films derived from hydrogen-rich plasmas had the least wear, while films derived from pure methane suffered the highest wear. We used a combination of surface analytical methods to characterize the structure and chemistry of the DLC films and worn surfaces.

Erdemir, A.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Nilufer, I. B.; Fenske, G. R.

2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

267

Effects of Friction on a Localized Structure in a Baroclinic Current  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the effects of bottom and interfacial friction on localized baroclinic instability are discussed in the weakly nonlinear, long-wave limit. Using a quasigeostrophic two-layer model in which the lower layer is assumed to be deep, we ...

Humio Mitsudera; Roger Grimshaw

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Multiple pass and multiple layer friction stir welding and material enhancement processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for friction stir welding, typically for comparatively thick plate materials using multiple passes and multiple layers of a friction stir welding tool. In some embodiments a first portion of a fabrication preform and a second portion of the fabrication preform are placed adjacent to each other to form a joint, and there may be a groove adjacent the joint. The joint is welded and then, where a groove exists, a filler may be disposed in the groove, and the seams between the filler and the first and second portions of the fabrication preform may be friction stir welded. In some embodiments two portions of a fabrication preform are abutted to form a joint, where the joint may, for example, be a lap joint, a bevel joint or a butt joint. In some embodiments a plurality of passes of a friction stir welding tool may be used, with some passes welding from one side of a fabrication preform and other passes welding from the other side of the fabrication preform.

Feng, Zhili (Knoxville, TN); David, Stan A. (Knoxville, TN); Frederick, David Alan (Harriman, TN)

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

269

Correlations to predict frictional pressure loss of hydraulic-fracturing slurry in coiled tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compared with conventional-tubing fracturing, coiled-tubing (CT) fracturing has several advantages. CT fracturing has become an effective stimulation technique for multizone oil and gas wells. It is also an attractive production-enhancement method for multiseam coalbed-methane wells, and wells with bypassed zones. The excessive frictional pressure loss through CT has been a concern in fracturing. The small diameter of the string limits the cross-sectional area open to flow. Furthermore, the tubing curvature causes secondary flow and results in extra flow resistance. This increased frictional pressure loss results in high surface pumping pressure. The maximum possible pump rate and sand concentration, therefore, have to be reduced. To design a CT fracturing job properly, it is essential to predict the frictional pressure loss through the tubing accurately. This paper presents correlations for the prediction of frictional pressure loss of fracturing slurries in straight tubing and CT. They are developed on the basis of full-scale slurry-flow tests with 11/2-in. CT and slurries prepared with 35 lbm/1,000 gal of guar gel. The extensive experiments were conducted at the full-scale CT-flow test facility. The proposed correlations have been verified with the experimental data and actual field CT-fracturing data. Case studies of wells recently fractured are provided to demonstrate the application of the correlations. The correlations will be useful to the CT engineers in their hydraulics design calculations.

Shah, S.; Zhoi, Y.X.; Bailey, M.; Hernandez, J. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Shoe soles for the gripping robot: Searching for polymer-based materials maximising friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of light-weight climbing robots capable of operating in various environments is a growing area in robotics. That is why there is a strong need for new tribologically-optimised materials at their gripping devices that may lead to the enhancement ... Keywords: Adhesion, Biomimetics, Climbing robot, Friction, Polymer, Robotics

Dagmar Voigt; Andreas Karguth; Stanislav Gorb

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Uncertainty in a Path-averaged Measurement of the Friction Velocity u*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several electro-optical methods exist for measuring a path-averaged value of the inner scale of turbulence l0. By virtue of Monin–Obukhov similarity, in the atmospheric surface layer such l0 measurements are related to the friction velocity u* or ...

Edgar L. Andreas

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tropical cyclone (TC) viewed as a heat engine converts heat energy extracted from the ocean into the kinetic energy of the TC, which is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while ...

Yuqing Wang; Jing Xu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Friction and Galling Performance of NOREM 02 and NOREM 02A Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To reduce plant radiation levels, EPRI has developed a series of iron-based hardfacing alloys known as NOREM. This report documents tests conducted to evaluate the friction and galling thresholds for NOREM 02 and 02A alloys to provide a basis for engineering evaluation of thrust requirements for gate valves in which these alloys are utilized.

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

274

FRICTION FACTOR IN HIGH PRESSURE NATURAL GAS PIPELINES FROM ROUGHNESS MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

number. The reported studies have focused on flow over smooth surfaces. In industrial applications )sin( 2 2 =++ + dx Ud U D f g dx dP Equation 2 Most friction factor correlations used in industry with an internal diameter of 150 mm were made of honed steel tubing to ensure high quality tolerance of the inner

Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

275

Victory Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm II Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm II Jump to: navigation, search Name Victory Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm II Facility Victory Gardens- Phase IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Zond Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

276

Inadale (Roscoe IV) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inadale (Roscoe IV) Wind Farm Inadale (Roscoe IV) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Inadale (Roscoe IV) Wind Farm Facility Inadale (Roscoe IV) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner E.On Climate & Renewables Developer E.On Climate & Renewables Location Scurry and Nolan Counties TX Coordinates 32.346675°, -100.379717° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.346675,"lon":-100.379717,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

277

Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Tempeartures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride. I = 2.2 mol·p.w. – present work. Reaction Pu 4+ + HF PuF 3+ + H + t oI = 0) Ref. p.w. p.w. p.w. Pu 4+ + 2HF 2H + PuF 22+ + dis

Moore, Dean A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Tempeartures  

SciTech Connect

Complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride was studied by solvent extraction at 25, 40 and 55 C in 2.2 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} HClO{sub 4}. The distribution ratio of Pu(IV) between the organic and aqueous phases decreased as the concentration of fluoride was increased due to the formation of Pu(IV)-F complexes in the aqueous phase. Two complexes, PuF{sup 3+} and PuF{sub 2}{sup 2+}, were identified under the conditions in this work and their stability constants at 25, 40 and 55 C and I = 2.2 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} HClO{sub 4} were determined from the distribution data. The Specific Ion Interaction approach (SIT) was used to extrapolate the constants to the state of infinite dilution. Data from this work indicate that the complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride is endothermic and entropy-driven. The complexation becomes stronger at higher temperatures.

Xia, Yuanxian; Rao, Linfeng; Friese, Judah I.; Moore, Dean A.; Bachelor, P. P.

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

279

The structure of the ILLIAC IV operating system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper outlines the structure of the operating system for the ILLIAC IV, a large array computer being built by the University of Illinois. The system is unique in that it resides primarily on a second control computer and distributes operating system ...

Peter A. Alsberg; Carlton R. Mills

1969-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Parameter extraction from I-V characteristics of PV devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Device parameters such as series and shunt resistances, saturation current and diode ideality factor influence the behaviour of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of solar cells and photovoltaic modules. It is necessary to determine these parameters since performance parameters are derived from the I-V curve and information provided by the device parameters are useful in analyzing performance losses. This contribution presents device parameters of CuIn(Se,S){sub 2}- and Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}-based solar cells, as well as, CuInSe{sub 2}, mono- and multicrystalline silicon modules determined using a parameter extraction routine that employs Particle Swarm Optimization. The device parameters of the CuIn(Se,S){sub 2}- and Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}-based solar cells show that the contribution of recombination mechanisms exhibited by high saturation current when coupled with the effects of parasitic resistances result in lower maximum power and conversion efficiency. Device parameters of photovoltaic modules extracted from I-V characteristics obtained at higher temperature show increased saturation current. The extracted values also reflect the adverse effect of temperature on parasitic resistances. The parameters extracted from I-V curves offer an understanding of the different mechanisms involved in the operation of the devices. The parameter extraction routine utilized in this study is a useful tool in determining the device parameters which reveal the mechanisms affecting device performance. (author)

Macabebe, Erees Queen B. [Department of Electronics, Computer and Communications Engineering, Ateneo de Manila University, Loyola Heights, Quezon City 1108 (Philippines); Department of Physics and Centre for Energy Research, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Sheppard, Charles J. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Dyk, E. Ernest van [Department of Physics and Centre for Energy Research, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, PO Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Victory Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm I Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm I Jump to: navigation, search Name Victory Gardens Phase IV Wind Farm I Facility Victory Gardens- Phase IV Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Zond Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

282

Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act Advisory Exemptions How to Submit a FOIA Request Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria Electronic Reading Room ISC Conventional Reading Rooms Reference Links Privacy Act Categorical Exclusion Determinations Contact Information Integrated Support Center Roxanne Purucker U.S. Department of Energy 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 P: (630) 252-2110 Larry Kelly U.S. Department of Energy 200 Administration Road Oak Ridge, TN 37830 P: (865) 576-0885 Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Fee Waiver and Reduction Criteria Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The FOIA generally requires that requesters pay fees for processing their requests. In accordance with 5 U.S.C 552(a)(4)(A)(iv), an agency is

283

DRAG REDUCTION WITH SUPERHYDROPHOBIC RIBLETS  

SciTech Connect

Samples combining riblets and superhydrophobic surfaces are fabricated at University of Pittsburgh and their drag reduction properties are studied at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a commercial cone-and-plate rheometer. In parallel to the experiments, numerical simulations are performed in order to estimate the slip length at high rotational speed. For each sample, a drag reduction of at least 5% is observed in both laminar and turbulent regime. At low rotational speed, drag reduction up to 30% is observed with a 1 mm deep grooved sample. As the rotational speed increases, a secondary flow develops causing a slight decrease in drag reductions. However, drag reduction above 15% is still observed for the large grooved samples. In the turbulent regime, the 100 microns grooved sample becomes more efficient than the other samples in drag reduction and manages to sustain a drag reduction above 15%. Using the simulations, the slip length of the 100 micron grooved sample is estimated to be slightly above 100 micron in the turbulent regime.

Barbier, Charlotte N [ORNL; D'Urso, Brian R [ORNL; Jenner, Elliot [University of Pittsburgh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Analysis of Instabilities and Their Impact on Friction Factor in Hole-Pattern Seals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The determination of the leakage and consequently the friction factor is an important part of analyzing the flow through a seal. This is done experimentally by means of a flat plate tester, which allows for the simplified representation of the seal pattern on a flat plate surface tested under a range of clearances and pressure drops. The setup mounts a smooth plate opposite a second plate which may be smooth or have a roughened surface while the separation between plates is held constant. The present study analyzes the phenomenon of friction factor 'upset' ? wherein it was seen that as the pressure drop across the parallel plates is increased, there is a sudden increase in the friction factor (i.e. a decrease in flow rate) at a certain Reynolds number and for any further increase in the pressure differential, the friction factor shows the expected trend and decreases slowly. This phenomenon was initially believed to be an anomaly in the rig and was attributed to choking at an upstream flow control valve. The present author differs from that view and hypothesized that the reason for the abrupt change is linked to the flow mechanics of the system and the current study analyzes the same. Preliminary analysis of available data has established that the cause for the 'upset' was not related to the switch from a normal mode resonance driven by the Helmholtz frequency of the cavities on the stator to a shear layer instability, as was seen earlier by Ha. The friction factor jump for this case is therefore proposed to be due to a change of the instability modes as the fluid passes over the cavities in the plate. A detailed analysis of the physics of the flow will be carried out via a numerical simulation using a Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model from ANSYS Fluent. Results will be validated through comparisons with experimental data from the flat plate test rig.

Sekaran, Aarthi 1985-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Studies of the frictional heating of polycrystalline diamond compact drag tools during rock cutting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A numerical-analytical model is developed to analyze temperatures in polycrystalline diamond compact (PDC) drag tools subject to localized frictional heating at a worn flat area and convective cooling at exposed lateral surfaces. Experimental measurements of convective heat transfer coefficients of PDC cutters in a uniform crossflow are presented and used in the model to predict temperatures under typical drilling conditions with fluid flow. The analysis compares favorably with measurements of frictional temperatures in controlled cutting tests on Tennessee marble. It is found that average temperatures at the wearflat contact zone vary directly with frictional force per unit area and are proportional to the one-half power of the cutting speed at the velocities investigated. Temperatures are found to be much more sensitive to decreases in the dynamic friction by lubrication than to increases in convective cooling rates beyond currently achievable levels with water or drilling fluids. It is shown that use of weighted drilling fluids may actually decrease cooling rates compared to those achieved with pure water. It is doubtful that tool temperatures can be kept below critical levels (750/sup 0/C) if air is employed as the drilling fluid. The degree of tool wear is found to have a major influence on the thermal response of the friction contact zone, so that for equal heating per contact area, a worn tool will run much hotter than a sharp tool. It is concluded that tool temperatures may be kept below critical levels with conventional water or mud cooling as long as the fluid provides good cutter-rock lubrication.

Ortega, A.; Glowka, D.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Dissolution of Technetium(IV) Oxide by Natural and Synthetic Organic Ligands Under both Reducing and Oxidizing Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Technetium-99 (Tc) in nuclear waste is a significant environmental concern due to its long half-life and high mobility in the subsurface. Reductive precipitation of Tc(IV) oxides [TcO2(s)] is an effective means of immobilizing Tc, thereby impeding its migration in groundwater. However, TcO2(s) is subject to dissolution by oxidants and/or complexing agents. In this study we ascertain the effects of a synthetic organic ligand, ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), and two natural humic isolates on the dissolution and solubility of Tc(IV) oxides. Pure synthetic TcO2(s) (0.23 mM) was used in batch experiments to determine dissolution kinetics at pH ~6 under both reducing and oxidizing conditions. All organic ligands were found to enhance the dissolution of Tc(IV) oxides, increasing their solubility from ~10-8 M (without ligands) to 4 10-7 M under strictly anoxic conditions. Reduced Tc(IV) was also found to re-oxidize rapidly under oxic conditions, with an observed oxidative dissolution rate approximately an order of magnitude higher than that of ligand-promoted dissolution under reducing conditions. Significantly, oxidative dissolution was inhibited by EDTA but enhanced by humic acid compared with experiments without any complexing agents. The redox functional properties of humics, capable of facilitating intra-molecular electron transfer, may account for this increased oxidation rate under oxic conditions. Our results highlight the importance of complex interactions for the stability and mobility of Tc, and thus for the long-term fate of Tc in contaminated environments.

Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Dong, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Wall, Nathalie [Washington State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT OF 1995  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT OF 1995 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY INFORMATION COLLECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Chris Rouleau, PRA Officer Records Management Division Office of the Associate Chief Information Officer for IT Planning, Architecture and E-Government Office of the Chief Information Officer Office of the Chief Information Officer 2/16/2010 2 TOPICS  Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 - Law  Paperwork Reduction Act - Overview  Information Collection Requests (ICRs)  Information Collection Request Associated with A Notice of Proposed Rule Making  Program Points of Contacts  Information Collection Clearance Managers  Information Collection Requests Checklist  Drivers  Annual Information Collection Budget  Summary of What To Do  Summary of What NOT

288

Carbothermic Reduction of Niobium Concentrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Ferro Niobium is produced by aluminothermic reduction of the ... However, the niobium concentrate has impurities, such as phosphorus, lead and tin, ... Phase Transformation of Andalusite-Mullite and Its Fiber Reinforcement to ...

289

Metal reduction kinetics in Shewanella  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: Metal reduction kinetics have been studied in cultures of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria which include the Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Estimation of system parameters from time-series data faces obstructions in ...

Raman Lall; Julie Mitchell

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

ALUMINIUM REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY: VII: Modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous models of the behaviour of interfacial waves in aluminium reduction cells ... Attia A. Arif, Omar M. Dahab, Power and Energy Dept., Minya University, Egypt ... of Technology, Liancheng Aluminum Plant, Lanzhou, Gansu 730335, China.

291

Piecewise polynomial nonlinear model reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel, general approach towards model-order reduction (MOR) of nonlinear systems that combines good global and local approximation properties. The nonlinear system is first approximated as piecewise polynomials over a number of regions, ...

Ning Dong; Jaijeet Roychowdhury

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction is a technical paper that addresses the operating and economic advantages associated with the program to lower the steam operating pressure. Evaluation of a testing program will be discussed. The paper will address the following. 1. Factors that determine the feasibility of reducing the plant steam operating pressure. 2. The operating advantages and disadvantages associated with the decreased steam pressure. 3. The economics of steam pressure reduction. Appropriate visual aids will be utilized as part of the discussion.

Sylva, D. M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Determination of kinetic coefficients for the simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium by Desulfovibrio desulfuricans bacteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium contamination of groundwaters and surface waters near abandoned mill tailings piles is a serious concern in many areas of the western United States. Uranium usually exists in either the U(IV) or the U(VI) oxidation state. U(VI) is soluble in water and, as a result, is very mobile in the environment. U(IV), however, is generally insoluble in water and, therefore, is not subject to aqueous transport. In recent years, researchers have discovered that certain anaerobic microorganisms, such as the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans, can mediate the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). Although the ability of this microorganism to reduce U(VI) has been studied in some detail by previous researchers, the kinetics of the reactions have not been characterized. The purpose of this research was to perform kinetic studies on Desulfovibrio desulficans bacteria during simultaneous reduction of sulfate and uranium and to determine the phase in which uranium exists after it has been reduced and precipitated from solution. The studies were conducted in a laboratory-scale chemostat under substrate-limited growth conditions with pyruvate as the substrate. Kinetic coefficients for substrate utilization and cell growth were calculated using the Monod equation. The maximum rate of substrate utilization (k) was determined to be 4.70 days{sup {minus}1} while the half-velocity constant (K{sub s}) was 140 mg/l COD. The yield coefficient (Y) was determined to be 0.17 mg cells/mg COD while the endogenous decay coefficient (k{sub d}) was calculated as 0.072 days{sup {minus}1}. After reduction, U(IV) Precipitated from solution in the uraninite (UO{sub 2}) phase. Uranium removal efficiency as high as 90% was achieved in the chemostat.

Tucker, M.D.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group The Charter of the Generation IV Roadmap Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group (FCCG) is to (1) examine the fuel cycle implications for alternative nuclear power scenarios in terms of Generation IV goals and (2) identify key fuel cycle issues associated with Generation IV goals. This included examination of "fuel resource inputs and waste outputs for the range of potential Generation IV fuel cycles, consistent with projected energy demand scenarios." This report summarizes the results of the studies. The membership of the FCCG comprised 8 US members and 7 members from Generation IV International Forum (GIF) countries including members from

295

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Requirements Recognizing the impact of carbon-emitting fuels on climate change and to

296

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Petroleum Reduction Petroleum Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Petroleum Reduction Requirements The Wisconsin Department of Administration's fleet management policy

297

Ridgetop Energy Wind Farm IV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IV IV Facility Ridgetop Energy Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Caithness Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.1317°, -118.451° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1317,"lon":-118.451,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

298

SEGS IV Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Power Plant Solar Power Plant Jump to: navigation, search Name SEGS IV Solar Power Plant Facility SEGS IV Sector Solar Facility Type Concentrating Solar Power Developer Luz Location Kramer Junction, California Coordinates 34.9925°, -117.540833° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.9925,"lon":-117.540833,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

299

Medicine Bow Wind Farm IV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Bow Wind Farm IV Medicine Bow Wind Farm IV Facility Medicine Bow Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Platte River Power Authority Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Platte River Power Authority Location Medicine Bow WY Coordinates 41.927554°, -106.371968° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.927554,"lon":-106.371968,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

300

McNeilus Wind Farm IV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IV IV Facility McNeilus Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner G. McNeilus Developer G. McNeilus Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Mower County MN Coordinates 43.673251°, -92.665436° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.673251,"lon":-92.665436,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Method of synthesis of anhydrous thorium(IV) complexes  

SciTech Connect

Method of producing anhydrous thorium(IV) tetrahalide complexes, utilizing Th(NO.sub.3).sub.4(H.sub.2O).sub.x, where x is at least 4, as a reagent; method of producing thorium-containing complexes utilizing ThCl.sub.4(DME).sub.2 as a precursor; method of producing purified ThCl.sub.4(ligand).sub.x compounds, where x is from 2 to 9; and novel compounds having the structures: ##STR00001##

Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Cantat, Thibault

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Noise-induced drift in stochastic differential equations with arbitrary friction and diffusion in the Smoluchowski-Kramers limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the dynamics of systems with arbitrary friction and diffusion. These include, as a special case, systems for which friction and diffusion are connected by Einstein fluctuation-dissipation relation, e.g. Brownian motion. We study the limit where friction effects dominate the inertia, i.e. where the mass goes to zero (Smoluchowski-Kramers limit). {Using the It\\^o stochastic integral convention,} we show that the limiting effective Langevin equations has different drift fields depending on the relation between friction and diffusion. {Alternatively, our results can be cast as different interpretations of stochastic integration in the limiting equation}, which can be parametrized by $\\alpha \\in \\mathbb{R}$. Interestingly, in addition to the classical It\\^o ($\\alpha=0$), Stratonovich ($\\alpha=0.5$) and anti-It\\^o ($\\alpha=1$) integrals, we show that position-dependent $\\alpha = \\alpha(x)$, and even stochastic integrals with $\\alpha \

Scott Hottovy; Giovanni Volpe; Jan Wehr

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

303

Noise-induced drift in stochastic differential equations with arbitrary friction and diffusion in the Smoluchowski-Kramers limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the dynamics of systems with arbitrary friction and diffusion. These include, as a special case, systems for which friction and diffusion are connected by Einstein fluctuation-dissipation relation, e.g. Brownian motion. We study the limit where friction effects dominate the inertia, i.e. where the mass goes to zero (Smoluchowski-Kramers limit). {Using the It\\^o stochastic integral convention,} we show that the limiting effective Langevin equations has different drift fields depending on the relation between friction and diffusion. {Alternatively, our results can be cast as different interpretations of stochastic integration in the limiting equation}, which can be parametrized by $\\alpha \\in \\mathbb{R}$. Interestingly, in addition to the classical It\\^o ($\\alpha=0$), Stratonovich ($\\alpha=0.5$) and anti-It\\^o ($\\alpha=1$) integrals, we show that position-dependent $\\alpha = \\alpha(x)$, and even stochastic integrals with $\\alpha \

Hottovy, Scott; Wehr, Jan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Phonon Dispersion and Elastic Moduli of Two-Dimensional Disordered Colloidal Packings of Soft-Particles with Frictional Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particle tracking and displacement covariance matrix techniques are employed to investigate the phonon dispersion relations of two-dimensional colloidal glasses composed of soft, thermoresponsive microgel particles whose temperature-sensitive size permits in situ variation of particle packing fraction. Bulk modulus, B, and shear modulus, G, of the colloidal glasses are extracted from the dispersion relations as a function of packing fraction. The ratio G/B is found to agree quantitatively with predictions for jammed packings of frictional soft particles with only one parameter required for the fit - the packing fraction for the onset of jamming in the limit of infinite friction. In addition, G and B individually agree with numerical predictions for frictional particles. This remarkable level of agreement enabled us to extract the inter-particle friction coefficient and an energy scale for the inter-particle interaction from the individual elastic constants.

Tim Still; Carl P. Goodrich; Ke Chen; Peter J. Yunker; Samuel Schoenholz; Andrea J. Liu; A. G. Yodh

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

305

A Potential Vorticity-Based Study of the Role of Diabatic Heating and Friction in a Numerically Simulated Baroclinic Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A particularly intense case of western Atlantic baroclinic cyclogenesis was investigated in this study. Specifically, the roles of latent heat of condensation and surface friction were examined from the potential vorticity or “PV thinking” ...

Mark T. Stoelinga

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

On the Evolution of Vorticity and Potential Vorticity in the Presence of Diabatic Heating and Frictional or Other Forces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some consequences of regarding potential vorticity as a tracer are considered. It is shown that neither diabatic heating, nor frictional forces, nor external forces such as might be used to model gravity-wave drag, can bring about any net ...

P. H. Haynes; M. E. McIntyre

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Influence of Bottom Friction on Sea Surface Roughness and Its Impact on Shallow Water Wind Wave Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a selected subset of the measured data obtained in shallow waters near Vindeby, Denmark, during RASEX (Risø Air–Sea Experiment), the role of bottom friction dissipation in predicting wind waves (not swell) is assessed with a third-...

Hakeem K. Johnson; Henrik Kofoed-Hansen

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Lateral Friction in Reduced-Gravity Models: Parameterizations Consistent with Energy Dissipation and Conservation of Angular Momentum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The f-plane reduced-gravity model has been extended with the parameterization of lateral friction in the momentum equations. The parameterization should preferably fulfill some requisites. One of them is that in the absence of external torques the ...

José Ochoa; Julio Sheinbaum; Aleph Jiménez

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Parameters defining flow resistance and the friction factor behavior in liquid annular seals with deliberately roughened surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-contacting annular seals are internal sealing devices used in rotating machinery, such as multistage centrifugal pumps and compressors. Their design affects both efficiency and rotor stability. Traditional plain and labyrinth seals are being replaced with stators containing different roughness patterns to reduce leakage and enhance rotor response. Several roughened seal experiments with liquid and air have produced leakage data indicating that the friction factor increases as the seal clearance is increased. Simplified models based on bulk flow theory and Moody�s approach to characterize wall friction in pipes cannot explain this outcome. This research is an extension of a 2-D numerical analysis of flat plate experiments with water which found that friction factor of these surfaces is governed by the roughness� ability to develop high static pressures. An exhaustive 3-D numerical analysis of several experiments with liquid annular seals has been performed using a CFD code. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent channel flow and smooth seals were replicated within 1% using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations and turbulence modeling. Similarly, measured groove seal leakage rates were reproduced within 2%. On the other hand, no turbulence model combination predicts the leakage in most 3-D pattern roughened seals with the same accuracy. Present results reproduce the friction factor �plateau� behavior predicted with the 2-D analysis and observed in the flat plate experiments. They also reproduce the friction-factor-to-clearance indifference behavior, the maximum friction factor observed in a specific roughness pattern size is independent of the actual clearance in a certain Reynolds number range, but clarify the role of the roughness length-to-clearance ratio and the actual roughness size in defining the friction-factor-toclearance proportionality. All simulations indicate that roughened surface area and roughness aspect ratios are the parameters defining the friction factor at a given seal clearance. The roughness pattern size, relevant in determining the friction-factor-to-clearance proportionality, plays a moderate role once the above cited ratios are defined. In any shape and size, shallow patterns are predicted and observed to provide larger friction factors than deep patterns. Predictions also confirm limited experimental data showing that friction factor is affected by the mean flow orientation relative to the roughness pattern. Solving RANS equations is sufficient to model simple seal geometries but might not be enough to replicate turbulent flow in liquid annular seals with roughened surfaces.

Villasmil Urdaneta, Larry Alfonso

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

312

NETL: Turbine Projects - Cost Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Reduction Cost Reduction Turbine Projects Cost Reduction Single Crystal Turbine Blades Enhancing Gas Turbine Efficiency Data/Fact Sheets Enabling and Information Technologies to Increase RAM of Advanced Powerplants Data/Fact Sheets Development of NDE Technology for Environmental Barrier Coating and Residual Life Estimation Data/Fact Sheets Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloy Data/Fact Sheets Combustion Turbine Hot Section Coating Life Management Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating [PDF] Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle RAM Data/Fact Sheets Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine [PDF]

313

Friction Stir Welding of ODS Steels … Steps toward a Commercial Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Friction Stir Welding of ODS Friction Stir Welding of ODS Steels - Steps toward a Commercial Process 1 Glenn Grant Scott Weil Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Presented at the Workshop: Fe-Based ODS Alloys: Role and Future Applications University of California San Diego La Jolla, CA Nov 17 th - 18 th 2010 Barriers: * Traditionally produced by powder metallurgy methods that tend to be costly - Commercial viability requires new processing and manufacturing technology * Unfavorable anisotropic properties can result if processed improperly for the application * Cannot be welded by melt/solidification processes ODS Alloys: Incorporate a dispersion of nanoscale oxide particles (such as Y 2 O 3 ) in the ferritic matrix to mitigate grain boundary movement and allow greatly improved creep and high temperature strength while maintaining good

314

Neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welding: a review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant amounts of residual stresses are often generated during welding and result in critical degradation of the structural integrity and performance of components. Neutron diffraction has become a well established technique for the determination of residual stresses in welds because of the unique deep penetration, three-dimensional mapping capability, and volume averaged bulk measurements characteristic of the scattering neutron beam. Friction stir welding has gained prominence in recent years. The authors reviewed a number of neutron diffraction measurements of residual stresses in friction stir welds and highlighted examples addressing how the microstructures and residual stresses are correlated with each other. An example of in situ neutron diffraction measurement result shows the evolution of the residual stresses during welding.

Woo, Wan Chuck [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Wang, Xun-Li [ORNL; David, Stan A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Bobbin-Tool Friction-Stir Welding of Thick-Walled Aluminum Alloy Pressure Vessels  

SciTech Connect

It was desired to assemble thick-walled Al alloy 2219 pressure vessels by bobbin-tool friction-stir welding. To develop the welding-process, mechanical-property, and fitness-for-service information to support this effort, extensive friction-stir welding-parameter studies were conducted on 2.5 cm. and 3.8 cm. thick 2219 Al alloy plate. Starting conditions of the plate were the fully-heat-treated (-T62) and in the annealed (-O) conditions. The former condition was chosen with the intent of using the welds in either the 'as welded' condition or after a simple low-temperature aging treatment. Since preliminary stress-analyses showed that stresses in and near the welds would probably exceed the yield-strength of both 'as welded' and welded and aged weld-joints, a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging treatment was also examined. Once a suitable set of welding and post-weld heat-treatment parameters was established, the project divided into two parts. The first part concentrated on developing the necessary process information to be able to make defect-free friction-stir welds in 3.8 cm. thick Al alloy 2219 in the form of circumferential welds that would join two hemispherical forgings with a 102 cm. inside diameter. This necessitated going to a bobbin-tool welding-technique to simplify the tooling needed to react the large forces generated in friction-stir welding. The bobbin-tool technique was demonstrated on both flat-plates and plates that were bent to the curvature of the actual vessel. An additional issue was termination of the weld, i.e. closing out the hole left at the end of the weld by withdrawal of the friction-stir welding tool. This was accomplished by friction-plug welding a slightly-oversized Al alloy 2219 plug into the termination-hole, followed by machining the plug flush with both the inside and outside surfaces of the vessel. The second part of the project involved demonstrating that the welds were fit for the intended service. This involved determining the room-temperature tensile and elastic-plastic fracture-toughness properties of the bobbin-tool friction-stir welds after a post-weld solution-treatment, quenching, and aging heat-treatment. These mechanical properties were used to conduct fracture-mechanics analyses to determine critical flaw sizes. Phased-array and conventional ultrasonic non-destructive examination was used to demonstrate that no flaws that match or exceed the calculated critical flaw-sizes exist in or near the friction-stir welds.

Dalder, E C; Pastrnak, J W; Engel, J; Forrest, R S; Kokko, E; Ternan, K M; Waldron, D

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

316

,- A Model for Syringe Grading Based on Extracted Features From High Dimensional Friction Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the biomedical products industry, measures of the quality of individual clinical specimens or manufacturing production units are often available in the form of high dimensional data such as continuous recordings obtained from an analytical instrument. These recordings are then examined by experts in the field who extract certain features and use these to classify individuals. To formalize and quantify this procedure an approach for extracting features from recordings based on nonparametric regression is described. These features are then used to build a classification model which incorporates the knowledge of the expert automatically. The procedure is presented via an example involving the grading of syringes from associated friction profile data. Features of the syringe friction profiles used in the classification are extracted via smoothing splines and grades of the syringes are assigned by an expert tribologist. A nonlinear classification model is constructed to predict syringe grades based on the extracted features. The classification model makes it possible to grade syringes automatically without

Gerry Gray; David Martin; Perry Haal; Series M. Oconnel; G. Gray; P. Haal; Michael O' connell; Doug Nychka; Gerry Gray; David Martin; Perry Haal

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Reduction and Reoxidation of Soils During and After Uranium Bioremediation; Implications for Long Term Uraninite Stability and Bioremediation Scheme Implementation  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this research was to study the reoxidation of biologically precipitated U(IV). Several experiments were performed and are summarized below. These experiments include: (1) a long-term (~200 days) U(VI) reduction experiment under low sulfate conditions in order to study in detail changes in iron phases and biomass and determine how they affect/buffer reoxidation; (2) a short term (~70 days) experiment where we tracked the uranium profile via XANES prior to reoxidation and during reoxidation in order to determine the U speciation; (3) a short term experiment where we compare the oxidation of U(IV) by oxygen and nitrate in the absence of FeS; and (4) a short term experiment where we compare the oxidation of U(IV) by oxygen and nitrate in the presence of FeS precipitates.

Peter R Jaffe

2009-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

318

2008 world direct reduction statistics  

SciTech Connect

This supplement discusses total direct reduced iron (DRI) production for 2007 and 2008 by process. Total 2008 production by MIDREX(reg sign) direct reduction process plants was over 39.8 million tons. The total of all coal-based processes was 17.6 million tons. Statistics for world DRI production are also given by region for 2007 and 2008 and by year (1970-2009). Capacity utilization for 2008 by process is given. World DRI production by region and by process is given for 1998-2008 and world DRI shipments are given from the 1970s to 2008. A list of world direct reduction plants is included.

NONE

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Predicting makeup torque of threaded tapered connections and evaluation of coefficients of friction  

SciTech Connect

This paper will show how it is possible to generate a general purpose formula to determine the amount of torque required to make up non-shouldering tapered threaded connections as are commonly used on tubing and casing connections. In addition, by manipulating this algorithm, values for the dynamic coefficient of friction of thread compounds may be derived. This algorithm allows any type of thread form to be analyzed and was verified through actual testing.

Hawke, M.C.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

On the Green-Kubo relationship of the liquid-solid friction coefficient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a new derivation for the Green-Kubo relationship for the liquid-solid friction coefficient, characterizing hydrodynamic slippage at a wall. It is based on a general Langevin approach for the fluctuating wall velocity, involving a non-markovian memory kernel with vanishing time integral. The calculation highlights some subtleties of the wall-liquid dynamics, leading to superdiffusive motion of the fluctuating wall position.

Lydéric Bocquet; Jean-Louis Barrat

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Diesel Idling Reduction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Diesel Idling Reduction Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Diesel Idling Reduction AgencyCompany...

322

Dry Barrier Mix in Reduction Cell Cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Dry Barrier Mix in Reduction Cell Cathodes ... successfully tested as a replacement for barrier bricks in several reduction cell technology types ...

323

The Effect of surface morphology on the friction of Electrogalvanized sheet steel in forming processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect in the drawbead simulator test were evaluated for a set of commercially coated steels and a set of laboratory coated steels with underlying surfaces produced by laser textured, shot blast, and electro-discharge textured rolls. In general, surfaces with higher roughness (R{sub a} parameter) measured lower friction in the DBS tests. The requisite roughness amplitude necessary for low friction was moderated somewhat by having a more closely spaced roughness as described by the median wavelength, {lambda}m, of the power spectrum. This effect is due to interaction with the lubricant by the micro-roughness imparted by the galvanizing process. The lubricant tends to be retained better by the surfaces with the micro-roughness, thereby increasing the amount of elasto- and plasto-hydrodynamic support of the load. Other variables, such as large variations in thickness of the sheet can mask the effect of the surface by changing the actual distance of sliding contact during the DBS test. For tests where the amount of sliding is similar, the effect of roughness is significant. The friction measured for EG steels in the DBS test is dominated by deformation of the surface with plowing by the asperities of the tooling adding to that caused by the deformation. The size of the plow marks in the deformed surfaces corresponds to the roughness of the tooling and no significant evidence of wear particles was observed.

Skarpelos, P.N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Mineral Engineering

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

An implementation of a dexterous manipulator for a two-dimensional, low-friction environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dexterous manipulation can be defined as the set of motions necessary to stably grasp an object in a robot hand and change its position and/or orientation through a series of coordinated motions. This thesis describes the design and implementation of a two-dimensional (planar) robot hand which can perform dexterous manipulation in low friction environments. In order for the hand to be able to perform a successful manipulation, it is necessary to have a coordinated set of joint torques and joint position set points. These can then be fed to the digital control system for each joint. Planning (to produce these trajectories) is done off-line under the assumption that the environment is frictionless. This assumption reduces the computational complexity of the problem, because motion is reversible in the frictionless domain. Also, planning in the frictionless case results in all contacts between objects being sliding contacts and no rolling occurs. While executing such "frictionless" plans in low friction environments, it is necessary to recognize that rolling contacts can occur and steps should be taken to prevent this from happening. The analysis and design of the control systems for each of the joints as well as their implementation are discussed. Experimental results are presented and compared with theoretical results. It is shown that it is possible to execute "frictionless' plans in low-friction environments.

Ram, Ranganathan Charath

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Black carbon snow albedo reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black carbon snow albedo reduction Black carbon snow albedo reduction Title Black carbon snow albedo reduction Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hadley, Odelle L., and Thomas W. Kirchstetter Journal Nature Climate Change Volume 2 Pagination 437-440 Abstract Climate models indicate that the reduction of surface albedo caused by black-carbon contamination of snow contributes to global warming and near-worldwide melting of ice1, 2. In this study, we generated and characterized pure and black-carbon-laden snow in the laboratory and verified that black-carbon contamination appreciably reduces snow albedo at levels that have been found in natural settings1, 3, 4. Increasing the size of snow grains in our experiments decreased snow albedo and amplified the radiative perturbation of black carbon, which justifies the aging-related positive feedbacks that are included in climate models. Moreover, our data provide an extensive verification of the Snow, Ice and Aerosol Radiation model1, which will be included in the next assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change5.

326

Poverty Reduction Strategies in Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Poverty Reduction Strategies in Indonesia A Public Lecture presented by Aris Mundayat, University in fifteen districts/cities in nine provinces in Indonesia, as measured by the newly launched People in Indonesia. Thursday 29th March 2012 10:00 am Murdoch University Senate Room All Welcome Aris Mundayat

327

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Credits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Credits Any state mobile emissions reduction credits program must allow credits for emissions reductions achieved by converting a vehicle to operate on an

328

Dynamic reduction, Version 1. 0  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the theoretical background of the EPRI Dynamic Reduction DYNRED V 1.0. EPRI initiated research under project RP763 to develop the original reduction program DYNEQU. This program was the first to be based on the concept of aggregating of coherent groups of synchronous generators into a single equivalent generator model. While technically advanced, DYNEQU proved difficult to use. Since then, the stability problems encountered in power system planning and operations have changed. The emphasis on first swing transient stability has been replaced by emphasis on inter-area oscillations and voltage stability. The method of identification of coherent generators used in DYNEQU is based on the comparison of rotor angle swings, in a linearized system model, following a fault. It has been shown that this method of coherency identification is good for first swing stability. For inter-area oscillation studies, this method of generator aggregation is less accurate. Far better, are identification methods based on the structure of the power system. Because of these changes in the requirements for reduced order power system models, a new dynamic reduction program (DYNRED) has been developed under EPRI project RP2447-1. It is coherency based, as is DYNEQU, but it has structurally based coherency identification methods in addition to the method used in DYNEQU. This report describes the techniques used in DYNRED, that is: Coherency Identification; Network Reduction; Method of Aggregation, Generator Aggregation, Excitation Aggregation, Primemover/Governor Aggregation. An example of the application of DYNRED to the reduction of a large interconnected power system model is also presented. DYNRED uses the special modeling and network solution techniques developed to enable systems having up to 12,000 bus to be studied. Dynamic data is completely compatible between MASS, PEALS, and the EPRI Extended Transient Midterm Stability Program (ETMSP).

Rogers, G.J.; Wong, D.Y.; Ottevangers, J.; Wang, L. (Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Foreign Trip Report MATGEN-IV Sep 24- Oct 26, 2007  

SciTech Connect

Gen-IV activities in France, Japan and US focus on the development of new structural materials for Gen-IV nuclear reactors. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) F/M steels have raised considerable interest in nuclear applications. Promising collaborations can be established seeking fundamental knowledge of relevant Gen-IV ODS steel properties (see attached travel report on MATGEN- IV 'Materials for Generation IV Nuclear Reactors'). Major highlights refer to results on future Ferritic/Martensitic steel cladding candidates (relevant to Gen-IV materials properties for LFR Materials Program) and on thermodynamic and mechanic behavior of metallic FeCr binary alloys, base matrix for future candidate steels (for the LLNL-LDRD project on Critical Issues on Materials for Gen-IV Reactors).

de Caro, M S

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Air Conditioner Reduction Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioner Reduction Project to Reduce Vehicle Fuel Use by 30% Conditioner Reduction Project to Reduce Vehicle Fuel Use by 30% United States map depicting number of millions of gallons of cooling and dehumidification by state: Alabama 167, Alaska 1, Arizona 43, Arkansas 86, California 730, Colorado 76, Connecticut 61, Delaware 19, Florida 753, Georgia 251, Hawaii 68, Idaho 26, Illinois 242, Indiana 142, Iowa 68, Kansas 75, Kentucky 95, Louisiana 176, Maine 21, Maryland 118, Massachusetts 86, Michigan 186, Minnesota 86, Mississippi 85, Missouri 144, Montana 12, Nebraska 40, Nevada 61, New Hampshire 90, New Jersey 167, New Mexico 52, New York 273, North Carolina 187, North Dakota 12, Ohio 229, Oklahoma 109, Oregon 66, Pennsylvania 238, Rhode Island 15, South Carolina 127, South Dakota 17, Tennessee 179, Texas 735, Utah 43, Vermont 9, Virginia 187, Washington 64, West Virginia 37, Wisconsin 167, and Wyoming 7

331

Elastic Properties and Internal Friction of Two Magnesium Alloys at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The elastic properties and internal friction of two magnesium alloys were studied from 25 C to 450 C using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS). The Young's moduli decrease with increasing temperature. At 200 C, a change in the temperature dependence of the elastic constants is observed. The internal friction increases significantly with increasing temperature above 200 C. The observed changes in the temperature dependence of the elastic constants and the internal friction are the result of anelastic relaxation by grain boundary sliding at elevated temperatures. Elastic properties govern the behavior of a materials subjected to stress over a region of strain where the material behaves elastically. The elastic properties, including the Young's modulus (E), shear modulus (G), bulk modulus (B), and Poisson's ratio (?), are of significant interest to many design and engineering applications. The choice of the most appropriate material for a particular application at elevated temperatures therefore requires knowledge of its elastic properties as a function of temperature. In addition, mechanical vibration can cause significant damage in the automotive, aerospace, and architectural industries and thus, the ability of a material to dissipate elastic strain energy in materials, known as damping or internal friction, is also important property. Internal friction can be the result of a wide range of physical mechanisms, and depends on the material, temperature, and frequency of the loading. When utilized effectively in engineering applications, the damping capacity of a material can remove undesirable noise and vibration as heat to the surroundings. The elastic properties of materials can be determined by static or dynamic methods. Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS), used in this study, is a unique and sophisticated non-destructive dynamic technique for determining the complete elastic tensor of a solid by measuring the resonant spectrum of mechanical resonance for a sample of known geometry, dimensions, and mass. In addition, RUS allows determination of internal friction, or damping, at different frequencies and temperatures. Polycrystalline pure magnesium (Mg) exhibits excellent high damping properties. However, the poor mechanical properties limit the applications of pure Mg. Although alloying can improve the mechanical properties of Mg, the damping properties are reduced with additions of alloying elements. Therefore, it becomes necessary to study and develop Mg-alloys with simultaneous high damping capacity and improved mechanical properties. Moreover, studies involving the high temperature dynamic elastic properties of Mg alloys are limited. In this study, the elastic properties and internal friction of two magnesium alloys were studied at elevated temperatures using RUS. The effect of alloy composition and grain size was investigated. The wrought magnesium alloys AZ31 and ZK60 were employed. Table 1 gives the nominal chemical compositions of these two alloys. The ZK60 alloy is a commercial extruded plate with a T5 temper, i.e. solution-treated at 535 C for two hours, quenched in hot water, and aged at 185 C for 24 hours. The AZ31 alloy is a commercial rolled plate with a H24 temper, i.e. strain hardened and partially annealed.

Freels, M.; Liaw, P. K.; Garlea, E.; Morrell, J. S.; Radiovic, M.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Reduct based Q-learning: an introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces an approach to Reinforcement Learning Algorithm by introducing reduct concept of rough set methodology using a variation of Q-Learning algorithm. Unlike the conventional Q-Learning, the proposed algorithm calculates the reduct from ... Keywords: Q-learning method, reduct and reduct based Q-learning, reinforcement learning, rough set

Punit Pandey; Deepshikha Pandey

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

NEHRP - National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Failures I by John Egan National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program. A research and implementation partnership. ...

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

334

Flexible reference trace reduction for VM simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The unmanageably large size of reference traces has spurred the development of sophisticated trace reduction techniques. In this article we present two new algorithms for trace reduction: Safely Allowed Drop (SAD) and Optimal LRU Reduction ... Keywords: cache hierarchies, locality, reference traces, trace compression, trace reduction

Scott F. Kaplan; Yannis Smaragdakis; Paul R. Wilson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction to Idle Reduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles School Buses Laws & Incentives Research & Development Related Links Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Idle Reduction Photo of fleet trucks

336

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Incentives Cascade Sierra Solutions (CSS) provides comprehensive idle reduction solutions for commercial trucks and trailers. Financing, loans, and grant

337

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide T. Mill (ted.mill@sri.com; 650-859-3605) SRI, PS273 333 Ravenswood Menlo Park, CA 94025 D. Ross (dsross3@yahoo.com; 650-327-3842) U.S. Geological Survey, Bldg 15 MS 999 345 Middlefield Rd. Menlo Park, CA 94025 Introduction The United States currently meets 80% of its energy needs by burning fossil fuels to form CO 2 . The combustion-based production of CO 2 has evolved into a major environmental challenge that extends beyond national borders and the issue has become as politically charged as it is technologically demanding. Whereas CO 2 levels in the atmosphere had remained stable over the 10,000 years preceeding the industrial revolution, that event initiated rapid growth in CO 2 levels over the past 150 years (Stevens, 2000). The resulting accelerating accumulation of

338

Wind load reduction for heliostats  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of wind-tunnel tests supported through the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) by the Office of Solar Thermal Technology of the US Department of Energy as part of the SERI research effort on innovative concentrators. As gravity loads on drive mechanisms are reduced through stretched-membrane technology, the wind-load contribution of the required drive capacity increases in percentage. Reduction of wind loads can provide economy in support structure and heliostat drive. Wind-tunnel tests have been directed at finding methods to reduce wind loads on heliostats. The tests investigated primarily the mean forces, moments, and the possibility of measuring fluctuating forces in anticipation of reducing those forces. A significant increase in ability to predict heliostat wind loads and their reduction within a heliostat field was achieved.

Peterka, J.A.; Hosoya, N.; Bienkiewicz, B.; Cermak, J.E.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Biological Sludge Reduction and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes research sponsored by EPRI and Advanced Biological Services (ABS). A series of experiments focused on the reduction and analysis of biological sludge in pulp mill wastewater. The first experiment involved optimization of the milling process through the alteration of the grinding gap and the number of times sludge was passed through the colloid mill in order to affect fractionation, dispersion, and lysis. For the second experiment, tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of ble...

2001-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

The reduction of packaging waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nationwide, packaging waste comprises approximately one-third of the waste disposed in sanitary landfills. the US Department of Energy (DOE) generated close to 90,000 metric tons of sanitary waste. With roughly one-third of that being packaging waste, approximately 30,000 metric tons are generated per year. The purpose of the Reduction of Packaging Waste project was to investigate opportunities to reduce this packaging waste through source reduction and recycling. The project was divided into three areas: procurement, onsite packaging and distribution, and recycling. Waste minimization opportunities were identified and investigated within each area, several of which were chosen for further study and small-scale testing at the Hanford Site. Test results, were compiled into five ``how-to`` recipes for implementation at other sites. The subject of the recipes are as follows: (1) Vendor Participation Program; (2) Reusable Containers System; (3) Shrink-wrap System -- Plastic and Corrugated Cardboard Waste Reduction; (4) Cardboard Recycling ; and (5) Wood Recycling.

Raney, E.A.; Hogan, J.J.; McCollom, M.L.; Meyer, R.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Supporting Technology for Enhanced Oil Recovery-EOR Thermal Processes Report IV-12  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Ninth Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 62 through 67. The first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eight, and ninth reports on Annex IV, [Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, and IV-8 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-89/1/SP, DOE/BC-90/1/SP) DOE/BC-92/1/SP, DOE/BC-93/3/SP, and DOE/BC-95/3/SP] contain the results from the first 61 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1! 987, November 1988, December 1989, October 1991, February 1993, and March 1995 respectively.

Izequeido, Alexandor

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A commercial vehicle or gasoline powered vehicle may not idle for more than five minutes during any 60-minute period. Exemptions are allowed for the

343

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reductions Emissions Reductions Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reductions Grants The Carl Moyer Memorial Air Quality Standards Attainment Program (Program) provides incentives to cover the incremental cost of purchasing engines and

344

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A gasoline-fueled motor vehicle is not allowed to operate for more than three consecutive minutes when the vehicle is not in motion, with the

345

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A vehicle may not idle at a loading zone, parking or service area, route terminal, or other off-street areas, except for the following situations:

346

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A motor vehicle engine may not operate for more than five consecutive minutes when the vehicle is not in motion, with the following exceptions:

347

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirements Effective May 1, 2014, a driver may not idle his or her motor vehicle for more than five minutes in a 60-minute period. This limit does not apply if

348

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Diesel vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating over 10,000 pounds may not idle for more than five minutes in any continuous 60 minute period.

349

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement The owner or operator of a diesel powered vehicle must limit the length of time their vehicle remains idle. The limit is based on the outside

350

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Motor vehicles may not idle unnecessarily for longer than five consecutive minutes during any 60-minute period. This includes heavy-duty diesel

351

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Diesel truck or bus engines may not idle for more than 15 consecutive minutes. Exemptions apply to diesel trucks or buses for which the Nevada

352

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A person that operates a diesel powered motor vehicle in certain counties and townships may not cause or allow the motor vehicle, when it is not in

353

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A diesel- or gasoline-powered motor vehicle may not idle for more than three consecutive minutes, except under the following conditions: 1) to

354

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Motor vehicles licensed for commercial or public service may not idle for more than three minutes in commercial or residential urban areas, unless

355

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Idling of any unattended vehicle is prohibited in Utah. Violators are subject to a penalty of up to $750 and/or up to 90 days imprisonment.

356

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement On-road heavy-duty motor vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of 8,500 pounds or greater may not idle for more than three consecutive

357

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Loans Idle Reduction Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Loans The Small Business Pollution Prevention Assistance Account Loan Program provides low interest rate loans to small businesses undertaking projects in Pennsylvania that reduce waste, pollution, or energy use, including the

358

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Petroleum Reduction Petroleum Reduction Initiative to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Petroleum Reduction Initiative The Petroleum Savings and Independence Advisory Commission (Commission) was established to provide recommendations and monitor programs designed to

359

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A motor vehicle may not idle for more than five consecutive minutes. This regulation does not apply to: 1) vehicles being serviced, provided that

360

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Vehicle operators may not idle any commercial diesel vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds for more than 10 minutes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement School bus operators may not idle a school bus engine for more than three consecutive minutes except under the following conditions: uncontrollable

362

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A commercial motor vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds or more may not idle for more than 15 minutes in any 60-minute

363

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A vehicle may not idle for more than five minutes from April through October in cities and counties where the local government has signed a

364

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A driver may not idle a vehicle on a roadway outside a business or residential district when it is practical to stop and park the vehicle. A

365

EIS-0402: Santa Susana Field Laboratory Area IV, California | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Santa Susana Field Laboratory Area IV, California 2: Santa Susana Field Laboratory Area IV, California EIS-0402: Santa Susana Field Laboratory Area IV, California Summary This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL Area IV). SSFL Area IV, occupying approximately 290 acres of the total 2,852-acre SSFL site is located in the hills between Chatsworth and Simi Valley, CA, and was developed as a remote site to test rocket engines and conduct nuclear research. This EIS will evaluate alternatives for disposition of radiological facilities and support buildings, remediation of the affected environment, and disposal of all resulting waste at existing, approved sites. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

366

NEPTUNIUM IV AND V SORPTIN TO END-MEMBER SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS TO THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Migration of Np through the subsurface is expected to be primarily controlled by sorption to sediments. Therefore, understanding and quantifying Np sorption to sediments and sediments from the Savannah River Site (SRS) is vital to ensure safe disposal of Np bearing wastes. In this work, Np sorption to two sediments representing the geological extremes with respect to sorption properties expected in the SRS subsurface environment (named 'subsurface sandy sediment' and 'subsurface clayey sediment') was examined under a variety of conditions. First a series of baseline sorption tests at pH 5.5 under an oxic atmosphere was performed to understand Np sorption under typical subsurface conditions. These experiments indicated that the baseline K{sub d} values for the subsurface sandy and subsurface clayey sediments are 4.26 {+-} 0.24 L kg{sup -1} and 9.05 {+-} 0.61 L kg{sup -1}, respectively. These Np K{sub d} values of SRS sediments are the first to be reported since Sheppard et al. (1979). The previous values were 0.25 and 0.16 L kg{sup -1} for a low pH sandy sediment. To examine a possible range of K{sub d} values under various environmental scenarios, the effects of natural organic matter (NOM, also a surrogate for cellulose degradation products), the presence of various chemical reductants, and an anaerobic atmosphere on Np sorption were examined. The presence of NOM resulted in an increase in the Np K{sub d} values for both sediments. This behavior is hypothesized to be the result of formation of a ternary Np-NOM-sediment complex. Slight increases in the Np sorption (K{sub d} 13-24 L kg{sup -1}) were observed when performing experiments in the presence of chemical reductants (dithionite, ascorbic acid, zero-valent iron) or under anaerobic conditions. Presumably, the increased sorption can be attributed to a slight reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV), the stronger sorbing form of Np. The most significant result of this study is the finding that Np weakly sorbs to both end member sediments and that Np only has a slight tendency to reduce to its stronger sorbing form, even under the most strongly reducing conditions expected under natural SRS conditions. Also, it appears that pH has a profound effect on Np sorption. Based on the these new measurements and the revelations about Np redox chemistry, the following changes to 'Best K{sub d}' values, as defined in Kaplan (2006), for SRS performance assessment calculations are recommended.

Kaplan, D.

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

367

Welding and Repair Technology Center: Assessment of Friction Stir Welding for Nuclear Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a study that was conducted to determine the usability of friction stir welding (FSW) for the repair of nuclear power plant components. The first phase of the study has performinged in air and underwater welding on 304 SS, 308L SS, Alloy182, and Alloy 600 test plates. In addition, crack sealing tests were carried out using electric discharge machining notches in these test plates. A patch seal test was also added to the test matrix to determine if a flat plate could be ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

368

UNIFICATION OF LUMINOUS TYPE 1 QUASARS THROUGH C IV EMISSION  

SciTech Connect

Using a sample of {approx}30,000 quasars from the 7th Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we explore the range of properties exhibited by high-ionization, broad emission lines, such as C IV {lambda}1549. Specifically, we investigate the anti-correlation between continuum luminosity and emission-line equivalent width (the Baldwin Effect (BEff)) and the 'blueshifting' of the high-ionization emission lines with respect to low-ionization emission lines. Employing improved redshift determinations from Hewett and Wild, the blueshift of the C IV emission line is found to be nearly ubiquitous, with a mean shift of {approx}810 km s{sup -1} for radio-quiet (RQ) quasars and {approx}360 km s{sup -1} for radio-loud (RL) quasars. The BEff is present in both RQ and RL samples. We consider these phenomena within the context of an accretion disk-wind model that is modulated by the nonlinear correlation between ultraviolet and X-ray continuum luminosity. Composite spectra are constructed as a function of C IV emission-line properties in an attempt to reveal empirical relationships between different line species and the continuum. Within a two-component disk+wind model of the broad emission-line region (BELR), where the wind filters the continuum seen by the disk component, we find that RL quasars are consistent with being dominated by the disk component, while broad absorption line quasars are consistent with being dominated by the wind component. Some RQ objects have emission-line features similar to RL quasars; they may simply have insufficient black hole (BH) spin to form radio jets. Our results suggest that there could be significant systematic errors in the determination of L{sub bol} and BH mass that make it difficult to place these findings in a more physical context. However, it is possible to classify quasars in a paradigm where the diversity of BELR parameters is due to differences in an accretion disk wind between quasars (and over time); these differences are underlain primarily by the spectral energy distribution, which ultimately must be tied to BH mass and accretion rate.

Richards, Gordon T.; Kruczek, Nicholas E.; Deo, Rajesh P.; Kratzer, Rachael M. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Hall, Patrick B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, Toronto, Ontario M3J 1P3 (Canada); Hewett, Paul C. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Leighly, Karen M. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Shen, Yue [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-51, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Global Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Global Threat Reduction Initiative Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative Global Threat Reduction Initiative The mission of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to reduce

370

Global Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Global Threat Reduction Initiative Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative Global Threat Reduction Initiative The mission of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to reduce

371

NOx Reduction through Efficiency Gain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benz Air Engineering and the CompuNOx system focus on a controls approach to minimize emissions without exposing steam generation plants to an unbearable financial burden. With minimal system changes we use thorough system analysis in conjunction with a novel control design to deliver a comprehensive boiler controls retrofit that provides reductions in emissions as well as substantial cost savings. Combining mechanical engineering expertise with substantial experience in control engineering in over 200 retrofits this system achieves astonishing results with short payback time, making CompuNOx a feasible solution for emission mandates and cost savings.

Benz, R.; Thompson, R.; Staedter, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

XAFS and LIBD Investigation of the Formation and Structure of Pu(IV) Hydrolysis Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pu(IV) oxyhydroxide colloid growth is investigated with XAFS and LIBD. From combined results a model of colloid formation is proposed, which leads to a face-centered cubic Pu sublattice having cation defects, as observed with EXAFS, and a linear dependency of log [Pu(IV)] on -log [H{sup +}] with slope -2, in accord with LIBD. The solubility for Pu(IV) measured with LIBD is close to the lower limit of the solubility curve from previously reported data.

Rothe, J.; Walther, C.; Denecke, M.A.; Fanghänel, Th. (Karlesruhe)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

373

Catalytic effects of period iv transition metal in the oxidation of biodiesel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??CATALYTIC EFFECTS OF PERIOD IV TRANSITION METALS IN THE OXIDATION OF BIODIESEL BRADLEY R CLARK December 2011 Advisors: Dr. Steve Salley, Dr. Simon Ng, Dr.… (more)

Clark, Bradley

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors February 17, 2006 - 11:58am Addthis FUKUI , JAPAN - The Department of Energy today announced that the United States signed a sodium-cooled fast reactor systems arrangement with France and Japan, providing the framework for collaboration among these countries on the research and development of these advanced nuclear reactors. The signing of the agreement took place on February 16, 2006. This arrangement will support the development of technologies associated with the U.S.-led Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), announced earlier this month by Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman. GNEP is a

375

EXHIBIT IV DOE/EV-0003/29 ORNL-5734  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

v EXHIBIT IV - DOE/EV-0003/29 ORNL-5734 Radiological Survey of the Former Kellex Research Facility, Jersey City, New Jersey 6. A. Berven H. W. Dickson W. A. Goldsmith W. M. Johnson W. D. Cottrell R. W. Doane F. F. Haywood M. T. Ryan W. H. Shinpaugh DOE/EV-0005/29 ORNL-5734 Dist. Category UC-70 Contract No. W-7405-eng-26 Health and Safety Research Division RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE FORMER KELLEX RESEARCH FACILITY, JERSEY CITY, NEW JERSEY B. A. Berven W. D. Cottrell H. W. Dickson R. W. Doane W. A. Goldsmith F. F. Haywood W. M. Johnson M. T. Ryan W. H. Shinpaugh Worked performed as part of the Remedial Action Survey and Certification Activities Date Published: February 1982 , OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION'CARBIDE CORPORATION for the

376

IvPE-cEAEs?nILE!! P  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Cw-rent: _______ rT--- Cw-rent: _______ rT--- Owner contacted 0 yes J7' j-r~~; if ye.. date contacted ___ IvPE-cEAEs?nILE!! P Research & Development 0 Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage 0 Prime ,!Z! Subcontract& JZl Purchase Order q Facility Type q Manufacturing q University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other --------------------- [7 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time & material, etc)------- OWNERSHIP: AEC/tlED AEC/MED GOVT GOVT CONTRACTOR CONTRACTOR OWNE_D LEfEEE !a!N_E_D !E!_sED OWNED ---------- ---LEASED LANDS BUILDINGS !I : 0 # % :: EQUIPMENT ; 0 0 1 ORE OR RAW MATL 0 0 FINAL PRODUCT 0 WASTE & RESIDUE q

377

Phonon Dispersion and Elastic Moduli of Two-Dimensional Disordered Colloidal Packings of Soft Particles with Frictional Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particle tracking and displacement covariance matrix techniques are employed to investigate the phonon dispersion relations of two-dimensional colloidal glasses composed of soft, thermoresponsive microgel particles whose temperature-sensitive size permits \\textit{in situ} variation of particle packing fraction. Bulk, $B$, and shear, $G$, moduli of the colloidal glasses are extracted from the dispersion relations as a function of packing fraction, and variation of the ratio $G/B$ with packing fraction is found to agree quantitatively with predictions for jammed packings of frictional soft particles. In addition, $G$ and $B$ individually agree with numerical predictions for frictional particles. This remarkable level of agreement enabled us to extract an energy scale for the inter-particle interaction from the individual elastic constants and to derive an approximate estimate for the inter-particle friction coefficient.

Tim Still; Carl P. Goodrich; Ke Chen; Peter J. Yunker; Samuel Schoenholz; Andrea J. Liu; A. G. Yodh

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

378

Quantum noise and stochastic reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In standard nonrelativistic quantum mechanics the expectation of the energy is a conserved quantity. It is possible to extend the dynamical law associated with the evolution of a quantum state consistently to include a nonlinear stochastic component, while respecting the conservation law. According to the dynamics thus obtained, referred to as the energy-based stochastic Schrodinger equation, an arbitrary initial state collapses spontaneously to one of the energy eigenstates, thus describing the phenomenon of quantum state reduction. In this article, two such models are investigated: one that achieves state reduction in infinite time, and the other in finite time. The properties of the associated energy expectation process and the energy variance process are worked out in detail. By use of a novel application of a nonlinear filtering method, closed-form solutions--algebraic in character and involving no integration--are obtained for both these models. In each case, the solution is expressed in terms of a random variable representing the terminal energy of the system, and an independent noise process. With these solutions at hand it is possible to simulate explicitly the dynamics of the quantum states of complicated physical systems.

Dorje C. Brody; Lane P. Hughston

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

379

Experimental research on comprehensive emission reduction of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comprehensively considering the factors of the reduction effect, the influence on ... Effects of reducer and slag concentrations in the iron-carbon nuggets coalescence in ... Simulation Calculation on Calciothermic Reduction of Titanium Dioxide.

380

Computational and experimental investigation of the drag reduction and the components of pressure drop in horizontal slug flow using liquids of different viscosities  

SciTech Connect

Computational and experimental investigation in 10-cm ID horizontal pipes have been carried out utilizing carbon dioxide as the gas phase and two types of oil with different viscosities; namely 0.0025Pas and 0.05Pas, as the liquid phase. The influence of oil viscosity on the magnitude of total pressure drop and each of its components as well as the effectiveness of a drag reducing additive (DRA, CDR WS 500M flow improver) in decreasing the pressure loss was investigated in two-phase oil-gas slug flow. The effects of changing oil viscosity on the contribution of frictional and accelerational components to total pressure drop in slug flow were also examined and analyzed. Computations of accelerational and frictional components of pressure drop were performed. The accelerational component of pressure drop was dominant in the 0.0025Pas oil while the frictional component had significant contributions in the 0.05Pas oil. Despite the fact that the magnitude of drag reduction was higher in the 0.05Pas oil, the DRA was more effective in reducing the total pressure drop and its components in the 0.0025Pas oil. (author)

Daas, Mutaz [Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Bleyle, Derek [Ohio University, 9933 State Route 682 Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Low-friction coatings for air bearings in fuel cell air compressors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In an effort to reduce fuel consumption and emissions, hybrid vehicles incorporating fuel cell systems are being developed by automotive manufacturers, their suppliers, federal agencies (specifically, the US Department of Energy) and national laboratories. The fuel cell system will require an air management subsystem that includes a compressor/expander. Certain components in the compressor will require innovative lubrication technology in order to reduce parasitic energy losses and improve their reliability and durability. One such component is the air bearing for air turbocompressors designed and fabricated by Meruit, Inc. Argonne National Laboratory recently developed a carbon-based coating with low friction and wear attributes; this near-frictionless-carbon (NFC) coating is a potential candidate for use in turbocompressor air bearings. The authors present here an evaluation of the Argonne coating for air compressor thrust bearings. With two parallel 440C stainless steel discs in unidirectional sliding contact, the NFC reduced the frictional force four times and the wear rate by more than two orders of magnitude. Wear mechanism on the uncoated surface involved oxidation and production of iron oxide debris. Wear occurred on the coated surfaces primarily by a polishing mechanism.

Ajayi, O. O.; Fenske, G. R.; Erdemir, A.; Woodford, J.; Sitts, J.; Elshot, K.; Griffey, K.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

382

An Approach for Measuring Reductions in Construction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. An Approach for Measuring Reductions in Construction Worker Illnesses and Injuries: Baseline Measures of Construction Industry ...

2001-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

383

Molecular Mechanisms of Uranium Reduction by Clostridia  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to elucidate systematically the molecular mechanisms involved in the reduction of uranium by Clostridia.

Francis, A.J.; Matin, A.C.; Gao, W.; Chidambaram, D.; Barak, Y.; Dodge, C.J.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

Earthquake Hazards Reduction Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2013). Earthquakes (08/15/2011). Fifteen Named to Earthquake Hazards Reduction Advisory Committee (10/05/2010). Final ...

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

385

Enhanced-oil-recovery thermal processes, annex IV. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE fossil-energy report IV-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Agreement between the United States and Venezuela was designed to further energy research and development in six areas. This report focuses on Annex IV - Enhanced-Oil-Recovery Thermal Processes which was divided into seven tasks. This report will discuss the information developed within Task I related to the Department of Energy providing data on the performance of insulated oil-well tubulars. Surface generated steam has been traditionally used in thermal enhanced oil recovery processes. In past years the tubing through which the steam is injected into the reservoir has been bare with relatively high heat losses. In recent years however various materials and designs for insulating the tubing to reduce heat losses have been developed. Evaluation of several of these designs in an instrumented test tower and in an oil field test environment was undertaken. These tests and the resulting data are presented.

Peterson, G.; Schwartz, E.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Project Title: VIscosity Reduction Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4t 3 4t 3 l I Project lnfonnatlon Project Title: VIscosity Reduction Date: 11-22-2010 DOE Code: 673()-()20-51141 Contractor Code: 8067-778 Project Lead: Frank Ingham Project Overview 1. The purpose of the project is to test a tool that temporarily reduces the viscosity of oil which allows it to be 1. Brief project description ~nclude pumped through pipelines easier. The test will require about 4 miles of line to pump the oil through after anything that could impact the treatment (hence the need to connect the 31oops together), a holding volume for recovery, then repeat. environmenJ] There will be tanks to hold the original volume, tanks to receive the volume after treatment and pumping 2. Legal location through the line, possible transfer between tanks, transport (trucking) of the oil to the site (by the COC) and

387

Connecticut Yankee risk reduction initiative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Risk Reduction Task Force, comprised of an interdisciplinary team of Connecticut Yankee (CY) and Northeast Utilities (NU) personnel, was formed to identify means of reducing the core-melt frequency (CMF) and the overall risk at CY. Currently, Connecticut Yankee is the only NU nuclear power plant with a CMF significantly above the corporate nuclear safety goal of < 10{sup {minus}4}/yr. It was the purpose of this task force to brainstorm ideas for design and/or procedural changes that would improve safety while allowing for operational flexibility, and also give consideration to licensing issues and design basis/deterministic concerns. The final recommendations by the task force include the installation of a tornado-protected, air-cooled diesel generator; reconfiguration of the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) flow path; addition of a diverse AFW pump; additional modifications to address tornado concerns; and repowering of several motor-operated valves.

Oswald, E.A.; Dube, D.A.; Becker, W.H.; Flannery, G.A.; Weyland, S.J. (Northeast Utilities Service Co., Hartford, CT (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Plains Co{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) activities have focused on developing information on deployment issues to support Task 5 activities by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) activities have focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) has included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) activities have focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

Edward N. Steadman

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Electrolyte treatment for aluminum reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of treating an electrolyte for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum employing an anode and a cathode, the alumina dissolved in the electrolyte, the treating improving wetting of the cathode with molten aluminum during electrolysis. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten electrolyte comprised of ALF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF and LiF, and treating the electrolyte by providing therein 0.004 to 0.2 wt. % of a transition metal or transition metal compound for improved wettability of the cathode with molten aluminum during subsequent electrolysis to reduce alumina to aluminum.

Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Brooks, Richard J. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Seattle, WA); Juric, Drago D. (Bulleen, AU)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O' Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers The environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) provides a valuable opportunity for Federal agency NEPA/309 reviewers to incorporate pollution prevention and environmental impact reduction into actions (or projects). This Environmental Protection Agency guidance was prepared to assist NEPA/309 reviewers in incorporating pollution prevention into each step of the environmental review process, including scoping, mitigation, monitoring, and enforcement. POLLUTION PREVENTION - ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REDUCTION CHECKLISTS FOR NEPA/309 REVIEWERS JANUARY 1995

393

Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers The environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) provides a valuable opportunity for Federal agency NEPA/309 reviewers to incorporate pollution prevention and environmental impact reduction into actions (or projects). This Environmental Protection Agency guidance was prepared to assist NEPA/309 reviewers in incorporating pollution prevention into each step of the environmental review process, including scoping, mitigation, monitoring, and enforcement. POLLUTION PREVENTION - ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REDUCTION CHECKLISTS FOR NEPA/309 REVIEWERS JANUARY 1995

394

Refill Friction Stir Spot Welding of Aluminum Alloys for Aviation by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refill FSSW process can supersede conventional rivet fastening and resistance spot welding techniques and contribute to weight reduction of structures as well.

395

The Friction and Wear Behaviors of (quinazolin-4-ones)-3-methyl-butyl Borate as Additive in Liquid Paraffin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been growing concern for the use of mineral oils because of the worldwide interest in environmental issues. This has promoted the use of ash less additives as environmental friendly lubricants. A potential ash less additive containing N, B, ... Keywords: Synthesis, Quinazolin-4-ones, Borate, Additive, Friction and wear behaviors

Ouyang Ping; Zhang Xianming

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Competitive Reduction of Pertechnetate (99TcO4?) by Dissimilatory Metal Reducing Bacteria and Biogenic Fe(II)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fate of pertechnetate (99Tc(VII)O4 -) during bioreduction was investigated in the presence of 2-line ferrihydrite (Fh) and various dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) (Geobacter, Anaeromyxobacter, Shewanella) in comparison with TcO4 - bioreduction in the absence of Fh. In the presence of Fh, Tc was present primarily as a fine-grained Tc(IV)/Fe precipitate that was distinct from the Tc(IV)O2 ·nH2O solids produced by direct biological Tc(VII) reduction. Aqueous Tc concentrations (reduced in the absence of Fh (4.0 × 10-8 to 1.0 × 10-7 mol L-1). EXAFS analyses of the bioreduced Fh-Tc products were consistent with variable chain length Tc-O octahedra bonded to Fe-O octahedra associated with the surface of the residual or secondary Fe(III) oxide. In contrast, biogenic TcO2 ·nH2O had significantly more Tc-Tc second neighbors and a distinct long-range order consistent with small particle polymers of TcO2. In Fe-rich subsurface sediments, the reduction of Tc(VII) by Fe(II) may predominate over direct microbial pathways, potentially leading to lower concentrations of aqueous 99Tc(IV).

Plymale, Andrew E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Heald, Steve M.; Moore, Dean A.; Kennedy, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Wang, Chong M.; Resch, Charles T.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Method Method PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 9. Refinery Receipts of Crude Oil by Method of Transportation by PAD District, 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Pipeline Domestic 3,989 665,625 988,103 88,072 243,055 1,988,844 Foreign 21,230 569,209 374,991 81,074 55,191 1,101,695 Tanker Domestic 3,537 0 6,795 0 182,822 193,154 Foreign 269,722 0 1,261,640 0 367,865 1,899,227 Barge Domestic 11,303 8,899 130,591 0 408 151,201 Foreign 12,497 596 43,718 0 23,652 80,463 Tank Cars Domestic 5,916 2,070 12,072 0 10,027 30,085 Foreign 3,685 0 235 0 194 4,114 Trucks Domestic 3,715 7,856 73,171 39,163 7,347 131,252 Foreign 0 0 0 0 0 0 Total Domestic 28,460 684,450 1,210,732 127,235 443,659 2,494,536 Foreign 307,134 569,805 1,680,584 81,074 446,902 3,085,499

398

Commodity PAD Districts I II III IV V United States  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Commodity Commodity PAD Districts I II III IV V United States Table 10a. Fuel Consumed at Refineries by PAD District, 2012 (Thousand Barrels, Except Where Noted) Crude Oil 0 0 0 0 0 0 Liquefied Petroleum Gases 0 464 490 49 518 1,521 Distillate Fuel Oil 4 89 236 1 209 539 Residual Fuel Oil 26 18 11 16 469 540 Still Gas 13,838 50,328 108,359 8,694 38,875 220,094 Marketable Petroleum Coke 0 0 0 528 166 694 Catalyst Petroleum Coke 9,003 17,611 42,614 2,852 12,416 84,496 Natural Gas (million cubic feet) 38,347 143,702 474,359 26,971 159,849 843,228 Coal (thousand short tons) 30 0 0 0 0 30 Purchased Electricity (million kWh) 2,355 11,892 23,255 2,003 5,130 44,635 Purchased Steam (million pounds) 3,849 12,723 88,922 1,439 14,426 121,359 Other Products 40 47 677 67 1,141 1,972

399

An Economic Analysis of Generation IV Small Modular Reactors  

SciTech Connect

This report examines some conditions necessary for Generation IV Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) to be competitive in the world energy market. The key areas that make nuclear reactors an attractive choice for investors are reviewed, and a cost model based on the ideal conditions is developed. Recommendations are then made based on the output of the cost model and on conditions and tactics that have proven successful in other industries. The Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS), a specific SMR design concept, is used to develop the cost model and complete the analysis because information about the ENHS design is readily available from the University of California at Berkeley Nuclear Engineering Department. However, the cost model can be used to analyze any of the current SMR designs being considered. On the basis of our analysis, we determined that the nuclear power industry can benefit from and SMRs can become competitive in the world energy market if a combination of standardization and simplification of orders, configuration, and production are implemented. This would require wholesale changes in the way SMRs are produced, manufactured and regulated, but nothing that other industries have not implemented and proven successful.

Stewart, J S; Lamont, A D; Rothwell, G S; Smith, C F; Greenspan, E; Brown, N; Barak, A

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Remediation of chromium(VI) in the vadose zone: stoichiometry and kinetics of chromium(VI) reduction by sulfur dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Immobilization and detoxification of chromium in the vadose zone is made possible by the existence of an effective reductant, SO2, that exists in a gaseous form at room temperature. Experimental studies were designed to characterize stoichiometry and kinetics of chromium reduction both in aqueous solutions at pH values near neutrality and in soil. First, batch experiments and elemental analyses were conducted to characterize the stoichiometry and kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction in water. The stoichiometric ratio of S(IV) removed to Cr(VI) removed ranged between 1.6 and 1.8. The overall reaction is believed to be the result of a linear combination of two reactions in which dithionate is an intermediate and sulfate is the stable oxidized product. The reaction was also rapid, with the half-time of about 45 minutes at pH 6 and about 16 hours at pH 7. A two-step kinetic model was developed to describe changes in concentrations of Cr(VI), S(IV), and S(V). Nonlinear regression was applied to obtain the kinetic parameters. The rate of reaction was assumed to be second-order with respect to [Cr(VI)] and first-order with respect to [S(IV)], and [S(V)]. The values for the rate coefficient for the first reaction (k1) were found to be 4.5 (?10%), 0.25 (?9.4%) (mM-2h-1) at pH 6 and 7, respectively. The values of the rate coefficient for the second reaction (k2) were 25 (?29%), 1.1 (? 30%) (mM-2h-1) at pH 6 and 7, respectively. The reaction rate decreased as pH increased. Experiments showed that the rate at pH 7 was lower than that at pH 6 by one order of magnitude. Second, batch experiments and elemental analyses were conducted to characterize the stoichiometry and kinetics of Cr(VI) reduction in soil. The stoichiometric ratio of S(IV) removed to Cr(VI) removed was almost 2, which is slightly higher than that for the reaction in water. This higher value may be due to S(IV) oxidation by soil-derived Fe(III). The reaction was rapid, with the half-time less than 2 minutes, which is faster than in water. The rate coefficients, k1 and k2, were 22 (?41%) and 13 (?77%) (M-2h-1), respectively.

Ahn, Min

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) and provided information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 2 efforts also included preparation of a draft topical report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region'', which is nearing completion. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The video will be completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in the next quarter. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. The addition of the Canadian province of Alberta to the PCOR Partnership region expanded the decision support system (DSS) geographic information system database. Task 5 screened and qualitatively assessed sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership characterization work is nearing completion, and most remaining efforts are related to finalizing work products. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) has developed a Topical Report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region''. Task 3 (Public Outreach) has developed an informational Public Television program entitled ''Nature in the Balance'', about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The program was completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in this quarter. Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) efforts are nearing completion, and data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation are being incorporated into a series of topical reports. The expansion of the Decision Support System Geographic Information System database has continued with the development of a ''save bookmark'' feature that allows users to save a map from the system easily. A feature that allows users to develop a report that summarizes CO{sub 2} sequestration parameters was also developed. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options and developing economic estimates for important regional CO{sub 2} sequestration strategies.

Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Lisa S. Botnen

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

9th Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Workshop 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The PowerTrap{trademark} is a non-exhaust temperature dependent system that cannot become blocked and features a controlled regeneration process independent of the vehicle's drive cycle. The system has a low direct-current power source requirement available in both 12-volt and 24-volt configurations. The system is fully programmable, fully automated and includes Euro IV requirements of operation verification. The system has gained European component-type approval and has been tested with both on- road and off-road diesel fuel up to 2000 parts per million. The device is fail-safe: in the event of a device malfunction, it cannot affect the engine's performance. Accumulated mileage testing is in excess of 640,000 miles to date. Vehicles include London-type taxicabs (Euro 1 and 2), emergency service fire engines (Euro 1, 2, and 3), inner city buses, and light-duty locomotives. Independent test results by Shell Global Solutions have consistently demonstrated 85-99 percent reduction of ultrafines across the 7-35 nanometer size range using a scanning mobility particle sizer with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and off-road high-sulfur fuel.

Kukla, P; Wright, J; Harris, G; Ball, A; Gu, F

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

404

Forces between clustered stereocilia minimize friction in the ear on a subnanometre scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection of sound begins when energy derived from acoustic stimuli deflects the hair bundles atop hair cells. As hair bundles move, the viscous friction between stereocilia and the surrounding liquid poses a fundamental challenge to the ear's high sensitivity and sharp frequency selectivity. Part of the solution to this problem lies in the active process that uses energy for frequency-selective sound amplification. Here we demonstrate that a complementary part involves the fluid-structure interaction between the liquid within the hair bundle and the stereocilia. Using force measurement on a dynamically scaled model, finite-element analysis, analytical estimation of hydrodynamic forces, stochastic simulation and high-resolution interferometric measurement of hair bundles, we characterize the origin and magnitude of the forces between individual stereocilia during small hair-bundle deflections. We find that the close apposition of stereocilia effectively immobilizes the liquid between them, which reduces t...

Kozlov, Andrei S; Risler, Thomas; Versteegh, Corstiaen P C; Hudspeth, A J; 10.1038/nature10073

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Impact of tool wear on joint strength in friction stir spot welding of DP 980 steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, using a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re, and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re. The sheet material used for all wear testing was 1.4 mm DP 980. Lap shear testing was used to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. The Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

Miles, Michael; Ridges, Chris; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Santella, M. L.; Steel, Russel

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

406

Experimental and theoretical studies of friction and heat transfer in rough passages  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses activities during this reporting period. A paper based on the results presented in the first final report (DOE/CE/90029-2) and entitled The Role of Transition in Determining Friction and Heat Transfer in Smooth and Rough Passages'' was published in the October issue (Volume 33) of the International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer. Beginning with the minimum objectives established at the outset of the period covered by this report, the general picture can be summed up as follows: detailed heat transfer and pressure drop (with and without heating) measurements with the smooth tube, fabrication of the eleven (enhanced tube) heat transfer test sections, tests with two of the three Hitachi tubes, and the construction of the liquid test facility were completed. In short, the minimum objectives were, for the most part, accomplished satisfactorily. 6 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Testing of Compact Bolted Fasteners with Insulation and Friction-Enhanced Shims for NCSX  

SciTech Connect

The fastening of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment's (NCSX) modular coils presented a number of engineering and manufacturing challenges due to the high magnetic forces, need to control induced currents, tight tolerances and restrictive space envelope. A fastening method using high strength studs, jack nuts, insulating spacers, bushings and alumina coated shims was developed which met the requirements. A test program was conducted to verify the design. The tests included measurements of flatness of the spacers, determination of contact area, torque vs. tension of the studs and jack nuts, friction coefficient tests on the alumina and G-10 insulators, electrical tests, and tension relaxation tests due to temperature excursions from room temperature to liquid nitrogen temperatures. This paper will describe the design and the results of the test program.

L. E. Dudek, J.H. Chrzanowski, G. Gettelfinger, P. Heitzenroeder, S. Jurczynski, M. Viola and K. Freudenberg

2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

408

Reduction of Lie-Jordan algebras: Classical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present a unified algebraic framework to discuss the reduction of classical and quantum systems. The underlying algebraic structure is a Lie-Jordan algebra supplemented, in the quantum case, with a Banach structure. We discuss the reduction by symmetries, by constraints as well as the possible, non trivial, combinations of both. We finally introduce a new, general framework to perform the reduction of physical systems in an algebraic setup.

F. Falceto; L. Ferro; A. Ibort; G. Marmo

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

409

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VALR Lab. NREL's Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction Laboratory houses ADAM, our advanced thermal manikin, as well as a passenger compartment climate simulator, testing equipment...

410

Harm Reduction Journal BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bundling occupational safety with harm reduction information as a feasible method for improving police receptiveness to syringe access programs: evidence from three U.S. cities

Corey S Davis; Leo Beletsky; Open Access

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Optimizing Anode Performance in DUBAL Reduction Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduction in Gross Carbon consumption by 5% over the past 4 years was achieved through optimization of anode quality, modification of anode design and ...

412

Idle Reduction Technology Demonstrations: Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is sponsoring 3 idle reduction demonstration projects for heavy-duty trucks. This report provides the status of the projects.

Proc, K.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction with Reduced Platinum ...  

Platinum is the most efficient electrocatalyst for accelerating the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Under operating conditions, though, platinum catalysts ...

414

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e.g. , reductions in landfill gas flaring),  or changes to landfills is +/?30%, the range for methane emissions from  natural gas 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Petroleum Reduction Planning Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Petroleum Reduction Planning Tool Petroleum Reduction Planning Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Petroleum Reduction Planning Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, Energy Efficiency, Fuels & Efficiency, Hydrogen, Transportation Phase: Prepare a Plan Topics: Analysis Tools, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/prep/index.php OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/petroleum-reduction-planning-tool Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation

416

Selection of Correlations and Look-Up Tables for Critical Heat Flux Prediction in the Generation IV "IRIS" Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to fulfill the goals set forth by the Generation IV International Forum, the current NERI funded

Romano, A.

417

New seismological results on the G0 IV eta Bootis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several attempts have been made to detect solar-like oscillations in the G0 IV star eta Boo. We present here new observations on this star simultaneously conducted with two spectrographs: Coralie mounted on the 1.2-m Swiss telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile) and Elodie based on the 1.93-m telescope at the Observatoire de Haute Provence (France). In total, 1239 spectra were collected over 13 nights. The power spectrum of the high precision velocity time series clearly presents several identifiable peaks between 0.4 and 1.0 mHz showing regularity with a large and small separations of Delta_nu = 39.9 uHz and delta_nu02 = 3.95 uHz respectively. Twenty-two individual frequencies have been identified. Detailed models based on these measurements and non-asteroseismic observables were computed using the Geneva evolution code including shellular rotation and atomic diffusion. By combining these seismological data with non-asteroseismic observations, we determine the following global parameters for eta Boo: a mass of 1.57 +- 0.07 M_sol, an age t=2.67 +- 0.10 Gyr and an initial metallicity Z/X_i=0.0391 +- 0.0070. We also show that the mass of eta Boo is very sensitive to the choice of the observed metallicity, while the age of eta Boo depends on the input physics used. Indeed, a higher metallicity favours a higher mass, while non-rotating models without overshooting predict a smaller age.

F. Carrier; P. Eggenberger; F. Bouchy

2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

418

Microsoft Word - Outside_CoverFinalEIS Volume IV.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IV - Public Comments IV - Public Comments June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers DOE/EIS-0377 Final Environmental Impact Statement Volume IV - Public Comments June 2009 Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project Prepared for: Lead Agency: Western Area Power Administration Cooperating Agency: U.S. Army Corps of Engineers VOLUME CONTENTS Volume I Executive Summary Acronyms Table of Contents Chapter 1 - Introduction Chapter 2 - Proposed Project, Proposed Federal Actions, and Alternatives Chapter 3 - Affected Environment Chapter 4 - Environmental Consequences

419

Enhanced High Temperature Performance of NOx Reduction Catalyst Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two primary NOx after-treatment technologies have been recognized as the most promising approaches for meeting stringent NOx emission standards for diesel vehicles within the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) 2007/2010 mandated limits, NOx Storage Reduction (NSR) and NH3 selective catalytic reduction (SCR); both are, in fact being commercialized for this application. However, in looking forward to 2015 and beyond with expected more stringent regulations, the continued viability of the NSR technology for controlling NOx emissions from lean-burn engines such as diesels will require at least two specific, significant and inter-related improvements. First, it is important to reduce system costs by, for example, minimizing the precious metal content while maintaining, even improving, performance and long-term stability. A second critical need for future NSR systems, as well as for NH3 SCR, will be significantly improved higher and lower temperature performance and stability. Furthermore, these critically needed improvements will contribute significantly to minimizing the impacts to fuel economy of incorporating these after-treatment technologies on lean-burn vehicles. To meet these objectives will require, at a minimum an improved scientific understanding of the following things: i) the various roles for the precious and coinage metals used in these catalysts; ii) the mechanisms for these various roles; iii) the effects of high temperatures on the active metal performance in their various roles; iv) mechanisms for higher temperature NOx storage performance for modified and/or alternative storage materials; v) the interactions between the precious metals and the storage materials in both optimum NOx storage performance and long term stability; vi) the sulfur adsorption and regeneration mechanisms for NOx reduction materials; vii) materials degradation mechanisms in CHA-based NH3 SCR catalysts. The objective of this CRADA project between PNNL and Cummins, Inc. is to develop a fundamental understanding of the above-listed issues. Model catalysts that are based on literature formulations are the focus of the work being carried out at PNNL. In addition, the performance and stability of more realistic high temperature NSR catalysts, supplied by JM, are being studied in order to provide baseline data for the model catalysts that are, again, based on formulations described in the open literature. For this short summary, we will primarily highlight representative results from our recent studies of the stability of candidate high temperature NSR materials.

Gao, Feng; Kim, Do Heui; Luo, Jinyong; Muntean, George G.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Currier, Neal; Kamasamudram, Krishna; Kumar, Ashok; Li, Junhui; Stafford, Randy; Yezerets, Aleksey; Castagnola, Mario; Chen, Hai Ying; Hess, Howard ..

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

INFLUENCE OF NATURAL AND SYNTHETIC ORGANIC LIGANDS ON THE STABILITY AND MOBILITY OF REDUCED TC(IV)  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives were (1) to quantify the interactions of organic ligands with Tc(IV) through the generation of thermodynamic (complexation) and kinetic parameters needed to assess and predict the mobility of reduced Tc(IV) at DOE contaminated sites; and (2) to determine the impact of organic ligands on the mobility and fate of reduced Tc(IV) under field geochemical conditions.

Nathalie A. Wall; Baohua Gu

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-11: Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery - EOR thermal processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Tenth Amendment anti Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Energy Agreement. This report is presented in sections (for each of the six Tasks) and each section contains one or more reports that were prepared to describe the results of the effort under each of the Tasks. A statement of each Task, taken from the Agreement Between Project Managers, is presented on the first page of each section. The Tasks are numbered 68 through 73. The first through tenth report on research performed under Annex IV Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report Number IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, IV-8, IV-9, IV-10 contain the results of the first 67 Tasks. These reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, December 1989, October 1991, February 1993, March 1995, and December 1997, respectively.

Venezuela

2000-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

422

Tracking the Sun IV: An Historical Summary of the Installed Cost of Photovoltaics in the United States from 1998 to 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 2007-2010. Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of$/W) Total Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of$/W) Total Tracking the Sun IV: The Installed Cost of

Darghouth, Naim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES  

SciTech Connect

This is the first of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. This paper examines the circumstances and consequences of the elimination of ? The INF-range Pershing II ballistic missile and Gryphon Ground-Launched Cruise Missile (GLCM), deployed by NATO under a dual-track strategy to counter Soviet intermediate-range missiles while pursuing negotiations to limit or eliminate all of these missiles. ? The Short-Range Attack Missile (SRAM), which was actually a family of missiles including SRAM A, SRAM B (never deployed), and SRAM II and SRAM T, these last two cancelled during an over-budget/behind-schedule development phase as part of the Presidential Nuclear Initiatives of 1991 and 1992. ? The nuclear-armed version of the Tomahawk Land-Attack Cruise Missile (TLAM/N), first limited to shore-based storage by the PNIs, and finally eliminated in deliberations surrounding the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review Report. ? The Missile-X (MX), or Peacekeeper, a heavy MIRVed ICBM, deployed in fixed silos, rather than in an originally proposed mobile mode. Peacekeeper was likely intended as a bargaining chip to facilitate elimination of Russian heavy missiles. The plan failed when START II did not enter into force, and the missiles were eliminated at the end of their intended service life. ? The Small ICBM (SICBM), or Midgetman, a road-mobile, single-warhead missile for which per-unit costs were climbing when it was eliminated under the PNIs. Although there were liabilities associated with each of these systems, there were also unique capabilities; this paper lays out the pros and cons for each. Further, we articulate the capabilities that were eliminated with these systems.

Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

424

Iodine retention during evaporative volume reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for retaining radioactive iodine in aqueous waste solutions during volume reduction is disclosed. The method applies to evaporative volume reduction processes whereby the decontaminated (evaporated) water can be returned safely to the environment. The method generally comprises isotopically diluting the waste solution with a nonradioactive iodide and maintaining the solution at a high pH during evaporation.

Godbee, H.W.; Cathers, G.I.; Blanco, R.E.

1975-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

425

Energy Use Reduction Pilot College of Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Engineering leadership are presented with the expectation of a realization in a reduction of energy usage equipment that consumes three to four times as much energy as a typical house. Observe behavior patterns to a reduction in energy usage. Building occupants include students, faculty and staff who spend a reasonable

Chinnam, Ratna Babu

426

On-The-Fly Path Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Path reduction is a well-known technique to alleviate the state-explosion problem incurred by explicit-state model checking, its key idea being to store states only at predetermined breaking points. This paper presents an adaptation of this technique ... Keywords: model checking, path reduction, state explosion, verification

Sebastian Biallas; Jörg Brauer; Dominique Gückel; Stefan Kowalewski

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Domain reduction method for atomistic simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a quasi-static formulation of the method of multi-scale boundary conditions (MSBCs) is derived and applied to atomistic simulations of carbon nano-structures, namely single graphene sheets and multi-layered graphite. This domain reduction ... Keywords: atomistic simulation, carbon nano-structures, deformable boundary, domain reduction, graphite, multi-scale modeling, nano-indentation

Sergey N. Medyanik; Eduard G. Karpov; Wing Kam Liu

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Danish Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scenarios for 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Danish Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scenarios for 2020 and 2050 February 2008 Prepared by Ea Energy 54 2.9 ENERGY RESOURCES 55 3 DANISH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION 58 3.1 GREENHOUSE GAS SOURCES 58 4 of 2007, Ea Energy Analyses and Risø DTU developed a number of greenhouse gas emissions reduction

429

Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts) Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional...

430

State Buildings Energy Reduction Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Buildings Energy Reduction Plan State Buildings Energy Reduction Plan Eligibility Institutional State Government Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization...

431

China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum July 13, 2006 - 3:03pm Addthis International Scope of Nuclear Nations Pursuing Advanced Reactors Broadens WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Dennis Spurgeon today announced that China and Russia are expected to join the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), a group of the world's leading nuclear nations who are working together to develop more efficient and less waste-intensive advanced reactors to meet future energy challenges. Earlier today, the GIF Policy Group voted unanimously to extend an offer of membership to China and Russia. China and Russia's formal entry into GIF is expected to be finalized by November 2006.

432

China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum July 13, 2006 - 3:03pm Addthis International Scope of Nuclear Nations Pursuing Advanced Reactors Broadens WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Energy Dennis Spurgeon today announced that China and Russia are expected to join the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), a group of the world's leading nuclear nations who are working together to develop more efficient and less waste-intensive advanced reactors to meet future energy challenges. Earlier today, the GIF Policy Group voted unanimously to extend an offer of membership to China and Russia. China and Russia's formal entry into GIF is expected to be finalized by November 2006.

433

O'Brien Biogas IV LLC Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

O'Brien Biogas IV LLC Biomass Facility O'Brien Biogas IV LLC Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name O'Brien Biogas IV LLC Biomass Facility Facility O'Brien Biogas IV LLC Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Middlesex County, New Jersey Coordinates 40.4111363°, -74.3587473° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4111363,"lon":-74.3587473,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

434

EIS-0469: Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh County,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh 9: Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh County, North Dakota EIS-0469: Proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, Burleigh County, North Dakota Summary Western Area Power Administration is evaluating the potential environmental impacts of interconnecting NextEra Energy Resources proposed Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Project, near Bismarck, North Dakota, to Western's existing Wilton/Baldwin substation and allowing NextEra's existing wind projects in this area to operate above 50 annual MW. Western is preparing a Supplemental Draft EIS to address substantial changes to the proposal, including 30 turbine locations and 5 alternate turbine locations in Crofte Township. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download

435

Feasibility of risk-informed regulation for Generation-IV reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the advent of new and innovative Generation-IV reactor designs, new regulations must be developed to assure the safety of these plants. In the past a purely deterministic way of developing design basis accidents was ...

Matos, Craig H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Stark broadening of B IV lines for astrophysical and laboratory plasma research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stark broadening parameters for 36 multiplets of B IV have been calculated using the semi-classical perturbation formalism. Obtained results have been used to investigate the regularities within spectral series and temperature dependence.

Dimitrijevi?, Milan S; Simi?, Zoran; Kova?evi?, Andjelka; Sahal-Bréchot, Sylvie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Architecture and urbanism in Henri IV's Paris : the Place Royale, Place Dauphine, and Hôpital St. Louis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation concerns the extensive building program which Henri IV undertook in Paris from 1600 to 1610. Focusing on the place Royale (now called the place des Vosges) , the place Dauphine, rue Dauphine, and Pont ...

Ballon, Hilary Meg

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Those early days as we remember them (Part IV) - Met Lab & Early...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Those early days as we remember them Part IV William P. Norris Division of Biological and Medical Research Ed. note: The following was transcribed from a tape recording made in...

440

Technical Session IV Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Construction Projects BES Home 2011 Accelerator Detector RD PI Meeting files Technical Session IV Talks Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Future Light...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Dysbaric gas bubble disease in dogs. IV. Acclimatization to diving  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acclimatization to diving was documented to occur in dogs. An increase in the number of repetitive dives which could be tolerated, as well as a decrease in the total number of pulmonary artery venous gas emboli resulting from individual dives were observed. The results from the experimental subject ''Jason'' indicate that acclimatization involves a reduction in the number of bubbles, and not an increase in the ability of the body to tolerate bubbles. Acclimatization is principally a physical rather than a physiological event. Bubbles forming in vivo must grow from nuclei of some sort. If these nuclei are stable, discrete structure that are destroyed when they grow into gross bubbles, then repetitive diving might markedly reduce by attrition the number of such bubble micronuclei. This would result in fewer bubbles being formed during subsequent dives, thus leading to the observed acclimatization effect. 7 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Kunkle, T.D.; Morita, A.; Beckman, E.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

A Virtual Reality Framework to Optimize Design, Operation and Refueling of GEN-IV Reactors.  

SciTech Connect

many GEN-IV candidate designs are currently under investigation. Technical issues related to material, safety and economics are being addressed at research laboratories, industry and in academia. After safety, economic feasibility is likely to be the most important crterion in the success of GEN-IV design(s). Lessons learned from the designers and operators of GEN-II (and GEN-III) reactors must play a vital role in achieving both safety and economic feasibility goals.

Rizwan-uddin; Nick Karancevic; Stefano Markidis; Joel Dixon; Cheng Luo; Jared Reynolds

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

443

Large Seasonal Modulation of Tides due to Ice Cover Friction in a Midlatitude Estuary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal episodes of significant tidal damping (reductions of tidal amplitudes as much as 50%) and tidal modulation were observed in the Hudson River estuary in the course of three consecutive winters from multiple tide gages. Through comparisons ...

Nickitas Georgas

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Developing an approach utilizing local deterministic analysis to predict the cycle friction of the piston ring-pack in internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nowadays, a rapid growth of internal combustion (IC) engines is considered to be a major contributor to energy crisis. About 20% of the mechanical loss in internal combustion engines directly goes to the friction loss ...

Liu, Yang, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Einstein-Hopf drag, Doppler shift of thermal radiation and blackbody friction: A unifying perspective on an intriguing physical effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thermal friction force acting on an atom moving relative to a thermal photon bath has recently been calculated on the basis of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. The thermal fluctuations of the electromagnetic field give rise to a drag force on an atom provided one allows for dissipation of the field energy via spontaneous emission. The drag force exists if the atomic polarizability has a nonvanishing imaginary part. Here, we explore alternative derivations. The damping of the motion of a simple harmonic oscillator is described by radiative reaction theory (result of Einstein and Hopf), taking into account the known stochastic fluctuations of the electromagnetic field. Describing the excitations of the atom as an ensemble of damped harmonic oscillators, we identify the previously found expressions as generalizations of the Einstein-Hopf result. In addition, we present a simple explanation for blackbody friction in terms of a Doppler shift of the thermal radiation in the inertial frame of the moving atom...

Lach, G; Jentschura, U D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Formation mechanism of linear friction welded Ti-6Al-4V alloy joint based on microstructure observation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microstructure of the linear friction welded Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy joint was investigated by optical microscope, scanning electronic microscope and transmission electron microscope. Results show that the dynamic recovery and recrystallization resulting from the intensive plastic deformation and fast heating and cooling processes during linear friction welding account for the superfine {alpha} + {beta} grains in the weld center. Fine {alpha} grains distribute in the {beta} matrix or at the boundaries of {beta} grains. A mass of dislocations networks and metastructures present within the {alpha} and {beta} grains. - Research Highlights: {yields} TEM is employed in the analysis. {yields} The dynamic recovery is the main mechanism in thermal deformation of TC4. {yields} Superfine grains in the weld result from dynamic recovery and dynamic recrystallizaion, but the recrystallization is inadequate.

Ma Tiejun; Chen Tao, E-mail: ctwc-13@163.com; Li Wenya; Wang Shiwei; Yang Siqian

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Energy Reduction Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction Goals Reduction Goals Energy Reduction Goals < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Other Program Info State Vermont Program Type Energy Efficiency Resource Standard Provider Vermont Energy Investment Corporation In June 1999, Vermont enacted legislation authorizing the Vermont Public Service Board (PSB) to establish a volumetric charge on all electric customers' bills to support energy efficiency programs and goals.* The subsequent year the PSB established Efficiency Vermont, a statewide "energy efficiency utility," and a funding mechanism to support it. Efficiency Vermont is currently administered by Vermont Energy Investment Corporation (VEIC), an independent, non-profit corporation. Efficiency Vermont periodically establishes certain goals that constitute

448

Municipal Energy Reduction Fund | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Energy Reduction Fund Municipal Energy Reduction Fund Municipal Energy Reduction Fund < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Maximum Rebate $400,000 Program Info Start Date 3/17/2010 State New Hampshire Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount $5,000 to $400,000 Provider New Hampshire Community Development Finance Authority In March 2010, the New Hampshire Community Development Finance Authority (CDFA) launched a revolving loan program to encourage the state's

449

Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Nancy Jackson Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories

450

Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Nancy Jackson Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories

451

Fundamental limits on NOx reduction by plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the gas-phase reaction mechanisms for removal of NO{sub x} in a plasma. The effect of oxygen content on the competition between the reduction and oxidation processes is discussed. The effect of the electron kinetic energy distribution on the radical production and subsequent chemistry is then discussed in order to predict the best performance that can be achieved for NO{sub x} reduction using the plasma alone. The fundamental limit on the minimum electrical energy consumption that will be required to implement NO{sub x} reduction in any type of plasma reactor is established.

Penetrante, B. M., LLNL

1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

452

Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

H.Y. Sohn

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

454

Evaporation heat transfer and friction characteristics of R-134a flowing downward in a vertical corrugated tube  

SciTech Connect

Differently from most previous studies, the heat transfer and friction characteristics of the pure refrigerant HFC-134a during evaporation inside a vertical corrugated tube are experimentally investigated. The double tube test sections are 0.5 m long with refrigerant flowing in the inner tube and heating water flowing in the annulus. The inner tubes are one smooth tube and two corrugated tubes, which are constructed from smooth copper tube of 8.7 mm inner diameter. The test runs are performed at evaporating temperatures of 10, 15, and 20 C, heat fluxes of 20, 25, and 30 kW/m{sup 2}, and mass fluxes of 200, 300, and 400 kg/m{sup 2} s. The quality of the refrigerant in the test section is calculated using the temperature and pressure obtained from the experiment. The pressure drop across the test section is measured directly by a differential pressure transducer. The effects of heat flux, mass flux, and evaporation temperature on the heat transfer coefficient and two-phase friction factor are also discussed. It is found that the percentage increases of the heat transfer coefficient and the two-phase friction factor of the corrugated tubes compared with those of the smooth tube are approximately 0-10% and 70-140%, respectively. (author)

Aroonrat, Kanit; Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Lab. (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

A nuclear magnetic resonance probe of group IV clathrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The clathrates feature large cages of silicon, germanium, or tin, with guest atoms in the cage centers. The group IV clathrates are interesting because of their thermoelectric efficiency, and their glasslike thermal conductivity at low temperatures. Clathrates show a variety of properties, and the motion of cage center atoms is not well understood. In Sr8Ga16Ge30, we found that the slow atomic motion in the order 10-5 s is present in this system, which is much slower than what would be expected for standard atomic dynamics. NMR studies of Sr8Ga16Ge30 showed that Knight shift and T1 results are consistent with low density metallic behavior. The lineshapes exhibit changes consistent with motional narrowing at low temperatures, and this indicates unusually slow hopping rates. To further investigate this behavior, we made a series of measurements using the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill NMR sequence. Fitting the results to a hopping model yielded an activation energy of 4.6 K. We can understand all of our observations in terms of non-resonant atomic tunneling between asymmetric sites within the cages, in the presence of disorder. For Ba8Ga16Ge30, the relaxation behavior (T1) deviates from the Korringa relation, and the Knight shift and linewidth change with temperature. Those results could be explained by carrier freezout, and the development of a dilute set of magnetic moments due to these localized carriers. For Ba8Ga16Ge30 samples made from Ga flux, we observed different T1 and Knight shift behavior as compared to n type material. This is due to the differences in carrier type among these different samples. The p type sample has a smaller Knight shift and a slower relaxation rate than n type samples made with the stoichiometric ratio, which is consistent with a change in orbital symmetry between the conduction and valence bands. WDS study for Ba8Al10Ge36 showed the existence of vacancies in the Al-deficient samples, which results in some degree of ordering of Al occupation on the framework sites. In Al NMR measurements on Ba8AlxGe40-x with x = 12 to 16, we found that T1 of all Al samples follows the Korringa relation. The broadening of the single NMR central peak of Ba8Al16Ge30 is due to the inhomogeneous Knight shifts for occupation of different framework sites. For Ba8Al12Ge34 and Ba8Al13Ge33, we observed two peaks, and NMR results show that they are from distinct Al sites, while for each peak, the inhomogeneous broadening is much smaller. The difference in lineshapes we attributed to the existence of vacancies which we detected in the Al-deficient materials, and we assign one of the two Al peaks to Al adjacent to a vacancy.

Gou, Weiping

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Non-equilibrium fluctuations in frictional granular motor: experiments and kinetic theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the study of a new experimental granular Brownian motor, inspired to the one published in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 248001 (2010)], but different in some ingredients. As in that previous work, the motor is constituted by a rotating pawl whose surfaces break the rotation-inversion symmetry through alternated patches of different inelasticity, immersed in a gas of granular particles. The main novelty of our experimental setup is in the orientation of the main axis, which is parallel to the (vertical) direction of shaking of the granular fluid, guaranteeing an isotropic distribution for the velocities of colliding grains, characterized by a variance $v_0^2$. We also keep the granular system diluted, in order to compare with Boltzmann-equation-based kinetic theory. In agreement with theory, we observe for the first time the crucial role of Coulomb friction which induces two main regimes: (i) rare collisions (RC), with an average drift $\\ \\sim v_0^3$, and (ii) frequent collisions (FC), with $\\ \\sim v_0$. We also study the fluctuations of the angle spanned in a large time interval, $\\Delta \\theta$, which in the FC regime is proportional to the work done upon the motor. We observe that the Fluctuation Relation is satisfied with a slope which weakly depends on the relative collision frequency.

Andrea Gnoli; Alessandro Sarracino; Alberto Petri; Andrea Puglisi

2013-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

457

Transient Heat and Material Flow Modeling of Friction Stir Processing of Magnesium Alloy using Threaded Tool  

SciTech Connect

A three-dimensional transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to investigate the material flow and heat transfer during friction stir processing (FSP) in an AZ31B magnesium alloy. The material was assumed to be a non-Newtonian viscoplastic fluid, and the Zener-Hollomon parameter was used to describe the dependence of material viscosity on temperature and strain rate. The material constants used in the constitutive equation were determined experimentally from compression tests of the AZ31B Mg alloy under a wide range of strain rates and temperatures. A dynamic mesh method, combining both Lagrangian and Eulerian formulations, was used to capture the material flow induced by the movement of the threaded tool pin. Massless inert particles were embedded in the simulation domain to track the detailed history of material flow. The actual FSP was also carried out on a wrought Mg plate where temperature profiles were recorded by embedding thermocouples. The predicted transient temperature history was found to be consistent with that measured during FSP. Finally, the influence of the thread on the simulated results of thermal history and material flow was studied by comparing two models: one with threaded pin and the other with smooth pin surface.

Yu, Zhenzhen [ORNL; Zhang, Wei [ORNL; Choo, Hahn [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Wear testing of friction stir spot welding tools for joining of DP 980 Steel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welding has been shown to be a viable method of joining ultra high strength steel (UHSS), both in terms of joint strength and process cycle time. However, the cost of tooling must be reasonable in order for this method to be adopted as an industrial process. Several tooling materials have been evaluated in prior studies, including silicon nitride and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN). Recently a new tool alloy has been developed, where a blend of PCBN and tungsten rhenium (W-Re) was used in order to improve the toughness of the tool. Wear testing results are presented for two of these alloys: one with a composition of 60% PCBN and 40% W-Re (designated as Q60), and one with 70% PCBN and 30% W-Re (designated at Q70). The sheet material used for all wear testing was DP 980. Tool profiles were measured periodically during the testing process in order to show the progression of wear as a function of the number of spots produced. Lap shear testing was done each time a tool profile was taken in order to show the relationship between tool wear and joint strength. For the welding parameters chosen for this study the Q70 tool provided the best combination of wear resistance and joint strength.

Ridges, Chris; Miles, Michael; Hovanski, Yuri; Peterson, Jeremy; Steel, Russell

2011-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

459

Friction Stir Lap Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Steel: A Preliminary Investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An initial study was made to evaluate the feasibility of joining Magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet to galvanized steel sheet in lap configuration using friction stir welding (FSW). Two different automotive sheet steels were used for comparative evaluation of the dissimilar joining potential; a 0.8mm thick, electro galvanized (EG) mild steel, and a 1.5mm thick hot dipped galvanized (HDG) high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA). These steels were joined to 2.33mm thick AZ31B magnesium sheet. A single FSW tool design was used for both dissimilar welds, and process parameters were kept the same. Average peak load for the AZ31-1.5 mm steel weld joint in lap shear mode was found to be 6.3 ± 1.0 kN. For the AZ31-0.8 mm steel weld, joint strength was 5.1 ± 1.5 kN. Microstructural investigation indicates melting of the Zn coating at the interface and subsequent alloying with the Mg sheet resulting in formation of solidified Zn-Mg alloy layer at AZ31/steel interface.

Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Friction Stir Spot Welding (FSSW) of Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Friction stir spot welding (FSSW) is applied to join advanced high strength steels (AHSS): galvannealed dual phase 780 MPa steel (DP780GA), transformation induced plasticity 780 MPa steel (TRIP780), and hot-stamped boron steel (HSBS). A low-cost Si3N4 ceramic tool was developed and used for making welds in this study instead of polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (PCBN) material used in earlier studies. FSSW has the advantages of solid-state, low-temperature process, and the ability of joining dissimilar grade of steels and thicknesses. Two different tool shoulder geometries, concave with smooth surface and convex with spiral pattern, were used in the study. Welds were made by a 2-step displacement control process with weld time of 4, 6, and 10 seconds. Static tensile lap-shear strength achieved 16.4 kN for DP780GA-HSBS and 13.2kN for TRIP780-HSBS, above the spot weld strength requirements by AWS. Nugget pull-out was the failure mode of the joint. The joining mechanism was illustrated from the cross-section micrographs. Microhardness measurement showed hardening in the upper sheet steel (DP780GA or TRIP780) in the weld, but softening of HSBS in the heat-affect zone (HAZ). The study demonstrated the feasibility of making high-strength AHSS spot welds with low-cost tools.

Santella, M. L.; Hovanski, Yuri; Pan, Tsung-Yu

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "friction reduction iv" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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461

Yield criteria for quasibrittle and frictional materials: a generalization to surfaces with corners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Convexity of a yield function (or phase-transformation function) and its relations to convexity of the corresponding yield surface (or phase-transformation surface) is essential to the invention, definition and comparison with experiments of new yield (or phase-transformation) criteria. This issue was previously addressed only under the hypothesis of smoothness of the surface, but yield surfaces with corners (for instance, the Hill, Tresca or Coulomb-Mohr yield criteria) are known to be of fundamental importance in plasticity theory. The generalization of a proposition relating convexity of the function and the corresponding surface to nonsmooth yield and phase-transformation surfaces is provided in this paper, together with the (necessary to the proof) extension of a theorem on nonsmooth elastic potential functions. While the former of these generalizations is crucial for yield and phase-transformation condition, the latter may find applications for potential energy functions describing phase-transforming materials, or materials with discontinuous locking in tension, or contact of a body with a discrete elastic/frictional support.

Andrea Piccolroaz; Davide Bigoni

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

462

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Transportation, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html Country: United States UN Region: Northern America CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Screenshot References: http://www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html "This Emissions Estimator provides the amount of reduced emissions in terms of pounds of CO2, SO2, and NOX based on input from the User regarding the CHP technology being used. In turn the User will be provided with

463

Intramolecular Oxyferryl Heme Reduction in Myoglobin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACS Publications Abstract: The kinetics of oxyferryl (FeIVO) heme reduction in horse heart myoglobin (Mb) by a4LRuII (a NH3; L NH3, pyridine, isonicotinamide) bound at the...

464

National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Credit for New Qualified Hybrid Motor Vehicles, and for Other Purposes"), includes a tax credit of up to 3,500 for idle reduction technology, including the installation of...

465

Multiresolution histogram analysis for color reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique for color reduction is presented, based on the analysis of the histograms of an image at different resolutions. Given an input image, lower resolution images are generated by using a scaling down interpolation method. Then, peaks and ...

Giuliana Ramella; Gabriella Sanniti Di Baja

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Lattice Reduction: a Toolbox for the Cryptanalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

], circulated around 1979) and the lattice reduc­ tion algorithm reached a final form in the paper [LLL82 reduction techniques, almost by inspection. This fact, which may be due to the apparent technicality

Stern, Jacques

467

Sharing the Burden of GHG Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The G8 countries propose a goal of a 50% reduction in global emissions by 2050, in an effort that needs to take account of other agreements specifying that developing countries are to be provided with incentives to action ...

Jacoby, Henry D.

468

Maximizing Wastewater Reduction for the Process Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides an overview of water and wastewater management practices in the U.S. process industries. The focus is on the chemical and petroleum industries and their methods for maximizing wastewater reduction and zero discharge. However, it also covers end-of-pipe treatment, since water reduction and zero discharge practices have evolved from end-of-pipe treatment practices. The resulting report is a comprehensive reference developed to help utilities and energy service providers understand and f...