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1

Anthracite coal supply for the 1981-1982 winter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains a letter addressed to the Chairman of the Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources in which findings on the potential for anthracite to become an effective component in meeting US energy needs are presented. Some of the problems facing the anthracite industry and consumers in the northeastern states, state and industry actions since the 1980 shortage, and the outlook for the winter of 1982 are addressed. Information was obtained on anthracite exports to foreign countries and to the DOD facilities in the Federal Republic of Germany. Development efforts to use anthracite in industrial boilers and the actions that the state of Pennsylvania has taken to encourage the use of anthracite in municipal buildings are also discussed. (DMC)

Peach, J.D.

1981-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

2

Fine Anthracite Coal Washing Using Spirals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spiral performed well in cleaning the coarse 8 x 16 mesh size fraction, as demonstrated by the Ep ranging from 0.091 to 0.177. This is in line with typical spiral performance. In addition, the presence of the coarser size fraction did not significantly affect spiral performance on the typical 16 x 100 mesh fraction, in which the Ep ranged from 0.144 to 0.250. Changes in solids concentration and flow rate did not show a clear correlation with spiral performance. However, for difficult-to-clean coals with high near-gravity material, such as this anthracite, a single-stage spiral cleaning such a wide size fraction may not be able to achieve the clean coal ash and yield specifications required. In the first place, while the performance of the spiral on the coarse 8 x 16 mesh fraction is good with regard to Ep, the cutpoints (SG50s) are high (1.87 to 1.92), which may result in a clean coal with a higher-than-desired ash content. And second, the combination of the spiral's higher overall cutpoint (1.80) with the high near-gravity anthracite results in significant misplaced material that increases the clean coal ash error. In a case such as this, one solution may be to reclean the clean coal and middlings from the first-stage spiral in a second stage spiral.

R.P. Killmeyer; P.H. Zandhuis; M.V. Ciocco; W. Weldon; T. West; D. Petrunak

2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

Health status of anthracite surface coal miners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1984-1985, medical examinations consisting of a chest radiograph, spirometry test, and questionnaire on work history, respiratory symptoms, and smoking history were administered to 1,061 white males who were employed at 31 coal cleaning plants and strip coal mines in the anthracite coal region of northeastern Pennsylvania. The prevalence of radiographic evidence of International Labour Office (ILO) category 1 or higher small opacities was 4.5% in 516 men who had never been employed in a dusty job other than in surface coal mining. Among these 516 workers, all 4 cases of ILO radiographic category 2 or 3 rounded opacities and 1 case of large opacities had been employed as a highwall drill operator or helper. The prevalence of category 1 or higher opacities increased with tenure as a highwall drill operator or helper (2.7% for 0 y, 6.5% for 1-9 yr, 25.0% for 10-19 y, and 55.6% for greater than or equal to 20 y drilling). Radiographic evidence of small rounded opacities, dyspnea, and decreases in FEV1.0, FVC, and peak flow were significantly related to tenure at drilling operations after adjusting for age, height, cigarette smoking status, and exposures in dusty jobs other than in surface coal mining. However, tenure in coal cleansing plants and other surface coal mine jobs were not related to significant health effects. The apparent excess prevalence of radiographic small rounded opacities in anthracite surface coal mine drillers suggests that quartz exposures have been increased. Average respirable quartz concentrations at surface coal mine drilling operations should be evaluated to determine whether exposures are within existing standards, and dust exposures should be controlled.

Amandus, H.E.; Petersen, M.R.; Richards, T.B.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results show: compared with anthracite coal, the ignition and burn out temperatures of biomass char were lower and the combustion characteristics were better ...

5

Lignin as Both Fuel and Fusing Binder in Briquetted Anthracite Fines for Foundry Coke Substitute.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lignin that had been extracted from Kraft black liquor was investigated as a fusing binder in briquetted anthracite fines for a foundry coke substitute. Cupola… (more)

Lumadue, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Anthracite R&D needs - CRADA 89-001. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to foster the development of one or more high performance, anthracite-fired boiler systems suitable for meeting space heating and hot water requirements of large buildings. The boiler system research would include fuel handling, combustion and heat transfer, ash handling, and control systems.

Bartis, J.T.; Inberman, A.K. [Eos Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Co-carbonization of two anthracites with a fat coal or two pitches  

SciTech Connect

The blends of two anthracite powders (YQ and JC) with a fat coal (C4) or a petroleum pitch (PP) or a coal tar pitch (CTP) in different proportions were co-carbonized at 3{sup o}C/min up to 1000{sup o}C in an experimental 1 kg coke oven. Coke yield, coke particulate size, coke micro-strength and coke cracking strength were measured respectively. Coke optical textures were watched under a microscope. The results show that as anthracite proportion increases, coke yields of all blends improve; > 0.8 mm lump coke yields of blends with CTP or PP decline slightly, blends with C4 drop heavily; coke microstrengths do not change sharply, and coke cracking strength of blends with C4 or PP decrease more than blends with CTP. C4 produces fine-grained mosaics, and two anthracites are mainly fusinite and fragments, PP is coarse-grained mosaics, and CTP is chiefly flow or domain textures. Independent optical textures were observed in cokes. There exist evident borders between the two contact optical textures which were produced by different components, and a few phenomena that domain or flow textures penetrating into fusinite appeared in the blends. It seems that CTP is the best adhesives for blending with anthracites for producing high quality cokes.

Shen, J.; Wang, Z.Z. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China). College of Chemical Engineering & Technology

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

Comparison of the Potential Impacts of Petroleum Coke and Anthracite Culm Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary feedstock for the proposed Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project would be low-cost anthracite culm, which is a locally abundant, previously discarded resource that could accommodate fuel requirements during the demonstration period. Culm reserves controlled by WMPI are estimated to be sufficient to supply the proposed facilities for about 15 years, or to supply both the proposed facilities and the existing Gilberton Power Plant for about 11 years. Based on the applicant’s proposal, the facilities would also be capable of using a blend of feedstock containing up to 25% petroleum coke. Petroleum coke is a high-sulfur, high-energy product having the appearance of coal. Oil refineries produce petroleum coke by heating and removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the residue remaining after the refining process. This appendix compares some of the potential impacts of 100 % anthracite culm use with the potential impacts from using a blended feedstock of 75 % anthracite culm and 25 % petroleum coke. Topics considered include carbon dioxide emissions, air emissions of sulfur compounds and toxic substances, solid wastes and byproduct production, and increased truck traffic. Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Published values for potential CO2 emissions from anthracite and petroleum coke are very similar.

Gilberton Coal-to-clean Fuels

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Electric conductivity and aggregation of anthracite and graphite particles in concretes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical model of the electric conductivity of a heterogeneous system based on coal and a binding agent is presented. In this system, a conductive phase appears because of particle aggregation. The model was tested in the systems of anthracite and graphite in cement stone. The consistency between the experimental and calculated electric conductivities with a correlation coefficient higher than 0.9 was found on a linear interpolation of model parameters. It was found that the presence of a surfactant (cetylpyridinium chloride) and a high-molecular-weight compound (polyvinyl acetate) changed the number of particles in anthracite and graphite aggregates to affect the specific conductivity of the heterogeneous system. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

E.A. Fanina; A.N. Lopanov [Belgorod State Technological University, Belgorod (Russian Federation)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

10

Recovering clean coal from anthracite culm: Coal Quality Development Center Campaign Report No. 8: Interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recovering Clean Coal from Anthracite Culm contains the results of an investigation into the cleanability of coarse anthracite (termed ''culm'') excavated from a refuse bank in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. This characterization consisted of five interrelated efforts: Unprocessed Coarse Culm Characterization, Laboratory Froth Flotation Testing, Impurities Liberation Investigation, Culm-Cleaning Evaluation, and Combustion Characteristics Comparison. Significant cleanability characterization findings were that: although the unprocessed culm is sticky, plastic, and extremely difficult to handle and store, cleaning makes this fuel easy to transport, store, and handle using conventional power plant equipment. In the characterization, cleaning reduced culm dry ash content from 59% to 11% while recovering 50% of the original culm energy content. Part of the cleanability characterizations involved testing of a new pre-cleaning device; a SuperScalper. In these tests it was demonstrated that the SuperScalper can economically increase the capacity of conventional cleaning units in recovering clean coal from anthracite culm. The SuperScalper can save 40% of the capital cost of a new cleaning plant and 30% of its operating cost when used to pre-clean the feed to concentrating tables. The SuperScalper also shows promise as a rough cleaning device to be used in reclaiming bituminous coal refuse for use in fluidized bed combustors, although further studies are needed to evaluate the economics of this application. 8 refs., 20 figs., 31 tabs.

Torak, E.R.; Bhowmick, A.K.; Cavalet, J.R.; Parsons, T.H.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Enhanced Oxidative Reactivity for Anthracite Coal via a Reactive Ball Milling Pretreatment Step  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive ball milling in a cyclohexene solvent significantly increases the oxidative reactivity of an anthracite coal, due to the combined effects of particle size reduction, metal introduction, introduction of volatile matter, and changes in carbon structure. Metals introduced during milling can be easily removed via a subsequent demineralization process, and the increased reactivity is retained. Solvent addition alters the morphological changes that occur during pyrolysis and leads to a char with significantly increased reactivity. When the solvent is omitted, similar effects are seen for the milled product, but a significant fraction of the char is resistant to oxidation. 33 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Angela D. Lueking; Apurba Sakti; Dania Alvarez-Fonseca; Nichole Wonderling [Pennsylvania State University, PA (United States). Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

12

Hg and Se capture and fly ash carbons from combustion of complex pulverized feed blends mainly of anthracitic coal rank in Spanish power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, the petrology and chemistry of fly ashes produced in a Spanish power plant from the combustion of complex pulverized feed blends made up of anthracitic/meta-anthracitic coals, petroleum, and natural coke are investigated. It was found that the behavior of fly ash carbons derived from anthracitic coals follows relatively similar patterns to those established for the carbons from the combustion of bituminous coals. Fly ashes were sampled in eight hoppers from two electrostatic precipitator (ESP) rows. The characterization of the raw ashes and their five sieved fractions (from {gt}150 to {lt}25 {mu}m) showed that glassy material, quartz, oxides, and spinels in different proportions are the main inorganic components. As for the organic fraction, the dominant fly ash carbons are anisotropic carbons, mainly unburned carbons derived from anthracitic vitrinite. The concentration of Se and Hg increased in ashes of the second ESP row, this increase being related to the higher proportion of anisotropic unburned carbons, particularly those largely derived from anthracitic vitrinite in the cooler ashes of the ESP (second row) and also related to the decrease in the flue gas temperature. This suggests that the flue gas temperature plays a major role in the concentration of mercury for similar ratios of unburned carbons. It was also found that Hg is highly concentrated in the medium-coarser fractions of the fly ashes ({gt} 45 {mu}m), there being a positive relationship between the amount of these carbons, which are apparently little modified during the combustion process, in the medium-coarse fractions of the ashes and the Hg retention. According to the results obtained, further research on this type of fly ash could be highly productive. 28 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

I. Surez-Ruiz; J.C. Hower; G.A. Thomas [Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR-CSIC), Oviedo (Spain)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Definition: Anthracite coal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for the majority of global production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons....

14

Anthracite Power & Light | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power & Light Place Pennsylvania Utility Id 56220 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 -...

15

s e c t i o n reinventing energy | white Paper www.generAtinginsights.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steps such as the release of radon gas during uranium ore mining, the decommissioning of nuclear sites-country comparison on the subject of reactor decommissioning, see Wuppertal Institute (2007) #12;20 Belgium. Nuclearby June 2010 Guillaume De Roo Risk and Responsibility Sharing in Nuclear Spent Fuel Management 10

16

THERMINATOR 2: THERMal heavy IoN generATOR 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an extended version of THERMINATOR, a Monte Carlo event generator dedicated to studies of the statistical production of particles in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The increased functionality of the code contains the following features: The input of any shape of the freeze-out hypersurface and the expansion velocity field, including the 3+1 dimensional profiles, in particular those generated externally with various hydrodynamic codes. The hypersufraces may have variable thermal parameters, which allows for studies departing significantly from the mid-rapidity region, where the baryon chemical potential becomes large. We include a library of standard sets of hypersurfaces and velocity profiles describing the RHIC Au+Au data at sqrt(s_(NN)) = 200 GeV for various centralities, as well as those anticipated for the LHC Pb+Pb collisions at sqrt(s_(NN)) = 5.5 TeV. A separate code, FEMTO-THERMINATOR, is provided to carry out the analysis of femtoscopic correlations which are an important source of info...

Chojnacki, Mikolaj; Florkowski, Wojciech; Broniowski, Wojciech

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Effects of Anthracite on Pelletization of Hematite Ore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Enrichment of Precious Metals in Iron Sulfides Using Microwave Energy · Chloridizing ... Co-Gasification Behavior of Metallurgical Coke with High and Low Reactivity .... Thermal Plasma Torches for Metallurgical Applications.

18

Steam Generator Management Program: Dynamic Analysis of a Steam Generator: Part 2 – Stability Analysis of Representative Steam Gener ators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a project that examined the effect of tube support plate blockage in recirculating steam generators on water level stability. This report builds upon Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report 1025134.BackgroundWater level oscillations in recirculating steam generators occur due to hydrodynamic instabilities in the natural circulation system. Utilities have reported water level oscillations in operating steam ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

19

s e c t i o n Building the new grid | white Paper www.generAtinginsights.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CtiVities: Angela Cifor, Sophia Lenz 2. smart grid arChiteCture and an OVerView OF energY stOrage, 33 grid sta and OppOrtunities 1 COnsOlidated reCOmmendatiOns1 Chapter 2. smart grid arChiteCture and an OVer mentioned above, a flexible communication architecture can be used to achieve a decentralized smart grid

20

s e c t i o n Building the new grid | white Paper www.generAtinginsights.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and tactics, and present a three- layer smart grid network architecture. Following a brief discussion about GRID NETWORK ARCHITECTURE Smart grid network is the necessary communica- tion platform for monitoring-level architec- ture design to low-level implementation detail. Figure 2. Smart grid network architecture

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh-mined anthracite gener" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Toronto Telegraph http://www.torontotelegraph.com 10:45 AM Thursday 06 June 2013 Toronto News Breaking Business News Breaking International News Breaking Financial Markets News Gener  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to help fight child porn, catch cyber thieves | Toronto Researchers develop new search tool to help fight child porn, catch cyber... http://www.torontotelegraph.com/index.php/sid/215016007/scat/03cb86... 1 of 6 a comment... Post to Facebook 0 0 New Researchers develop new search tool to help fight child porn, catch

Fung, Benjamin C. M.

22

Incomplete Environmental Regulation, Imperfect Competition, and Emissions Leakage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performance standards for new baseload gener- ation underperformance standard for baseload generation under contract,

Fowlie, Meredith

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Evaluation of co-cokes from bituminous coal with vacuum resid or decant oil, and evaluation of anthracites, as precursors to graphite.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Graphite is utilized as a neutron moderator and structural component in some nuclear reactor designs. During the reactor operaction the structure of graphite is damaged… (more)

Nyathi, Mhlwazi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Table 8.3a Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, waste coal, and coal synfuel. 7 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur ...

25

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, waste coal, and coal synfuel. 7 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur ...

26

Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, waste coal, and coal synfuel. 9 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur ...

27

Table 8.2d Electricity Net Generation: Commercial and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, waste coal, and coal synfuel. 9 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, ...

28

The Effect of Temperature on Dielectric Permitivity and Microwave ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dielectric property and microwave absorption property of anthracite were measured ... Effect of Continuous Cooling Rate on Microstructural Transformation of ...

29

Table 8.2d Electricity Net Generation: Commercial and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, waste coal, and coal synfuel. 9 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, purchased steam, sulfur ...

30

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal includes anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous and lignite coal. ... DOE, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Form OE-781R, ...

31

The Beta Maxwell Distribution.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work we considered a general class of distributions gener- ated from the logit of the beta random variable. We looked at various works… (more)

Amusan, Grace Ebunoluwa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Thermal biology, torpor use and activity patterns of a small diurnal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

all climate zones with varying thermal conditions. Gener- ally, however, the lack of vegetation, moisture and cloud cover in desert regions result in extreme daily ...

33

Solving Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow Problems by a ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The optimal power flow (OPF) problem describes a minimum cost electricity gener- ation model that takes into account ...... Electricity Market, 2008. EEM 2008 .

34

Power Quality Site Surveys: Fact, Fiction, and Fallacies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Because normal use of electricity gener- ates disturbances ... in these surveys led to the generation of some ... development of a solid-state circuit which ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

35

Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions with natural gas power plants, which had meancontested subject, natural gas power plants are less carbon-emissions because natural gas power plants not only gener-

Kaswan, Alice

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Making Direct Reduced Iron from Millscale Containing Coal by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Millscale fines have good microwave heating characteristics, better than anthracite .... Tile Production Using Wastes from Mining Industry of the Mining District ...

37

A B  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oils and diesel) Crude oil and lease condensate Motor gasoline LPG (Ethane, ethylene, propane, propylene, butane, butylene) Natural gas Anthracite Bituminous and subbituminous...

38

Table 8.5b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, waste coal, and coal synfuel. 9 Municipal solid waste from biogenic sources, landfill gas, ...

39

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rank By Mining Method By Location 200 U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Review 2011 Anthracite Lignite Subbituminous Coal Subbituminous coal and...

40

Poster Session  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... The presentation will report the synthesis of alternative porous materials, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh-mined anthracite gener" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Evolution of the Thermo-Mechanical Properties of Ramming Paste ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This anthracite and coal tar pitch mixture bakes during the cell start-up and chemical ... and Air Permeability Through Process Optimization and Coke Blending.

42

Glossary | U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Account of others (natural gas): ... Note: Since the 1980's, anthracite refuse or mine waste has been used for steam electric power generation.

43

Table A5. Approximate Heat Content of Coal and Coal Coke, 1949 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum › Weekly Petroleum Status Report › Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report ... coal obtained from a refuse bank or slurry dam, anthracite culm,

44

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas utility demand-side management (DSM) program sponsor: A DSM ... refuse bank, slurry dam, and dredge operations except for Pennsylvania anthracite.

45

Materials and Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A14: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by Thermogravimetric Analysis · A15: Purification of Metallurgical Grade ...

46

Table 6. Coal production and number of mines by State and coal...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal production and number of mines by State and coal rank, 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Bituminous",,"Subbituminous",,"Lignite",,"Anthracite",,"Total" "Coal-Producing State and...

47

Glossary - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 167 Glossary Anthracite: ... the electric department at tariff or other specified rates

48

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol ... The heat content of anthracite coal consumed in the United States averages 25 million ...

49

CARBON TECHNOLOGY: Session V: Cathode - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ECA (Electrically Calcined Anthracite) is the main raw material for the carbon part of the electrolysis cells. Demand for increased potlife and more efficient ...

50

Pennsylvania Profile - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Quick Facts. Pennsylvania was the fourth largest coal-producing State in the Nation in 2011, and the only State producing anthracite coal, which has a ...

51

Designing Advanced Hydrogen Storage Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by Thermogravimetric Analysis · A4: Analysis of Micro-compositional and ...

52

Recent Progress on the Development of High Performance ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by Thermogravimetric Analysis · A4: Analysis of Micro-compositional and ...

53

Materials for Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by Thermogravimetric Analysis · A4: Analysis of Micro-compositional and ...

54

Multifunctional Molybdenum Back Contacts for CIGS Solar Cells on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and optimized surface morphology while acting as a sodium supply. ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by  ...

55

A15: Purification of Metallurgical Grade Silicon by Electron-Beam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by Thermogravimetric Analysis ... A18: Study on Super Stable All-solid-state Battery at High Temperature.

56

Engineering Point Defects for Charge and Energy Transport in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by Thermogravimetric Analysis ... A2: Anode Properties of MgH2 for All Solid State Lithium Ion Battery.

57

Effect of Pore Structure on the Mechanical, Electrical and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anode Properties of MgH2 for All Solid State Lithium Ion Battery ... Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ...

58

Design Guide for Dye-sensitized Solar Cells using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by Thermogravimetric Analysis ... A2: Anode Properties of MgH2 for All Solid State Lithium Ion Battery.

59

Thermoelectric Material Design of Half-Heusler (Zr,Ti)NiSn-based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by Thermogravimetric Analysis ... A2: Anode Properties of MgH2 for All Solid State Lithium Ion Battery.

60

Nanoscale Thermoelectric Materials and Devices for Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by Thermogravimetric Analysis ... A2: Anode Properties of MgH2 for All Solid State Lithium Ion Battery.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh-mined anthracite gener" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Hierarchical ZnO Nano-tree Growth for High Efficiency Solar Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char ... Three-Dimensional Nickel Nanoparticle/Graphene Aerogel for Direct Ethanol ...

62

Table 8.2c Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, lignite, waste coal, and coal synfuel. 9 Solar thermal and photovoltaic (PV) energy. 2 Distillate fuel oil ...

63

Idaho - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum › Weekly Petroleum Status Report ... Power System Outage Task Force, ... com, Stories from PA History, Overview: Mining Anthracite: Nuclear:

64

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Anthracite kg CO2 / MMBtu Bituminous Sub-bituminous Lignite Electric Power Sector Industrial Coking ... Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, ...

65

"Table A42. Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources by...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nonutility(c)","Total","from Utility(b)","from Nonutility(c)","Total","Total","Anthracite","Coal","Lignite","Coal Coke","Breeze","Petroleum Coke","Waste","from...

66

PURPOSE - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Waste/Other Coal (including anthracite culm, bituminous gob, fine coal, lignite waste, waste coal) RC. tons. 20. 29. ... the Government Accountability Office, ...

67

International Energy Annual 2001 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy ... Coal includes anthracite, subanthracite, bituminous, subbituminous, lignite, and brown coal.

68

Table 7.7 Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

dividing total production by total labor hours worked by all mine employees except office workers; beginning in ... 1978 and Coal—Pennsylvania Anthracite 1977; ...

69

Table 7.7 Coal Mining Productivity, 1949-2011 (Short Tons per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

anthracite, were originally ... in 1998, the calculation also includes office workers. R=Revised. P=Preliminary. NA=Not available. 2 Beginning in 2001, ...

70

Exhibitor: SKAMOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Carbon Skamol markets two types of ramming pastes based on Electrically Calcined Anthracite (ECA). ... For further information contact one of our offices:.

71

Application of Advanced Microscopy to Elucidate Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and ORNL's ShaRE User ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass ...

72

ITP Mining: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Mining Industry: Chapter 2: Coal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Coal Coal is a mixture of organic mineral material produced by a natural process of growth and decay, or an accumulation of debris both vegetal and mineral with some sorting and stratification. The process is accomplished by chemical, biological, bacteriological and metamorphic action. 1 Forms of Coal Coal is a hydrocarbon that is classified according to the amount of heat it produces. Heat content depends upon the amount of fixed carbon it contains. Rank is the degree of progressive alteration in the transformation from lignite to anthracite. There are four primary ranks of coal: * Anthracite (semi-anthracite, anthracite, and meta-anthracite) * Bituminous (high-volatile, medium-volatile, and low-volatile) * Subbituminous * Lignite (brown coal and lignite)

73

Effects of self, induced and cross phase modulations on the generation of picosecond and femtosecond white light supercontinua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectroscopy and Lasers, and Photonics Application Laboratory, Departments of Electrical Engineering rates, gigawatt output peak powers, and femtosecond pulse durations. Ultrafast supercontinuum pulses materials [17-32]. A brief historical background of continuum gener- ation is displayed in figure 1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

74

Highlights - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ucts in major world markets, which were also expe- ... gions that exceeded the ac-ceptable levels of ozone pollution. Fears of exces-sively high prices and gener-

75

Inhibition of Premixed Carbon Monoxide-Hydrogen-Oxygen ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The fuel gas is carbon monoxide (Mathe- son UHP, 99.9% CO, with the sum of ... filters) gener- ates the schlieren image of the flame for capture by a ...

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

Climate Change, the Clean Air Act, and Industrial Pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contested subject, natural gas power plants are less carbon-emissions because natural gas power plants not only gener-mean damages from natural-gas power plants are 0.16 cents

Kaswan, Alice

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Electrochemical Performance of LiMn0.5-xNi0.5-xAl2xO2 by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

78

Materials for Organic Photovoltaic Solar Cells PBTTT and PTB7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

79

Porous Graphene Nanosheets for Li-ion Battery Anodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

80

Molten Salt Electrorefining of Zr-Hf Impure Metal for Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh-mined anthracite gener" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A11: Renewable Thermoenergetic Resources in the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

82

Synthesis, Characterization and Pseudo-Capacitive Performance of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

83

Study of Electronic Conductivity of LiNi 0.5 Mn 1.5 O 4 Cathode ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

84

Porous Silicon/Carbon Nanocomposite as Anode Materials for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

85

A1: 3D TiO2 Long Nanotube Arrays Manufactured by Anodization of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

86

Effects of Alloy Microstructure and Manganese Cobaltite Coatings ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

87

Novel LSM/GDC Composite Materials Used as Cathode Supports ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

88

Reaction Mechanism of Hydrogen Storage Materials with High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

89

HIgh Yield Fabrication of Semiconductor Nanoparticles for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

90

Study on Preventing Volume Expansion of Amorphous Si/Sn ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

91

Co3O4/reduced Graphene Oxide Nanocomposites for High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

92

Porous Materials for Fuel Gas Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

93

First-principles Study Using Hybrid-density Functional Theory for the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

94

Europe and Middle-East International Oil Business: How to Reach ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

95

Activation of TiFe Intermetallics for Hydrogen Storage Using High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

96

Carbon-coated LiFePO4/porous Carbon Composites as Cathode ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A21: First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Chemical ... A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by ... Lithium Redox Process for Thermochemical Water-Splitting as Energy Conversion.

97

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Table 7.2 Coal Production, Selected Years, 1949-2011 (Million Short Tons) Year Rank Mining Method Location Total 1 Bituminous Coal 1 Subbituminous Coal Lignite Anthracite 1...

98

Heterojunction Organic Photovoltaics– Nano Morphology Control ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A30: Study on Super Stable All-solid-state Battery at High Temperature · A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by  ...

99

Thermoelectric Properties of Iron Aluminum Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A30: Study on Super Stable All-solid-state Battery at High Temperature · A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by  ...

100

A2: Corrosion Problems in Heat Recovery for Water Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A30: Study on Super Stable All-solid-state Battery at High Temperature · A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by  ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh-mined anthracite gener" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Highly Efficient Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes Using Graphene ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A30: Study on Super Stable All-solid-state Battery at High Temperature · A3: Investigation on Co-combustion Kinetics of Anthracite Coal and Biomass Char by  ...

102

Guidelines for Manuscript Preparation for Publication in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cement pyroprocess. The European Cement Research Academy (ECRA) has estimated that modern anthracite- and lignite-fired power plants emit 750 or 950 grams(g) CO 2 kWh,...

103

Winter'04Ash4-5  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PA In eastern Pennsylvania, there are several pre-act stripping pits in the middle of an anthracite coal basin where active strip and deep mining for coal was practiced since the...

104

Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several issues that could have an impact on the capability to burn anthracite culm in a rotary bed boiler were identified; specifically, questions were raised concerning the specifications of the anthracite culm itself and some relating to the equipment. The anthracite culm delivered was wet, (with more than 10 percent moisture), and coarser than feed material for fluidized boilers. It was felt that using finer fuel, ensuring that it is largely dry, would aid the combustion of anthracite culm. It also appeared that if provisions were made for more efficient internal and external recycle of ash, this would also enhance the combustion of this fuel. Accordingly, the decision was made to conduct an additional campaign of tests that would incorporate these changes. The tests, conducted on July 15 and 16, 1991, involved an anthracite culm that was, in fact, obtained from a fluidized bed a heating value of 3,000 Btu/lb and came with a top size of 1/4-inch. Despite these changes, sustained combustion could not be achieved without the use of large quantities of supplemental fuel. Based on these tests, we tend to conclude that the rotary kiln is ill suited for the combustion of hard-to-burn, low-grade solid fuels like anthracite culm.

Cobb, J.T. Jr.

1991-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

Residential coal use: 1982 international solid fuel trade show and conference Atlantic City, New Jersey. [USA; 1974; By state  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy's anthracite and residential coal programs are described. The residential coal effort is an outgrowth and extension of the anthracite program, which has been, and continues to be, involved in promoting increased production and use of anthracite and the restoration of anthracite as a viable economic alternative to soft coals and to imported oil and gas now supplying the Northeast. Since anthracite is a preferred fuel for residential heating, residential coal issues comprise an important part of our anthracite activities. We have commenced a study of residential coal utilization including: overview of the residential coal market; market potential for residential coal use; analysis of the state of technology, economics, constraints to increased use of coal and coal-based fuels in residential markets, and identification of research and development activities which would serve to increase the market potential for coal-fired residential systems. A considerable amount of information is given in this report on residential coal furnaces and coal usage in 1974, prices of heating oils and coal, methods of comparing these fuels (economics), air pollution, safety, wood and wood furnaces, regulations, etc.

Pell, J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

3RLQWVRI&RQWDFW NASA Office of Inspector General  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;OFFICe OF InSpeCtOr GenerAl I SemIAnnuAl repOrt #12; I AprIl 1­September 30, 2007 Robert W. Cobb Inspector General from The InspeCTor General #12;OFFICe OF InSpeCtOr GenerAl I SemIAnnuAl repOrt #12; I Apr executIve offIcer Renee N. Juhans counsel to the Inspector General Francis P. LaRocca offIce of au

Christian, Eric

107

Site Visits by US Dept of Homeland Security regarding H-1B employees at Stanford University If your Department has sponsored H-1B employees, it is possible that the U.S. Department of Homeland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;OFFICe OF InSpeCtOr GenerAl I SemIAnnuAl repOrt #12; I AprIl 1­September 30, 2007 Robert W. Cobb Inspector General from The InspeCTor General #12;OFFICe OF InSpeCtOr GenerAl I SemIAnnuAl repOrt #12; I Apr executIve offIcer Renee N. Juhans counsel to the Inspector General Francis P. LaRocca offIce of au

Ford, James

108

MODELLING OF A NONLINEAR MULTIVARIABLE BOILER PLANT USING HAMMERSTEIN MODEL, A NONPARAMETRIC APPROACH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELLING OF A NONLINEAR MULTIVARIABLE BOILER PLANT USING HAMMERSTEIN MODEL, A NONPARAMETRIC mathematically and prac- tically tractable. Boilers are industrial units, which are used for gener- ating steam of fuel. Boiler operation is a complex operation in which hot water must be delivered to a turbine

Rizvi, Syed Z.

109

Int J Multimed Info Retr DOI 10.1007/s13735-012-0024-2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for video semantic analysis. Among others, STIP feature is mostly used [10]. A popular way to gener- ate the STIP feature is by using the Harris3D detector [10] followed by the processing of HOG/HOF [11] descriptor. Besides the STIP feature, another recent feature type, i.e., MoSIFT shows promising performance

Chang, Shih-Fu

110

Journal of Colloid and Interface Science 314 (2007) 523530 www.elsevier.com/locate/jcis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

100871, China b College of Life Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China Received 6 April 2007, drug delivery systems and microreactors [1­3]. Gener- ally, different function relies on different drugs [5]. However, the properties of vesicles in aqueous solution were often affected by the variation

Huang, Jianbin

111

Directed Evolution of Soluble Single-chain Human Class II MHC Molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Directed Evolution of Soluble Single-chain Human Class II MHC Molecules Olga Esteban1 and Huimin directed evolu- tion and yeast surface display to engineer soluble single-chain human lymphocyte antigen variants and a few site-directed mutants gener- ated de novo indicated three amino acid residues in the b1

Zhao, Huimin

112

R E S E A R C H L E T T E R Mannitol biosynthesis is required for plant pathogenicity by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photo-oxidative damage by scavenging singlet oxygen species and by transforming excess absorbed light oxygen species, plastid-gener- ated hydrogen peroxide, the redox state of the photosyn- thetic electron6f complex (PETO), PS I (PSAE, PSAG, PSAH, PSAL and PSAO), PS II (PSBR, PSBS and PSBW), oxygen

Daub, Margaret

113

doi:10.1128/mBio.00159-11. mBio.Methanogenic Wastewater Digester Aggregates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

portion of the TVS readily decomposes and forms biogas under anaerobic conditions. The remainder is gener solids content of the feedstock. Cow manure slurry at 5% solids content released up to 30% more biogas in a mesophilic anaerobic digester with an HRT of 28 d. Biogas yields ranged between 0.65 and 0.86 m3 kg-1 VS

Lovley, Derek

114

Biochemical Systematics and Ecology 32 (2004) 11371144 www.elsevier.com/locate/biochemsyseco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The steam distilled (24 h) oil of the roots from tissue cultured (cleansed) vetiver yielded 0.02% clear oil) appears to enhance the oil production in normal vetiver by both increasing yield and by the gener- ation with the `Sunshine' group, indicating that the vetiver cultivars used for commercial essential oil production

Adams, Robert P.

115

A Green Technology for the Production of Biofuels . The past several decades have been demarcated by growing concerns about  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- propagating photolysis and probe laser beams, each gener- ated by separate excimer pumped tunable dye laser the excimer pumped dye laser system (i.e., -2 vs -0.5 cm-I ). Probe radiation in the range ..1.=220-230 nm of the jet and of the laser beams. The photomultiplier tube (PMT) signal is digitized by a digital storage

Appanna, Vasu

116

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Moreover, this numerical model could be used to design and operate the next gener- ation of pyroelectric in power, refrigeration, and heat pump devices. In 2009, energy losses corresponded to more than 50, Stirling engines have been used in heat pump, cryogenic refrigeration, and air liquefaction applications [3

Pilon, Laurent

117

A first approach to the closed-form specification and analysis of an autonomic control system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

explain our ideas with reference to a hybrid hardware/software system, and argue that it gener- alises have long been used to abstract away some of the complexity of managing a set of interconnected software components. However, the complexity of the control systems themselves has recently been

Dobson, Simon

118

QUANTUM FILTERING OF MARKOV SIGNALS WITH WHITE QUANTUM NOISE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTUM FILTERING OF MARKOV SIGNALS WITH WHITE QUANTUM NOISE V. P. BELAVKIN Abstract. Time-continuous non-anticipating quantum processes of nonde- molition measurements are introduced as the dynamical-valued probability measures on the trajectory spaces of the gener- alized temporal observations in quantum open

Belavkin, Viacheslav P.

119

Accumulation of particles in propagating fronts Karl R. Helfrich  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-surface velocities u that exceed the propagation speed c of the gravity current nose. It is shown by simple dam from the gravity current head by the circulation in this region. A dam break into an ambient fluid- oratory experiments using buoyant gravity currents gener- ated by a dam release. Measurements of the two

Helfrich, Karl R.

120

A Model for Patchy Reconnection in Three Dimensions M.G. Linton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the cross sections of these reconnected flux tubes appear as teardrop shaped bundles of flux propagating therefore hypothesize that these descending voids are flux tubes which were gener- ated by a short duration.g., the simulation area or a significant fraction of the corona. When the reconnected tube retracts, the external

Longcope, Dana

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh-mined anthracite gener" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Improving Automatic Interface Generation with Smart Templates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving Automatic Interface Generation with Smart Templates Jeffrey Nichols, Brad A. Myers 1. Arrangements of media playback controls gener- ated automatically from the media-control Smart differently. Smart Templates is a technique that uses parameterized templates in the appliance model

Myers, Brad A.

122

Special precautions for multiple short-delay blasting in coal mines  

SciTech Connect

Special precautions for multiple short-delay blasting of coal in underground mines are presented in this circular to guide safety engineers, shot firers, and coal-mine inspectors. These new safety recommendations are suggested in addition to those normally followed in blasting, as outlined in the Federal Mine Safety Codes for bituminous-coal, lignite, and anthracite mines.

Nagy, J.; Hartmann, I.; Van Dolah, R.W.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

THE BEST MEASURE OF A UNIVERSITY IS THECOLLECTIVE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Russian government conceived a program for doubling the output of Russian coal #12;v v v n v COAL mines in ocoupy high positions are the Hudson Coal Company, Weston Dodson Company, East Alden Mining Company to the anthracite field. In the mining of bituminous coal, the techniml and exmu- tive skill of its graduates

Napier, Terrence

124

Undergraduate Research Day April 23, 2008, McKeldin Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Culture on the Media's Portrayal of the 1902 Anthracite Coal Strike Elizabeth Ahn, Christopher De, Jessica Lieberman, and Mary Tellers Controversy over Surface Mine Legislation in the Appalachian Region Karen Jo, Hailey Lin, and Louis Wu The Sociology of Coal Extraction: Tragedy to Change Katherine Mann

Johnson, Raymond L.

125

Catalytic coal liquefaction process  

SciTech Connect

An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Sunder, Swaminathan (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Catalysts for coal liquefaction processes  

SciTech Connect

Improved catalysts for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprise a combination of zinc or copper, or a compound thereof, and a Group VI or non-ferrous Group VIII metal, or a compound thereof.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the U.S.-Resource Base  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the U.S.-Resource Base Gregory D. Croft1 and Tad W the multi-Hubbert curve analysis to coal production in the United States, we demonstrate that anthracite production of this highest-rank coal. The pro- duction of bituminous coal from existing mines is about 80

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

128

Filtering coal-derived oil through a filter media precoated with particles partially solubilized by said oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solids such as char, ash, and refractory organic compounds are removed from coal-derived liquids from coal liquefaction processes by the pressure precoat filtration method using particles of 85-350 mesh material selected from the group of bituminous coal, anthracite coal, lignite, and devolatilized coals as precoat materials and as body feed to the unfiltered coal-derived liquid.

Rodgers, Billy R. (Concord, TN); Edwards, Michael S. (Knoxville, TN)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Coal liquefaction process using pretreatment with a binary solvent mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for thermal solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprises pretreating the coal with a binary mixture of an aromatic hydrocarbon and an aliphatic alcohol at a temperature below 300.degree. C. before the hydroliquefaction step. This treatment generally increases both conversion of coal and yields of oil.

Miller, Robert N. (Allentown, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluation of fluorescent lighting systems in various underground coal mines. Final report, May 1975-June 1978  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a variety of coal mining lighting projects that were funded by the Bureau of Mines to obtain underground lighting experience in support of new lighting requirements for underground coal mines. Some of the variables covered were low and high coal, narrow and wide entries, conventional and continuous mining, ac and dc power, bituminous and anthracite coal, machine mounting, and area lighting.

Ketler, A.E.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Catalysts for coal liquefaction processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved catalysts for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprise a combination of zinc or copper, or a compound thereof, and a Group VI or non-ferrous Group VIII metal, or a compound thereof.

Garg, D.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

132

Catalytic coal liquefaction process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for catalytic solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a solvent comprises using as catalyst a mixture of a 1,2- or 1,4-quinone and an alkaline compound, selected from ammonium, alkali metal, and alkaline earth metal oxides, hydroxides or salts of weak acids. 1 fig.

Garg, D.; Sunder, S.

1986-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

Zevenhoven & Kilpinen SULPHUR 6.1.2004 3-1 Chapter 3 Sulphur  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to anthracite, peat, oil shales etc., sulphur is present in two inorganic forms, being pyritic sulphur (FeS2) ~ 0.2 Auto shredder residue (ASR) ~ 0.3 Petroleum coke, "petcoke" ~ 5 Leather waste 1 - 2 Estonian oil shale ~ 2 OrimulsionTM ~ 4 Black liquor solids ~ 5 #12;Zevenhoven & Kilpinen SULPHUR 6.1.2004 3-5 3

Zevenhoven, Ron

134

Combustion Characteristics and Kinetic Analysis of Biomass Coal Oil Water Slurry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combustion characteristics of biomass coal oil water slurry (biomass-COWS), containing Fujian anthracite, water hyacinth, heavy oil and dispersant were studied by thermal analysis with TG-DTG method. The results showed that the ignition temperature ... Keywords: biomass coal oil water slurry, coal oil water slurry, water hyacinth, thermal analysis, combustion kinetics

Luo Zuyun; Lin Rongying

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Criminology Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Office Of inspectOr General I Semiannual RepoRt I;OFFICe OF InSpeCtOr GenerAl I SemIAnnuAl repOrt #12; I AprIl 1--September 30, 2006 From the Inspector General a key strategic goal of the office of Inspector General (oIG) is to maximize value to the national

Ronquist, Fredrik

136

Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Capture Retrofit Options: Duke Edwardsport Integrated-Gasification Combined-Cycle Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a project supported by Duke Energy using tailored collaboration funds to study the potential impact to plant performance of retrofitted carbon dioxide (CO2) capture on the Duke Edwardsport integrated-gasificationcombined-cycle (IGCC) plant. The Duke Edwardsport IGCC plant is under construction and scheduled to begin operation in September 2012. Details on the project have been published in a 2010 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report, Duke Edwardsport Gener...

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

Allocating Transmission to Mitigate Market Power in Electricity Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Europe and the United States. In many cases the interconnection capacity between regions or countries was developed to provide security rather than to facilitate energy trade. In liberalised markets where consumers are free to buy from out... sale volume, consisting of contract sales, and contracts plus energy volume in the spot 12 market, is increased and outweighs the effect of lower prices. Prices are reduced because gener- ators have less incentive to withhold output and therefore total...

Neuhoff, Karsten; Newbery, David; Gilbert, Richard

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

138

Gas Turbine Condition Monitoring and Predictive Maintenance Capability Analysis Between Aviation and Power Generation Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares and contrasts aviation and power generation condition monitoring and fault diagnosis. The report provides an overview of the technology, process, sensor suite and decision-making processes for both industries. The study highlights the level of decision automation and the structure to automatically initiate a maintenance process in aviation as one of the key differences between the two industries. This automation has important potential cost and operational benefits for the power gener...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

139

Reducing 68Ge Background in Dark Matter Experiments  

SciTech Connect

Experimental searches for dark matter include experiments with sub-0.5 keV-energy threshold high purity germanium detectors. Experimental efforts, in partnership with the CoGeNT Collaboration operating at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, are focusing on energy threshold reduction via noise abatement, reduction of backgrounds from cosmic ray generated isotopes, and ubiquitous environmental radioactive sources. The most significant cosmic ray produced radionuclide is 68Ge. This paper evaluates reducing this background by freshly mining and processing germanium ore. The most probable outcome is a reduction of the background by a factor of two, and at most a factor of four. A very cost effective alternative is to obtain processed Ge as soon as possible and store it underground for 18 months.

Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Combustion characterization of coals for industrial applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The five parent coals ear-marked for this study have been characterized. These coals include (1) a Texas (Wilcox) lignite; (2) a Montana (Rosebud) subbituminous; (4) an Alabama (Black Creek) high volatile bituminous; and (5) a Pennsylvania (Buck Mountain) anthracite. Samples for analyses were prepared in accordance with the ASTM standard (ASTM D 2013-72). The following ASTM analyses were performed on each coal: proximate, ultimate, higher heating value, Hardgrove grindability index, ash fusibility, and ash composition. Additionally, the flammability index (FI) of each coal was determined in an in-house apparatus. The FI is indicative of the ignition temperature of a given fuel on a relative basis. The combustion kinetic parameters (apparent activation energies and frequency factors) of Montana subbituminous and Pennsylvania anthracite chars have also been derived from data obtained in the Drop Tube Furnace System (DTFS). This information depicts the combustion characteristics of these two coal chars. 1 ref., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Nsakala, N.; Patel, R.L.; Lao, T.C.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh-mined anthracite gener" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Environmental renaissance in Pennsylvania  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During centuries of rapid growth of the coal mining industry and expanded development in Pennsylvania, trees were felled, streams were diverted and strip mining caused much environmental damage. All that has now changed. The article gives examples of land and water restoration carried out by organizations such as the Susquehanna River Basin Commission, the West Branch Susquehanna Restoration Coalition and the Anthracite Region Independent Power Producers Association. The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection directs and coordinates environmental projects. 5 photos.

Stevens, J.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

A study of mining-induced seismicity in Czech mines with longwall coal exploitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review is performed for the data of local and regional seismographical networks installed in mines of the Ostrava-Karvina Coal Basin (Czech Republic), where underground anthracite mining is carried out and dynamic events occur in the form of rockbursts. The seismological and seismoacoustic observations data obtained in panels that are in limiting state are analyzed. This aggregate information is a basic for determining hazardous zones and assigning rockburst prevention measures.

Holub, K. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Adsorption of anionic and cationic surface-active agents by natural coals  

SciTech Connect

Adsorption isotherms were measured in terms of isopropyl-, butyl- and pentyl-amine and isopropyl alcohol for gas coals and anthracite. It was shown that the amount of adsorption depends on the type of coal and the structure of the adsorbate molecules. Cationic surfactants tend to be adsorbed better than anionic. The paper calculates the standard reduction in free energy during adsorption of amines by coal. It was found that the amine adsorption process leads to an increase in pH.

Butuzova, L.F.; Isaeva, L.N.; Saranchuk, V.I.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Coal liquefaction process using pretreatment with a binary solvent mixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for thermal solvent refining or hydroliquefaction of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures under hydrogen pressure in a hydrogen donor solvent comprises pretreating the coal with a binary mixture of an aromatic hydrocarbon and an aliphatic alcohol at a temperature below 300 C before the hydroliquefaction step. This treatment generally increases both conversion of coal and yields of oil. 1 fig.

Miller, R.N.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

145

Model documentation of the Short-Term Coal Analysis System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The short-term coal analysis system (SCOAL) is used by the Data Analysis and Forecasting Branch (DAFB) as an analytic aid to support preparation of short-term projections of bituminous coal and lignite production at the state level, and anthracite production, domestic imports of coal, and domestic and export demand for US coal at the national level. A description of SCOAL is presented which includes a general overview of the model and its analytical capabilities. (DMC)

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor. Final report, March 15, 1990--July 31, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the combustion of coal and coal wastes in a rotary kiln reactor with limestone addition for sulfur control. The rationale for the project was the perception that rotary systems could bring several advantages to combustion of these fuels, and may thus offer an alternative to fluid-bed boilers. Towards this end, an existing wood pyrolysis kiln (the Humphrey Charcoal kiln) was to be suitably refurbished and retrofitted with a specially designed version of a patented air distributor provided by Universal Energy, Inc. (UEI). As the project progressed beyond the initial stages, a number of issues were raised regarding the feasibility and the possible advantages of burning coals in a rotary kiln combustor and, in particular, the suitability of the Humphrey Charcoal kiln as a combustor. Instead, an opportunity arose to conduct combustion tests in the PEDCO Rotary Cascading-Bed Boiler (RCBB) commercial demonstration unit at the North American Rayon CO. (NARCO) in Elizabethton, TN. The tests focused on anthracite culm and had two objectives: (a) determine the feasibility of burning anthracite culms in a rotary kiln boiler and (b) obtain input for any further work involving the Humphrey Charcoal kiln combustor. A number of tests were conducted at the PEDCO unit. The last one was conducted on anthracite culm procured directly from the feed bin of a commercial circulating fluid-bed boiler. The results were disappointing; it was difficult to maintain sustained combustion even when large quantities of supplemental fuel were used. Combustion efficiency was poor, around 60 percent. The results suggest that the rotary kiln boiler, as designed, is ill-suited with respect to low-grade, hard to burn solid fuels, such as anthracite culm. Indeed, data from combustion of bituminous coal in the PEDCO unit suggest that with respect to coal in general, the rotary kiln boiler appears inferior to the circulating fluid bed boiler.

Cobb, J.T. Jr.

1992-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

147

Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the combustion of coal and coal wastes in a rotary kiln reactor with limestone addition for sulfur control. The rationale for the project was the perception that rotary systems could bring several advantages to combustion of these fuels, and may thus offer an alternative to fluid-bed boilers. Towards this end, an existing wood pyrolysis kiln (the Humphrey Charcoal kiln) was to be suitably refurbished and retrofitted with a specially designed version of a patented air distributor provided by Universal Energy, Inc. (UEI). As the project progressed beyond the initial stages, a number of issues were raised regarding the feasibility and the possible advantages of burning coals in a rotary kiln combustor and, in particular, the suitability of the Humphrey Charcoal kiln as a combustor. Instead, an opportunity arose to conduct combustion tests in the PEDCO Rotary Cascading-Bed Boiler (RCBB) commercial demonstration unit at the North American Rayon CO. (NARCO) in Elizabethton, TN. The tests focused on anthracite culm and had two objectives: (a) determine the feasibility of burning anthracite culms in a rotary kiln boiler and (b) obtain input for any further work involving the Humphrey Charcoal kiln combustor. A number of tests were conducted at the PEDCO unit. The last one was conducted on anthracite culm procured directly from the feed bin of a commercial circulating fluid-bed boiler. The results were disappointing; it was difficult to maintain sustained combustion even when large quantities of supplemental fuel were used. Combustion efficiency was poor, around 60 percent. The results suggest that the rotary kiln boiler, as designed, is ill-suited with respect to low-grade, hard to burn solid fuels, such as anthracite culm. Indeed, data from combustion of bituminous coal in the PEDCO unit suggest that with respect to coal in general, the rotary kiln boiler appears inferior to the circulating fluid bed boiler.

Cobb, J.T. Jr.

1992-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

148

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012" 1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Bituminous","Subbituminous","Lignite","Anthracite","Total" "Alabama",106.57,"-","-","-",106.57 "Alaska","-","w","-","-","w" "Arizona","w","-","-","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","-","-","w" "Colorado","w","w","-","-",37.54 "Illinois",53.08,"-","-","-",53.08 "Indiana",52.01,"-","-","-",52.01

149

Military installations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has reviewed the use of U.S. coal at DOD installations in West Germany. DOD reported that between April 1, 1988, and December 31, 1988, it had between 306,000 and 419,000 tons of U.S. coal stored in Germany. About two-thirds of that was anthracite coal. GAO visited six coal-handling locations that accounted for 72 to 79 percent of the total U.S. coal between April and December 1988. This report could not verify the official inventory records at five locations - two Air Force and three Army - for several reasons, including a lack of required physical inventories of coal for recent years. DOD's coal consumption data for fiscal year 1988 appeared to be accurate since it matched the data reported on source documents maintained at the installations and their commands. According to reported DOD coal inventory and consumption data, as of September 30, 1988, DOD had enough anthracite coal on hand to satisfy projected demands through at least fiscal year 1993, given that no additional heating plant conversions other than those already approved occur and no additional shipments of coal occur. DOD said that as of September 30, 1988, it facilities in Germany had enough anthracite coal on hand to last a minimum of five years.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Antibodies against insulin measured by electrochemiluminescence predicts insulitis severity and disease onset in non-obese diabetic mice and can distinguish human type 1 diabetes status  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tripropylamine (TPA) that occurs near the electrode is a regenerative process that allows for an ECL signal that amplifies over time (Figure 2A). Background signal is very low as photons can be gener- ated only in the electric field near the electrode surface... of tripropylamine (TPA) to produce a photon. Superscripted asterisk indicates the higher energy state of the chemical and superscripted dot indicates a radical species. Bipyridine = bpy. B) The murine IAA ECL was tested using an anti-insulin mouse (Ms) monoclonal...

Lo, Bernice; Swafford, Austin D-E; Shafer-Weaver, Kimberly A; Jerome, Lawrence F; Rakhlin, Luba; Mathern, Douglas R; Callahan, Conor A; Jiang, Ping; Davison, Lucy J; Stevens, Helen E; Lucas, Carrie L; White, Jill; von Borstel, Reid; Todd, John A; Lenardo, Michael J

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

Information Effects in Valuation of Electricity and Water Service Attributes Using Contingent Valuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on costs and bene?ts of fuel options for electricity gener- 1CCS is a process through which emitted CO2 can be captured and stored in under- ground sites including depleted oil and gas ?elds. 3 ation and investments to improve energy security has an impact... of lakes or endangered species, while exploration of information for other types of non-market goods such as utility attributes has been neglected. Understanding how information can a¤ect consumers is particularly per- tinent to the electricity sector...

Akcura, Elcin

152

Influence of process changes on PCDD/Fs produced in an iron ore sintering plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the influence of different charge typologies and additives on the PCDD/Fs amount produced and on the congener profiles in an iron ore sintering plant. Many tests were carried out combining different typologies of charge (iron materials) and solid fuel ('coke breeze' or 'anthracite') with or without the use of urea. The PCDD/Fs produced ranged from 1.2 to 22.7 {mu} g I-TEQ/ton of agglomerate, whereas the PCDD/Fs released to the ambient air ranged from 0.10 to 1.92 ng I-TEQ/Nm{sup 3} because of cleaning in an electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and a Wetfine scrubber (WS). A more homogeneous charge with a higher amount of fine particles charge appeared to produce a lower PCDD/Fs concentration due to a better combustion but this hypothesis needs further investigations on charges having different dimension particles. Only a synergitic action of urea and anthracite was able to reduce the high PCDD/Fs content due to the bad combustion of the more inhomogeneous charge with a lower amount of fine particles. The congener profile was a typical combustion process fingerprint because the PCDFs predominated, the highly chlorinated congeners (HeptaCDD and OctaCDD) prevailed in PCDDs, whereas in PCDFs the profile was more varied; 1,2,3,4,6,7,8-HeptaCDF was the main contributor to the total concentration while 2,3,4,7,8-PentaCDF was the main contributor to the I-TEQ concentration. Whereas all the parameters under scrutiny influenced strongly the amount of PCDD/Fs produced, they affected only slightly the fingerprint of PCDD/Fs. In all cases studied, the reduction obtained using urea, anthracite, or the more homogeneous charge with a higher amount of fine particles was slightly greater on the higher chlorinated congeners in respect to the lower ones.

Guerriero, E.; Bianchini, M.; Gigliucci, P.F.; Guarnieri, A.; Mosca, S.; Rossetti, G.; Varde, M.; Rotatori, M. [CNR, Monterotondo (Italy)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glossary Glossary Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Glossary Add.png Add a Definition 2 2-M Probe Survey A Acoustic Logs Acoustic Televiewer Active Seismic Techniques Active Sensors Adaptive Protection Adequacy Adjacent Balancing Authority Advanced Interrupting Switch Advanced Metering Infrastructure Advanced Metering Infrastructure (Ami) / Smart Meters Advanced Transmission Applications Adverse Reliability Impact Aerial Photography Aeromagnetic Survey Air Cooling Airborne Gravity Survey Airborne Gravity Survey Algae Algae fuel Alternating current Alternative-fuel vehicle Alternator Altitude Correction Factor Ampere Analytical Modeling Ancillary Service Ancillary Services Revenue Angle of incidence Anode Anthracite coal Anti-Aliasing Filter Area Control Error Arranged Interchange Artesian Well

154

"1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Emission Factors" Fuel Emission Factors" "(From Appendix H of the instructions to Form EIA-1605)" "1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion1" "Fuel ",,"Emission Factor ",,"Units" "Coal2" "Anthracite",,103.69,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Bituminous",,93.28,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Sub-bituminous",,97.17,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Lignite",,97.72,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Electric Power Sector",,95.52,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Industrial Coking",,93.71,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Other Industrial",,93.98,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Residential/Commercial",,95.35,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Natural Gas3"

155

Mulled Coal: A beneficiated coal form for use as a fuel or fuel intermediate. Technical progress report No. 6, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect

Under the auspices of the Department of Energy and private industry, considerable progress has been made in: preparation of coal-water fuels; combustion of low-ash coal-based fuel forms; and in processes to provide deeply-cleaned coal. Since the inception of the project, we have: developed formulations for stabilizing wet filter cake into a granular free flowing material (Mulled Coal); applied the formulation to wet cake from a variety of coal sources ranging from anthracite to subbituminous coal; evaluated effects of moisture loss on mull properties; and developed design concepts for equipment for preparing the Mulled Coal and converting it into Coal Water Fuel.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Create a Consortium and Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of these projects was to investigate alternative technologies for non-fuel uses of coal. Special emphasis was placed on developing premium carbon products from coal-derived feedstocks. A total of 14 projects, which are the 2003 Research Projects, are reported herein. These projects were categorized into three overall objectives. They are: (1) To explore new applications for the use of anthracite in order to improve its marketability; (2) To effectively minimize environmental damage caused by mercury emissions, CO{sub 2} emissions, and coal impounds; and (3) To continue to increase our understanding of coal properties and establish coal usage in non-fuel industries. Research was completed in laboratories throughout the United States. Most research was performed on a bench-scale level with the intent of scaling up if preliminary tests proved successful. These projects resulted in many potential applications for coal-derived feedstocks. These include: (1) Use of anthracite as a sorbent to capture CO{sub 2} emissions; (2) Use of anthracite-based carbon as a catalyst; (3) Use of processed anthracite in carbon electrodes and carbon black; (4) Use of raw coal refuse for producing activated carbon; (5) Reusable PACs to recycle captured mercury; (6) Use of combustion and gasification chars to capture mercury from coal-fired power plants; (7) Development of a synthetic coal tar enamel; (8) Use of alternative binder pitches in aluminum anodes; (9) Use of Solvent Extracted Carbon Ore (SECO) to fuel a carbon fuel cell; (10) Production of a low cost coal-derived turbostratic carbon powder for structural applications; (11) Production of high-value carbon fibers and foams via the co-processing of a low-cost coal extract pitch with well-dispersed carbon nanotubes; (12) Use of carbon from fly ash as metallurgical carbon; (13) Production of bulk carbon fiber for concrete reinforcement; and (14) Characterizing coal solvent extraction processes. Although some of the projects funded did not meet their original goals, the overall objectives of the CPCPC were completed as many new applications for coal-derived feedstocks have been researched. Future research in many of these areas is necessary before implementation into industry.

Frank Rusinko; John Andresen; Jennifer E. Hill; Harold H. Schobert; Bruce G. Miller

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Compilation of air-pollutant emission factors. Volume 1. Stationary point and area sources, Fourth Edition. Supplement B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the supplement to the Fourth Edition of AP-42, new or revised emissions data are presented for Bituminous And Subbituminous Coal Combustion; Anthracite Coal Combustion; Residential Wood Stoves; Waste Oil Combustion; Refuse Combustion; Sewage Sludge Incineration; Surface Coating; Polyester Resin Plastics Product Fabrication; Soap and Detergents; Grain Elevators and Processing Plants; Lime Manufacturing; Crushed Stone Processing; Western Surface Coal Mining; Wildfires and Prescribed Burning; Unpaved Roads; Aggregate Handling And Storage Piles; Industrial Paved Roads; Industrial Wind Erosion; and Appendix C.3, Silt Analysis Procedures.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Process for producing electrodes from carbonaceous particles and a boron source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described of making an electric arc furnace graphite electrode comprising: (a) calcining a carbonaceous material selected form the group consisting of anthracite coal, bituminous coal, lignites, and nos. 2 and 3 cokes; (b) mixing the calcined carbonaceous material with pitch, a lubricant, and a boron source selected from the group consisting of elemental boron, boron carbide, silicon tetraboride, and iron boride, in an amount such that the boron content is from about 0.1 to about 5.0 percent by weight of the graphite electrode to form a mixture; (c) extruding the mixture into an electrode form; (d) and graphitizing the electrode form to provide a graphite electrode.

Sara, R.V.

1988-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

159

Demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States on January 1, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second in a series of annual summaries on minable coal in the United States, pursuant to the power plant and industrial fuel use act. The demonstrated reserve base of coal in the United States on January 1, 1980 by area, rank, and potential method of mining is given. Reserve data are given by state and by type of coal (anthracite, bithiminous, subbituminous, and lignite). An introduction, summary, and a glossary of selected coal classification terms is also included. The appendix provides the demonstrated reserve base adjustments and related notions by state. References are also included. Coal reserves for 1979 are given for comparison. 7 figures, 6 tables.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Compilation of air pollutant emission factors. Volume 1. Stationary point and area sources. Supplement E  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Supplement to the Fourth Edition of AP-42 Volume I, new or revised emissions data are presented for Anthracite Coal Combustion; Natural Gas Combustion; Liquified Petroleum Gas Combustion; Wood Waste Combustion In Boilers; Bagasse Combustion In Sugar Mills; Residential Fireplaces; Residential Wood Stoves; Waste Oil Combustion; Automobile Body Incineration; Conical Burners; Open Burning; Stationary Gas Turbines for Electricity Generation; Heavy Duty Natural Gas Fired Pipeline Compressor Engines; Gasoline and Diesel Industrial Engines; Large Stationary Diesel and All Stationary Dual Fuel Engines; Soap and Detergents; and Storage of Organic Liquids.

Not Available

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh-mined anthracite gener" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Organic emissions from coal pyrolysis: mutagenic effects. Environ. Health Perspect. 73  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four different types of coal have been pyrolyzed in a laminar flow, drop tube furnace in order to establish a relationship between polycyclic aromatic compound (PAC) evolution and mutagenicity. Temperatures of 900K to 1700K and particle residence times up to 0.3 sec were chosen to best simulate conditions of rapid rate pyrolysis in pulverized (44-53,um) coal combustion. The specific mutagenic activity (i.e., the activity per unit sample weight) of extracts from particulates and volatiles captured on XAD-2 resin varied with coal type according to the order: subbituminous> high volatile bituminous> lignite> anthracite. Total mutagenic activity (the activity per gram of coal pyrolyzed), however, varied with coal type according to the order: high volatile bituminous>> subbituminous = lignite>> anthracite, due primarily to high organic yield during high volatile bituminous coal pyrolysis. Specific mutagenic activity peaked in a temperature range of 1300K to 1500K and generally appeared at higher temperatures and longer residence times than peak PAC production.

Andrew G. Braun; Mary J. Wornat; T Amitava Mitra; Adel F. Sarofimt

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor. Quarterly report No. 1, April 16, 1990--July 15, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BCR National Laboratory (BCRNL) has initiated a project aimed at evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of using a rotary kiln, suitably modified, to burn Pennsylvania anthracite wastes, co-fired with high-sulfur bituminous coal. Limestone will be injected into the kiln for sulfur control, to determine whether high sulfur capture levels can be achieved with high sorbent utilization. The principal objectives of this work are: (1) to prove the feasibility of burning anthracite refuse, with co-firing of high-sulfur bituminous coal and with limestone injection for sulfur emissions control, in a rotary kiln fitted with a Universal Energy International (UEI) air injector system; (2) to determine the emissions levels of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} and specifically to identify the Ca/S ratios that are required to meet New Source Performance Standards; (3) to evaluate the technical and economic merits of a commercial rotary kiln combustor in comparison to fluidized bed combustors; and, (4) to ascertain the need for further work, including additional combustion tests, prior to commercial application, and to recommend accordingly a detailed program towards this end.

Cobb, J.T. Jr.

1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Coal desulfurization in a rotary kiln combustor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BCR National Laboratory (BCRNL) has initiated a project aimed at evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of using a rotary kiln, suitably modified, to burn Pennsylvania anthracite wastes, co-fired with high-sulfur bituminous coal. Limestone will be injected into the kiln for sulfur control, to determine whether high sulfur capture levels can be achieved with high sorbent utilization. The principal objectives of this work are: (1) to prove the feasibility of burning anthracite refuse, with co-firing of high-sulfur bituminous coal and with limestone injection for sulfur emissions control, in a rotary kiln fitted with a Universal Energy International (UEI) air injector system; (2) to determine the emissions levels of SO{sub x} and NO{sub x} and specifically to identify the Ca/S ratios that are required to meet New Source Performance Standards; (3) to evaluate the technical and economic merits of a commercial rotary kiln combustor in comparison to fluidized bed combustors; and, (4) to ascertain the need for further work, including additional combustion tests, prior to commercial application, and to recommend accordingly a detailed program towards this end.

Cobb, J.T. Jr.

1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Determination of electrical resistivity of dry coke beds  

SciTech Connect

The electrical resistivity of the coke bed is of great importance when producing FeMn, SiMn, and FeCr in a submerged arc furnace. In these processes, a coke bed is situated below and around the electrode tip and consists of metallurgical coke, slag, gas, and metal droplets. Since the basic mechanisms determining the electrical resistivity of a coke bed is not yet fully understood, this investigation is focused on the resistivity of dry coke beds consisting of different carbonaceous materials, i.e., coke beds containing no slag or metal. A method that reliably compares the electrical bulk resistivity of different metallurgical cokes at 1500{sup o} C to 1600{sup o}C is developed. The apparatus is dimensioned for industrial sized materials, and the electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, petroleum coke, and metallurgical coke has been measured. The resistivity at high temperatures of the Magnitogorsk coke, which has the highest resistivity of the metallurgical cokes investigated, is twice the resistivity of the Corus coke, which has the lowest electrical resistivity. Zdzieszowice and SSAB coke sort in between with decreasing resistivities in the respective order. The electrical resistivity of anthracite, charcoal, and petroleum coke is generally higher than the resistivity of the metallurgical cokes, ranging from about two to about eight times the resistivity of the Corus coke at 1450{sup o}C. The general trend is that the bulk resistivity of carbon materials decreases with increasing temperature and increasing particle size.

Eidem, P.A.; Tangstad, M.; Bakken, J.A. [NTNU, Trondheim (Norway)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Thermal Scout Pinpoints Hard-to-Find Problems in CSP Fields (Fact Sheet), Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

receiver survey system uses an infrared camera, receiver survey system uses an infrared camera, GPS technology, and computer software to rapidly analyze concentrating solar power fields and locate defective receivers. In a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) system, collectors reflect the sun's rays onto long, tubular receivers that convert the sunlight into heat that is used to gener- ate electricity. The long-term performance of these receivers-designed to minimize heat loss to the environment while absorbing as much sunlight as possible-is critical for high efficiency and sustained performance. Traditionally, locating problems with receivers has been a costly, time-consuming, and labor- intensive effort, often requiring manual inspection of tens of thousands of receiver tubes. In most cases, operators must assess the entire output of a plant and roughly estimate the

166

Albany, OR * Anchorage, AK * Morgantown, WV * Pittsburgh, PA * Sugar Land, TX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Turbine Thermal Gas Turbine Thermal Performance-Ames Laboratory Background Developing turbine technologies to operate on coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas), hydrogen fuels, and oxy-fuels is critical to the development of advanced power gener-ation technologies such as integrated gasification combined cycle and the deployment of near-zero-emission type power plants with capture and separation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). Turbine efficiency and service life are strongly affected by the turbine expansion process, where the working fluid's high thermal energy gas is converted into mechanical energy to drive the compressor and the electric generator. The most effective way to increase the efficiency of the expansion process is to raise the temperature of the turbine's

167

World Oil Price, 1970-2020  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

World Oil Price, 1970-2020 World Oil Price, 1970-2020 (1999 dollars per barrel) 17.09 50- 45 - 40 - I Nominal dollars 35- 1995 _2020 15 - J 9, AE02000 5- 10 - HHistory Projections 0 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 35AS0570 ^a .i^ Petroleum Supply, Consumption, and Imports, 1970-2020 (million barrels per day) 30- History Projections 25 - 20 - 20~ Consumption _ Net imports 15 - Domestic supply . _ 5- 0 0 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 '-'e^~~~ u,~~ ~35AS0570 ., te Petroleum Consumption by Sector, 1970-2020 (million barrels per day) 20- History Projections 15- XTransportation 10 Industrial Eect i city gener - 5- 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 .n 35AS0570 r-N Crude Oil Production by Source, 1970-2020 (million barrels per day) 8 History Projections 6- Lower 48 conventional 4- Lower 48 offshore 2- lasa k r 0 § ^.^^^r"_ "^^"' ^Lower 48 EOR

168

Disastrous Equations J. Douglas Wright Drexel University Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Disastrous Disastrous Equations J. Douglas Wright Drexel University Department of Mathematics Science on Saturday 1 Earthquakes far out in the ocean gener- ate massive water waves called tsunami. When such waves hit coastlines they can cause massive damage. 2 The 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami: 100' waves. 230,000 deaths. (photo by David Rydevik) 3 The 2011 TÂŻ ohoku Tsunami: 130' waves. 15,000 deaths + Nuclear accidents. (photo from National Geographic) 4 The 2011 TÂŻ ohoku Tsunami: 130' waves. 15,000 deaths + Nuclear accidents. (photo from National Geographic) 5 6 7 8 Tsunami behavior The waves which leave from the quake zone: 1. are NOT very high, around five feet; 2. are extremely wide, around one hundred miles; 3. move very fast, order of 500 mph; 4. go long distances, like halfway around the world, and do not "disperse" as they travel. 9 Tsunami behavior So long as they are in deep water,

169

Biofuel alternatives to ethanol: pumping the microbial well  

SciTech Connect

Engineered microorganisms are currently used for the production of food products, pharmaceuticals, ethanol fuel and more. Even so, the enormous potential of this technology has yet to be fully exploited. The need for sustainable sources of transportation fuels has gener-ated a tremendous interest in technologies that enable biofuel production. Decades of work have produced a considerable knowledge-base for the physiology and pathway engineering of microbes, making microbial engineering an ideal strategy for producing biofuel. Although ethanol currently dominates the biofuel mar-ket, some of its inherent physical properties make it a less than ideal product. To highlight additional options, we review advances in microbial engineering for the production of other potential fuel molecules, using a variety of biosynthetic pathways.

Fortman, J. L.; Chhabra, Swapnil; Mukhopadhyay, Aindrila; Chou, Howard; Lee, Taek Soon; Steen, Eric; Keasling, Jay D.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

170

EIS-0357 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in Giberton, PA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in 7 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in Giberton, PA EIS-0357 - Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project in Giberton, PA Summary This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project was selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES

171

EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Environmental Impact Statement Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project, Gilberton, Pennsylvania This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project has been selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale.

172

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Table 4.8 Coal Demonstrated Reserve Base, January 1, 2011 (Billion Short Tons) Region and State Anthracite Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite Total Underground Surface Underground Surface Underground Surface Surface 1 Underground Surface Total Appalachian .............................................. 4.0 3.3 68.2 21.9 0.0 0.0 1.1 72.1 26.3 98.4 Alabama ................................................... .0 .0 .9 2.1 .0 .0 1.1 .9 3.1 4.0 Kentucky, Eastern .................................... .0 .0 .8 9.1 .0 .0 .0 .8 9.1 9.8 Ohio .......................................................... .0 .0 17.4 5.7 .0 .0 .0 17.4 5.7 23.1

173

Definition: Coal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal Coal Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Coal A combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock composed mostly of carbon and hydrocarbons. It is formed from plant remains that have been compacted, hardened, chemically altered, and metamorphosed by heat and pressure over geologic time (typically millions of years). It is the most abundant fossil fuel produced in the United States.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Coal (from the Old English term col, which has meant "mineral of fossilized carbon" since the 13th century) is a combustible black or brownish-black sedimentary rock usually occurring in rock strata in layers or veins called coal beds or coal seams. The harder forms, such as anthracite coal, can be regarded as metamorphic rock because of later

174

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Los Alamos Site Office | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Alamos Site Office Los Alamos Site Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Los Alamos Site Office Categorical Exclusion Determinations issued by Los Alamos Site Office. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 16, 2013 Anthracite/Total Orange/Black Transfer of Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste to Idaho National Laboratory for Processing and Shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CX(s) Applied: B1.30 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Los Alamos Site Office November 30, 2012 CX-009798: Categorical Exclusion Determination Foreign Location Source Recovery - Fiscal Year 2013 CX(s) Applied: B2.6 Date: 11/30/2012 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Los Alamos Site Office November 30, 2012 CX-009524: Categorical Exclusion Determination Foreign Location Source Recovery - Fiscal Year 2013

175

PriceTechNotes2011.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

prices prices are developed for the following three categories: coking coal; steam coal (all noncoking coal); and coal coke imports and exports. Coking coal, used in the industrial sector only, is a high-quality bitumi- nous coal that is used to make coal coke. Steam coal, which may be used by all sectors, includes anthracite, bituminous coal, subbituminous coal, and lignite. In the industrial sector, coal consumption is the sum of cok- ing coal and steam coal. The industrial coal price is the quantity- weighted average price of these two components. Imports and exports of coal coke are available only on the national level and are accounted for in the industrial sector. Coal coke imports and ex- ports are reported separately and are not averaged with other coal prices and expenditures. Coking Coal Coking coal is generally more expensive than steam coal; therefore, it is identified separately

176

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2013 16, 2013 Anthracite/Total Orange/Black Transfer of Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste to Idaho National Laboratory for Processing and Shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CX(s) Applied: B1.30 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Los Alamos Site Office July 16, 2013 CX-010582: Categorical Exclusion Determination Spring Creek Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 16, 2013 CX-010581: Categorical Exclusion Determination Little Shell Property Funding CX(s) Applied: B1.25 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration July 16, 2013 CX-010858: Categorical Exclusion Determination Demolition of the 745-N Excess Equipment Pad CX(s) Applied: B1.23

177

Definition: Bituminous coal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bituminous coal Bituminous coal Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Bituminous coal A dense coal, usually black, sometimes dark brown, often with well-defined bands of bright and dull material, used primarily as fuel in steam-electric power generation, with substantial quantities also used for heat and power applications in manufacturing and to make coke; contains 45-86% carbon.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Bituminous coal or black coal is a relatively soft coal containing a tarlike substance called bitumen. It is of higher quality than lignite coal but of poorer quality than anthracite. Formation is usually the result of high pressure being exerted on lignite. Its composition can be black and sometimes dark brown; often there are well-defined bands of bright and dull

178

Microsoft Word - Responses for IRS Notices 2006 24 and 25 May 4 2006.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6-24, Qualifying Advanced Coal Project Program, 6-24, Qualifying Advanced Coal Project Program, IRS Notice 2006-25, Qualifying Gasification Program May 4, 2006 DOE is answering questions related only to DOE certifications. Other questions should be directed to the IRS by calling Doug Kim or Kathy Reed at (202) 622-3110, or by faxing the questions to them at (202) 622-4779. 21. Waste Coal. Is it correct that a low-cost anthracite culm (i.e., culm is defined as coal waste that consists of coal and rock with varying amounts of carbon material remaining after removal of a higher-quality saleable coal) qualifies for clean coal investment tax credits under sections 48A and 48B? Kindly assume that the producer procured the culm from a culm bank (i.e., ubiquitous piles or other depository of culm on

179

Phases Energy Services County Electric Power Assn A N Electric Coop  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alliant Energy Alliant Energy Alpena Power Co Altamaha Electric Member Corp Amana Society Service Co Ambit Energy L P Ambit Energy L P Maryland Ambit Energy L P New York Ameren Energy Marketing Ameren Energy Marketing Illinois Ameren Illinois Company Ameren Illinois Company Illinois AmeriPower LLC American Electric Power Co Inc American Mun Power Ohio Inc American PowerNet American PowerNet District of Columbia American PowerNet Maine American PowerNet Maryland American PowerNet New Jersey American Samoa Power Authority American Transmission Systems Inc Amicalola Electric Member Corp Amigo Energy Anadarko Public Works Auth Anchorage Municipal Light and Power Aniak Light Power Co Inc Anoka Electric Coop Anthracite Power Light Anza Electric Coop Inc Appalachian Electric Coop

180

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Glossary Anthracite: A hard, black, lustrous coal containing a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter. Often referred to as hard coal. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure equivalent to 42 U.S. gallons. Biomass: Organic nonfossil material of biological origin constituting a renewable energy source. Bituminous Coal: A dense, black coal, often with well-defined bands of bright and dull material, with a moisture content usually less than 20 percent. Often referred to as soft coal. It is the most common coal. Blast Furnace: A shaft furnace in which solid fuel (coke) is burned with an air blast to smelt ore in a continuous operation. Blast Furnace Gas: The waste combustible gas generated in a blast furnace when iron ore is being reduced with coke to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh-mined anthracite gener" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

The First Coal Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coal Plants Coal Plants Nature Bulletin No. 329-A January 25, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE FIRST COAL PLANTS Coal has been called "the mainspring" of our civilization. You are probably familiar, in a general way, with the story of how it originated ages ago from beds of peat which were very slowly changed to coal; and how it became lignite or brown coal, sub-bituminous, bituminous, or anthracite coal, depending on bacterial and chemical changes in the peat, how much it was compressed under terrific pressure, and the amount of heat involved in the process. You also know that peat is formed by decaying vegetation in shallow clear fresh-water swamps or bogs, but it is difficult to find a simple description of the kinds of plants that, living and dying during different periods of the earth's history, created beds of peat which eventually became coal.

182

Process for solvent refining of coal using a denitrogenated and dephenolated solvent  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the solvent refining of non-anthracitic coal at elevated temperatures and pressure in a hydrogen atmosphere using a hydrocarbon solvent which before being recycled in the solvent refining process is subjected to chemical treatment to extract substantially all nitrogenous and phenolic constituents from the solvent so as to improve the conversion of coal and the production of oil in the solvent refining process. The solvent refining process can be either thermal or catalytic. The extraction of nitrogenous compounds can be performed by acid contact such as hydrogen chloride or fluoride treatment, while phenolic extraction can be performed by caustic contact or contact with a mixture of silica and alumina.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Schweighardt, Frank K. (Allentown, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Development of biological coal gasification (MicGAS process). Final report, May 1, 1990--May 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ARCTECH has developed a novel process (MicGAS) for direct, anaerobic biomethanation of coals. Biomethanation potential of coals of different ranks (Anthracite, bitumious, sub-bitumious, and lignites of different types), by various microbial consortia, was investigated. Studies on biogasification of Texas Lignite (TxL) were conducted with a proprietary microbial consortium, Mic-1, isolated from hind guts of soil eating termites (Zootermopsis and Nasutitermes sp.) and further improved at ARCTECH. Various microbial populations of the Mic-1 consortium carry out the multi-step MicGAS Process. First, the primary coal degraders, or hydrolytic microbes, degrade the coal to high molecular weight (MW) compounds. Then acedogens ferment the high MW compounds to low MW volatile fatty acids. The volatile fatty acids are converted to acetate by acetogens, and the methanogens complete the biomethanation by converting acetate and CO{sub 2} to methane.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Stable slurries of solid carbonaceous fuel and water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a pumpable slurry of solid carbonaceous fuel and water with reduced viscosity and sedimentation rate for use as feed to a partial oxidation gas generator for the production of raw synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas by reacting in the gas generator with a free-oxygen containing gas. The slurry comprises about 50 to 75 weight percent of high rank comminuted solid carbonaceous fuel having 5.0 weight percent or below of organically combined oxygen wherein the solid carbonaceous fuel is selected from the group consisting of anthracite coal, petroleum coke, coal liquefaction solid residue, asphaltic bitumen, and mixtures thereof; and about 0.001 to 0.100 parts by weight of a surfactant for each part by weight of the solid carbonaceous fuel.

Yaghmaie, F.; McKeon, R.J.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

185

Injury experience in coal mining, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Mine and Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1989. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hydrocarbon-oil encapsulate bubble flotation of fine coal. Technical progress report for the twelfth quarter, July 1--September 30, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two modes of collector addition techniques including gasified collector transported in gas phase and direct collector addition techniques were applied in the column flotation to demonstrate the selectivity of utilizing the hydrocarbon-oil encapsulated air bubbles in the fine coal flotation process. A 3-in. flotation column was used to evaluate two modes of collector dispersion and addition techniques on the recovery and grade of fine coals using various ranks of coal. Five different coal samples were used in the column flotation test program. They are Mammoth, Lower Kittanning, Upper Freeport, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Illinois No. 6 seam coals, which correspond to anthracite-, low volatile-, medium volatile-, and high volatile-seam coals, respectively. In this quarterly report, the test results for the Upper Freeport seam coal and Pittsburgh No. 8 seam coal are reported.

Peng, F.F. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States). Dept. of Mineral Processing Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Injury experience in coal mining, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1992. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

Reich, R.B.; Hugler, E.C.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Coal production: 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US coal production and related data are reported for the year 1980, with similar data for 1979 given for comparison. The data here collected on Form EIA-7A, coal production report, from 3969 US mines that produced, processed, or prepared 10,000 or more short tons of coal in 1980. Among the items covered are production, prices, employment, productivity, stocks, and recoverable reserves. Data are reported by state, county, coal producing district, type of mining, and by type of coal (anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite). Also included are a glossary of coal terms used, a map of the coal producing disricts, and form EIA-7A with instructions. 14 figures, 63 tables.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Supplement a to compilation of air pollutant emission factors. Volume 1. Stationary point and area sources. Fifth edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Supplement to AP-42 addresses pollutant-generating activity from Bituminous and Subbituminous Coal Combustion; Anthracite Coal Combustion; Fuel Oil Combustion; Natural Gas Combustion; Wood Waste Combustion in Boilers; Lignite Combustion; Waste Oil Combustion: Stationary Gas Turbines for Electricity Generation; Heavy-duty Natural Gas-fired Pipeline Compressor Engines; Large Stationary Diesel and all Stationary Dual-fuel engines; Natural Gas Processing; Organic Liquid Storage Tanks; Meat Smokehouses; Meat Rendering Plants; Canned Fruits and Vegetables; Dehydrated Fruits and Vegetables; Pickles, Sauces and Salad Dressing; Grain Elevators and Processes; Cereal Breakfast Foods; Pasta Manufacturing; Vegetable Oil Processing; Wines and Brandy; Coffee Roasting; Charcoal; Coal Cleaning; Frit Manufacturing; Sand and Gravel Processing; Diatomite Processing; Talc Processing; Vermiculite Processing; paved Roads; and Unpaved Roads. Also included is information on Generalized Particle Size Distributions.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Combustion characterization of coals for industrial applications. First quarterly progress report, 1 April 1982-30 June 1982  

SciTech Connect

Three of the five coals ear-marked for this study have been characterized. These coals include (1) A Montana (Rosebud) subbituminous; (2) An Illinois (No. 6) high volatile bituminous; and (3) A Pennsylvania (Buck Mountain) anthracite. Samples for analyses were prepared in accordance with the ASTM standard (ASTM D 2013-72). The following ASTM analyses were performed on each coal: proximate, ultimate, higher heating value, Hardgrove grindability index, ash fusibility, and ash composition. Additionally, the flammability index (FI) of each coal was determined in an in-house apparatus. The (FI) is indicative of the ignition temperature of a given fuel on a relative basis. These analyses yielded information regarding the ASTM classification of the three coals as well as their chemical, physical, and ignitibility characteristics. 1 figure, 2 tables.

Borio, R.W.; Goetz, G.J.; Nsakala ya Nsakala; Patel, R.L.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

57: Final Environmental Impact Statement 57: Final Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0357: Final Environmental Impact Statement Gilberton Coal-to-Clean Fuels and Power Project, Gilberton, Pennsylvania This Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) assesses the potential environmental impacts that would result from a proposed Department of Energy (DOE) action to provide cost-shared funding for construction and operation of facilities near Gilberton, Pennsylvania, which have been proposed by WMPI PTY, LLC, for producing electricity, steam, and liquid fuels from anthracite coal waste (culm). The project has been selected by DOE under the Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI) to demonstrate the integration of coal waste gasification and Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) synthesis of liquid hydrocarbon fuels at commercial scale.

192

Carbon Sequestration 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perspectives on Carbon Capture and Storage Perspectives on Carbon Capture and Storage - Directions, Challenges, and Opportunities Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Capture and Storage November 13-15, 2007 Austin, Texas C Capture & Storage, Austin, TX Nov. 13-15, 2007 U.S. Fossil Fuel Reserves / Production Ratio 250+ Year Supply at Current Demand Levels ! 258 11.7 9.7 0 100 200 300 Coal Oil Natural Gas Anthracite & Bituminous Sub- Bituminous & Lignite Sources: BP Statistical Review, June 2004, - for coal reserves data - World Energy Council; EIA, Advance Summary U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves, 2003 Annual Report, September 22, 2004 - for oil and gas reserves data. C Capture & Storage, Austin, TX Nov. 13-15, 2007 80 120 160 200 240 1970 1975 1980

193

Phases Energy Services County Electric Power Assn A N Electric Coop  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alpena Power Co Alpena Power Co Altamaha Electric Member Corp Amana Society Service Co Ambit Energy L P Ambit En ergy L P Maryland Ambit Energy L P New York Ameren Energy Marketing Ameren Energy Marketing Illinois Ameren Illinois Company Ameren Illinois Company Illinois AmeriPower LLC American Electric Power Co Inc American Mun Power Ohio Inc American PowerNet American PowerNet District of Columbia American PowerNet Maine American PowerNet Maryland American PowerNet New Jersey American Samoa Power Authority American Transmission Systems Inc Amicalola Electric Member Corp Amigo Energy Anadarko Public Works Auth Anchorage Municipal Light and Power Aniak Light Power Co Inc Anoka Electric Coop Anthracite Power Light Anza Electric Coop Inc Appalachian Electric Coop

194

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 22070 of 28,905 results. 61 - 22070 of 28,905 results. Download CX-010875: Categorical Exclusion Determination Routine Maintenance and Custodial Services August 2013 to August 2014 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/28/2013 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): River Protection-Richland Operations Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010875-categorical-exclusion-determination Event FWP Event Mound- Miamisburg, OH FWP Event Mound - Miamisburg, OH http://energy.gov/hss/events/fwp-event-mound-miamisburg-oh-3 Download Anthracite/Total Orange/Black Transfer of Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste to Idaho National Laboratory for Processing and Shipment to Waste Isolation Pilot Plant CX(s) Applied: B1.30 Date: 07/16/2013 Location(s): New Mexico Offices(s): Los Alamos Site Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/anthracitetotal-orangeblack

195

B  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B B l a c k H i l l s R e g io n Northern Anthracite Field S o u t h e r n A n t h r a c i t e F i e l d E. Middle Anthracite F ield Rhode Island Meta-Anthrac ite Terling ua Coal Field Coos Bay Coal Field Turtle Montain Coal Field North Central Coal Region San Juan Basin G u l f C o a s t C o a l R e g i o n Ft. Union Coal Re gion (Willist on Basin) Northern Appalachian Ba sin Powder Rive r Ba sin Uinta Basin Cheroke e P la tform Ce nt ra l Appalachian Ba sin Gr ea te r Gr ee n Ri ve r Ba si n T e r t i a r y L a k e B e d s R e g i o n Arkom a Ba sin Pic eance Ba sin Big Horn Ba sin Wind River Ba sin R a to n B as in Black Mesa Basin Taylorville Basin D e e p R i v e r B a s i n N. & Mid. Park Basins C u l p e p p e r B a s in Ha nna -Carbon Ba sin J a c k s o n H o le C o a l F ie ld He nr y Mo u nta ins Co al F iel d Rock Creek Coal Field Glacier Coal Field Goshen Hole Coal Field D a n R i v e r - D a n v i l l e B a s i n Goose Creek Field

196

Determination of the effect of different additives in coking blends using a combination of in situ high-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry measurements were carried out on 4:1 wt/wt blends of a medium volatile bituminous coal with two anthracites, two petroleum cokes, charcoal, wood, a low-temperature coke breeze, tyre crumb, and active carbon to determine the effects on fluidity development to identify the parameters responsible for these effects during pyrolysis and to study possible relationships among the parameters derived from these techniques. Positive, negative, and neutral effects were identified on the concentration of fluid material. Small positive effects (ca. 5-6%) were caused by blending the coal with petroleum cokes. Charcoal, wood, and active carbon all exerted negative effects on concentration (18-27% reduction) and mobility (12-25% reduction in T2) of the fluid phase, which have been associated with the inert character and high surface areas of these additives that adsorb the fluid phase of the coal. One of the anthracites and the low-temperature coke breeze caused deleterious effects to a lesser extent on the concentration (7-12%) and mobility (13-17%) of the fluid material, possibly due to the high concentration of metals in these additives (ca. 11% ash). Despite the high fluid character of tyre crumb at the temperature of maximum fluidity of the coal (73%), the mobility of the fluid phase of the blend was lower than expected. The comparison of {sup 1}H NMR and rheometry results indicated that to account for the variations in minimum complex viscosity for all the blends, both the maximum concentration of fluid phase and the maximum mobility of the fluid material had to be considered. For individual blends, two exponential relationships have been found between the complex viscosity and the concentration of solid phase in both the softening and resolidification stages but the parameters are different for each blend. 30 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

Miguel C. Diaz; Karen M. Steel; Trevor C. Drage; John W. Patrick; Colin E. Snape [Nottingham University, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Nottingham Fuel and Energy Centre, School of Chemical, Environmental and Mining Engineering

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

RS-NWPA [National Waste Policy Act]  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minning (OCRWM) Minning (OCRWM) I 586-4349 Ed Nugent DOE 586-3288 6. C k K T : F I C A T E O F A G E N C Y R E P R E S E N T A T I V E r - . . REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY (See tnstructions on reverse) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS SERVICE. WASHINGTON, DC 20408 i F ROha (AECnc? or rstcblishmcnt) a % - e ~ - - - Office of C i v i l f a n R a d i o a c t i v e Naste Mar -gement - 3 M I N O R S U B D l V l S l O N - - 6 N A M E O F P E R S O N W l T P W H O M T O C O N F E R I 5. TELEPHONE E X T . I hereby cert~fy that I am authorized to act for thls agency In ms.ter: perta~ning to the disposal of the aoency's record: that the records proposed for drsposal In this Request of ' 2 ' page(s) are not now needed for the business o f th agency or w ~ i l not be needed after ;he retention per~ods speclf~ed; and that written concurrence from the Gener:

198

Word Pro - Untitled1  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Coal Mining Productivity 7 Coal Mining Productivity Total, 1949-2011 By Mining Method, 2011 By Location, 2011 By Mining Method, 1 1949-2011 By Region and Mining Method, 2011 210 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Annual Energy Review 2011 Mississippi 1 For 1979 forward, includes all coal; prior to 1979, excludes anthracite. Note: Beginning in 2001, surface mining includes a small amount of refuse recovery. Source: Table 7.7. 2.68 15.98 East of the West of the 0 5 10 15 20 Short Tons per Employee Hour 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 2 4 6 8 Short Tons per Employee Hour Mississippi 2.76 8.86 Underground Surface 0 3 6 9 12 Short Tons per Employee Hour 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 0 3 6 9 12 Short Tons per Employee Hour 2.52 3.03 5.54 19.34 Underground Surface Underground Surface 0 6 12 18 24 Short Tons

199

Annual Coal Distribution Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2001 and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2001 State / Region Domestic Foreign Total Alabama 14,828 4,508 19,336 Alaska 825 698 1,524 Arizona 13,143 - 13,143 Arkansas 13 - 13 Colorado 32,427 894 33,321 Illinois 33,997 285 34,283 Indiana 36,714 - 36,714 Kansas 176 - 176 Kentucky Total 131,546 2,821 134,367 East 107,000 2,707 109,706 West 24,547 114 24,660 Louisiana 3,746 - 3,746 Maryland 4,671 319 4,990 Mississippi 475 - 475 Missouri 366 - 366 Montana 38,459 485 38,944 New Mexico 28,949 - 28,949 North Dakota 30,449 - 30,449 Ohio 25,463 12 25,475 Oklahoma 1,710 - 1,710 Pennsylvania Total 64,392 6,005 70,397 Anthracite 2,852 205 3,057 Bituminous 61,540 5,800 67,340 Tennessee 3,346 28 3,374 Texas 45,019 31 45,050 Utah 24,761 2,144 26,905 Virginia 25,685 7,071 32,756 Washington 4,623 - 4,623 West Virginia Total 144,584

200

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012 Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 31. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Anthracite Total Alabama 106.57 - - - 106.57 Alaska - w - - w Arizona w - - - w Arkansas w - - - w Colorado w w - - 37.54 Illinois 53.08 - - - 53.08 Indiana 52.01 - - - 52.01 Kentucky Total 63.12 - - - 63.12 Kentucky (East) 75.62 - - - 75.62 Kentucky (West) 48.67 - - - 48.67 Louisiana - - w - w Maryland 55.67 - - - 55.67 Mississippi - - w - w Missouri w - - - w Montana w 17.60 w - 18.11 New Mexico w w - - 36.74 North Dakota - - 17.40 - 17.40 Ohio 47.80 - - - 47.80 Oklahoma 59.63 - - - 59.63 Pennsylvania Total 72.57

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh-mined anthracite gener" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Table 7.1 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Physical Units. Coal NAICS TOTAL Acetylene Breeze Total Anthracite Code(a) Subsector and Industry (million Btu) (cu ft) (short tons) (short tons) (short tons) Total United States 311 Food 9.12 0.26 0.00 53.43 90.85 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6.30 0.29 0.00 51.34 50.47 311221 Wet Corn Milling 4.87 0.48 0.00 47.74 50.47 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 5.02 0.31 0.00 53.34 236.66 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 9.78 0.27 0.00 90.59 0.00 3115 Dairy Products 11.21 0.10 0.00 103.12 0.00 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

202

file://C:\Documents%20and%20Settings\ICR\My%20Documents\Coal\Di  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Release Date: September 2003 Release Date: September 2003 Next Release Date: Summer 2004 Domestic and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2002 (Thousand Short Tons) State / Region Domestic Foreign Total Alabama 15,552 3,425 18,977 Alaska 847 311 1,158 Arizona 12,971 - 12,971 Arkansas 12 - 12 Colorado 33,904 843 34,748 Illinois 32,719 21 32,740 Indiana 35,391 - 35,391 Kansas 205 - 205 Kentucky Total 123,129 791 123,920 East 98,492 791 99,284 West 24,636 - 24,636 Louisiana 3,810 - 3,810 Maryland 4,632 413 5,044 Mississippi 2,906 - 2,906 Missouri 203 - 203 Montana 37,050 180 37,230 New Mexico 27,555 - 27,555 North Dakota 31,011 - 31,011 Ohio 20,919 68 20,987 Oklahoma 1,394 - 1,394 Pennsylvania Total 59,764 5,530 65,294 Anthracite 2,436 251 2,687 Bituminous 57,328 5,279 62,607 Tennessee 3,229 52 3,281 Texas 45,638 33

203

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 3. Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012 (thousand short tons) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State and Region 1 Continuous 2 Conventional and Other 3 Longwall 4 Total Alabama 139 20 12,410 12,570 Arkansas 96 - - 96 Colorado 757 - 22,889 23,646 Illinois 18,969 - 23,868 42,837 Indiana 15,565 - - 15,565 Kentucky Total 56,179 2,018 - 58,198 Kentucky (East) 22,090 2,010 - 24,100 Kentucky (West) 34,089 9 - 34,098 Maryland 797 - - 797 Montana - - 5,708 5,708 New Mexico - - 4,960 4,960 Ohio 3,903 7 14,214 18,125 Oklahoma 349 - - 349 Pennsylvania Total 11,367 52 33,623 45,041 Pennsylvania (Anthracite)

204

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 April 2008 Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas Colorado Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Total Louisiana Maryland Mississippi Missouri Montana New Mexico North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania Total Tennessee Texas Utah Virginia Washington West Virginia Total Wyoming Appalachian Total Interior Total Western Total East of Miss. River West of Miss. River U.S. Total State / Region Domestic Foreign 19,449 1,398 8,027 4 33,125 31,076 36,379 437 125,333 98,027 27,306 4,257 7,689 3,593 391 41,570 26,473 30,265 23,139 1,920 73,815 2,902 70,913 2,633 44,531 24,519 31,789 2,580 145,321 42,435 102,886 449,638 401,863 149,893 617,595 500,216 669,134 1,169,350 Total East West Anthracite Bituminous Northern Southern 13,425 964 8,027 4 32,326 30,836 36,379 437 121,621 94,315 27,306 4,257 7,277 3,593

205

file://J:\mydocs\Coal\Distribution\2003\distable1.HTML  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2003 and Foreign Distribution of U.S. Coal by State of Origin, 2003 (Thousand Short Tons) State / Region Domestic Foreign Total Alabama 16,639 3,902 20,541 Alaska 856 232 1,088 Arizona 12,093 - 12,093 Arkansas 6 - 6 Colorado 34,997 898 35,895 Illinois 31,751 55 31,806 Indiana 35,350 - 35,350 Kansas 154 - 154 Kentucky Total 113,241 906 114,146 East 92,391 890 93,282 West 20,849 15 20,865 Louisiana 3,959 - 3,959 Maryland 4,955 596 5,551 Mississippi 3,739 - 3,739 Missouri 345 - 345 Montana 36,181 541 36,721 New Mexico 27,138 - 27,138 North Dakota 31,077 - 31,077 Ohio 21,770 176 21,945 Oklahoma 1,645 - 1,645 Pennsylvania Total 57,362 3,562 60,924 Anthracite 2,805 68 2,873 Bituminous 54,557 3,494 58,051 Tennessee 2,551 2 2,553 Texas 47,506 8 47,513 Utah 23,276 318 23,594 Virginia 26,000 6,117 32,117 Washington 6,232 - 6,232 West Virginia Total 134,359

206

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. World recoverable coal reserves as of January 1, 2009 2. World recoverable coal reserves as of January 1, 2009 billion short tons Recoverable reserves by coal rank Region/country Bituminous and anthracite Subbituminous Lignite Total 2010 production Reserves-to- production ratio (years) World total 445.0 285.9 215.2 946.1 7.954 119 United Statesa 118.4 107.2 33.1 258.6 1.084 238 Russia 54.1 107.4 11.5 173.1 0.359 482 China 68.6 37.1 20.5 126.2 3.506 36 Other non-OECD Europe and Eurasia 42.2 18.9 39.9 100.9 0.325 311 Australia and New Zealand 40.9 2.5 41.4 84.8 0.473 179 India 61.8 0.0 5.0 66.8 0.612 109 OECD Europe 6.2 0.9 54.5 61.6 0.620 99 Africa 34.7 0.2 0.0 34.9 0.286 122 Other non-OECD Asia 3.9 3.9 6.8 14.7 0.508 29 Other Central and South America 7.6 1.0 0.0 8.6 0.085 101

207

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012 Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Table 29. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012 (dollars per short ton) U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Coal Report 2012 Coal-Producing State Continuous 1 Conventional and Other 2 Longwall 3 Total Alabama w - w 107.73 Arkansas w - - w Colorado w - 37.18 w Illinois 48.08 - 59.51 54.18 Indiana 52.94 - - 52.94 Kentucky Total w w - 62.24 Kentucky (East) w w - 79.23 Kentucky (West) 50.18 - - 50.18 Maryland w - - w Montana - - w w New Mexico - - w w Ohio w - w 49.39 Oklahoma w - - w Pennsylvania Total 94.53 w 65.01 w Pennsylvania (Anthracite) w w - 82.71 Pennsylvania (Bituminous) w - w 72.67 Tennessee w - - w Utah w - 34.99

208

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, . Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, 2002 through 2012 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Nuclear 2002 10,314 10,641 9,533 10,442 2003 10,297 10,610 9,207 10,422 2004 10,331 10,571 8,647 10,428 2005 10,373 10,631 8,551 10,436 2006 10,351 10,809 8,471 10,435 2007 10,375 10,794 8,403 10,489 2008 10,378 11,015 8,305 10,452 2009 10,414 10,923 8,159 10,459 2010 10,415 10,984 8,185 10,452 2011 10,444 10,829 8,152 10,464 2012 10,498 10,991 8,039 10,479 Coal includes anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous and lignite coal. Waste coal and synthetic coal are included starting in 2002. Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1 and No. 2 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil, jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke, and waste oil.

209

table7.2_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; 2 Average Prices of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: All Energy Sources Collected; Unit: U.S. Dollars per Million Btu. Bituminous and NAICS Coal Subbituminous Coal Petroleum Code(a) Subsector and Industry TOTAL Acetylene Breeze Total Anthracite Coal Lignite Coke Coke Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.1 2.1 0.6 0.9 0.6 0.9 1.4 0.7 0.9 311 Food 6.42 113.78 0 1.46 W 1.46 0 5.18 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 3.11 106.84 0 1.32 0 1.32 0 0 0 31131 Sugar 3.14 80.39 0 1.65 W 1.64 0 5.18 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 7.09 103.28 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 7.53 123.52 0 2.32 0 2.32 0 0 0 3121 Beverages 7.96 124.83

210

Opportunities for coal to methanol conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The accumulations of mining residues in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania offer a unique opportunity to convert the coal content into methanol that could be utilized in that area as an alternative to gasoline or to extend the supplies through blending. Additional demand may develop through the requirements of public utility gas turbines located in that region. The cost to run this refuse through coal preparation plants may result in a clean coal at about $17.00 per ton. After gasification and synthesis in a 5000 ton per day facility, a cost of methanol of approximately $3.84 per million Btu is obtained using utility financing. If the coal is to be brought in by truck or rail from a distance of approximately 60 miles, the cost of methanol would range between $4.64 and $5.50 per million Btu depending upon the mode of transportation. The distribution costs to move the methanol from the synthesis plant to the pump could add, at a minimum, $2.36 per million Btu to the cost. In total, the delivered cost at the pump for methanol produced from coal mining wastes could range between $6.20 and $7.86 per million Btu.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Measurements of the flame emissivity and radiative properties of particulate medium in pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces by image processing of visible radiation  

SciTech Connect

Due to the complicated processes for coal particles burning in industrial furnaces, their radiative properties, such as the absorption and scattering coefficients, which are essential to make reliable calculation of radiative transfer in combustion computation, are hard to be given exactly by the existing methods. In this paper, multiple color image detectors were used to capture approximately red, green, and blue monochromatic radiative intensity images in the visible wavelength region, and the flame emissivity and the radiative properties of the particulate media in three pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces were got from the flame images. It was shown that as the load increased, the flame emissivity and the radiative properties increased too; these radiative parameters had the largest values near the burner zone, and decreased along the combustion process. Compared with the combustion medium with a low-volatile anthracite coal burning in a 670 t/h boiler, the emissivity and the absorption coefficient of the medium with a high-volatile bituminous coal burning in a 1025 t/h boiler were smaller near the outlet zone, but were larger near the burner zone of the furnace, due to the significant contribution of soot to the radiation. This work will be of practical importance in modeling and calculating the radiative heat transfer in combustion processes, and improving the technology for in situ, multi-dimensional visualization of large-scale combustion processes in coal-fired furnaces of power plants. 18 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

Chun Lou; Huai-Chun Zhou; Peng-Feng Yu; Zhi-Wei Jiang [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Optimization of the process of plasma ignition of coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are given of experimental and theoretical investigations of plasma ignition of coal as a result of its thermochemical preparation in application to the processes of firing up a boiler and stabilizing the flame combustion. The experimental test bed with a commercial-scale burner is used for determining the conditions of plasma ignition of low-reactivity high-ash anthracite depending on the concentration of coal in the air mixture and velocity of the latter. The calculations produce an equation (important from the standpoint of practical applications) for determining the energy expenditure for plasma ignition of coal depending on the basic process parameters. The tests reveal the difficulties arising in firing up a boiler with direct delivery of pulverized coal from the mill to furnace. A scheme is suggested, which enables one to reduce the energy expenditure for ignition of coal and improve the reliability of the process of firing up such a boiler. Results are given of calculation of plasma thermochemical preparation of coal under conditions of lower concentration of oxygen in the air mixture.

Peregudov, V.S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Potential for Coal-to-Liquids Conversion in the U.S.-Resource Base  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By applying the multi-Hubbert curve analysis to coal production in the United States, we demonstrate that anthracite production can be modeled with a single Hubbert curve that extends to the practical end of commercial production of this highest-rank coal. The production of bituminous coal from existing mines is about 80% complete and can be carried out at the current rate for the next 20 years. The production of subbituminous coal from existing mines can be carried out at the current rate for 40-45 years. Significant new investment to extend the existing mines and build new ones would have to commence in 2009 to sustain the current rate of coal production, 1 billion tons per year, in 2029. In view of the existing data, we conclude that there is no spare coal production capacity of the size required for massive coal conversion to liquid transportation fuels. Our analysis is independent of other factors that will prevent large-scale coal liquefaction projects: the inefficiency of the process and either emissions of greenhouse gases or energy cost of sequestration.

Croft, Gregory D. [University of California, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States); Patzek, Tad W. [University of Texas, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (United States)], E-mail: patzek@mail.utexas.edu

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Rate of coal devolatilization in iron and steelmaking processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The devolatilization of coal particles under ironmaking and steelmaking conditions was studied. A new experimental technique was developed to measure the rates of devolatilization. A unique method was used to prepare coal particles based on thick coal bands rich in a given maceral group. Experiments with these single particles gave good reproducibility. The rates of devolatilization for all coal types from low to high rank coals were measured in the gaseous atmosphere and within the slag phase. Real time x-ray images were taken for high volatile, low volatile and anthracite coals devolatilizing in a molten smelting slag. The rate in terms of percentage devolatilization were relatively independent of coal type and a small function of furnace temperature at high heating rates and temperatures studied. The rates depended on particle size and heating rates. The results were consistent with internal transport controlled processes primarily heat transfer. Furthermore the rates were the same in the gas and slag phase which is consistent with heat transfer control.

Sampaio, R.S.; Rio Doce, C.V. do; Fruehan, R.J.; Ozturk, B. (Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Center for Iron and Steel Making Research)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Investigation of the rank dependence of tar evolution  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study are to develop an improved understanding of the process of coal tar evolution, its relationship to the structural characteristics of the parent coal, and the dependence of the chemical and physical properties of the tar products on the conditions of devolatilization. Data from this study are expected to allow hypothesis testing and refinements of coal devolatilization models relevant to the pulverized coal combustion process. The program is divided into seven major technical areas: tar evolution rates in rapid heating conditions; molecular weight and vapor pressure characteristics of tars; chemical structure and calorific values of tars; influence of interphase mass transport phenomena; gas phase secondary reactions of primary'' tars; parent coal nitrogen evolution during devolatilization; and model hypothesis testing. A range of coal ranks, from a Texas lignite to a Pennsylvania anthracite, are employed in the investigation. In addition, a high temperature polymer, a polyimide, is utilized as an additional reference case. The polyimide serves as a truly polymeric reference material for examining the nitrogen evolution behavior of coal. The samples are subjected to elemental composition determination, infrared absorbance characteristics, calorific value, high temperature ash analysis, and maceral composition. Consideration is being given to NMR analysis as well as tetrahydrofuran (THF) solubility. Results are discussed. 4 refs., 27 figs., 4 tabs.

Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Investigation of the rank dependence of tar evolution  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study are to develop an improved understanding of the process of coal tar evolution, its relationship to the structural characteristics of the parent coal, and the dependence of the chemical and physical properties of the tar products on the conditions of devolatilization. Data from this study are expected to allow hypothesis testing and refinements of coal devolatilization models relevant to the pulverized coal combustion process. A range of coal ranks, from a Texas lignite to a Pennsylvania anthracite, are employed in the investigation. In addition, a high temperature polymer, a polyimide, is utilized as an additional reference case. The polyimide serves as a truly polymeric reference material for examining the nitrogen evolution behavior of coal. The samples are subjected to elemental composition determination, infrared absorbance characterization, calorific value measurement, high temperature ash analysis, and maceral composition. Potential tar yields are determined by long hold time heated grid investigations of each coal at a final temperature and heating rate observed to maximize tar yields for the reference coal. Relative tar evolution kinetic behavior is determined by zero hold time heated grid investigations of each coal. 4 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Feasible experimental study on the utilization of a 300 MW CFB boiler desulfurizating bottom ash for construction applications  

SciTech Connect

CFB boiler ash cannot be used as a cement replacement in concrete due to its unacceptably high sulfur content. The disposal in landfills has been the most common means of handling ash in circulating fluidized bed boiler power plants. However for a 300 MW CFB boiler power plant, there will be 600,000 tons of ash discharged per year and will result in great volumes and disposal cost of ash byproduct. It was very necessary to solve the utilization of CFB ash and to decrease the disposal cost of CFB ash. The feasible experimental study results on the utilization of the bottom ashes of a 300 MW CFB boiler in Baima power plant in China were reported in this paper. The bottom ashes used for test came from the discharged bottom ashes in a 100 MW CFB boiler in which the anthracite and limestone designed for the 300 MW CFB project was burned. The results of this study showed that the bottom ash could be used for cementitious material, road concrete, and road base material. The masonry cements, road concrete with 30 MPa compressive strength and 4.0 MPa flexural strength, and the road base material used for base courses of the expressway, the main road and the minor lane were all prepared with milled CFB bottom ashes in the lab. The better methods of utilization of the bottom ashes were discussed in this paper.

Lu, X.F.; Amano, R.S. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Far- and mid-infrared spectroscopy of complex organic matter of astrochemical interest: coal, heavy petroleum fractions, and asphaltenes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The coexistence of a large variety of molecular species (i.e., aromatic, cycloaliphatic and aliphatic) in several astrophysical environments suggests that unidentified IR emission (UIE) occurs from small solid particles containing a mix of aromatic and aliphatic structures (e.g., coal, petroleum, etc.), renewing the astronomical interest on this type of materials. A series of heavy petroleum fractions namely DAE, RAE, BQ-1, and asphaltenes derived from BQ-1 were used together with anthracite coal and bitumen as model compounds in matching the band pattern of the emission features of proto-planetary nebulae (PPNe). All the model materials were examined in the mid-infrared (2.5-16.7 um) and for the first time in the far-infrared (16.7-200 um), and the IR bands were compared with the UIE from PPNe. The best match of the PPNe band pattern is offered by the BQ-1 heavy aromatic oil fraction and by its asphaltenes fraction. Particularly interesting is the ability of BQ-1 to match the band pattern of the aromatic-ali...

Cataldo, F; Manchado, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Iron and manganese removal from a groundwater supply  

SciTech Connect

The treatment options and planning techniques used by the town of Castle Rock (Colorado) for a new water treatment facility are described. Castle Rock officials assessed the available treatment options for dissolved iron and manganese removal and selected potassium permanganate as the primary oxidant to be followed by manganese greensand. A backup prechlorination system for oxidation was also installed. In addition, to prevent excess headloss buildup in the manganese greensand filter media, an anthracite carbon cap was used as the top filter medium for precipitate removal. It is recommended that a treatability study be performed to determine individual design criteria to allow for specific site conditions. The town also assessed the capital and operation and maintenance costs for both treatment at individual well fields and a centralized location for treatment of a cluster of well fields. The results indicate that it is more economical to provide centralized water treatment even though there are capital costs associated with piping raw water from the individual well fields to the central facility. 3 refs.

Lorenz, W.; Seifert, K.; Kasch, O.K. (Arber Richard P. Associates, Inc., Denver, CO (USA))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Technical support to the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) demonstration projects: assessment of current research and development  

SciTech Connect

A program to demonstrate Solvent Refined Coal (SRC) technology has been initiated by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in partnership with two industrial groups. Project management responsibility has been assigned to the Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) of DOE. ORO requested that the Oak Ridge National Laboratory assess current research and development (R and D) activities and develop recommendations for those activities that might contribute to successful completion of the SRC demonstration plant projects. The objectives of this final report are to discuss in detail the problem areas in SRC; to discuss the current and planned R and D investigations relevant to the problems identified; and to suggest appropriate R and D activities in support of designs for the SRC demonstration plants. Four types of R and D activities are suggested: continuation of present and planned activities; coordination of activities and results, present and proposed; extension/redirection of activities not involving major equipment purchase or modifications; and new activities. Important examples of the first type of activity include continuation of fired heater, slurry rheology, and slurry mixing studies at Ft. Lewis. Among the second type of activity, coordination of data acquisition and interpretation is recommended in the areas of heat transfer, vapor/liquid equilibria, and physical properties. Principal examples of recommendations for extension/redirection include screening studies at laboratory scale on the use of carbonaceous precoat (e.g., anthracite) infiltration, and 15- to 30-day continuous tests of the Texaco gasifier at the Texaco Montebello facility (using SRC residues).

Edwards, M.S.; Rodgers, B.R.; Brown, C.H.; Carlson, P.K.; Gambill, W.R.; Gilliam, T.M.; Holmes, J.M.; Krishnan, R.P.; Parsly, L.F.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh-mined anthracite gener" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Stable aqueous suspension of partial oxidation ash, slag and char containing polyethoxylated quaternary ammonium salt surfactant  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a pumpable aqueous suspension of particulate matter with reduced viscosity and increased resistance to sedimentation. It has a particle size in the range of about 37-2000 microns as produced by quench cooling of scrubbing the hot raw effluent gas stream comprising H/sub 2/+CO at a temperature in the range of about 1700{sup 0}F - 3000{sup 0}F from the partial oxidation of solid carbonaceous fuel selected from the group consisting of anthracite, bituminous, sub-bituminous and lignite coal, coke from coal, petroleum coke, coal liquefaction solid residue, oil shale, tar sands, asphaltic bitumen, and mixtures thereof. Wherein the aqueous suspension comprises water, about 1.0-50.0 weight percent of the particulate matter consisting of a mixture of slag and char, and about 0.1-10.0 weight percent of a polyethoxylated quaternary ammonium salt surfactant of the formula: where R is an alkyl radical selected from the group consisting of coco, tallow, lauryl, oleyl, and octadecyl, and x+y has a value in the range of 2-15.

Najjar, M.S.; Yaghmaie, F.; Sorell, L.S.

1989-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

222

Model documentation of the Short-Term Coal Analysis System. Volume 2. Model description. [SCOAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second of three volumes of documentation for the Short-Term Coal Analysis System (SCOAL) developed by the Coal Data Analysis and Forecasting Branch, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric, and Alternate Fuels. The principal aim of SCOAL is to project on a quarterly basis the likely contribution of each of the 26 major bituminous coal, lignite, and anthracite producing states to total US production. A secondary objective is to estimate a companion demand-side aggregated by region but disaggregated by end-use sector. In its current use, the two sides are operated in tandem, and serve to cross-validate each other by means of tracking market balances. The purposes of this report are to describe the estimation method, results, and performance evaluation criteria that were deemed relevant in assessing the potential predictive performance of SCOAL's statistically fitted relationships and to discuss the pre- and post-estimation considerations that prevailed over the course of mode development. The single equation parameter estimates, associated significance levels, statistical equation performance measures, and general comments regarding SCOAL's supply and demand side equations are presented.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Characterizing and modeling combustion of mild-gasification chars in pressurized fluidized beds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance estimates for the UCC2, IGTP1, and IGTP2 chars were made for a typical utility PFBC boiler having nominal characteristics similar to those of the American Electric Power 75 MW(e) Tidd PFBC demonstration facility. Table 2 summarizes the assumed boiler operating conditions input to the PFBC simulation code. Input fuel parameters for the chars and reference fuels were determined from their standard ASTM analyses (Table 1) and the results of the bench-scale characterization tests at B&W`s Alliance Research Center. The required characterization information for the reference fuels was available from the B&W data base, and the combustion reactivity information for the mild-gasification chars was generated in the pressurized bench-scale reactor as described earlier. Note that the combustion reactivity parameters for Beulah lignite are those previously measured at low-pressure conditions. It was necessary to use the previous values as the new parameters could not be accurately measured in the pressurized bench-scale facility. Based on very limited measurements of particle size attrition in paste-type feed systems, it was assumed that all of the fuels (including the chars) would have a very small (essentially negligible) degree of attrition in the feed system. Char devolatilization parameters were assumed to be equal to those of anthracite because of the very low levels of volatiles present in UCC2, IGTP1, and IGTP2. Major fuel input parameters and higher heating values are summarized in Table 3.

Daw, C.S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Thermodynamic properties of pulverized coal during rapid heating devolatilization processes. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the thermodynamic and morphological properties of coal associated with rapid heating decomposition pathways is essential to progress in coal utilization technology. Specifically, knowledge of the heat of devolatilization, surface area and density of coal as a function of rank characteristics, temperature and extent of devolatilization in the context of rapid heating conditions is essential to the fundamental determination of kinetic parameters of coal devolatilization. These same properties are also needed to refine existing devolatilization sub-models utilized in large-scale modeling of coal combustion systems. The objective of this research is to obtain data on the thermodynamic properties and morphology of coal under conditions of rapid heating. Specifically, the total heat of devolatilization, external surface area, BET surface area and true density will be measured for representative coal samples. The coal ranks to be investigated will include a high volatile A bituminous (PSOC 1451 D) and a low volatile bituminous (PSOC 1516D). An anthracite (PSOC 1468) will be used as a non-volatile coal reference. In addition, for one coal, the contribution of each of the following components to the overall heat of devolatilization will be measured: the specific heat of coal/char during devolatilization, the heat of thermal decomposition of the coal, the specific heat capacity of tars, and the heat of vaporization of tars.

Proscia, W.M.; Freihaut, J.D.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Coal distribution, January-September 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US coal producers and distributors shipped 665.3 million short tons of coal to domestic and foreign destinations from January through September 1986, 2.8 million short tons more than the amount shipped during the same time period of 1985. Nearly all (99.9%) of the coal that was produced and purchased during the first 9 months of 1986 was shipped. In contrast, shipments exceeded production and purchases by 1.6 million short tons during the comparable period of 1985 as producers and distributors drew from their stockpiles to help meet the demand. During January through September 1986: (1) Coal production was 0.7% higher and coal shipments were 0.4% higher than during the same time period of 1985. (2) Producers and distributors held stockpiles of 33.7 million short tons on September 30, 1986, 1.8% more than their stocks at the end of 1985. (3) Shipments for export were 7.8% less than they were 1 year earlier. (4) Domestic shipments to electric utilities and other industrial plants were higher while those to coke plants were lower, compared to the same time period of 1985. This issue contained a review article on Pennsylvania anthracite. 6 figs., 33 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

Injury experience in coal mining, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of coal mining in the United States for 1991. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and anthracite or bituminous coal. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison between coal mining and the metal and nonmetal mineral mining industries, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. Data used in compiling this report were reported by operators of coal mines and preparation plants on a mandatory basis as required under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977, Public Law 91-173,as amended by Public Law 95-164. Since January 1, 1978, operators of mines or preparation plants or both which are subject to the Act have been required under 30 CFR, Part 50, to submit reports of injuries, occupational illnesses, and related data.

Not Available

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Coal - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. U.S. Coal Production by Coal-Producing Region and State, 2006 - 2010 2. U.S. Coal Production by Coal-Producing Region and State, 2006 - 2010 (Million Short Tons) Coal-Producing Region and State 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 Percent Change 2009 - 2010 Appalachia Total 391.2 377.8 390.2 341.4 334.3 -2.1 Alabama 18.8 19.3 20.6 18.8 20.2 7.6 Kentucky, Eastern 93.6 87.1 90.3 74.7 67.4 -9.7 Maryland 5.1 2.3 2.9 2.3 2.5 7.4 Ohio 22.7 22.6 26.3 27.5 27.3 -0.8 Pennsylvania Total 66.0 65.0 65.4 57.9 58.0 0.1 Anthracite 1.5 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.7 0.3 Bituminous 64.5 63.5 63.7 56.2 56.3 0.1 Tennessee 2.8 2.7 2.3 2.0 1.7 -16.1 Virginia 29.7 25.3 24.7 21.0 21.6 2.9 West Virginia Total 152.4 153.5 157.8 137.1 135.6 -1.1 Northern 42.4 42.2 41.1 38.4 41.4 7.9 Southern 110.0 111.3 116.7 98.7 94.2 -4.6

228

Small boiler uses waste coal  

SciTech Connect

Burning coal waste in small boilers at low emissions poses considerable problem. While larger boiler suppliers have successfully installed designs in the 40 to 80 MW range for some years, the author has been developing small automated fluid bed boiler plants for 25 years that can be applied in the range of 10,000 to 140,000 lbs/hr of steam. Development has centered on the use of an internally circulating fluid bed (CFB) boiler, which will burn waste fuels of most types. The boiler is based on the traditional D-shaped watertable boiler, with a new type of combustion chamber that enables a three-to-one turndown to be achieved. The boilers have all the advantages of low emissions of the large fluid boilers while offering a much lower height incorporated into the package boiler concept. Recent tests with a waste coal that had a high nitrogen content of 1.45% demonstrated a NOx emission below the federal limit of 0.6 lbs/mm Btu. Thus a NOx reduction on the order of 85% can be demonstrate by combustion modification alone. Further reductions can be made by using a selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) system and sulfur absorption of up to 90% retention is possible. The article describes the operation of a 30,000 lbs/hr boiler at the Fayette Thermal LLC plant. Spinheat has installed three ICFB boilers at a nursing home and a prison, which has been tested on poor-grade anthracite and bituminous coal. 2 figs.

Virr, M.J. [Spinheat Ltd. (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Mulled coal - a beneficiated coal form for use as a fuel or fuel intermediate. Technical progress report No. 11, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Under the auspices of the DOE and private industry, considerable progress has been made in: preparation of coal-water fuels; combustion of low-ash coal-based fuel forms; processes to provide deeply-cleaned coal. Developments in advanced beneficiation of coal to meet stringent requirements for low ash and low sulfur can be anticipated to further complicate the problem areas associated with this product. This is attributable to the beneficiated coal being procured in very fine particles with high surface areas, modified surface characteristics, reduced particle size distribution range, and high inherent moisture. Experience in the storage, handling, and transport of highly beneficiated coal has been limited. This is understandable, as quantities of such product are only now becoming available in meaningful quantities. Since the inception of the project, the authors have: developed formulations to stabilize wet filter cake into a granular free flowing material (Mulled Coal); applied the formulation to wet cake from a variety of coal sources ranging from anthracite to subbituminous coal; evaluated effects of moisture loss on mull properties; developed design concepts for equipment for preparing the Mulled Coal and converting it into Coal Water Fuel; obtained storage and handling system design data for the granular coal; completed the 74-day aging study on various mull formulations to determine the effects of time and exposure on mull properties; demonstrated the continuous production of mulled coal from wet filter cake; performed atomization studies on Mulled Coal and CWF prepared from Mulled Coal; developed a standardized set of empirical tests to evaluate handling characteristics of various mull formulations; completed integrated, continuous mulling process circuit design. During this report period they have completed coal aging studies; plant design is being reviewed; and final report preparation has begun.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Reactivity of heat treated chars  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reactivities of a number of chars produced from American coals varying in rank from lignite to anthracite have been measured in air, CO/sub 2/, steam and H/sub 2/. The variables chosen for the study were: rank of the parent coal, inorganic matter content, particle size, reaction temperature and pressure as well as heat treatment conditions used during char preparation. In all gasification atmospheres studied, reactivity plots for different chars are essentially of the same general shape and have three distinct regions. The reaction rate first increases slowly with time. The plot then goes through a maximum in slope, followed by a lengthy region of decreasing slope as burn-off approaches 100 percent. The shape of the burn-off curves can be explained on the basis of what is known about the development of porosity and surface area in microporous chars as they undergo gasification. Using an adjustable time parameter, equations have been developed which successfully correlate the reactivity data. Char reactivity decreases, in general, with increase in rank of the parent coal. Reactivities of chars in air, CO/sub 2/ and steam increase over 150-fold in going from a low volatile bituminous to a lignite parent coal; the spread in char reactivities in H/sub 2/ is only 30-fold. Removal of inorganic matter from coal precursors prior to their charring or from chars produced from the raw coals has a marked effect on char reactivity and surface area. Removal of inorganic matter (by acid washing) decreases, in general, reactivity of chars produced from lower rank coals, whereas reactivities of chars derived from higher rank coals increase.

Mahajan, O. P.; Walker, Jr., P. L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Postcombustion and its influences in 135 MWe CFB boilers  

SciTech Connect

In the cyclone of a circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boiler, a noticeable increment of flue gas temperature, caused by combustion of combustible gas and unburnt carbon content, is often found. Such phenomenon is defined as post combustion, and it could introduce overheating of reheated and superheated steam and extra heat loss of exhaust flue gas. In this paper, mathematical modeling and field measurements on post combustion in 135MWe commercial CFB boilers were conducted. A novel one-dimensional combustion model taking post combustion into account was developed. With this model, the overall combustion performance, including size distribution of various ashes, temperature profile, and carbon content profiles along the furnace height, heat release fraction in the cyclone and furnace were predicted. Field measurements were conducted by sampling gas and solid at different positions in the boiler under different loads. The measured data and corresponding model-calculated results were compared. Both prediction and field measurements showed post combustion introduced a temperature increment of flue gas in the cyclone of the 135MWe CFB boiler in the range of 20-50{sup o}C when a low-volatile bituminous coal was fired. Although it had little influence on ash size distribution, post combustion had a remarkable influence on the carbon content profile and temperature profile in the furnace. Moreover, it introduced about 4-7% heat release in the cyclone over the total heat release in the boiler. This fraction slightly increased with total air flow rate and boiler load. Model calculations were also conducted on other two 135MWe CFB boilers burning lignite and anthracite coal, respectively. The results confirmed that post combustion was sensitive to coal type and became more severe as the volatile content of the coal decreased. 15 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Shaohua Li; Hairui Yang; Hai Zhang; Qing Liu; Junfu Lu; Guangxi Yue [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Thermal Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Exergetic, thermal, and externalities analyses of a cogeneration plant  

SciTech Connect

A thermodynamic study of an 88.4 MW cogeneration plant located in the United States is presented in this paper. The feedstock for this actual plant is culm, the waste left from anthracite coal mining. Before combustion in circulating fluidized bed boilers, the usable carbon within the culm is separated from the indigenous rock. The rock and ash waste from the combustion process fill adjacent land previously scared by strip mining. Trees and grass are planted in these areas as part of a land reclamation program. Analyses based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics using actual operating data are first presented to acquaint the reader with the plant's components and operation. Using emission and other relevant environmental data from the plant, all externalities study is outlined that estimates the plant's effect on the local population. The results show that the plant's cycle performs with a coefficient of utilization of 29% and all approximate exergetic efficiency of 34.5%. In order to increase these values, recommended improvements to the plant are noted. In addition, the externality costs associated with the estimated SO{sub 2} and NOx discharge from the culm fed plant are lower (85-95%) than those associated with a similarly sized coal fed plant. The plant's cycle efficiencies are lower than those associated with more modern technologies; such as all integrated gas turbine combined cycle. However, given the abundant, inexpensive supply of feedstock located adjacent to the plant and the environmental benefit of removing culm banks, the plant's existing operation is unique from an economical and environmental viewpoint.

Bailey, M.B.; Curtiss, P.; Blanton, P.H.; McBrayer, T.B. [Rochester Institute of Technology, Rochester, NY (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Wood power - its potential in our energy crisis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wood is meeting about 2% of total U.S. energy needs and may eventually supply up to 7% of our nation's energy. Many forms of direct combustion equipment are available for residential heating and range from supplemental wood-burning stoves to complete house-heating multi-fuel furnaces. A recent survey conducted in New York indicated that one-third of the people contacted used wood for home heating. The total amount of fuelwood used in New York State in 1978 amounted to 1,716,000 standard cords. A Wisconsin study indicates that more than 1.2 million cords of firewood were burned by Wisconsin households during the 1979-80 heating season. A Pennsylvania survey indicated that 22% of single family households used wood for home heating. Corning Glass Works recently conducted a wood-burning stove market survey and found that 18% of all U.S. households own wood-burning stoves. On the basis of cost per unit of heat, wood heat is cheaper than its next closest commonly available rival (fuel oil) and is also cheaper than anthracite coal and electricity. Industrial wood-burning furnaces are commonly incorporated into boiler systems. Nearly 1700 wood-fired boiler systems are in operation in the United States. The economic value of a wood fuel will depend on its heating value and moisture content. For an indsutry considering use of densified wood for fuel, there is a question of whether the added expense is justified by increased ease of handling and improved burning efficiency. Where high sulfur emissions from coal are a problem, burning sulfur-free pellets in combination with coal may be a solution. In Maine a $3 million pellet-making plant is producing 600 tons of pellets per day. Nationally, the overall generating capacity of all known electrical generating plants using wood and wood derived fuels is about 4500 megawatts. Wood can be processed to produce liquid fuels and other chemicals.

Johnson, W.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Predicting the devolatilization behavior of any coal from its ultimate analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

FLASHCHAIN has been developed to predict yields and product characteristics from any coal for any operating conditions. This evaluation demonstrates the model`s utility for the usual situation where the ultimate analysis is the only sample-specific information available. It also identifies the key reaction centers in coal as its structural components called labile bridges. Their elemental compositions are grossly different than the analogous whole-coal properties, showing much stronger rank dependences and a much higher degree of sample-to-sample variability. In light of these findings, it is inconceivable that bride conversion rates are rank-independent. Parameters in the rate law for bridge conversion in FLASHCHAIN are now explicitly related to the elemental compositions of bridges. The (O/C){sub B} ratios are the best regression variable for the rate constants because oxygen is the most effective promoter of pyrolytic decompositions. The (O/H){sub B} rates are best for the selectivity coefficient between scission and condensation into char links because oxygen promotes crosslinking but hydrogen addition to broken bridge fragments stabilizes them. These extensions are evaluated in comparisons against a database of 27 coals that span all ranks from lignite to anthracite, for heating rates from 5 to 5,000 K/s, ultimate temperatures to 1,300 K, and pressures from vacuum to 70 MPa. In four out of five cases, predicted total and tar yields are within experimental uncertainties. The model is also used to rigorously define nominal devolatilization rates for diverse coal types and broad ranges of operating conditions. Nominal rates have very low activation energies, proving that heat and mass transport resistances are not responsible for the low values because this theory is completely free of these considerations. Whereas nominal rates are rather insensitive to coal type variations and independent of pressure, they vary in proportion to changes in heating rate.

Niksa, S. [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States). Molecular Physics Lab.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Evaluation of operating characteristics for a chabazite zeolite system for treatment of process wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory and pilot-scale testing were performed for development and design of a chabazite zeolite ion-exchange system to replace existing treatment systems at the Process Waste Treatment Plant (PWTP) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The process wastewater treatment systems at ORNL need upgrading to improve efficiency, reduce waste generation, and remove greater quantities of contaminants from the wastewater. Previous study indicated that replacement of the existing PWTP systems with an ion-exchange system using chabazite zeolite will satisfy these upgrade objectives. Pilot-scale testing of the zeolite system was performed using a commercially available ion-exchange system to evaluate physical operating characteristics and to validate smaller-scale column test results. Results of this test program indicate that (1) spent zeolite can be sluiced easily and completely from a commercially designed vessel, (2) clarification followed by granular anthracite prefilters is adequate pretreatment for the zeolite system, and (3) the length of the mass transfer zone was comparable with that obtained in smaller-scale column tests. Laboratory studies were performed to determine the loading capacity of the zeolite for selected heavy metals. These test results indicated fairly effective removal of silver, cadmium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, and zinc from simple water solutions. Heavy-metals data collected during pilot-scale testing of actual wastewater indicated marginal removal of iron, copper, and zinc. Reduced effectiveness for other heavy metals during pilot testing can be attributed to the presence of interfering cations and the relatively short zeolite/wastewater contact time. Flocculating agents (polyelectrolytes) were tested for pretreatment of wastewater prior to the zeolite flow-through column system. Several commercially available polyelectrolytes were effective in flocculation and settling of suspended solids in process wastewater.

Kent, T.E.; Perona, J.J.; Jennings, H.L.; Lucero, A.J.; Taylor, P.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

EARLY ENTRANCE CO-PRODUCTION PLANT - DECENTRALIZED GASIFICATION COGENERATION TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND STEAM FROM AVAILABLE FEEDSTOCKS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste Processors Management Inc. (WMPI), along with its subcontractors entered into a cooperative agreement with the USDOE to assess the techno-economic viability of building an Early Entrance Co-Production Plant (EECP) in the US that produces ultra clean Fischer-Tropsch transportation fuels with either power or steam as the major co-product. The EECP will emphasize on reclaiming and gasifying low-cost coal waste and/or its mixture as the primary feedstocks. The project consists of three phases. Phase I objectives include conceptual development, technical assessment, feasibility design and economic evaluation of a Greenfield commercial co-production plant and a site specific demonstration EECP to be located adjacent to the existing WMPI Gilberton Power Station. There is very little foreseen design differences between the Greenfield commercial coproduction plant versus the EECP plant other than: The greenfield commercial plant will be a stand alone FT/power co-production plant, potentially larger in capacity to take full advantage of economy of scale, and to be located in either western Pennsylvania, West Virginia or Ohio, using bituminous coal waste (gob) and Pennsylvania No.8 coal or other comparable coal as the feedstock; The EECP plant, on the other hand, will be a nominal 5000 bpd plant, fully integrated into the Gilbertson Power Company's Cogeneration Plant to take advantage of the existing infrastructure to reduce cost and minimize project risk. The Gilberton EECP plant will be designed to use eastern Pennsylvania anthracite coal waste and/or its mixture as feedstock.

Unknown

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers: Arsenic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns over emissions of hazardous air pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue; the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants has been greatly expanded through passage of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Arsenic and arsenic compounds are of concern mainly because of their generally recognized toxicity. Arsenic is also regarded as one of the trace elements in coal subject to significant vaporization. This report summarizes and evaluates available published information on the arsenic content of coals mined in the United States, on arsenic emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Bituminous and lignite coals have the highest mean arsenic concentrations, with subbituminous and anthracite coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in arsenic concentrations. Arsenic emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific arsenic compounds. Variations in emission, rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of arsenic by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with cold electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 50 to 98% have been reported. Limited data for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems show widely varying removals of from 6 to 97%. On the other hand, waste incineration plants report removals in a narrow range of from 95 to 99%. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in arsenic control for existing flue-gas-cleanup technologies and summarizes the status of analytical techniques for measuring arsenic emissions from combustion sources.

Mendelsohn, M.H.; Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Emissions of airborne toxics from coal-fired boilers: Mercury  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns over emissions of hazardous air Pollutants (air toxics) have emerged as a major environmental issue, and the authority of the US Environmental Protection Agency to regulate such pollutants was greatly expanded through the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Mercury has been singled out for particular attention because of concerns over possible effects of emissions on human health. This report evaluates available published information on the mercury content of coals mined in the United States, on mercury emitted in coal combustion, and on the efficacy of various environmental control technologies for controlling airborne emissions. Anthracite and bituminous coals have the highest mean-mercury concentrations, with subbituminous coals having the lowest. However, all coal types show very significant variations in mercury concentrations. Mercury emissions from coal combustion are not well-characterized, particularly with regard to determination of specific mercury compounds. Variations in emission rates of more than an order of magnitude have been reported for some boiler types. Data on the capture of mercury by environmental control technologies are available primarily for systems with electrostatic precipitators, where removals of approximately 20% to over 50% have been reported. Reported removals for wet flue-gas-desulfurization systems range between 35 and 95%, while spray-dryer/fabric-filter systems have given removals of 75 to 99% on municipal incinerators. In all cases, better data are needed before any definitive judgments can be made. This report briefly reviews several areas of research that may lead to improvements in mercury control for existing flue-gas-clean-up technologies and summarizes the status of techniques for measuring mercury emissions from combustion sources.

Huang, H.S.; Livengood, C.D.; Zaromb, S.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Combustion characterization of coals for industrial applications. Final technical report, January 1, 1981-May 29, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In-depth fundamental information was obtained from a two-inch inner diameter laminar flow reactor referred to as the Drop Tube Furnace System (DTFS). This information consists of the following: (1) pyrolysis kinetic characteristics of four coals of various rank (Texas lignite, Montana subbituminous, Alabama high volatile bituminous, and Pennsylvania anthracite); and (2) combustion kinetic studies of chars produced from the foregoing parent coals. A number of standard ASTM and special in-house bench scale tests were also performed on the coals and chars prepared therefrom to characterize their physicochemical properties. The pilot scale (500,000 Btu/hr) Controlled Mixing History Furnace (CMHF) was used to determine the effect of staged combustion on NO/sub x/ emissions control from an overall combustion performance of the Alabama high volatile bituminous coal. The quantitative fundamental data developed from this study indicate significant differences in coal/char chemical, physical, and reactivity characteristics, which should be useful to those interested in modeling coal combustion and pyrolysis processes. These results underscore the fact that coal selection is one of the keys governing a successful coal conversion/utilization process. The combustion kinetic information obtained on the high volatile bituminous coal has been used in conjunction with combustion engineering's proprietary mathematical models to predict the combustion performance of this coal in the Controlled Mixing History Furnace. Comparison of the predicted data with the experimental results shows a virtually one-to-one scale-up from the DTFS to the CMHF. These data should provide vital information to designers in the area of carbon burnout and NO/sub x/ reduction for large scale coal utilization applications. 31 refs., 28 figs., 17 tabs.

Nsakala, N.; Patel, R.L.; Lao, T.C.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Coalbed methane potential of the Pechora Coalfield, Timan-Pechora Basin, Russia  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of the more important geologic attributes of coal beds in the coalbed methane producing regions of the United States to Permian coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield, Timan-Pechora Basin, Russia indicates a high potential for commercial coalbed methane production. Although the depositional and structural histories, as well as the age, of the coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield are different than coal beds in U.S. basins, coal quality attributes are similar. The more prospective part of the coal-bearing sequence is as thick as 1600 m and contains more than 150 coal beds that individually are as thick as 4 m. These coal beds are composed primarily of rank ranges from subbituminous to anthracite (,0.5->2.5% R[sub 0]), with the highest rank coal located near the city of Vorkuta. Published data indicates that the gas content of coals is as high as 28-35 m[sup 3]/ton, with an average value of 18 m[sup 3]/ton. About 700 MMCM of gas per year is emmitted from coal mines. Pore pressures in the coal beds are unknown, however, interbedded sandstones in some parts of the basin are overpressured. The commonly occurring problem, in mid-latitude coalbed methane well, of excessive amounts of water may be alleviated in this high-latitude coal field. We suggest that the wide-spread occurrence of permafrost in the Pechora Coalfield may form an effective barrier to down-dip water flow, thereby facilitating the dewatering state. In summary, the quality of coal beds in the Pechora Coalfield are similar to methane producing coal beds in the United States and should, therefore, be favorable for commercial rates of gas production.

Yakutseni, V.P.; Petrova, Y.E. (VNIGRI, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)); Law, B.E.; Ulmishek, G.F. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fresh-mined anthracite gener" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

In-line continuous monitoring system improve water plant EOR performance  

SciTech Connect

To optimize water plant performance and reduce maintenance expense, Unocal has installed a continuous produced-water monitoring system at its Dome water plant, which serves an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) project east of Bakersfield, Calif. These EOR leases are producing approximately 12,000 b/d of oil by injection of 40,000 equivalent b/d of steam. More than 75% of the water required for steaming is obtained by recycling produced water through separation and filtration stages to remove the residual oil and solids. The recycled water is then softened prior to being returned to the steam generators. Under normal operating conditions, produced water received at the main collection tank ranges from 50-200 ppm oil, and is reduced to 5 ppm or less downstream of the dissolved air flotation unit. The plant has been in operation for over 8 years and during that time has experienced the usual number of upsets in the oil-water separation system. These upsets have resulted in additional maintenance expenses to clean fouled garnet and anthracite in the multimedia filters, replace cartridge filter elements, and clean (sometimes replace) softener resin. Direct costs associated with these failures were estimated to be in excess of $30,000/year. Unocal had tried monitoring systems, with poor results due to low reliability or insufficient accuracy before it found a satisfactory system. It was an MPS-3000 in-line continuous monitor, manufactured by the Micro Pure Division of Rexnord Automation. Unlike previously tested monitors, this unit operates on a detection principle of reflected ultrasonic energy, a low maintenance design which would theoretically be unaffected by components other than oil and solids in the produced water.

Morin, R.J.; Gaucher, D.E.

1986-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

242

Update on use of mine pool water for power generation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2004, nearly 90 percent of the country's electricity was generated at power plants using steam-based systems (EIA 2005). Electricity generation at steam electric plants requires a cooling system to condense the steam. With the exception of a few plants using air-cooled condensers, most U.S. steam electric power plants use water for cooling. Water usage occurs through once-through cooling or as make-up water in a closed-cycle system (generally involving one or more cooling towers). According to a U.S. Geological Survey report, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 136 billion gallons per day of fresh water in 2000 (USGS 2005). This is almost the identical volume withdrawn for irrigation purposes. In addition to fresh water withdrawals, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 60 billion gallons per day of saline water. Many parts of the United States are facing fresh water shortages. Even areas that traditionally have had adequate water supplies are reaching capacity limits. New or expanded steam electric power plants frequently need to turn to non-traditional alternate sources of water for cooling. This report examines one type of alternate water source-groundwater collected in underground pools associated with coal mines (referred to as mine pool water in this report). In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) funded Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to evaluate the feasibility of using mine pool water in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. That report (Veil et al. 2003) identified six small power plants in northeastern Pennsylvania (the Anthracite region) that had been using mine pool water for over a decade. It also reported on a pilot study underway at Exelon's Limerick Generating Station in southeastern Pennsylvania that involved release of water from a mine located about 70 miles upstream from the plant. The water flowed down the Schuylkill River and augmented the natural flow so that the Limerick plant could withdraw a larger volume of river water. The report also included a description of several other proposed facilities that were planning to use mine pool water. In early 2006, NETL directed Argonne to revisit the sites that had previously been using mine pool water and update the information offered in the previous report. This report describes the status of mine pool water use as of summer 2006. Information was collected by telephone interviews, electronic mail, literature review, and site visits.

Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.; Environmental Science Division

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z